Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF KHAKIMOVA AND OTHERS v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: 01,02,03,13,05,P1-1

NUMERO: 36875/11/2019
STATO: Russia
DATA: 08/10/2019
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

THIRD SECTION









CASE OF KHAKIMOVA AND OTHERS v. RUSSIA

(Applications nos. 36875/11 and 4 others – see appended list)







JUDGMENT







STRASBOURG


8 October 2019



This judgment is final but it may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Khakimova and Others v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Committee composed of:
Georgios A. Serghides, President,
Branko Lubarda,
Erik Wennerström, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 17 September 2019,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in five applications against Russia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) on the various dates indicated in the appended table.
2. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were given notice of the applications.
3. The Government did not object to the examination of the applications by a Committee.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicants are Russian nationals who, at the material time, lived in the Chechen Republic. Their personal details are set out in the appended table. They are close relatives of individuals who disappeared after allegedly being unlawfully detained by servicemen during special operations. The events concerned took place in areas under the full control of the Russian federal forces. The applicants have not seen their missing relatives since the alleged arrests. Their whereabouts remain unknown.
5. The applicants reported the abductions to the law enforcement authorities, and official investigations were opened. The proceedings were ongoing for several years without any tangible results being achieved. The applicants lodged requests for information and assistance in the search for their relatives with the investigating authorities and various law enforcement bodies. Their requests received either only formalistic responses or none at all. The perpetrators have not been identified by the investigating authorities. It appears that all of the investigations are still ongoing.
6. Summaries of the facts in respect of each application are set out below. Each account is based on statements provided by the applicants and their relatives and/or neighbours to both the Court and the domestic investigating authorities. The Government did not dispute the principal facts of the cases as presented by the applicants, but questioned the involvement of servicemen in the events.
A. Khakimova and Others v. Russia (no. 36875/11)
7. The first applicant is the wife of Mr Saitaksi Umarov, who was born in 1953. The second applicant is his son. The third applicant was his daughter, who died on 22 January 2016.
1. Background information
8. Mr Saitaksi Umarov lived in the village of Duba-Yurt. During the first Chechen war in 1994 to 1996 he was a member of the Duba-Yurt self defence unit. After the war he continued living in the village, which was regularly subjected to “sweeping-up” operations by the federal forces between 2001 and 2005 (see Kukurkhoyeva and Others v. Russia [Committee], nos. 50556/08 and 9 other applications, §§ 100-12, 22/01/2019; Sagayeva and Others v. Russia, nos. 22698/09 and 31189/11, § 32, 8 December 2015; and Bitiyeva and Others v. Russia, no. 36156/04, §§ 7-24, 23 April 2009) and was surrounded by numerous checkpoints (see Sagayeva and Others, cited above, § 33).
9. On 27 March 2004 eight members of the Duba-Yurt self-defence unit were taken into custody by State agents. About two weeks later they were each found to have suffered a violent death (the State’s responsibility for their apprehension and deaths was established by the Court in Bitiyeva and Others, cited above, §§ 80-102).
10. On 3 December 2004 State agents arrested another village resident, Mr Rasul Mukayev, who never returned home and was presumed dead following his detention in custody (see Sagayeva and Others, cited above, §§ 74-76 and 81-83).
2. Abduction of Mr Saitaksi Umarov and subsequent events
11. According to the applicants, on the night of 15 to 16 February 2005, armed men in two UAZ minivans or armoured personal carriers (APCs) arrived at a brick factory on the outskirts of Duba-Yurt village, where Mr Saitaksi Umarov worked as a night guard. They forcibly took him away to an unknown destination, passing undetected through military checkpoints despite there being a curfew in place.
12. The applicants submitted interview records of three village residents, Ms L.A., Ms Kh.E., and Ms A.A. prepared by the NGO Materi Chechni on 27 April 2011. On the night of 15 to 16 February 2005 they had seen two UAZ vehicles driving to the outskirts of the village in the direction of the brick factory and then back again.
13. On the morning of 16 February 2005 Mr Saitaksi Umarov’s relatives arrived at the brick factory and found his passport lying on the table. His clothing was scattered about. The applicants noticed tyre tracks in the vicinity, presumably belonging to UAZ vehicles. According to the applicants, they informed the authorities of the abduction that day.
3. Official investigation into the abduction
14. On 18 February 2005 the head of the Duba-Yurt village administration asked the Shali district prosecutor’s office to open a criminal case into Mr Saitaksi Umarov’s disappearance.
15. On 11 March 2005 police officers from the Shali district department of the interior (ROVD) examined the crime scene. No evidence was collected.
16. On 14 March 2005 the first applicant contacted the Chechen President asking for his assistance in the search for her husband. She claimed that he had been abducted by armed men in APCs. Her request was forwarded to the Chechen Prosecutor and registered as a crime report.
17. On 23 March 2005 the police officers established that during the first Chechen war in 1994 to 1996 Mr Saitaksi Umarov had been a member of the Duba-Yurt self-defence unit. Eight other members of the unit had been abducted on 27 March 2004 and found dead two weeks later (the circumstances surrounding their deaths and the ensuing investigation were examined by the Court in Bitiyeva and Others, cited above, §§ 80-102).
18. On 4 October 2005 the first applicant asked the Chechen Government to assist in the search for her husband. Her request was forwarded to the Shali district prosecutor’s office on 28 October 2010.
19. On 9 November 2005 the Shali district prosecutor’s office opened criminal case no. 46151 under Article 105 of the Russian Criminal Code (“the CC”) (murder).
20. On 14 November 2005 the investigators sent requests to various authorities to check if Mr Saitaksi Umarov had been arrested. The replies received stated that the authorities had no information either about the alleged arrest of the applicants’ relative or his subsequent detention.
21. On the same date the first applicant was granted victim status in the criminal proceedings and questioned.
22. On 9 February 2006 the investigation was suspended for failure to identify the perpetrators. Subsequently, it was resumed on 8 September 2006, 2 March 2010, 14 October and 29 November 2011 and then suspended on 11 October 2006, 1 April 2010 and 19 October 2011 respectively.
23. On 3 October 2006 the investigators examined the crime scene. No evidence was collected.
24. On 4 October 2006 the investigators questioned Mr I.Z, the applicant’s neighbour, who had heard that on 15 February 2005 Mr Saitaksi Umarov had not returned home from work.
25. On 9 October 2006 the investigators questioned the first applicant, who described what her husband had been wearing on the day of his abduction.
26. On 14 May 2009 the first applicant requested access to the criminal case file. Four days later, on 18 May 2009, the request was granted.
27. On 19 March 2010 the investigators interviewed the manager of the brick factory. He submitted that he had learned of Mr Saitaksi Umarov’s disappearance on 16 February 2005 and that the disarray at his workplace suggested that he had been abducted.
28. On 24 March 2010 the second applicant was granted victim status.
29. On 29 March 2010 the investigators collected blood samples from Ms K.U., the daughter of Mr Umarov, for inclusion into the database containing DNA samples of relatives of missing persons.
30. On 15 October 2011 the investigators refused to declare the first applicant a civil claimant in the criminal proceedings.
31. On 23 November 2011 that decision was quashed by a supervising authority as ill-founded.
32. On 29 November 2011 the first applicant was declared a civil claimant in the criminal proceedings.
4. Proceedings against the investigators
33. On 17 February 2010, an unspecified date and 21 October 2010 the first applicant complained to the Shali Town Court about the investigators’ decisions to suspend the investigation, alleging that they had failed to take basic investigative steps. The court dismissed her complaints on 3 March 2010, 1 November 2010 and 17 February 2011 respectively.
B. Dedishev v. Russia (no. 46624/11)
34. The applicant is the brother of Mr Pasha Dedishev, who was born in 1948.
1. Abduction of Mr Pasha Dedishev
35. In January 2000 the Russian federal forces conducted an extensive military operation against members of illegal armed groups (?????????? ??????????? ????????????) in Grozny. The town was subjected to shelling and sweeping-up operations. By the end of January 2000 the central parts of the city were under the control of the Russian forces (see Umayeva v. Russia, no. 1200/03, § 79, 4 December 2008, and Khashiyev and Akayeva v. Russia, nos. 57942/00 and 57945/00, §§ 16 and 41, 24 February 2005).
36. On 17 January 2000 a group of armed service personnel of Slavic appearance, wearing camouflage uniforms and equipped with portable radios, arrived at the town in a Ural lorry and arrested several residents including Mr Pasha Dedishev, Mr Vasilkov, Mr Ch. and Mr G. The circumstances of their arrest are described in Vasilkova v. Russia (see Isayeva and Others v. Russia [Committee], no. 53075/08 and 9 others, § 55, 28 May 2019).
2. Official investigation into the abduction
37. As submitted by the applicant and not disputed by the Government, on an unspecified date in June 2000 he reported his brother’s abduction to the law-enforcement authorities, but the investigators did not accept his complaint. On the following day unidentified Russian military servicemen attempted to arrest him.
38. On 30 June 2000 Mr Ch.’s mother asked the Zavodskoy district temporary department of the interior in Grozny to open a criminal case into the abduction on 17 January 2000 of her son and other men by federal servicemen during a sweeping-up operation.
39. On 7 July 2000 the investigators refused to open a criminal case.
40. On 17 November 2000 that decision was overruled by the Grozny prosecutor’s office, which opened criminal case no. 12284 under Article 126 of the CC (abduction) into the incident.
41. On 17 January 2001 the investigators suspended the proceedings for failure to identify the perpetrators.
42. On 15 April 2001 the Grozny prosecutor’s office opened a separate criminal case no. 13064 under Article 126 of the CC into the abduction of Mr Sergey Vasilkov and Mr G.
43. On 11 July 2001 the Grozny prosecutor’s office opened a new criminal case no. 13103 into the abduction of Mr Sergey Vasilkov.
44. In the meantime, according to the applicant, between 2000 and 2003, his sister and mother lodged abduction complaints with various authorities, including the North Caucasus military commander’s headquarters, the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Chechen President. It appears that as a result of those complaints Mr Pasha Dedishev was included in the list of abducted persons in criminal case no. 12284.
45. On 6 November 2003 the investigation was resumed and cases nos. 13064 and 13103 were joined to case no. 12284.
46. The subsequent developments in the proceedings between 6 November 2003 and 5 February 2013 are described in Isayeva and Others v. Russia, cited above, §§ 67-76. In particular, the proceedings were suspended on 27 February 2005 and then resumed on 1 December 2009.
47. Subsequently, the investigators resumed the proceedings on 16 June 2016 and suspended them again on 6 July 2016.
3. Court proceedings
48. According to the applicant, on 9 October 2007 he lodged a claim with the Zavodskoy District Court in Grozny seeking compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage, including that caused by the alleged abduction of his brother by federal servicemen. Subsequently, his claim was transferred to the Leninskiy District Court of Grozny because the initial court declined jurisdiction.
49. On 6 April 2009 Leninskiy District Court of Grozny dismissed the complaint as unsubstantiated. That decision was upheld on appeal by the Chechnya Supreme Court on 17 November 2009.
?. Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov v. Russia (no. 65054/11)
50. The first applicant is the wife of Mr Uvays Shaipov, who was born in 1967, and the sister of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, who was born in 1983. The second applicant is the latter’s brother.
1. Abduction of Mr Uvays Shaipov and subsequent events
51. On 23 May 2001 Mr Uvays Shaipov was stopped by armed men at a checkpoint next to the Kirov-Yurt settlement in Chechnya. The servicemen threatened him with firearms, forced him into an APC with the registration number K-149 and drove off to an unknown destination.
52. The event took place in the presence of several witnesses, including Ms E.Kh, the mother of Mr Uvays Shaipov. Immediately afterwards she followed the APC and saw it entering the base of a military unit stationed in the village of Khatuni, Chechnya.
53. Later that day a military officer who introduced himself as Mr Igor Strelkov informed the applicants that Mr Uvays Shaipov had been taken to the headquarters of the federal forces in Khankala, Chechnya.
54. In June 2001 Mr Uvays Shaipov was shown on the television as an accomplice of illegal armed groups in Chechnya arrested by federal forces. It is unclear whether the applicants provided this information to the investigators.
2. Official investigation into the abduction
55. On an unspecified date the applicants informed the authorities of the abduction of Mr Uvays Shaipov.
56. On 18 July 2001 the Vedeno district prosecutor’s office opened criminal case no. 73059 under Article 126 of the CC (abduction).
57. On an unspecified date in September 2002 (the precise day is illegible) Ms E.Kh., the mother of Mr Uvays Shaipov, was granted victim status in the case. She was questioned by the investigators and confirmed the circumstances of the abduction as described above.
58. On an unspecified date in September (the precise day is also illegible) the investigators questioned one of the witnesses, Ms Z.M., who confirmed the circumstances of Mr Uvays Shaipov’s detention by military servicemen at the checkpoint next to Kirov-Yurt.
59. On 18 September 2002 the investigation in the case was suspended for failure to identify the perpetrators.
60. On 17 December 2002 the criminal case file was destroyed by a fire at the prosecutor’s office.
61. On 27 October 2004 the acting Vedeno district prosecutor ordered that the criminal case material be restored and the investigation be resumed.
62. On 27 November 2004 the investigation in the case was suspended.
63. The Government did not provide the Court with the case material relating to the period that followed. From the materials submitted by the applicants it appears that the investigation progressed as follows.
64. On 26 April 2005 the investigation was resumed. Subsequently, it was suspended on 26 May 2005, resumed on an unspecified date between 2009 and 2011 and again suspended on 7 May 2011. It appears that the applicants were not informed of the suspension order of 26 May 2005.
65. On 15 April 2009 Ms E.Kh asked the head of the Chechen Parliamentary Committee on the Search for Missing Persons to assist her in the search for her son. The request was forwarded to the investigators, who informed her on 20 May 2009 that the proceedings in the case had been suspended and that operational-search activities were being taken in order to establish Mr Uvays Shaipov’s whereabouts.
66. On 28 April 2011 the first applicant applied for victim status. The investigators granted her request on 5 May 2011.
67. On 24 May 2011 the investigators allowed a request by the first applicant to consult the case file.
3. Abduction of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov
68. At around 4.30 a.m. on 31 March 2002 armed men in military camouflage uniforms and balaclavas arrived at the applicants’ block of flats in the village of Chiri-Yurt in an URAL lorry and a grey UAZ-452 with the registration number 835 XA/RUS 95. A group of about five men broke into the family flat where Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov lived with his mother, Ms R.Dzh., and aunt, Ms L.A. The men forced him outside and then took him away to an unknown destination.
69. The same morning two other residents of Chiri-Yurt, Mr Ibragim Asabayev and Mr Alkhazur Asabayev, were abducted in similar circumstances (see Israilovy and Others v. Russia, no. 34909/12 and 4 others [CTE], § 73, 24 September 2019).
70. Three days after the abduction, on 3 April 2002, the servicemen brought Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov back to Chiri-Yurt in a UAZ minivan. They took him into his flat and searched it. Ms L.A. was at home and witnessed the search. Thereafter, they forced him back into the vehicle and drove off.
71. The abduction took place in the presence of numerous witnesses, including Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov’s relatives and neighbours.
4. Official investigation into the abduction
72. On 24 April 2002 a relative of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov informed the authorities of the abduction and requested that criminal proceedings be opened.
73. On 31 July 2002 the Shali district prosecutor’s office opened criminal case no. 59174 under Article 126 of the CC (abduction).
74. From the documents submitted it appears that on 31 July 2002 (the date was also stated as 30 July 2002, the day before the case was opened) the first applicant was granted victim status.
75. On the same date the investigators questioned Ms L.A., the aunt of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, who confirmed the circumstances of the abduction as stated above.
76. On 31 July 2002 the investigators informed a relative of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov that they would provide an update about the progress of the investigation.
77. On 27 August 2003 the investigators asked the military commander of the Shali district in Chechnya whether federal servicemen had arrested Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov or had a UAZ-452 vehicle with the registration number 835 XA/RUS 95. The commander replied that the subordinate military unit had not been involved in the arrest, and that the military headquarters had several UAZ-452 vehicles.
78. On 31 September 2002 the investigation in the case was suspended for failure to identify the perpetrators. The applicants were not informed of that decision.
79. On various sates between 2003 and 2007 the mother of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov asked a number of authorities, including the Russian Prosecutor General, the Prosecutor General’s Office in the South Federal Circuit, the Chechen Prosecutor and the Chechen Government to assist her in the search for her son. Her requests were forwarded to the investigators, who replied on 17 May 2003, 14 July 2003, 8 February 2006 and 24 March 2007 that operational-search activities to establish her son’s whereabouts were in progress.
80. On 24 May 2011 the investigators granted a request by the first applicant to be provided with access to the criminal case file.
81. On 19 December 2011 they dismissed a request by her to be provided with a specific document from the case file.
82. On 25 June 2012 the first applicant enquired about the developments in the case. The next day she was informed that the proceedings had been suspended on 31 September 2002 for failure to identify the perpetrators.
83. On 10 September 2012 the investigators asked the Shali ROVD to intensify the search for Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, in particular to identify the witness to the abduction and the perpetrators.
D. Chapanovy v. Russia (no. 76566/11)
84. The first and second applicants were the parents of Mr Lema Chapanov, born in 1974, and Mr Aslan Chapanov, born in 1979. They died after the application had been lodged with the Court. After the death of the second applicant, his son, Mr Ramzan Chapanov (a brother of Mr Lema Chapanov and Mr Aslan Chapanov) expressed the wish to pursue the application in his stead.
85. The third and fourth applicants are the brothers of Mr Lema Chapanov and Mr Aslan Chapanov.
1. Abduction of the Chapanov brothers
86. At around 5 a.m. on 12 September 2000 (in the documents submitted the date was also referred to as 15 September 2000) the Chapanov family were at home in the village of Alkhazurovo, Chechnya, when a group of about twenty armed men in camouflage uniforms and balaclavas arrived in two APCs and a white VAZ 2106 vehicle. After searching the house and checked the family’s identity documents, the men informed the applicants that they were going to detain the Chapanov brothers (in particular, Mr Lema Chapanov, Mr Aslan Chapanov, as well as the third and fourth applicants) and take them to the town of Urus Martan for further identity checks.
87. The men ordered the applicants to show them the ownership documents for the family car, a Niva with the registration number 8405 MT parked in the courtyard of their house. After taking the documents, the men ordered the brothers to follow the APCs in the family car.
88. On the main road between the village of Goyskoye and Urus-Martan the convoy stopped. The servicemen ordered the brothers to get out of their car and pull their t-shirts over their heads. They then put them into one of the APCs and drove them to an unknown destination about three hours away.
89. On their arrival the brothers were ordered to get out of the APC and take their t-shirts off their heads. The brothers saw a large area with a big number of military vehicles and armed men speaking unaccented Russian.
90. The servicemen then blindfolded the brothers, tied their hands behind their backs and put them in cells. When one of the brothers asked where they were, a cellmate replied that they were in Khankala, where the headquarters of the Russian federal forces was located.
91. The next day the men put the fourth applicant into an APC with a registration number containing the digits 823 and took him back to Alkhazurovo. After searching the applicants’ family house, the servicemen dropped the fourth applicant off at the outskirts of the village.
92. The third applicant was released a week later and returned home. According to his statements, throughout his detention in Khankala he was detained in the same cell as one of his brothers, Mr Aslan Chapanov.
93. Mr Lema Chapanov and Mr Aslan Chapanov have not been seen since.
94. The abduction took place in the presence of several witnesses, including the applicants, their relatives and neighbours. The applicants submitted written statements of Mr S.A. and Mr B.B., supporting their version of events.
2. Official investigation into the abduction of Mr Lema Chapanov and Mr Aslan Chapanov
95. On 8 December 2000 the first applicant informed the authorities of the abduction of her sons and theft of their Niva car by the abductors. She requested assistance in the search for her missing relatives as well as protection for having made the abduction complaint.
96. On 15 February 2001 the Urus-Martan district prosecutor’s office opened criminal case no. 25025 under Article 126 of the CC (abduction).
97. A comparison of the documents submitted by the parties showed that the Government did not provide the Court with the criminal file in its entirety, despite its request to that effect. As far as can be seen from the documents in the Court’s possession, the proceedings may be summarised as follows.
98. On 15 April 2001 the investigation in the case was suspended for failure to identify the perpetrators. It was subsequently resumed on 11 August 2001, 18 March 2002 and 19 May 2006 following criticism from the senior prosecutors, and then suspended on 11 September 2001, 25 April 2003 and 19 June 2006 respectively.
99. In the meantime, on 2 and 8 September August 2001, Mr Lema Chapanov’s partner and the fourth applicant were granted victim status in the criminal proceedings and questioned. The statement of Mr Lema Chapanov’s partner was similar to the applicants’ submissions to the Court. The copy of the fourth applicant’s statement submitted to the Court was illegible.
100. In April 2003 the investigators sent a number of requests to various law-enforcement authorities to check if the Chapanov brothers had been detained during a special operation. The replies received stated that those authorities had no information about them.
101. On 2 October 2003 the first applicant asked several officials in the Urus-Martan district, including the district military commander, the military prosecutor, the prosecutor and the head of the ROVD to assist her in establishing the whereabouts of her children. It is not clear whether she received a reply.
102. On 17 May 2006 the first applicant asked the Urus-Martan prosecutor to grant her victim status in the criminal proceedings, update her about the progress of the investigation and provide her with a copy of the decision to open a criminal case dated 15 February 2001.
103. On 22 May 2006 the first applicant was granted victim status and questioned. She confirmed the circumstances of her sons’ abduction and mentioned that she had no information concerning their whereabouts or the Niva car.
104. On 5 June 2006 the investigators asked the head of the Urus Martan department of the interior to identify the registration plate and for details of the Niva car belonging to the Chapanov brothers. The outcome of the request is unknown.
105. On 9 June 2006 the investigator questioned the fourth applicant, who described the circumstances of the brothers’ abduction in great detail.
106. On 15 June 2006, at the request of the first applicant, the Urus Martan Town Court declared Mr Lema Chapanov and Mr Aslan Chapanov dead.
107. On an unspecified date in August 2006 the first applicant asked the NGO Memorial to assist in the search for her sons. On 31 August 2006 the NGO forwarded her request to the investigators, who replied on 16 October 2006 that the proceedings had been suspended, but operative-search activities in the case were ongoing.
108. On 7 July 2010 and 4 April 2011 the first applicant asked the investigators to resume the proceedings in the criminal case and grant her full access to the case file. On 12 July 2010 and 6 April 2011 respectively her requests were rejected.
109. On 28 July 2011 the first applicant enquired about the course of the proceedings. It is not clear whether she received a reply.
3. Proceedings against the investigators
110. On 6 June 2011 the first applicant complained to the Urus-Martan Town Court that she had been denied access to the criminal case file. The outcome of the proceedings is unknown.
E. Gerimovy v. Russia (no. 8435/12)
111. The applicants are close relatives of Mr Akhyad Gerimov, who was born in 1961. The first applicant is his wife, while the second and third applicants are his children.
1. Abduction of Mr Akhyad Gerimov
112. At about 3 p.m. on 2 June 2000 Mr Akhyad Gerimov was driving to work at the Lenina factory in Grozny in a VAZ 2106 car with the registration number AZ-05-VA-347. On the way he picked up an acquaintance, Ms R.I.
113. In the Zavodskoy district in Grozny, at a checkpoint manned by Russian servicemen, several armed men in camouflage uniforms with bandanas covering their heads (typically worn by State servicemen) stopped the car, pointed their guns at Mr Akhyad Gerimov and Ms R.I. and ordered them to get out. They then forced Mr Akhyad Gerimov into an APC waiting nearby and took him and his car away.
114. Ms R.I. was taken behind the checkpoint and held there until 10 p.m. She was then blindfolded, tied up by her hands and taken away in another APC. On her arrival she was put in a tent. She saw tanks and helicopters nearby. A few minutes later she heard Mr Akhyad Gerimov in a neighbouring tent screaming and asking for help. Ms R.I. was then taken to the tent, interrogated and beaten up.
115. At 9 a.m. the next day Ms R.I. was taken blindfolded and with her hands tied in an APC to the centre of Grozny and released. The men took all her jewellery and told her not to speak to anyone about the incident.
2. Official investigation into the abduction
116. On 23 June 2000 the Grozny prosecutor’s office opened criminal case no. 12073 under Article 126 of the CC (abduction). The Government did not submit all the documents from the criminal case file, despite the Court’s request to that effect. Accordingly, it is unclear on what dates the investigation was suspended or resumed and whether or not the applicants were informed of the relevant decisions. From the parties’ submissions it appears that the proceedings progressed as follows.
117. In August 2000 the investigators took statements from the first applicant and Ms R.I. The first applicant’s statement was similar to the applicants’ submissions to the Court. Among other details she gave the model and registration number of her husband’s car.
118. On an unspecified date in August 2000 (the date on the document is illegible), in reply to a request for information, the Ministry of the Interior informed the investigators that the checkpoint had been manned by a police special forces unit from Irkutsk.
119. In 2001 the first applicant forwarded several requests to the Grozny prosecutor’s office and the Russian Prosecutor General’s Office asking for assistance in establishing Mr Akhyad Gerimov’s whereabouts.
120. On 21 August 2001 the Russian Prosecutor General’s Office informed the applicant that her request had been forwarded to the Chechen Prosecutor’s Office.
121. On 13 February 2002 the investigators questioned the first applicant about the abduction. She confirmed her previous statement.
122. On an unspecified date in March 2003 the first applicant was granted victim status in the criminal proceedings. On 27 March 2003 and 20 May 2004 she was questioned again. She repeated her previous statements.
123. On 7 August 2006, in reply to a request for information on the progress of the investigation into the abduction of Mr Akhyad Gerimov, the applicants were informed by the Zavodskoy district prosecutor’s office that it was not currently investigating the incident.
124. On 6 October 2008 the investigator of the Chechnya Investigative Committee questioned Ms R.I. about the abduction.
125. On 23 April 2010 the Leninskiy district department of the Investigative Committee informed the applicants that the Zavodskoy district prosecutor’s office had not forwarded the criminal case concerning their relative’s abduction to them for investigation.
126. On 4 May 2010 the Chechnya Investigative Committee separated several documents concerning Mr Akhyad Gerimov’s abduction from criminal case file no. 12073 and launched a new pre-investigation inquiry into the offence proscribed by Article 162 of the CC (robbery).
127. On 7 June 2010 the Chechnya Investigative Committee opened a new criminal investigation, this time under the case number 21027, into Mr Akhyad Gerimov’s abduction (Article 126 of the CC (abduction)) and the theft of his car by the abductors (Article 162 of the CC (robbery)).
128. On 29 June 2010 the first applicant was granted victim status in criminal case no. 21027.
129. On 7 August 2010 the criminal case was suspended for failure to identify the perpetrators. Subsequently, it was resumed on 21 November 2011 and 6 April 2015 and then suspended on 20 December 2011 and 16 April 2015 respectively.
130. On 15 September 2011 the first applicant asked the investigators to allow her to access the investigation file. Her request was granted after she complained to the courts (see paragraph 132 below).
131. On 6 April 2015 the second applicant was granted victim status in the criminal proceedings and questioned as a witness. His statement was consistent with the applicants’ previous submissions.
3. Proceedings against the investigators
132. On 15 November 2011 the first applicant complained to the Staropromyslovskiy District Court in Grozny about the investigators’ failure to reply to her request concerning access to the criminal case file and the decision to suspend the investigation.
133. On 25 November 2011 the court stated that the applicant was to be allowed access to the case file. As for the complaint against the decision to suspend the investigation, it was dismissed as four days earlier, on 21 November 2011, the investigators had resumed the proceedings.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND INTERNATIONAL MATERIAL
134. For a summary of the relevant domestic law and international and domestic reports on disappearances in Chechnya and Ingushetia, see Aslakhanova and Others v. Russia (nos. 2944/06, 8300/07, 50184/07, 332/08 and 42509/10, §§ 43-59 and §§ 69-84, 18 December 2012).
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
135. In accordance with Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court, the Court decides to join the applications, given their similar factual and legal background.
II. LOCUS STANDI
136. The Court notes that the first two applicants in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) died after the application had been lodged with the Court, and that the second applicant’s son, Mr Ramzan Chapanov, expressed the wish to pursue the application in his stead (see paragraph 84 above). The Government objected, stating that Mr Ramzan Chapanov had neither witnessed the abduction nor participated in the criminal proceedings. According to the Government, he could not therefore claim to be a victim of the alleged violations.
137. The Court normally permits the next-of-kin to pursue an application, provided they have a legitimate interest, where the original applicant has died after lodging the application with the Court (see Murray v. the Netherlands [GC], no.10511/10, § 79, 26 April 2016, and Maylenskiy v. Russia, no. 12646/15, § 27, 4 October 2016; for cases concerning abductions in Chechnya see Sultygov and Others v. Russia, nos. 42575/07 and 11 others, §§ 381-86). Having regard to the subject matter of the application and all the information in its possession, the Court considers that the second applicant’s son, and the brother of the abducted men, Mr Ramzan Chapanov, has a legitimate interest in pursuing the application and that he thus has the requisite locus standi under Article 34 of the Convention.
III. COMPLIANCE WITH THE SIX-MONTH RULE
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The Government
138. In their observations, the Government argued that the applicants had lodged their applications with the Court several years after the abduction of their relatives, and more than six months after the date when they ought to have become aware of the ineffectiveness of the ensuing investigations, or more than six months after the most recent decision of the investigators. The Government also pointed out that the applicants had remained passive and had not maintained contact with the investigating authorities for a significant amount of time. According to the Government, all the applications should be declared inadmissible as brought “out of time”.
2. The applicants
139. The applicants submitted that they had complied with the six month rule. They had taken all possible steps within a reasonable time limit to initiate the searches for their missing relatives and assist the authorities in the proceedings. In Dedishev (no. 46624/11) the applicant acknowledged a delay in lodging a formal abduction complaint with the authorities but stated that it had been due to the hostilities in the region, the authorities’ refusal to register his abduction complaint and their subsequent attempt to arrest him (see paragraph 37 above). He further explained than between 2007 and 2009 he had had serious health problems and had undergone inpatient treatment, which had affected his ability to maintain regular contact with the investigators.
140. The applicants further submitted that there had been no excessive or unexplained delays in lodging their applications with the Court, which had been brought as soon as they had considered the domestic investigations to be ineffective. According to them, the armed conflict taking place in Chechnya at the material time had led them to believe that investigative delays were inevitable. It had only been with the passage of time and a lack of information from the investigating authorities that they had begun to doubt the effectiveness of the investigations and had started looking for free legal assistance to assess the effectiveness of the proceedings and then, subsequently, to lodge their applications with the Court without undue delay.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. General principles
141. A summary of the principles concerning compliance with the six month rule in disappearance cases may be found in Sultygov and Others, cited above, §§ 369 74, 9 October 2014.
2. Application of the principles to the present cases
142. Turning to the circumstances of the present cases, the Court notes that in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) the applicants lodged their application with the Court within less than seven years of the incident and the initiation of the related investigation (see Varnava and Others v. Turkey [GC], nos. 16064/90 and 8 others, § 166, ECHR 2009).
143. In the remainder of the applications at hand that period varied between ten years and five months and eleven years and seven months (it amounted to around eleven years and six months in Dedishev (no. 46624/11); ten years and five months and ten years and nine months in Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11); eleven years and two months in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11); and eleven years and seven months in Gerimovy (no. 8435/12)).
144. The Court further notes that in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) the authorities became aware of the abductions within several weeks of the respective incidents, which can be considered as lodging the official complaints without undue delay given the situation at the material time.
145. In Dedishev (no. 46624/11) the Government did not contest the applicant’s submission that he had informed the authorities of his brother’s abduction in June 2000, but the authorities had refused to accept his claim and the next day had attempted to arrest him. Taking that into account, the situation of armed conflict in the region and the alleged involvement of the authorities in the perpetrated offence, the Court accepts the applicant’s explanation that exceptional circumstances justified the delay. It does not appear that it deprived the investigation of any prospects of success.
146. The Court further observes that in each of the applications the authorities opened a criminal investigation into the applicants’ complaints of abduction which was repeatedly suspended and then resumed following criticism from the senior investigators. In each case, the investigation was still ongoing when the application was lodged with the Court (see paragraph 5 above).
147. The Court also notes certain lulls in the criminal proceedings (see in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) paragraph 22 above; in Dedishev (no. 46624/11) paragraph 46 above; in Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) paragraphs 64 and 786464; in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) paragraph 98; and in Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) paragraphs 122 and 124 above), while the investigations were suspended. The most significant of them, which appears to have exceeded five years (the exact dates of suspension and resumption were not always clear), took place in Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) and Chapanovy (no. 76566/11).
148. However, from the documents submitted it appears that in each of those cases the applicants and other relatives of those abducted did not remain passive. In the first case, they contacted the Chechen Parliamentary Committee on the Search for Missing Persons, the Russian Prosecutor General, the Prosecutor General’s Office in the South Federal Circuit, the Chechen Prosecutor and the Chechen Government, asking them for assistance in the search for their relatives. Their requests were subsequently forwarded to the investigators, who then reassured them that operational-search measures were ongoing (see paragraphs 79-82 above). In the second case, on a number of occasions the applicants applied to the investigators both directly and with the assistance of the NGO Memorial. Just like in the first case, the investigators replied stating that the search for their relative was in progress. The applicants also complained to the courts that they had been denied full access to the case file (see paragraphs 107-110 above).
149. Overall, the documents submitted show that the applicants in every case clearly demonstrated their interest in the search for their missing relatives and took steps to maintain contact with the authorities.
150. In assessing the circumstances of the cases, the Court takes into account that all of the applications were lodged within twelve years of the incidents (contrast Dzhabrailova and Others v. Russia, nos. 3752/13 and 9 others, 7 May 2019, where the Court declared inadmissible applications submitted more than twelve years after the abduction of the applicants’ relatives), and that the authorities became aware of the abductions without undue delays. It also notes the applicants’ efforts to have the dormant proceedings resumed and their overall active stance in the proceedings. It therefore concludes that the applicants acted diligently and maintained contact with the investigators.
151. Given that the investigations were complex and concerned very serious allegations, the Court concludes that it was reasonable for the applicants to wait for developments that could have resolved crucial factual or legal issues (see El-Masri v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 39630/09, § 142, ECHR 2012). The delays in opening the criminal cases, or the lulls in the proceedings, therefore cannot be interpreted as the applicants’ failure to comply with the six-month requirement (see Abdulkhadzhiyeva and Abdulkhadzhiyev v. Russia, no. 40001/08, §§ 9, 15 and 67, 4 October 2016, where the delay in lodging a formal complaint amounted to eight months, and contrast Doshuyeva and Yusupov v. Russia (dec.), 58055/10, §§ 41-47, 31 May 2016, where the applicants did not contact the investigating authorities for about eight years and three months, while the investigation was seemingly dormant).
152. In the light of the above, and bearing in mind the arguments submitted by the parties, the Court concludes that the investigations in the cases at hand, albeit sporadic, were being conducted during the periods in question, and that it is satisfied with the explanations submitted by the applicants (see Varnava and Others, cited above, § 166). Accordingly, they complied with the six-month rule.
IV. COMPLIANCE WITH THE EXHAUSTION RULE
A. The parties’ submissions
1. Government
153. The Government argued that the applicants had failed to exhaust domestic remedies in respect of their complaints related to the abduction of their relatives as they had failed to complain to the courts about the actions or omissions of the investigating authorities.
2. The applicants
154. The applicants stated that lodging complaints against the investigators would not have remedied the shortcomings in the proceedings, and that the criminal investigations had proved to be ineffective.
B. The Court’s assessment
155. The Court has already concluded that the ineffective investigation of disappearances that occurred in Chechnya between 2000 and 2006 constitutes a systemic problem, and that criminal investigations are not an effective remedy in this regard (see Aslakhanova and Others, cited above, § 217).
156. In such circumstances, and noting the absence of tangible progress in any of the criminal investigations into the abduction of the applicants’ relatives, the Court concludes that this objection must be dismissed, since the remedy suggested by the Government would not have been effective in the circumstances (for similar reasoning, see Ortsuyeva and Others v. Russia, nos. 3340/08 and 24689/10, § 79, 22 November 2016).
V. ASSESSMENT OF THE EVIDENCE AND ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FACTS
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The Government
157. The Government did not contest the essential facts underlying each application, but submitted that the applicants’ allegations were based on assumptions, as there was no evidence proving beyond reasonable doubt that State agents had been involved in the alleged abductions, or that the applicants’ relatives were dead.
2. The applicants
158. The applicants submitted that it had been established “beyond reasonable doubt” that the men who had taken their relatives had been State agents. In support of that assertion, they referred to evidence contained in their submissions and documents from the criminal investigation files disclosed by the Government. They also submitted that they had each made out a prima facie case that their relatives had been abducted by State agents, but the essential facts underlying their complaints had not been challenged by the Government. Given the lack of any reliable news about their relatives for a long time and the life threatening nature of unacknowledged detention in Chechnya at the relevant time, they asked the Court to consider their relatives dead.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. General principles
159. A summary of the principles concerning the assessment of evidence and the establishment of facts in disappearance cases, and the life threatening nature of such incidents, may be found in Sultygov and Others, cited above, §§ 393 96.
2. Application of the above principles to the present cases
160. Turning to the circumstances of the cases presently before it, and in view of all the material, including the copies of documents from the relevant criminal case files submitted by the parties, the Court finds that the applicants have presented prima facie cases that their relatives were abducted by State agents in the circumstances set out above. The Court notes that each of the abductions took place in areas under State control.
161. In Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) the applicant’s village was frequently “swept” by the federal forces. Before the abduction of Mr Saitaksi Umarov, eight members of his self-defence unit had been arrested by State agents and then found dead (see Bitiyeva and Others, cited above, §§ 7-24). The perpetrators of Mr Saitaksi Umarov’s abduction used military vehicles and passed through checkpoints undetected despite there being a curfew in place (see paragraphs 8-13 above).
162. In Dedishev (no. 46624/11) the applicant’s relative was abducted by a group of armed military personnel of Slavic appearance, wearing camouflage uniforms and equipped with portable radios. It appears that on the same date the same group of men were involved in the arrest of another local resident, Mr Sergey Vasilkov (see paragraphs 35 and 36 above).
163. In Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) Mr Uvays Shaipov was abducted at a military checkpoint by armed men with an APC. Shortly afterwards a man introducing himself as a military officer informed Mr Uvays Shaipov’s relatives that the latter had been taken to the military headquarters in Khankala (see paragraphs 51-53 above). Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov was abducted by men in military camouflage uniforms and balaclavas that morning with two other residents of the same village, Mr Ibragim Asabayev and Mr Alkhazur Asabayev. In Israilovy and Others (cited above) the Court established that the latter had been arrested and taken into custody by State agents (see Israilovy and Others, cited above, § 141). Moreover, three days later the abductors took him into his flat to search it, and after doing so, took him away again (see paragraphs 68-71 above).
164. In Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) the perpetrators, wearing camouflage uniforms and balaclavas, arrived at the applicants’ house in two APCs and a VAZ vehicle. Their actions corresponded to those used by the federal forces during special operations, which have been examined by the Court in many similar cases (see paragraphs 86-94 above; see also Kukurkhoyeva and Others, cited above, §§ 27, 31, 64, 69 and 182; and Tazuyeva and Others v. Russia [Committee], nos. 36962/09 and 9 others, §§ 71, 72, 85, 86, 105, 106 and 171, 22 January 2019).
165. In Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) the applicant’s relative was abducted by armed men in an APC at a military checkpoint, similar to Mr Uvays Shaipov. Ms R.I., who was detained with the applicant’s relative, saw helicopters and tanks at the place of their subsequent detention (see paragraphs 112-115 above).
166. The Court further notes that in the cases at hand, the investigating authorities accepted as fact the primary versions of events presented by the applicants, and took steps to verify whether State agents had indeed been involved in the abductions by sending information requests to the relevant authorities.
167. In their submissions to the Court, the Government did not provide a satisfactory and convincing explanation for the events in question or an alternative version of events. They have therefore failed to discharge their burden of proof.
168. Bearing in mind the general principles enumerated above, the circumstances of the cases and the Court’s findings in Bitiyeva and Others, Isayeva and Others and Israilovy and Others (all cited above), the Court finds that the applicants’ relatives were taken into custody by State agents during special operations. Given the lack of any reliable news about Mr Saitaksi Umarov, Mr Pasha Dedishev, Mr Uvays Shaipov, Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, Mr Lema Chapanov, Mr Aslan Chapanov and Mr Akhyad Gerimov since their detention, and the life threatening nature of such detention, they may be presumed dead following their unacknowledged detention.
VI. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 2 OF THE CONVENTION
169. The applicants complained, under Article 2 of the Convention, that their relatives had disappeared after being detained by State agents, and that the domestic authorities had failed to carry out effective investigations into the matter. Article 2 reads as follows:
“1. Everyone’s right to life shall be protected by law. No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally save in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided by law...”
A. The parties’ submissions
170. In Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Dedishev (no. 46624/11) and Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) the Government submitted that the applicants’ complaints should be dismissed as unsubstantiated. In Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) they stated that Article 2 of the Convention was inapplicable to the applicants’ complaint of abductions, and that it should be examined under Article 5 of the Convention, because there was no evidence of the death of the applicants’ relatives. In this connection, they referred to the case of Kurt v. Turkey (25 May 1998, §§ 101 09, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998 III). In Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) the Government also submitted that the mere fact that the investigation had not produced any specific results, or had given only limited ones, did not mean that it had been ineffective. They claimed that all necessary steps had been taken to comply with the positive obligation under Article 2 of the Convention.
171. The applicants maintained their complaints, alleging that their relatives had been abducted and intentionally deprived of their lives in circumstances involving a violation of Article 2 of the Convention. They further argued that the investigations into the incidents had fallen short of the standards set by the Convention.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
172. In the light of the parties’ submissions, the Court considers that the complaints raise serious issues of fact and law under the Convention, the determination of which requires an examination of the merits. The complaints under Article 2 of the Convention must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
(a) Alleged violation of the right to life of the applicants’ relatives
173. The Court observes that it is undisputed by the parties that the whereabouts of the applicants’ relatives remained unaccounted for from the time of their abduction to the lodging of the applications with the Court. The question arises whether, contrary to the Government’s submission, Article 2 of the Convention is applicable to the applicants’ situations.
174. The Court has already examined the Government’s objection in similar cases concerning alleged abductions by State agents and dismissed it (see, for example, Sultygov and Others, cited above, §§ 441-42; and Dzhabrailov and Others v. Russia, nos. 8620/09 and 8 others, §§ 317-18, 27 February 2014), Accordingly, the Court finds that Article 2 of the Convention applies and that the Government’s objection in this respect should be rejected.
175. Based on the above, and noting that it has already been found that in all of the applications under examination the applicants’ relatives may be presumed dead following their unacknowledged detention by State agents (see paragraph 168 above), in the absence of any justification put forward by the Government, the Court finds that the deaths of the applicants’ relatives can be attributed to the State and that there has been a violation of the substantive aspect of Article 2 of the Convention in respect of Mr Saitaksi Umarov, Mr Pasha Dedishev, Mr Uvays Shaipov, Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, Mr Lema Chapanov, Mr Aslan Chapanov and Mr Akhyad Gerimov.
(b) Alleged inadequacy of the investigations into the abductions
176. The Court has already found that a criminal investigation does not constitute an effective remedy in respect of disappearances, particularly those which occurred in Chechnya between 1999 and 2006, and that such a situation constitutes a systemic problem under the Convention (see paragraph 155 above). In the case at hand, as in many previous similar cases reviewed by the Court, the investigations have been ongoing for many years without bringing about any significant developments as regards the identities of the perpetrators or the fate of the applicants’ missing relatives.
177. The Court observes that each set of criminal proceedings has been plagued by a combination of defects similar to those enumerated in the Aslakhanova and Others judgment (cited above, §§ 123 25). Each was subjected to several decisions to suspend the investigation, followed by periods of inactivity, which further diminished the prospects of solving the crimes. No timely and thorough measures have been taken to identify and question the servicemen who could have participated in the abductions.
178. In the light of the foregoing, the Court finds that the authorities failed to carry out effective criminal investigations into the circumstances of the disappearances and deaths of Mr Saitaksi Umarov, Mr Pasha Dedishev, Mr Uvays Shaipov, Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, Mr Lema Chapanov, Mr Aslan Chapanov and Mr Akhyad Gerimov. Accordingly, there has been a violation of the procedural aspect of Article 2 of the Convention.
VII. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLES 3, 5 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION
179. The applicants in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11), Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) and Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) complained of a violation of Article 3 of the Convention on account of the mental suffering caused by the disappearance of their relatives. In the latter case the Government were given notice of the complaint related to the abduction of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov submitted in the application form on 3 October 2011, but were not given notice of the complaint related to the abduction of Mr Uvays Shaipov submitted at a later stage with the applicants’ comments on the Government’s observations on 5 April 2016.
180. The applicants in all of the cases except Dedishev (no. 46624/11) further complained of a violation of Article 5 of the Convention on account of the unlawfulness of their relatives’ detention and argued that, contrary to Article 13 of the Convention, they had had no effective domestic remedies against the alleged violation of Article 2 of the Convention. The applicants in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) and Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) also alleged a lack of effective remedies in respect of their complaints under Article 5 of the Convention.
181. The relevant parts of the provisions relied on by the applicants read:
Article 3
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
Article 5
“1. Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be deprived of his liberty save in the following cases and in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law:
...
(c) the lawful arrest or detention of a person effected for the purpose of bringing him before the competent legal authority on reasonable suspicion of having committed an offence or when it is reasonably considered necessary to prevent his committing an offence or fleeing after having done so;
...
2. Everyone who is arrested shall be informed promptly, in a language which he understands, of the reasons for his arrest and of any charge against him.
3. Everyone arrested or detained in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 1 (c) of this Article shall be brought promptly before a judge or other officer authorised by law to exercise judicial power and shall be entitled to trial within a reasonable time or to release pending trial. Release may be conditioned by guarantees to appear for trial.
4. Everyone who is deprived of his liberty by arrest or detention shall be entitled to take proceedings by which the lawfulness of his detention shall be decided speedily by a court and his release ordered if the detention is not lawful.
5. Everyone who has been the victim of arrest or detention in contravention of the provisions of this Article shall have an enforceable right to compensation.”
Article 13
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The parties’ submissions
182. The Government contested the applicants’ claims. They stated, in particular, that the applicants’ mental suffering had not reached the minimum level of severity to fall within the scope of Article 3 of the Convention. The Government also averred that the domestic legislation, including Articles 124 and 125 of the Russian Code of Criminal Procedure, had provided the applicants with effective remedies for their complaints.
183. The applicants maintained their complaints.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
184. The Court notes that these complaints are not manifestly ill founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
185. On many occasions the Court has found that a situation of enforced disappearance gives rise to a violation of Article 3 of the Convention in respect of the close relatives of a victim, irrespective of their age (see Aslakhanova and Others, § 133, and Dzhabrailov and Others, §§ 326-27, both cited above).
186. Given the above findings regarding the State’s responsibility for the abductions of the applicants’ relatives and the failure to carry out meaningful investigations into the incidents (see paragraphs 178 above), the Court finds that the applicants in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11), Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) and Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11), as far as the latter’s complaint related to the abduction of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, must be considered victims of a violation of Article 3 of the Convention on account of the distress and anguish they suffered, and continue to suffer, as a result of both their inability to ascertain the fate of their missing family members and the manner in which their complaints have been dealt with.
187. Regard being had to the belated submission of the claim in respect of the mental suffering caused by the abduction of Mr Uvays Shaipov to his relatives in Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11), the Court will not examine it within the present proceedings (see, for similar reasoning, Elita Magomadova v. Russia, no. 77546/14, §§ 37-38, 10 April 2018; and Chernenko and Others v. Russia, no. 4246/14 and 5 other applications, § 37, 5 February 2019).
188. The Court has found on a number of occasions that unacknowledged detention is a complete negation of the guarantees contained in Article 5 of the Convention and discloses a particularly grave violation of its provisions (see Çiçek v. Turkey, no. 25704/94, § 164, 27 February 2001; and Luluyev and Others v. Russia, no. 69480/01, § 122, ECHR 2006-XIII (extracts)). The Court furthermore confirms that since it has been established that the applicants’ relatives were detained by State agents, apparently in the absence of any legal grounds or acknowledgement of such detention, this constitutes a particularly grave violation of the right to liberty and security of persons enshrined in Article 5 of the Convention in respect of the applicants’ relatives in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 8435/12).
189. The Court reiterates its findings regarding the general ineffectiveness of criminal investigations in cases such as those under examination. In the absence of the results of a criminal investigation, any other possible remedy becomes inaccessible in practice.
190. In the light of the above, and taking into account the scope of the applicants’ complaints, the Court finds that the applicants in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) did not have at their disposal an effective domestic remedy for their grievances under Article 2, in breach of Article 13 of the Convention.
191. In addition, the applicants in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) and Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) did not have at their disposal an effective domestic remedy for their grievances under Article 3, in breach of Article 13 of the Convention.
192. As regards the alleged breach of Article 13, read in conjunction with Article 5 of the Convention, as submitted by the applicants in the two cases mentioned above, the Court has already stated in similar cases that no separate issue arises in respect of Article 13, read in conjunction with Article 5 of the Convention (see Zhebrailova and Others v. Russia, no. 40166/07, § 84, 26 March 2015; and Aliyev and Gadzhiyeva v. Russia, no. 11059/12, § 110, 12 July 2016).
VIII. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
193. The applicants in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 3435/12) claimed that during the abduction of their relatives the State agents had unlawfully seized two cars, thereby violating the property rights guaranteed under Article 1 of the Protocol No. 1 of the Convention, which provides, in particular:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law. ...”
A. The parties’ submissions
194. The Government stated that State agents had not been responsible for the alleged violation, that the scope of the criminal cases had not included robbery, and that the applicants had failed to exhaust domestic remedies.
195. The applicants reiterated their complaint.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
196. Having already found that no effective remedy existed which would have permitted the applicants to establish the identities of the individuals involved in the abductions (see paragraph 155 and 156 above), the Court dismisses the Government’s objection as regards the applicants’ failure to exhaust domestic remedies (for the same approach, see Orlov and Others v. Russia, no. 5632/10, § 117, 14 March 2017).
197. The Court further notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
198. The Court further notes that the Government neither disputed the estimated value of the cars taken by the abductors nor who owned the vehicles. In view of the fact that the Court has already found that the men who abducted the applicants’ relatives were State servicemen, it finds that the loss of property was imputable to the respondent State.
199. Accordingly, there was an interference with the right to the protection of property. In the absence of any reference on the part of the Government to the lawfulness and proportionality of that action, the Court finds that there has been a violation of the right to protection of property guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Gakayeva and Others v. Russia, nos. 51534/08 and 9 others, §§ 383-84, 10 October 2013).
IX. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO.1 TO THE CONVENTION
200. The applicants in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) complained that they had been deprived of effective remedies in respect of their complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, contrary to Article 13 of the Convention (the relevant provisions are cited in paragraphs 181 and 193 above).
201. The Government did not comment on the issue.
A. Admissibility
97. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
202. The Court considers that given that the authorities denied involvement in the seizure of the vehicle, and that the domestic investigators failed to effectively investigate the matter, the applicants did not have access to any effective domestic remedies in respect of the alleged violation of their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Accordingly, there has been a violation on that account (see Abdulkhadzhiyeva and Abdulkhadzhiyev, cited above, §§ 98-100).
X. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
203. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
1. Pecuniary damage
204. All of the applicants except the applicant in Dedishev (no. 46624/11) and the second applicant in Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) claimed compensation for loss of financial support from the breadwinners in their families.
205. The applicants in Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) made their calculations on the basis of the UK Ogden Actuary Tables, using domestic subsistence levels and inflation rates.
206. The applicants in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) and Gerimovy v. Russia (no. 8435/12) based their calculations on the amount of minimum salary in Russia and its expected growth in the future.
207. The applicants in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) referred to the minimum subsistence level and the Court’s case-law on the issue.
208. The applicants in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) also claimed compensation for the seizure of the two vehicles in an amount equivalent to their estimated value.
209. The Government left the issue to the Court’s discretion.
2. Non-pecuniary damage
210. The amounts claimed by the applicants under that head are indicated in the appended table.
211. The Government left the issue to the Court’s discretion.
B. Costs and expenses
212. All of the applicants claimed compensation for costs and expenses. The amounts are indicated in the appended table. All of them except the applicant in Dedishev (no. 46624/11) asked the awards to be transferred into the bank accounts of their representatives.
213. In Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) the Government stated that the amounts claimed were excessive.
214. In the remainder of the cases the Government left the issue to the Court’s discretion.
C. The Court’s assessment
215. The Court reiterates that there must be a clear causal connection between the damages claimed by the applicants and the violation of the Convention, and that this may, where appropriate, include compensation in respect of loss of earnings. The Court further finds that loss of earnings applies to close relatives of the disappeared persons, including spouses, elderly parents and minor children (see, among other authorities, Imakayeva v. Russia, no. 7615/02, § 213, ECHR 2006 XIII (extracts)).
216. Wherever the Court finds a violation of the Convention, it may accept that the applicants have suffered non-pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated for solely by the finding of a violation, and make a financial award.
217. As to costs and expenses, the Court has to establish whether they were actually incurred and whether they were necessary and reasonable as to quantum (see McCann and Others v. the United Kingdom, 27 September 1995, § 220, Series A no. 324).
218. Having regard to the conclusions and principles set out above, the parties’ submissions and the principle of ne ultra petitum (“not beyond the request” or “not beyond the scope of the dispute”), the Court awards the applicants the amounts detailed in the appended table, plus any tax that may be chargeable to them on those amounts. The awards in respect of costs and expenses in respect of all of the cases except Dedishev (no. 46624/11) are to be paid into the representatives’ bank accounts, as indicated by the applicants. In Dedishev (no. 46624/11) the award is to be paid into the bank account indicated by the applicant.
D. Default interest
219. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Decides to join the applications;

2. Decides that in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) Mr Ramzan Chapanov has locus standi in the proceedings before the Court;

3. Declares the applications admissible;

4. Holds that there has been a substantive violation of Article 2 of the Convention in respect of the applicants’ relatives – Mr Saitaksi Umarov, Mr Pasha Dedishev, Mr Uvays Shaipov, Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, Mr Lema Chapanov, Mr Aslan Chapanov and Mr Akhyad Gerimov;

5. Holds that there has been a procedural violation of Article 2 of the Convention on account of the failure to effectively investigate the disappearance of the applicants’ relatives;

6. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention in respect of the applicants in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11), Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) and Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11) as far as the latter’s complaint relates to the abduction of Mr Alvi Dzhankhotov, on account of their mental suffering caused by their relatives’ disappearance and the authorities’ response to their suffering;

7. Holds that in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 8435/12) there has been a violation of Article 5 of the Convention in respect of the applicants’ relatives, on account of their unlawful detention;

8. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 2 of the Convention in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova and Dzhankhotov (no. 65054/11), Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 8435/12);

9. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 3 of the Convention in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) and Chapanovy (no. 76566/11);

10. Holds that no separate issue arises under Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 5 of the Convention in Khakimova and Others (no. 36875/11) and Chapanovy (no. 76566/11);

11. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11) and Gerimovy (no. 8435/12);

12. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in Chapanovy (no. 76566/11);

13. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months, the amounts indicated in the appended table, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement. The awards in respect of costs and expenses in all of the cases except Dedishev (no. 46624/11) are to be paid into the representatives’ bank accounts, as indicated by the applicants. In Dedishev (no. 46624/11) the award is to be paid into the bank account indicated by the applicant;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

14. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claims for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 8 October 2019, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Georgios A. Serghides
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

TERZA SEZIONE









CASO KHAKIMOVA E ALTRI v. RUSSIA

(Applicazioni n. 36875/11 e altre 4 – vedi elenco allegato)







Giudizio







Strasburgo


giovedì 8 ottobre 2019



Questa sentenza è definitiva, ma può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nel caso di Khakimova e altri contro la Russia,
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Terza sezione), in qualità di comitato composto da:
Georgios A. Serghides, Presidente,
Branko Lubarda,
Erik Wennerstrom, giudici,
e StephenPhillips, Section Registrar,
Dopo aver deliberato in privato il 17 settembre 2019,
Pronuncia la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in tale data:
Procedura
1. Il caso ha avuto origine in cinque domande contro la Russia presentate alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la protezione dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") nelle varie date indicate nella tabella allegata.
2. Il governo russo ("il governo") è stato informato delle domande.
3. Il governo non si è opposto all'esame delle domande da parte di una commissione.
I FATTI
I. Le CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
4. I ricorrenti sono cittadini russi che, all'epoca materiale, vivevano nella Repubblica Cecena. I loro dati personali sono riportati nella tabella allegata. Sono parenti stretti di individui scomparsi dopo essere stati detenuti illegalmente dai militari durante le operazioni speciali. Gli eventi in questione si sono svolti in zone sotto il pieno controllo delle forze federali russe. I ricorrenti non hanno visto i loro parenti scomparsi dopo i presunti arresti. La loro posizione rimane sconosciuta.
5. Le ricorrenti hanno segnalato i rapimenti alle autorità preposte all'applicazione della legge e sono state aperte indagini ufficiali. Il procedimento è stato avviato per diversi anni senza che si ottenessero risultati tangibili. Le ricorrenti hanno presentato richieste di informazioni e assistenza nella ricerca dei loro parenti con le autorità inquirenti e vari organi di contrasto. Le loro richieste hanno ricevuto solo risposte formali o nessuna. Gli autori non sono stati identificati dalle autorità inquirenti. Sembra che tutte le indagini siano ancora in corso.
6. I riepiloghi dei fatti relativi a ciascuna domanda sono riportati di seguito. Ogni conto si basa su dichiarazioni fornite dai ricorrenti e dai loro parenti e/o vicini sia alla Corte che alle autorità nazionali inquirenti. Il governo non ha messo in discussione i fatti principali dei casi presentati dalle ricorrenti, ma ha messo in discussione il coinvolgimento dei militari nei casi.
A. Khakimova e altri v. Russia (n. 36875/11)
7. Il primo richiedente è la moglie del signor Saitaksi Umarov, nato nel 1953. Il secondo richiedente è suo figlio. Il terzo richiedente era sua figlia, morta il 22 gennaio 2016.
1. Informazioni di base
8. Saitaksi Umarov viveva nel villaggio di Duba-Yurt. Durante la prima guerra cecena nel 1994-1996 è stato membro dell'unità di autodifesa Duba-Yurt. Dopo la guerra continuò a vivere nel villaggio, che fu regolarmente sottoposto a operazioni "sweeping-up" da parte delle forze federali tra il 2001 e il 2005 (vedi Kukurkhoyeva and Others v. Russia [Comitato], nos. 50556/08 e altre 9 applicazioni, USD 100-12, 22/01/2019; Sagayeva e altri v. Russia, n. 22698/09 e 31189/11, : 32, 8 dicembre 2015; e Bitiyeva e altri v. Russia,n. 36156/04, n. 7-24, 23 aprile 2009) ed è stato circondato da numerosi punti di controllo (Sagayeva e altri, citato sopra.
9. Il 27 marzo 2004 otto membri dell'unità di autodifesa Duba-Yurt sono stati presi in custodia da agenti statali. Circa due settimane dopo si scoprì che essi subirono una morte violenta (la responsabilità dello Stato per la loro apprensione e la loro morte fu stabilita dalla Corte di Bitiyeva e altri, citati sopra, 80-102).
10. Il 3 dicembre 2004 gli agenti statali hanno arrestato un altro residente del villaggio, Rasul Mukayev, che non è mai tornato a casa e si presume morto in seguito alla sua detenzione in custodia (vedi Sagayeva e altri, citati sopra,74-76 e 81-83).
2. Rapimento di Saitaksi Umarov e eventi successivi
11. Secondo i ricorrenti, nella notte tra il 15 e il 16 febbraio 2005, uomini armati di due minivan o portaerei blindati (APC) sono arrivati in una fabbrica di mattoni alla periferia del villaggio di Duba-Yurt, dove il signor Saitaksi Umarov ha lavorato come guardia notturna. Lo portarono con la forza in una destinazione sconosciuta, passando inosservato attraverso i posti di blocco militari nonostante ci fosse un coprifuoco in atto.
12. Le ricorrenti hanno presentato le registrazioni di tre residenti del villaggio, la sig.ra L.A., la sig.ra Kh.E. e la sig.ra A.A. elaborata dall'ONG Materi Chechni il 27 aprile 2011. Nella notte tra il 15 e il 16 febbraio 2005 avevano visto due veicoli dell'UA alla periferia del villaggio in direzione della fabbrica di mattoni e poi di nuovo.
13. La mattina del 16 febbraio 2005 i parenti del signor Saitaksi Umarov sono arrivati alla fabbrica di mattoni e hanno trovato il passaporto sdraiato sul tavolo. I suoi vestiti erano sparsi. I candidati hanno notato tracce di pneumatici nelle vicinanze, presumibilmente appartenenti ai veicoli dell'UA. Secondo le ricorrenti, tale giorno essi hanno informato le autorità del rapimento.
3. Indagine ufficiale sul rapimento
14. Il 18 febbraio 2005 il capo dell'amministrazione del villaggio di Duba-Yurt ha chiesto alla procura distrettuale di Shali di aprire un procedimento penale sulla scomparsa di Saitaksi Umarov.
15. L'11 marzo 2005 gli agenti di polizia del dipartimento distrettuale dell'interno di Shali (ROVD) hanno esaminato la scena del crimine. Non sono state raccolte prove.
16. Il 14 marzo 2005 la prima ricorrente ha contattato il presidente ceceno chiedendo la sua assistenza nella ricerca del marito. Affermò che era stato rapito da uomini armati negli APC. La sua richiesta è stata inoltrata al procuratore ceceno e registrata come rapporto di reato.
17. Il 23 marzo 2005 gli agenti di polizia hanno stabilito che durante la prima guerra cecena nel 1994-1996 Saitaksi Umarov era stato membro dell'unità di autodifesa Duba-Yurt. Altri otto membri dell'unità erano stati rapiti il 27 marzo 2004 e trovati morti due settimane dopo (le circostanze della loro morte e dell'indagine che ne sono svolte sono state esaminate dalla Corte di Bitiyeva e da altri, citata sopra, 80-102).
18. Il 4 ottobre 2005 la prima ricorrente ha chiesto al governo ceceno di assistersi nella ricerca del marito. La sua richiesta è stata inoltrata alla procura distrettuale di Shali il 28 ottobre 2010.
19. Il 9 novembre 2005 la procura distrettuale di Shali ha aperto la causa penale n. 46151 ai sensi dell'articolo 105 del codice penale russo ("CC") (omicidio).
20. Il 14 novembre 2005 gli inquirenti hanno inviato richieste a varie autorità di verificare se Saitaksi Umarov sia stato arrestato. Le risposte ricevute indicavano che le autorità non disponevano né del presunto arresto del parente dei ricorrenti né della sua successiva detenzione.
21. Nella stessa data al primo richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima nel procedimento penale e interrogato.
22. Il 9 febbraio 2006 l'indagine è stata sospesa per mancata identificazione degli autori. Successivamente, è stato ripreso l'8 settembre 2006, il 2 marzo 2010, il 14 ottobre e il 29 novembre 2011 e poi sospeso rispettivamente l'11 ottobre 2006, il 1o aprile 2010 e il 19 ottobre 2011.
23. Il 3 ottobre 2006 gli inquirenti hanno esaminato la scena del crimine. Non sono state raccolte prove.
24. Il 4 ottobre 2006 gli inquirenti hanno interrogato il sig.
25. Il 9 ottobre 2006 gli inquirenti hanno interrogato il primo richiedente, che ha descritto ciò che suo marito aveva indossato il giorno del suo rapimento.
26. Il 14 maggio 2009 il primo richiedente ha richiesto l'accesso al fascicolo penale. Quattro giorni dopo, il 18 maggio 2009, la richiesta è stata accolta.
27. Il 19 marzo 2010 gli investigatori hanno intervistato il direttore della fabbrica di mattoni. Egli ha sostenuto di aver appreso della scomparsa di Saitaksi Umarov il 16 febbraio 2005 e che il disordine sul posto di lavoro ha suggerito che era stato rapito.
28. Il 24 marzo 2010 al secondo richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima.
29. Il 29 marzo 2010 gli investigatori hanno raccolto campioni di sangue dalla sig.ra K.U., figlia del signor Umarov, per l'inclusione nella banca dati contenente campioni di DNA di parenti di persone scomparse.
30. Il 15 ottobre 2011 gli inquirenti si sono rifiutati di dichiarare il primo richiedente un richiedente civile nel procedimento penale.
31. Il 23 novembre 2011 tale decisione è stata annullata da un'autorità di vigilanza in quanto malfondata.
32. Il 29 novembre 2011 il primo richiedente è stato dichiarato un richiedente civile nel procedimento penale.
4. Procedimento contro gli inquirenti
33. Il 17 febbraio 2010, data imprecisata e il 21 ottobre 2010 il primo ricorrente ha presentato una denuncia al tribunale di Shali Town in merito alle decisioni degli inquirenti di sospensione dell'indagine, sostenendo di non aver adottato misure investigative di base. Il tribunale ha respinto le sue denunce rispettivamente il 3 marzo 2010, il 1o novembre 2010 e il 17 febbraio 2011.
B. Dedishev v. Russia (n. 46624/11)
34. Il ricorrente è il fratello del signor Pasha Dedishev, nato nel 1948.
1. Rapimento di Pasha Dedishev
35. Nel gennaio 2000 le forze federali russe hanno condotto un'estesa operazione militare contro i membri di gruppi armati illegali. La città è stata sottoposta a operazioni di bombardamento e di spazzamento. Entro la fine di gennaio 2000 le parti centrali della città erano sotto il controllo delle forze russe (vedi Umayeva v. Russia,n. 1200/03, 79, 4 dicembre 2008, e Khashiyev e Akayeva v. Russia,n. 57942/00 e 57945/00, n. 16 e 41, 24 febbraio 2005).
36. Il 17 gennaio 2000 un gruppo di militari di servizio armati di aspetto slavo, con uniformi mimetiche e dotato di radio portatili, è arrivato in città in un camion urali e ha arrestato diversi residenti tra cui Pasha Dedishev, Vasilkov, Ch. e G. Le circostanze del loro arresto sono descritte in Vasilkova v. Russia (vedi Isayeva e altri v. Russia [Comitato], n. 53075/08 e altre 9 persone, 55, 28 maggio 2019).
2. Indagine ufficiale sul rapimento
37. Come presentato dal ricorrente e non contestato dal governo, in una data non specificata nel giugno 2000 ha denunciato il rapimento del fratello alle autorità preposte all'applicazione della legge, ma gli inquirenti non hanno accettato la sua denuncia. Il giorno seguente i militari russi non identificati tentarono di arrestarlo.
38. Il 30 giugno 2000 la madre del sig.
39. Il 7 luglio 2000 gli inquirenti si sono rifiutati di aprire un procedimento penale.
40. Il 17 novembre 2000 tale decisione è stata annullata dalla procura di Grozny, che ha aperto il caso penale n. 12284 ai sensi dell'articolo 126 del CC (sequestro) nell'incidente.
41. Il 17 gennaio 2001 gli inquirenti hanno sospeso il procedimento per non aver identificato i responsabili.
42. Il 15 aprile 2001 la procura di Grozny ha aperto una causa penale separata n. 13064 ai sensi dell'articolo 126 del CC in seguito al rapimento di Sergey Vasilkov e G.
43. L'11 luglio 2001 la procura di Grozny ha aperto un nuovo caso penale n. 13103 nel rapimento di Sergey Vasilkov.
44. Nel frattempo, secondo la ricorrente, tra il 2000 e il 2003, sua sorella e sua madre hanno presentato denunce di rapimento a varie autorità, tra cui la sede del comandante militare del Caucaso settentrionale, il Comitato internazionale della Croce Rossa e il presidente ceceno. Sembra che a seguito di tali denunce, Pasha Dedishev sia stato incluso nell'elenco delle persone rapite nel caso penale n. 12284.
45. Il 6 novembre 2003 l'indagine è stata ripresa e i casi 13064 e 13103 sono stati uniti al caso n. 12284.
46. I successivi sviluppi del procedimento tra il 6 novembre 2003 e il 5 febbraio 2013 sono descritti in Isayeva e altri v. Russia, citati in precedenza: 67-76. In particolare, il procedimento è stato sospeso il 27 febbraio 2005 e poi ripreso il 1o dicembre 2009.
47. Successivamente, gli inquirenti hanno ripreso il procedimento il 16 giugno 2016 e li hanno nuovamente sospesi il 6 luglio 2016.
3. Procedimento giudiziario
48. Secondo la ricorrente, il 9 ottobre 2007 ha presentato una domanda d'accordo al tribunale distrettuale di Grozny chiedendo un risarcimento per danni pecuniari e non pecuniari, tra cui quello causato dal presunto rapimento del fratello da parte di militari federali. Successivamente, la sua richiesta è stata trasferita alla Corte Distrettuale di Leninskiy di Grozny perché il tribunale iniziale ha rifiutato la giurisdizione.
49. Il 6 aprile 2009 il Tribunale distrettuale di Leninskiy di Grozny ha respinto la denuncia come infondata. Tale decisione è stata confermata in appello dalla Corte suprema della Cecenia il 17 novembre 2009.
. . . . Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov v. Russia (n. 65054/11)
50. Il primo richiedente è la moglie del signor Uvays Shaipov, nato nel 1967, e la sorella del sig. Il secondo richiedente è il fratello di quest'ultimo.
1. Rapimento di Uvays Shaipov e eventi successivi
51. Il 23 maggio 2001 il signor Uvays Shaipov è stato fermato da uomini armati in un posto di blocco vicino all'insediamento Kirov-Yurt in Cecenia. I militari lo minacciarono di armi da fuoco, lo costrinsero ad un APC con il numero di registrazione K-149 e se ne andarono verso una destinazione sconosciuta.
52. L'evento si è svolto alla presenza di diversi testimoni, tra cui la sig.ra E.Kh, la madre del sig. Subito dopo seguì l'APC e lo vide entrare nella base di un'unità militare di stanza nel villaggio di Khatuni, in Cecenia.
53. Più tardi quel giorno un ufficiale militare che si presentò come Igor Strelkov informò i ricorrenti che Uvays Shaipov era stato portato al quartier generale delle forze federali a Khankala, in Cecenia.
54. Nel giugno 2001 Il signor Uvays Shaipov è stato trasmesso dalla televisione come complice di gruppi armati illegali in Cecenia arrestati dalle forze federali. Non è chiaro se le ricorrenti abbiano fornito tali informazioni agli inquirenti.
2. Indagine ufficiale sul rapimento
55. In una data imprecisata, i ricorrenti hanno informato le autorità del rapimento di Uvays Shaipov.
56. Il 18 luglio 2001 la procura distrettuale di Vedeno ha aperto la causa penale n. 73059 ai sensi dell'articolo 126 del CC (sequestro).
57. In una data non specificata nel settembre 2002 (il giorno esatto è illeggibile) la sig.ra E.Kh, madre del signor Uvays Shaipov, ha ottenuto lo status di vittima nel caso. È stata interrogata dagli inquirenti e ha confermato le circostanze del rapimento come descritto sopra.
58. In una data non specificata a settembre (il giorno preciso è anche illeggibile) gli inquirenti hanno interrogato uno dei testimoni, la sig.ra M.M., che ha confermato le circostanze della detenzione di Uvays Shaipov da parte dei militari al posto di blocco accanto a Kirov-Yurt.
59. Il 18 settembre 2002 l'indagine nel caso è stata sospesa per mancata identificazione degli autori.
60. Il 17 dicembre 2002 il fascicolo penale è stato distrutto da un incendio nell'ufficio del procuratore.
61. Il 27 ottobre 2004 il procuratore distrettuale di Vedeno ha ordinato che il materiale del caso penale fosse ripristinato e che l'indagine fosse ripresa.
62. Il 27 novembre 2004 l'indagine nel caso è stata sospesa.
63. Il governo non ha fornito alla Corte il materiale relativo al periodo successivo. Dai materiali presentati dalle ricorrenti risulta che l'indagine è progredita come segue.
64. Il 26 aprile 2005 l'indagine è stata ripresa. Successivamente, è stato sospeso il 26 maggio 2005, ripreso in una data non specificata tra il 2009 e il 2011 e di nuovo sospeso il 7 maggio 2011. Sembra che le ricorrenti non siano state informate dell'ordine di sospensione del 26 maggio 2005.
65. Il 15 aprile 2009 la sig.ra E.Kh ha chiesto al capo della commissione parlamentare cecena sulla ricerca di persone scomparse di assisterla nella ricerca di suo figlio. La richiesta è stata inoltrata agli inquirenti, che l'hanno informata il 20 maggio 2009 che il procedimento della causa era stato sospeso e che erano in corso attività di perquisizione operativa per stabilire dove si trova il signor Uvays Shaipov.
66. Il 28 aprile 2011 il primo richiedente ha presentato domanda di status di vittima. Gli inquirenti hanno accolto la sua richiesta il 5 maggio 2011.
67. Il 24 maggio 2011 gli inquirenti hanno accolto la richiesta del primo richiedente di consultare il fascicolo del caso.
3. Rapimento di Alvi Dzhankhotov
68. Intorno alle 4.30 del 31 marzo 2002 uomini armati in uniformi di mimetizzazione militare e passamontagna sono arrivati al blocco di appartamenti dei richiedenti nel villaggio di Chiri-Yurt in un camion URAL e un grigio UAz-452 con il numero di registrazione 835 XA/RUS 95. Un gruppo di circa cinque uomini ha fatto irruzione nell'appartamento di famiglia dove il signor Alvi Dzhankhotov viveva con la madre, la sig.ra R.Dzh., e la zia, la sig.ra L.A. Gli uomini lo costrinsero fuori e poi lo portarono via in una destinazione sconosciuta.
69. La stessa mattina altri due residenti di Chiri-Yurt, Ibragim Asabayev e Alkhazur Asabayev, sono stati rapiti in circostanze analoghe (vedi Israilovy and Others v. Russia, n. 34909/12 e altre 4 [CTE], 73, 24 settembre 2019).
70. Tre giorni dopo il rapimento, il 3 aprile 2002, i militari hanno riportato Alvi Dzhankhotov a Chiri-Yurt in un minivan dell'UA. Lo portarono nel suo appartamento e lo perquisirono. La signora L.A. era a casa e ha assistito alla perquisizione. In seguito, lo costrinsero a tornare nel veicolo e se ne andarono.
71. Il rapimento è avvenuto alla presenza di numerosi testimoni, tra cui i parenti e i vicini di Alvi Dzhankhotov.
4. Indagine ufficiale sul rapimento
72. Il 24 aprile 2002 un parente del sig.
73. Il 31 luglio 2002 la procura distrettuale di Shali ha aperto la causa penale n. 59174 ai sensi dell'articolo 126 del CC (sequestro).
74. Dai documenti presentati risulta che il 31 luglio 2002 (la data era anche indicata come 30 luglio 2002, il giorno prima dell'apertura del caso) al primo richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima.
75. Nella stessa data gli inquirenti hanno interrogato la sig.ra L.A., la zia del sig.
76. Il 31 luglio 2002 gli inquirenti hanno informato un parente del sig.
77. Il 27 agosto 2003 gli inquirenti hanno chiesto al comandante militare del distretto di Shali in Cecenia se i funzionari federali avessero arrestato il signor Alvi Dzhankhotov o avevano un veicolo UA-452 con numero di immatricolazione 835 XA/RUS 95. Il comandante rispose che l'unità militare subordinata non era stata coinvolta nell'arresto, e che il quartier generale militare aveva diversi veicoli UAz-452.
78. Il 31 settembre 2002 l'indagine nel caso è stata sospesa per mancata identificazione dei responsabili. Le ricorrenti non erano informate di tale decisione.
79. In vari anni tra il 2003 e il 2007 la madre di Alvi Dzhankhotov ha chiesto a diverse autorità, tra cui il procuratore generale russo, l'ufficio generale del procuratore generale nel circuito federale meridionale, il procuratore ceceno e il governo ceceno di assisterla nella ricerca di suo figlio. Le sue richieste sono state inoltrate agli inquirenti, che hanno risposto il 17 maggio 2003, il 14 luglio 2003, l'8 febbraio 2006 e il 24 marzo 2007, che le attività di ricerca operativa per stabilire dove si trovava in suo figlio erano in corso.
80. Il 24 maggio 2011 gli inquirenti hanno accolto la richiesta del primo richiedente di avere accesso al fascicolo penale.
81. Il 19 dicembre 2011 hanno respinto la sua richiesta di essere fornita da un documento specifico del fascicolo del caso.
82. Il 25 giugno 2012 il primo richiedente ha chiesto informazioni sugli sviluppi del caso. Il giorno successivo è stata informata della sospensione del procedimento il 31 settembre 2002 per non aver identificato i responsabili.
83. Il 10 settembre 2012 gli inquirenti hanno chiesto all'ROVD di Shali intensificare la ricerca di Alvi Dzhankhotov, in particolare per identificare il testimone del rapimento e degli autori.
D. Chapanovy v. Russia (n. 76566/11)
84. Il primo e il secondo richiedente erano i genitori di Lema Chapanov, nato nel 1974, e Aslan Chapanov, nato nel 1979. Sono morti dopo che la domanda era stata presentata alla Corte. Dopo la morte del secondo richiedente, suo figlio Ramzan Chapanov (fratello di Lema Chapanov e Aslan Chapanov) ha espresso il desiderio di perseguire la domanda al suo posto.
85. Il terzo e il quarto richiedente sono i fratelli di Lema Chapanov e Aslan Chapanov.
1. Rapimento dei fratelli Chapanov
86. Intorno alle 5 del 12 settembre 2000 (nei documenti presentati la data era anche indicata il 15 settembre 2000) la famiglia Chapanov era a casa nel villaggio di Alkhazurovo, in Cecenia, quando un gruppo di una ventina di uomini armati in uniformi mimetiche e passamontagna arrivato in due APC e un veicolo bianco VA 2106. Dopo aver perquisito la casa e controllato i documenti di identità della famiglia, gli uomini hanno informato i ricorrenti che avrebbero tratte i fratelli Chapanov (in particolare, il signor Lema Chapanov, Aslan Chapanov, nonché il terzo e il quarto richiedente) e li hanno alla città di Urusmartan per ulteriori controlli di identità.
87. Gli uomini hanno ordinato ai ricorrenti di mostrare loro i documenti di proprietà per l'auto di famiglia, una Niva con il numero di immatricolazione 8405 MT parcheggiato nel cortile della loro casa. Dopo aver preso i documenti, gli uomini ordinarono ai fratelli di seguire gli APC nell'auto di famiglia.
88. Sulla strada principale tra il villaggio di Goyskoye e Urus-Martan il convoglio si fermò. I militari ordinarono ai fratelli di scendere dalla loro auto e di mettere le magliette sopra la testa. Poi li hanno messi in uno degli APC e li hanno spinti in una destinazione sconosciuta a circa tre ore di distanza.
89. Al loro arrivo ai fratelli fu ordinato di uscire dall'APC e togliersi le magliette dalla testa. I fratelli videro una vasta area con un gran numero di veicoli militari e uomini armati che parlavano russo senza accento.
90. I militari hanno poi bendato i fratelli, legato le mani dietro la schiena e li hanno messi nelle celle. Quando uno dei fratelli chiese dove si trovavano, un compagno di cella rispose che si trovavano a Khankala, dove si trovava il quartier generale delle forze federali russe.
91. Il giorno dopo gli uomini hanno messo il quarto richiedente in un APC con un numero di registrazione contenente le cifre 823 e lo hanno riportato ad Alkhazurovo. Dopo aver perquisito la casa di famiglia dei richiedenti, i militari hanno lasciato il quarto richiedente alla periferia del villaggio.
92. Il terzo ricorrente è stato rilasciato una settimana dopo e tornò a casa. Secondo le sue dichiarazioni, durante la sua detenzione a Khankala è stato detenuto nella stessa cella di uno dei suoi fratelli, Aslan Chapanov.
93. Da allora Lema Chapanov e Aslan Chapanov non sono più stati visti.
94. Il rapimento è avvenuto alla presenza di diversi testimoni, tra cui i ricorrenti, i loro parenti e i loro vicini. Le ricorrenti hanno presentato dichiarazioni scritte dei sig.
2. Indagine ufficiale sul rapimento di Lema Chapanov e Aslan Chapanov
95. L'8 dicembre 2000 la prima ricorrente ha informato le autorità del rapimento dei suoi figli e del furto della loro auto Niva da parte dei rapitori. Ha chiesto assistenza nella ricerca dei suoi parenti scomparsi e protezione per aver presentato la denuncia di rapimento.
96. Il 15 febbraio 2001 la procura distrettuale Urus-Martan ha aperto la causa penale n. 25025 ai sensi dell'articolo 126 del CC (sequestro).
97. Un raffronto dei documenti presentati dalle parti ha dimostrato che il governo non ha fornito alla Corte il fascicolo penale nella sua interezza, nonostante la sua richiesta in tal senso. Per quanto si possa vedere dai documenti in possesso della Corte, il procedimento può essere riassunto come segue.
98. Il 15 aprile 2001 l'indagine nel caso è stata sospesa per mancata identificazione degli autori. È stato successivamente ripreso l'11 agosto 2001, il 18 marzo 2002 e il 19 maggio 2006 a seguito delle critiche dei procuratori di alto livello, per poi essere sospeso rispettivamente l'11 settembre 2001, il 25 aprile 2003 e il 19 giugno 2006.
99. Nel frattempo, il 2 e l'8 agosto 2001, al partner di Lema Chapanov e al quarto richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima nel procedimento penale e interrogato. La dichiarazione del partner del signor Lema Chapanov era simile alle osservazioni dei ricorrenti alla Corte. La copia della quarta dichiarazione presentata alla Corte era illeggibile.
100. Nell'aprile 2003 gli inquirenti hanno inviato una serie di richieste a varie autorità di contrasto per verificare se i fratelli Chapanov fossero stati detenuti durante un'operazione speciale. Le risposte ricevute indicavano che tali autorità non disponevano di informazioni in merito.
101. Il 2 ottobre 2003 il primo richiedente ha chiesto a diversi funzionari del distretto di Urus-Martan, tra cui il comandante militare distrettuale, il procuratore militare, il procuratore e il capo del ROVD, di assisterla nella definizione di dove si trovano i suoi figli. . Non è chiaro se abbia ricevuto una risposta.
102. Il 17 maggio 2006 la prima ricorrente ha chiesto al procuratore Urus-Martan di concedere la sua vittima nel procedimento penale, di aggiornarla sullo stato di avanzamento dell'indagine e di fornirle una copia della decisione di aprire un procedimento penale datato 15 febbraio 2001.
103. Il 22 maggio 2006 al primo richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima e interrogato. Ha confermato le circostanze del rapimento dei suoi figli e ha detto che non aveva informazioni sulla loro posizione o sull'auto Niva.
104. Il 5 giugno 2006 gli investigatori hanno chiesto al capo deldipartimento degli interni urus Martan di identificare la targa di immatricolazione e per i dettagli dell'auto Niva appartenente ai fratelli Chapanov. L'esito della richiesta è sconosciuto.
105. Il 9 giugno 2006 l'investigatore ha interrogato il quarto ricorrente, che ha descritto in dettaglio le circostanze del rapimento dei fratelli.
106. Il 15 giugno 2006, su richiesta del primo richiedente, il tribunale urusMartan Town ha dichiarato morti Lema Chapanov e Aslan Chapanov.
107. In una data imprecisata nell'agosto 2006, la prima ricorrente ha chiesto all'ONG Memorial di assistersi nella ricerca dei suoi figli. Il 31 agosto 2006 l'ONG ha trasmesso la sua richiesta agli inquirenti, che il 16 ottobre 2006 ha risposto che il procedimento era stato sospeso, ma che le attività di ricerca operativa nel caso erano in corso.
108. Il 7 luglio 2010 e il 4 aprile 2011 la prima ricorrente ha chiesto agli inquirenti di riprendere il procedimento nel caso penale e di concedere il suo pieno accesso al fascicolo del caso. Il 12 luglio 2010 e il 6 aprile 2011 sono state respinte.
109. Il 28 luglio 2011 il primo richiedente ha chiesto il corso del procedimento. Non è chiaro se abbia ricevuto una risposta.
3. Procedimento contro gli inquirenti
110. Il 6 giugno 2011 la prima ricorrente ha denunciato al tribunale della città di Urus-Martan di averle negato l'accesso al fascicolo penale. L'esito del procedimento è sconosciuto.
E. Gerimovy v. Russia (n. 8435/12)
111. I ricorrenti sono parenti stretti del sig. Il primo richiedente è la moglie, mentre il secondo e il terzo richiedente sono i suoi figli.
1. Rapimento di Akhyad Gerimov
112. Verso le 15 del 2 giugno 2000 Akhyad Gerimov era in viaggio per lavorare presso lo stabilimento Lenina di Grozny su un'auto VA 2106 con il numero di immatricolazione A-05-VA-347. Sulla strada in cui ha preso un conoscente, signora R.I.
113. Nel distretto di Grozny, in un posto di blocco gestito da militari russi, diversi uomini armati in uniformi mimetiche con bandane che coprivano la testa (tipicamente indossate dai militari di Stato) hanno fermato l'auto, puntando le armi contro Akhyad Gerimov e la sig.ra R.I. e ordinò loro di uscire. Poi costrinsero a Akhyad Gerimov un APC che aspetta nelle vicinanze e portò via lui e la sua auto.
114. La sig.ra R.I. è stata portata dietro il posto di blocco e vi è rimasta fino alle 22. Fu poi bendata, legata per le mani e portata via in un altro APC. Al suo arrivo è stata messa in una tenda. Ha visto carri armati ed elicotteri nelle vicinanze. Pochi minuti dopo ha sentito il signor Akhyad Gerimov in una tenda vicina urlare e chiedere aiuto. La signora R.I. è stata poi portata in tenda, interrogata e picchiata.
115. Alle 9 del mattino del giorno successivo la sig.ra R.I. è stata presa bendata e con le mani legate in un APC al centro di Grozny e rilasciata. Gli uomini presero tutti i suoi gioielli e le dissero di non parlare con nessuno dell'incidente.
2. Indagine ufficiale sul rapimento
116. Il 23 giugno 2000 la procura di Grozny ha aperto la causa penale n. 12073 ai sensi dell'articolo 126 del CC (sequestro). Il governo non ha presentato tutti i documenti del fascicolo penale, nonostante la richiesta della Corte in tal senso. Di conseguenza, non è chiaro in quale data l'inchiesta sia stata sospesa o ripresa e se le ricorrenti siano state o meno informate delle decisioni pertinenti. Dalle osservazioni delle parti risulta che il procedimento è progredito come segue.
117. Nell'agosto 2000 gli inquirenti hanno preso le dichiarazioni del primo richiedente e della sig.ra R.I. La prima dichiarazione della ricorrente era simile alle osservazioni delle ricorrenti alla Corte. Tra gli altri dettagli ha dato la modella e il numero di registrazione dell'auto del marito.
118. In una data non specificata nell'agosto 2000 (la data del documento è illeggibile), in risposta a una richiesta di informazioni, il Ministero dell'Interno ha informato gli inquirenti che il posto di blocco era stato gestito da un'unità delle forze speciali della polizia di Irkutsk.
119. Nel 2001 il primo richiedente ha inoltrato diverse richieste alla procura di Grozny e alla Procura generale russa chiedendo assistenza per stabilire dove si trova Akhyad Gerimov.
120. Il 21 agosto 2001 la Procura russa ha informato la ricorrente che la sua richiesta era stata trasmessa alla Procura cecena.
121. Il 13 febbraio 2002 gli inquirenti hanno interrogato il primo ricorrente in merito al rapimento. Ha confermato la sua precedente dichiarazione.
122. In una data non specificata nel marzo 2003 al primo richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima nel procedimento penale. Il 27 marzo 2003 e il 20 maggio 2004 è stata nuovamente interrogata. Ha ripetuto le sue precedenti dichiarazioni.
123. Il 7 agosto 2006, in risposta a una richiesta di informazioni sull'avanzamento dell'indagine sul rapimento di Akhyad Gerimov, i ricorrenti sono stati informati dall'ufficio del procuratore distrettuale di Avodskoy che non stava attualmente indagando sull'incidente.
124. Il 6 ottobre 2008 l'investigatore del comitato investigativo della Cecenia ha interrogato la sig.ra R.I. in merito al rapimento.
125. Il 23 aprile 2010 il dipartimento distrettuale di Leninskiy del Comitato Investigativo ha informato i ricorrenti che la procura distrettuale di Avodskoy non aveva trasmesso loro il caso penale relativo al rapimento del parente per indagine.
126. Il 4 maggio 2010 il Comitato investigativo della Cecenia ha separato diversi documenti relativi al rapimento di Akhyad Gerimov dal fascicolo del caso penale n. 12073 e ha avviato una nuova indagine pre-inchiesta sul reato indicato dall'articolo 162 del CC ( rapina).
127. Il 7 giugno 2010 il Comitato investigativo della Cecenia ha aperto una nuova indagine penale, questa volta sotto il numero 21027, sul rapimento di Akhyad Gerimov (articolo 126 del CC (sequestro)) e sul furto della sua auto da parte dei rapitori (articolo 162 del CC ( rapina)).
128. Il 29 giugno 2010 al primo richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima nel caso penale n. 21027.
129. Il 7 agosto 2010 il procedimento penale è stato sospeso per mancata identificazione degli autori. Successivamente, è stato ripreso il 21 novembre 2011 e il 6 aprile 2015 e poi sospeso il 20 dicembre 2011 e il 16 aprile 2015 rispettivamente.
130. Il 15 settembre 2011 la prima ricorrente ha chiesto agli inquirenti di consentirle di accedere al fascicolo d'inchiesta. La sua richiesta è stata accolta dopo che si è lamentata dinanzi ai tribunali (cfr. paragrafo 132 sotto).
131. Il 6 aprile 2015 al secondo richiedente è stato concesso lo status di vittima nel procedimento penale e interrogato come testimone. La sua dichiarazione era coerente con le precedenti osservazioni delle ricorrenti.
3. Procedimento contro gli inquirenti
132. Il 15 novembre 2011 la prima ricorrente ha presentato una denuncia al Tribunale distrettuale di Staropromyslovskiy di Grozny in merito alla mancata risposta degli inquirenti alla sua richiesta relativa all'accesso al fascicolo penale e alla decisione di sospendere l'indagine.
133. Il 25 novembre 2011 il giudice ha dichiarato che alla ricorrente sarebbe stato consentito l'accesso al fascicolo del caso. Per quanto riguarda la denuncia contro la decisione di sospendere l'inchiesta, essa è stata respinta in quanto quattro giorni prima, il 21 novembre 2011, gli inquirenti avevano ripreso il procedimento.
II. LEGGE RILEVANTE E MATERIALE INTERNAZIONALE
134. Per una sintesi del diritto interno pertinente e delle relazioni internazionali e nazionali sulle sparizioni in Cecenia e Inuscezia, vedere Aslakhanova e altri contro la Russia (n. 2944/06, 8300/07, 50184/07, 332/08 e 42509/10, 43-59 usd e 69-84, 18 dicembre 2012).
la legge
I. APPLICAZIONI CONFORMI
135. Conformemente all'articolo 42 , 1 del Regolamento, la Corte decide di aderire alle domande, data la loro analoga situazione di fatto e di diritto.
II. LOCUS STANDI
136. La Corte rileva che i primi due ricorrenti di Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) sono decaduti dopo che la domanda era stata presentata alla Corte e che il figlio del secondo ricorrente, ramzan Chapanov, ha espresso la volontà di proseguire la domanda al suo posto (cfr. paragrafo 84 sopra). Il governo si è opposto, affermando che Ramzan Chapanov non aveva assistito al rapimento né partecipato al procedimento penale. Secondo il governo, egli non poteva quindi pretendere di essere vittima delle presunte violazioni.
137. La Corte autorizza normalmente i parenti di decorrere da una domanda, a condizione che abbiano un legittimo interesse, in cui il richiedente originale sia destato la morte dopo aver ritirato la domanda alla Corte (cfr. Murray v. i Paesi Bassi [GC], no.10511/10, 79, 26 aprile 2016, e Maylenskiy v. Russia,n. 12646/15, : 27, 4 ottobre 2016; per i casi riguardanti rapimenti in Cecenia vedere Sultygov e Altri v. Russia,nos. Per quanto riguarda l'oggetto della domanda e tutte le informazioni in suo possesso, la Corte ritiene che il figlio del secondo richiedente, e il fratello degli uomini rapiti, Ramzan Chapanov, abbiano un legittimo interesse a perseguire la domanda e che pertanto abbia il locus di cui all'articolo 34 della Convenzione il luogo necessario.
III. CONFORMITÀ ALLA REGOLA DEI SEI MESI
A. Le candidature delle parti
1. Il governo
138. Nelle loro osservazioni, il governo ha sostenuto che le ricorrenti avevano presentato alla Corte diverse anni dopo il rapimento dei loro parenti e più di sei mesi dopo la data in cui avrebbero dovuto essere a conoscenza della inefficacia delle indagini successive, o più di sei mesi dopo l'ultima decisione degli inquirenti. Il governo ha inoltre sottolineato che le ricorrenti erano rimaste passive e non avevano mantenuto i contatti con le autorità inquirenti per un notevole periodo di tempo. Secondo il governo, tutte le domande dovrebbero essere dichiarate inammissibili come portate "fuori tempo".
2. Le ricorrenti
139. Le ricorrenti hanno sostenuto di aver rispettato la regola dei sei mesi. Avevano preso tutte le misure possibili entro un termine ragionevole per avviare le ricerche dei loro parenti scomparsi e assistere le autorità nel procedimento. A Dedishev (n. 46624/11) la ricorrente ha riconosciuto un ritardo nell'insorgere una denuncia formale di rapimento presso le autorità, ma ha dichiarato che era dovuto alle ostilità nella regione, al rifiuto delle autorità di registrare la denuncia di rapimento e al successivo tentativo di arrestarlo (cfr. paragrafo 37 sopra). Egli ha inoltre spiegato che tra il 2007 e il 2009 aveva avuto seri problemi di salute e aveva subito un trattamento ospedaliero, che aveva influenzato la sua capacità di mantenere un contatto regolare con gli inquirenti.
140. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre sostenuto che non vi erano stati ritardi eccessivi o inspiegabili nell'invio delle loro domande alla Corte, che erano state presentate non appena avevano ritenuto inefficaci le indagini nazionali. Secondo loro, il conflitto armato in corso in Cecenia in epoca prima di tutto li aveva portati a credere che i ritardi investigativi fossero inevitabili. Solo con il passare del tempo e con la mancanza di informazioni da parte delle autorità inquirenti che avevano cominciato a dubitare dell'efficacia delle indagini e avevano iniziato a cercare assistenza legale gratuita per valutare l'efficacia del procedimento e poi, successivamente, di presentare le loro domande alla Corte senza indebito ritardo.
B. Valutazione della Corte
1. Principi generali
141. Una sintesi dei principi relativi al rispetto della regola dei sei mesi nei casi di scomparsa può essere trovata in Sultygov e in altri, citati in precedenza, 36974, 9 ottobre 2014.
2. Applicazione dei principi ai casi in es.
142. Per quanto riguarda le circostanze delle cause attuali, la Corte osserva che a Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11) i ricorrenti hanno presentato la loro domanda alla Corte entro meno di sette anni dall'incidente e all'avvio dell'indagine correlata (vedi Varnava e altri contro la Turchia [GC], n. 16064/90 e 8 altri, 1666, ECH 200).
143. Nel resto delle domande in corso tale periodo variava tra i dieci anni e i cinque mesi e undici anni e sette mesi (era di circa undici anni e sei mesi a Dedishev (n. 46624/11); dieci anni e cinque mesi e dieci anni e nove mesi a Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11); undici anni e due mesi a Chapanovy (n. 76566/11); e undici anni e sette mesi a Gerimovy (n. 8435/12)).
144. La Corte osserva inoltre che in Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) le autorità sono rese a conoscenza dei rapimenti entro diverse settimane dai rispettivi incidenti, che possono essere considerati come alloggiare le denunce ufficiali senza indebito ritardo data la situazione al momento materiale.
145. A Dedishev (n. 46624/11) il governo non ha contestato la proposta del ricorrente di aver informato le autorità del rapimento del fratello nel giugno 2000, ma le autorità si erano rifiutate di accettare la sua richiesta e il giorno successivo aveva tentato di arrestarlo. Tenendo conto di ciò, della situazione di conflitto armato nella regione e del presunto coinvolgimento delle autorità nel reato perpetrato, la Corte accetta la spiegazione della ricorrente che circostanze eccezionali giustificavano il ritardo. Non sembra che abbia privato l'indagine su prospettive di successo.
146. La Corte osserva inoltre che in ciascuna delle domande le autorità hanno avviato un'indagine penale sulle denunce di rapimento delle ricorrenti che sono state ripetutamente sospese e poi riprese a seguito delle critiche degli inquirenti di alto livello. In ogni caso, l'indagine era ancora in corso al momento della domanda presentata alla Corte (cfr. paragrafo 5 sopra).
147. La Corte rileva inoltre alcune pause nel procedimento penale (cfr. in Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11) paragrafo 22 di cui sopra; nel paragrafo 46 di Dedishev (n. 46624/11) di cui sopra; in Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11) paragrafi 64 e 786464; in Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) paragrafo 98; e in Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) paragrafi 122 e 124 sopra), mentre le indagini sono state sospese. Il più significativo di loro, che sembra aver superato i cinque anni (le date esatte di sospensione e ripresa non erano sempre chiare), ha avuto luogo a Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11) e Chapanovy (n. 76566/11).
148. Tuttavia, dai documenti presentati risulta che in ciascuno di tali casi i ricorrenti e gli altri parenti di coloro che sono stati rapiti non sono rimasti passivi. Nel primo caso, hanno contattato la commissione parlamentare cechena per la ricerca delle persone scomparse, il procuratore generale russo, l'ufficio del procuratore generale nel circuito federale meridionale, il procuratore ceceno e il governo ceceno, chiedendo loro assistenza nella ricerca dei loro parenti. Le loro richieste sono state successivamente inoltrate agli inquirenti, che li hanno poi rassicurati sul fatto che le misure di ricerca operativa erano in corso (cfr. paragrafi 79-82 sopra). Nel secondo caso, in diverse occasioni le ricorrenti hanno presentato domanda agli inquirenti sia direttamente che con l'assistenza dell'ONG Memorial. Proprio come nel primo caso, gli inquirenti hanno risposto affermando che la ricerca del loro parente era in corso. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre presentato una denuncia ai giudici di essere stato loro negato il pieno accesso al fascicolo (cfr. paragrafi 107-110 di cui sopra).
149. Nel complesso, i documenti presentati dimostrano che le ricorrenti, in ogni caso, dimostravano chiaramente il loro interesse per la ricerca dei loro parenti scomparsi e adoperavano misure per mantenere i contatti con le autorità.
150. Nel valutare le circostanze dei casi, la Corte tiene conto del fatto che tutte le domande sono state presentate entro dodici anni dall'altro degli incidenti (contrasto Dzhabrailova e altri v. Russia, 3752/13 e altre 9, il 7 maggio 2019, in cui la Corte ha dichiarato domande inammissibili presentate più di dodici anni dopo il rapimento dei parenti dei ricorrenti) e che le autorità sono venute a conoscenza dei rapimenti senza ritardi. Essa rileva inoltre gli sforzi delle ricorrenti per la ripresa del procedimento dometrato e la loro posizione attiva nel procedimento. Essa conclude pertanto che le ricorrenti hanno agito diligentemente e hanno mantenuto i contatti con gli inquirenti.
151. Dato che le indagini erano complesse e riguardavano accuse molto gravi, la Corte conclude che era ragionevole che i ricorrenti attendessero sviluppi che avrebbero potuto risolvere questioni cruciali o giuridiche (cfr. El-Masri contro l'ex Repubblica jugoslava di Macedonia [GC], n. 39630/09, n. 142, ECHR 2012). I ritardi nell'apertura dei procedimenti penali, o le pause nel procedimento, non possono pertanto essere interpretati come il mancato rispetto del requisito semestrale da parte delle ricorrenti (cfr. Abdulkhadzhiyeva e Abdulkhadzhiyev v. Russia,n. 40001/08, 9, 15 e 67 USD, 4 ottobre 2016, in cui il ritardo nell'alloggio di una denuncia formale ammontava a otto mesi, e contrastano Doshuyeva e Yusupov v. Russia (dec.), 58055/10, 41-47, 31 usd 2016, dove i ricorrenti non hanno contattato le indagini autorità per circa otto anni e tre mesi, mentre l'indagine era apparentemente danneggiata).
152. Alla luce di quanto sopra, e tenendo conto delle argomentazioni presentate dalle parti, la Corte conclude che le indagini sui casi in corso, seppur sporadiche, sono state condotte durante i periodi in questione, e che essa è soddisfatta delle spiegazioni presentate dai ricorrenti (vedi Varnava e altri, citati in precedenza, 166). Di conseguenza, hanno rispettato la regola dei sei mesi.
IV. LE REGOLE CONFORMI
Le candidature delle parti
1. Il governo
153. Il governo ha sostenuto che le ricorrenti non avevano esaurito i rimedi interni per quanto riguarda le loro denunce relative al rapimento dei loro parenti in quanto non avevano presentato un reclamo ai tribunali circa le azioni o le omissioni dell'indagine Autorità.
2. Le ricorrenti
154. Le ricorrenti hanno dichiarato che presentare denunce contro gli inquirenti non avrebbe rimediato alle carenze del procedimento e che le indagini penali si erano rivelate inefficaci.
B. Valutazione della Corte
155. La Corte ha già concluso che l'indagine inefficace sulle sparizioni avvenute in Cecenia tra il 2000 e il 2006 costituisce un problema sistemico, e che le indagini penali non sono un rimedio efficace al riguardo (cfr. Aslakhanova e altri),citati in precedenza, 217).
156. In tali circostanze, e notando l'assenza di progressi tangibili in nessuna delle indagini penali sulla rapimento dei parenti dei ricorrenti, la Corte conclude che tale obiezione deve essere respinta, poiché il rimedio proposto dal governo non sarebbe stato efficace nelle circostanze (per un ragionamento simile, vedi Ortsuyeva e altri contro la Russia, nos. 3340/08 e 24689/10, 79, 22 novembre 201).
V. VALUTAZIONE DELLE PROVE E INDIVIDUAZIONE DEI FATTI
A. Le candidature delle parti
1. Il governo
157. Il governo non ha contestato i fatti essenziali alla base di ciascuna domanda, ma ha sostenuto che le accuse delle ricorrenti si basavano su ipotesi, in quanto non vi erano prove che dimostrassero oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio che gli agenti statali fossero stati coinvolti nella presunti rapimenti, o che i parenti dei ricorrenti erano morti.
2. Le ricorrenti
158. Le ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che era stato accertato "al di là di ragionevoli dubbi" che gli uomini che avevano preso i loro parenti erano stati agenti statali. A sostegno di tale affermazione, essi hanno fatto riferimento alle prove contenute nelle loro osservazioni e documenti dei fascicoli di indagine penale divulgati dal governo. Essi hanno inoltre sostenuto che ciascuno di essi aveva fatto un caso primario che i loro parenti erano stati rapiti da agenti statali, ma i fatti essenziali alla base delle loro denunce non erano stati contestati dal governo. Data la mancanza di notizie attendibili sui loro parenti per lungo tempo e la natura potenzialmente letale della detenzione non riconosciuta in Cecenia al momento opportuno, hanno chiesto alla Corte di considerare i loro parenti morti.
B. Valutazione della Corte
1. Principi generali
159. Una sintesi dei principi relativi alla valutazione delle prove e all'istituzione di fatti nei casi di scomparsa, e la natura potenzialmente letale di tali incidenti, può essere trovata in Sultygov e in altri, citati in precedenza, 39396.
2. Applicazione dei suddetti principi ai casi attuali
160. Per quanto riguarda le circostanze delle cause attualmente d'esalto e, tenuto conto di tutto il materiale, comprese le copie dei documenti dei relativi fascicoli penali presentati dalle parti, la Corte rileva che le ricorrenti hanno presentato casi di prima facie. che i loro parenti sono stati rapiti da agenti statali nelle circostanze sopra stabilite. La Corte rileva che ciascuno dei rapimenti ha avuto luogo in zone sotto il controllo dello Stato.
161. A Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11) il villaggio della ricorrente è stato spesso "spazzato" dalle forze federali. Prima del rapimento di Saitaksi Umarov, otto membri della sua unità di autodifesa erano stati arrestati da agenti statali e poi trovati morti (vedi Bitiyeva e altri, citati sopra, n. 7-24). Gli autori del rapimento di Saitaksi Umarov hanno utilizzato veicoli militari e sono passati attraverso posti di blocco inosservati nonostante vi sia un coprifuoco (cfr. paragrafi 8-13 sopra).
162. A Dedishev (n. 46624/11) il parente del ricorrente è stato rapito da un gruppo di militari armati di aspetto slavo, con uniformi mimetiche e dotato di radio portatili. Sembra che, nella stessa data, lo stesso gruppo di uomini sia stato coinvolto nell'arresto di un altro residente locale, Sergey Vasilkov (cfr. paragrafi 35 e 36 sopra).
163. A Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11) Uvays Shaipov è stato rapito a un posto di blocco militare da uomini armati con un APC. Poco dopo un uomo che si presentava come ufficiale militare informò i parenti di Uvays Shaipov che quest'ultimo era stato portato al quartier generale militare di Khankala (cfr. paragrafi 51-53 sopra). Alvi Dzhankhotov è stato rapito da uomini in uniforme militare di camuffamento e passamontagna quella mattina con altri due residenti dello stesso villaggio, Ibragim Asabayev e Alkhazur Asabayev. In Israilovy and Others (citato sopra) la Corte ha stabilito che quest'ultimo era stato arrestato e preso in custodia da agenti statali (vedi Israilovy e altri, citati sopra, 141). Inoltre, tre giorni dopo i rapitori lo portarono nel suo appartamento per cercarlo, e dopo averlo fatto, lo portò via di nuovo (vedi paragrafi 68-71 sopra).
164. In Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) gli autori, indossando uniformi mimetiche e passamontagna, sono arrivati a casa dei richiedenti in due APC e con un veicolo VA. Le loro azioni corrispondevano a quelle utilizzate dalle forze federali durante le operazioni speciali, che sono state esaminate dalla Corte in molti casi analoghi (cfr. paragrafi 86-94 sopra; vedi anche Kukurkhoyeva e altri, citati sopra, n. 27, 31, 64, 69 e 182; e Tazuyeva e altri v. Russia [Comitato], nos. 36962/09 e altri 9, 71, 72, 85, 86, 105, 106 e 171, 22 gennaio 2019).
165. A Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) il parente del ricorrente è stato rapito da uomini armati in un APC a un posto di blocco militare, simile al signor Uvays Shaipov. La sig.ra R.I., detenuta con il parente della ricorrente, ha visto elicotteri e carri armati nel luogo della loro successiva detenzione (cfr. paragrafi 112-115 sopra).
166. La Corte rileva inoltre che, nei casi in esulti, le autorità inquirenti hanno accettato di fatto le principali versioni degli eventi presentati dalle ricorrenti e ha adottato misure per verificare se gli agenti statali fossero stati effettivamente coinvolti nei rapimenti inviando richieste di informazioni alle autorità competenti.
167. Nelle loro osservazioni alla Corte, il governo non ha fornito una spiegazione soddisfacente e convincente per gli eventi in questione o una versione alternativa degli eventi. Non hanno quindi scaricato il loro onere della prova.
168. Tenendo conto dei principi generali sopra citati, delle circostanze e delle conclusioni della Corte in Bitiyeva e in altri, Isayeva e altri e altri (tutti citati sopra), la Corte rileva che i parenti dei ricorrenti sono stati presi in custodia da agenti statali durante operazioni speciali. Data la mancanza di notizie attendibili su Saitaksi Umarov, Pasha Dedishev, Uvays Shaipov, Alvi Dzhankhotov, Lema Chapanhoov, Aslan Chapanov e Akhyad Gerimov dopo la loro detenzione, e la natura potenzialmente tale minaccia di vita di tale detenzione, essi possono essere presunti morti dopo la loro detenzione non riconosciuta.
VI. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 2 DELLA CONVENZIONE
169. Le ricorrenti denunciavano, ai sensi dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione, che i loro parenti erano scomparsi dopo essere stati arrestati da agenti statali e che le autorità nazionali non avevano effettuato indagini efficaci sulla questione. L'articolo 2 recita come segue:
"1. Il diritto di tutti alla vita è tutelato dalla legge. Nessuno può essere privato della sua vita, salvo intenzionalmente nell'esecuzione di una sentenza di un tribunale in seguito alla sua condanna di un reato per il quale questa pena è prevista dalla legge..."
A. Le candidature delle parti
170. In Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11), Dedishev (n. 46624/11) e Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11) il governo ha sostenuto che le denunce delle ricorrenti dovrebbero essere respinte come infondate. A Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) essi hanno affermato che l'articolo 2 della Convenzione era inapplicabile alla denuncia dei ricorrenti in materia di rapimenti e che doveva essere esaminata ai sensi dell'articolo 5 della Convenzione, in quanto non vi erano prove della morte dei parenti dei ricorrenti. A questo proposito, essi hanno fatto riferimento al caso di Kurt v. Turchia (25 maggio 1998, N. 10109, Relazioni di Giudizi e Decisioni 1998III). A Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) il governo ha inoltre sostenuto che il semplice fatto che l'indagine non avesse prodotto alcun risultato specifico, o ne avesse forniti solo di tipo limitato, non significava che fosse stata inefficace. Essi hanno sostenuto che erano state adottate tutte le misure necessarie per adempiere all'obbligo positivo ai sensi dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione.
171. Le ricorrenti hanno mantenuto le loro denunce, sostenendo che i loro parenti erano stati rapiti e intenzionalmente privati della loro vita in circostanze che comportavano una violazione dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione. Essi hanno inoltre sostenuto che le indagini sugli incidenti non erano all'altezza delle norme stabilite dalla Convenzione.
B. Valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
172. Alla luce delle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte ritiene che le denunce sollevino gravi questioni di fatto e di diritto ai sensi della Convenzione, la cui determinazione richiede un esame del merito. Le denunce ai sensi dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione devono pertanto essere dichiarate ammissibili.
2. Meriti
a) Presunta violazione del diritto all'eta' dei parenti dei richiedenti
173. La Corte osserva che è indiscusso dalle parti che il luogo in cui i parenti dei ricorrenti rimanevano inspiegati dal momento del loro rapimento all'alloggio delle domande presso la Corte. Si pone la questione se, contrariamente a quanto del governo, l'articolo 2 della Convenzione sia applicabile alle situazioni dei ricorrenti.
174. La Corte ha già esaminato l'obiezione del governo in casi analoghi riguardanti presunti rapimenti da parte di agenti statali e l'ha respinta (si veda, ad esempio, Sultygov e altri, citati sopra, 441-42; e Dzhabrailov e Altri contro la Russia,nos. 8620/09 e altre 8 persone,n. 317-18, 27 febbraio 2014), di conseguenza, la Corte rileva che si applica l'articolo 2 della Convenzione e che l'obiezione del governo al riguardo dovrebbe essere respinta.
175. Sulla base di quanto sopra, e tenendo presente che è già stato constatato che in tutte le domande d'esame i parenti dei ricorrenti possono essere presunti morti in seguito alla loro detenzione non riconosciuta da parte di agenti statali (cfr. paragrafo 168 sopra), in assenza di qualsiasi giustificazione avanzata dal governo, la Corte rileva che la morte dei parenti dei ricorrenti può essere attribuita allo Stato e che vi è stata una violazione dell'aspetto sostanziale dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione nei confronti di Saitaksi Umarov. , Pasha Dedishev, Uvays Shaipov, Alvi Dzhankhotov, Lema Chapanov, Aslan Chapanov e Akhyad Gerimov.
b) Presunta inadeguatezza delle indagini sui rapimenti
176. La Corte ha già constatato che un'indagine penale non costituisce un rimedio efficace per quanto riguarda le sparizioni, in particolare quelle avvenute in Cecenia tra il 1999 e il 2006, e che tale situazione costituisce un problema sistemico ai sensi della Convenzione (cfr. paragrafo 155 sopra). Nel caso in esame, come in molti casi analoghi precedentemente esaminati dalla Corte, le indagini sono in corso da molti anni senza apportare sviluppi significativi per quanto riguarda l'identità dei responsabili o il destino dei parenti scomparsi dei ricorrenti.
177. La Corte osserva che ogni serie di procedimenti penali è stata afflitta da una combinazione di difetti simili a quelli elencati nella sentenza Aslakhanova e altri (citati in precedenza, n. 12325). Ciascuno di essi è stato sottoposto a diverse decisioni di sospensione dell'indagine, seguite da periodi di inattività, che hanno ulteriormente diminuito le prospettive di risoluzione dei crimini. Non sono state adottate misure tempestive e approfondite per identificare e interrogare i militari che avrebbero potuto partecipare ai rapimenti.
178. Alla luce della necessità, la Corte rileva che le autorità non hanno svolto indagini penali efficaci sulle circostanze delle sparizioni e dei decessi di Saitaksi Umarov, Pasha Dedishev, Uvays Shaipov, Alvi Dzhankhotov, Lema Chapanov, Aslan Chapanov e Akhyad Gerimov. Di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione dell'aspetto procedurale dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione.
VII. PRESUNTE VIOLATIONS DI ARTICLES 3, 5 E 13 DELLA CONVENTION
179 del 179. Le ricorrenti in Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11), Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) e Dzhankhotova e Dzhanktov (n. 65054/11) hanno denunciato una violazione dell'articolo 3 della Convenzione a causa delle sofferenze mentali causate dalla scomparsa dei loro parenti. In quest'ultimo caso il governo è stato incaricato della denuncia relativa al rapimento di Alvi Dzhankhotov presentato nel modulo di domanda il 3 ottobre 2011, ma non è stato notificato della denuncia relativa al rapimento del sig.
180. Le ricorrenti in tutti i casi, ad eccezione di Dedishev (n. 46624/11) hanno inoltre denunciato una violazione dell'articolo 5 della Convenzione a causa dell'illegittimità della detenzione dei loro parenti e hanno sostenuto che, contrariamente all'articolo 13 della Convenzione, non avevano avuto rimedi interni efficaci contro la presunta violazione dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione. Anche le ricorrenti di Khakimova e altri (n. 36875/11) e Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) hanno affermato anche una mancanza di rimedi efficaci per quanto riguarda le loro denunce ai sensi dell'articolo 5 della Convenzione.
181. Le parti pertinenti delle disposizioni invocate dalle ricorrenti recitano:
Articolo 3
"Nessuno sarà sottoposto a torture o a trattamenti o punizioni inumani o degradanti."
Articolo 5
"1. Ognuno ha diritto alla libertà e alla sicurezza della persona. Nessuno deve essere privato della sua libertà, salvo nei seguenti casi e secondo una procedura prescritta dalla legge:
...
c) l'arresto legale o la detenzione di una persona effettuata al fine di portarlo dinanzi all'autorità giudiziaria competente con ragionevole sospetto di aver commesso un reato o quando è ragionevolmente ritenuto necessario per impedirgli di commettere un reato o in fuga dopo averlo fatto;
...
2. Tutti coloro che vengono arrestati sono tempestivamente informati, in una lingua che comprende, delle ragioni del suo arresto e di qualsiasi accusa contro di lui.
3. Tutti gli arrestati o detenuti conformemente alle disposizioni del paragrafo 1 (c) del presente articolo sono tempestivamente portati dinanzi a un giudice o a un altro funzionario autorizzato dalla legge ad esercitare il potere giudiziario e hanno il diritto di essere processati entro un termine ragionevole o di rilascio in attesa di prova. Il rilascio può essere condizionato da garanzie di comparire per il processo.
4. Tutti coloro che sono privati della sua libertà con l'arresto o la detenzione hanno il diritto di intraprendere un procedimento in base al quale la legittimità della sua detenzione sia decisa rapidamente da un tribunale e che la sua liberazione sia ordinata se la detenzione non è legittima.
5. Chiunque sia stato vittima di un arresto o di una detenzione in violazione delle disposizioni del presente articolo ha diritto esecutivo al risarcimento."
Articolo 13, cui all'articolo,
"Tutti coloro i cui diritti e libertà, come indicato nella [la] Convenzione, devono avere un rimedio efficace dinanzi a un'autorità nazionale, nonostante la violazione sia stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale".
A. Le candidature delle parti
182. Il governo ha contestato le rivendicazioni delle ricorrenti. Essi hanno dichiarato, in particolare, che le sofferenze mentali delle ricorrenti non avevano raggiunto il livello minimo di gravità per rientrare nel campo di applicazione dell'articolo 3 della Convenzione. Il governo ha inoltre scongiurato che la legislazione nazionale, compresi gli articoli 124 e 125 del codice russo di procedura penale, aveva fornito alle ricorrenti rimedi efficaci per le loro denunce.
183. Le ricorrenti hanno mantenuto le loro denunce.
B. Valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
184. La Corte rileva che tali denunce non sono manifestamente malate ai sensi dell'articolo 35 , 3 (a) della Convenzione. Essa rileva inoltre che non sono inammissibili per altri motivi. Essi devono pertanto essere dichiarati ammissibili.
2. Meriti
185. In molte occasioni la Corte ha constatato che una situazione di scomparsa forzata provoca una violazione dell'articolo 3 della Convenzione nei confronti dei parenti stretti di una vittima, indipendentemente dalla loro età (vedi Aslakhanova e altri), 133, e Dzhabrailov e altri,n. 326-27, entrambi citati sopra).
186. Tenuto conto delle suddette conclusioni sulla responsabilità dello Stato per i rapimenti dei parenti dei ricorrenti e per il mancato esecuzione di indagini significative sugli incidenti (cfr. paragrafi 178 sopra), la Corte rileva che le ricorrenti di Khakimova e altri (n. . 36875/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11), Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) e Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11), per quanto riguarda la denuncia di quest'ultima relativa al Il rapimento di Alvi Dzhankhotov deve essere considerato vittima di una violazione dell'articolo 3 della Convenzione a causa dell'angoscia e dell'angoscia che hanno subito, e continuano a soffrire, a causa della loro incapacità di accertare la sorte dei loro familiari scomparsi sia il modo in cui le loro denunce sono state trattate.
187. Per quanto riguarda la presentazione denunciata della rivendicazione in merito alle sofferenze mentali causate dal rapimento di Uvays Shaipov ai suoi parenti a Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11), la Corte non lo esaminerà nell'ambito del presente procedimento (cfr. per un ragionamento simile, Elita Magomadova v. Russia,n. 77546/14, n. 77546/14, n. 77546/14, n. 37546/14, n. 377-38, 10 aprile 2018; e Chernenko and Others v. Russia , n. 4246/14 e altre 5 applicazioni, 37, 5 7aprile 2018; e Chernenko and Others v. Russia,n. 4246/14 e altre 5 applicazioni, 37, 5 febbraio 2019).
188. La Corte ha constatato in diverse occasioni che la detenzione non riconosciuta è una totale negazione delle garanzie contenute nell'articolo 5 della Convenzione e rivela una violazione particolarmente grave delle sue disposizioni (cfr. Turchia, n. 25704/94, 164, 27 febbraio 2001; e Luluyev e altri v. Russia,n. 69480/01, : 122, ECHR 2006-XIII (estratti)). La Corte conferma inoltre che, da quando è stato accertato che i parenti dei ricorrenti sono stati detenuti da agenti statali, apparentemente in assenza di motivi giuridici o di riconoscimento di tale detenzione, ciò costituisce una violazione particolarmente grave del diritto alla libertà e alla sicurezza delle persone sancite dall'articolo 5 della Convenzione per quanto riguarda i parenti dei ricorrenti in Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e Gerimovy (n. 8435/12).
189. La Corte ribadisce le sue conclusioni in merito all'inefficacia generale delle indagini penali in casi come quelli in esame. In assenza dei risultati di un'indagine penale, qualsiasi altro rimedio diventa inaccessibile nella pratica.
190. Alla luce di quanto sopra, e tenendo conto della portata delle denunce delle ricorrenti, la Corte rileva che le ricorrenti di Khakimova e di altri (n. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) non avevano a disposizione un rimedio interno efficace per le loro rimostranze ai sensi dell'articolo 2, in violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione.
191. Inoltre, le ricorrenti di Khakimova e di altri (n. 36875/11) e Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) non avevano a disposizione un rimedio interno efficace per le loro rimostranze ai sensi dell'articolo 3, in violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione.
192. Per quanto riguarda la presunta violazione dell'articolo 13, letta di conto dell'articolo 5 della Convenzione, come presentato dalle ricorrenti nei due casi sopra menzionati, la Corte ha già affermato in casi analoghi che non si pone alcuna questione separata rispetto all'articolo 13, letto in concomitanza con l'articolo 5 della Convenzione (cfr. esagiva e altri v. Russia, n. 40166/07, n. 84, 26 marzo 2015; e Aliyev e Gadzhiyeva v. Russia,n. 11059/12,110, 12 luglio 2016).
VIII. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DI ARTICLE 1 DI PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
193. Le ricorrenti di Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e di Gerimovy (n. 3435/12) hanno sostenuto che durante il rapimento dei loro parenti gli agenti statali avevano illegalmente sequestrato due autovetture, violando così i diritti di proprietà garantiti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, che prevede, in particolare:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno deve essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e ai principi generali del diritto internazionale. ..."
A. Le candidature delle parti
194. Il governo ha dichiarato che gli agenti statali non erano responsabili della presunta violazione, che la portata dei casi penali non aveva incluso la rapina e che le ricorrenti non avevano esaurito i rimedi domestici.
195. Le ricorrenti hanno ribadito la loro denuncia.
B. Valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
196 del 196. Avendo già constatato l'esistenza di un rimedio efficace che avrebbe consentito alle ricorrenti di stabilire l'identità delle persone coinvolte nei rapimenti (cfr. paragrafo 155 e 156 sopra), la Corte respinge l'obiezione del governo per quanto riguarda il fallimento dei ricorrenti nell'esaurire i rimedi interni (per lo stesso approccio, vedi Orlov e altri contro la Russia,n. 5632/1017).
197. La Corte rileva inoltre che tale denuncia non è manifestamente illusoria ai sensi dell'articolo 35 , 3 (a) della Convenzione. Non è inammissibile per nessun altro motivo. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ammissibile.
2. Meriti
198. La Corte rileva inoltre che il governo non contestava il valore stimato delle auto prese dai rapitori né che possedeva i veicoli. Tenuto conto del fatto che la Corte ha già constatato che gli uomini che hanno rapito i parenti dei ricorrenti erano militari statali, risulta che la perdita di beni era imputabile allo Stato convenuto.
199. Di conseguenza, vi è stata un'interferenza con il diritto alla protezione della proprietà. In assenza di qualsiasi riferimento da parte del governo alla legittimità e alla proporzionalità di tale azione, la Corte rileva che vi è stata una violazione del diritto alla protezione dei beni garantito dall'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione (vedi Gakayeva e altri contro la Russia, nos. 51534/08 e altri 9,383-84, 10 ottobre 2013).
IX. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 13 IN CONNESSIONE CON ARTICOLO 1 DI PROTOCOLLO NO.1 ALLA CONVENTION
200. Le ricorrenti di Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) hanno lamentato di essere state private di rimedi efficaci per quanto riguarda la loro denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1, contrariamente all'articolo 13 della Convenzione (le disposizioni pertinenti sono citate nei paragrafi 181 e 193 di cui sopra).
201. Il governo non ha commentato la questione.
A. Ammissibilità
97. La Corte rileva che tale denuncia non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35 , 3 a, della Convenzione. Essa rileva inoltre che non è inammissibile per altri motivi. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ammissibile.
B. Meriti
202. La Corte ritiene che, tenuto conto del fatto che le autorità hanno negato il coinvolgimento nel sequestro del veicolo e che gli inquirenti nazionali non hanno indagato efficacemente sulla questione, le ricorrenti non hanno avuto accesso ad alcun rimedio interno effettivo in relazione alla presunta violazione dei loro diritti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione. Di conseguenza, c'è stata una violazione su questo conto (vedi Abdulkhadzhiyeva e Abdulkhadzhiyev, citati sopra, 98-100).
X. APPLICATION DI ARTICLE 41 DELLA CONVENTION
203. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se la Corte rileva che vi è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli in questione, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta parte contraente interessato consente di risarcire solo parzialmente, la Corte, se necessario, proibirà solo soddisfazione partito ferito.
A. Danni
1. Danni pecuniari
204. Tutti i ricorrenti, ad eccezione del ricorrente di Dedishev (n. 46624/11) e del secondo richiedente a Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11) hanno chiesto un risarcimento per perdita di sostegno finanziario da parte dei capofamiglia.
205. Le ricorrenti di Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11) hanno effettuato i loro calcoli sulla base delle tabelle attuariali dell'Ogden nel Regno Unito, utilizzando i livelli di sussistenza interna e i tassi di inflazione.
206. Le ricorrenti di Khakimova e altri (n. 36875/11) e Gerimovy v. Russia (n. 8435/12) hanno basato i loro calcoli sull'importo dello stipendio minimo in Russia e sulla sua prevista crescita in futuro.
207. Le ricorrenti di Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) hanno fatto riferimento al livello minimo di sussistenza e alla giurisprudenza della Corte in materia.
208. Le ricorrenti di Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) hanno anche chiesto un risarcimento per il sequestro dei due veicoli in un importo equivalente al loro valore stimato.
209. Il governo ha lasciato la questione alla discrezione della Corte.
2. Danni non pecuniari
210. Gli importi richiesti dalle ricorrenti sotto tale capo sono indicati nella tabella algato.
211. Il governo ha lasciato la questione alla discrezione della Corte.
B. Costi e spese
212. Tutti i ricorrenti hanno chiesto un risarcimento per le spese e le spese. Gli importi sono indicati nella tabella allegata. Tutti, ad eccezione del ricorrente di Dedishev (n. 46624/11) hanno chiesto che i premi fossero trasferiti sui conti bancari dei loro rappresentanti.
213. A Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11) il governo ha dichiarato che gli importi dichiarati erano eccessivi.
214. Nel restante caso il governo ha lasciato la questione alla discrezionalità della Corte.
C. Valutazione della Corte
215. La Corte ribadisce che deve sussista un chiaro nesso causale tra i danni subiti dai ricorrenti e la violazione della Convenzione e che ciò può, se del caso, includere un risarcimento in caso di perdita di reddito. La Corte rileva inoltre che la perdita di guadagno si applica ai parenti stretti delle persone scomparse, compresi i coniugi, i genitori anziani e i figli minori (si veda, tra le altre autorità, Imakayeva v. Russia, n. 7615/02, n. 213, ECHR 2006XIII (estratti)).
216. Ovunque la Corte ritenga una violazione della Convenzione, essa può accettare che i ricorrenti abbiano subito un danno non pecuniario che non può essere compensato unicamente con l'accertamento di una violazione e consegua un premio finanziario.
217. Per quanto riguarda i costi e le spese, la Corte deve stabilire se fossero effettivamente sostenuti e se fossero necessari e ragionevoli per quanto riguarda la quantistica (cfr. McCann e altri v. il Regno Unito, 27 settembre 1995, 220, Serie A n. 324).
218. Per quanto riguarda le conclusioni e i principi sopra indicati, le osservazioni delle parti e il principio di ne ultra petitum ("non al di là della richiesta" o "non al di fuori dell'ambito della controversia"), la Corte assegna al richiedente gli importi indicati nella tabella allegata, oltre a qualsiasi imposta che possa essere loro addebitata su tali importi. I premi relativi ai costi e alle spese relativi a tutti i casi ad eccezione di Dedishev (n. 46624/11) devono essere versati sui conti bancari dei rappresentanti, come indicato dai ricorrenti. A Dedishev (n. 46624/11) il premio deve essere versato sul conto bancario indicato dal richiedente.
D. Interesse di default
219. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di default si basi sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale si dovrebbero aggiungere tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
1. Decide di partecipare alle domande;

2. decide che in Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) Ramzan Chapanov ha locus standi nel procedimento dinanzi alla Corte;

3. Dichiara ammissibili le domande;

4. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione sostanziale dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione nei confronti dei parenti dei ricorrenti – Saitaksi Umarov, Pasha Dedishev, Uvays Shaipov, Alvi Dzhankhotov, Lema Chapanov, Aslan Chapanov e Akhyad Gerimov;

5. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione procedurale dell'articolo 2 della Convenzione a causa della mancata indagine in caso di indagazione in caso di indagazione in caso di sparizione dei parenti dei ricorrenti;

6. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 3 della Convenzione nei confronti dei ricorrenti in Khakimova e in altri (n. 36875/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11), Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) e Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11) per quanto riguarda la denuncia di quest'ultimo si riferisce al rapimento di Alvi Dzhankhotov,a causa della lorosofferenza mentale causata dai loro parenti la scomparsa e la risposta delle autorità alle loro sofferenze;

7. contiene che in Khakimova e altri (no. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e Gerimovy (n. 8435/12) vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 5 della Convenzione nei confronti dei parenti dei ricorrenti, a causa della loro detenzione illecita;

8. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l'articolo 2 della Convenzione in Khakimova e altri (n. 36875/11), Dzhankhotova e Dzhankhotov (n. 65054/11), Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e Gerivy (n. 8435/12);

9. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l'articolo 3 della Convenzione in Khakimova e altri (n. 36875/11) e Chapanovy (n. 76566/11);

10. ritiene che non si presenti alcuna questione separata ai sensi dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l'articolo 5 della Convenzione in Khakimova e altri (n. 36875/11) e Chapanovy (n. 76566/11);

11. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione di Chapanovy (n. 76566/11) e Gerimovy (n. 8435/12);

12. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione di Chapanovy (n. 76566/11);

13. Regge
(a) che lo Stato convenuto debba pagare ai richiedenti, entro tre mesi, gli importi indicati nella tabella più eventuali imposte che possono essere addebitabili ai richiedenti, da convertire nella valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data di regolamento. I premi relativi ai costi e alle spese in tutti i casi, ad eccezione di Dedishev (n. 46624/11) devono essere versati sui conti bancari dei rappresentanti, come indicato dai ricorrenti. A Dedishev (n. 46624/11) il premio deve essere versato sul conto bancario indicato dal richiedente;
b) che dalla scadenza dei suddetti tre mesi fino alla liquidazione degli interessi semplici siano pagabili sugli importi summenzionati ad un tasso pari al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea durante il periodo di insolvenza più tre punti percentuali;

14. respinge il resto delle richieste dei ricorrenti.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l'8 ottobre 2019, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 n. 2 e 3 del Regolamento.
Stephen PhillipsGeorgios A. Serghides
Presidente cancelliere


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 03/08/2020.