Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SANDU AND OTHERS v. THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA AND RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 01,41,13,35,37,P1-1

NUMERO: 21034/05/2018
STATO: Moldova
DATA: 03/12/2018
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions:
Struck out of the list (Art. 37) Striking out applications-{general}
(Art. 37-1-a) Absence of intention to pursue application
(Art. 37-1-c) Continued examination not justified
Remainder inadmissible (Art. 35) Admissibility criteria
(Art. 35-3-a) Ratione personae
No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) (the Republic of Moldova)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) (Russia)
No violation of Article 13+P1-1-1 - Right to an effective remedy (Article 13 - Effective remedy) (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property
Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) (the Republic of Moldova)
Violation of Article 13+P1-1-1 - Right to an effective remedy (Article 13 - Effective remedy) (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property
Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) (Russia)
Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)


SECOND SECTION




CASE OF SANDU AND OTHERS v. THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA AND RUSSIA

(Applications nos. 21034/05 and 7 others)








JUDGMENT







STRASBOURG

17 July 2018

FINAL

03/12/2018

This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Sandu and Others v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Robert Spano, President,
Paul Lemmens,
Ledi Bianku,
I??l Karaka?,
Valeriu Gri?co,
Dmitry Dedov,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 26 June 2018,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in eight applications (nos. 21034/05, 41569/04, 41573/04, 41574/04, 7105/06, 9713/06, 18327/06 and 38649/06) against the Republic of Moldova and the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by 1,646 Moldovan natural persons and 3 companies (“the applicants”, see attached Annexes nos.1-9), on 25, 26 and 28 October 2004, 24 May 2005, 20 January, 8 February, 14 April and 6 September 2006 respectively.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, lawyers practising in Chi?in?u. The Moldovan Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr L. Apostol. The Russian Government were represented by Mr G. Matyushkin, Representative of the Russian Government to the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that they had been denied access to their land, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, and that they had no effective remedies in this respect.
4. On 17 January 2013 the applications were communicated to the Governments.
THE FACTS
THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
6. The 1,646 applicants natural persons live in the villages of Doro?caia, Pîrîta, Molovata Nou?, Pohrebea and Cocieri, situated on the left bank of the Dniester in the region of Dub?sari. These villages are under Moldovan control. Part of the land belonging to the applicants is situated in areas near these villages, across a road which links the northern and southern parts of the self-proclaimed “Moldovan Transdniestrian Republic” (the “MRT” – see for more details Ila?cu and Others v. Moldova and Russia ([GC], no. 48787/99, §§ 28-185, ECHR 2004 VII) and Catan and Others v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia ([GC], nos. 43370/04 and 2 others, §§ 8 42, ECHR 2012 (extracts)). That road, which cuts through two zones controlled by the Moldovan Government, is controlled by the authorities of the “MRT”.
7. The applicants obtained titles to these plots of land from Moldova as part of the “Pamântul” (Land) privatisation programme. In a letter dated 2 December 1999 the “MRT” local administration informed the Moldovan Department of privatisation that it “did not have any objections to the creation, on the basis of agricultural entities in the villages of Doro?caia, Pîrîta, Molovata Nou?, Co?ni?a and Cocieri, the lands of which are situated on the territory of the [“MRT”], of peasant farms within the framework of the ‘Pamântul’ reform”.
8. Title to some of the land was subsequently transferred to others through gift or inheritance. The details of each applicant natural person are set out in Annexes nos. 1-9.
9. The applicants Posedo-Agro S.R.L., Agro-Tiras S.R.L. and Agro S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. are companies which rented land from owners during the relevant period of time.
10. On 15 August 2007 the applicant company Posedo-Agro S.R.L. ceded all of its rights and obligations to Serghei Popa Farming Proprietorship (FP). Both of those companies are solely owned by Mr Serghei Popa. On 30 October 2007 Posedo-Agro S.R.L. was liquidated. On 10 October 2013 Serghei Popa FP asked the Court to substitute itself for the original applicant company in respect of application no. 41569/04 and declared that it maintained that application before the Court.
11. The applicants’ main source of income is the working of the land owned or rented by them. In order to reach their land, they have to cross the road controlled by the authorities of the “MRT”.
12. Between 1992 and 1998 the applicants used the land in question or rented it without interference. In 1998 the “MRT” authorities set up checkpoints to monitor the movement of agricultural products across the “border” coinciding with the above-mentioned road. From then on the applicants had to pay various taxes and fees to the “MRT” authorities.
13. In August 2004 the “MRT” authorities declared that the land owned or rented by the applicants was the property of the “MRT”. The applicants could continue working it, on condition that they paid rent to the local “MRT” authorities. The applicants refused to sign rental contracts because they were already the lawful owners (or renters) of that land. As a consequence, all access to their land was blocked and the harvest was lost. Some of the agricultural machines belonging to those who tried to work their land were also seized. No work was done on the land in the following two years, which made it difficult to bring it back to its former capacity.
14. The applicants made numerous complaints to the “MRT” authorities, asking for a right of passage. Such a passage was refused because the authorities considered the land in question to be the property of the “MRT”.
15. The applicants also complained to the Moldovan authorities, who replied that they had no means to compel the “MRT” authorities to allow them free passage. They asked the Moldovan Prosecutor General’s Office to start a criminal investigation against the people responsible for blocking the applicants’ access to their land.
16. The applicants complained to the Russian embassy in Moldova and to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (the “OSCE”), to no avail. On 26 April 2005 a group of landowners, including some of the applicants, protested in front of the Russian embassy in Moldova, asking the authorities of that State to intervene as a guarantor of peace and stability in the region. A similar protest took place on 11 May 2005.
17. The applicant company Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. submitted a document issued by the Moldovan tax office, which showed that it had paid tax on plots of land rented from 281 owners. According to a certificate from the mayor of Pîrîta village, the applicant company had rented plots of land (104 hectares) from people in the village between 1998 and 2006. The applicant company also submitted copies of its tax and statistics reports for 2004, as well as an audit report by a company called Total Consulting dated 15 November 2013, which showed that in 2004-2005 the applicant company cultivated 359 hectares of land, of which 104 hectares were situated in the area concerned by the present case. On 3 May 2005 the applicant company complained to Dub?sari Regional Council (a Moldovan local authority) about the situation, and it confirmed on 17 May 2005 that it was unable to cultivate 105 hectares of land rented from 320 landowners. Similar complaints and requests to allow cultivation of the land were made to the “MRT” local authorities, for instance on 19 July 2005.
18. The applicant company Agro-Tiras S.R.L. submitted a certificate from the mayor of Molovata Nou? village dated 11 October 2004, confirming that it rented 450 hectares of land from the villagers there, all of which were situated across the road, between Dub?sari and Rîbni?a (the relevant area). According to a decision of the “MRT” Customs Office of 15 October 2004, a tractor with agricultural accessories and 5.8 tonnes of wheat had been seized from the applicant company owing to a failure to properly declare the importation of such items into the “MRT”. According to the decision, the tractor was travelling from Molovata Nou? village in the direction of “plots of land of the ‘MRT’ under Moldovan jurisdiction”.
19. According to a certificate dated 13 November 2013 from the mayor of Cocieri village, the applicant company Posedo-Agro S.R.L. rented land from 782 villagers during the period 2004-2006. The applicant company submitted a copy of a decision taken by the “MRT” Customs Office of 4 August 2004, which stated that 16 tonnes of barley had been seized from it owing to a failure to properly declare the importation of such items into the “MRT”. A fine (approximately 1,450 United States dollars (“USD”)) equal to the market price of the barley was imposed and additional costs had to be covered, otherwise the truck carrying the barley, which had also been temporarily seized on 30 July 2004, would be confiscated. A similar decision was taken on 16 August 2004, by which the applicant company lost 6.1 tonnes of apples. It also had to pay a fine (approximately USD 250) equal to the market price of the apples or risk the confiscation of three tractors temporarily seized on 11 August 2004. According to a certificate dated 12 October 2004, the applicant company rented 1,377 hectares of land from 820 people in Cocieri, of which 1,256 hectares were situated in the area concerned by the present application. On 4 August 2004 the applicant company complained to the Moldovan Government, the OSCE and the Dub?sari prosecutor’s office (belonging to the “MRT”) about the fine and seizure, stating that it rented 1,256 hectares of villagers’ land situated in the relevant area and that despite having temporary registration with the “MRT Customs Office” it was not allowed to take the harvest to storage.
20. According to the Moldovan Government, the Moldovan Parliament passed a number of laws aimed at compensating the inhabitants of villages under Moldovan control on the left bank of the Dniester (in the area concerned by the present cases) for losses caused by various actions of the “MRT”. The compensation included differences in natural gas and electricity prices, increasing pensions, giving tax breaks and preferential credits to agricultural companies in the region, and allocating diesel fuel for agricultural activities. Moreover, a number of laws and decisions were implemented in 2004-2007 providing for the payment of compensation to villagers who had sustained losses owing to their inability to cultivate their land in the relevant area, with the total amount of aid reaching almost 39 million Moldovan lei (MDL) (approximately 2.3 million euros (EUR)). In 2006 the Moldovan authorities managed to negotiate with the “MRT” authorities a temporary “MRT” registration mechanism for owners of land in the relevant area, which allowed them to cultivate the land and be exempt from making payments to the “MRT”. The temporary registration system is renewed each year in negotiations between Moldova and the “MRT” authorities.
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF APPLICATIONS
21. The Court notes that the subject matter of all of the applications is similar. It is therefore appropriate to join the cases, in application of Rule 42 of the Rules of Court.
II. ADMISSIBILITY
22. The Moldovan Government submitted that the complaint lodged by one of the applicants, Posedo-Agro S.R.L., was inadmissible because the company had been liquidated.
23. For their part, the Russian Government argued that the applicants did not come within their jurisdiction and that consequently the applications should be declared inadmissible ratione personae and ratione loci in respect of the Russian Federation. Alternatively, they submitted that the applications were inadmissible for the applicants’ failure to exhaust domestic remedies in Russia. They also submitted that Posedo Agro S.R.L.’s application was inadmissible as it had been liquidated and could not transfer any rights to its sole owner, Mr Serghei Popa.
A. Jurisdiction
24. The Court must first determine whether the applicants fall within the jurisdiction of the respondent States for the purposes of the matters complained of, within the meaning of Article 1 of the Convention.
1. The parties’ submissions
a. The applicants’ submissions
25. The applicants submitted that Russia continued to maintain a military presence in the “MRT” despite the undertakings given in the 1999 OSCE Istanbul Summit Declaration. This military force had a dissuasive effect on any attempt by the Moldovan authorities to re-establish control over the region. Moreover, Russian officials had stated, in particular in 2012 and 2013, that they had no intention of withdrawing their troops and ammunition from the “MRT” until the conflict had been finally resolved. That gave support to separatism in the region. While in their observations the Russian Government had referred to alleged inconsistencies between the Court’s factual findings in previous cases and reality, they had not submitted any evidence of that. In fact, Russian military, political and economic support for the “MRT” had continued throughout 2012 and 2013 with the provision of gas without payment and various other kinds of assistance, such as a decision of 17 March 2012 by the Russian Security Council to give the “MRT” some USD 150 million in aid. The applicants submitted that according to information available from the website of the Russian Ministry of Justice an “autonomous non-commercial organisation” (“Eurasian Integration”) had obtained three million roubles (RUB) from various sources and had given assistance to the “MRT” of RUB one billion (approximately EUR 24 million), which could thus not be considered as money coming from private sources, but was rather from the Russian authorities.
26. The applicants also submitted articles, mainly from “MRT” media, quoting statements from various Russian officials about the “MRT”. In a television interview quoted in a local newspaper on 31 October 2012, the coordinator of the Russian Duma’s group for cooperation with the “MRT” Parliament, Mr Serghei Gavrilov, declared that the Duma was planning “to pass decisions aimed at protecting the interests of the ‘MRT’... concerning international transportation, the modernisation of Tiraspol airport, assistance to ‘MRT’ companies in reaching the Russian market, including through the [Russian Defence Ministry’s] purchases”. He added that “Russia, in agreement with the ‘MRT’, must have as many of its military personnel here as required to ensure the security of the ‘MRT’ and Russian national interests”. In an interview of 17 November 2012 the “MRT” President declared during a visit by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitrii Rogozin that “Russia’s role for the ‘MRT’ is in many respects a defining one. ... The Russian Federation is the main guarantor for the ‘MRT’”. An article dated 9 May 2012 quoted Mr Rogozin as saying that through the above-mentioned organisation Eurasian Integration, and under his personal control, a series of projects was to be implemented in the “MRT”, including the reconstruction of hospitals and schools, the construction of a new wing for the local university, fully equipping that university with computers, and donating eight ambulances. On 10 May 2013 another “MRT” newspaper quoted Mr Rogozin as promising a total of RUB one billion (approximately EUR 24.5 million at the time) in humanitarian aid to the “MRT”. The same article quoted a Russian Duma member, Mr A. Zhuravliov, as saying that Russia was providing help to the “MRT” and its people worth hundreds of millions of Russian roubles each year. On 31 July 2013 Mr Rogozin was quoted as saying that the Russian President was personally monitoring the implementation of the building of ten infrastructure projects in the “MRT” and that the help given to the “MRT” was not help to a foreign subject because approximately 200,000 Russian citizens lived in the region. On 10 September 2013, following Moldova’s refusal to join the Eurasian Customs Union, the import of Moldovan wines to Russia was prohibited. On 12 September 2013 the Russian authorities stated that the ban did not affect alcohol originating from the “MRT”. In an article dated 18 September 2013 a Russian newspaper (Kommersant) quoted “MRT” Government decisions from April 2012 as stating that some of the money collected from consumers of natural gas in the “MRT” was diverted to a “stabilisation fund” for the “MRT”. According to the newspaper, the region had since 2009 completely stopped making any payments to Gazprom for the gas it consumed, accumulating debts of USD 4 billion.
27. As for Moldova’s jurisdiction over the region, that had been confirmed in previous judgments and there was nothing to add on that subject.
b. The submissions of the Moldovan Government
28. The Moldovan Government acknowledged that they had territorial jurisdiction over the region and asked the Court to find that they had taken reasonable actions consistent with their limited influence over the issue.
c. The submissions of the Russian Government
29. The Russian Government argued that the applicants did not come within their jurisdiction and that, consequently, the applications should be declared inadmissible ratione personae and ratione loci in respect of the Russian Federation. As they did in Mozer v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia ([GC], no. 11138/10, §§ 92-94, ECHR 2016), the Russian Government expressed the view that the approach to the issue of jurisdiction taken by the Court in Ila?cu and Others (cited above), Ivan?oc and Others v. Moldova and Russia (no. 23687/05, 15 November 2011), and Catan and Others (cited above) was wrong and at variance with public international law.
30. They further submitted that Russia had never accepted that it had spent millions of United States dollars on various forms of financial assistance to the “MRT”. Any help offered had been of a humanitarian nature, limited to food and other vital necessities, but had not involved financial assistance such as pension payments (there were at most two people receiving pensions from Russia and one thousand people receiving Second World War veterans’ payments in the “MRT”). Moreover, natural gas was supplied directly to the Moldovagaz company, which then redistributed it to consumers throughout Moldova, including the “MRT” region. It was therefore incorrect to state that Russia supplied natural gas to the “MRT” for free as the debt for gas that had been consumed but not paid for in that region (approximately USD 2 billion) had built up at Moldovagaz. As for the “MRT” residents in possession of Russian passports, their number did not exceed 140,000 as of September 2013, and was not one-fifth of the population, as suggested by the Court in Catan and Others (cited above, § 120).
31. The Russian presence in the “MRT” was limited to peacekeeping forces as part of its mediation effort and to the personnel necessary for guarding ammunition that could not be evacuated. The Court had been given information about the exact quantity of ammunition stored at Cobasna (approximately 20,000 tonnes of outdated, non-transportable ammunition). The applicants had not claimed that any agent of the Russian State had been involved in the events complained of. Moreover, the “MRT” was not controlled by Russia and had in the past rejected some of Russia’s proposals. In Catan and Others (cited above), Russia had been held responsible for actions in which it had not been involved and which it had not initiated or controlled.
2. The Court’s assessment
32. The Court notes that the parties in the present case have positions concerning the matter of jurisdiction which are similar to those expressed by the parties in Catan and Others (cited above, §§ 83-101) and in Mozer (cited above, §§ 81-95). Namely, the applicants and the Moldovan Government submitted that both respondent Governments had jurisdiction, while the Russian Government submitted that they had no jurisdiction.
33. The Court recalls that the general principles concerning the issue of jurisdiction under Article 1 of the Convention in respect of acts and facts occurring in the Transdniestrian region of Moldova were set out in Ila?cu and Others (cited above, §§ 311-19), Catan and Others (cited above, §§ 103-07) and, more recently, Mozer (cited above, §§ 97-98).
34. In so far as the Republic of Moldova is concerned, the Court notes that in Ila?cu and Others, Catan and Others and Mozer it found that although Moldova had no effective control over the Transdniestrian region, it followed from the fact that Moldova was the territorial State that persons within that territory fell within its jurisdiction. However, its obligation, under Article 1 of the Convention, to secure to everyone within its jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in the Convention, was limited to that of taking the diplomatic, economic, judicial and other measures that were both in its power and in accordance with international law (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, § 333; Catan and Others, cited above, § 109; and Mozer, cited above, § 100). Moldova’s obligations under Article 1 of the Convention were found to be positive obligations (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, §§ 322 and 330-31; Catan and Others, cited above, §§ 109-10; and Mozer, cited above, § 99).
35. The Court sees no reason to distinguish the present case from the above-mentioned cases. Besides, it notes that the Moldovan Government do not object to applying a similar approach in the present case. Therefore, it finds that Moldova has jurisdiction for the purposes of Article 1 of the Convention, but that its responsibility for the acts complained of is to be assessed in the light of the above-mentioned positive obligations (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, § 335).
36. In so far as the Russian Federation is concerned, the Court notes that in Ila?cu and Others it found that the Russian Federation contributed both militarily and politically to the creation of a separatist regime in the region of Transdniestria in 1991-1992 (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, § 382). The Court also found in subsequent cases concerning the Transdniestrian region that up until July 2010, the “MRT” was only able to continue to exist, and to resist Moldovan and international efforts to resolve the conflict and bring democracy and the rule of law to the region, because of Russian military, economic and political support (see Ivan?oc and Others, cited above, §§ 116-20; Catan and Others, cited above, §§ 121-22; and Mozer, cited above, §§ 108 and 110). The Court concluded in Mozer that the “MRT”‘s high level of dependency on Russian support provided a strong indication that the Russian Federation continued to exercise effective control and a decisive influence over the Transdniestrian authorities and that, therefore, the applicant fell within that State’s jurisdiction under Article 1 of the Convention (Mozer, cited above, §§ 110-11).
37. The Court sees no grounds on which to distinguish the present case from Ila?cu and Others, Ivan?oc and Others, Catan and Others, and Mozer (all cited above), taking into account the fact that the main events complained of happened in 2004-2006, a period covered by the findings in Mozer (cited above).
38. It follows that the applicants in the present case fell within the jurisdiction of the Russian Federation under Article 1 of the Convention. Consequently, the Court dismisses the Russian Government’s objections ratione personae and ratione loci.
39. The Court will hereafter determine whether there has been any violation of the applicants’ rights under the Convention such as to engage the responsibility of either respondent State (see Mozer, cited above, § 112).
B. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
40. The Russian Government submitted that the applications should be rejected for failure to exhaust domestic remedies before the Russian courts.
41. The Court notes that the obligation to exhaust domestic remedies requires an applicant to make normal use of remedies which are available and sufficient in respect of his or her Convention grievances. The existence of the remedies in question must be sufficiently certain, not only in theory but in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness. To be effective, a remedy must be capable of directly redressing the impugned state of affairs and must offer reasonable prospects of success (see Mozer, cited above, § 116).
42. By contrast, there is no obligation to have recourse to remedies which are inadequate or ineffective (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 67, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 IV). However, the existence of mere doubts as to the prospects of success of a particular remedy which is not obviously futile is not a valid reason for failing to exhaust that avenue of redress (see Akdivar and Others, cited above, § 71, and Mocanu and Others v. Romania [GC], nos. 10865/09 and 2 others, § 223, ECHR 2014 (extracts)).
43. As regards the burden of proof, it is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one, and available in theory and in practice at the relevant time. Once this burden has been satisfied, it falls to the applicant to establish that the remedy advanced by the Government was in fact used, or was for some reason inadequate and ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case, or that there existed special circumstances absolving him or her from this requirement (see, inter alia, Maktouf and Damjanovi? v. Bosnia and Herzegovina [GC], nos. 2312/08 and 34179/08, § 58, ECHR 2013 (extracts); Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia (preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, §§ 69-77, 25 March 2014; and Gherghina v. Romania [GC] (dec.), no. 42219/07, §§ 83-89, 9 July 2015).
44. The Court notes the Russian Government’s submission concerning the failure to exhaust domestic remedies before the Russian courts. It observes that it examined essentially the same objection in Ila?cu and Others, finding that:
“... the Russian Government mentioned that it was possible for the applicants to bring their complaints to the knowledge of the Russian authorities but did not state what remedies Russian domestic law might have afforded for the applicants’ situation.
It notes also that the Russian Government denied all allegations that the armed forces or other officials of the Russian Federation had taken part in the applicants’ arrest, imprisonment and conviction or had been involved in the conflict between Moldova and the region of Transdniestria. Given such a denial of any involvement of Russian forces in the events complained of, the Court considers that it would be contradictory to expect the applicants to have approached the Russian Federation authorities” (Ila?cu and Others [GC] (dec.), no. 48787/99, 4 July 2001).
45. In the present case, the Russian Government did not specify which of their courts had jurisdiction over complaints against the actions of the “MRT” authorities. Moreover, no details were given as to the legal basis for examining such complaints and to the manner in which any decision taken would be enforced. In addition, the Russian Government continued to deny any direct involvement in the Transdniestrian conflict. Given those circumstances the Court is not satisfied that the remedies referred to by the Russian Government were available and sufficient.
46. It follows from the above that the Russian Government’s objection must be dismissed.
C. Standing of Posedo-Agro S.R.L.
47. The Moldovan Government submitted that Posedo-Agro S.R.L. could no longer claim to be a victim of a violation of its rights since it had been liquidated on 30 October 2007.
48. The Russian Government also submitted that the applicant company could no longer claim to be a victim of a violation of its rights since it had been liquidated. The contract ceding its rights to its sole owner, Mr Serghei Popa, which it had concluded prior to its liquidation, should not be possible legally since it would imply a contract between Mr Popa and himself. They argued that the liquidation of a company did not entail any transfer of its rights to third parties. Moreover, Mr Popa had only informed the Court about that transaction five and a half years after the fact.
49. The representative of the company Serghei Popa FP noted that it had obtained all the rights belonging to the original applicant company (Posedo Agro S.R.L., see paragraph 10 above) and that it had requested that the Court allow it to replace the original applicant company. It added that a transfer of rights between two companies owned by the same person, as was the case here, was not prohibited under Moldovan law. Moreover, Mr Popa had signed the original application form and the power of attorney for his lawyer in his own name and in the name of Posedo-Agro S.R.L. As he was the sole owner of that company and the sole owner of Serghei Popa FP, he could still claim to be a victim of the breach of the rights protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
50. The Court notes that on 15 August 2007 Posedo-Agro S.R.L. ceded all of its rights to Serghei Popa FP before it had been liquidated and thus at a moment when it had the power to transfer any right to a third party. The director and sole owner of Serghei Popa FP, Mr Popa, subsequently expressed the wish to maintain the application before this court (see paragraph 10 above). Given the economic nature of the interests at stake, which are thus transferable to other persons or entities, and the absence of any doubt that Mr Popa had the right to represent each of the two companies he had created, the Court sees no reason to disregard the agreement between the two companies and finds no procedural impediment to replacing the original applicant company by the new one (see, for instance, Dimitrescu v. Romania, nos. 5629/03 and 3028/04, § 34, 3 June 2008). For practical reasons this judgment will continue to refer to Posedo-Agro S.R.L. as the “applicant” although its successor company Serghei Popa FP is today to be regarded as having that status (see Dalban v. Romania [GC], no. 28114/95, § 1, ECHR 1999 VI, and Brosset-Triboulet and Others v. France [GC], no. 34078/02, § 58, 29 March 2010).
The Russian Government’s objection to the transfer of rights from a company owned by a private individual to that individual himself must therefore be rejected as the transfer was in fact one between two legal entities.
51. In view of the replacement of the original applicant by another one, the Moldovan Government’s objection concerning the subsequent liquidation of the original applicant company must also be rejected.
52. Given the fact that the complaint lodged by Mr Serghei Popa in his own name coincides with that lodged by Posedo-Agro S.R.L., and given the absence of any exceptional reason for “piercing the corporate veil” in his favour since the company was able to lodge the application, the Court considers that Mr Popa does not have separate standing in respect of the complaint. Therefore, his personal complaint must be rejected for being incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention (see Agrotexim and Others v. Greece, 24 October 1995, §§ 66 and 71, Series A no. 330 A).
D. Withdrawal by three applicants
53. On 29 August 2016 three applicants (Mr Simion Cre?, Mrs Lidia Cre? and Mr Ion Luchianov) stated that they did not intend to pursue their applications before the Court.
54. The Court considers that this information must be examined in the light of Article 37 § 1 of the Convention. Insofar as relevant, Article 37 provides:
“1. The Court may at any stage of the proceedings decide to strike an application out of its list of cases where the circumstances lead to the conclusion that
(a) the applicant does not intend to pursue his application;
..
However, the Court shall continue the examination of the application if respect for human rights as defined in the Convention and the Protocols thereto so requires.”
55. Article 37 § 1 (a) of the Convention covers the situation where the applicant wishes to withdraw his or her application (see K.A.S. v. The United Kingdom (dec.), no. 38884/12, § 45, 4 June 2013, and Polovynko and Others v. Ukraine and Russia (dec.), no. 52061/14 and 3 others, § 10, 5 July 2016). Circumstances regarding respect for human rights as defined in the Convention and the Protocols thereto, which require the continued examination of the application, exist when such examination would contribute to elucidating, safeguarding and developing the standards of protection under the Convention (see, for example, H.P. v. Denmark (dec.), no. 55607/09, § 85, 13 December 2016, and, a contrario, Konstantin Markin v. Russia [GC], no. 30078/06, § 90, ECHR 2012 (extracts)).
56. In the present cases, the Court notes that the applicants expressly stated that they no longer wished to pursue their applications. It further notes that this case was brought by more than 1,600 applicants. The Court therefore has an opportunity to determine the legal issues involved, even if these three applicants withdraw their applications. Respect for human rights as defined in the Convention and the Protocols thereto does not require the continued examination of their applications.
57. In the light of the foregoing, the Court, in accordance with Article 37 § 1 (a) of the Convention, decides to strike the applications out of the list of cases as far as these three applicants are concerned.
E. Other admissibility issues
58. The Court notes that a number of applicants have not provided it with sufficient information in order to be able to continue examining their applications, such as personal identification, the surface of plots of land which they owned at the relevant time in the area under consideration or cadastral numbers for such land. In addition, some applicants have died and no known successors have declared their wish to continue with the relevant applications. Both categories of applicants are listed in Annexes 2, 5, 7 and 9.
59. The Court considers that these applications must be examined in the light of Article 37 § 1 (c) of the Convention. Insofar as relevant, Article 37 provides:
“1. The Court may at any stage of the proceedings decide to strike an application out of its list of cases where the circumstances lead to the conclusion that
...
(c) for any other reason established by the Court, it is no longer justified to continue the examination of the application.
...”
60. The Court considers, having regard to the circumstances mentioned above (see paragraph 58 above), that it is no longer justified to continue the examination of the applications listed in Annexes 2, 5, 7 and 9. Moreover, for the reasons given above (see paragraph 56 above), the Court considers that respect for human rights as defined in the Convention and the Protocols thereto, does not require the continued examination of these applications.
61. In the light of the foregoing, the Court, in accordance with Article 37 § 1 (c) of the Convention, decides to strike the 172 applications listed in Annexes 2, 5, 7 and 9 out of the list of cases.
62. The Court also notes that some of the applicants died after lodging the application and their heirs expressed a wish to continue with the relevant applications, as reflected in annexes 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8. In view of the pecuniary nature of the complaints made in the present application, the Court sees no reason to refuse these requests by the heirs. For practical reasons, this judgment will continue to refer to the original applicants as the “applicants”, although their heirs are now to be regarded as having that status (see paragraph 50 above).
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
63. The applicants complained that by not allowing them access to their land or by making it conditional on them paying rent, the “MRT” authorities had breached their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
64. The Court notes that the applications are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants’ submissions
65. The applicants natural persons argued that by being prevented from obtaining access to the land they owned in 2004-2006 and subsequently being forced to conclude rental agreements concerning their land, the “MRT” authorities had breached their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. They submitted that while the land had not been formally expropriated, their property rights had been limited in a manner similar to those of the Cypriot citizens who had lost access to their property under the effective control of the self-proclaimed “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus”, as found by the Court in the case of Loizidou v. Turkey (merits) (18 December 1996, Reports 1996 VI). Moreover, their property had lost much of its value because of the limits on its use.
66. The applicants accepted that the initial lists of applicants in the application forms had not been fully accurate since some applicants had been listed several times because they owned several plots of land. Moreover, some confusion had been caused by the fact that certain names had been written differently during the Soviet era from their spelling in the new Moldovan identification and land title documents. Some documents confirming ownership or the rent of land had been omitted by mistake. However, they had submitted an updated list of applicants and appended all the relevant information to their observations of 20 November 2013.
67. The applicant companies argued that they had a “legitimate expectation”, within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, of being able to use the relevant land in accordance with their rental contracts, and of making profit from their agricultural activity there. They referred to the various certificates from the Moldovan authorities confirming that they had in 2004-2006 rented specific areas of land in the relevant area, and to the decisions of the “MRT” authorities fining them and seizing their agricultural equipment used to cultivate that land (see paragraphs 17-19 above). By being prevented from cultivating the rented land, they had sustained losses and lost profits. Their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention had thus been breached.
(b) The Moldovan Government’s submissions
68. The Moldovan Government noted that the merits of the complaint was closely related to the jurisdictional issue and to the extent to which Moldova had carried out the positive obligations under the Convention. They did not make any additional arguments concerning this complaint.
(c) The Russian Government’s submissions
69. The Russian Government noted that information in respect of many of the applicants (they specifically identified forty-six of them), was incomplete or illegible, lacking, for instance, cadastral numbers and other evidence of ownership or cultivation of the land. While some applicants had submitted deeds of gift or wills, they had not appended documents confirming that ownership of the land had been obtained through such acts.
70. The applicant company Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. had not submitted any evidence that it had rented 104 hectares of land in the relevant area, such as rental contracts, a list of lessors, extracts from the register of real estate or details of the location of the land. In the absence of copies of rental agreements, it was impossible to speculate as to whether it could or could not rent land from unspecified landowners and at what price. Owing to their inability to establish facts in the “MRT”, the Russian Government could not verify themselves whether each applicant owned or rented land in the relevant area.
71. Moreover, the applicants who had submitted evidence of owning or renting land in the relevant area could farm it once they had signed tenancy agreements with the local authorities in the “MRT”. In that case, as was clear from the documents submitted by the applicants themselves, the “MRT” customs bodies would not have prevented the farming of the land.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether the applicants had “possessions”
72. The Court reiterates that “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” that they will be realised, that is, that he or she will obtain effective enjoyment of a property right (see, for example, Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, 20 November 1995, § 31, Series A no. 332; Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, § 69, ECHR 2002 VII; Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, c, ECHR 2004 IX; Fabris v. France [GC], no. 16574/08, § 50, ECHR 2013 (extracts); and Radomilja and Others v. Croatia [GC], nos. 37685/10 and 22768/12, § 143, 20 March 2018).
73. The Court notes the Russian Government’s submission that most of the applicants failed to submit documents proving that they were owners of land in the relevant area or that they rented such land. In essence, they argued that such applicants did not have “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. By way of example, the Russian Government listed forty-six applicants (natural persons) for whom documents were lacking or whose documents were incomplete or unreadable.
74. The Court notes that the applicants’ representatives of the applicants natural persons annexed to their observations of 20 November 2013 copies of documents for each applicant, including copies of passports or identification cards, of certificates from the Moldovan State land registry (Cadastru) with cadastral numbers, the plan of the plots of land and the history of the ownership of the relevant plots of land, and, where applicable, deeds of gift, marriage certificates (in case of a change of name), death certificates, and wills or legal succession certificates issued by notaries public. Those annexes are mostly legible and, in the Court’s view, establish with sufficient certainty that all these applicants, including forty-three of the forty-six identified by the Russian Government in their observations, owned land at the relevant time, in the relevant region. It is also worth noting that, despite the land in question being situated across a road controlled by the “MRT” and allegedly on “MRT territory”, the latter’s authorities did not object to distribution of that land by the Moldovan authorities to the applicants (see paragraph 7 above). Finally, it is clear from the documents in the file that some of the applicants were able to sell or donate their land in the relevant region, which confirms their property right.
75. Accordingly, as landowners they had “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
76. In respect of the applicant companies, the Court notes that they all submitted certificates from the mayors of the relevant villages, showing that they had rented land from villagers situated in the relevant area (see paragraphs 17-19 above). Moreover, two of the applicant companies submitted decisions by the “MRT” Customs Office fining them for transporting agricultural products into or out of the “MRT” without declaring them at the “border” (situated along the road mentioned in paragraph 6 above), clearly finding that the products were being transported across the road separating the relevant villages from their land. The audit reports submitted by two of those companies (Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. and Agro-Tiras S.R.L.) also confirm that they had incurred losses from being unable to cultivate the land they had rented from the villagers. Lastly, the complaints made in 2004 to the Moldovan authorities by two of the applicant companies (see paragraphs 17 and 19 above) provide contemporaneous evidence that they indeed rented land during the relevant period.
77. It is true that none of the applicant companies claimed that they were owners of any land. However, on the basis of the documents submitted to it, the Court is able to conclude that they rented land and cultivated it for commercial purposes. Recalling that the concept of “possessions” in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention has an autonomous meaning which is not limited to ownership of physical goods, but covers also certain other rights and interests constituting assets (see, in general, Béláné Nagy v. Hungary [GC], no. 53080/13, § 73, ECHR 2016; see in particular, with respect to a “clientele” built up through the operation of an enterprise on a site leased by the entrepreneur, Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 1999 II), the Court considers that the right to use land, on the basis of rent contracts, connected to the conduct of a business, conferred on the applicant companies title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, among other authorities, Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 62, ECHR 2010, and Di Marco v. Italy, no. 32521/05, §§ 51-53, 26 April 2011). The applicant companies thus had “possessions” within the meaning of that provision.
(b) Whether there was an interference with the applicants’ property rights
78. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention comprises three distinct rules. The first rule, which is set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property. The second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions. The third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest, by enforcing such laws as they deem necessary for the purpose. However, the rules are not “distinct” in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among many other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98, and Fábián v. Hungary [GC], no. 78117/13, § 60, ECHR 2017 (extracts)).
79. The Court notes that while the “MRT” authorities declared that the “MRT” was the owner of the land owned or rented by the applicants, they did not formally deprive the applicants of their property. However, they obliged the applicants to conclude rental contracts with the “MRT” authorities, although the applicants owned the land or rented it from its lawful owners. Upon the refusal of the applicants to sign such contracts, the authorities between 2004 and 2006 blocked access to the land they owned or rented (see paragraph 13 above). There has therefore been an interference with the applicants’ property rights. While this interference does not amount to a deprivation of property or to a control of the use of property, the Court considers that the applicants’ inability to cultivate their land falls to be considered under the first rule mentioned above, namely the general principle of the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Loizidou, cited above, § 63).
(c) Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
80. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see, among other authorities, Iatridis, cited above, § 58, and Béláné Nagy, cited above, § 112).
81. The Court must therefore determine whether there was any legal basis in domestic law for the interference identified above (see Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 96, 25 October 2012). It notes that the respondent Governments did not submit any arguments on that point.
82. The Court notes that the applicants had title to the land or valid rental contracts with the landowners. It does not see any legal basis for the obligation placed upon them to conclude rental contracts with the “MRT” authorities as a condition for being able to cultivate the land. Likewise, it does not see any legal basis for blocking without reason access to land which someone owns or legally rents.
83. The above conclusion dispenses the Court from examining whether the other requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention were complied with in the instant case.
84. The Court therefore concludes that there has been a breach of the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(d) Responsibility of the respondent Governments
(i) The responsibility of the Republic of Moldova
85. The Court must next determine whether the Republic of Moldova fulfilled its positive obligations to take appropriate and sufficient measures to secure the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraph 34 above). In Mozer the Court held that Moldova’s positive obligations related both to measures needed to re establish its control over the Transdniestrian territory, as an expression of its jurisdiction, and to measures to ensure respect for individual applicants’ rights (see Mozer, cited above, § 151).
86. As regards the first aspect of Moldova’s obligation, to re-establish control, the Court found in Mozer that, from the onset of the hostilities in 1991 and 1992 until July 2010, Moldova had taken all the measures in its power (Mozer, cited above, § 152). Since the events complained of in the present case took place before the latter date, the Court sees no reason to reach a different conclusion (ibidem).
87. Turning to the second aspect of the positive obligations, namely to ensure respect for the applicants’ rights, the Court notes the efforts made by the Moldovan authorities both in securing access to the relevant land and in compensating those affected by the restrictions imposed by the “MRT” (see paragraph 20 above). In view of the case-file material, it considers that the Republic of Moldova did not fail to fulfil its positive obligations in respect of the applicants (see Mozer, cited above, § 154).
88. There has therefore been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Republic Moldova.
(ii) The responsibility of the Russian Federation
89. In so far as the responsibility of the Russian Federation is concerned, the Court has established that Russia exercised effective control over the “MRT” during the period in question (see paragraphs 36-37 above). In the light of this conclusion, and in accordance with its case-law, it is not necessary to determine whether or not Russia exercised detailed control over the policies and actions of the subordinate local administration (see Mozer, cited above, § 157). By virtue of its continued military, economic and political support for the “MRT”, which could not otherwise survive, Russia’s responsibility under the Convention is engaged as regards the violation of the applicants’ rights (ibidem).
90. In conclusion, and having found that there has been a breach of the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraph 84 above), the Court holds that there has been a violation of that provision by the Russian Federation.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
91. The applicants complained that they had no effective remedy in respect of their complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. They relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. Alleged violation of Article 13 of the Convention
92. The Court observes that the applicants’ complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention was undoubtedly arguable (see paragraph 83 above). The applicants were therefore entitled to an effective domestic remedy within the meaning of Article 13 of the Convention.
93. The Court considers that the complaint under Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
94. The Moldovan Government did not submit any specific arguments in respect of this complaint, except to refer to their efforts in securing the applicants’ rights on the territory controlled by the “MRT”.
95. The Russian Government did not submit any specific arguments in respect of this complaint, referring to the Court’s lack of jurisdiction to examine the present cases. However, they raised an objection (see paragraph 40 above) that the applicants had failed to exhaust the domestic remedies available in Russia. The Court finds, for the same reasons for which it rejected the objection raised by Russia (see paragraphs 44-46 above), that there were no effective remedies available to the applicants in Russia.
96. Moreover, there is no indication in the file that any effective remedies were available to the applicants in the “MRT” in respect of the above-mentioned complaints (see Mozer, cited above, § 211).
97. The Court therefore concludes that the applicants did not have an effective remedy in respect of their complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Consequently, it must decide whether any violation of Article 13 of the Convention can be attributed to either of the respondent States (see Mozer, cited above, § 212).
B. Responsibility of the respondent States
98. As for the responsibility of Moldova, the Court notes that it found in Mozer (cited above, § 214):
“... the positive obligation incumbent on Moldova is to use all the legal and diplomatic means available to it to continue to guarantee to those living in the Transdniestrian region the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms defined in the Convention (...). Accordingly, the ‘remedies’ which Moldova must offer the applicant consist in enabling him to inform the Moldovan authorities of the details of his situation and to be kept informed of the various legal and diplomatic actions taken.”
99. It also observes that in Mozer it found that Moldova had created a set of judicial, investigative and civil service authorities which worked in parallel with those created by the “MRT” (Mozer, cited above, § 215). In addition, as can be seen from the particular circumstances of the present case, the Moldovan authorities have actively negotiated various methods of protecting the applicants’ rights and obtained an improvement in their situation in 2006 (see paragraph 20 above).
100. In the light of the foregoing, the Court considers that the Republic of Moldova has made procedures available to the applicants commensurate with its limited ability to protect their rights. It has thus fulfilled its positive obligations. Accordingly, the Court finds that Moldova is not responsible for the violation of Article 13 of the Convention (see Mozer, cited above, § 216).
101. As for the responsibility of Russia, the Court refers to its finding that the Russian Federation exercised effective control over the “MRT”, at least until 2010 (see paragraphs 36-37 above). In accordance with its case law it is thus not necessary to determine whether Russia exercised detailed control over the policies and actions of the subordinate local administration. Russia’s responsibility is engaged by virtue of its continued military, economic and political support for the “MRT”, which could not otherwise survive (see Mozer, cited above, § 217).
102. The Court concludes that the Russian Federation is responsible for the violation of Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in the present case (see Mozer, cited above, § 218).
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
103. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
104. The applicants natural persons claimed 2,400 euros (EUR) each in respect of non-pecuniary damage. Their representatives argued that it would be virtually impossible to make individual arguments for each applicant given the differences amongst them in terms of age, the amount of land owned and any alternative income and owing to other issues, and so it seemed more appropriate to them to claim a fixed amount in respect of non pecuniary damage, which would also cover the pecuniary damage caused to them. At the same time, some applicants had disposed of their land after lodging their application and could not claim the same amount. These applicants claimed EUR 1,500 each.
105. The applicant companies submitted audits detailing their losses and asked for compensation for those sums: 2,020,779 Moldovan lei (MDL, the equivalent of approximately EUR 115,300) in the case of Agro-Tiras S.R.L.; MDL 1,411,181 (approximately EUR 80,500) for Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L.; and MDL 5,325,000 (approximately EUR 303,900) for Posedo Agro S.R.L. In addition, they each claimed EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
106. The Moldovan Government noted that they had fulfilled their positive obligations in respect of the applicants’ cases.
107. The Russian Government considered that the claims for non pecuniary damages were ill-founded and unsubstantiated. Any damage caused to them had not been Russia’s fault. In any event, the interference, if any, with their rights had been of short duration, unlike the cases concerning Northern Cyprus. Moreover, the applicants natural persons had acknowledged that they could sell their land, as some had done, which showed that they had preserved all the powers of owners to possess, use and sell their land. As for the applicant companies, their claims were based on audits which could not be verified owing to a failure to append any primary company documents on which those reports had been based. Therefore, the pecuniary claims by the applicant companies were highly speculative and “[could] be considered only as reference material” (with reference to Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine (just satisfaction), no. 48553/99, § 61, 2 October 2003).
108. The Court notes that it has not found any violation of the Convention by Moldova in the present case. Accordingly, no award of compensation is to be made with regard to this respondent State.
109. Having found that the Russian Federation is responsible for the violations found, the Court will examine the claims for just satisfaction with regard to that respondent State.
110. The Court considers that some damage has been caused to the applicants natural persons owing to their inability to access their land for two years and the subsequent obligation to conclude rental agreements for land which they already owned. Having regard to the circumstances of the case and making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards in respect of non-pecuniary damage EUR 1,500 to each such applicant (mentioned in Annexes 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8, with the exception of Mr Simion Cre?, Mrs Lidia Cre? and Mr Ion Luchianov, see paragraph 53 above), plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
111. As for the applicant companies, the Court notes that in addition to audits carried out by independent companies two of the three applicant companies also submitted copies of primary documents. Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. and Agro-Tiras S.R.L. each submitted, for the period of for 2004 and 2005, their financial reports, their annual balance sheets and reports to the Statistics Department, as well as the 2004 reports on special forms reserved for agricultural entities. They also submitted certificates from the statistical authorities concerning the average productivity of land in the region, as well as average sales prices for various types of agricultural products in 2004. Each of them also submitted an audit by an independent Moldovan company calculating the losses sustained as a result of the restrictions on their agricultural activity on the land rented in the relevant area.
112. The Court notes that the Russian Government challenged the authenticity of the audits owing to their inability to access the primary financial documents on which those reports had been based. However, as found above (see paragraph 111 above), copies of such primary documents were in the case file and had been sent to the Russian Government. In the absence of any reason to doubt the authenticity of the primary financial documents and of any other comment by the parties as to the actual calculations made in the audit reports, the Court cannot ignore the reports submitted by the applicant companies. It therefore awards the amounts requested in full, namely EUR 115,300 to Agro-Tiras S.R.L. and EUR 80,500 to Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L., in respect of pecuniary damage.
113. The Court notes that the applicant company Posedo-Agro S.R.L. submitted its own calculations based on its balance sheet. As it has not existed since 2007, it was incapable of obtaining audit reports. The Court finds that the absence of primary financial documents makes it difficult to determine the exact extent of the losses sustained by the company as a result of being unable to cultivate the land in the relevant region. At the same time, it is clear that the company was actively harvesting agricultural products in 2004, at the time when access to the land was blocked, as is evidenced by the fines paid to the “MRT” authorities for failure to declare its exportation of agricultural products (see paragraph 19 above). Moreover, the overall area of land which the company rented in the relevant area (1,256 hectares, see paragraph 19 above) greatly exceeded that of the other two companies (105 and 450 hectares respectively). This may explain the applicant company’s claim that its losses exceeded those of the two other companies combined. Owing, on the one hand, to the absence of a compelling manner in which to establish the damage caused to this company, but also, on the other hand, in view of the overall area of land it rented over the relevant period and the other evidence in the file, the Court awards Posedo-Agro S.R.L. EUR 50,000 for the pecuniary damage incurred, to be paid to its successor, Serghei Popa FP.
114. As for the applicant companies’ claims for non-pecuniary damages, the Court reiterates that it “cannot ... exclude the possibility that a commercial company may be awarded pecuniary compensation for non pecuniary damage”. Moreover, non-pecuniary damage suffered by such companies may include heads of claim that are to a greater or lesser extent “objective” or “subjective”. Among those, account should be taken of the company’s reputation, uncertainty in decision-making, disruption in the management of the company (for which there is no precise method of calculating the consequences) and lastly, albeit to a lesser degree, the anxiety and inconvenience caused to the members of the management team (see Comingersoll S.A. v. Portugal [GC], no. 35382/97, § 35, ECHR 2000 IV; Sovtransavto Holding, cited above, § 79; and Karhuvaara and Iltalehti v. Finland, no. 53678/00, § 60, ECHR 2004 X).
115. In the present case, the Court notes that the applicant companies’ sole activity consisted of agriculture. Following the loss of access to the land rented with the aim of cultivating it, the companies sustained losses, while Posedo-Agro S.R.L. ceased to exist.
116. Ruling on an equitable basis the Court awards each applicant company EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage (see Sovtransavto Holding, cited above, § 82, and Oferta Plus S.R.L. v. Moldova (just satisfaction), no. 14385/04, § 76, 12 February 2008).
B. Costs and expenses
117. The applicants also claimed EUR 111,060 for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court. The applicant companies relied on contracts with their legal representatives, based on an hourly rate of EUR 100 and itemised lists of hours spent working on the cases (in total EUR 12,000). As for the representation of the applicants natural persons, the basis taken was the smallest charge applicable under the Moldovan Bar Association tariff for international litigation (EUR 60 per hour). They took into account that at least one hour had been spent per applicant in order to talk to them and gather the enormous volume of information required (identification details, cadastral information, and the verification of electronic databases), and their number (1,649 applicants) and so claimed EUR 99,060.
118. The Moldovan Government considered that the costs claimed by the applicants were excessive.
119. The Russian Government argued that the legal costs claimed by the applicants were ill-founded, unconfirmed by documents and “unprecedentedly excessive”. Moreover, in breach of Rule 60 of the Rules of Court, the applicants had failed to submit itemised particulars of the claims, as well as any supporting documents. Lastly, they noted that the claims for legal fees had not been signed by the applicants, only their representatives, and that there was no evidence that the applicants had ever agreed to pay such sums to their representatives.
120. For the same reasons as indicated above, the Court makes no award covering costs and expenses with regard to Moldova, and limits its consideration of the relevant claims to the Russian Federation (see paragraphs 108-109 above).
121. According to the Court’s case-law (see for a recent example Merabishvili v. Georgia [GC], no. 72508/13, § 370, ECHR 2017 (extracts)), an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, as well as the undeniably extensive work in gathering and submitting individual documents for more than 1,600 applicants, the Court considers it reasonable to award them jointly the sum of EUR 20,000 covering costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
122. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Decides, unanimously, to join the applications;

2. Decides, unanimously, to strike out the applications lodged by the applicants listed in Annexes 2, 5, 7 and 9, as well as those lodged by Mr Simion Cre?, Mrs Lidia Cre?, and Mr Ion Luchianov;

3. Declares, unanimously, the application lodged by Mr Serghei Popa in his own name inadmissible;

4. Declares, by a majority, the applications lodged by the applicants listed in Annexes 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8, as well as by the applicant companies admissible;

5. Holds, unanimously, that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Republic of Moldova;

6. Holds, by six votes to one, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Russian Federation;

7. Holds, unanimously, that there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Republic of Moldova;

8. Holds, by six votes to one, that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Russian Federation;

9. Holds, by six votes to one,
(a) that the Russian Federation is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 115,300 (one hundred and fifteen thousand three hundred euros) to Agro-Tiras S.R.L., EUR 80,500 (eighty thousand five hundred euros) to Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. and EUR 50,000 (fifty thousand euros) to Serghei Popa FP, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 1,500 (one thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage to each applicant listed in Annexes 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8 or to their heirs as noted in those Annexes, with the exception of Mr Simion Cre?, Mrs Lidia Cre? and Mr Ion Luchianov;
(iii) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage to each of the three applicant companies;
(iv) EUR 20,000 (twenty thousand euros) jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

10. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 17 July 2018, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Robert Spano
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Dedov is annexed to this judgment.
R.S.
S.H.N.

DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE DEDOV
My vote in the present case was based on my previous dissenting opinion in the case of Mozer v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia ([GC], no. 11138/10, ECHR 2016) on the issue of the Russian Federation’s effective control over Transdniestria.


TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni:
Colpito del ruolo (l'Art. 37) colpendo richiesta-generale
(L'Art. 37-1-un) l'Assenza di intenzione di intraprendere la richiesta
(L'Art. 37-1-c) Continuò esame non allineato
Resto inammissibile (l'Art. 35) criterio di ammissibilità
(L'Art. 35-3-un) il personae di Ratione
Nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) (la Repubblica della Moldavia)
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) (la Russia)
Nessuna violazione di Articolo 13+P1-1-1 - Diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva (Articolo 13 - via di ricorso Effettiva) (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà
Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) (la Repubblica della Moldavia)
Violazione di Articolo 13+P1-1-1 - Diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva (Articolo 13 - via di ricorso Effettiva) (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà
Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) (la Russia)
Danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale
Danno patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)


SECONDA SEZIONE




CAUSA SANDU ED ALTRI C. REPUBBLICA DELLA MOLDAVIA E RUSSIA

(Richieste N. 21034/05 e 7 altri)








SENTENZA







STRASBOURG

17 luglio 2018

DEFINITIVO

03/12/2018

Questa sentenza è divenuta definitivo sotto Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Sandu ed Altri c. la Repubblica di Moldavia e la Russia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Robert Spano, Presidente
Paul Lemmens,
Ledi Bianku,
Il ?Karaka?,
Valeriu Grico?,
Dmitry Dedov,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 26 giugno 2018,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in otto richieste (N. 21034/05, 41569/04 41573/04, 41574/04 7105/06, 9713/06 18327/06 e 38649/06) contro la Repubblica di Moldavia e la Federazione russa depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con 1,646 persone fisiche di Moldovan e 3 società (“i richiedenti”, veda attaccato Annette nos.1-9), 25, 26 e 28 ottobre 2004, 24 maggio 2005, 20 gennaio, 8 febbraio, 14 aprile e 6 settembre 2006 rispettivamente.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, avvocati che praticano in Chiinu.?? Il Governo di Moldovan (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. L. Apostol. Il Governo russo fu rappresentato col Sig. G. Matyushkin, Rappresentante del Governo russo alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che loro erano stati negati accesso alla loro terra, in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, e che loro non avevano via di ricorso effettive in questo riguardo.
4. 17 gennaio 2013 le richieste furono comunicate ai Governi.
I FATTI
LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato con le parti, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
6. Le 1,646 persone fisiche di richiedenti vivono nei villaggi di Dorocaia?, Pîrîta, Molovata Nou?, Pohrebea e Cocieri, situato sulla banca sinistra del Dniester nella regione di Dubsari.? Questi villaggi sono sotto il controllo di Moldovan. Parte della terra che appartiene ai richiedenti è situata in aree vicino questi villaggi, attraverso una strada che collega i settentrionali e parti meridionali degli stesso-proclamarono “Moldovan Transdniestrian Repubblica” (il “MRT”-veda per più dettaglia Ilacu ?ed Altri c. Moldavia e la Russia ([GC], n. 48787/99, §§ 28-185 ECHR 2004 VII) e Catan ed Altri c. la Repubblica di Moldavia e la Russia ([GC], N. 43370/04 e 2 altri, §§ 8 42 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti)). Che strada che taglia per due zone controllato col Governo di Moldovan è controllata con le autorità del “MRT.”
7. I richiedenti ottennero titoli a queste aree di terra dalla Moldavia come parte del “Pamântul” (la Terra) programme della privatizzazione. In una lettera 2 dicembre 1999 datò il “MRT” amministrazione locale informò il Settore di Moldovan di privatizzazione che sé “non abbia qualsiasi eccezioni alla creazione, sulla base delle entità agricole nei villaggi di Dorocaia?, Pîrîta, Molovata Nou?, Conia ?e Cocieri le terre di che è situato sul territorio del [“MRT”], di fattorie di contadino all'interno della struttura del ‘Pamântul ' riformi.”
8. Intitoli ad alcuna della terra fu trasferito successivamente ad altri per regalo o eredità. I dettagli di ogni persona fisica di richiedente sono insorti fuori Annette N. 1-9.
9. I richiedenti Posedo-Agro S.R.L., Agro-Tiras S.R.L. ed Agro S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. è società che affittarono terra da proprietari durante il periodo attinente di tempo.
10. 15 agosto 2007 la società di richiedente Posedo-Agro S.R.L. ceduto tutti i suoi diritti ed obblighi a Serghei Popa Farming Proprietà (FP). Sia di quelle società è posseduto solamente col Sig. Serghei Popa. Sul 2007 Posedo-Agro S.R.L di 30 ottobre. fu liquidato. Sul 2013 Serghei Popa FP di 10 ottobre la Corte chiese a sostituirsi per la società di richiedente originale in riguardo della richiesta n. 41569/04 e dichiarò che sostenne che la richiesta di fronte alla Corte.
11. I richiedenti ' fonte di reddito principale è la lavorare della terra posseduto o affittò con loro. Per giungere alla loro terra loro devono attraversare la strada controllato con le autorità del “MRT.”
12. Fra il 1992 ed il 1998 i richiedenti usarono la terra in oggetto o l'affittarono senza interferenza. Nel 1998 il “MRT” autorità prepararono posto di controllo per esaminare il movimento di prodotti agricoli attraverso il “il confine” coincidendo con la strada summenzionata. Da doveva poi sui richiedenti pagare le varie tasse e parcelle al “MRT” le autorità.
13. Ad agosto 2004 il “MRT” autorità dichiararono che la terra possedette o affittò coi richiedenti era la proprietà del “MRT.” I richiedenti potrebbero continuare lavorarlo, a condizione che loro pagarono affitto al locale “MRT” le autorità. I richiedenti rifiutati di firmare noleggio contraggono perché loro già erano i proprietari legali (o affittuari) di quel la terra. Come una conseguenza, ogni accesso alla loro terra fu bloccato, ed il raccolto fu perso. Alcune delle macchine agricole che appartengono a quelli che tentarono di lavorare la loro terra furono sequestrati anche. Nessun lavoro era fatto sulla terra nel seguente due anni che lo fecero difficile ritornarlo alla sua veste precedente.
14. I richiedenti fecero azioni di reclamo numerose al “MRT” autorità, chiedendo un diritto di passaggio. Tale passaggio si rifiutò perché le autorità considerarono la terra in oggetto essere la proprietà del “MRT.”
15. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche alle autorità di Moldovan che risposero che loro non avevano nessuno mezzi di obbligare il “MRT” autorità per concederli passaggio gratis. Loro chiesero all'Ufficio del Moldovan Accusatore Generale di avviare un'indagine penale contro le persone responsabile per rendere impraticabile i richiedenti l'accesso di ' alla loro terra.
16. I richiedenti si lamentarono all'ambasciata russa in Moldavia ed all'Organizzazione per la Sicurezza e Co-operazione in Europa (il “OSCE”), inutilmente. 26 aprile 2005 un gruppo di possidenti, incluso alcuni dei richiedenti protestò di fronte all'ambasciata russa in Moldavia, mentre chiedendo alle autorità di che Stato per intervenire come un garante della pace e la stabilità nella regione. Una protesta simile ebbe luogo in 11 maggio 2005.
17. La società di richiedente Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. presentò un documento emesso con l'ufficio di tassa di Moldovan che mostrò che aveva pagato tassa su aree di rendita fondiaria da 281 proprietari. Secondo un certificato dal sindaco del villaggio di Pîrîta, la società di richiedente aveva affittato aree di terra (104 ettari) da persone nel villaggio fra il 1998 ed il 2006. La società di richiedente anche presentata copie della sua tassa e statistiche riporta per 2004, così come un rendiconto di certificazione con una società chiamato Totale che Consulta 15 novembre 2013 datato che mostrò che nel 2004-2005 la società di richiedente coltivò 359 ettari di terra dei quali 104 ettari furono situati nell'area riguardati con la causa presente. In 3 maggio 2005 la società di richiedente si lamentò a Dubsari ?Consiglio Regionale (un Moldovan autorità locale) della situazione, e confermò in 17 maggio 2005 che non era capace di coltivare 105 ettari di rendita fondiaria da 320 possidenti. Azioni di reclamo simili e richiede di concedere coltura della terra fu reso al “MRT” autorità locali, per istanza 19 luglio 2005.
18. La società di richiedente Agro-Tiras S.R.L. presentato un certificato dal sindaco di Molovata il ?villaggio di Nou datò 11 ottobre 2004, mentre confermando che affittò 450 ettari di terra da là gli abitanti di un villaggio tutti di che furono situati attraverso la strada fra Dubsari e Rîbnia ?(l'area attinente). Secondo una decisione del “MRT” Dogane Ufficio di 15 ottobre 2004, un trattore con complici agricoli e 5.8 tonnes di grano era stato sequestrato dalla società di richiedente che deve ad un insuccesso per in modo appropriato dichiarare l'importazione di simile articoli nel “MRT.” Il trattore era viaggiante di Molovata il ?villaggio di ?Nou ?nella direzione secondo ?la decisione, ?di “aree di terra del ‘MRT ' sotto la giurisdizione di Moldovan.”
19. Secondo un certificato 13 novembre 2013 datò dal sindaco del villaggio di Cocieri, la società di richiedente Posedo-Agro S.R.L. terra affittata da 782 abitanti di un villaggio durante il periodo 2004-2006. La società di richiedente presentò una copia di una decisione presa col “MRT” Dogane Ufficio di 4 agosto 2004 che determinato che 16 tonnes di orzo che avevano dovuto ad un insuccesso per in modo appropriato dichiarare l'importazione di simile articoli in erano stati sequestrati da sé il “MRT.” Una multa (approssimativamente 1,450 dollari di Stati Uniti (“USD”)) uguale al prezzo di mercato dell'orzo fu imposto e spese extra dovevano essere coperte, altrimenti l'autocarro che porta l'orzo che era stato sequestrato anche temporaneamente 30 luglio 2004 sarebbe confiscato. Una decisione simile fu impiegata 16 agosto 2004 col quale la società di richiedente perse 6.1 tonnes di mele. Doveva pagare anche una multa (verso USD 250) uguale al prezzo di mercato delle mele o rischia il sequestro di tre trattori sequestrato temporaneamente 11 agosto 2004. Secondo un certificato 12 ottobre 2004, la società di richiedente affittata 1,377 ettari di terra da 820 persone in Cocieri del quale 1,256 ettari furono situati nell'area riguardata con la richiesta presente datò. 4 agosto 2004 la società di richiedente si lamentò al Governo di Moldovan, l'OSCE e l'ufficio dell'accusatore di Dubsari ?(appartenendo al “MRT”) della multa e la confisca, affermando che affittò 1,256 ettari di abitanti di un villaggio terra di ' situata nell'area attinente e che nonostante avendo registrazione provvisoria col “MRT Dogane Ufficio” non fu concesso per portare il raccolto a deposito.
20. Secondo il Governo di Moldovan, il Parlamento di Moldovan passato un numero di leggi mirato a compensando gli abitanti di villaggi sotto Moldovan controlla sulla banca sinistra del Dniester (nell'area riguardata con le cause presenti) per perdite causate con le varie azioni del “MRT.” Il risarcimento incluse le differenze in gas naturale e l'elettricità fissa il prezzo di, pensioni in aumento, dando che tassa, rompe e crediti preferenziali a società agricole nella regione, ed assegnando combustibile di diesel per le attività agricole. Inoltre, un numero di leggi e decisioni che previde per il pagamento del risarcimento ad abitanti di un villaggio che avevano subito perdite che devono alla loro incapacità per coltivare la loro terra nell'area attinente fu implementato nel 2004-2007, con l'importo totale di aiuto che giunge a pressocché 39 milioni di Moldovan lei (MDL) (approssimativamente 2.3 milioni di euros (EUR)). Nel 2006 le autorità di Moldovan riuscirono a negoziare col “MRT” le autorità un provvisorio “MRT” meccanismo di registrazione per proprietari di terra nell'area attinente che concedè loro coltivare la terra ed essere esente dal fare pagamenti al “MRT.” Il sistema di registrazione provvisorio è rinnovato ogni anno in negoziazioni fra la Moldavia ed il “MRT” le autorità.
LA LEGGE
IO. RIUNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
21. La Corte nota che l'argomento di tutte le richieste è simile. È perciò appropriato congiungere le cause, nella richiesta di Articolo 42 degli Articoli di Corte.
II. AMMISSIBILITÀ
22. Il Governo di Moldovan presentò che l'azione di reclamo depositò entro uno dei richiedenti, Posedo-Agro S.R.L., era inammissibile perché la società era stata liquidata.
23. Per la loro parte, il Governo russo dibattè, che i richiedenti non vennero all'interno della loro giurisdizione e che di conseguenza le richieste dovrebbero essere dichiarate ratione personae inammissibile e ratione loci in riguardo della Federazione russa. Alternativamente, loro presentarono che le richieste erano inammissibili per i richiedenti l'insuccesso di ' per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali in Russia. Loro presentarono anche che Posedo Agro S.R.L. ' la richiesta di s era inammissibile come sé era stato liquidato e non poteva trasferire qualsiasi i diritti a suo risuoli proprietario, il Sig. Serghei Popa.
Giurisdizione di A.
24. La Corte prima deve determinare se i richiedenti incorrono all'interno della giurisdizione degli Stati rispondenti per i fini delle questioni si lamentò di, all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 della Convenzione.
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
un. I richiedenti le osservazioni di '
25. I richiedenti presentarono che Russia continuò a mantenere una presenza militare nel “MRT” nonostante le imprese date nei 1999 OSCE Istanbul Cima Dichiarazione. Questo vigore militare aveva un effetto dissuasivo su qualsiasi tentativo con le autorità di Moldovan di riattivare controlla sulla regione. Inoltre, ufficiali russi avevano affermato, in particolare nel 2012 e 2013, che loro non avevano nessuna intenzione di ritirare le loro truppe e munizioni dal “MRT” finché il conflitto infine era stato risolto. Quel diede appoggio al separatismo nella regione. Mentre nelle loro osservazioni il Governo russo si era riferito a discordanze allegato fra le sentenze che riguarda i fatti della Corte in cause precedenti e la realtà, loro non avevano presentato qualsiasi la prova di quel. Infatti, appoggio militare, politico ed economico russo per il “MRT” aveva continuato in tutto 2012 e 2013 con la disposizione di benzina senza pagamento ed i vari altri generi di assistenza, come una decisione di 17 marzo 2012 del Consiglio di Sicurezza russo per dare il “MRT” dell'USD 150 milione in aiuto. I richiedenti presentarono che secondo informazioni disponibile dal website del Ministero russo della Giustizia un “organizzazione non-commerciale ed autonoma” (“l'Integrazione di Eurasian”) aveva ottenuto tre milioni di rubli (Strofini) dalle varie fonti ed aveva dato assistenza al “MRT” di Strofini un miliardo (verso EUR 24 milione) che non poteva essere considerato così come soldi che viene da fonti private ma potrebbe essere stato piuttosto dalle autorità russe.
26. I richiedenti presentarono anche articoli, principalmente da “MRT” i media, citando dichiarazioni dai vari ufficiali russi del “MRT.” In un colloquio di televisione citato in un giornale locale 31 ottobre 2012, il coordinatore del gruppo del Duma russo per la cooperazione col “MRT” Parlamento, il Sig. Serghei Gavrilov dichiarò che il Duma stava progettando “passare decisioni mirate a proteggendo gli interessi del ‘MRT '... trasporto internazionale che riguarda, il modernisation dell'aeroporto di Tiraspol assistenza a ‘MRT ' società nel giungere al mercato russo, incluso per il [Difesa Ministero russo] gli acquisti.” Lui aggiunse che “Russia, in conformità col ‘MRT ' deve avere come molto del suo personale militare qui come costretto ad assicurare la sicurezza del ‘MRT ' ed il russi interessi di cittadino.” In un colloquio di 17 novembre 2012 il “MRT” Presidente dichiarò durante una visita con Sostituto Primavera russa Ministro Dmitrii Rogozin che “il ruolo della Russia per il ‘MRT ' è in molti riguardi un importante. ... La Federazione russa è il garante principale per il ‘MRT '.” Un articolo datò 9 maggio 2012 citò il Sig. Rogozin come dicendo che per l'organizzazione summenzionata l'Integrazione di Eurasian, e sotto il suo controllo personale, una serie di progetti sarebbe implementata nel “MRT”, incluso la ricostruzione di ospedali e scuole, la costruzione di un'ala nuova per l'università locale, equipaggiando pienamente che l'università con computer, e donando otto ambulanze. In 10 maggio 2013 un altro “MRT” giornale citato il Sig. Rogozin come promettendo ad un totale di Strofina un miliardo (verso EUR 24.5 milione al tempo) in aiuto umanitario al “MRT.” Lo stesso articolo citò un membro di Duma russo, il Sig. A. Zhuravliov come dicendo che Russia stava offrendo aiuto al “MRT” ed il suo centinaio di valore di persone di millions di rubli russi ogni anno. Sul 2013 Sig. Rogozin di 31 luglio fu citato come dicendo che il Presidente russo stava esaminando personalmente l'attuazione dell'edificio di dieci infrastruttura proietta nel “MRT” e che l'aiuto dato al “MRT” era non aiuta ad una materia estera perché approssimativamente 200,000 cittadini russi vissero nella regione. 10 settembre 2013, il rifiuto della Moldavia seguente per congiungere l'Eurasian Dogane Unione, l'importazione dei vini di Moldovan a Russia fu proibita. 12 settembre 2013 le autorità russe affermarono che la proibizione non colpì alcol che nasce da dal “MRT.” In un articolo 18 settembre 2013 datò un giornale russo (Kommersant) citò “MRT” decisioni Statali da aprile 2012 siccome affermando che alcuno dei soldi raccolsero da consumatori di gas naturale nel “MRT” fu deviato ad un “stabilisation procurano” per il “MRT.” Secondo il giornale, la regione aveva fin da 2009 creazione completamente fermata qualsiasi pagamenti a Gazprom per la benzina consumò, mentre accumulando debiti di USD 4 miliardo.
27. Come per la giurisdizione della Moldavia sulla regione che era stata confermata in sentenze precedenti e non c'era niente da aggiungere quel la materia.
b. Le osservazioni del Governo di Moldovan
28. Il Governo di Moldovan ammise che loro avevano giurisdizione territoriale sulla regione e chiese alla Corte di trovare che loro avevano intentato su cause ragionevoli coerenti con la loro influenza limitata il problema.
c. Le osservazioni del Governo russo
29. Il Governo russo dibattè che i richiedenti non vennero all'interno della loro giurisdizione e che, di conseguenza, le richieste dovrebbero essere dichiarate ratione personae inammissibile e ratione loci in riguardo della Federazione russa. Siccome loro facevano in Mozer c. la Repubblica di Moldavia e la Russia ([GC], n. 11138/10, §§ 92-94 ECHR 2016), il Governo russo espresse la prospettiva che l'approccio al problema di giurisdizione preso con la Corte in Ilacu ?ed Altri (citò sopra), Ivanoc ?ed Altri c. Moldavia e la Russia (n. 23687/05, 15 novembre 2011), e Catan ed Altri (citò sopra) era sbagliato ed a variazione con diritto internazionale pubblico.
30. Loro presentarono inoltre che Russia non aveva accettato mai che aveva speso millions di dollari di Stati Uniti su varie forme di assistenza finanziaria al “MRT.” Qualsiasi aiuto offerto era stato di una natura umanitaria, limitata a cibo e le altre necessità vitali ma non aveva comportato assistenza finanziaria come pagamenti di pensione (c'erano più al massimo due persone pensioni riceventi da Russia e milli persone che ricevono Secondo veterani di Guerra di Mondo i pagamenti di ' nel “MRT”). Gas naturale fu provvisto direttamente inoltre, alla società di Moldovagaz che poi lo ridistribuì a consumatori in tutta la Moldavia incluso il “MRT” la regione. Era perciò incorretto a stato che Russia provvide gas naturale al “MRT” per libero come il debito per benzina che era stata consumata ma non pagato per in che regione (verso USD 2 miliardo) aveva costruito su a Moldovagaz. Come per il “MRT” residenti in proprietà di passaporti russi, il loro numero non eccedè 140,000 come di settembre 2013, e non era uno-quinto della popolazione, siccome suggerito con la Corte in Catan ed Altri (citò sopra, § 120).
31. La presenza russa nel “MRT” fu limitato a vigori di peacekeeping come parte del suo sforzo di mediazione ed al personale necessario per proteggere munizioni che non poteva essere evacuata. La Corte era stata data informazioni della quantità esatta di munizioni immagazzinata a Cobasna (approssimativamente 20,000 tonnes di munizioni antiquata, non-trasportabile). I richiedenti non avevano chiesto che qualsiasi agente dello Stato russo era stato coinvolto negli eventi si lamentò di. Inoltre, il “MRT” non era controllato con la Russia ed aveva di passato respinto alcune delle proposte della Russia. In Catan ed Altri (citò sopra), Russia era stata sostenuta responsabile per azioni nelle quali non era stato coinvolto e quale non era iniziato o controllato.
2. La valutazione della Corte
32. La Corte nota che le parti nella causa presente hanno posizioni riguardo alla questione di giurisdizione che è simile a quegli espressa con le parti in Catan ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 83-101) ed in Mozer (citò sopra, §§ 81-95). Vale a dire, i richiedenti ed il Governo di Moldovan presentarono che sia Governi rispondenti avevano giurisdizione, mentre il Governo russo presentò che loro non avevano giurisdizione.
33. I richiami di Corte che i principi generali riguardo al problema di giurisdizione sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione in riguardo di atti e fatti che accadono nella regione di Transdniestrian della Moldavia furono esposti fuori in Ilacu ?ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 311-19), Catan ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 103-07) e, più recentemente, Mozer (citò sopra, §§ 97-98).
34. In finora come la Repubblica della Moldavia riguarda, la Corte nota che in Ilacu ?ed Altri, Catan ed Altri e Mozer trovato che benché Moldavia non avesse su controllo effettivo la regione di Transdniestrian, seguì dal fatto che Moldavia era lo Stato territoriale che le persone entro che territorio incorse all'interno della sua giurisdizione. Comunque, il suo obbligo, sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione per garantire ad ognuno all'interno della sua giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definirono nella Convenzione, fu limitato a che di presa il diplomatico, misure economiche, giudiziali ed altre che erano sia nel suo potere e nella conformità con diritto internazionale (veda Ilacu ed Altri, citato sopra, § 333; Catan ed Altri, citato sopra, § 109; e Mozer, citato sopra, § 100). Gli obblighi della Moldavia sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione furono trovati essere obblighi positivi (veda Ilacu ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 322 e 330-31; Catan ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 109-10; e Mozer, citato sopra, § 99).
35. La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di distinguere la causa presente dalle cause summenzionate. Inoltre, nota che il Governo di Moldovan non obietta a facendo domanda un approccio simile nella causa presente. Perciò, trova che Moldavia ha giurisdizione per i fini di Articolo 1 della Convenzione, ma che la sua responsabilità per gli atti si lamentò di sarà valutato nella luce degli obblighi positivi e summenzionati (veda Ilacu ?ed Altri, citato sopra, § 335).
36. In finora come la Federazione russa riguarda, la Corte nota che in Ilacu ?ed Altri che ha fondato che la Federazione russa contribuì sia militarmente e politicamente alla creazione di un regime separatista nella regione di Transdniestria nel 1991-1992 (veda Ilacu ed Altri, citato sopra, § 382). La Corte trovata anche in cause susseguenti riguardo alla regione di Transdniestrian che su sino a luglio 2010, il “MRT” era solamente in grado continuare ad esistere, e resistere a Moldovan e sforzi internazionali per chiarire il conflitto e portare la democrazia e l'articolo di legge alla regione, a causa del russi appoggio militare, economico e politico (veda Ivanoc ?ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 116-20; Catan ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 121-22; e Mozer, citato sopra, §§ 108 e 110). La Corte concluse in Mozer che il “MRT”‘s livello alto di dipendenza su appoggio russo offrì un'indicazione forte che la Federazione russa ha continuato ad esercitare su controllo effettivo ed un'influenza decisiva le autorità di Transdniestrian e che, perciò, il richiedente incorse entro che la giurisdizione di Stato sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione (Mozer, citato sopra, §§ 110-11).
37. La Corte non vede motivi su che distinguere la causa presente da Ilacu ?ed Altri, Ivanoc ?ed Altri, Catan ed Altri, e Mozer (tutti citarono sopra), prendendo in considerazione il fatto che gli eventi principali si lamentarono di accadde nel 2004-2006, un periodo coperto con le sentenze in Mozer (citò sopra).
38. Segue che i richiedenti nella pelle di causa presente all'interno della giurisdizione della Federazione russa sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge il personae di ratione di eccezioni del Governo russo e ratione loci.
39. La Corte determinerà in futuro se c'è stato qualsiasi violazione dei richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto la Convenzione come impegnare la responsabilità di entrambi Stato rispondente (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 112).
L'Esaurimento di B. di via di ricorso nazionali
40. Il Governo russo presentò che le richieste dovrebbero essere respinte per insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali di fronte alle corti russe.
41. La Corte nota che l'obbligo per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali costringe un richiedente ad avvalersi normale di via di ricorso del quale sono disponibili e sufficiente in riguardo suo o i suoi danni di Convenzione. L'esistenza delle via di ricorso in oggetto deve essere sufficientemente sicuro, non solo in teoria ma in pratica, fallendo a loro mancherà quale l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia. Una via di ricorso deve essere capace di compensare direttamente lo stato contestato di affari per essere effettivo, e deve offrire prospettive ragionevoli del successo (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 116).
42. Con contrasto, non è nessun obbligo per avere ricorso a via di ricorso che sono inadeguate o inefficaci (veda Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, § 67 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996 IV). Comunque, l'esistenza di dubbi meri come alle prospettive del successo di una particolare via di ricorso che non è evidentemente futile una ragione valida non è per non riuscire ad esaurire che viale di compensazione (veda Akdivar ed Altri, citato sopra, § 71, e Mocanu ed Altri c. la Romania [GC], N. 10865/09 e 2 altri, § 223 ECHR 2014 (gli estratti)).
43. Come riguardi l'onere della prova, è in carica sulla non-esaurimento che chiede Statale per soddisfare la Corte che la via di ricorso era un effettivo, e disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente. Una volta questo carico è stato soddisfatto, incorre al richiedente per stabilire che la via di ricorso avanzò col Governo era infatti usato, o era per della ragione inadeguato ed inefficace nelle particolari circostanze della causa, o che là esistè circostanze speciali che li assolvono lui o da questo requisito (veda, inter alia, Maktouf e Damjanovi ?c. Bosnia e Herzegovina [GC], N. 2312/08 e 34179/08, § 58 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti); Vukovi ed Altri c. Serbia (eccezione preliminare) [GC], N. 17153/11 e 29 altri, §§ 69-77 25 marzo 2014; e Gherghina c. la Romania [GC] (il dec.), n. 42219/07, §§ 83-89 9 luglio 2015).
44. La Corte nota l'osservazione del Governo russo riguardo all'insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali di fronte alle corti russe. Osserva che essenzialmente esaminò la stessa eccezione in Ilacu ?ed Altri, trovando quel:
“... il Governo russo menzionò che era possibile per i richiedenti per portare le loro azioni di reclamo alla conoscenza delle autorità russe ma non affermò è probabile che diritto nazionale russo avrebbe riconosciuto che via di ricorso per i richiedenti la situazione di '.
Nota anche che il Governo russo negò tutte le dichiarazioni che le forze armate o gli altri ufficiali della Federazione russa avevano preso parte nei richiedenti l'arresto di ', reclusione e la condanna o erano stati coinvolti nel conflitto fra Moldavia e la regione di Transdniestria. Dato tale rifiuto di qualsiasi coinvolgimento di vigori russi negli eventi si lamentò di, la Corte considera che sarebbe contraddittorio per aspettarsi che i richiedenti essersi avvicinati agli autorità di Federazione russi” (Ilacu ?ed Altri [GC] (il dec.), n. 48787/99, 4 luglio 2001).
45. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il Governo russo non specificò quale delle loro corti aveva giurisdizione su azioni di reclamo contro le azioni del “MRT” le autorità. Inoltre, nessuno dettagli furono dati come alla base legale per esaminare simile azioni di reclamo ed alla maniera in che qualsiasi decisione presa sarebbe eseguita. In oltre, il Governo russo continuò a negare qualsiasi coinvolgimento diretto nel conflitto di Transdniestrian. Dato quelle circostanze che la Corte non è soddisfatta che le via di ricorso assegnarono a col Governo russo era disponibile e sufficiente.
46. Segue dal sopra che l'eccezione del Governo russo deve essere respinta.
C. Standing di Posedo-Agro S.R.L.
47. Il Governo di Moldovan presentò quel Posedo-Agro S.R.L. potrebbe chiedere più di essere una vittima di una violazione dei suoi diritti poiché era stato liquidato 30 ottobre 2007.
48. Il Governo russo presentò anche che la società di richiedente non potesse chiedere più di essere una vittima di una violazione dei suoi diritti poiché era stato liquidato. Il cedere contraente i suoi diritti a suo risuoli proprietario, il Sig. Serghei Popa che aveva concluso prima della sua liquidazione non dovrebbe essere giuridicamente possibile poiché implicherebbe un contratto fra il Sig. Popa e lui. Loro dibatterono che la liquidazione di una società non comportò qualsiasi trasferisce dei suoi diritti a terze parti. Inoltre, il Sig. Popa aveva informato solamente la Corte di che operazione cinque ed un mezzi anni dopo il fatto.
49. Il rappresentante della società Serghei Popa FP notò che aveva ottenuto tutti i diritti che appartengono alla società di richiedente originale (Posedo Agro S.R.L., veda paragrafo 10 sopra) e che aveva richiesto che la Corte gli concede sostituire la società di richiedente originale. Aggiunse che un trasferimento di diritti fra due società possedute con la stessa persona, siccome era la causa qui, non fu proibito sotto la legge di Moldovan. Inoltre, il Sig. Popa aveva firmato il modulo di domanda originale e la procura per il suo avvocato nel suo proprio nome e nel nome di Posedo-Agro S.R.L. Siccome lui era il risuoli proprietario di che società ed il risuoli proprietario di Serghei Popa FP, lui ancora potrebbe dire di essere una vittima della violazione dei diritti protegguta sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
50. La Corte nota che sul 2007 Posedo-Agro S.R.L di 15 agosto. cedè tutti i suoi diritti a Serghei Popa FP prima che fosse stato liquidato e così ad un momento quando aveva il potere per trasferire qualsiasi diritto ad una terza parte. Il direttore e risuola proprietario di Serghei Popa FP, il Sig. Popa successivamente espresse il desiderio per mantenere la richiesta di fronte a questa corte (veda paragrafo 10 sopra). Dato la natura economica degli interessi a gioco che è così trasferibile alle altre persone o le entità e l'assenza di qualsiasi dubita che il Sig. Popa aveva diritto a rappresentare ognuno delle due società lui aveva creato, la Corte non vede nessuna ragione di trascurare l'accordo fra le due società e costatazione nessun impedimento procedurale a sostituendo la società di richiedente originale col nuovo (veda, per istanza, Dimitrescu c. la Romania, N. 5629/03 e 3028/04, § 34 3 giugno 2008). Per ragioni pratiche questa sentenza continuerà a riferirsi a Posedo-Agro S.R.L. come il “il richiedente” benché la sua società di successore Serghei Popa FP oggi si riguarderà siccome avendo che status (veda Dalban c. la Romania [GC], n. 28114/95, § 1 ECHR 1999 VI, e Brosset-Triboulet ed Altri c. la Francia [GC], n. 34078/02, § 58 29 marzo 2010).
L'eccezione del Governo russo al trasferimento di diritti da una società posseduta con un individuo privato a che individuale lui deve essere respinto perciò come il trasferimento era infatti una fra due persone giuridiche.
51. In prospettiva della sostituzione del richiedente originale entro un altro uno, l'eccezione del Governo di Moldovan riguardo alla liquidazione susseguente della società di richiedente originale deve essere respinta anche.
52. Dato il fatto che l'azione di reclamo depositò col Sig. Serghei Popa nel suo proprio nome coincide con quel depositò con Posedo-Agro S.R.L., e determinato l'assenza di qualsiasi ragione eccezionale per “forando il velo aziendale” nel suo favore poiché la società era in grado depositare la richiesta, la Corte considera che il Sig. Popa non ha stando in piedi separato in riguardo dell'azione di reclamo. Perciò, la sua azione di reclamo personale deve essere respinta per essere ratione personae incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione, facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione (veda Agrotexim ed Altri c. Grecia, 24 ottobre 1995 §§ 66 e 71, Serie Un n. 330 Un).
Ritiro di D. con tre richiedenti
53. Sul 2016 tre richiedenti di 29 agosto (il Sig. Simion Cre?, il Sig.ra Lidia Cre ed il Sig. Ion Luchianov) determinato che loro non intesero di intraprendere le loro richieste di fronte alla Corte.
54. La Corte considera che queste informazioni devono essere esaminate nella luce di Articolo 37 § 1 della Convenzione. Pertanto come attinente, Articolo 37 prevede:
“1. La Corte può a qualsiasi stadio dei procedimenti decide di colpire una richiesta del suo ruolo di cause dove le circostanze conducono alla conclusione che
(un) il richiedente non intende di intraprendere la sua richiesta;
..
Comunque, la Corte continuerà l'esame della richiesta se riguardo per diritti umani come definito nella Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre così richiede.”
55. Articolo 37 § 1 (un) delle coperte di Convenzione la situazione dove il richiedente desidera ritirare suo o la sua richiesta (veda K.A.S. c. Il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 38884/12, § 45, 4 giugno 2013, e Polovynko ed Altri c. Ucraina e la Russia (il dec.), n. 52061/14 e 3 altri, § 10 5 luglio 2016). Circostanze riguardo a riguardo per diritti umani come definito nella Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre che richiede l'esame continuato della richiesta esiste quando simile esame contribuirebbe a delucidando, mentre salvaguarda e sviluppando gli standard di protezione sotto la Convenzione (veda, per esempio, H.P. c. la Danimarca (il dec.), n. 55607/09, § 85, 13 dicembre 2016 e, un contrario, Konstantin Markin c. la Russia [GC], n. 30078/06, § 90 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti)).
56. Al giorno d'oggi le cause, la Corte nota che i richiedenti affermarono espressamente che loro non desiderarono più intraprendere le loro richieste. Nota inoltre che questa causa fu portata con più di 1,600 richiedenti. La Corte ha perciò un'opportunità di determinare i problemi legali coinvolta, anche se questi tre richiedenti ritirano le loro richieste. Riguardo per diritti umani come definito nella Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre non richieda l'esame continuato delle loro richieste.
57. Nella luce del precedente, la Corte, nella conformità con Articolo 37 § 1 (un) della Convenzione, decide di colpire le richieste del ruolo di cause come lontano siccome concernono questi tre richiedenti.
E. gli Altri problemi di ammissibilità
58. La Corte nota che un numero di richiedenti non l'ha offerto con informazioni sufficienti per essere in grado continuare esaminare le loro richieste, come identificazione personale la superficie di aree di terra che loro possedettero al momento di entrata attinente l'area sotto la considerazione o numeri catastali per simile terra. In oltre, dei richiedenti sono morti e nessuno successore noto ha dichiarato il loro desiderio per continuare con le richieste attinenti. Ambo le categorie di richiedenti sono elencate in Annette 2, 5, 7 e 9.
59. La Corte considera che queste richieste devono essere esaminate nella luce di Articolo 37 § 1 (il c) della Convenzione. Pertanto come attinente, Articolo 37 prevede:
“1. La Corte può a qualsiasi stadio dei procedimenti decide di colpire una richiesta del suo ruolo di cause dove le circostanze conducono alla conclusione che
...
(il c) per qualsiasi l'altra ragione stabilita con la Corte, non è giustificato più per continuare l'esame della richiesta.
...”
60. La Corte considera, mentre avendo riguardo ad alle circostanze menzionate sopra di (veda paragrafo 58 sopra), che non è giustificato più per continuare l'esame delle richieste elencato in Annette 2, 5, 7 e 9. Inoltre, per le ragioni date sopra di (veda paragrafo 56 sopra), la Corte considera che riguardo per diritti umani come definito nella Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre, non richieda l'esame continuato di queste richieste.
61. Nella luce del precedente, la Corte, nella conformità con Articolo 37 § 1 (il c) della Convenzione, decide di prevedere le 172 richieste elencate in Annette 2, 5 7 e 9 fuori del ruolo di cause.
62. La Corte nota anche che alcuni dei richiedenti morirono dopo avere depositato la richiesta ed i loro eredi espressero un desiderio per continuare con le richieste attinenti, siccome riflesso in annette 1, 3, 4, 6 e 8. In prospettiva della natura patrimoniale delle azioni di reclamo resa nella richiesta presente, la Corte non vede nessuna ragione di rifiutare queste richieste con gli eredi. Per ragioni pratiche, questa sentenza continuerà a riferirsi ai richiedenti originali come il “i richiedenti”, benché i loro eredi ora saranno riguardati siccome avendo che status (veda paragrafo 50 sopra).
III. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
63. I richiedenti si lamentarono che con non concedendoli accesso alla loro terra o con facendolo condizionale su loro pagando affitto, il “MRT” autorità avevano violato i loro diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
64. La Corte nota che le richieste non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Merits
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) I richiedenti le osservazioni di '
65. Le persone fisiche di richiedenti dibatterono che essendo ostacolato dall'ottenere accesso alla terra loro possedettero nel 2004-2006 ed essendo costretto successivamente per concludere accordi di noleggio che concernono la loro terra, il “MRT” autorità avevano violato i loro diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Loro presentarono che mentre la terra non era stata espropriata formalmente, i loro diritti di proprietà erano stati limitati in una maniera simile a quelli dei cittadini ciprioti che avevano perso accesso alla loro proprietà sotto il controllo effettivo degli stesso-proclamarono “Repubblica turca della Cipro Settentrionale”, come trovato con la Corte nella causa di Loizidou c. la Turchia (i meriti) (18 dicembre 1996, Relazioni 1996 VI). Inoltre, la loro proprietà aveva perso molto del suo valore a causa dei limiti sul suo uso.
66. I richiedenti accettarono che i ruoli iniziali di richiedenti nei moduli di domanda non erano stati completamente accurati poiché dei richiedenti si avevano elencato molte volte perché loro possedettero molte aree di terra. Inoltre, della confusione era stata causata col fatto che i certi nomi erano stati scritti differentemente durante l'era sovietica dalla loro compitazione nell'identificazione di Moldovan nuova e documenti di titolo di terra. Dei documenti che confermano proprietà o l'affitto di terra erano stati omessi con errore. Comunque, loro avevano presentato un ruolo aggiornato di richiedenti ed avevano appeso tutte le informazioni attinenti alle loro osservazioni di 20 novembre 2013.
67. Le società di richiedente dibatterono che loro avevano un “l'aspettativa legittima”, all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, di essere in grado usare la terra attinente in conformità col loro noleggio contrae, e di profitto di creazione dalla loro attività agricola là. Loro si riferirono ai vari certificati dalle autorità di Moldovan che confermano che loro avevano in 2004-2006 specifiche aree affittate di terra nell'area attinente, ed alle decisioni del “MRT” autorità multandoli e prendendo la loro attrezzatura agricola coltivavano che terra (veda divide in paragrafi 17-19 sopra). Essendo ostacolato dal coltivare la terra affittata, loro avevano subito perdite e profitti perduti. I loro diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione era stato violato così.
(b) le osservazioni di Il Governo di Moldovan
68. Il Governo di Moldovan notò che i meriti dell'azione di reclamo furono riferiti da vicino al problema giurisdizionale ed alla misura alla quale Moldavia aveva eseguito gli obblighi positivi sotto la Convenzione. Loro non resero qualsiasi argomenti supplementari riguardo a questa azione di reclamo.
(il c) le osservazioni di Il Governo russo
69. Il Governo russo notò che informazioni in riguardo di molti dei richiedenti (loro specificamente identificarono quaranta-sei di loro), era incompleto o illeggibile, mentre mancando, per istanza, numeri catastali e l'altra prova di proprietà o la coltura della terra. Mentre alcuni richiedenti avevano presentato atti di regalo o le volontà, loro non avevano appeso documenti che confermano che proprietà della terra era stata ottenuta per simile atti.
70. La società di richiedente Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. non aveva presentato qualsiasi la prova che aveva affittato 104 ettari di terra nell'area attinente, come contratti di noleggio, un ruolo di locatori, estratti dal registro di beni immobili o dettagli dell'ubicazione della terra. Nell'assenza di copie di accordi di noleggio, era impossibile per speculare come a se poteva o poteva terra non lacerata da possidenti non specificati ed a che prezzo. Dovendo alla loro incapacità per stabilire fatti nel “MRT”, il Governo russo non poteva verificarsi se ogni richiedente possedette o affittò terra nell'area attinente.
71. I richiedenti che avevano presentato prova di possedendo o affittare terra nell'area attinente potrebbero coltivarlo una volta inoltre, loro avevano firmato all'entrata accordi di affitto con le autorità locali il “MRT.” In che causa, siccome era chiaro dai documenti presentati coi richiedenti stessi, il “MRT” corpi di dogane non avrebbero ostacolato l'agricoltura della terra.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Se i richiedenti avevano “le proprietà”
72. La Corte reitera che “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione può essere uno “proprietà esistenti” o i beni, incluso rivendicazioni in riguardo delle quali il richiedente può dibattere che lui o lei hanno almeno un “l'aspettativa legittima” che di loro si saranno resi conto, che è, che lui o lei otterranno godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (veda, per esempio, Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri c. il Belgio, 20 novembre 1995, § 31 la Serie Un n. 332; Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. la Repubblica ceca (il dec.) [GC], n. 39794/98, § 69 ECHR 2002 VII; Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35, c ECHR 2004 IX; Fabris c. la Francia [GC], n. 16574/08, § 50 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti); e Radomilja ed Altri c. Croatia [GC], N. 37685/10 e 22768/12, § 143 20 marzo 2018).
73. La Corte nota l'osservazione del Governo russo che la maggior parte dei richiedenti non sono riusciti a presentare documenti che provano che loro erano proprietari di terra nell'area attinente o che loro affittarono simile terra. In essenza, loro dibatterono, che simile richiedenti non avevano “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Con modo di esempio, il Governo russo elencò quaranta-sei richiedenti (le persone fisiche) per che documenti stava mancando o di chi documenti erano incompleti o illeggibili.
74. La Corte nota che i richiedenti che i rappresentanti di ' delle persone fisiche di richiedenti hanno annesso alle loro osservazioni del 2013 copie di 20 novembre di documenti per ogni richiedente, incluso copie di passaporti o l'identificazione carda, di certificati dal Moldovan State la cancelleria di terra (Cadastru) con numeri catastali, il piano delle aree di terra e la storia della proprietà delle aree attinenti di terra, e, dove applicabile, atti di regalo, certificati di matrimonio (in causa di un cambio di nome), certificati di morte, e vuole o certificati di successione legali emisero con pubblico di notai. Quegli annette è quasi sempre leggibile e, nella prospettiva della Corte, stabilisca con certezza sufficiente che tutti questi richiedenti, incluso quaranta-tre dei quaranta-sei identificati col Governo russo nelle loro osservazioni, terra posseduta al tempo attinente, nella regione attinente. Vale anche che, nonostante la terra in oggetto essendo situato attraverso una strada controllato col “MRT” e presumibilmente su “il territorio di MRT”, le autorità seconde non obiettarono alla distribuzione di che terra con le autorità di Moldovan ai richiedenti (veda paragrafo 7 sopra). Infine, è chiaro dai documenti nell'archivio che alcuni dei richiedenti erano in grado ad imbroglio o donano la loro terra nella regione attinente che conferma il loro diritto di proprietà.
75. Come possidenti loro avevano di conseguenza, “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
76. In riguardo delle società di richiedente, la Corte nota, che loro tutti presentarono certificati dai sindaci dei villaggi attinenti, mentre mostra che loro avevano affittato terra da abitanti di un villaggio situati nell'area attinente (veda divide in paragrafi 17-19 sopra). Inoltre, due delle società di richiedente presentarono decisioni col “MRT” Dogane Ufficio che li multa per trasportare prodotti agricoli in o fuori del “MRT” senza dichiararli al “il confine” (situato lungo la strada menzionata in paragrafo 6 sopra), chiaramente trovando che i prodotti erano trasportati attraverso la strada che disgiunge i villaggi attinenti dalla loro terra. I rendiconti di certificazione presentati entro due di quelle società (Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. ed Agro-Tiras S.R.L.) anche confermi che loro erano incorsi in perdite dal non essere capace di coltivare la terra loro avevano affittato dagli abitanti di un villaggio. Infine, le azioni di reclamo resero nel 2004 alle autorità di Moldovan entro due delle società di richiedente (veda divide in paragrafi 17 e 19 sopra) offre prova contemporanea che loro affittarono davvero terra durante il periodo attinente.
77. È vero che nessune delle società di richiedente chiese che loro erano proprietari di qualsiasi la terra. Sulla base dei documenti presentata a sé, la Corte è comunque, in grado concludere che loro affittarono terra e lo coltivarono per fini commerciali. Richiamando che il concetto di “le proprietà” in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato a proprietà di beni fisici, ma coperte anche i certi altri diritti ed interessi che costituiscono i beni (veda, in generale, Béláné Nagy c. l'Ungheria [GC], n. 53080/13, § 73 ECHR 2016; veda in particolare, riguardo ad un “la clientela” costruì su per l'operazione di un'impresa su un luogo affittato con l'imprenditore, Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 1999 II), la Corte considera che il diritto per usare terra, sulla base di contratti di affitto connesse alla condotta di un affari, conferì sulle società di richiedente intitoli ad un interesse effettivo protegguto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda, fra le altre autorità, Depalle c. la Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 62, ECHR 2010, e Di Marco c. l'Italia, n. 32521/05, §§ 51-53 26 aprile 2011). Le società di richiedente avevano così “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di quel la disposizione.
(b) Se c'era un'interferenza coi richiedenti diritti di proprietà di '
78. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione comprende tre articoli distinti. Il primo articolo che è esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio di godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni. Il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale, con eseguendo simile leggi siccome loro ritengono necessari per il fine. Comunque, gli articoli non sono “distinto” nel senso di essere distaccato. Il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò nella luce del principio generale enunciata nel primo articolo (veda, fra molte altre autorità, James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37 la Serie Un n. 98, e Fábián c. l'Ungheria [GC], n. 78117/13, § 60 ECHR 2017 (gli estratti)).
79. La Corte nota che mentre il “MRT” autorità dichiararono che il “MRT” era il proprietario della terra posseduto o affittò coi richiedenti, loro non spogliarono formalmente i richiedenti della loro proprietà. Comunque, loro obbligarono i richiedenti a concludere contratti di noleggio col “MRT” le autorità, benché i richiedenti possedettero la terra o l'affittarono dai suoi proprietari legali. Sul rifiuto dei richiedenti per firmare simile contratti, le autorità fra 2004 e 2006 accesso bloccato alla terra loro possedettero o affittarono (veda paragrafo 13 sopra). C'è stata perciò un'interferenza coi richiedenti diritti di proprietà di '. Mentre questa interferenza non corrisponde ad una privazione di proprietà o ad un controllo dell'uso di proprietà, la Corte considera, che i richiedenti l'incapacità di ' per coltivare la loro terra incorre essere considerata sotto il primo articolo menzionò sopra di, vale a dire il principio generale del godimento tranquillo di proprietà (veda Loizidou, citato sopra, § 63).
(il c) Ottemperanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
80. La Corte reitera che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (veda, fra le altre autorità, Iatridis, citato sopra, § 58, e Béláné Nagy, citato sopra, § 112).
81. La Corte deve determinare perciò se c'era qualsiasi base legale in diritto nazionale per l'interferenza identificata sopra di (veda Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 96 25 ottobre 2012). Nota che i Governi rispondenti non presentarono qualsiasi gli argomenti su quel il punto.
82. La Corte nota che i richiedenti avevano titolo alla terra o noleggio valido contrae coi possidenti. Non vede qualsiasi base legale per l'obbligo mise su loro per concludere contratti di noleggio col “MRT” autorità come una condizione per essere in grado coltivare la terra. Similmente, non vede qualsiasi base legale per bloccare senza accesso di ragione per sbarcare qualcuno possiede quale o giuridicamente gli affitti.
83. La conclusione sopra dispensa la Corte dall'esaminare se gli altri requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione si fu attenuto con nella causa presente.
84. La Corte conclude perciò che c'è stata una violazione dei richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(d) la Responsabilità dei Governi rispondenti
(i) La responsabilità della Repubblica della Moldavia
85. La Corte deve determinare seguente se la Repubblica della Moldavia adempiè ai suoi obblighi positivi per prendere misure appropriate e sufficienti per garantire i richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda paragrafo 34 sopra). In Mozer la Corte sostenne che gli obblighi positivi di Moldavia riferirono sia a misure necessitate a re stabilisca sul suo controllo il territorio di Transdniestrian, come un'espressione della sua giurisdizione ed a misure per assicurare riguardo per richiedenti individuali i diritti di ' (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 151).
86. Come riguardi il primo aspetto dell'obbligo della Moldavia, riattivare controllo la Corte trovata in Mozer che, dall'assalto delle ostilità in 1991 e 1992 sino a luglio 2010, Moldavia aveva preso tutte le misure nel suo potere (Mozer, citato sopra, § 152). Poiché gli eventi si lamentarono di nella causa presente succedè di fronte alla data seconda, la Corte non vede nessuna ragione di giungere ad una conclusione diversa (l'ibidem).
87. Rivolgendosi al secondo aspetto degli obblighi positivi, vale a dire assicurare riguardo per i richiedenti i diritti di ' la Corte nota gli sforzi resi con le autorità di Moldovan sia nel garantire accesso alla terra attinente e nel compensare quelli colpiti con le restrizioni imposte col “MRT” (veda paragrafo 20 sopra). In prospettiva del materiale di causa-archivio, considera, che la Repubblica della Moldavia non andò a vuoto ad adempiere i suoi obblighi positivi in riguardo dei richiedenti (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 154).
88. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione della Repubblica la Moldavia.
(l'ii) La responsabilità della Federazione russa
89. In finora come la responsabilità della Federazione russa riguarda, la Corte ha stabilito che Russia esercitò su controllo effettivo il “MRT” durante il periodo in oggetto (veda divide in paragrafi 36-37 sopra). Nella luce di questa conclusione, e nella conformità con la sua causa-legge, non è necessario per determinare se o non Russia esercitò particolareggiata controlli sulle politiche ed azioni dell'amministrazione locale e subordinata (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 157). Con virtù del suo appoggio militare, economico e politico e continuato per il “MRT” che non poteva sopravvivere altrimenti la responsabilità della Russia sotto la Convenzione è impegnata come riguardi la violazione dei richiedenti i diritti di ' (l'ibidem).
90. In conclusione, ed avendo trovato che c'è stata una violazione dei richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda paragrafo 84 sopra), la Corte sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di che approvvigiona con la Federazione russa.
IV. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 13 Di La Convenzione Presa In Concomitanza Con Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
91. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro non avevano via di ricorso effettiva in riguardo delle loro azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 13 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
A. Alleged violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione
92. La Corte osserva che i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione era indubbiamente difendibile (veda paragrafo 83 sopra). I richiedenti furono concessi perciò ad una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva all'interno del significato di Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
93. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 13 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non è mal-fondato manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
94. Il Governo di Moldovan non presentò qualsiasi gli specifici argomenti in riguardo di questa azione di reclamo, ometta riferirsi ai loro sforzi nel garantire i richiedenti i diritti di ' sul territorio controllato col “MRT.”
95. Il Governo russo non presentò qualsiasi gli specifici argomenti in riguardo di questa azione di reclamo, riferendosi alla mancanza della Corte di giurisdizione per esaminare le cause presenti. Comunque, loro sollevarono una difficoltà (veda paragrafo 40 sopra) che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali disponibile in Russia. La Corte trova, per le stesse ragioni per le quali respinse l'eccezione sollevate con la Russia (veda divide in paragrafi 44-46 sopra), che non c'erano via di ricorso effettive disponibili ai richiedenti in Russia.
96. Non c'è inoltre, indicazione nell'archivio che in qualsiasi via di ricorso effettive erano disponibili ai richiedenti il “MRT” in riguardo delle azioni di reclamo summenzionate (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 211).
97. La Corte conclude perciò che i richiedenti non avevano una via di ricorso effettiva in riguardo delle loro azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Di conseguenza, deve decidere se qualsiasi violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione può essere attribuita ad entrambi gli Stati rispondenti (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 212).
La Responsabilità di B. degli Stati rispondenti
98. Come per la responsabilità della Moldavia, la Corte nota, che trovato in Mozer (citò sopra, § 214):
“... l'obbligo positivo in carica sulla Moldavia è usare tutto il legale e diplomatico vuole dire disponibile a sé per continuare a garantire a quelli vivendo nella regione di Transdniestrian il godimento dei diritti e le libertà definì nella Convenzione (...). Di conseguenza, il ‘rimedia a ' che Moldavia deve offrire il richiedente consistono nell'abilitarlo per informare le autorità di Moldovan dei dettagli della sua situazione ed essere tenuto informato delle varie azioni legali e diplomatiche preso.”
99. Osserva anche che in Mozer trovato che Moldavia aveva creato un set di autorità di servizio giudiziali, investigative e civili che funzionarono in parallelo con quelli creato col “MRT” (Mozer, citato sopra, § 215). In oltre, siccome può essere visto dalle particolari circostanze della causa presente, le autorità di Moldovan attivamente hanno negoziato i vari metodi di proteggere i richiedenti i diritti di ' e hanno ottenuto un miglioramento nella loro situazione nel 2006 (veda paragrafo 20 sopra).
100. Nella luce del precedente, la Corte considera, che la Repubblica della Moldavia ha fatto procedure disponibile ai richiedenti commisurato con la sua capacità limitata di proteggere i loro diritti. Ha adempiuto così ai suoi obblighi positivi. Di conseguenza, i costatazione di Corte che Moldavia non è responsabile per la violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 216).
101. Come per la responsabilità della Russia, la Corte si riferisce alla sua sentenza che la Federazione russa esercitò su controllo effettivo il “MRT”, almeno sino a 2010 (veda divide in paragrafi 36-37 sopra). Nella conformità col suo diritto giurisprudenziale non è così necessario per determinare se Russia esercitò particolareggiata controlli sulle politiche ed azioni dell'amministrazione locale e subordinata. La responsabilità della Russia è impegnata con virtù del suo appoggio militare, economico e politico e continuato per il “MRT” che non poteva sopravvivere altrimenti (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 217).
102. La Corte conclude che la Federazione russa è responsabile per la violazione di Articolo 13 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nella causa presente (veda Mozer, citato sopra, § 218).
C. la Richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
103. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
104. Le persone fisiche di richiedenti chiesero 2,400 euros (EUR) ognuno in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. I loro rappresentanti dibatterono che sarebbe virtualmente impossibile per costituire argomenti individuali ogni richiedente dato le differenze fra loro in termini maggiorenne, l'importo di terra possedette e qualsiasi reddito alternativo e dovendo agli altri problemi, e così sembrò più appropriato a loro per chiedere un importo fisso in riguardo di non danno patrimoniale che coprirebbe anche il danno patrimoniale causò a loro. Allo stesso tempo, dei richiedenti si erano sbarazzati della loro terra dopo avere depositato la loro richiesta e non potevano chiedere lo stesso importo. Questi richiedenti chiesero EUR 1,500 ognuno.
105. Le società di richiedente presentarono revisioni che dettagliano le loro perdite e chiesero il risarcimento per quelle somme: 2,020,779 Moldovan lei (MDL, l'equivalente di verso EUR 115,300) nella causa di Agro-Tiras S.R.L.; MDL 1,411,181 (verso EUR 80,500) per Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L.; e MDL 5,325,000 (verso EUR 303,900) per Posedo Agro S.R.L. In oltre, loro ognuno chiese EUR 5,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
106. Il Governo di Moldovan notò che loro avevano adempiuto ai loro obblighi positivi in riguardo dei richiedenti le cause di '.
107. Il Governo russo considerò che le rivendicazioni per non danni patrimoniali furono mal-fondati e non comprovato. Qualsiasi danno causato a loro non era stato la colpa della Russia. In qualsiasi evento, l'interferenza se qualsiasi, coi loro diritti era stato della durata breve, diversamente da cause che concernono Cipro Settentrionale. Inoltre, le persone fisiche di richiedenti avevano ammesso che loro potessero vendere la loro terra, come alcuni aveva fatto che mostrò che loro avevano preservato tutti i poteri di proprietari per possedere, l'uso e vende la loro terra. Come per le società di richiedente, le loro rivendicazioni furono basate su revisioni che non potevano essere verificate dovendo ad un insuccesso per appendere qualsiasi società primaria documenta sul quale erano stati basati quelli rapporti. Perciò, le rivendicazioni patrimoniali con le società di richiedente erano estremamente speculative e “[poteva] sia considerato solamente come materiale di riferimento” (con riferimento a Sovtransavto Holding c. l'Ucraina (soddisfazione equa), n. 48553/99, § 61 2 ottobre 2003).
108. La Corte nota che non ha trovato qualsiasi violazione della Convenzione di Moldavia nella causa presente. Di conseguenza, nessuna assegnazione del risarcimento sarà resa con riguardo ad a questo Stato rispondente.
109. Avendo trovato che la Federazione russa è responsabile per le violazioni trovate, la Corte esaminerà le rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa con riguardo ad a quel Stato rispondente.
110. La Corte considera che alcuno danno è stato causato alle persone fisiche di richiedenti che devono alla loro incapacità per accedere la loro terra per due anni e l'obbligo susseguente per concludere accordi di noleggio per terra che loro già possedettero. Avendo riguardo ad alle circostanze della causa e facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale EUR 1,500 ad ognuno simile richiedente (menzionò in Annette 1, 3 4, 6 e 8 con l'eccezione del Sig. Simion Cre?, il Sig.ra Lidia Cre ed il Sig. Ion Luchianov, veda paragrafo 53 sopra), più qualsiasi tassa sulla quale può essere addebitabile quel l'importo.
111. Come per le società di richiedente, la Corte nota, che oltre a revisioni eseguite anche con società due indipendenti delle tre società di richiedente copie di documenti primari presentarono. Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. ed Agro-Tiras S.R.L. ognuno presentò, per il periodo di per 2004 e 2005, i loro rapporti finanziari, i loro rendiconti patrimoniali annuali e rapporti allo Statistica Settore, così come i 2004 rapporti su forme speciali riservate per le entità agricole. Loro presentarono anche certificati dalle autorità statistiche riguardo alla produttività media di terra nella regione, così come prezzi di vendite medi per i vari tipi di prodotti agricoli nel 2004. Ognuno di loro presentò anche una revisione con una società di Moldovan indipendente che calcola le perdite subita come un risultato delle restrizioni sulla loro attività agricola sulla rendita fondiaria nell'area attinente.
112. La Corte nota che il Governo russo impugnò l'autenticità delle revisioni che devono alla loro incapacità per accedere i documenti finanziari e primari sui quali erano stati basati quelli rapporti. Comunque, come trovato sopra (veda paragrafo 111 sopra), copie di simile documenti primari erano nell'archivio di causa ed erano state spedite al Governo russo. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi ragione di dubitare l'autenticità dei documenti finanziari e primari e di qualsiasi l'altro commento con le parti come ai calcoli effettivi resi nei rendiconti di certificazione, la Corte non può ignorare i rapporti presentati con le società di richiedente. Assegna perciò gli importi richiesti in pieno, vale a dire EUR 115,300 ad Agro-Tiras S.R.L. ed EUR 80,500 ad Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L., in riguardo di danno patrimoniale.
113. La Corte nota che la società di richiedente Posedo-Agro S.R.L. i suoi propri calcoli presentati basarono sul suo rendiconto patrimoniale. Come sé non esiste dal 2007, era incapace di ottenere rendiconti di certificazione. I costatazione di Corte che l'assenza di documenti finanziari e primari lo fa difficile determinare la misura esatta delle perdite subì con la società come un risultato di non essere capace di coltivare la terra nella regione attinente. Allo stesso tempo, è chiaro che la società attivamente stava raccogliendo prodotti agricoli nel 2004, al tempo quando accesso alla terra fu bloccato, siccome è attestato con le multe pagate al “MRT” autorità per insuccesso per dichiarare la sua esportazione di prodotti agricoli (veda paragrafo 19 sopra). Inoltre, l'area complessiva di terra che la società affittò nell'area attinente (1,256 ettari, veda paragrafo 19 sopra) grandemente eccedè che delle altre due società (105 e 450 ettari rispettivamente). Questo può spiegare la rivendicazione della società di richiedente che le sue perdite eccederono quelli delle due altre società combinò. Dovendo, sulla mano del una, all'assenza di una maniera irresistibile nella quale stabilire il danno causò a questa società ma affittò su anche, d'altra parte in prospettiva dell'area complessiva di terra il periodo attinente e l'altra prova nell'archivio, la Corte assegna Posedo-Agro S.R.L. EUR 50,000 per il danno patrimoniale incorso in, essere pagato al suo successore, Serghei Popa FP.
114. Come per le società di richiedente ' chiede per danni non-patrimoniali, la Corte reitera che sé “non... escluda la possibilità che una società commerciale può essere assegnata il risarcimento patrimoniale per non danno patrimoniale.” Inoltre, danno non-patrimoniale subito con simile società può includere capi di rivendicazione al quale è un più grande o minore misura “l'obiettivo” o “soggettivo.” Fra quelli, conto dovrebbe essere preso della reputazione della società, l'incertezza in decisionale, la disgregazione nella gestione della società (per che non c'è nessun metodo preciso di calcolare le conseguenze) ed infine, benché ad un minore grado, l'ansia e disturbo causarono ai membri dell'organizzazione aziendale (veda Comingersoll S.A. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 35382/97, § 35 ECHR 2000 IV; Sovtransavto Sostenendo, citato sopra, § 79; e Karhuvaara ed Iltalehti c. la Finlandia, n. 53678/00, § 60 ECHR 2004 X).
115. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte nota che le società di richiedente ' risuola attività consistita dell'agricoltura. Seguendo la perdita di accesso alla rendita fondiaria con lo scopo di coltivarlo, le società subirono perdite, mentre Posedo-Agro S.R.L. cessato esistere.
116. Decidendo su una base equa la Corte assegna EUR 5,000 ogni società di richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale (veda Sovtransavto Sostenendo, citato sopra, § 82, ed Oferta Più S.R.L. c. la Moldavia (soddisfazione equa), n. 14385/04, § 76 12 febbraio 2008).
Costi di B. e spese
117. I richiedenti chiesero anche EUR 111,060 per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alla Corte. Le società di richiedente si appellarono su contratti coi loro rappresentanti legali, basato su un tasso orario di EUR 100 e particolareggiò ruoli di ore spesero lavorando sulle cause (in EUR 12,000 totale). Come la base presa era la più piccola accusa applicabile sotto la Moldovan Sbarra Associazione tariffa per la causa internazionale per la rappresentanza delle persone fisiche di richiedenti, (EUR 60 per ora). Loro presero in considerazione che almeno un'ora era stata spesa per richiedente per parlarloro e raggruppare il volume enorme di informazioni richiese (l'identificazione dettaglia, informazioni catastali, e la verifica di databasi elettronici), ed il loro numero (1,649 richiedenti) e così chiese EUR 99,060.
118. Il Governo di Moldovan considerò che i costi chiesero coi richiedenti era eccessivo.
119. Il Governo russo dibattè che le spese processuali chiesero coi richiedenti fu mal-fondato, non confermato con documenti e “l'unprecedentedly eccessivo.” In violazione di Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte, i richiedenti non erano riusciti inoltre, a presentare dettagli particolareggiati delle rivendicazioni, così come qualsiasi sostenendo documenti. Infine, loro notarono che le rivendicazioni per parcelle legali non erano state firmate coi richiedenti, solamente loro rappresentanti e che non c'era nessuna prova che i richiedenti mai erano stati d'accordo a pagare simile somme ai loro rappresentanti.
120. Per le stesse ragioni siccome indicato sopra, la Corte fabbrica costi coprenti e spese nessuna assegnazione con riguardo ad a Moldavia, e limiti la sua considerazione delle rivendicazioni attinenti alla Federazione russa (veda divide in paragrafi 108-109 sopra).
121. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte (veda per un recente esempio Merabishvili c. la Georgia [GC], n. 72508/13, § 370 ECHR 2017 (gli estratti)), un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, così come il lavoro innegabilmente esteso nel raggruppando e presentare documenti individuali per più di 1,600 richiedenti, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnarloro congiuntamente la somma di EUR 20,000 costi di copertura sotto tutti i capi.
Interesse di mora di C.
122. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Decide, unanimamente, congiungere le richieste;

2. Decide, unanimamente, colpire le richieste depositò coi richiedenti elencati in Annette 2, 5, 7 e 9 così come quelli depositarono col Sig. Simion Cre?, il Sig.ra Lidia Cre, ed il Sig. Ion Luchianov;

3. Dichiara, unanimamente, la richiesta depositata col Sig. Serghei Popa nel suo proprio nome inammissibile;

4. Dichiara, con una maggioranza, le richieste depositate coi richiedenti elencati in Annettono 1, 3 4, 6 e 8 così come con le società di richiedente ammissibile;

5. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione della Repubblica della Moldavia;

6. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione della Federazione russa;

7. Sostiene, unanimamente, che c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione della Repubblica della Moldavia;

8. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione della Federazione russa;

9. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno,
(un) che la Federazione russa è pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 115,300 (cento e quindici mila trecento euros) ad Agro-Tiras S.R.L., EUR 80,500 (ottanta mila cinquecento euros) ad Agro-S.A.V.V.A. S.R.L. ed EUR 50,000 (cinquanta mila euros) a Serghei Popa FP, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 1,500 (milli cinquecento euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale ad ogni richiedente elencato in 1 Annette, 3, 4 6 e 8 o ai loro eredi come notato in quegli Annette, con l'eccezione del Sig. Simion Cre?, il Sig.ra Lidia Cre ed il Sig. Ion Luchianov;
(l'iii) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale ad ognuno delle tre società di richiedente;
(l'iv) EUR 20,000 (venti mila euros) congiuntamente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

10. Respinge, unanimamente, il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 17 luglio 2018, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Robert Spano
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudice Dedov è annessa a questa sentenza.
R.S.
S.H.N.

OPINIONE CHE DISSENTE DI GIUDICE DEDOV
Il mio voto nella causa presente fu basato sulla mia opinione che dissente precedente nella causa di Mozer c. la Repubblica di Moldavia e la Russia ([GC], n. 11138/10, ECHR 2016) sul problema del controllo effettivo della Federazione russa su Transdniestria.





DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 20/02/2020.