Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF DIMITAR YORDANOV v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,35,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 3401/09/2018
STATO: Bulgaria
DATA: 06/09/2018
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions:
Remainder inadmissible (Art. 35) Admissibility criteria
(Art. 35-1) Six-month period
No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings
Article 6-1 - Fair hearing)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)
Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)


FIFTH SECTION






CASE OF DIMITAR YORDANOV v. BULGARIA

(Application no. 3401/09)






JUDGMENT




STRASBOURG


6 September 2018


FINAL

06/12/2018

This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
.
In the case of Dimitar Yordanov v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Angelika Nußberger, President,
Erik Møse,
André Potocki,
Yonko Grozev,
Síofra O’Leary,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer,
L?tif Hüseynov, judges,
and Milan Blaško, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 10 July 2018,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 3401/09) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 17 December 2008.
2. The applicant was represented by Ms N. Sedefova, a lawyer practising in Sofia. The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agents, Ms M. Kotseva and Ms M. Dimitrova, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the State had been responsible for damage to property of his, due in his view to unlawful mining activities in close proximity, and that the domestic courts had wrongly dismissed his tort claim related to that damage.
4. On 15 September 2016 the above complaints were communicated to the Government and the remainder of the application was declared inadmissible pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1939 and lives in Sofia.
6. The applicant owns one half of a plot of land in the village of Golyamo Buchino, close to the city of Pernik. He also owned one half of a house standing on the plot, in which he lived until 1997, and one half of two smaller buildings, a barn and a pen. Those buildings no longer exist.
7. On an unspecified date towards the end of the 1980s or the beginning of the 1990s the State took a decision to create an opencast coalmine near the village. In a decision of 8 May 1990 the local mayor expropriated about ninety properties in the area for that purpose, including the applicant’s land and buildings.
8. The expropriation decision stated that the applicant should receive in compensation another plot of land in the village. The applicant received additionally a sum of money (the parties have not presented the decision of the mayor on the additional compensation). The majority of the remaining owners received either monetary compensation or flats in the city of Pernik. As another plot was not provided to the applicant within the statutory time limit of one year, on 21 August 1992 he requested that the expropriation be cancelled, as he was entitled to under section 102 of the Property Act (see paragraph 24 below). Another person who was due a plot of land in compensation also applied to have the expropriation of her property cancelled. In a decision of 2 October 1992 the Pernik regional governor cancelled the two expropriations, noting that the plots of land due in compensation had not been provided “owing to the impossibility for the municipality to ensure such plots”. The decision stated furthermore that the owners had to pay back the monetary compensation they had additionally received. On 22 December 1993 the applicant paid back that compensation.
9. The applicant remained in his house. In the years which followed the mine approached the house, due to its gradual enlargement. Coal was extracted from it by means of detonations, which, according to the applicant, shook the house on a daily basis. On unspecified dates cracks appeared on the walls of the house, and the barn and the pen collapsed. Towards the beginning of 1997 the applicant’s family moved out of the house, judging it too dangerous to stay.
10. Subsequently, the applicant contacted the mine, seeking to obtain compensation, but the negotiations failed. At the time, the mine was managed by a company which was wholly State-owned. In 2005 it was privatised.
11. In 2001 the applicant brought a tort action against the company operating the mine, seeking compensation for the damage caused to his property.
12. The Pernik Regional Court (“the Regional Court”), which examined the case at first instance, heard a witness, a neighbour of the applicant, who stated during a court hearing of 13 December 2001 that the walls of the applicant’s house were cracked, that its state continued to deteriorate, and that the barn had collapsed three or four years earlier. He thought that the house had been well constructed, and explained that after the initial damage the applicant had attempted to repair it. On 7 March 2002 the Regional Court heard another witness, who stated that most of the damage to the applicant’s house had been caused three or four years earlier.
13. The Regional Court appointed an expert, who established that the house had been constructed between 1948 and 1950, when there had been no requirements as to seismic resistance. At the time of drawing up the expert report the house was uninhabitable, as its walls were bent and cracked, with the cracks sometimes reaching 20-35 cm in width. The distance between the house and the mine’s periphery was about 160 180 metres. This meant that the house was situated well inside the so called “sanitation zone” consisting of land within 500 metres of the mine’s edge, inside which the law prohibited any dwellings. The “security zone” for the mine, within which no unauthorised person was to be present during detonation works, had a radius of 600 metres. The expert confirmed his conclusions at a court meeting on 24 January 2002.
14. In a judgment of 27 June 2003 the Regional Court dismissed the applicant’s action. It considered it established that the applicant’s property had been seriously damaged and that the damage had coincided in time with the beginning of detonation works in the mine. Still, it concluded that the applicant had not proven that a causal link existed between the damage and the detonations. He had relied in that regard on the witness testimony provided by two neighbours, but according to the Regional Court it was impossible to establish what had caused the damage to the property by way of witness testimony. The burden of proof to establish such a circumstance lay on the applicant and the other party had argued that the damage had been due to the manner of construction of his house.
15. The applicant lodged an appeal. Before the Sofia Court of Appeal (“the Court of Appeal”) he called an additional witness, who stated during a hearing on 2 February 2004 that many houses in the area had already collapsed, and that all the other houses in the applicant’s neighbourhood had cracks.
16. On 25 June 2004 the Court of Appeal upheld the Regional Court’s judgment, confirming its reasoning. It held that while witness testimony could establish the extent and the timing of the damage to the applicant’s property, it could not prove the causal link between that damage and the detonation works at the mine.
17. The applicant lodged an appeal on points of law. In a judgment of 5 April 2006 the Supreme Court of Cassation quashed the Court of Appeal’s judgment and remitted the case for fresh examination. It was of the view that the lower courts had not duly accounted for the fact that the mine operated in a prohibited area close to the applicant’s house, the house being situated within both the “sanitation zone” and the “security zone” around the mine. The lower courts had had to examine this fact in light of the statements of the witnesses, which had “established the circumstance” that the damage to the applicant’s property had been the result of the detonation works. It was also necessary to assess compliance by the company operating the mine with other statutory requirements, such as those concerning environmental protection.
18. After the case was remitted, the Court of Appeal commissioned a new expert report. The expert noted that, owing to the passage of time and the destruction of some documents, it was impossible to determine the exact distance between the applicant’s house and the area where the detonations had been carried out in 1997. Nevertheless, it was clear that the house had been well inside the “sanitation zone” around the mine. The expert additionally noted that the detonations had been carried out by qualified workers, in accordance with the mine’s internal rules.
19. The Court of Appeal heard an additional witness for the applicant, who stated during a court hearing of 23 November 2006 that many houses in the village had collapsed, and that he thought that this was due to the detonations at the mine. He added that the detonations took place on a daily basis, that they caused “earthquakes”, and that the houses shattered as a result. The first cracks on the applicant’s house had appeared even before the time when the mine had operated closest to it. The witness was not aware of any landslides in the area.
20. In a judgment of 2 April 2007 the Court of Appeal once again upheld the Regional Court’s judgment of 27 June 2003, dismissing the applicant’s claim. It found it “indisputable” that employees of the mine had acted in breach of law, by carrying out detonations in a prohibited area close to residential buildings, including at the time when, according to the applicant, the damage to his property had started. Nevertheless, on the basis of the material submitted, the applicant had not proved the causal link between the mine’s work and the damage to his property. The Court of Appeal reasoned in that regard:
“The causal link ... cannot be assumed – it is to be fully proven by the claimant. It has not been shown in the case that the claimant’s building, constructed in the 1950s, has been damaged precisely because of the detonation works at the mine. The claimant has not shown that the residential building and the auxiliary buildings, given [their] manner of construction, the materials [used] and the time of [their] construction, would not have been damaged, or would not have been damaged to such an extent, had it not been for the detonation works at the mine. It has not been shown whether and to what degree the buildings’ state described by the expert [heard by the Regional Court] was due to normal wear and tear, taking into account the year [they were built] and the manner of [their] construction, and any lack of maintenance by the owner after the 1990 expropriation.”
21. Upon a further appeal by the applicant, in a final judgment of 3 July 2008 the Supreme Court of Cassation upheld the Court of Appeal’s judgment, affirming its conclusions. It pointed out in particular that the expert report presented to the Court of Appeal (see paragraph 18 above) had only established that the applicant’s property had been situated within the “sanitation zone” around the mine, but “was insufficient to prove the existence of a causal link between the damage ... and the unlawful behaviour of employees of the respondent company”.
22. In the meantime, the applicant’s house has collapsed and no longer exists. The property has been abandoned.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Expropriations for public needs under the Property Act
23. Section 101 of the Property Act (????? ?? ?????????????), as worded at the relevant time, allowed the expropriation of private property for “especially important State needs”, which could not be met otherwise.
24. Section 102 stated in addition that the owner would receive compensation through other property or in cash, and that the authorities could take possession of the expropriated property only after the provision of the compensation due. If such compensation was not provided within one year of the entry into force of the expropriation decision, the owner could seek the cancellation of the expropriation. In 1996 section 102 of the Property Act was superseded by other legislation.
B. Health and safety requirements with regard to industrial installations
25. Ordinance No. 7 of 25 May 1992 concerning the health and safety requirements for the protection of health in residential areas (??????? ? 7 ?? 25.05.1992 ?. ?? ?????????? ?????????? ?? ??????? ?????? ?? ????????? ?????), adopted by the Minister of Health in implementation of the Public Health Act (see paragraph 27 below), provided for the creation of “sanitation zones” around industrial installations which represented an environmental hazard. The width of such zones was to be between 50 and 3,000 metres, depending on the specific characteristics of each installation, and the construction of non-industrial buildings was not permitted inside the zones. If such buildings already existed, the owners of installations concerned by the “sanitation zone” requirement were obliged to limit any harmful activities “to the statutory levels” by the end of 1997; otherwise, they were obliged to close down the respective installation or move it to another area. This ordinance remained in force until 2011.
26. In addition, “security zones” around detonation sites, within which no person is allowed during any detonation works, are provided for in a document entitled Security Rules During Detonation Works (????????? ?? ????????????? ?? ????? ??? ????????? ??????), adopted on 28 December 1996 by the Minister for Work and Social Assistance.
27. The 1973 Public Health Act (????? ?? ????????? ??????), in force until 2005, and after that the Health Act (????? ?? ????????), regulate the functioning and powers of health protection bodies. Among other things, those bodies are entitled to conduct checks and inspections, and if necessary suspend the functioning of industrial objects or installations operating in breach of health protection rules, and impose administrative punishments.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 AND ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
28. The applicant complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention of the manner in which the national court had decided on his claim against the company operating the mine. He complained furthermore under Article 8 of the Convention of an infringement of his right to a home. Lastly, he complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that he had been deprived of the possibility to “use freely” his property.
29. Article 6 § 1, in so far as relevant, reads:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 read:
Article 8
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties’ arguments
1. The Government
30. The Government pointed out that the complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention was related to the outcome of the civil proceedings, and argued that it was of a fourth-instance character.
31. Under Article 8 of the Convention, the Government contested the applicant’s claim that the house in Golyamo Buchino had been his “home”, pointing out that after 1997 he had not lived there.
32. As concerns the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Government pointed out that if the applicant had considered that employees of the mine had handled explosives in breach of the relevant rules, he could have requested that criminal proceedings be initiated against them on that account.
33. The Government contended that the State could not be held responsible for the damage caused to the applicant’s property, as he had not shown that it was due to any action of the public authorities. Nor had the applicant shown that the damage at issue was indeed the result of the operation of the mine, and, this being so, the State could not have been expected to take measures to prevent “events the cause of which is unknown or cannot be reasonably predicted”. Moreover, the State could not be required to close down the mine, an enterprise of “crucial economic importance”, for the sole reason that “an individual upon his free will chose to continue living in its vicinity”.
34. The Government submitted that the State’s responsibility was limited to guaranteeing the effectiveness of judicial proceedings between private parties. In such proceedings, the applicant had failed to substantiate his claim, and the claim had thus been dismissed “due to the objective facts of the case”. In any event, at the beginning of the 1990s the State had expropriated the applicant’s property and had offered him compensation.
2. The applicant
35. The applicant reiterated that his rights had been breached. He pointed out that the Government had not contested the fact that the mine had operated in a prohibited area close to his property, which had also been acknowledged by the domestic courts.
36. Under Article 6 of the Convention, the applicant argued that the national courts had reached the wrong conclusion in the tort proceedings initiated by him in finding that he had not proved the causal link between the mine’s work and the damage to his property. In his view, that causal link had been clearly established by the witnesses and the experts heard by the courts. The applicant added that, prior to being obliged to leave the house, he had repaired and maintained it, and that it had been well constructed.
37. As regards his complaint under Article 8 of the Convention and the question as to whether the case concerned his “home”, the applicant pointed out that he had a “strong emotional connection” with the house in Golyamo Buchino, where he had grown up and where he had lived predominantly with his family until 1997. He had not left the house of his own free will, but had been forced to do so after it had become dangerous to live there. The unlawful damage to the house rendering it uninhabitable meant that Article 8 of the Convention had been breached.
38. Under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as to the Government’s argument that he could have sought the criminal prosecution of employees of the mine (see paragraph 32 above), the applicant considered that such prosecution could not have provided the redress he sought, and in any event he had pursued another remedy, claiming damages.
39. The applicant pointed out that detonation works were inherently dangerous, and that the State had therefore established safety rules. In the event of a mine operating near to a house, the State required a protective “sanitation zone”, but even though his house had remained well inside such a zone, the mine had been allowed to continue to operate. The applicant argued that after the cancellation of the expropriation of his property the State had had to step in to exercise control and ban the unlawful activity. The applicant additionally pointed out that his request that the 1990 expropriation of his properties be cancelled had been motivated by the State’s failure to provide the compensation due to him within the statutory time limit. He had not been obliged to await this compensation indefinitely.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
(a) Article 8 of the Convention
40. The applicant complained of a breach of his right to respect for his home (see paragraph 28 above).
41. Under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, the Court may examine a matter only where it has been submitted to it within six months of the date on which a final decision was taken. The primary purpose of this rule is to maintain legal certainty by ensuring in particular that cases raising issues under the Convention are examined within a reasonable time. Furthermore, the rule facilitates the establishment of facts in a case, since with the passage of time any fair examination of the issues raised is rendered problematic (see Sabri Güne? v. Turkey [GC], no. 27396/06, § 39, 29 June 2012).
42. As was also pointed out by the Government (see paragraph 31 above), the house in Golyamo Buchino, which is the subject of this complaint, ceased to be the applicant’s home in 1997 when he moved out of it, judging it too dangerous to stay (see paragraph 9 above). The tort proceedings the applicant brought subsequently were not aimed at recovering the house or enabling him to return there, and there were no other developments in relation to his right to respect for his home. For these reasons the Court is of the view that as concerns the applicant’s complaint under Article 8 the six-month time-limit under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention started running in 1997 when he moved out of his house.
43. That complaint, lodged in December 2008 (see paragraph 1 above), has thus been lodged out of time, and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
(b) Remainder of the application
44. Concerning the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Government appeared to raise an objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies, since they stated that the applicant had failed to seek the criminal prosecution of employees of the mine who might have handled explosives in breach of the relevant rules (see paragraph 32 above). However, the Government have not shown that the remedy at issue could have provided any adequate redress to the applicant, enabling him to return to his house or to obtain compensation, and the Court thus dismisses the objection.
45. It finds in addition that the complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention, or inadmissible on any other ground. They must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
(a) Article 6 § 1 of the Convention
46. The applicant argued that the national courts had wrongly decided in the tort proceedings brought by him against the company operating the mine, in particular in concluding that no causal link had been shown to exist between the detonations at the mine and the damage to his property (see paragraph 36 above).
47. The Court has said on numerous occasions that it is not called upon to deal with errors of fact or law allegedly committed by the national courts, as it is not a court of fourth instance, and that it is not called upon to reassess the national courts’ findings, provided that they are based on a reasonable assessment of the evidence (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 28, ECHR 1999 I, and Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. and Di Stefano v. Italy [GC], no. 38433/09, § 197, ECHR 2012). Thus, issues such as the weight attached by the national courts to given items of evidence or to findings or assessments submitted to them for consideration are not normally for the Court to review (see Bochan v. Ukraine (no. 2) ([GC], no. 22251/08, § 61, ECHR 2015, and Moreira Ferreira v. Portugal (no. 2) [GC], no. 19867/12, § 83, ECHR 2017 (extracts)).
48. Nevertheless, the Court may entertain a fresh assessment of evidence where the decisions reached by the national courts can be regarded as arbitrary or manifestly unreasonable (see Khodorkovskiy and Lebedev v. Russia, nos. 11082/06 and 13772/05, §§ 803-4, 25 July 2013, and Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish and Others v. Romania [GC], no. 76943/11, § 90, ECHR 2016 (extracts)). Thus, for instance, in the case of Dulaurans v. France (no. 34553/97, §§ 36-38, 21 March 2000), the Court found a violation of the right to a fair trial because the sole reason why the French Court of Cassation had arrived at its contested decision rejecting the applicant’s appeal on points of law as inadmissible was the result of “a manifest error of assessment”. In An?elkovi? v. Serbia (no. 1401/08, § 27, 9 April 2013), the Court also found that the domestic court’s decision, which principally had had no legal basis in domestic law and had not established any connection between the facts, the applicable law and the outcome of the proceedings, was arbitrary. In Bochan (no. 2) (cited above, §§ 63-65), the Supreme Court had so “grossly misinterpreted” a legal text (an earlier judgment of the Court) that its reasoning could not be seen merely as a different reading of that text, but was “grossly arbitrary” or entailing a “denial of justice”. In Carmel Saliba v. Malta (no. 24221/13, §§ 69-79, 29 November 2016), the Court criticised the domestic courts for having relied on the inconsistent testimony of one witness and having failed to adequately comment on the remaining evidence; combined with other less significant shortcomings of the civil proceedings, this meant that those proceedings had not been fair.
49. In the present case the domestic courts appointed experts and heard witnesses, former neighbours of the applicant, and found on the basis of this evidence that the applicant’s house and the other buildings in his yard were seriously damaged and had become unusable. They found furthermore that the detonations in the nearby mine had been carried out in breach of law (even though by qualified workers and in accordance with the mine’s own internal rules), including at the time when, according to the applicant, the damage to his property had started (see paragraphs 14 and 20 above).
50. It was also established that, when the detonations were carried out closest to the applicant’s property, they were within 160-180 metres of it (see paragraph 13 above). However, while the applicant has not at any stage specified when the mining activity of which he complained commenced, it would appear that this occurred sometime in the early 1990s (see paragraph 7 above). In contrast, the expert reports on which the domestic courts relied were only drawn up in 2001-02 and 2006-07 as the applicant waited until 2001 to initiate his tort action. Those expert reports found that it was impossible to say whether the distance just referred to had been the distance in 1997 when the damage to the applicant’s house had become so significant that he had had to leave (see paragraphs 13 and 18 above).
51. The Court is of the view that, unlike the cases referred to in paragraph 48 above, the present case does not concern “a manifest error of assessment” on the part of the national courts, or a “gross misinterpretation” of the relevant circumstances, or reasoning disregarding the bulk of the evidence presented or failing to connect the established facts, the applicable law and the outcome of the proceedings. The present case concerns the national courts’ assessment of the applicant’s claim as argued by him and in light of the evidence presented. The courts discussed and took into account the findings of the experts which they had appointed and the testimony of the witnesses put forward by the applicant, and made their own assessment as to their evidentiary value, stating in particular that the witness evidence was insufficient to prove the causal link alleged by the applicant (see paragraphs 14, 16 and 20-21 above).
52. After the case was remitted by the Supreme Court of Cassation (see paragraph 17 above), the Court of Appeal complied with its instructions to take into account the unlawfulness of the detonation works carried out at the mine, and expressly discussed that aspect, but still, on the balance, considered that the causal link between those detonations and the damage to the applicant’s house had remained unproven (see paragraph 20 above). As already noted, due to the passage of time and the destruction of some documents, it had proved impossible to determine the distance between the applicant’s house and the area where the detonations had been carried out in 1997 – the year in which he had abandoned his property. While it had been established that damage to the property had occurred, the cause or causes of that damage or the extent to which the mining activities had caused the damage and when could not be established.
53. The above conclusion was upheld when the case reached the Supreme Court of Cassation for the second time (see paragraph 21 above).
54. The applicant’s complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention concerns thus the weight attached by the national courts to the evidence presented, in particular the witness testimony, and their assessments of the issues raised before them. As mentioned above (see paragraph 47), it is not normally for the Court to review such matters.
55. In view of the above, the Court cannot conclude that the decisions of the national courts, in particular their conclusion contested by the applicant as to the existence of a causal link between the detonation works at the mine and the damage to his property, reached the threshold of arbitrariness and manifest unreasonableness described in paragraph 48 above, or amounted to a “denial of justice”. Accordingly, the applicant did have a “fair hearing” of his case, as required by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention
56. Hence, there has been no violation of that provision.
(b) Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
57. The applicant owned one half of the plot of land and the buildings located in the village of Golyamo Buchino (see paragraph 6 above). Accordingly, the Court finds that he had “possessions”, within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
58. On an unspecified date towards the end of the 1980s or the beginning of the 1990s the State took a decision to create an opencast coalmine close to the applicant’s village. An expropriation procedure concerning numerous properties in the area of the future mine, including the applicant’s house and land, was commenced in 1990 (see paragraph 7 above). However, as regards the applicant’s property the procedure failed, as the expropriation was quashed at the request of the applicant after part of the compensation designated for him, namely another plot of land in the village, was never provided to him (see paragraph 8 above). While, as mentioned, it was the applicant himself who sought the quashing of the expropriation (ibid.), the Court is of the view that he cannot be blamed for the expropriation procedure’s failure. He had waited to receive another plot of land in the village for more than two years, from May 1990 to August 1992, and the Government have not shown that the authorities intended to honour their legal obligations under the expropriation procedure and that such a plot could have indeed been provided to the applicant.
59. The applicant and his family remained in the house, whereas the mine started operating close to it (see paragraph 9 above). It has not been disputed – and it was confirmed by the domestic courts in the tort proceedings initiated by the applicant – that the mine, where coal was extracted by means of detonations, represented an environmental hazard, and that the health-and-safety requirements contained in the Minister of Health’s Ordinance No. 7 of 25 May 1992, in particular the maintenance of “sanitation zones” around non-industrial buildings such as dwellings (see paragraph 25 above), applied to it. The “sanitation zone” required in the case was 500-metre wide. However, the mine gradually expanded, and at the closest operated within 160-180 metres from the applicant’s house.
60. At the relevant time the mine was managed by a company which was entirely State-owned (see paragraph 10 above). For the Court, the fact that that company was a separate legal entity under domestic law (see, for example, Ilieva and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 17705/05, § 36, 3 February 2015) cannot be decisive to rule out the State’s direct responsibility under the Convention (see Liseytseva and Maslov v. Russia, nos. 39483/05 and 40527/10, § 188, 9 October 2014, and Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, § 114, ECHR 2014). The parties have provided no information on the extent of State supervision and control of the company at the relevant time. Of relevance is that it was not engaged in ordinary commercial business, operating instead in a heavily regulated field subject to environmental and health-and-safety requirements (see, mutatis mutandis, Mykhaylenky and Others v. Ukraine, nos. 35091/02 and 9 others, § 45, ECHR 2004 XII). It is also significant that the decision to create the mine was taken by the State, which also expropriated numerous privately-owned properties in the area to allow for its functioning, under legislation concerning “especially important State needs” (see paragraphs 7 and 24 above). All of the above factors demonstrate that the company was the means of conducting a State activity and that, accordingly, the State must be held responsible for its acts or omissions raising issues under the Convention.
61. In view of the considerations above, the Court is of the view that the authorities, through the failed expropriation of the applicant’s property and the work of the mine under what was effectively State control, were responsible for the applicant’s property remaining in an area of environmental hazard, namely daily detonations in close proximity to the applicant’s house. That situation, which led to the applicant abandoning his property in 1997 (see paragraph 9 above), amounted to State interference with his “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
62. Such an interference cannot be regarded as either a deprivation of property or a control of use within the meaning of the first and second paragraphs of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, it falls within the meaning of the first sentence of that provision as an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see, mutatis mutandis, Loizidou v. Turkey (merits), 18 December 1996, § 63, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 VI).
63. The first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see, for example, Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 108, ECHR 2000 I). This means, in the first place, compliance with the requirements of national law (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 58-62, ECHR 1999 II).
64. In the present case, domestic law required the maintenance of protective “sanitation zones” around industrial installations representing environmental hazard, on the territory of which there could be no residential buildings (see paragraph 25 above). As regards in particular the mine in the vicinity of the applicant’s village, the required buffer area was 500-metre wide. Despite that, the mine operated, conducting daily detonations much closer, at the closest within 160-180 metres (see paragraphs 13 and 19 above).
65. In the tort proceedings initiated by the applicant, the Court of Appeal stated that the carrying out of detonations by the mine in such vicinity to the residential buildings was “indisputably” in breach of the domestic legislation (see paragraph 20 above). This means that the interference with the peaceful enjoyment of the applicant’s possessions as defined above, manifestly in breach of Bulgarian law, was not lawful either for the purposes of the analysis under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the applicant’s rights (see Iatridis, cited above, § 62).
66. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
67. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
68. In respect of pecuniary damage, the applicant claimed 9,040.70 Bulgarian levs (BGN – the equivalent of 4,622.51 euros (EUR)) for the value of his share of the property in Golyamo Buchino, plus default interest. He presented valuation reports prepared by experts. He pointed out that, as a result of the conduct of the State complained of, his house and the auxiliary buildings had collapsed and had become unusable. In respect of non-pecuniary damage, the applicant claimed EUR 9,000.
69. The Government contested the claims.
70. The Court finds that it is justified to award the applicant compensation for the breach of his property rights as a result of the exposure of his property to environmental hazard. It considers in addition that it is appropriate to award a lump sum, covering any pecuniary and non pecuniary damage. In view of all the circumstances of the case, including the value of the applicant’s property as indicated by him (see paragraph 68 above), the Court fixes that sum at EUR 8,000.
B. Costs and expenses
71. For the proceedings before the Court, the applicant claimed BGN 2,800 (the equivalent of EUR 1,431) for the fee charged by his legal representative, the expert valuations submitted in support of his claim for pecuniary damage (see paragraph 68 above) and translation. In support of the claim he submitted the relevant receipts and a contract with a translator.
72. The applicant also claimed expenses incurred by him in the domestic tort proceedings, amounting to BGN 961.30 in total (the equivalent of EUR 491). These included court fees and the cost of an expert report. In support of this claim the applicant submitted the relevant receipts.
73. The Government contested the claims.
74. In accordance with the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court allows the claim in respect of costs and expenses in full. As to the claim concerning the expenses incurred in the domestic tort proceedings, it notes that, in bringing those proceedings, the applicant sought to obtain compensation for the violation of his property rights. The total amount awarded under this head is thus EUR 1,922.
C. Default interest
75. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaint under Article 8 of the Convention inadmissible and the remainder of the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Bulgarian levs at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 8,000 (eight thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 1,922 (one thousand nine hundred and twenty-two euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 6 September 2018, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Milan Blaško Angelika Nußberger
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni:
Resto inammissibile (l'Art. 35) criterio di ammissibilità
(L'Art. 35-1) periodo di sei-mese
Nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili
Articolo 6-1 - l'udienza corretta)
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà)
Danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale
Danno patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)


QUINTA SEZIONE






CAUSA DIMITAR YORDANOV C. BULGARIA

(Richiesta n. 3401/09)






SENTENZA




STRASBOURG


6 settembre 2018


DEFINITIVO

06/12/2018

Questa sentenza è divenuta definitivo sotto Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.
.
Nella causa di Dimitar Yordanov c. la Bulgaria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Angelika Nußberger, Presidente
Erik Møse,
André Potocki,
Yonko Grozev,
Síofra O'Leary,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer,
Ltif ?Hüseynov, giudici
e Blaško di Milano, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato 10 luglio 2018,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 3401/09) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 17 dicembre 2008.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato col Sig.ra N. Sedefova, un avvocato che pratica in Sofia. Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato coi loro Agenti, il Sig.ra M. Kotseva ed il Sig.ra M. Dimitrova, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che lo Stato era stato responsabile per danno a proprietà del suo, dovuto nella sua prospettiva alle attività di estrazione illegali in prossimità vicina, e che le corti nazionali avevano respinto erroneamente la sua rivendicazione di illecito civile riferita a quel il danno.
4. 15 settembre 2016 che le azioni di reclamo sopra sono state comunicate al Governo ed il resto della richiesta fu dichiarato inammissibile facendo seguito Decidere 54 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1939 e vive in Sofia.
6. Il richiedente possiede uno la metà di un'area di terra nel villaggio di Golyamo Buchino, vicino alla città di Pernik. Lui possedette anche uno la metà di un alloggio che sta in piedi sull'area nella quale lui visse sino a 1997, ed uno la metà di due più piccoli edifici, un granaio ed una penna. Quegli edifici non esistono più.
7. Su una data non specificata verso la fine degli anni ottanta o l'inizio degli anni novanta lo Stato prese una decisione di creare un opencast coalmine vicino il villaggio. In una decisione di 8 maggio 1990 il sindaco locale espropriò approssimativamente novanta proprietà nell'area per che fine, incluso la terra del richiedente ed edifici.
8. La decisione di espropriazione affermò che il richiedente dovrebbe ricevere in risarcimento un'altra area di terra nel villaggio. Il richiedente ricevette inoltre una somma di soldi (le parti non hanno presentato la decisione del sindaco sul risarcimento supplementare). La maggioranza dei proprietari rimanenti ricevette o risarcimento valutario o appartamenti, nella città di Pernik. Siccome un'altra area non fu offerta al richiedente all'interno del termine di decadenza legale di un anno, 21 agosto 1992 lui richiese che l'espropriazione sia annullata, siccome lui fu concesso a sotto sezione 102 della Proprietà Agisca (veda paragrafo 24 sotto). Un'altra persona che era anche dovuta un'area di terra in risarcimento fece domanda avere l'espropriazione della sua proprietà annullato. In una decisione di 2 ottobre 1992 il Pernik governatore regionale annullò le due espropriazioni, mentre notando che le aree di terra dovuto in risarcimento non era stato previsto “dovendo all'impossibilità per il municipio per assicurare simile aree.” La decisione affermò inoltre che i proprietari dovevano pagare di nuovo il risarcimento valutario loro avevano ricevuto inoltre. 22 dicembre 1993 il richiedente pagò di nuovo quel il risarcimento.
9. Il richiedente rimase in alloggio suo. Di anni che seguì l'i miei si avvicinarono all'alloggio, a causa del suo ingrandimento graduale. Carbone fu estratto da sé con vuole dire di detonazioni che, secondo il richiedente, scosse l'alloggio su una base quotidiana. Su non specificato data fessure sembrate sui muri dell'alloggio, ed il granaio e la penna crollarono. Verso l'inizio di 1997 la famiglia del richiedente si mosse fuori dell'alloggio, judging sé troppo pericoloso sospendere.
10. Successivamente, il richiedente contattò la miniera, mentre cercando di ottenere il risarcimento, ma le negoziazioni andarono a vuoto. Al tempo, l'il mio fu maneggiato con una società che era completamente Statale. Nel 2005 fu privatizzato.
11. Nel 2001 il richiedente portò un'azione di illecito civile contro la società che aziona la miniera, mentre chiedendo il risarcimento per il danno causò alla sua proprietà.
12. Il Pernik Corte Regionale (“la Corte Regionale”) che esaminò la causa istanza per prima ascoltò un testimone, un vicino di casa del richiedente che affermò durante un'udienza di corte di 13 dicembre 2001 che i muri dell'alloggio del richiedente furono rotti, che il suo stato continuò a deteriorare, e che il granaio era crollato tre o quattro anni più primo. Lui pensò che l'alloggio era stato costruito bene, e spiegò che dopo che il danno iniziale il richiedente aveva tentato di ripararlo. 7 marzo 2002 la Corte Regionale ascoltò un altro testimone che affermò che la maggior parte del danno all'alloggio del richiedente era stato provocato tre o quattro anni più primo.
13. La Corte Regionale nominò un perito che stabilì che l'alloggio era stato costruito fra il 1948 ed il 1950, quando non c'erano stati requisiti come a resistenza sismica. Al tempo di stendere il rapporto competente l'alloggio era inabitabile, siccome i suoi muri furono volti e ruppero, con le fessure che giungono a 20-35 cm in ampiezza qualche volta. La distanza fra l'alloggio e la periferia della miniera era approssimativamente 160 180 metri. Questo volle dire che l'alloggio fu situato bene nel così chiamò “zona di igiene” consistendo di terra all'interno di 500 metri dell'orlo della miniera nei quali la legge proibì qualsiasi le abitazioni. Il “zona di sicurezza” per la miniera entro la quale nessuna persona non autorizzata doveva essere presente durante detonazione lavora, aveva un raggio di 600 metri. L'esperto confermò le sue conclusioni ad una riunione di corte 24 gennaio 2002.
14. In una sentenza di 27 giugno 2003 la Corte Regionale respinse l'azione del richiedente. Considerò stabilì che la proprietà del richiedente era stata danneggiata seriamente e che il danno aveva coinciso in tempo con l'inizio di lavori di detonazione nella miniera. Ancora, concluse che il richiedente non aveva provato che un collegamento causale esistè fra il danno e le detonazioni. Lui si era appellato in che riguardo a sulla testimonianza di testimone prevista con due vicini di casa, ma secondo la Corte Regionale era impossibile per stabilire che che aveva provocato il danno alla proprietà con modo di testimonianza di testimone. L'onere della prova per stabilire tale disposizione di circostanza sul richiedente e l'altra parte aveva dibattuto che il danno era stato dovuto alla maniera di costruzione di alloggio suo.
15. Il richiedente depositò un ricorso. Di fronte alla Corte d'appello di Sofia (“la Corte d'appello”) lui chiamato un testimone supplementare che affermò durante un'udienza 2 febbraio 2004 che molti alloggi nell'area già erano crollati, e che tutti gli altri alloggi nel neighbourhood del richiedente avevano fessure.
16. 25 giugno 2004 la Corte d'appello sostenne la sentenza della Corte Regionale, mentre confermando il suo ragionamento. Contenne che mentre testimonianza di testimone potesse stabilire la misura ed il tempismo del danno alla proprietà del richiedente, non poteva provare il collegamento causale fra che danno e la detonazione funziona alla miniera.
17. Il richiedente depositò un ricorso su questioni di diritto. In una sentenza di 5 aprile 2006 la Corte Suprema di Cassazione annullò la sentenza della Corte d'appello e rinviò la causa per esame nuovo. Era della prospettiva che le corti più basse non avevano debitamente accounted per il fatto che l'i miei operarono in una zona interdetta vicino all'alloggio del richiedente, l'alloggio che è situato entro sia il “zona di igiene” ed il “zona di sicurezza” circa la miniera. Le corti più basse avevano dovuto esaminare questo fatto in luce delle dichiarazioni dei testimoni che avevano “stabilito la circostanza” che il danno alla proprietà del richiedente era stato il risultato dei lavori di detonazione. Era anche necessario per valutare ottemperanza con la società che aziona la miniera con gli altri requisiti legali, come quelli concernendo protezione ambientale.
18. Dopo che la causa fu rinviata, la Corte d'appello commissionò un rapporto competente e nuovo. L'esperto notò che, dovendo al passaggio di tempo e la distruzione di alcuni documenti, era impossibile per determinare la distanza esatta fra l'alloggio del richiedente e l'area dove le detonazioni erano state eseguite nel 1997. Ciononostante, era chiaro che l'alloggio era stato bene nel “zona di igiene” circa la miniera. L'esperto notò inoltre che le detonazioni erano state eseguite con lavoratori qualificati, in conformità con gli articoli interni della miniera.
19. La Corte d'appello ascoltò un testimone supplementare per il richiedente che affermò durante un'udienza di corte di 23 novembre 2006 che molti alloggi nel villaggio erano crollati, e che lui pensò che questo era dovuto alle detonazioni alla miniera. Lui aggiunse che le detonazioni ebbero luogo su una base quotidiana che loro hanno causato “i terremoti”, e che gli alloggi fracassarono di conseguenza. Le prime fessure sull'alloggio del richiedente erano sembrate anche prima che il tempo quando l'i miei avevano operato più vicino a sé. Il testimone non era consapevole di qualsiasi frane nell'area.
20. In una sentenza di 2 aprile 2007 la Corte d'appello ancora una volta sostenne la sentenza della Corte Regionale di 27 giugno 2003, mentre respingendo la rivendicazione del richiedente. Lo trovò “indisputabile” che impiegati dell'i miei avevano agito in violazione di legge, con eseguendo detonazioni in una zona interdetta vicino ad edifici residenziali incluso al tempo quando, secondo il richiedente, il danno alla sua proprietà aveva cominciato. Sulla base del materiale presentata, il richiedente avuto non provò ciononostante, il collegamento causale fra il lavoro della miniera ed il danno alla sua proprietà. La Corte d'appello ragionò in quel riguardo a:
“Il collegamento causale... non può essere presunto-è essere provato pienamente col rivendicatore. Non è stato mostrato nella causa che il rivendicatore sta costruendo, costruita negli anni cinquanta è stato danneggiato precisamente a causa dei lavori di detonazione alla miniera. Il rivendicatore non ha mostrato che l'edificio residenziale e gli edifici ausiliari, determinato [loro] maniera di costruzione, i materiali [usato] ed il tempo di [loro] la costruzione, non sarebbe stato danneggiato, o non sarebbe stato danneggiato a tale misura, l'aveva non stato per i lavori di detonazione alla miniera. Non è stato mostrato se ed a che grado gli edifici stato di ' descritto con l'esperto [ascoltò con la Corte Regionale] era dovuto a deterioramento normale, mentre prendendo in considerazione l'anno [loro furono costruiti] e la maniera di [loro] la costruzione, e qualsiasi mancanza di mantenimento col proprietario dopo l'espropriazione del 1990.”
21. In una definitivo sentenza di 3 luglio 2008 la Corte Suprema di Cassazione sostenne la sentenza della Corte d'appello su un ulteriore ricorso col richiedente, mentre affermando le sue conclusioni. Aguzzò fuori in particolare che il rapporto competente presentò alla Corte d'appello (veda paragrafo 18 sopra) aveva stabilito solamente che la proprietà del richiedente era stata situata entro il “zona di igiene” circa la miniera, ma “era insufficiente per provare l'esistenza di un collegamento causale fra il danno... ed il comportamento illegale di impiegati della società rispondente.”
22. Nel frattempo, l'alloggio del richiedente è crollato e più è esistito. La proprietà è stata abbandonata.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
Le Espropriazioni di A. per le necessità pubbliche sotto il Proprietà Atto
23. Sezione 101 della Proprietà Agisce (?), siccome messo in parole al tempo attinente, concedè l'espropriazione di proprietà privata per “le necessità di Stato specialmente importanti” che non poteva essere incontrato altrimenti.
24. Sezione 102 determinato in oltre che il proprietario riceverebbe il risarcimento per l'altra proprietà o per contanti, e che le autorità potessero prendere solamente proprietà della proprietà espropriata dopo la disposizione della quota di risarcimento. Se simile risarcimento non fosse offerto entro un anno dell'entrata in vigore della decisione di espropriazione, il proprietario potrebbe chiedere l'annullamento dell'espropriazione. Nel 1996 sezione 102 del Proprietà Atto fu sostituita con l'altra legislazione.
Salute di B. e requisiti di sicurezza con riguardo ad ad installazioni industriali
25. Ordinanza N.ro 7 di 25 maggio 1992 riguardo alla salute e requisiti di sicurezza per la protezione di salute in zone residenziali (?7 ?25.05.1992.? ?? ?????????? ?????????? ?? ??????? ?????? ?? ????????? ?????), adottò col Ministro di Salute in attuazione del Salute Atto Pubblico (veda paragrafo 27 sotto), purché per la creazione di “igiene suddivide in zone” circa installazioni industriali che rappresentarono un rischio ambientale. L'ampiezza di simile zone doveva essere fra 50 e 3,000 metri, mentre dipendendo dalle specifiche caratteristiche di ogni installazione, e la costruzione di edifici non-industriali non fu permessa nelle zone. Se simile edifici già esistessero, i proprietari di installazioni riguardati col “zona di igiene” requisito fu obbligato per limitare qualsiasi le attività dannose “ai livelli legali” con la fine di 1997; altrimenti, loro furono obbligati a chiusura in giù la rispettiva installazione o lo trasportano ad un'altra area. Questa ordinanza rimase in vigore sino a 2011.
26. In oltre, “la sicurezza suddivide in zone” circa luoghi di detonazione entro i quali è permessa nessuna persona durante qualsiasi detonazione funziona, è previsto per in un documento diede un titolo ad Articoli di Sicurezza Durante Detonazione Lavori (?), adottò 28 dicembre 1996 col Ministro per Lavoro ed Assistenza Sociale.
27. Il Pubblico del 1973 Salute Atto (?), in vigore sino a 2005, e dopo che il Salute Atto (?), regoli il funzionare e motorizza di corpi di protezione di salute. Fra le altre cose, quelli corpi sono concessi per condurre controlli ed ispezioni, e se necessario sospenda il funzionare di oggetti industriali o installazioni che operano in violazione di protezione di salute decide, ed impone punizioni amministrative.
LA LEGGE
IO. VIOLAZIONI ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 6 § 1 ED ARTICOLO 8 DI LA CONVENZIONE ED ARTICOLO 1 DI PROTOCOLLO N. 1
28. Il richiedente si lamentò Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione della maniera nella quale la corte nazionale aveva deciso sulla sua rivendicazione contro la società che aziona la miniera sotto. Lui si lamentò inoltre sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione di una violazione del suo diritto ad una casa. Lui si lamentò sotto infine, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che lui era stato privato della possibilità a “usi liberamente” la sua proprietà.
29. Articolo 6 § 1, in finora come attinente, letture:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...”
Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 lettura:
Articolo 8
“1. Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia, la sua casa e la sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza con un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto come è in conformità con la legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione di disturbo o incrimina, per la protezione di salute o morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le parti gli argomenti di '
1. Il Governo
30. Il Governo indicò che l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione fu riferito alla conseguenza dei procedimenti civili, e dibattè che era di un carattere di quarto-istanza.
31. Sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione, il Governo contestò la rivendicazione del richiedente che l'alloggio in Golyamo Buchino era stato suo “la casa”, indicando che dopo 1997 lui non aveva vissuto là.
32. Come preoccupazioni l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il Governo indicò che se il richiedente avesse considerato che impiegati dell'i miei si erano occupati di esplosivi in violazione degli articoli attinenti, lui avrebbe potuto richiedere che procedimenti penali siano iniziati contro loro su quel il conto.
33. Il Governo contese che lo Stato non poteva essere sostenuto responsabile per il danno causato alla proprietà del richiedente, siccome lui non aveva mostrato che era dovuto a qualsiasi azione delle autorità pubbliche. Né il richiedente aveva mostrato che il danno in questione era davvero il risultato dell'operazione della miniera, e, questo essere così, lo Stato non poteva essere aspettatosi di prendere misure per ostacolare “gli eventi la causa di che è ignoto o non può essere predetto ragionevolmente.” Inoltre, lo Stato non poteva essere richiesto a chiusura in giù la miniera, un'impresa di “l'importanza economica e cruciale”, per il risuoli ragione che “un individuo sul suo spontanea volontà scelse di continuare vivere nel suo vicinato.”
34. Il Governo presentò che la responsabilità dello Stato fu limitata a garantendo l'efficacia di procedimenti giudiziali fra parti private. In simile procedimenti, il richiedente non era riuscito a provare la sua rivendicazione, e la rivendicazione era stata respinta così “a causa dei fatti obiettivi della causa.” In qualsiasi l'evento, all'inizio degli anni novanta lo Stato aveva espropriato la proprietà del richiedente e gli aveva offerto risarcimento.
2. Il richiedente
35. Il richiedente reiterò che i suoi diritti erano stati violati. Lui indicò che il Governo non aveva contestato il fatto che l'i miei avevano operato in una zona interdetta vicino alla sua proprietà alla quale era stata data credito anche con le corti nazionali.
36. Sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione, il richiedente dibattè che le corti nazionali erano giunte alla conclusione sbagliata nei procedimenti di illecito civile iniziati con lui nel trovare che lui aveva non provò il collegamento causale fra il lavoro della miniera ed il danno alla sua proprietà. Nella sua prospettiva che collegamento causale chiaramente era stato stabilito coi testimoni e gli esperti ascoltata con le corti. Il richiedente aggiunse che, prima di essendo obbligato per lasciare l'alloggio, lui aveva riparato, e l'aveva mantenuto, e che era stato costruito bene.
37. Come riguardi la sua azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione e la questione come a se la causa riguardò suo “la casa”, il richiedente indicò che lui aveva un “il collegamento emotivo e forte” con l'alloggio in Golyamo Buchino, dove lui era cresciuto e dove lui prevalentemente aveva vissuto con la sua famiglia fino a 1997. Lui non aveva lasciato l'alloggio di suo proprio spontanea volontà, ma era stato costretto per fare così dopo che era divenuto pericoloso per vivere là. Il danno illegale all'alloggio che lo rende inabitabile voluto dire che Articolo 8 della Convenzione era stato violato.
38. Sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, come all'argomento del Governo che lui avesse potuto chiedere l'azione penale di impiegati della miniera (veda paragrafo 32 sopra), il richiedente considerò che simile accusa non potesse offrire la compensazione lui chiese, ed in qualsiasi l'evento lui aveva intrapreso un'altra via di ricorso, mentre chiedendo danni.
39. Il richiedente indicò che lavori di detonazione erano inerentemente pericolosi, e che lo Stato aveva stabilito perciò articoli di sicurezza. Nell'evento di un funzionamento di miniera vicino ad un alloggio, lo Stato richiese, un protettivo “zona di igiene”, ma anche se il suo alloggio era rimasto bene in tale zona, l'a i miei erano stati permessi per continuare ad operare. Il richiedente dibattè che dopo l'annullamento dell'espropriazione della sua proprietà lo Stato aveva dovuto avanzare in per esercitare controlli e proibisca l'attività illegale. Il richiedente indicò inoltre che la sua richiesta che l'espropriazione del 1990 delle sue proprietà sia annullata era stata motivata con l'insuccesso dello Stato per offrire il risarcimento a causa di lui all'interno del termine di decadenza legale. Lui non era stato obbligato per attendere indefinitamente questo risarcimento.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Ammissibilità
(un) Articolo 8 della Convenzione
40. Il richiedente si lamentò di una violazione del suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa (veda paragrafo 28 sopra).
41. Sotto l'Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, la Corte può esaminare solamente una questione dove è stato presentato a sé entro sei mesi della data sui quali una definitivo decisione fu presa. Il fine primario di questo articolo è mantenere la certezza legale con assicurando in particolare che cause che sollevano problemi sotto la Convenzione sono esaminate all'interno di un termine ragionevole. Inoltre, l'articolo facilita la costituzione di fatti in una causa, poiché col passaggio di tempo qualsiasi esame equo dei problemi sollevò è reso problematico (veda Sabri Güne ?c. la Turchia [GC], n. 27396/06, § 39 29 giugno 2012).
42. Siccome fu indicato anche col Governo (veda paragrafo 31 sopra), l'alloggio in Golyamo Buchino che è la materia di questa azione di reclamo cessò essere alla casa del richiedente nel 1997 quando lui si mosse fuori di sé, il judging sé troppo pericoloso sospendere (veda paragrafo 9 sopra). I procedimenti di illecito civile che il richiedente ha portato successivamente non furono tirati recuperando l'alloggio o abilitandolo per ritornare là, e non c'erano altri sviluppi in relazione al suo diritto rispettare per la sua casa. Per queste ragioni la Corte è della prospettiva che come preoccupazioni l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 8 il tempo-limite di sei-mese sotto Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione cominciò a correre nel 1997 quando lui si mosse fuori di alloggio suo.
43. Che azione di reclamo, depositò a dicembre 2008 (veda paragrafo 1 sopra), è stato depositato così fuori termini, e deve essere respinto in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
(b) Resto della richiesta
44. Riguardo all'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il Governo sembrò sollevare una difficoltà della non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali, poiché loro affermarono che il richiedente non era riuscito a chiedere l'azione penale di impiegati della miniera che si sarebbe occupata di esplosivi in violazione degli articoli attinenti (veda paragrafo 32 sopra). Comunque, il Governo non ha mostrato che la via di ricorso in questione avrebbe potuto prevedere qualsiasi compensazione adeguata al richiedente, abilitandolo per ritornare ad alloggio suo od ottenere il risarcimento, e la Corte respinge così l'eccezione.
45. Trova in oltre che le azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non è mal-fondato manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione, o inammissibile su qualsiasi l'altra base. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
2. Meriti
(un) l'Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione
46. Il richiedente dibattè che le corti nazionali avevano deciso erroneamente nei procedimenti di illecito civile portati con lui contro la società che aziona la miniera, in particolare nel concludere che nessun collegamento causale era stato mostrato per esistere fra le detonazioni alla miniera ed il danno alla sua proprietà (veda paragrafo 36 sopra).
47. La Corte ha detto su occasioni numerose che non è chiamato su per trattare con errori di fatto o legge commesse presumibilmente con le corti nazionali, come sé una corte di quarta istanza non è, e che non è chiamato su per rimporre il nazionale corteggia le sentenze di ', previde che loro sono basati su una valutazione ragionevole della prova (veda García Ruiz c. la Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 28 ECHR 1999 io, e Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. e Di Stefano c. l'Italia [GC], n. 38433/09, § 197 ECHR 2012). Così, problemi come il peso allegato con le corti nazionali ad articoli determinati di prova o a sentenze o valutazioni presentate a loro per la considerazione non è per la Corte per fare una rassegna normalmente (veda Bochan c. l'Ucraina (n. 2) ([GC], n. 22251/08, § 61, ECHR 2015, e Moreira Ferreira c. il Portogallo (n. 2) [GC], n. 19867/12, § 83 ECHR 2017 (gli estratti)).
48. Ciononostante, la Corte può accogliere una valutazione nuova di prova dove le decisioni giunsero alle corti nazionali può essere riguardato come arbitrario o manifestamente irragionevole (veda Khodorkovskiy e Lebedev c. la Russia, N. 11082/06 e 13772/05, §§ 803-4, 25 luglio 2013, ed il Lupeni greco Parrocchia cattolica ed Altri c. la Romania [GC], n. 76943/11, § 90 ECHR 2016 (gli estratti)). Così, per istanza, nella causa di Dulaurans c. la Francia (n. 34553/97, §§ 36-38 21 marzo 2000), la Corte trovò una violazione del diritto ad un processo equanime perché il risuoli ragione perché la Corte francese di Cassazione era arrivata alla sua decisione contestata che respinge il ricorso del richiedente su questioni di diritto come inammissibile era il risultato di “un errore manifesto di valutazione.” In Anelkovi ?c. Serbia (n. 1401/08, § 27 9 aprile 2013), la Corte fondò anche che la decisione della corte nazionale che principalmente non aveva avuto base legale in diritto nazionale e non aveva stabilito qualsiasi il collegamento fra i fatti, la legge applicabile e la conseguenza dei procedimenti, era arbitrario. In Bochan (n. 2) (citò sopra, §§ 63-65), la Corte Suprema aveva così “grezzamente interpretò male” un testo giuridico (una più prima sentenza della Corte) che il suo ragionamento non poteva essere considerato soltanto una lettura diversa di che testo, ma era “grezzamente arbitrario” o comportando un “rifiuto della giustizia.” In Carmel Saliba c. il Malta (n. 24221/13, §§ 69-79 29 novembre 2016), la Corte criticò le corti nazionali per si essendo appellato sulla testimonianza incoerente di un testimone e non essere riuscito a fare commenti adeguatamente sulla prova rimanente; combinato con gli altri difetti meno significativi dei procedimenti civili, questo volle dire, che quelli procedimenti non erano stati equi.
49. Al giorno d'oggi la causa le corti nazionali nominarono periti ed ascoltarono testimoni, vicini di casa precedenti del richiedente e fondò sulla base di questa prova che l'alloggio del richiedente e gli altri edifici nel suo recinto sono stati danneggiati seriamente ed erano divenuti inutili. Loro fondarono inoltre che le detonazioni nella miniera vicina erano state eseguite in violazione di legge (anche se con lavoratori qualificati e nella conformità coi propri articoli interni della miniera), incluso al tempo quando, secondo il richiedente, il danno alla sua proprietà aveva cominciato, (veda divide in paragrafi 14 e 20 sopra).
50. Fu stabilito anche che, quando le detonazioni furono eseguite più vicine alla proprietà del richiedente, loro erano all'interno di 160-180 metri di sé (veda paragrafo 13 sopra). Comunque, mentre il richiedente non ha a qualsiasi stadio specificò quando l'attività di estrazione della quale lui si lamentò cominciò, sembrerebbe che questo accadde una volta o l'altra nei primi 1990s (veda paragrafo 7 sopra). In contrasto, i rapporti competenti sui quali si appellate le corti nazionali furono disegnati solamente su nel 2001-02 e 2006-07 come il richiedente aspettato finché 2001 per iniziare la sua azione di illecito civile. Quelli rapporti competenti fondarono che era impossibile per dire se la distanza equo assegnò ad era stato la distanza nel 1997 quando il danno all'alloggio del richiedente era divenuto così significativo che lui aveva dovuto lasciare (veda divide in paragrafi 13 e 18 sopra).
51. La Corte è della prospettiva che, diversamente da cause assegnate ad in paragrafo 48 sopra, la causa presente non riguarda, “un errore manifesto di valutazione” da parte delle corti nazionali, o un “malinteso lordo” delle circostanze attinenti, o discutendo trascurando la massa della prova presentò o non riuscendo a connettere i fatti stabiliti, la legge applicabile e la conseguenza dei procedimenti. La causa presente riguarda il nazionale corteggia valutazione di ' della rivendicazione del richiedente siccome dibattuto con lui ed in luce della prova presentata. Le corti discussero e presero in considerazione le sentenze dei periti che loro avevano nominato e la testimonianza dei testimoni fissò in avanti col richiedente, e fece la loro propria valutazione come al loro valore probatorio, affermando in particolare che la prova di testimone era insufficiente per provare il collegamento causale addotto col richiedente (veda divide in paragrafi 14, 16 e 20-21 sopra).
52. Dopo che la causa fu rinviata con la Corte Suprema di Cassazione (veda paragrafo 17 sopra), la Corte d'appello si attenne con le sue istruzioni per prendere in considerazione l'illegalità dei lavori di detonazione eseguita alla miniera, e discusse espressamente che aspetto, ma ancora, sull'equilibrio, considerò che il collegamento causale fra quelle detonazioni ed il danno all'alloggio del richiedente era rimasto unproven (veda paragrafo 20 sopra). Come già celebre, a causa del passaggio di tempo e la distruzione di alcuni documenti, si ebbe dimostrato impossibile per determinare la distanza fra l'alloggio del richiedente e l'area dove le detonazioni erano state eseguite nel 1997-l'anno nel quale lui aveva abbandonato la sua proprietà. Mentre era stato stabilito che era accaduto danno alla proprietà, la causa o cause di che danno o la misura alle quali le attività di estrazione avevano provocato il danno e quando non poteva essere stabilito.
53. La conclusione sopra si sostenne quando la causa giunse alla Corte Suprema di Cassazione per la seconda volta (veda paragrafo 21 sopra).
54. L'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione concerne così il peso allegato con le corti nazionali alla prova presentata, in particolare la testimonianza di testimone, e le loro valutazioni dei problemi sollevarono di fronte a loro. Siccome menzionato sopra (veda paragrafo 47), non è per la Corte per fare una rassegna simile questioni normalmente.
55. In prospettiva del sopra, la Corte non può concludere, che le decisioni delle corti nazionali, in particolare la loro conclusione contestata col richiedente come all'esistenza di un collegamento causale fra la detonazione funziona alla miniera ed il danno alla sua proprietà, giunse alla soglia dell'arbitrarietà e l'irragionevolezza di manifestazione descritta in paragrafo 48 sopra, o corrispose ad un “rifiuto della giustizia.” Di conseguenza, il richiedente aveva un “l'udienza corretta” della sua causa, come richiesto con Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione
56. Non c'è stata da adesso, violazione di quel la disposizione.
(b) Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
57. Il richiedente possedette uno la metà dell'area di terra e gli edifici localizzato nel villaggio di Golyamo Buchino (veda paragrafo 6 sopra). Di conseguenza, i costatazione di Corte che lui aveva “le proprietà”, all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
58. Su una data non specificata verso la fine degli anni ottanta o l'inizio degli anni novanta lo Stato prese una decisione di creare un opencast coalmine vicino al villaggio del richiedente. Una procedura di espropriazione che concerne proprietà numerose nell'area della miniera di futuro, incluso l'alloggio del richiedente e sbarca, fu cominciato nel 1990 (veda paragrafo 7 sopra). Comunque, come riguardi la proprietà del richiedente che la procedura è andata a vuoto, siccome l'espropriazione fu annullata alla richiesta del richiedente dopo che parte del risarcimento designò per lui, vale a dire un'altra area di terra nel villaggio non fu previsto mai a lui (veda paragrafo 8 sopra). Mentre, siccome menzionato, era il richiedente stesso chi chiese l'annullare dell'espropriazione (l'ibid.), la Corte è della prospettiva che lui non può essere biasimato per l'insuccesso della procedura di espropriazione. Lui aveva aspettato ricevere un'altra area di terra nel villaggio per più di due anni, da maggio 1990 ad agosto 1992, ed il Governo non ha mostrato che le autorità intesero di onorare i loro obblighi legali sotto la procedura di espropriazione e che tale area sarebbe potuta essere offerta davvero al richiedente.
59. Il richiedente e la sua famiglia rimasero nell'alloggio, mentre l'i miei cominciarono ad operare vicino a sé (veda paragrafo 9 sopra). Non è stato contestato-e fu confermato con le corti nazionali nei procedimenti di illecito civile iniziati col richiedente-che la miniera, dove carbone fu estratto con vuole dire di detonazioni, rappresentò un rischio ambientale, e che i requisiti di salute-e-sicurezza contennero nel Ministro dell'Ordinanza di Salute N.ro 7 di 25 maggio 1992, in particolare il mantenimento di “igiene suddivide in zone” circa edifici non-industriali come abitazioni (veda paragrafo 25 sopra), fece domanda a sé. Il “zona di igiene” richiesto nella causa era 500-metre ampio. La miniera gradualmente espanse comunque, ed al più vicino operò all'interno di 160-180 metri dall'alloggio del richiedente.
60. Al tempo attinente l'il mio fu maneggiato con una società che era completamente Statale (veda paragrafo 10 sopra). Per la Corte, il fatto che che società era una persona giuridica separata sotto diritto nazionale (veda, per esempio, Ilieva ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, n. 17705/05, § 36 3 febbraio 2015) non può essere decisivo per decidere fuori la responsabilità diretta dello Stato sotto la Convenzione (veda Liseytseva e Maslov c. la Russia, N. 39483/05 e 40527/10, § 188, 9 ottobre 2014, ed Ališi ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, § 114 ECHR 2014). Le parti non hanno offerto informazioni sulla misura di soprintendenza Statale e controllo della società al tempo attinente. Di attinenza è che non fu preso parte negli affari commerciali ed ordinari, mentre opera invece in un campo pesantemente regolato soggetto ad ambientale e requisiti di salute-e-sicurezza (veda, mutatis mutandis, Mykhaylenky ed Altri c. l'Ucraina, N. 35091/02 e 9 altri, § 45 ECHR 2004 XII). È anche significativo che la decisione di creare l'il mio fu preso con lo Stato che anche espropriò proprietà privatamente-possedute e numerose nell'area per lasciare spazio al suo funzionare sotto legislazione che riguarda “le necessità di Stato specialmente importanti” (veda divide in paragrafi 7 e 24 sopra). Tutti i fattori sopra dimostrano che la società era la mezzi di condurre un'attività Statale e che, di conseguenza, lo Stato deve essere sostenuto responsabile per i suoi atti od omissioni che sollevano problemi sotto la Convenzione.
61. In prospettiva delle considerazioni sopra, la Corte è della prospettiva che le autorità, tramite l'espropriazione fallita della proprietà del richiedente ed il lavoro della miniera sotto che che era efficacemente controllo Statale, era responsabile per la proprietà del richiedente che rimane in un'area di rischio ambientale, vale a dire detonazioni quotidiane in prossimità vicina all'alloggio del richiedente. Che situazione che condusse al richiedente che abbandona la sua proprietà nel 1997 (veda paragrafo 9 sopra), corrispose ad intromissione dello stato con suo “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
62. Tale interferenza non può essere considerata o una privazione di proprietà o un controllo di uso all'interno del significato dei primo e secondo paragrafi di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Comunque, incorre all'interno del significato della prima frase di che approvvigiona come un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (veda, mutatis mutandis, Loizidou c. la Turchia (i meriti), 18 dicembre 1996, § 63 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996 VI).
63. Il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (veda, per esempio, Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 108 ECHR 2000 io). Questo vuole dire, nel primo posto, ottemperanza coi requisiti di legge nazionale (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 58-62 ECHR 1999 II).
64. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, diritto nazionale richiese il mantenimento di protettivo “igiene suddivide in zone” circa installazioni industriali che rappresentano rischio ambientale, sul territorio di che non ci potrebbero essere edifici residenziali (veda paragrafo 25 sopra). Come riguardi in particolare la miniera nel vicinato del villaggio del richiedente, la zona intermedia richiesta era 500-metre ampio. Nonostante che, l'i miei operarono, mentre molto conducendo detonazioni quotidiane più vicine, al più vicino all'interno di 160-180 metri (veda divide in paragrafi 13 e 19 sopra).
65. Nei procedimenti di illecito civile iniziati col richiedente, la Corte d'appello affermò, che l'eseguire di detonazioni con la miniera in simile vicinato agli edifici residenziali era “indiscutibilmente” in violazione della legislazione nazionale (veda paragrafo 20 sopra). Questo vuole dire che l'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle proprietà del richiedente come definito sopra, manifestamente in violazione di legge bulgara, non era o legale per i fini dell'analisi sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Questa conclusione lo fa non necessario accertare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti del richiedente (veda Iatridis, citato sopra, § 62).
66. C'è stata perciò una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
67. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
68. In riguardo di danno patrimoniale, il richiedente chiese 9,040.70 levs bulgari (BGN-l'equivalente di 4,622.51 euros (EUR)) per il valore della sua quota della proprietà in Golyamo Buchino, più l'interesse di mora. Lui presentò rapporti di valutazione preparati con esperti. Lui indicò che, come un risultato della condotta dello Stato si lamentò di, il suo alloggio e gli edifici ausiliari erano crollati ed erano divenuti inutili. In riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, il richiedente chiese EUR 9,000.
69. Il Governo contestò le rivendicazioni.
70. I costatazione di Corte che è giustificato per assegnare il risarcimento di richiedente per la violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà come un risultato dell'esposizione della sua proprietà a rischio ambientale. Considera in oltre che è appropriato per assegnare un prezzo globale, mentre coprendo qualsiasi patrimoniale e non danno patrimoniale. In prospettiva di tutte le circostanze della causa, incluso il valore della proprietà del richiedente siccome indicato con lui (veda paragrafo 68 sopra), la Corte fissa che somma ad EUR 8,000.
Costi di B. e spese
71. Per i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, il richiedente chiese BGN 2,800 (l'equivalente di EUR 1,431) per la parcella accusata col suo rappresentante legale, le valutazioni competenti presentarono in appoggio della sua rivendicazione per danno patrimoniale (veda paragrafo 68 sopra) e traduzione. In appoggio della rivendicazione lui presentò le ricevute attinenti ed un contratto con un traduttore.
72. Il richiedente chiese anche spese incorse in con lui nei procedimenti di illecito civile nazionali, mentre corrispondendo a BGN 961.30 in totale (l'equivalente di EUR 491). Queste parcelle di corte incluse ed il costo di un rapporto competente. In appoggio di questa rivendicazione il richiedente presentò le ricevute attinenti.
73. Il Governo contestò le rivendicazioni.
74. Nella conformità con la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte concede la rivendicazione in riguardo di costi e spese in pieno. Come alla rivendicazione riguardo alle spese incorse in nei procedimenti di illecito civile nazionali, nota, che, nel portare quelli procedimenti, il richiedente cercò di ottenere il risarcimento per la violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà. L'importo totale assegnato sotto questo capo è così EUR 1,922.
Interesse di mora di C.
75. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione inammissibile ed il resto della richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

4. Sostiene
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, essere convertito in levs bulgaro al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 8,000 (otto mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 1,922 (milli novecento e ventidui euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

5. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 6 settembre 2018, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Blaško di Milano Angelika Nußberger
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 26/03/2020.