Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF OSMANYAN AND AMIRAGHYAN v. ARMENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,P1-1

NUMERO: 71306/11/2018
STATO: Armenia
DATA: 11/10/2018
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions:
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property)
Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)


FIRST SECTION






CASE OF OSMANYAN AND AMIRAGHYAN v. ARMENIA

(Application no. 71306/11)








JUDGMENT




STRASBOURG

11 October 2018

FINAL

11/01/2019

This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Osmanyan and Amiraghyan v. Armenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, President,
Kristina Pardalos,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Jovan Ilievski, judges,
and Abel Campos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 18 September 2018,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 71306/11) against the Republic of Armenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by five Armenian nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 11 November 2011.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr K. Tumanyan, a lawyer practising in Vanadzor. The Armenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr G. Kostanyan, Representative of the Republic of Armenia to the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the deprivation of their property did not satisfy the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 18 March 2014 the complaint concerning the expropriation of the applicants’ property was communicated to the Government and the remainder of the application was declared inadmissible pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants, Suren Osmanyan, Serob Osmanyan, Bakur Osmanyan, Mane Osmanyan and Donara Amiraghyan were born in 1935, 1961, 1988, 1990 and 1966 respectively and live in Teghout village.
6. The applicants are a family of five, making their living from agriculture. They jointly owned a plot of arable land in the village measuring 0.383 ha.
7. In the 1970s a copper-molybdenum deposit (“Teghout”) was discovered about 4 and 6 km from the villages of Teghout and Shnogh respectively, in the Lori Region.
8. In 2001 a private company, Armenian Copper Programme CJSC, was granted a mining licence for the exploitation of the Teghout copper molybdenum deposit for a period of twenty-five years.
9. On 1 November 2007 the Government adopted Decree no. 1279-N approving the expropriation zones of territories situated within the administrative boundaries of the rural communities of Shnogh and Teghout in the Lori Region to be taken for State needs, and changing the category of land use. According to the Decree, Armenian Copper Programme CJSC or Teghout CJSC, founded by the former for the implementation of the Teghout copper-molybdenum deposit exploitation project, were to acquire the units of land listed in its annexes. The plot of land belonging to the applicants was listed among the units of land falling within these expropriation zones.
10. On 25 March 2008 Oliver Group LLC, a licensed evaluation company hired by Teghout CJSC, delivered an evaluation report of the applicants’ plot of land. According to the report, the cadastral value of the applicants’ plot of land was AMD 250,865 (approximately EUR 545). By means of calculations based on comparative and income capitalisation methods, the market value of the applicants’ plot of land was estimated at AMD 188,000 (approximately EUR 409).
11. On an unspecified date Teghout CJSC addressed a letter to the applicants containing an offer to buy their plot of land for AMD 188,000 plus an additional 15% as required by law, making the final offer AMD 216,200 (approximately EUR 470).
12. The applicants did not reply to the offer, not being satisfied with the amount of compensation. They claimed that they were unable to obtain an evaluation of their property by another company since no other evaluation company was willing to make an independent evaluation of the market value of their land.
13. On 12 May 2008 Teghout CJSC lodged a claim with the Lori Regional Court (“the Regional Court”) against the applicants and L., the first applicant’s late wife, seeking to oblige them to sign the agreement on the taking of their property for State needs. The company based its claim, inter alia, on the evaluation report prepared by Oliver Group LLC.
14. In the course of the proceedings Teghout CJSC submitted a corrected version of the evaluation report on the applicants’ property stating that Oliver Group LLC had made certain corrections as a result of which the market value of the land was estimated at AMD 194,000 (approximately EUR 422). The final amount of compensation, together with the additional 15% required by the law, would thus be equal to AMD 223,100 (approximately EUR 485). The remainder of the data contained in the original report had not been changed.
15. The applicants argued before the Regional Court that the market value of their land had been underestimated and that the court should order a forensic expert examination to determine the real market value of their property.
16. On 6 October 2008 the Regional Court granted Teghout CJSC’s claim, awarding L. and the applicants a total of AMD 223,100 in compensation.
17. The applicants lodged an appeal complaining, inter alia, that the third applicant had not been duly notified about the proceedings and that L. had died before the proceedings before the Regional Court had started. They further argued that they had not been duly notified about the dates and times of the rescheduled hearings.
18. On 27 February 2009 the Civil Court of Appeal quashed the Regional Court’s judgment and remitted the case for a fresh examination.
19. On 2 June 2009 the Regional Court granted Teghout CJSC’s claim finding, inter alia, that the evaluation reports prepared by Oliver Group LLC should be considered lawful and acceptable evidence to determine the market value of the applicants’ property to be taken for State needs and that the applicants’ request to order a forensic expert examination was groundless. The Regional Court stated that the first applicant, as L.’s successor, should be awarded her share in the amount of compensation and awarded the applicants a total of AMD 223,100 in equal shares as compensation.
20. The applicants lodged an appeal claiming, inter alia, that the amount of compensation was not adequate and that no account had been taken of their fruit trees and their profitability. They argued that the Regional Court had accepted the reports submitted by their opponent as established proof of the market value of their property. Also, they argued that the Regional Court should have exercised its statutory discretion to order an expert examination since such a necessity had arisen in the course of the proceedings and they had no possibility to provide an alternative evaluation themselves.
21. On 31 July 2009 the Civil Court of Appeal quashed the Regional Court’s judgment, stating that it should have granted the applicants’ request by ordering a forensic expert examination to determine the market value of the property. The case was remitted to the Regional Court.
22. On 27 January 2010 the Regional Court ordered a forensic expert examination to determine the market value of the applicants’ plot of land, including that of immovable property or other improvements, if there were any.
23. On 12 August 2010 expert G. of the “Expertise Centre”, a State nonprofit organisation, delivered a report according to which the market value of the property was estimated to be AMD 230,000 (approximately EUR 500). It was stated in the report that the applicants’ plot of land was entirely covered with grass, did not have any water supply and was used to provide fodder. There were four peach trees on the land in question. Relevant photographs of the applicants’ plot of land were attached to the report.
24. On 1 November 2010 the Regional Court ordered an additional forensic expert examination. The expert was requested to determine whether there were any improvements on the applicants’ plot of land and, if so, to describe them and to establish the market value of the land together with the value of the improvements, if there were any.
25. On 17 December 2010 expert A. of “National Bureau of Expertise”, a State nonprofit organisation, delivered his report which estimated the market value of the applicants’ plot of land at AMD 209,100 (approximately EUR 450). The report confirmed the description of the applicants’ plot of land contained in the previous expert report. In addition, it was stated that in the expert’s opinion that the four fruit trees on the land could not have any bearing on the determination of its market value. The report also stated that the first expert report and the evaluation report by Oliver Group CJSC had produced quite realistic results.
26. On 21 April 2011 the Regional Court granted Teghout CJSC’s claim. It relied on the corrected evaluation report prepared by Oliver Group CJSC and two forensic expert reports. The Regional Court granted the applicants AMD 264,500 (approximately EUR 575) by taking the highest market value of the three evaluations at its disposal and adding to that amount the additional 15% as required by law.
27. The applicants lodged an appeal arguing, inter alia, that the second forensic examination report was not credible since the expert had failed to specify the sources of information he had used to reach his conclusions and moreover no account had been taken of the number of the applicants’ trees and their value. They further argued that they had filed an application with the Regional Court seeking to exclude this piece of evidence and assign an additional forensic examination, but their application was dismissed.
28. On 7 July 2011 the Civil Court of Appeal upheld the Regional Court’s judgment finding that the amount of compensation had been correctly determined based on the existing evidence. As regards the applicants’ arguments concerning the fruit trees, the Civil Court of Appeal stated that both experts appointed by the Regional Court had recorded that there were only four fruit trees on the plot of land while expert A. had stated in his report that the trees in question could not have a significant bearing on the market value of the land.
29. The applicants lodged an appeal on points of law. They raised similar complaints to those raised before the Court of Appeal.
30. On 31 August 2011 the Court of Cassation declared the applicants’ cassation appeal inadmissible for lack of merit.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
31. According to Article 31 of the Constitution, everyone shall have the right to dispose of, use, manage and bequeath his property in the way he sees fit. No one can be deprived of his property, save by a court in cases prescribed by law. Property can be expropriated for the needs of society and the State only in exceptional cases of paramount public interest, in a procedure prescribed by law and with prior equivalent compensation.
A. The Law on Alienation of Property for the needs of Society and the State (adopted on 27 November 2006 and in force from 30 December 2006)
32. According to Article 3 § 1, the constitutional basis for alienation of property for the needs of society and the State is the prevailing public interest.
33. According to Article 3 § 2, the constitutional requirements for alienation of property for the needs of society and the State are the following:
(a) alienation must be carried out in accordance with a procedure prescribed by the law,
(b) prior adequate compensation should be provided for property subject to alienation.
34. According to Article 4 § 1, the principles for the determination of the public interest for alienation of property for the needs of society and the State are the following:
(a) the public interest must prevail over the interests of the owner of property subject to alienation;
(b) the effective implementation of the public interest cannot be ensured without alienation of the given property;
(c) taking into account the public interest, the alienation of property should not cause unjustified damage to the owner;
(d) the public interest is recognised by a governmental decree;
(e) the issue of existence of a public interest may be subject to judicial review.
35. According to Article 4 § 2, the prevailing public interest may pursue, inter alia, the implementation of mining projects having important State or community significance. The aim of securing additional income for the State or community budget is not by itself a prevailing public interest.
36. According to Article 11 § 1, adequate compensation should be paid to the owner of property subject to alienation. The market value of the property plus an additional 15% is considered to be an adequate amount of compensation.
37. According to Article 11 § 3 the determination of the market value of real estate and property rights in respect of real estate is carried out in accordance with the procedure set out by the Law on Real Estate Evaluation Activity.
B. The Law on Real Estate Evaluation Activity (as in force at the material time)
38. According to Article 3, real estate evaluation activity is regulated by the Civil Code, the Law on Real Estate Evaluation Activity, the real estate evaluation standard and other legal acts, as well as international treaties.
39. According to Article 4, which sets out a list of definitions used in this law, real estate evaluation is the determination of the market value of real estate in accordance with this law, the evaluation standard of real estate in Armenia and other legal acts on a paid basis. The real estate evaluation standard is a set of rules and instructions adopted by the Government which regulate real estate evaluation activity. A real estate evaluator is a natural person who has obtained a real estate evaluator’s licence from the relevant authority.
40. The real estate evaluation standard is adopted by the Government and is mandatory for real estate evaluators. The real estate evaluation standard should include, inter alia, the methods of real estate evaluation (Article 7 §§ 1 and 2).
41. Article 8 provides that evaluation is obligatory in case of alienation of immovable property for State or community needs.
42. According to Article 15 § 1 (1) evaluators have the right to use independent methods of real estate evaluation in compliance with the real estate evaluation standard.
C. Government Decree No. 1279-N of 1 November 2007 approving the expropriation zones of certain territories situated within the administrative boundaries of rural communities of Shnogh and Teghout in the Lori Region to be taken for State needs and changing the category of land use (?? ????????????? 2007 ?. ????????? 1-? ??? 1279-? ???????? ????????? ?????????????? ????? ????? ????? ? ??????? ????????? ??????????? ???????? ???????????? ???? ???????????? ???????? ?????? ???????? ??? ????????? ? ?????? ?????????? ?????????????? ????????? ?????)
43. For the purpose of the implementation of the Teghout copper molybdenum deposit exploitation project, and in the perspective of building and operating a mining plant, the Government decided to approve the expropriation zones of agricultural land situated within the administrative boundaries of the rural communities of Shnogh and Teghout in the Lori Region to be taken for State needs, with a total area of 81.483 ha. According to the Decree, the public interest in the development of the economy and infrastructure and the interest in higher levels of production and export prevailed over the private interests of the proprietors.
D. Government Decree No. 1746-N of 24 December 2003 approving the procedure for cadastral value estimation of Republic of Armenia inhabited locality lands, their placement zoning coefficients and borders (?? ????????????? 2003 ?. ?????????? 1-? ??? 1746-? ???????? ????????? ?????????????? ???????????? ?????? ??????????? ????????? ?????, ??????????????? ???????? ????? ?????????????? ???????????? ? ?????????? ?????????? ?????)
44. Annexes 1 and 2 of the Decree set out the coefficients for cadastral value estimation of lands, in accordance with their respective zones. Teghout village is included in zone 14 with a coefficient of 0.037. According to Article 2 (a), the calculation basis for one square metre of inhabited locality land is AMD 60,000. Article 2 (b) provides that the coefficients set out in Annexes 1 and 2 are not applicable to the determination of the cadastral value of agricultural lands.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
45. The applicants complained that they were deprived of their property in violation of the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
46. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ arguments
47. The applicants submitted that their expropriated land was their main source of income. They argued that the deprivation of their property did not satisfy the requirement of lawfulness, did not pursue any public interest and that the amount of compensation awarded was inadequate. As regards the requirement of lawfulness, they argued that the law is not sufficiently foreseeable in that it does not specify the criteria for determining the market value of property to be taken for State needs. The applicants denied that the expropriation of their land had been carried out on “public interest” grounds. They argued that it was manifestly unreasonable in the present case to rely on a “public interest” when the measure had an exclusively commercial purpose, taking into account that the mining project was being implemented by a private company which did not have any State participation. The applicants further argued that the evaluation of the market value of their land was done based on the comparative method which could not adequately reflect its true market value. Moreover, the sum that they had received in compensation was much lower than the cadastral value of the expropriated land at the time the expropriation procedure was initiated and was manifestly inadequate in relation to the actual value of the land in question. They referred to Government Decree No. 746 of 29 December 2003 according to which the cadastral value of land in the same zone as theirs amounted to AMD 222 per square metre.
48. The Government submitted that the expropriation of the applicants’ property had been in accordance with the law. It was based on the Law on Alienation of Property for the needs of Society and the State adopted on 27 November 2006 which was both accessible to the applicants at the time of the expropriation and foreseeable in its consequences. As regards, in particular, the issue of evaluation of property to be taken for State needs, the mentioned law makes reference to another legal act, namely the Law on Real Estate Evaluation Activity, which sets out the relevant procedure. The Government argued that the impugned expropriation had been “in the public interest”. Its main aim had been to ensure the development of the economy and infrastructure in the region, as stated in Government Decree No. 1279 N of 1 November 2007. The Government lastly submitted that the applicants were eventually awarded AMD 264,500 in compensation, which was more than the cadastral value of their land at the time of expropriation.
2. The Court’s assessment
49. In the present case, it is not in dispute that there has been a “deprivation of possessions” within the meaning of the second sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court must therefore ascertain whether the impugned deprivation was justified under that provision.
50. The Court reiterates that to be compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, an expropriation measure must fulfil three conditions: it must be carried out “subject to the conditions provided for by law”, which rules out any arbitrary action on the part of the national authorities, must be “in the public interest”, and must strike a fair balance between the owner’s rights and the interests of the community (see, among other authorities, Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 94, 25 October 2012). The Court will thus proceed to examine whether those three conditions have been met in the present case.
(a) “Subject to the conditions provided for by law”
51. An essential condition for an interference with a right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be deemed compatible with this provision is that it should be lawful. The rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999 II, ECHR 2016; Visti?š and Perepjolkins, cited above, § 95, and Béláné Nagy v. Hungary [GC], no. 53080/13, § 112).
52. However, the existence of a legal basis in domestic law does not suffice, in itself, to satisfy the principle of lawfulness. In addition, the legal basis must have a certain quality, namely it must be compatible with the rule of law and must provide guarantees against arbitrariness. Thus, in addition to being in accordance with the domestic law of the Contracting State, including its Constitution, the legal norms upon which the deprivation of property is based should be sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see Visti?š and Perepjolkins, cited above, §§ 96-97 and the cases cited therein).
53. A norm cannot be regarded as a “law” unless it is formulated with sufficient precision to enable citizens to regulate their conduct; they must be able – if need be with appropriate advice – to foresee, to a degree that is reasonable in the circumstances, the consequences which a given action may entail. Such consequences need not be foreseeable with absolute certainty: experience shows this to be unattainable. The level of precision required of domestic legislation – which cannot in any case provide for every eventuality – depends to a considerable degree on the content of the law in question, the field it is designed to cover and the number and status of those to whom it is addressed. In particular, a rule is “foreseeable” when it affords a measure of protection against arbitrary interferences by the public authorities (see, Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. and Di Stefano v. Italy [GC], no. 38433/09, §§ 141-143, ECHR 2012 with further references).
54. In the instant case it is not in dispute that the expropriation of the applicants’ property was carried out on the basis of the Law of 27 November 2006 on Alienation of Property for the needs of Society and the State (the Law).
55. The Court notes that the applicants’ property was expropriated more than one year after the enactment of the Law, which is of general application and was not specifically intended by the legislature to apply to the applicants’ situation. The Law was therefore accessible to the applicants. In fact, the applicants themselves did not argue that the relevant legal provisions based on which they were deprived of their property were not accessible to them but claimed that the Law was not foreseeable as to its effects as regards the manner of determination of the market value of land subject to expropriation.
56. The Court observes that Article 11 § 3 of the Law, which concerns the issue of determination of the market value of real estate to be taken for the needs of society and the State, refers to the Law on Real Estate Evaluation Activity (see paragraph 37 above). Article 7 of the latter law in its turn provides that the methods for real estate evaluation are set out in the real estate evaluation standard which is adopted by the Government and is mandatory for real estate evaluators (see paragraphs 38 and 40 above). Furthermore, according to Article 4 of the same law, real estate evaluation is a professional activity which is carried out by licensed real estate evaluators in accordance with the rules and instructions set out in the real estate evaluation standard (see paragraph 39 above).
57 The Court does not share the applicants’ view that the Law was not sufficiently foreseeable in its effects. In particular, the Law, which provides the general legal framework for the procedure of taking property for the needs of society and the State, cannot be expected to regulate in such detail particular instances of deprivation of property as to specify the method of determination of the market price for each type of property subject to evaluation for expropriation purposes. Moreover, taking into account that real estate evaluation is a professional licensed activity, it does not seem unreasonable that a certain choice of methods to be used during evaluation is left to the evaluator who chooses an appropriate method in a particular situation depending on the specificities of the real estate in question.
58. The Court is satisfied that in the circumstances the above-mentioned legal provisions were clear enough to enable the applicants to foresee in general terms the manner in which the market value of their property would be evaluated. The applicants could then challenge the report prepared by the evaluator hired by the acquirer of their property, of which possibility they successfully availed themselves (see paragraphs 22 and 24 above). The Court finds therefore that the applicants were afforded sufficient guarantees against arbitrariness.
59. Consequently, the impugned expropriation may be regarded as having been carried out “subject to the conditions provided for by law”.
(b) “In the public interest”
60. The Court reiterates that, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures of deprivation of property. Here, as in other fields to which the safeguards of the Convention extend, the national authorities accordingly enjoy a certain margin of appreciation. Furthermore, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws expropriating property will commonly involve consideration of political, economic and social issues. The Court, finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is “in the public interest” unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 112, ECHR 2000 I, and Visti?š and Perepjolkins, cited above, § 106).
61. The Government argued that the State needed to expropriate the applicants’ land for the development of the economy and infrastructure as a result of the implementation of the Teghout copper molybdenum deposit exploitation project. The Court has no convincing evidence on which to conclude that these reasons were manifestly devoid of any reasonable basis (contrast Tkachevy v. Russia, no. 35430/05, § 50, 14 February 2012).
(c) Proportionality of the impugned measure
62. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 requires that any interference be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99 and 2 others, §§ 81 94, ECHR 2005 VI). The requisite fair balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Stefanetti and Others v. Italy, nos. 21838/10 and 7 others, § 66, 15 April 2014).
63. Compensation terms under the relevant legislation are material to the assessment of whether the contested measure respects the requisite fair balance and, notably, whether it imposes a disproportionate burden on the applicants (see the recapitulation of the relevant principles in Visti?š and Perepjolkins, cited above, §§ 110-114).
64. The applicants argued that the compensation received was significantly lower than the cadastral value of their land. The Court observes that the cadastral value of the applicants’ plot of land was indicated at AMD 250,865 in the initial and corrected evaluation reports (see paragraphs 10 and 14 above) that is AMD 65.50 per sq. m, as opposed to the AMD 222 per sq. m, as claimed by the applicants (see paragraph 47 above).
65. The Court also observes that at no point during the domestic proceedings or in the proceedings before the Court did the applicants dispute the accuracy of the amount of the cadastral value of their land indicated in the above evaluation reports. Neither did the applicants submit any evidence before the Court, such as for instance receipts of their payments in respect of land tax which would substantiate that the cadastral value of their land was indeed AMD 222 per sq. m. Insofar as the applicants claim that the cadastral value of land in the same zone as theirs amounted to AMD 222 per sq. m., it should be noted that Government Decree No. 1746 N of 24 December 2003, which sets out the coefficients used for calculation of cadastral value of land and indeed lists the applicants’ village within the zone, the coefficient of which corresponds to the amount per square metre claimed by the applicants, explicitly states that this decree is not applicable to the determination of cadastral value of agricultural lands (see paragraph 44 above).
66. The Court notes that the applicants’ property was first evaluated by the evaluating company hired by Teghout CJSC in its capacity as the acquirer of the property and, subsequently, by forensic experts based on court orders (see paragraphs 10, 14, 22, 23, 24 and 25 above). The Court considers that, on the basis of the material before it, there are no elements sufficiently demonstrating that the market value of the applicants’ land was grossly underestimated.
67. That said, the Court observes that, having used the comparative method of evaluation of real estate, the experts determined the market value of the applicants’ plot of land in comparison with the sale prices of other plots of land in the same expropriation zone. The Court is mindful of its above finding that the relevant provisions of the Law were sufficiently foreseeable in that a professional expert should legitimately have the freedom of choice of the appropriate real estate evaluation method (see paragraph 58 above). It should be noted however that in a situation where the market value of the applicants’ land was determined on the basis of the sale prices of plots of land within the same area, it cannot be excluded that the applicants would not be able to acquire or would at least experience serious difficulty in finding equivalent land in another area not subject to expropriation with the amount of compensation received.
68. Furthermore, the applicants continuously expressed their disagreement with the evaluation reports prepared upon the order of Teghout CJSC as well as with the reports delivered by the court-appointed experts on the ground that no account had been taken of their fruit trees and their profitability. It should be noted in this respect that both experts appointed by the court attached to their respective reports photographs of the applicants’ plot of land which showed that they had indeed four fruit trees. In their opinion, however, the four trees in question could not have affected significantly the market value of the land (see paragraph 28 above).
69. Without prejudice to the relevant provisions of the Law and the margin of appreciation of the State in these matters, the Court considers that there may be situations where compensation representing the market price of the real estate in question even with the addition of the statutory surplus, would not constitute adequate compensation for deprivation of property. In the Court’s opinion, such a situation may arise in particular if the property the person was deprived of constituted his main, if not only source of income and the offered compensation did not reflect that loss (see Lallement v. France, no. 46044/99, § 18, 11 April 2002).
70. In the present case the applicants submitted that as a family unit they had depended economically on the land in question. This argument has not been refuted by the respondent Government (see paragraphs 47-48 above). It is to be noted that this particular aspect, namely that in consequence of the expropriation the applicants had lost their main source of income, was not taken into account by the domestic courts in their decisions on the amount of the compensation due. The courts decided that, despite the circumstances, the applicants should be provided with compensation which was determined in relation to the prices of real estate situated in the area subject to expropriation. They did not address the issue whether the compensation granted would cover the applicants’ actual loss involved in deprivation of means of subsistence or was at least sufficient for them to acquire equivalent land within the area in which they lived.
71. In view of the foregoing, the Court finds that the applicants had to bear an excessive individual burden. Accordingly, the impugned expropriation was in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
72. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
73. The applicants claimed 22,190 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage. According to the applicants, the claimed amount reflected the sale and rental prices of land within the same community in the same period. They took 3,000 Armenian Drams (AMD) per square metre of land as a basis for calculation. The applicants further claimed EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
74. The Government submitted that the overall manner of calculation of the claimed amount was unclear. They therefore urged the Court to reject the applicant’s claims. The Government further submitted that the applicants’ claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage was excessive.
75. Given the nature of the violation found (see paragraphs 70 and 71 above), the Court finds that the applicants undoubtedly suffered some pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage (see, mutatis mutandis, Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 105, 15 September 2009). In the particular circumstances of the present case, making an assessment on an equitable basis, as is required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards the applicants EUR 10,000 to cover all heads of damage.
B. Costs and expenses
76. The applicants also claimed EUR 2,000 for legal costs incurred before the domestic courts and the Court.
77. The Government contested this claim.
78. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession, the Court finds it appropriate to award the legal costs claimed in their entirety.
C. Default interest
79. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement, simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period, plus three percentage points.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 11 October 2018, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Abel Campos Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni:
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - la Privazione di proprietà)
Danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale
Danno patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)


PRIMA LA SEZIONE






CAUSA OSMANYAN ED AMIRAGHYAN C. ARMENIA

(Richiesta n. 71306/11)








SENTENZA




STRASBOURG

11 ottobre 2018

DEFINITIVO

11/01/2019

Questa sentenza è divenuta definitivo sotto Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Osmanyan ed Amiraghyan c. l'Armenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, Presidente
Kristina Pardalos,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Jovan Ilievski, giudici
ed Abel Campos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 18 settembre 2018,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 71306/11) contro la Repubblica dell'Armenia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con cinque cittadini Armeni, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 11 novembre 2011.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati col Sig. K. Tumanyan, un avvocato che pratica in Vanadzor. Il Governo Armeno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. G. Kostanyan, Rappresentante della Repubblica dell'Armenia alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che la privazione della loro proprietà non soddisfece i requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
4. 18 marzo 2014 l'azione di reclamo riguardo all'espropriazione dei richiedenti che la proprietà di ' è stata comunicata al Governo ed il resto della richiesta fu dichiarata inammissibile facendo seguito Decidere 54 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti, Suren Osmanyan, Serob Osmanyan Bakur Osmanyan, Criniera che Osmanyan e Donara Amiraghyan sono nati nel 1935 1961, 1988 1990 e 1966 rispettivamente e vive in villaggio di Teghout.
6. I richiedenti sono una famiglia di cinque, mentre facendo il loro vivendo dall'agricoltura. Loro possedettero congiuntamente un'area di terra arabile nel villaggio che misura 0.383 ha.
7. Negli anni settanta un rame-molybdenum depositi (“Teghout”) fu scoperto approssimativamente rispettivamente 4 e 6 km dai villaggi di Teghout e Shnogh, nella Regione di Lori.
8. Nel 2001 una società privata, Copper di armeno Programme CJSC, fu accordato una licenza di estrazione per lo sfruttamento del molybdenum di rame di Teghout depositi per un periodo di venticinqui anni.
9. 1 novembre 2007 il Governo adottò Decreto n. 1279-N che approvano le zone di espropriazione di territori situate all'interno dei confini amministrativi delle comunità rurali di Shnogh e Teghout nella Regione di Lori per essere preso per le necessità di Stato, e cambiando la categoria di uso di terra. Secondo il Decreto, Copper di armeno Programme CJSC o Teghout CJSC, fondò col precedente per l'attuazione del Teghout rame-molybdenum depositi progetto di sfruttamento, era acquisire le unità di terra elencate in suo annette. L'area di terra che appartiene ai richiedenti fu elencata fra le unità di terra che incorre all'interno di questi zone di espropriazione.
10. Sul 2008 Oliver di 25 marzo LLC Di gruppo, una società di valutazione di autorizzato noleggiata con Teghout CJSC consegnò un rapporto di valutazione dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra. Secondo il rapporto, il valore catastale dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra era AMD 250,865 (verso EUR 545). Con vuole dire di calcoli basati su comparativo e metodi di capitalisation di reddito, il valore di mercato dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra fu valutato ad AMD 188,000 (verso EUR 409).
11. Su una data non specificata Teghout CJSC rivolse una lettera ai richiedenti che contengono un'offerta per comprare la loro area di terra per AMD 188,000 più un supplementare 15% come richiesto con legge, mentre fabbricando AMD 216,200 la definitivo offerta (verso EUR 470).
12. I richiedenti non risposero all'offerta, non essendo soddisfatto con l'importo del risarcimento. Loro dissero che loro non erano capaci di ottenere una valutazione della loro proprietà con un'altra società poiché nessuna altra società di valutazione era disposta a fare una valutazione indipendente del valore di mercato della loro terra.
13. Sul 2008 Teghout CJSC di 12 maggio una rivendicazione depositò col Lori Corte Regionale (“la Corte Regionale”) contro i richiedenti e L., la defunta moglie del primo richiedente, cercando di obbligarli a firmare l'accordo sulla presa della loro proprietà per le necessità di Stato. La società basò la sua rivendicazione, inter alia, sul rapporto di valutazione preparato con Oliver LLC Di gruppo.
14. Nel corso dei procedimenti Teghout CJSC presentò una versione corretta del rapporto di valutazione sui richiedenti proprietà di ' che afferma che Oliver LLC Di gruppo aveva fatto le certe correzioni come un risultato del quale il valore di mercato della terra fu valutato ad AMD 194,000 (verso EUR 422). Il definitivo importo del risarcimento, insieme col supplementare 15% richiesti con la legge, sarebbe così uguale ad AMD 223,100 (verso EUR 485). Il resto dei dati contenuto nel rapporto originale non era cambiato.
15. I richiedenti dibatterono di fronte alla Corte Regionale che il valore di mercato della loro terra era stato sottovalutato e che la corte dovrebbe ordinare un esame di consulente legale per determinare il vero valore di mercato della loro proprietà.
16. 6 ottobre 2008 la Corte Regionale ammise il ricorso di Teghout CJSC, mentre assegnando un totale di AMD 223,100 L. ed i richiedenti in risarcimento.
17. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso lamentandosi, inter alia che il terzo richiedente non era stato notificato debitamente dei procedimenti e che L. era morto prima i procedimenti prima che la Corte Regionale aveva cominciato. Loro dibatterono inoltre che loro non erano stati notificati debitamente delle date e tempi delle udienze riprogrammate.
18. 27 febbraio 2009 la Corte d'appello Civile annullò la sentenza della Corte Regionale e rinviò la causa per un esame nuovo.
19. 2 giugno 2009 la Corte Regionale accordò il rivendicazione trovando di Teghout CJSC, inter alia che i rapporti di valutazione hanno preparato con Oliver LLC Di gruppo dovrebbero essere considerati prova legale ed accettabile per determinare il valore di mercato dei richiedenti la proprietà di ' per essere preso per le necessità di Stato e che i richiedenti ' richiede di ordinare un esame di consulente legale era infondato. La Corte Regionale affermò che il primo richiedente, come L. ' successore di s, dovrebbe essere assegnato la sua quota nell'importo del risarcimento e dovrebbe essere assegnato un totale di AMD 223,100 i richiedenti in quote uguali come risarcimento.
20. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso chiedendo, inter l'alia, che l'importo del risarcimento non era adeguato e che nessun conto era stato preso dei loro alberi di frutta e la loro redditività. Loro dibatterono che la Corte Regionale aveva accettato i rapporti presentati col loro oppositore come prova stabilita del valore di mercato della loro proprietà. Anche, loro dibatterono che la Corte Regionale avrebbe dovuto esercitare la sua discrezione legale per ordinare un esame competente poiché tale necessità era sorta nel corso dei procedimenti e loro non avevano nessuna possibilità di offrire loro una valutazione alternativa.
21. 31 luglio 2009 la Corte d'appello Civile annullò la sentenza della Corte Regionale, mentre afferma che avrebbe dovuto accordare i richiedenti ' richiede con ordinare un esame di consulente legale per determinare il valore di mercato della proprietà. La causa fu rinviata alla Corte Regionale.
22. 27 gennaio 2010 l'Ordine della corte Regionale un esame di consulente legale per determinare il valore di mercato dei richiedenti ' disegna di terra, incluso che di patrimonio immobiliare o gli altri miglioramenti, se c'era qualsiasi.
23. Sul 2010 G. competenti di 12 agosto del “Expertise Centre”, un'organizzazione disinteressata e Statale, consegnò un rapporto secondo il quale il valore di mercato della proprietà fu valutato per essere AMD 230,000 (verso EUR 500). Fu affermato nel rapporto che i richiedenti ' disegna di terra fu coperto completamente con erba, non abbia qualsiasi approvvigionamento di acqua e fu usato per offrire foraggio. C'erano quattro alberi di pesca sulla terra in oggetto. Fotografie attinenti dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra furono allegate al rapporto.
24. 1 novembre 2010 l'Ordine della corte Regionale un esame di consulente legale supplementare. L'esperto fu richiesto di determinare se c'era qualsiasi miglioramenti sui richiedenti ' disegna di terra e, in tal caso, descriverli e stabilire insieme il valore di mercato della terra col valore dei miglioramenti, se c'era qualsiasi.
25. Sul 2010 A. competenti di 17 dicembre di “Scrivania Nazionale di Expertise”, un'organizzazione disinteressata e Statale, consegnò il suo rapporto che valutò il valore di mercato dei richiedenti ' disegni di terra ad AMD 209,100 (verso EUR 450). Il rapporto confermò la descrizione dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra contenuta nel rapporto competente e precedente. In oltre, fu affermato che nell'opinione dell'esperto che i quattro alberi di frutta sulla terra non potevano avere qualsiasi nascendo sulla determinazione del suo valore di mercato. Il rapporto affermò anche che il primo rapporto di esperto e la valutazione riportano con Oliver CJSC Di gruppo aveva prodotto risultati piuttosto realistici.
26. 21 aprile 2011 la Corte Regionale ammise il ricorso di Teghout CJSC. Si appellò sul rapporto di valutazione corretto preparato con Oliver CJSC Di gruppo e due rapporti di consulente legale. La Corte Regionale accordò i richiedenti AMD 264,500 (verso EUR 575) con prendendo il valore di mercato più alto delle tre valutazioni alla sua disposizione ed aggiungendo a che importo il supplementare 15% come richiesto con legge.
27. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso dibattendo, inter l'alia che il secondo rapporto di esame forense non era credibile poiché l'esperto non era riuscito a specificare le fonti di informazioni lui giungeva alle sue conclusioni ed inoltre nessun conto era stato preso del numero dei richiedenti gli alberi di ' ed il loro valore. Loro dibatterono inoltre che loro avevano registrato una richiesta con la Corte Regionale che chiede di escludere questo pezzo di prova ed assegnare un esame forense e supplementare, ma la loro richiesta fu respinta.
28. 7 luglio 2011 la Corte d'appello Civile sostenne la sentenza della Corte Regionale che trova che l'importo del risarcimento era stato determinato correttamente basato sulla prova esistente. Come riguardi i richiedenti gli argomenti di ' riguardo agli alberi di frutta, la Corte d'appello Civile affermò che ambo gli esperti nominarono con la Corte Regionale aveva registrato che c'erano solamente quattro alberi di frutta sull'area di terra mentre A. competente aveva affermato nel suo rapporto che gli alberi in oggetto non poteva avere un portante significativo sul valore di mercato della terra.
29. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso su questioni di diritto. Loro sollevarono azioni di reclamo simili a quelli sollevati di fronte alla Corte d'appello.
30. 31 agosto 2011 la Corte di Cassazione dichiarò i richiedenti ricorso di cassazione di ' inammissibile per mancanza di merito.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
31. Secondo Articolo 31 della Costituzione, ognuno avrà diritto a disporre di, usi, maneggi e trasmetta la sua proprietà nel suo modo di vedere l'adattamento. Nessuno può essere privato della sua proprietà, salvi con una corte in cause prescritte con legge. Proprietà può essere espropriata solamente per le necessità di società e lo Stato in cause eccezionali di interesse pubblico ed eminente, in una procedura prescritta con legge e con risarcimento equivalente e precedente.
A. La Legge su Cessione dei beni per le necessità di Società e lo Stato (adottò 27 novembre 2006 ed in vigore da 30 dicembre 2006)
32. Secondo Articolo 3 § 1, la base costituzionale per cessione dei beni per le necessità di società e lo Stato è l'interesse pubblico e prevalente.
33. Secondo Articolo 3 § 2, i requisiti costituzionali per cessione dei beni per le necessità di società e lo Stato sono il seguente:
(un) l'alienazione deve essere eseguita in conformità con una procedura prescritta con la legge,
(b) il risarcimento adeguato e precedente dovrebbe essere offerto per proprietà soggetto all'alienazione.
34. Secondo Articolo 4 § 1, i principi per la determinazione dell'interesse pubblico per cessione dei beni per le necessità di società e lo Stato sono il seguente:
(un) l'interesse pubblico deve prevalere sugli interessi del proprietario di proprietà soggetto all'alienazione;
(b) l'attuazione effettiva dell'interesse pubblico non può essere assicurata senza alienazione della proprietà determinata;
(il c) prendendo in considerazione l'interesse pubblico, la cessione dei beni non dovrebbe provocare danno ingiustificato al proprietario;
(d) l'interesse pubblico è riconosciuto con un decreto governativo;
(e) il problema di esistenza di un interesse pubblico può essere soggetto a controllo giurisdizionale.
35. Secondo Articolo 4 § 2, l'interesse pubblico e prevalente può perseguire, inter alia, l'attuazione di scavare progetti che hanno l'importante Stato o significato di comunità. Lo scopo di garantire reddito supplementario per lo Stato o bilancio di comunità non è un interesse pubblico e prevalente da solo.
36. Secondo Articolo 11 § 1, il risarcimento adeguato dovrebbe essere pagato al proprietario di proprietà soggetto all'alienazione. Il valore di mercato della proprietà più un supplementare si considera che 15% a siano un importo adeguato del risarcimento.
37. Secondo Articolo 11 § 3 la determinazione del valore di mercato di beni immobili e diritti di proprietà in riguardo di beni immobili è eseguita in conformità con la procedura esposta fuori con la Legge su Attività della Valutazione del Beni immobili.
B. La Legge su Attività della Valutazione del Beni immobili (come in vigore al tempo di materiale)
38. Secondo Articolo 3, l'attività di valutazione di beni immobili è regolata col Codice civile, la Legge sull'Attività della Valutazione del Beni immobili, lo standard di valutazione di beni immobili e gli altri atti legali così come trattati internazionali.
39. Secondo Articolo 4 che espone fuori un ruolo di definizioni usato in questa legge, valutazione di beni immobili è la determinazione del valore di mercato di beni immobili in conformità con questa legge, lo standard di valutazione di beni immobili in Armenia e gli altri atti legali su una base pagata. Lo standard di valutazione di beni immobili è un set di articoli ed istruzioni adottato col Governo che regola l'attività di valutazione di beni immobili. Un evaluator del beni immobili è una persona fisica che ha ottenuto la licenza di un evaluator del beni immobili dall'autorità attinente.
40. Lo standard di valutazione di beni immobili è adottato col Governo e è obbligatorio per evaluators del beni immobili. Lo standard di valutazione di beni immobili dovrebbe includere, inter l'alia, i metodi di valutazione di beni immobili (l'Articolo 7 §§ 1 e 2).
41. Articolo 8 prevede che valutazione è obbligatoria in causa dell'alienazione di patrimonio immobiliare per Stato o le necessità di comunità.
42. Secondo Articolo 15 § 1 (1) evaluators hanno diritto ad usare metodi indipendenti di valutazione di beni immobili in ottemperanza con lo standard di valutazione di beni immobili.
C. Governo Decreto N.ro 1279-N 1 novembre 2007 che approva le zone di espropriazione di certi territori situarono all'interno dei confini amministrativi delle comunità rurali di Shnogh e Teghout nella Regione di Lori per essere preso per le necessità di Stato e cambiando la categoria di uso di terra (?2007.? ????????? 1 - ?1279 -?)
43. Per il fine dell'attuazione del molybdenum di rame di Teghout depositi progetto di sfruttamento, e nella prospettiva di costruendo ed azionare una pianta di estrazione, il Governo decise di approvare le zone di espropriazione di terra agricola situate all'interno dei confini amministrativi delle comunità rurali di Shnogh e Teghout nella Regione di Lori per essere preso per le necessità di Stato, con un'area totale di 81.483 ha. Secondo il Decreto, l'interesse pubblico nello sviluppo dell'economia ed infrastruttura e l'interesse in livelli più alti di produzione ed esportazione prevalse sugli interessi privati dei proprietari.
D. Governo Decreto N.ro 1746-N 24 dicembre 2003 che approva la procedura per il preventivo di valore catastale di Repubblica dell'Armenia abitarono località sbarca, la loro disposizione che suddivide in zone coefficienti e confini (?2003.? ?????????? 1 - ?1746 -?,?)
44. Annette 1 e 2 del Decreto esposto fuori i coefficienti per il preventivo di valore catastale di terre, in conformità con le loro rispettive zone. Il villaggio di Teghout è incluso in zona 14 con un coefficiente di 0.037. Secondo Articolo 2 (un), la base di calcolo per uno metro quadrato di terra di località abitata è AMD 60,000. Articolo 2 (b) prevede che i coefficienti insorsero fuori Annette 1 e 2 non è applicabile alla determinazione del valore catastale di terre agricole.
LA LEGGE
IO. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 1 DI PROTOCOLLO N. 1 A LA CONVENZIONE
45. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro furono privati della loro proprietà in violazione dei requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
46. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Le parti gli argomenti di '
47. I richiedenti presentarono che la loro terra espropriata era la loro fonte di reddito principale. Loro dibatterono che la privazione della loro proprietà non soddisfece il requisito della legalità, non persegua qualsiasi interesse pubblico e che l'importo del risarcimento assegnato era inadeguato. Come riguardi il requisito della legalità, loro dibatterono che la legge non è sufficientemente prevedibile in che non specifica il criterio per determinare il valore di mercato di proprietà per essere preso per le necessità di Stato. I richiedenti negarono che l'espropriazione della loro terra era stata continuata fuori “interesse pubblico” i motivi. Loro dibatterono che era manifestamente irragionevole nella causa presente per appellarsi su un “interesse pubblico” quando la misura aveva un fine esclusivamente commerciale, mentre prendendo in considerazione che il progetto di estrazione era implementato con una società privata che non aveva qualsiasi partecipazione Statale. I richiedenti dibatterono inoltre che la valutazione del valore di mercato della loro terra era fatta basata sul metodo comparativo che non poteva riflettere adeguatamente il suo vero valore di mercato. La somma che loro avevano ricevuto in risarcimento molto era inoltre, più bassa del valore catastale della terra espropriata al tempo la procedura di espropriazione fu iniziata ed era manifestamente inadeguata in relazione al valore effettivo della terra in oggetto. Loro si riferirono a Governo Decreto N.ro 746 29 dicembre 2003 secondo che il valore catastale di terra nella stessa zona come il loro corrisposto ad AMD 222 per metro quadrato.
48. Il Governo presentò che l'espropriazione dei richiedenti che la proprietà di ' era stata in conformità con la legge. Fu basato sulla Legge su Cessione dei beni per le necessità di Società e lo Stato adottate 27 novembre 2006 quale era sia accessibile ai richiedenti al tempo dell'espropriazione e prevedibile nelle sue conseguenze. Come riguardi, in particolare, il problema di valutazione di proprietà per essere preso per le necessità di Stato, la legge menzionata fa riferimento ad un altro atto legale, vale a dire la Legge su Attività della Valutazione del Beni immobili che espone fuori la procedura attinente. Il Governo dibattè che l'espropriazione contestata era stata “nell'interesse pubblico.” Il suo scopo principale era stato assicurare lo sviluppo dell'economia ed infrastruttura nella regione, come affermato in Governo Decreto N.ro 1279 N di 1 novembre 2007. Il Governo presentò infine che i richiedenti furono assegnati infine AMD 264,500 in risarcimento che era più del valore catastale di terra loro al tempo dell'espropriazione.
2. La valutazione della Corte
49. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, non è in controversia che c'è stata un “la privazione di proprietà” all'interno del significato della seconda frase di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte deve accertare perciò se la privazione contestata fu giustificata sotto quel la disposizione.
50. La Corte reitera che essere compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, una misura di espropriazione deve adempiere le tre condizioni: deve essere eseguito “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge” che decide fuori qualsiasi azione arbitraria da parte delle autorità nazionali, deve essere “nell'interesse pubblico”, e deve prevedere un equilibrio equo fra i diritti del proprietario e gli interessi della comunità (veda, fra le altre autorità, Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 94 25 ottobre 2012). La Corte procederà così esaminare se quelle tre condizioni sono state soddisfatte nella causa presente.
(un) “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge”
51. Una condizione essenziale per un'interferenza con un diritto protegguto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per essere ritenuto compatibile con questa disposizione è che dovrebbe essere legale. L'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999 II, ECHR 2016; Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins, citato sopra, § 95, e Béláné Nagy c. l'Ungheria [GC], n. 53080/13, § 112).
52. Comunque, l'esistenza di una base legale in diritto nazionale non basta, in se stesso, soddisfare il principio della legalità. In oltre, la base legale deve avere una certa qualità, vale a dire deve essere compatibile con l'articolo di legge e deve offrire garanzie contro l'arbitrarietà. Oltre ad essendo in conformità col diritto nazionale dello Stato Contraente, incluso la sua Costituzione le norme legali sulle quali è basata la privazione di proprietà dovrebbero essere così, sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro richiesta (veda Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins, citato sopra, §§ 96-97 e le cause citate therein).
53. Una norma non può essere riguardata come un “la legge” a meno che è formulato con precisione sufficiente per abilitare cittadini per regolare la loro condotta; loro devono essere in grado-se bisogno è con consiglio appropriato-prevedere, ad un grado che è ragionevole nelle circostanze le conseguenze che può comportare un'azione determinata. Simile conseguenze non hanno bisogno di essere prevedibile con certezza assoluta: l'esperienza mostra questo per essere irraggiungibile. Il livello di precisione richiese di legislazione nazionale-quale non può in qualsiasi causa prevede per ogni eventualità-dipende ad un grado considerevole dal contenuto della legge in oggetto, il campo è progettato per coprire ed il numero e status di quegli a chi è rivolto. In particolare, un articolo è “prevedibile” quando riconosce una misura di protezione contro interferenze arbitrarie con le autorità pubbliche (veda, Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. e Di Stefano c. l'Italia [GC], n. 38433/09, §§ 141-143 ECHR 2012 con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
54. Nella causa presente non è in controversia che l'espropriazione dei richiedenti la proprietà di ' fu eseguita sulla base della Legge di 27 novembre 2006 su Cessione dei beni per le necessità di Società e lo Stato (la Legge).
55. La Corte nota che i richiedenti la proprietà di ' fu espropriata più di un anno dopo la promulgazione della Legge che è della richiesta generale e non fu proporsi specificamente con la legislatura per fare domanda ai richiedenti la situazione di '. La Legge era perciò accessibile ai richiedenti. Infatti, i richiedenti stessi non dibatterono che le disposizioni legali ed attinenti basarono su che loro furono privati della loro proprietà non era accessibile a loro ma affermò che la Legge non era prevedibile come ai suoi effetti come riguardi la maniera della determinazione del valore di mercato di terra soggetto all'espropriazione.
56. La Corte osserva che Articolo 11 § 3 della Legge che concerne il problema della determinazione del valore di mercato di beni immobili per essere presa per le necessità di società e lo Stato si riferisce alla Legge su Attività della Valutazione del Beni immobili (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). Articolo 7 della legge seconda nella sua svolta prevede che i metodi per valutazione di beni immobili sono esposti fuori nello standard di valutazione di beni immobili che è adottato col Governo e è obbligatorio per evaluators del beni immobili (veda divide in paragrafi 38 e 40 sopra). Secondo Articolo 4 della stessa legge, valutazione di beni immobili è inoltre, un'attività professionale che è eseguita con evaluators di beni immobili di autorizzato in conformità con gli articoli ed istruzioni esposta fuori nello standard di valutazione di beni immobili (veda paragrafo 39 sopra).
57 la Corte non divide i richiedenti la prospettiva di ' che la Legge non era sufficientemente prevedibile nei suoi effetti. In particolare, la Legge che offre la struttura legale e generale per la procedura di prendere proprietà per le necessità di società e lo Stato non può essere aspettatasi di regolare in simile dettaglio le particolari istanze della privazione di proprietà come specificare il metodo della determinazione del prezzo di mercato per ogni tipo di proprietà soggetto a valutazione per fini di espropriazione. Inoltre, prendendo in considerazione che valutazione di beni immobili è un'attività di autorizzato professionale, non sembra irragionevole che una certa scelta di metodi essere usato durante valutazione ha lasciato all'evaluator che sceglie un metodo appropriato in una particolare situazione che dipende dalle specificità del beni immobili in oggetto.
58. La Corte si soddisfa che nelle circostanze le disposizioni legali e summenzionate abbastanza erano chiare per abilitare i richiedenti per prevedere in termini generali la maniera nella quale sarebbe valutato il valore di mercato della loro proprietà. I richiedenti potrebbero impugnare poi il rapporto preparato con l'evaluator noleggiato con l'acquisitore della loro proprietà di che la possibilità loro si giovarono a con successo (veda divide in paragrafi 22 e 24 sopra). La Corte trova perciò che i richiedenti furono riconosciuti garanzie sufficienti contro l'arbitrarietà.
59. Di conseguenza, l'espropriazione contestata può essere riguardata siccome stato stato eseguito “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge.”
(b) “Nell'interesse pubblico”
60. La Corte reitera che, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure della privazione di proprietà. Qui, come negli altri campi ai quali prolungano le salvaguardie della Convenzione, le autorità nazionali godono di conseguenza un certo margine della valutazione. Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è esteso. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi che espropriano proprietà comporterà comunemente considerazione di problemi politici, economici e sociali. La Corte, trovandolo naturale che il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere un ampio, rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che che è “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (veda Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 112 ECHR 2000 io, e Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins, citato sopra, § 106).
61. Il Governo dibattè che lo Stato ebbe bisogno di espropriare i richiedenti ' sbarca per lo sviluppo dell'economia ed infrastruttura come un risultato dell'attuazione del molybdenum di rame di Teghout depositi progetto di sfruttamento. La Corte non ha prova convincente su che concludere che queste ragioni erano manifestamente prive di qualsiasi base ragionevole (il contrasto Tkachevy c. la Russia, n. 35430/05, § 50 14 febbraio 2012).
(il c) la Proporzionalità della misura contestata
62. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede che qualsiasi interferenza è ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso (veda Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99 e 2 altri, §§ 81 94 ECHR 2005 VI). L'equilibrio equo e richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardò sopporta un carico individuale ed eccessivo (veda Stefanetti ed Altri c. l'Italia, N. 21838/10 e 7 altri, § 66 15 aprile 2014).
63. Il risarcimento chiama sotto la legislazione attinente è materiale alla valutazione di se la misura contestata rispetta l'equilibrio equo e richiesto e, notevolmente, se impone un carico sproporzionato sui richiedenti (veda la ricapitolazione dei principi attinenti in Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins, citato sopra, §§ 110-114).
64. I richiedenti dibatterono che il risarcimento ricevuto era significativamente più basso del valore catastale della loro terra. La Corte osserva che il valore catastale dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra fu indicato ad AMD 250,865 nell'iniziale e fu corretto valutazione riporta (veda divide in paragrafi 10 e 14 sopra) quel è AMD 65.50 per sq. metro, come opposto all'AMD 222 per sq. metro, siccome chiesto coi richiedenti (veda paragrafo 47 sopra).
65. La Corte osserva anche che a nessun punto durante i procedimenti nazionali o nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte faceva i richiedenti contestano l'accuratezza dell'importo del valore catastale della loro terra indicata nei rapporti di valutazione sopra. Neanche i richiedenti presenti qualsiasi attesta di fronte alla Corte, come per ricevute di istanza dei loro pagamenti in riguardo di tassa di terra che proverebbe che il valore catastale della loro terra era davvero AMD 222 per sq. metro. Pertanto siccome la rivendicazione di richiedenti che il valore catastale di terra nella stessa zona come il loro corrisposto ad AMD 222 per sq. metro., dovrebbe essere notato che Decreto Statale N.ro 1746 N di 24 dicembre 2003 che espone fuori i coefficienti usò per il calcolo di valore catastale di terra e davvero i ruoli i richiedenti il villaggio di ' all'interno della zona, il coefficiente di che corrisponde all'importo per metro quadrato chiese coi richiedenti, esplicitamente gli stati che questo decreto non è applicabile alla determinazione di valore catastale di terre agricole (veda paragrafo 44 sopra).
66. La Corte nota che i richiedenti la proprietà di ' fu valutata con la società che valuta noleggiata con Teghout CJSC nella sua veste come l'acquisitore della proprietà prima e, successivamente, con consulenti legali basati su ordini della corte (veda divide in paragrafi 10, 14 22, 23 24 e 25 sopra). La Corte considera che, sulla base del materiale di fronte a sé, non sono nessuno elementi che sufficientemente dimostrano che il valore di mercato dei richiedenti che la terra di ' è stata sottovalutata grezzamente.
67. Che detto, la Corte osserva che, avendo usato il metodo comparativo di valutazione di beni immobili, gli esperti determinarono il valore di mercato dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra rispetto coi prezzi di vendita di altre aree di terra nella stessa zona di espropriazione. La Corte è attenta della sua sentenza sopra che le disposizioni di legge attinenti erano sufficientemente prevedibili in che un esperto professionale legittimamente dovrebbe avere la libertà di scelta del metodo di valutazione di beni immobili appropriato (veda paragrafo 58 sopra). Dovrebbe essere notato comunque che in una situazione dove il valore di mercato dei richiedenti che la terra di ' è stata determinata sulla base dei prezzi di vendita di aree di terra all'interno della stessa area, non può essere escluso che i richiedenti non sarebbero in grado acquisire o esperimenterebbero almeno la difficoltà seria nel non trovare terra equivalente in un'altra area soggetto all'espropriazione con l'importo del risarcimento ricevette.
68. I richiedenti espressero continuamente inoltre, il loro disaccordo coi rapporti di valutazione preparati sull'ordine di Teghout CJSC così come coi rapporti consegnati con gli esperti corte-nominati sulla base che nessun conto era stato preso dei loro alberi di frutta e la loro redditività. Dovrebbe essere notato in questo riguardo che ambo gli esperti hanno nominato con la corte allegato alle loro rispettive fotografie di rapporti dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra che mostrò che loro avevano davvero quattro alberi di frutta. Nella loro opinione, comunque i quattro alberi in oggetto non poteva colpire significativamente il valore di mercato della terra (veda paragrafo 28 sopra).
69. Senza pregiudizio alle disposizioni di legge attinenti ed il margine della valutazione dello Stato in queste questioni, la Corte considera, che ci possono essere situazioni dove risarcimento che rappresenta anche il prezzo di mercato del beni immobili in oggetto con l'oltre dell'eccedenza legale, non costituirebbe il risarcimento adeguato per la privazione di proprietà. Nell'opinione della Corte, tale situazione può sorgere in particolare se la proprietà della quale la persona è stata privata costituisse suo principale, se non solo fonte di reddito ed il risarcimento offerto non riflettessero che perdita (veda Lallement c. la Francia, n. 46044/99, § 18 11 aprile 2002).
70. Al giorno d'oggi causa che i richiedenti hanno presentato che come un'unità di famiglia loro erano dipesi economicamente dalla terra in oggetto. Questo argomento non è stato confutato col Governo rispondente (veda divide in paragrafi 47-48 sopra). Sarà notato che questo particolare aspetto, vale a dire che in conseguenza dell'espropriazione i richiedenti avevano perso la loro fonte di reddito principale, non fu preso in considerazione con le corti nazionali nelle loro decisioni sull'importo della quota di risarcimento. Le corti decisero che, nonostante le circostanze, ai richiedenti dovrebbero essere forniti risarcimento che fu determinato in relazione ai prezzi di beni immobili situato nell'area soggetto all'espropriazione. Loro non rivolsero il problema se il risarcimento accordò coprirebbe i richiedenti perdita effettiva di ' coinvolta in privazione di vuole dire di esistenza o era almeno sufficiente per loro per acquisire terra equivalente all'interno dell'area dove loro vissero.
71. In prospettiva del precedente, la Corte trova, che i richiedenti dovevano sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo. Di conseguenza, l'espropriazione contestata era in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
72. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
73. I richiedenti chiesero 22,190 euros (EUR) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale. Secondo i richiedenti, l'importo chiesto riflettè la vendita e noleggio fissa il prezzo di di terra all'interno della stessa comunità di stesso periodo. Loro presero 3,000 Dracme Armene (AMD) per metro di piazza di terra come una base per il calcolo. I richiedenti chiesero inoltre EUR 5,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
74. Il Governo presentò che la maniera complessiva del calcolo dell'importo chiesto era poco chiara. Loro esortarono perciò la Corte a respingere le rivendicazioni del richiedente. Il Governo presentò inoltre che i richiedenti ' chiede in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale era eccessivo.
75. Dato la natura della violazione trovata (veda divide in paragrafi 70 e 71 sopra), la Corte trova che i richiedenti soffrirono indubbiamente di alcuno danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale (veda, mutatis mutandis, Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 105 15 settembre 2009). Nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente, facendo una valutazione su una base equa, siccome è richiesto con Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna EUR 10,000 per coprire tutti i capi di danno i richiedenti.
Costi di B. e spese
76. I richiedenti chiesero anche EUR 2,000 per spese processuali incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali e la Corte.
77. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
78. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà, la Corte lo trova appropriato assegnare le spese processuali chieste nella loro interezza.
Interesse di mora di C.
79. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

3. Sostiene
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, essere convertito nella valuta dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 10,000 (dieci mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 2,000 (due mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo, al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito, più tre punti di percentuale.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 11 ottobre 2018, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Abel Campos Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 20/02/2020.