Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BRADSHAW AND OTHERS v. MALTA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,14,34

NUMERO: 37121/15/2018
STATO: Malta
DATA: 23/10/2018
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions:
Preliminary objection dismissed (Art. 34) Individual applications
(Art. 34) Victim
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property)
No violation of Article 14 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) read in the light of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - (P1-1) Protection of property (Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property)
Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)


THIRD SECTION







CASE OF BRADSHAW AND OTHERS v. MALTA

(Application no. 37121/15)









JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

23 October 2018




FINAL

23/01/2019

This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Bradshaw and Others v. Malta,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Branko Lubarda, President,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Helen Keller,
Dmitry Dedov,
Georgios A. Serghides,
Jolien Schukking,
María Elósegui, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 2 October 2018,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 37121/15) against the Republic of Malta lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by twenty four Maltese nationals and a company registered in Malta (see appendix for details), (“the applicants”), on 20 July 2015.
2. The applicants were represented by Dr J. Camilleri, a lawyer practising in Valletta. The Maltese Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Dr P. Grech, Attorney General.
3. The applicants alleged that they had been suffering an ongoing interference with their property rights in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. They also considered that they were being discriminated against with regard to the enjoyment of their property, since as the law stood, they were obliged to renew their rent agreement on a yearly basis, while people having commercial rents had been freed from such obligation through amendments introduced to the Civil Code in 2009.
4. On 4 January 2017 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Background to the case
5. The applicants are joint owners of the property at number 274, Republic Street, Valletta. The property, known as the “King’s Own Band Club” (hereinafter referred to as “the KOBC”), is a four storey building of 864 square metres, and is located in a prime site in Malta’s capital city.
6. Initially, the property belonged to the applicants’ ascendants. In 1946, the applicants’ ascendants entered into a rent agreement with the KOBC, whereby they willingly rented the said property for 500 pounds sterling (GBP) annually (around 1,164.69 euros (EUR)). In 1955 legislation specifically regulating the lease of property to band clubs (Act V of 1955, hereinafter “the 1955 amendments”) was introduced.
7. By law (The Civil Code read in conjunction with the Re letting of Urban Property (Regulation) Ordinance – see relevant domestic law below), the applicants are obliged to renew, on an annual basis, the lease entered into by their ascendants, and may not demand an increase in rent. According to the applicants’, the property’s market rental value (in 2014) was EUR 269,100 annually.
8. Part of the property is utilised as a band club, and part of the property is operated as a restaurant and bar. The applicants claim that the operation of the restaurant and bar is a profitable economic activity that generates an income to the caterer of around EUR 150,000 or more annually.
9. In 2009, amendments were introduced to allow for increases in certain rents and to establish a cut-off date for existing protected leases relating to commercial properties, which are thus to come to an end in 2028. These amendments did not affect the applicants’ property which is rented out as a band club. The amendments however also gave the relevant Minister the power to regulate conditions relating to clubs, thus allowing for the possibility of future amendments (see paragraph 19 below).
1. Constitutional redress proceedings
10. In 2011, the applicants filed proceedings before the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional jurisdiction. The proceedings were brought against the Attorney General (hereinafter referred to as “the AG”), the Prime Minister (hereinafter referred to as “the PM”) and the King’s Own Band Club (the lessee). The applicants claimed that their right to peaceful enjoyment of the property as protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention was being breached. They claimed that they were being denied the use of their property without being provided with adequate compensation. The applicants further submitted that, in 2009, the law had been amended, allowing for an increase in rent and the establishment of a cut off date for existing “protected rents”, but the amendments in the law did not cover properties rented out as clubs. Therefore, in contrast with other commercial rents, the annual rent for the club could not be raised, and the rent contract could not be terminated. The applicants claimed that the law was discriminatory and was therefore in violation of Article 14 of the Convention.
11. On 8 October 2013, the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional jurisdiction found that the applicants had suffered a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in so far as the interference with the applicants’ property rights had not been proportionate. The applicants had submitted that the property had a rental value of EUR 269,100 a year, while the AG and the PM had submitted that the property had a rental value of EUR 93,000 a year. Irrespective of which value one was to consider, the court concluded that the rent being received by the applicants was disproportionate. Keeping in mind the estimated rental values presented before the court, and the income that the KOBC was generating from its bar, the court awarded EUR 300,000 in damages to the applicants (to be paid half by the AG and the PM jointly, and half by the KOBC). The costs of the proceedings were to be paid, half by the AG and PM, and the other half by the KOBC.
12. The court further concluded that the applicants had not suffered any discrimination as no satisfactory proof had been presented showing that they were discriminated against when compared to other owners leasing their property as a club.
13. The AG, PM and KOBC filed an appeal before the Constitutional Court.
14. On 6 February 2015 the Constitutional Court overturned in part the judgment of the first instance court, and concluded that there had been no violation of the applicants’ rights. The Constitutional Court ordered that the costs of proceedings at both instances be paid by the applicants.
15. The Constitutional Court found that contrary to that pleaded by the Government, the applicants did have title of ownership over the property at issue. However, in line with domestic case-law the Constitutional Court concluded that, because the agreement had been entered into voluntarily with full knowledge of the consequences it would lead to (that is, that the rent due could not be raised and the rent agreement could not be terminated), then the applicants could not allege a violation of their rights. This was so, even if due to the rate of inflation throughout the years, the rent due was now to be considered low. The Constitutional Court further held that the amendments to the law of 2009, mentioned by the applicants, did not affect their position which remained the same as that when the rent agreement had been entered into [in 1946], and therefore there was no reason for the principle of pacta sunt servanda (“agreements must be complied with”) not to be given full effect.
2. Retrial proceedings
16. On 6 May 2015, the applicants filed an application for retrial. They claimed that the Constitutional Court had committed an error of fact and applied a wrong interpretation of the law. They noted that the protection given in law to clubs was introduced in 1955 while their predecessors in title had entered into a lease agreement in 1946.
17. Nevertheless, the applicants also instituted proceedings before this Court on 20 July 2015.
18. On 3 February 2016 the Constitutional Court rejected the applicants’ request for a re trial. The Constitutional Court held that, as the law stood, retrial could not be applied in regard to a case of a constitutional nature. The costs of the proceedings were to be paid by the applicants.
3. Relevant amendments
19. Pending the constitutional redress proceedings (on appeal), on 1 January 2014, the Conditions Regulating the Leases of Clubs Regulations (hereinafter ‘the Regulations’), Subsidiary Legislation Chapter 16.13 of the Laws of Malta came into force (see relevant domestic law).
20. The Regulations provided that the rent payable to the owners by the band clubs holding the property under title of lease was to be increased by 10% (from the previous year) every year until 2016 and as from 1 January 2016 the rent was to be increased by 5% (from the previous year) every year until 2023, following which it would increase every year according to the index of inflation. As from 2015 the tenant also had to pay an additional rent calculated at the rate of 5% on the annual income derived by the club. As a result in 2015 the total annual rent paid to the applicants by the KOBC was EUR 2,876. 26 and in 2016 EUR 3,017.20,
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
21. Act I of 1925 introduced restrictions whereby controlled rents were applied to urban property. Article 2 of Act I of 1925 defined the term premises as “any urban immovable property”. The owner was only able to gain back the possession of the property by requesting authorisation from the Rent Regulation Board on condition that the owner was able to prove that the lessee was not paying the rent or that the property was needed for the accommodation for the owner himself or his ascendants and descendents. Act I of 1925 was intended to provide such protection until 1929. By means of Act XXIII of 1929 the obligation of renewal of leases was extended until 1933. In the meantime, in 1931, Ordinance XXI had been promulgated (originally Chapter 109 of the Laws of Malta, today Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta), which provided that the obligation to renew a lease was an indefinite obligation. In 1955 legislation specifically regulating the lease of property to band clubs (the 1955 amendments) was introduced.
22. Article 2, of the Reletting of Urban Property (Regulation) Ordinance, Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta (as applicable to date), in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“In this Ordinance, unless the context otherwise requires -
the expression ‘club’ means any club registered as such at the Office of the Commissioner of Police under the appropriate provisions of law”
1. The 2009 amendments
23. Article 1531I and Article 1531J of the Civil Code, Chapter 16 of the Laws of Malta, read as follows:
Article 1531I
“In the case of commercial premises leased prior to 1st June, 1995, the tenant shall be considered to be the person who occupies the tenement under a valid title of lease on the 1st June, 2008, as well as the husband or wife of such tenant, provided they are living together and are not legally separated, and also in the event of the death of the tenant, his heirs who are related by consanguinity or by affinity up to the grade of cousins inclusively:
Provided that a lease of commercial premises made before the 1st June, 1995 shall in any case terminate within twenty years which start running from the 1st June, 2008 unless a contract of lease has been made stipulating a specific period. When a contract of lease made prior to the 1st June, 1995 for a specific period and which on the 1st January, 2010 the original period di fermo or di rispetto is still running and such period of lease has not yet been automatically extended by law, then in that case the period or periods stipulated in the contract shall apply. A contract made prior to the 1st June, 1995 and which is to be renewed automatically or at the sole discretion of the tenant, shall be deemed as if it is not a contract made for a specific period and shall as such terminate within twenty years which start running from the 1st June, 2008.”
Article 1531J
“In the case of a tenement leased to an entity and used as a club before the 1st June, 1995 including but not limited to a musical, philanthropic, social, sport or political entity, when its lease is for a specific period and on the 1st January, 2010 the original period di fermo or di rispetto is still running and the lease has not yet been automatically extended by law, then in that case the period of lease established in the contract shall apply. In all other instances where the contract of lease was made prior to the 1st June, 1995 the law and all definitions as in force on the 1st June, 1995 shall continue to apply:
Provided that notwithstanding the provisions of the law as in force before the 1st June, 1995, the Minister responsible for accommodation may from time to time make regulations to regulate the conditions of lease of clubs so that a fair balance may be reached between the rights of the lessor, of the tenant and the public interest”.
2. The 2014 amendments
24. In 2014, the Conditions Regulating the Leases of Clubs Regulations, Subsidiary Legislation Chapter 16.13 of the Laws of Malta were introduced through Legal Notice 195 of 2014. In so far as relevant, these Regulations provide that:
“2. (1) The rent of a club as referred to in Article 1531J of the Civil Code which is paid on the basis of a lease entered into before the 1st June 1995 shall, unless otherwise agreed upon in writing after the 1st January 2014, or agreed upon in writing prior to the 1st June 1995 with regard to a lease which was still in its original period di fermo or di rispetto on the 1st January 2014, as from the date of the first payment of rent due after the 1st January 2014, be increased by a fixed rate of ten per cent over the rent payable in respect of the previous year and shall continue to be increased as from the date of the first payment of rent due after the 1st January of each year until and including the year 2016 by ten per cent over the previous rent.
(2) The rent as from the first payment of rent due after the 1st January 2017 shall be increased by a fixed rate of five per cent over the rent payable in 2016. Such rent shall continue to be increased by five per cent per annum until the 31 December 2023 and the rent shall thereafter increase every year according to the index of inflation for the previous year.
3. (1) Where club premises or part thereof to which these regulations apply are used for the generation of income through an economic activity carried out in the said premises, then as from the 1st January 2015 the tenant of the said premises shall also pay the person entitled to receive the rent a sum equivalent to five per cent of the annual income derived by the club from the said economic activity, other than income derived from fundraising or philanthropic activities organized and managed by the club itself:
Provided that for the purposes of this regulation, income generated from economic activity means any income which is directly or indirectly derived from the bar and, or restaurant and from any lease, sub-lease, lease of a going-concern or a management agreement of the said premises that is leased out as a club or part thereof.
(2) The amount referred to in sub-regulation (1) shall be calculated on an annual basis and shall be payable by the 30th September of the following year with the first payment being due in respect of the year 2015 by the 30th September 2016.
(3) The annual income referred to in sub-regulation (1) shall be calculated on the basis of financial statements signed by a certified public accountant in the case of clubs having an income of less than €200,000 per annum and by audited financial statements in the case of clubs having an income of €200,000 or more per annum”.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
25. The applicants complained that they had been suffering an ongoing interference with their property rights in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
26. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
1. Scope of the complaint/ compatibility ratione temporis
27. The Court reiterates that its jurisdiction ratione temporis covers only the period after the ratification of the Convention or its Protocols by the respondent State. From that date onwards, all of the State’s alleged acts and omissions must conform to the Convention or its Protocols and subsequent facts fall within the Court’s jurisdiction even where they are merely extensions of an already existing situation (see, for example, Bezzina Wettinger and Others v. Malta, no. 15091/06, § 52, 8 April 2008).
28. The Court notes that in their application the applicants did not specify a date as to when they started suffering from the continuing violation, and that their just satisfaction claims concern the period starting from 1967 (date of Malta’s ratification) onwards. Indeed the Government raised no objection in this respect.
29. In that light the Court considers that the complaint does not concern the period before 1967 which would be incompatible ratione temporis with the provisions of the Convention.
30. The Court finds that the complaint in the present case which refers to the subsequent period is compatible ratione temporis with the provisions of the Convention.
2. The Government’s objection of lack of victim status
31. The Government submitted that protection of urban property, which in their view comprised band clubs, under controlled rents with an obligation to renew the lease had been in force since 1925. They argued that the 1955 amendments had been effected to distinguish band clubs from other urban property as these clubs had evolved over the years, and by 1947 there were sixty band clubs, with one or more for every parish. Nevertheless, the applicants’ ancestors had freely entered into the lease agreement with KOBC on 1 May 1946, knowing what the consequences would be. Thus, in the Government’s view, the applicants had not been subjected to an interference and could not claim to be victims of the alleged violation.
32. The applicants submitted that their ascendants had entered into the lease agreement in 1946 and they could not foresee, at that time, that nine years later the Government was going to protect club leases indefinitely. They highlighted that it was only in May 1955 that the rent laws were amended to specifically include band clubs. Indeed had the Government’s contention (that band clubs fell under the definition of urban property) been true, there would hardly have been any need to introduce the 1995 law specifically extending the effects of rent laws to band clubs.
33. The Court need not determine whether under domestic law band clubs were already subject to such restrictions in 1946, as even in the event that they were the Court has already examined similar scenarios.
34. The Court has previously held that in a situation where the applicants’ predecessor in title had, decades before, knowingly entered into a rent agreement with relevant restrictions (specifically the inability to increase rent or to terminate the lease), the applicants’ predecessor in title could not, at the time, reasonably have had a clear idea of the extent of inflation in property prices in the decades to follow. Moreover, the Court observed that when such applicants had inherited the property in question they had been unable to do anything more than attempt to use the available remedies, which had been to no avail in their circumstances. The decisions of the domestic courts regarding their request had thus constituted interference in their respect. Furthermore, those applicants, who had inherited a property that had already been subject to a lease, had not had the possibility to set the rent themselves (or to freely terminate the agreement). It followed that they could not be said to have waived any rights in that respect. Accordingly, the Court found that the rent control regulations and their application in those cases had constituted an interference with the applicants’ right (as landlords) to use their property (see, for example, Zammit and Attard Cassar v. Malta, no. 1046/12, §§ 50 51, 30 July 2015).
35. There is no reason to hold otherwise in the present case. It follows that there has been an interference with the applicants’ right (as landlords) to use their property, and thus they are victims of the violation complained of. The Government’s objection is therefore dismissed.
3. Conclusion
36. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
37. The applicants submitted that the conditions of the lease agreements with clubs were “protected” by the Re-letting of Urban Property (Regulation) Ordinance by virtue of the amendment by Act V of 1955, which meant that not only were the owners bound (as they still are) to renew the lease automatically on a yearly basis and thus could not terminate the lease, they were also prohibited from imposing any increase in rent. They considered that the Regulations introduced in 2014 which finally provided for the possibility of an increase (within strict, controlled parameters) nevertheless did not suffice to alter the disproportionality of the measure.
38. The applicants noted that according to law the lease will never terminate and will subsist indefinitely meaning that the applicants will never enjoy their property as its owners, and that, in that light, any eventual sale transaction will suffer from a price reduction. Thus, the legislative measures introduced also failed to meet the “foreseeability” requirement since the law did not provide a termination date for the lease in question.
39. In the applicants’ view the measure did not pursue any public interest since a significant area within the ground floor of the property was being used for a clearly commercial purpose, namely as a bar and restaurant open to the public which generated thousands of euros per year. This economic activity was disguised under the name of a ‘band club’ which was not used solely for the benefit of its members. The applicants submitted that the purpose of protecting band clubs should not be abused and extended to a situation where a band club is used to generate income and profits for the benefit of the lessee. In the present case, the use as a restaurant was not an ancillary activity for the benefit and exclusive enjoyment of its members but a free-standing income-generating activity. Indeed the management agreement entered into with the restaurant showed that the latter was paying the band club EUR 17,000 annually for the use of part of the ground floor. Furthermore, the applicants considered that while accepting that a band club had its cultural and social role, there was no reason why such a club needed to operate in a multi-storey building in a prime site in Malta’s capital city. The same cultural aim could have been achieved from a more modest property.
40. Moreover, no fair balance had been struck between the applicants’ fundamental right to enjoy their property and the community at large. First of all, the rent they received of EUR 1,164.69 annually (in 2014) compared to the market rental value that same year, of EUR 269,100 annually, was disproportionate. The applicants submitted that EUR 1,164.69 annually was also disproportionate prior to 2014, given that, for example, calculations based on the property price index showed that in 2004 rent would have worked out to two thirds of that rent [i.e. around EUR 179,400]. The Regulations introduced in 2014 merely gave a 10% increase on the rent for the years 2014 to 2016 and a negligible 5% increase for the years 2016 till 2023. The rent from 2023 onwards will be regulated by the index of inflation, which was generally substantially low for instance, the rate of inflation for the year 2014 was 0.31% and the rate for 2013 was 1.38%. The Regulations also provided a premium of 5% per annum on the profits of the lessee. However, theses profits were not foreseeable since the profits may vary from year to year. The fact remained that (in 2017) the applicants were receiving a rent of around EUR 3,000 while the rental market value was one hundred times as much (EUR 350,000 annually according to an expert report submitted to the Court).
41. Moreover, as a result of a law promulgated decades before, the applicants were barred from requesting a fairer rent. Nor had they had any other remedies, save for the constitutional proceedings which rejected their claim on appeal.
42. In reply to the Government’s contention that the applicants’ valuation was too high, the applicants submitted to the Court a Government scheme showing that the Government was leasing its own properties at substantial rates which were only slightly lower than market rates. Indeed in that scheme the Government’s property intended for commercial use, situated in the same area as that of the applicants, was scheduled at a rental rate of EUR 500 per square metre (at ground floor level and the higher floors at 25% and 20% respectively of the ground floor rate) and was to be rented out for a determinate term. This was in stark contrast with the rent received by the applicants of EUR 1,164.69 for 865 square metres.
43. The applicants considered that as private individuals they should not be burdened with ‘financing’ or ‘sponsoring’ the social and cultural interests of the community. Indeed as things stood such burden was borne only by the landlords of leased clubs. Indeed the applicants considered that the Government’s conclusion - that an annual rent of EUR 2,000 3,000 was proportionate - when the market value was closer to an annual rent of EUR 350,000, bordered on the cynical.
(b) The Government
44. Without prejudice to the above submissions as to the absence of an interference, the Government submitted that any interference would have been lawful, in accordance with Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta (Chapter 109 at the time when the lease was entered into).
45. Any interference had also pursued a legitimate aim, namely the protection of the cultural identity of Maltese citizens. In the Government’s view, band clubs played a very important role in Maltese culture in order to increase and stimulate the local musical talents and thus a public interest persisted even though such a cultural service was given by a private entity as in the present case. The Government explained that band clubs were prominent institutions and social centres in all towns and villages and the two Valetta band clubs practically enjoyed a national status in the Maltese cultural landscape. They noted that such clubs could not function in small secluded premises as they were at the heart of the village/town feast and that on the days before the feast and during the feast people would come together at the club to socialise whilst band marches were played in the centre of the village or town. Moreover, given that clubs were usually dependent on donations, the fact that they generated some income from a commercial activity did not eliminate the public interest element, given their primary function.
46. The Government submitted that in 1946 and subsequent years (it was envisaged that the lease would remain in force for a maximum of sixteen years and thus would expire in 1962) approximately EUR 1,645 as rent as established by contract was a substantial rent. Subsequently, until 2004, it could still not be said to be a low rent unless it was compared to rents charged to commercial entities or to Maltese persons who struggled to pay high rents. The Government emphasised that the rental valuation presented by the applicants (EUR 269,100 annually in 2014) was excessive and the applicants had not shown that there had been anyone willing to pay that amount. Indeed the Government had, during domestic proceedings, submitted a rental valuation of EUR 93,000 annually (in 2014). The Government submitted that in cases where there was a public interest for the measure owners were not due market values. Thus, in the light of the above, the Government considered that it was evident that the applicants had not suffered a disproportionate burden relative to the amount of rent payable until 2014.
47. Following the Regulations introduced in 2014, the rent payable increased by 10% (from the one applicable the year before) every year until 2016 (i.e. according to law, in 2015 the rent payable to the applicants was EUR 1,281.20 annually and in 2016 EUR 1,409.27 annually). As from 1 January 2016 the rent increased by 5% and will continue to do so until 2023, following which it will increase every year according to the index of inflation. As from 2015 the tenant also had to pay an additional rent calculated at the rate of 5% on the annual income derived by the club. Indeed in 2015 the total annual rent paid to the applicants by the KOBC was EUR 2,876. 26 and in 2016 EUR 3,017.20, which in the Government’s view was a considerable increase to the rent paid prior to the 2014 amendments. Thus, the Government submitted that a fair balance had been reached.
48. The Government also submitted that the comparison to the Government scheme mentioned by the applicants was not tenable as that scheme provided for acquiring shops on a temporary emphyteusis for forty five years. The Government submitted that an empyhteutae is granted a real right on the property entitling him to exercise all the rights of ownership during the relevant period and thus his or her status was more similar to that of a landlord than a lessee. Moreover, an empyhteutae had an obligation to affect all necessary maintenance unlike the lessee.
49. The Government insisted that there was no arbitrary or unforeseeable impact on the applicants given that their ancestor had known the applicable conditions and limitations when he signed the contract in 1964. In any event the Government considered that there existed procedural safeguards, but that the Court should not look into the matter given that the ancestors were aware of the applicable regime in 1964.
2. The Court’s assessment
50. The Court has previously held that rent-control schemes and restrictions on an applicant’s right to terminate a tenant’s lease constitute control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It follows that the case should be examined under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Hutten Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, §§ 160 161, ECHR 2006 VIII, and Bittó and Others v. Slovakia, no.30255/09, § 101, 28 January 2014).
51. The Court reiterates that in order for an interference to be compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 it must be lawful, be in the general interest and be proportionate, that is, it must strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see, among many other authorities, Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 107, ECHR 2000 I, and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 75, ECHR 2007 III). The Court will examine these requirements in turn.
(a) Whether the Maltese authorities observed the principle of lawfulness
52. The first requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions be lawful. In particular, the second paragraph of Article 1, while recognising that States have the right to control the use of property, subjects their right to the condition that it be exercised by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the principle of lawfulness presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 147, ECHR 2004-V, and Amato Gauci v. Malta, no. 47045/06, § 53, 15 September 2009).
53. In the present case the measure affecting the applicants from 1967 onwards was in accordance with Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta, and its subsidiary legislation. The mere fact that the law provided for an indefinite renewal of the lease, an element which plays a part in the assessment of the proportionality of the interference, does not suffice to make the law in itself unforeseeable. The interference was therefore “lawful” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) Whether the measure pursued a “legitimate aim in the general interest”
54. A measure aimed at controlling the use of property can only be justified if it is shown, inter alia, to be “in accordance with the general interest”. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the “general” or “public” interest (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 165). In situations where the operation of rent-control legislation involves wide-reaching consequences for numerous individuals and has economic and social consequences for the country as a whole, the authorities must have considerable discretion not only in choosing the form and deciding on the extent of control over the use of property but also in deciding on the appropriate timing for the enforcement of the relevant laws. Nevertheless, that discretion, however considerable, is not unlimited and its exercise cannot entail consequences at variance with the Convention standards (see Fleri Soler and Camilleri v. Malta, no. 35349/05, § 76, ECHR 2006 X). However, these principles do not necessarily apply in the same manner where an interference effecting property belonging to private individuals is not aimed at securing the social welfare of tenants or preventing homelessness (ibid. § 77). In such cases the effects of the rent-control measures are subject to closer scrutiny at the European level (ibid., in connection with property requisitioned for use as government offices).
55. As submitted by the Government and also accepted by the applicants (see paragraph 39 above), a band club has a cultural and social role in Maltese society. In consequence the Court can accept that the measure pursued a legitimate aim in the public interest. Nevertheless, other considerations in this connection may be relevant to the proportionality of the measure. In particular, the Court reiterates that the use of property for reasons other than to secure the social welfare of tenants and prevent homelessness is a relevant factor in assessing the compensation due to the owner (see Fleri Soler and Camilleri v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 35349/05, § 18, 17 July 2008).
(c) Whether the Maltese authorities struck a fair balance
56. In each case involving an alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must ascertain whether by reason of the State’s interference, the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden (see Amato Gauci, cited above, § 57). In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. That assessment may involve not only the conditions of the rent received by individual landlords and the extent of the State’s interference with freedom of contract and contractual relations in the lease market, but also the existence of procedural and other safeguards ensuring that the operation of the system and its impact on a landlord’s property rights are neither arbitrary nor unforeseeable. Uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State’s conduct (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy, [GC], no. 22774/93, § 54, ECHR 1999-V, and Broniowski, cited above, § 151).
57. The Court observes that in the present case the lease was subject to renewal by operation of law and the applicants had no possibility to evict the tenant. Furthermore, the applicants were unable to fix the rent – or rather to increase the rent established by their predecessor more than seventy years ago. It was only in 2014 that the Regulations increasing the rent to be paid came into force, and those regulations nevertheless did not allow the applicants to set the rent themselves.
58. In relation to the rent which the applicants received the Court recalls that the use being made of the premises was as a band club as opposed to, for example, social housing, and thus that the situation in the present case might be said to involve a degree of public interest which is significantly less marked than in other cases and which does not justify such a substantial reduction compared with the free market rental value (see, mutatis mutandis, Zammit and Attard Cassar, cited above, § 75).
59. As to the rent payable from 1967 to 2013 (prior to the 2014 Regulations) the Court notes that the applicants were being paid EUR 1,164.69 annually, that is a rent of approximately EUR 97 per month for a multi-storey property of 864 square metres in a prime location in the capital city. The Court considers that while this might have been an appropriate rent in the 1960s (the original lease at that price was intended to expire in 1962), and possibly in the 1970s, it could not be said to be so decades later, for the following reasons.
60. Taking 2004 - a year relied on by the parties the Court observes that the applicants claimed that a market rent for that year would be in the vicinity of EUR 179,000 annually while they were receiving EUR 1,164.69 annually. The Government did not submit any figures in relation to that period (despite admitting that there was a boom in the property market, see paragraph 89 below). The Court observes that the Government implicitly accepted that the applicable rent was a low rent (see paragraph 46 above). Indeed, contrary to the Government’s assertion, the Court sees no reason why the applicable rent should not be compared to “rents charged to commercial entities or to Maltese persons” which are the relevant comparators and therefore the rent applicable to them is precisely what constitutes a current market value. Thus, even accepting that the applicants’ valuation is on the high side, the Court considers that, as found by the first instance constitutional jurisdiction which examined the proportionality of the measure, the rent received by the applicants could not be considered in any way proportionate.
61. Taking 2014 – a year also relied on by the parties – the Court observes that according to the applicants’ expert’s report the annual rental value of the property for 2014 was EUR 269,100 annually, while according to the Government’s report, for that same year, it was EUR 93,000 annually. Thus, even on the basis of the Government’s lower valuation, the applicants were receiving 1.25% of the market rental value. Moreover, at that same time, while the applicants were receiving solely EUR 1,164.69 annually for rent in respect of the entire building, the KOBC was receiving in rent EUR 17,000 annually from sub-letting only part of the ground floor. Contrary to the Government’s allegation, the Court considers that the disproportionality in the present case is clear and manifest.
62. As for the period following 2014, and the introduction of the Regulations, the Court notes that in practical terms the ameliorated formula translated into the following rents for the applicants: EUR 2,876. 26 in 2015 and EUR 3,017.20 in 2016. The Court notes that, while the Regulations allowed for more or less double the rent previously received by the applicants, it still amounted to around 3% of the rental value estimated by the Government for the year 2014 (and around 1% of that estimated by the applicants). It was also around EUR 14,000 less than the rent the KOBC was obtaining for the use of part of the first floor by the catering facility. The Court thus considers that the situation following the 2014 remains disproportionate, and without any action by the legislature, it is likely to remain so indefinitely.
63. The Court reiterates that State control over levels of rent falls into a sphere that is subject to a wide margin of appreciation by the State, and its application may often cause significant reductions in the amount of rent chargeable. Nevertheless, this may not lead to results which are manifestly unreasonable (see, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci, cited above, § 62). While the applicants do not have an absolute right to obtain rent at market value, the Court observes that, despite the recent amendments, the amount of rent is very much lower than the market value of the premises. Furthermore, the restriction on the applicants’ rights has been in place for fifty years since the Convention came into effect in respect of Malta, and will remain so perpetually in the absence of any action by the legislature to establish the required balance. These elements must be weighed against the interests at play in the present case, which are not those of avoiding homelessness but of enhancing social and cultural activities, comprising those of a commercial nature.
64. While the Court has accepted above that the overall measure was, in principle, in the general interest, the fact that there also exists an underlying private interest of a commercial nature cannot be disregarded. In such circumstances, both States and the Court in its supervisory role must be vigilant to ensure that measures, such as the one at issue, do not give rise to an imbalance that imposes an excessive burden on landlords while allowing tenants to make inflated profits. It is also in such contexts that effective procedural safeguards become indispensable (see, mutatis mutandis, Zammit and Attard Cassar, cited above, § 63). The Government argued that there existed procedural safeguards, without mentioning what these were, preferring to rely on the fact that the applicants had no right to complain given their ancestors’ knowledge of the applicable laws seventy years ago. The Court notes that the latter argument has repeatedly been rejected by the Court, as was done in paragraph 35 of the present case. From the information available to the Court, there were no avenues - other than constitutional redress proceedings which the applicants could pursue to ameliorate their situation (if circumstances so required). Consequently, the application of the law itself lacked adequate procedural safeguards aimed at achieving a balance between the interests of the tenants and those of the owners (see, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci, cited above, § 62, Anthony Aquilina v. Malta, no. 3851/12, § 66, 11 December 2014 and Statileo v. Croatia, no. 12027/10, § 128, 10 July 2014).
65. Having assessed all the elements above, and notwithstanding the margin of appreciation allowed to a State in choosing the form and deciding on the extent of control over the use of property in such cases, the Court finds that, having regard to the use made of the property, the extremely low rent of the premises and the lack of procedural safeguards in the application of the law, a disproportionate and excessive burden was imposed on the applicants, who have had to bear and continue to bear a significant part of the social and financial costs of supporting a local custom by supplying the band club with premises for its activities, including commercial activities. It follows that the Maltese State failed to strike the requisite fair balance between the general interests of the community and the protection of the applicants’ right to the enjoyment of their property.
66. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
67. The applicants complained of a violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as they were being discriminated against with regard to the enjoyment of their property, since as the law stood, they were obliged to renew their rent agreement on a yearly basis, while people having commercial rents had been freed from such obligation through amendments introduced to the Civil Code in 2009. Article 14 reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
A. Admissibility
68. According to the established case-law of the Court, Article 14 of the Convention complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. Although the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of those provisions – and to this extent it is autonomous – there can be no room for its application unless the facts in issue fall within the ambit of one or more of the latter (see, among many other authorities, Van Raalte v. the Netherlands, 21 February 1997, § 33, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997 I; Petrovic v. Austria, 27 March 1998, § 22, Reports 1998 II; Zarb Adami v. Malta, no. 17209/02, § 42, ECHR 2006 VIII; and Konstantin Markin v. Russia [GC], no. 30078/06, § 124, ECHR 2012 (extracts)).
69. The Court considers that the facts at issue fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and that Article 14 is therefore applicable in the instant case.
70. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
71. The applicants considered that, contrary to that held by the domestic court, the comparators in the present case were not other landlords of a club, but landlords of other commercial leases as per Article 1531I of the Civil Code. Rent legislation in Malta broadly distinguished between residential and commercial premises. However, it was amply clear that premises used as a ‘band club’ were not residential in nature, particularly, if a significant part of the premises were operated commercially. Thus, landlords of commercial leases and landlords of a band club were in a ‘relatively similar situation’ and, the right of enjoyment of property should thus apply to both indiscriminately. They recalled that the Convention prohibited discrimination on the bases of status, and that status included the status of the applicants as the landlords. They relied on Berger Krall and Others v. Slovenia (no. 14717/04, 12 June 2014).
72. The applicants submitted that according to Article 1531I of the Civil Code, commercial leases which were protected by law (before the amendments introduced by Act X of 2009) were liberalised in the sense that a termination date was established (not later than 2028). This gave the opportunity to the landlords of a commercial lease to enjoy their property once the lease agreement terminates (in 2028). Moreover, it made it feasible for a long-term investor to buy commercial premises, notwithstanding a running lease, in view of the knowledge that possession of the property would be returned within a foreseeable future. However, the applicants were being discriminated against since, as the law stood, they were obliged to renew their lease agreement on a yearly basis.
73. The applicants submitted that the Government’s argument that the rent issues were being dealt with in a piecemeal fashion were not tenable since nearly a decade had passed since the 2009 amendments and there were no indications of any measure to be taken in respect of people in the applicants’ situation. The applicants also considered that the Government were attempting to deceive the Court in so far as it was not correct to claim that the 2009 amendments in relation to commercial premises were linked to the amount of rent a property was generating. Indeed they were not, nor were they linked to the status of the company, its income or the type of business activity carried out. All commercial premises had been included irrespective of the value of the rent. Similarly, all band clubs had been excluded irrespective of the value of the rent, or any other consideration. Thus, it was not true that the commercial premises deserved greater attention because their rent was not high enough for landlords. Similarly, the fact that the property at issue was leased as a band club did not mean that that private individuals could be deprived of the use of their property indefinitely, at a rent of 1% its market value, thus leaving land owners like the applicants to be the only ones carrying the relevant burden.
(b) The Government
74. The Government acknowledged that the applicants had been treated differently from owners of commercial premises. However, they opined that the distinction had an objective and reasonable justification. The Government submitted that commercial leases had been freed from the obligation of renewal as from 2028 as part of a rent law reform aimed to tackle old leases created prior to 1995. The rents applicable to those leases were tied to values of the early 1900s which created a disproportionate burden on owners. The Government also noted that the position of owners of premises leased as band clubs had also been improved through the reform by means of the 2014 amendments, which increased their rent - a measure which was not applied to owners of commercial premises.
75. The Government submitted that in an area as complicated as rent control, which developed over a period of eighty years, the fact that the authorities tackled the problem piecemeal to provide for those cases which raised the most concern could not constitute discrimination. Indeed the applicants who were receiving EUR 1,164.69 annually were better off than landlords who were receiving much less for commercial premises. The Government submitted that the State had objective and justifiable reasons based on economic assessments when it introduced such reforms. Moreover, they considered that band clubs as social institutions contributing to the identity of the country were more deserving of protection than commercial premises whose controlled leases where being phased out.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
76. The Court reiterates that in the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Convention, Article 14 affords protection against different treatment, without an objective and reasonable justification, of persons in similar situations. For the purposes of Article 14, a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it “has no objective and reasonable justification”, that is, if it does not pursue a “legitimate aim” or if there is not a “reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised”. Moreover, the Contracting States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment. The scope of the margin of appreciation will vary according to the circumstances, the subject matter and the background, but the Court must determine in the last resort whether the Convention requirements have been complied with. Since the Convention is first and foremost a system for the protection of human rights, the Court must however have regard to the changing conditions in Contracting States and respond, for example, to any emerging consensus as to the standards to be achieved (see Fabris v. France [GC], no. 16574/08, § 56, ECHR 2013 (extracts)).
(b) Application to the present case
77. The Court considers that the applicants, as landlords of controlled property leased out as band clubs, are in a comparable situation to landlords of controlled property leased out for commercial use, as they are both persons subject to controlled properties which are not used for the social welfare of tenants or to prevent homelessness.
78. As admitted by the Government (see paragraph 74 above) the applicants were, however, treated differently in so far as unlike landlords whose controlled property was leased out for commercial use the applicants did not benefit from the change of law allowing their property to be free (from the imposed conditions) as of 2028 as provided by the 2009 amendments.
79. While the Court can accept that following repeated findings of violations in respect of the controlled-rent laws in Malta, the Government felt obliged to attempt to ameliorate the situation of owners whose property was subject to such rent laws or other rent-laws which could have raised the same problems, the Court must ascertain whether an objective and reasonable justification has been supplied by the Government as to why property owners, like the applicants, who were housing band clubs, were treated differently from their counterparts (compare Cassar v. Malta, no. 50570/13, § 80, 30 January 2018).
80. The applicants considered that there had been no objective justification behind such a legislative choice. The Government considered that the objective justification for the exclusion of the applicants from the relevant amendments was the fact that it was more important to protect band clubs than property used for commercial use, and that in any event the applicants had had other benefits, which had not been applied to owners of property leased for commercial purposes. The Government were also of the view that the owners of property leased for commercial purposes were suffering more than the applicants as a result of the applicable rent laws prior to the reform and that it was for that reason that the reform firstly tackled the latter group and then the group of persons in the applicants’ position.
81. The Court is ready to accept that the State had to start from somewhere to improve the situation of owners suffering from the effects of controlled rents (see Cassar, cited above, § 81); indeed the Government submitted that ameliorating the situation of landlords of commercial purposes was a priority, both because such owners were suffering more and because commercial premises deserved lesser protection, thus amendments in that respect had been a first step. The Court reiterates that no discrimination is disclosed as a result of a particular date being chosen for the commencement of a new legislative regime and differential treatment arising out of a legislative change is not discriminatory where it has a reasonable and objective justification in the interests of the good administration of justice (see Amato Gauci, cited above, § 71). While the Government failed to substantiate their claim that persons leasing out property for commercial purposes were suffering more than people in the applicants’ position, the fact that commercial premises deserved lesser protection is for the purpose of this part of the assessment an acceptable argument. The Court is thus ready to accept that the Government’s choice at the time of enacting the 2009 amendments fell within their margin of appreciation and was reasonably justified. The question remains, whether the situation persisting after that date was also reasonable and justified.
82. While the Government refrained from stating that situations such as those of the applicants would have been dealt with in a similar manner in the near future, they, however, argued that different measures had been taken in respect of the applicants. They referred to the 2014 amendments. The Court notes that it has already found above (see paragraphs 62 and 66 above) that the 2014 amendments were of little comfort to the applicants, who continued to suffer a breach of their property rights. Indeed more than eight years have passed since the 2009 amendments and the situation of persons in the applicants’ position remains the same. According to the Government this different level of improvement was justified because band clubs were more deserving of protection. Accordingly, the Court accepts that the reason behind the applicants’ continued exclusion from the amendment complained of was precisely the Government’s will to continue to preserve local customs and in particular the functioning of band clubs, which in itself is not unreasonable.
83. The Court considers that if the global measures taken by the Government in respect of persons in the applicants’ position reach the requisite balance between the interests at play, it would be possible to find that the difference in treatment pursued a legitimate aim and that there was a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. In the present case the measure complained of by the applicants is that, according to the law at present, their property will not be “released” in 2028, while that of their comparators will. Thus, such an action will come to be in respect of their comparator only in ten years’ time. From the parties’ submissions the Court cannot conclude that further amelioration to the applicants’ situation will not ensue until such date, even more so in the light of the violation upheld by the Court in the present case in relation to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraph 66 above). Bearing in mind the foregoing considerations, the Court finds that the current existing difference in treatment, in law, complained of by the applicants, may at this stage be considered reasonably justified.
84. It follows that there has not been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention, in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
85. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
1. The parties’ submissions
86. In the absence of a possibility of the property being returned to them, the applicants claimed pecuniary damage amounting to EUR 10,400,694 plus 8% interest (domestic rate), in order to compensate for the loss of rental value they suffered from 1967 to 2017.
87. They noted that, on the one hand, based on the applicants’ valuation of 2014, from 1955 till 2014 the rent that should have been received would have amounted to approximately EUR 15 million. On the other hand by taking into account the valuation of the defendants the rent that should have been received would have been around EUR 5 million, which was still a considerable sum. Thus, the compensation of EUR 300,000 awarded to the applicants by the first-instance constitutional jurisdiction was a very conservative one, albeit one which, in the circumstances, the applicants had been willing to accept. However, the applicants noted that they were still suffering from the violation which would persist ad infinitum. They therefore submitted a fresh updated architect report dated 2017 which estimated a fair rental value for that year as being EUR 352,550 annually (comprising EUR 111,750 for the ground floor as commercial premises, EUR 58,800 for the mezzanine, and EUR 91,000 each for the second and third floor rented out as offices). The report took into account the properties found in the same street as the applicants’ property and the particular features and characteristics of the property at issue. On the basis of that report and relevant calculations back dating the rent for each of the relevant years (for example, the rent in 1967 is estimated as being approximately EUR 74,352, that in 1980 as being approximately EUR 153,958 and that in 2000 as EUR 255,316), the total rent due was EUR 10,488,115.82 from which had to be deducted the rents actually received i.e. EUR 87,421.76.
88. The applicants also claimed EUR 300,000 in non pecuniary damage.
89. The Government submitted that there was a boom in property prices only in around 2004 and that in any event the expert valuations submitted by the applicants were exorbitant. In their view, their own valuation was more reliable and showed an annual rental value in 2014 as being EUR 93,000 per year. Thus, in their view an award of EUR 20,000 sufficed to cover the years from 2004 to 2014 (date of the amendments) and that no interest was due on that amount as Convention proceedings should not be a kin to domestic claims for damage. They also considered that an award of EUR 5,000, jointly, sufficed as non-pecuniary damage.
2. The Court’s assessment
90. The Court must proceed to determine the compensation the applicants are entitled to in respect of the loss of control, use and enjoyment of the property which they have suffered. The Court has already found that while the rent paid to the applicants might have been an appropriate rent in the 1960s – 70s it was not so decades later (see paragraph 59 above), it also found a violation for both the period before and after 2014, consequently the applicants are due compensation until the date of this judgment.
91. The Court notes the significant difference between the Government’s only valuation (of 2014) and the valuations submitted by the applicants. While it is true that the property is a four-storey building, the Court observes that the principal part of its ground floor which is being used as a restaurant, and which the applicants’ architect estimated in 2017 at EUR 111,750 was being rented out in 2014 at EUR 17,000. Moreover, the rent established willingly by the applicants’ ancestors until 1962, which the Court found to be appropriate for 1960s – 70s, was EUR 1,164.69 annually, however, the backdated calculation submitted by the applicants estimates the market rent for that year as being EUR 74,352. The Court therefore considers that such an estimate has no reasonable foundation in the reality of the time. With that in mind, and noting that the upper floors are lower in price (as also shown by the applicants’ valuation) it would appear that the Government’s valuation is closer to the actual reality. Thus, in assessing the pecuniary damage sustained by the applicants, the Court has considered the estimates provided in as far as appropriate and has had regard to the information available to it on rental values on the Maltese property market during the relevant period. It also takes into account that the applicants were satisfied with the award of EUR 300,000 granted by the first-instance domestic court. To that amount must be added a sum in respect of the annual rent lost for the period 2013 to date.
92. The Court reiterates that legitimate objectives in the “public interest”, such as those pursued in measures of economic reform or measures designed to achieve greater social justice, may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see Ghigo v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 31122/05, § 18, 17 July 2008). In the present case however, the Court keeps in mind that the property was not used for securing the social welfare of tenants or preventing homelessness (compare Fleri Soler and Camilleri, (just satisfaction), cited above, § 18).
93. Furthermore, the sums already received by the owners for the relevant period must be deducted.
94. The Court reiterates that an award for pecuniary damage under Article 41 of the Convention is intended to put the applicant, as far as possible, in the position he would have enjoyed had the breach not occurred. It therefore considers that interest should be added to the above award in order to compensate for loss of value of the award over time. As such, the interest rate should reflect national economic conditions, such as levels of inflation and rates of interest (ibid., § 20). The Court thus considers that a one-off payment of 5% interest should be added to the above amount (see Ghigo (just satisfaction), cited above, § 20).
95. Hence, the Court awards the applicants, jointly, EUR 592,000 under this head.
96. The Court considers that the applicants must have sustained feelings of frustration and stress, having regard to the nature of the breaches. It thus awards the applicants, jointly, EUR 8,000 under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
97. The applicants also claimed EUR 17,013.87 (as per relevant receipts) for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts (including for retrial proceedings) and the Court.
98. The Government did not contest the EUR 4,204.28 representing the applicants’ costs of domestic proceedings but argued that the applicants had not shown that the remaining EUR 6,077.53 in defendants’ costs they had been ordered to pay had actually been paid. They also submitted that costs for proceedings before this Court should not exceed EUR 2,000.
99. The Court considers, on the one hand, that the costs of retrial proceedings are not due, it being an extraordinary remedy which needed not be pursued for the purposes of the proceedings before this Court. On the other hand, as continuously reiterated by this Court, any sums in judicial costs ordered by the domestic courts (for the purposes of exhausting regular domestic proceedings) remain payable by the applicants, and thus must be awarded. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 10,700, jointly, covering costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
100. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares, unanimously, the application admissible;

2. Holds, unanimously, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds, by four votes to three, that there has been no violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

4. Holds, unanimously,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, jointly, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 592,000 (five hundred and ninety-two thousand euros), in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 8,000 (eight thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 10,700 (ten thousand seven hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 23 October 2018, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Branko Lubarda
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following separate opinions are annexed to this judgment:
(a) concurring opinion of Judge Dedov;
(b) joint partly dissenting opinion of Judges Keller, Serghides and Schukking.
B.L.
J.S.P.


CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE DEDOV
It is always difficult for the Court to assess a case under Article 14 of the Convention. There is no consistency or clarity in its methodology. In the case of Slivenko v. Latvia ([GC], no. 48321/99, 9 October 2003), the Court found a violation of Article 8 because there were no formal obstacles to prevent the applicants from becoming permanent residents of Latvia; the applicants could not be regarded as endangering the national security of Latvia by reason of belonging to the family of a former Soviet military officer (see § 127 of the Slivenko judgment). The applicants in that case also relied on Article 14, complaining that they had been removed from Latvia as members both of the Russian speaking ethnic minority and of the family of a former Russian military officer. Those arguments, based on different treatment of an ethnic minority, were much stronger, and the Court considered that it was not necessary to rule on the applicants’ complaints under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 8, in view of its finding of a violation of Article 8 of the Convention.
At the same time, in the case of A.H. and Others v. Russia (no. 6033/13, 17 January 2017), the Court examined the complaint (concerning different treatment of US adoptive parents and those from other countries) under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 8, ignoring the absolute margin of appreciation in the sphere of international adoption. The Court, without providing any explanation, preferred to examine the complaint under Article 14, which is not autonomous, chose to exploit a stronger line of argument – including discrimination on the ground of nationality – and then held that it was not necessary to examine the core complaint under Article 8. In this area the Court must be careful to avoid double standards.
It is well established that Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and the Protocols thereto. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. The judges should take this principle into account and establish where is the core complaint under the substantive provision or under Article 14. In the case of Biao v. Denmark ([GC], no. 38590/10, 24 May 2016), the core complaint concerned the Danish authorities’ refusal to grant the applicant and his wife family reunion in Denmark on the basis of the attachment requirement under national law. The attachment requirement was thus the principal issue of the case. The applicant insisted that the authorities had taken their decision as a result of an unjustified difference in treatment between Danish nationals of Danish ethnic origin and Danish nationals of other ethnic origin. In the Biao case, it could be accepted that the discrimination issue under Article 14 was more important and it was reasonable not to examine the case solely under Article 8. The dissenting judges took different positions as to whether it was necessary to examine Article 8 if there would be no violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8. Judge Jäderblom preferred not to examine the application separately under Article 8, whereas judges Villiger, Mahoney and Kjølbro considered it necessary to examine the application under Article 8 taken alone. However, in their view, it was clear that there had been no violation of Article 8 of the Convention, since the female applicant had no ties with Denmark and their family life in Denmark was not feasible.
Equally, the Court may not examine the complaint if it is premature, for example, if the domestic authorities have not issued the final decision. In the present case, we have both criteria in place, which enabled the Court to examine the complaint under Article 14 on the merits: the complaint was based on the provisions of national law establishing different treatment for commercial landlords and band clubs; although the relevant provisions will become effective as from 2028, they were enacted in 2008, and thus the national authorities have already expressed their views on the issue. Since the rent legislation in Malta broadly distinguished between residential and commercial premises, the difference in treatment could therefore be justified due to the wide margin of appreciation and the principle of subsidiarity. It is not for the international judge, but for the national authorities, to solve social problems, including those arising from the automatic renewal of lease agreements.
Earlier in the judgment, the Court found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 because of a disproportionate interference with the property rights of owners renting premises to band clubs (see the conclusions in paragraphs 65 and 66 of the judgment). The Court has found that a disproportionate and excessive burden was imposed on the applicants, arising mainly from the extremely low rent of these premises. Since Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 14 refer to different problems (economic and social) and to different issues (low rent and obligatory renewal of the lease), an examination by the Court of their merits is justified in the present case.

?
JOINT PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES KELLER, SERGHIDES AND SCHUKKING
1. We voted against point 3 of the operative part because, in particular, we cannot follow the reasoning in paragraph 83 of the judgment; we would have preferred a more cautious approach on the Court’s part concerning the issue whether the Maltese law in question was discriminatory.
2. Where the same set of facts or circumstances gives rise to claims under both Article 14 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court has repeatedly found it “unnecessary to examine” the former claim (see, for example, Cyprus v. Turkey [GC], no. 25781/94, 10 May 2001; Herrmann v. Germany [GC], no. 9300/07, 26 June 2012; Willis v. United Kingdom, no. 36042/97, 11 June 2002; Schneider v. Luxembourg, no. 2113/04, 10 July 2007; Alexandrou v. Turkey, no. 16162/90, 20 January 2009; Andreou Papi v. Turkey, no. 16094/90, 22 September 2009; Strati v. Turkey, no. 16082/90, 22 September 2009; Vrahimi v. Turkey, no. 16078/90, 22 September 2009; and Olymbiou v. Turkey, no. 16091/90, 27 October 2009).
3. Thus, this Court has held that “having regard to its findings under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, ... there is no need to give a separate ruling on the applicant’s complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1” (see Herrmann v. Germany, § 105). In our view, the issue in this case with regard to Article 14 is analogous, and must follow this line of cases.
4. While Article 14 has no independent existence apart from the other provisions of the Convention, it plays an “important autonomous role by complementing the other normative provisions of the Convention and the Protocols: Article 14 ... safeguards individuals ... from any discrimination in the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in those other provisions” (see Marckx v. Belgium, no. 6833/74, § 32, 13 June 1979).
5. Finding that a violation of Article 14 has not occurred is a conclusion that is entirely distinct from holding that it is unnecessary to examine the issue.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni:
Eccezione preliminare respinse (l'Art. 34) le richieste individuali
(L'Art. 34) la vittima
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà)
Nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - la Discriminazione) legga nella luce di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - (P1-1) Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà)
Danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale
Danno patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)


TERZA SEZIONE







CAUSA BRADSHAW ED ALTRI C. MALTA

(Richiesta n. 37121/15)









SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

23 ottobre 2018




DEFINITIVO

23/01/2019

Questa sentenza è divenuta definitivo sotto Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Bradshaw ed Altri c. il Malta,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Branko Lubarda, Presidente
Vincenzo A. De Gaetano,
Helen Keller,
Dmitry Dedov,
Georgios A. Serghides,
Jolien Schukking,
María Elósegui, giudici
e Stefano Phillips, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 2 ottobre 2018,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 37121/15) contro la Repubblica del Malta depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con venti quattro cittadini maltesi ed una società registrate in Malta (veda appendice per dettagli), (“i richiedenti”), 20 luglio 2015.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati col Dr J. Camilleri, un avvocato che pratica in Valletta. Il Governo maltese (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Dr P. Grech, Avvocato General.
3. I richiedenti addussero che loro stavano soffrendo di un'interferenza in corso coi loro diritti di proprietà in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Loro considerarono anche che loro erano discriminati contro con riguardo ad al godimento della loro proprietà, poiché siccome stette in piedi la legge, loro furono obbligati per rinnovare il loro accordo di affitto su una base annuale, mentre persone che hanno affitti commerciali erano state liberate da simile obbligo per emendamenti introdotti al Codice civile nel 2009.
4. 4 gennaio 2017 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
Sfondo di A. alla causa
5. I richiedenti sono proprietari uniti della proprietà a numero 274, Repubblica Strada, Valletta. La proprietà, noto come il “il Proprio di Re Nastro Bastona” (in seguito assegnò a come “il KOBC”), è l'edificio di un piano del quattro di 864 metri di piazza, e è localizzato in un primo luogo nella città di capitale del Malta.
6. Inizialmente, la proprietà appartenne ai richiedenti gli ascendenti di '. Nel 1946, i richiedenti che gli ascendenti di ' sono entrati in un accordo di affitto col KOBC, da che cosa loro affittarono volentieri la proprietà detta per 500 libbre genuino (GBP) annualmente (circa 1,164.69 euros (EUR)). In 1955 legislazione che specificamente regola il contratto d'affitto di proprietà per unire bastoni (Atto V di 1955, in seguito “i 1955 emendamenti”) fu introdotto.
7. Con legge (Il Codice civile lesse in concomitanza col Re che affitta di Proprietà Urbana (la Regolamentazione) l'Ordinanza-veda diritto nazionale attinente sotto), i richiedenti sono obbligati a rinnovare, su una base annuale il contratto d'affitto entrò in coi loro ascendenti, e non può esigere un aumento in affitto. Secondo i richiedenti ', il valore di noleggio di mercato della proprietà (nel 2014) era annualmente EUR 269,100.
8. Parte della proprietà è utilizzata come un bastone di nastro, e parte della proprietà è operata come un ristorante e sbarra. La rivendicazione di richiedenti che l'operazione del ristorante e sbarra è un'attività economica proficua che genera un reddito all'organizzatore di banchetti di circa EUR 150,000 o più annualmente.
9. Nel 2009, emendamenti furono introdotti lasciare spazio ad aumenti nei certi affitti e stabilire una data d'arresta per esistere contratti d'affitto protetti relativo a proprietà commerciali che sono così finire nel 2028. Questi emendamenti non colpirono i richiedenti proprietà di ' che è affittata fuori come un bastone di nastro. Gli emendamenti diedero comunque anche il Ministro attinente il potere per regolare le condizioni relativo a bastoni, lasciando spazio così alla possibilità di emendamenti futuri (veda paragrafo 19 sotto).
1. Procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali
10. Nel 2011, i richiedenti registrarono procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Civile (Prima la Sala) nella sua giurisdizione costituzionale. I procedimenti furono portati contro l'Avvocato General (in seguito assegnò a come “l'AG”), il Primo Ministro (in seguito assegnò a come “il PM”) ed il Proprio del Re Nastro Bastona (l'affittuario). I richiedenti chiesero che il loro diritto a godimento tranquillo della proprietà come protegguto sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione era violato. Loro dissero che loro erano negati l'uso della loro proprietà senza essere previsto con risarcimento adeguato. I richiedenti presentarono inoltre che, nel 2009, la legge era stata corretta, mentre lasciando spazio ad un aumento in affitto e la costituzione di un taglio via data per esistere “affitti protetti”, ma gli emendamenti nella legge non coprirono proprietà affittate fuori come bastoni. In contrasto con gli altri affitti commerciali, l'affitto annuale per il bastone non poteva essere sollevato perciò, ed il contratto di affitto non poteva essere terminato. I richiedenti affermarono che la legge era discriminatoria ed era perciò in violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
11. 8 ottobre 2013, la Corte Civile (Prima la Sala) nella sua giurisdizione costituzionale trovata che i richiedenti avevano sofferto di una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in finora come l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritti di proprietà di ' non erano stati proporzionati. I richiedenti avevano presentato che la proprietà aveva un valore di noleggio di EUR 269,100 per anno, mentre l'AG ed il PM avevano presentato che la proprietà aveva un valore di noleggio di EUR 93,000 per anno. Irrispettoso di che valore uno era considerare, la corte concluse che l'essere di affitto ricevette coi richiedenti era sproporzionato. Ricordando i valori di noleggio valutati presentò di fronte alla corte, ed il reddito che il KOBC stava generando dalla sua sbarra, la corte assegnò EUR 300,000 in danni ai richiedenti (essere pagato congiuntamente metà con l'AG ed il PM, e mezzo del KOBC). I costi dei procedimenti sarebbero pagati, mezzo dell'AG e PM, e l'altra metà del KOBC.
12. La corte concluse inoltre che i richiedenti non avevano subito qualsiasi la discriminazione come nessuna prova soddisfacente era stata presentata esposizione contro la quale loro sono stati discriminati quando comparò agli altri proprietari che affittano la loro proprietà come un bastone.
13. L'AG, PM e KOBC registrarono un ricorso di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale.
14. 6 febbraio 2015 la Corte Costituzionale rovesciò in parte la sentenza del primo giudice di prima istanza, e concluse che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dei richiedenti i diritti di '. L'Ordine della corte Costituzionale che i costi di procedimenti a sia istanze siano pagate coi richiedenti.
15. La Corte Costituzionale fondò che contrario a quello pleaded del Governo, i richiedenti avevano titolo di proprietà sulla proprietà in questione. In linea con causa-legge nazionale la Corte Costituzionale concluse comunque, che, perché l'accordo era stato entrato volontariamente in con la piena conoscenza delle conseguenze sé condurrebbe a (quel è, che la quota di affitto non poteva essere sollevata e l'accordo di affitto non poteva essere terminato), poi i richiedenti non potevano addurre una violazione dei loro diritti. Questo era così, anche se a causa del tasso di inflazione in tutto gli anni, l'affitto dovuto ora sarebbe considerato basso. La Corte Costituzionale sostenne inoltre che gli emendamenti alla legge di 2009, menzionò coi richiedenti, non colpisca la loro posizione come la quale rimase lo stesso che quando l'accordo di affitto era stato entrato in [nel 1946], e non c'era perciò ragione per il principio di servanda di sunt di pacta (“accordi devono essere attenutisi con”) non essere dato il pieno effetto.
2. Procedimenti di nuovo processo
16. In 6 maggio 2015, i richiedenti registrarono una richiesta per nuovo processo. Loro dissero che la Corte Costituzionale aveva commesso un errore di fatto ed aveva fatto domanda un'interpretazione sbagliata della legge. Loro notarono che la protezione data in legge a bastoni fu introdotta nel 1955 mentre i loro predecessori in titolo erano entrati in un accordo di contratto d'affitto nel 1946.
17. I richiedenti avviarono anche ciononostante, procedimenti di fronte a questa Corte 20 luglio 2015.
18. 3 febbraio 2016 la Corte Costituzionale respinse i richiedenti che ' richiede per un processo di re. La Corte Costituzionale sostenne che, siccome stette in piedi la legge, nuovo processo non poteva essere fatto domanda in riguardo ad ad una causa di una natura costituzionale. I costi dei procedimenti sarebbero pagati coi richiedenti.
3. Emendamenti attinenti
19. Durante i procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali (su ricorso), 1 gennaio 2014, le Condizioni che Regolano i Contratti d'affitto di Bastoni Regolamentazioni (in seguito ‘le Regolamentazioni '), Legislazione Sussidiaria Capitolo 16.13 delle Leggi del Malta entrò in vigore (veda diritto nazionale attinente).
20. Le Regolamentazioni previde che l'affitto pagabile ai proprietari con la partecipazione azionaria di bastoni di nastro la proprietà sotto titolo di contratto d'affitto sarebbe aumentata entro 10% (dall'anno precedente) ogni anno fino a 2016 e come da 1 gennaio 2016 l'affitto sarebbe aumentato entro 5% (dall'anno precedente) ogni anno fino a 2023, seguendo aumenterebbe quale ogni anno secondo l'indice dell'inflazione. Come da 2015 l'inquilino doveva anche pagare un affitto supplementare calcolato al tasso di 5% sul reddito annuale derivato col bastone. Come un dia luogo al 2015 l'affitto annuale e totale pagato ai richiedenti col KOBC era EUR 2,876. 26 ed in 2016 EUR 3,017.20,
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
21. Agisca io di 1925 restrizioni introdotte da che cosa affitti controllati furono fatti domanda a proprietà urbana. Articolo 2 di Atto io di 1925 definito il termine premette come “qualsiasi patrimonio immobiliare urbano.” Il proprietario era solamente in grado guadagnare di nuovo la proprietà della proprietà richiedendo auorizzazione dal Consiglio della Regolamentazione dell'Affitto a condizione che il proprietario era in grado provare che l'affittuario non stava pagando l'affitto o che della proprietà fu avuta bisogno per l'alloggio per il proprietario lui o i suoi ascendenti e descendents. Agisca io di 1925 fui inteso di offrire simile protezione sino a 1929. Con vuole dire di Atto XXIII di 1929 che l'obbligo di rinnovamento di contratti d'affitto è stato prolungato fino a 1933. Nel frattempo, nel 1931, Ordinanza XXI era stato promulgato (originalmente Capitolo 109 delle Leggi del Malta, oggi Capitolo 69 delle Leggi del Malta) che purché che l'obbligo per rinnovare un contratto d'affitto era un obbligo indefinito. In 1955 legislazione che specificamente regola il contratto d'affitto di proprietà per unire bastoni (i 1955 emendamenti) fu introdotto.
22. Articolo 2, del Subaffitto di Proprietà Urbana (la Regolamentazione) l'Ordinanza, Capitolo 69 delle Leggi del Malta (come applicabile datare), in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
“In questa Ordinanza, a meno che il contesto richiede altrimenti -
l'espressione che ‘bastona ' vuole dire come qualsiasi bastone registrò simile all'Ufficio del Commissario di Polizia sotto le disposizioni appropriate di legge”
1. I 2009 emendamenti
23. Articolo 1531I ed Articolo 1531J del Codice civile, Capitolo 16 delle Leggi del Malta lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 1531I
“Si considererà che l'inquilino sia la persona che occupa il casamento sotto un titolo valido di contratto d'affitto il 1 giugno, 2008, nella causa di locali commerciali affittata prima di 1 giugno, 1995 così come il marito o moglie di simile inquilino, previde loro stanno vivendo insieme e non sono separati giuridicamente, ed anche nell'evento della morte dell'inquilino, i suoi eredi che sono riferiti con consanguineità o con affinità su al grado di cugini compresamente:
Purché che un contratto d'affitto di locali commerciali rese di fronte al 1 giugno, 1995 possono in qualsiasi causa termina entro venti anni che cominciano a correre dal 1 giugno, 2008 a meno che un contratto di contratto d'affitto che ha stipulato un specifico periodo è stato fatto. Quando un contratto di contratto d'affitto rese prima del 1 giugno, 1995 per un specifico periodo e quale il 1 gennaio, 2010 il fermo di di di periodo originale o di rispetto ancora sta funzionando e simile periodo di contratto d'affitto non è stato prolungato ancora automaticamente con legge, poi in che causa il periodo o periodi convennero nel contratto farà domanda. Un contratto rese prima del 1 giugno, 1995 e quale sarà rinnovato automaticamente o al risuoli discrezione dell'inquilino, sarà ritenuto come se non è un contratto costituito un specifico periodo e può come così limitato entro venti anni che cominciano a correre dal 1 giugno, 2008.”
Articolo 1531J
“Nella causa di un casamento affittata ad un'entità ed usato come un bastone di fronte al 1 giugno, 1995 incluso ma non limitato ad un musicale, filantropico, sociale, sport o l'entità politica, quando il suo contratto d'affitto è per un specifico periodo ed il 1 gennaio, 2010 il fermo di di di periodo originale o di rispetto ancora sta funzionando ed il contratto d'affitto non è stato prolungato ancora automaticamente con legge, poi in che causa il periodo di contratto d'affitto stabilito nel contratto farà domanda. In tutte le altre istanze dove il contratto di contratto d'affitto fu reso prima del 1 giugno, 1995 la legge e tutte le definizioni come in vigore il 1 giugno, 1995 continueranno a fare domanda:
Purché che nonostante le disposizioni di legge come in vigore di fronte al 1 giugno, 1995 il Ministro responsabile per alloggio regolamentazioni possono rendere a volte regolare le condizioni di contratto d'affitto di bastoni così che un equilibrio equo può essere giunto ai diritti del locatore, dell'inquilino e l'interesse pubblico.”
2. I 2014 emendamenti
24. Nel 2014, le Condizioni che Regolano i Contratti d'affitto di Bastoni Regolamentazioni, Legislazione Sussidiaria Capitolo 16.13 delle Leggi del Malta fu introdotto per Avviso 195 Legale di 2014. In finora come attinente, queste Regolamentazioni prevedono quel:
“2. (1) l'affitto di un bastone siccome assegnato ad in Articolo 1531J del Codice civile che è pagato sulla base di un contratto d'affitto entrato in di fronte al 1 giugno 1995, a meno che altrimenti concordò per iscritto su dopo il 1 gennaio 2014, o convenuto su per iscritto prima del 1 giugno 1995 con riguardo ad ad un contratto d'affitto che era ancora nel suo fermo di di di periodo originale o di rispetto il 1 gennaio 2014, come dalla data del primo pagamento di affitto dovuto dopo il 1 gennaio 2014, sia aumentato con un tasso fisso di dieci per cento sull'affitto pagabile in riguardo dell'anno precedente e continuerà ad essere aumentato come dalla data del primo pagamento di affitto dovuto dopo il 1 gennaio di ogni anno sino ad ed incluso l'anno 2016 entro dieci per cento sull'affitto precedente.
(2) l'affitto come dal primo pagamento di affitto dovuto dopo il 1 gennaio 2017 sarà aumentato con un tasso fisso di cinque per cento sull'affitto pagabile nel 2016. Simile affitto continuerà ad essere aumentato all'anno entro cinque per cento sino al 31 dicembre 2023 e l'affitto aumenterà da allora in poi ogni anno secondo l'indice dell'inflazione per l'anno precedente.
3. (1) dove al riguardo locali di bastone o parte alle quali fanno domanda queste regolamentazioni è usata per la generazione di reddito per un'attività economica eseguita nei locali detti, poi come dal 1 gennaio 2015 l'inquilino dei locali detti pagherà anche la persona concessa per ricevere l'affitto una somma equivalente a cinque per cento del reddito annuale derivata col bastone dall'attività economica detta, altro che reddito derivò dalla raccolta dei fondi o le attività filantropiche organizzate e maneggiò col bastone stesso:
Purché che per i fini di questa regolamentazione, reddito generato dall'attività economica vuole dire, qualsiasi reddito che è derivò direttamente o indirettamente dalla sbarra e, o ristorante e da qualsiasi contratto d'affitto, supplire-contratto d'affitto il contratto d'affitto di un andata-interessato o un accordo di gestione dei locali detti che sono affittati al riguardo fuori come un bastone o parte.
(2) l'importo assegnò ad in supplire-regolamentazione (1) sarà calcolato su una base annuale e sarà pagabile nel 30 settembre dell'anno seguente col primo pagamento che è dovuto in riguardo dell'anno 2015 nel 30 settembre 2016.
(3) il reddito annuale assegnò ad in supplire-regolamentazione (1) sarà calcolato sulla base di rendiconti gestionali firmata con un ragioniere iscritto all'albo nella causa di bastoni che hanno un reddito di meno che €200,000 all'anno e con rendiconti gestionali rivisti nella causa di bastoni che hanno un reddito di €200,000 o più all'anno.”
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
25. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro stavano soffrendo di un'interferenza in corso coi loro diritti di proprietà in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
26. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Sfera dell'azione di reclamo / temporis di ratione di compatibilità
27. La Corte reitera che il suo temporis di ratione di giurisdizione copre solamente il periodo dopo la ratifica della Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli con lo Stato rispondente. Da che onwards della data, tutti l'atti allegato di Stato ed omissioni devono adattare alla Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli e fatti susseguenti incorrono anche all'interno della giurisdizione della Corte dove sono soltanto proroghe di una situazione già esistente loro (veda, per esempio, Bezzina Wettinger ed Altri c. il Malta, n. 15091/06, § 52 8 aprile 2008).
28. La Corte nota che nella loro richiesta i richiedenti non specificarono una data come a quando loro cominciarono a patire la violazione che continua, e che la loro soddisfazione equa chiede interessata il periodo che comincia da 1967 (data della ratifica del Malta) l'onwards. Effettivamente il Governo non sollevò difficoltà in questo riguardo.
29. In che luce che la Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo non concerne il periodo di fronte a 1967 quali sarebbero ratione temporis incompatibili con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
30. I costatazione di Corte che l'azione di reclamo nella causa presente che si riferisce al periodo susseguente è ratione temporis compatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
2. L'eccezione del Governo di mancanza di status di vittima
31. Il Governo presentò che protezione di proprietà urbana che nel loro comprised della prospettiva unisce bastoni, sotto affitti controllati con un obbligo rinnovare il contratto d'affitto era in vigore dal 1925. Loro dibatterono che i 1955 emendamenti erano stati effettuati per distinguere bastoni di nastro dall'altra proprietà urbana come questi bastoni aveva evoluto sugli anni, ed entro 1947 erano sessanta bastoni di nastro, con uno o più per ogni parrocchia. Ciononostante, i richiedenti che gli antenati di ' erano entrati liberamente nell'accordo di contratto d'affitto con KOBC in 1 maggio 1946, sapendo che che sarebbero le conseguenze. Nella prospettiva del Governo, i richiedenti non erano stati sottoposti così, ad un'interferenza e non potevano chiedere di essere vittime della violazione allegato.
32. I richiedenti presentarono che i loro ascendenti erano entrati nell'accordo di contratto d'affitto nel 1946 e loro non potevano prevedere, a che tempo che il Governo stava per nove anni più tardi proteggere bastone affitta indefinitamente. Loro accentuarono che era solamente in maggio 1955 che le leggi di affitto furono corrette per specificamente includere bastoni di nastro. Effettivamente aveva la contesa del Governo (che bastoni di nastro abbatterono la definizione di proprietà urbana sotto) stato vero, non ci sarebbe stato proprio qualsiasi ha bisogno introdurre la legge del 1995 che specificamente prolunga gli effetti di leggi di affitto per unire bastoni.
33. La Corte non ha bisogno di determinare se sotto bastoni di nastro di diritto nazionale già era soggetto a simile restrizioni nel 1946, come anche nell'evento che loro erano la Corte già ha esaminato scenari simili.
34. La Corte prima ha sostenuto che in una situazione dove i richiedenti il predecessore di ' in titolo avuto, decadi prima, entrò di proposito in un accordo di affitto con restrizioni attinenti (specificamente l'incapacità per aumentare affitto o terminare il contratto d'affitto), i richiedenti il predecessore di ' in titolo non poteva, al tempo, ragionevolmente ha avuto un'idea chiara della misura dell'inflazione in proprietà fissa il prezzo di di decadi per seguire. Inoltre, la Corte osservò che quando simile richiedenti avevano ereditato la proprietà in oggetto loro non era stato capace di fare qualsiasi cosa più che tenti di usare le via di ricorso disponibili che erano state inutilmente in circostanze loro. Le decisioni delle corti nazionali che riguardano la loro richiesta avevano costituito così interferenza nel loro riguardo. Inoltre, quelli richiedenti che avevano ereditato una proprietà che già era stata soggetto ad un contratto d'affitto non avevano avuto la possibilità di esporre l'affitto loro (o terminare liberamente l'accordo). Seguì che non si poteva dire che loro abbiano rinunciato a, qualsiasi i diritti in quel il riguardo. Di conseguenza, la Corte fondò che le regolamentazioni di controllo di affitto e la loro richiesta in quelle cause avevano costituito un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' (come padroni di casa) usare la loro proprietà (veda, per esempio, Zammit ed Attard Cassar c. il Malta, n. 1046/12, §§ 50 51 30 luglio 2015).
35. Non c'è nessuna ragione di sostenere altrimenti nella causa presente. Segue che c'è stata un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' (come padroni di casa) usare la loro proprietà, e così loro sono vittime della violazione si lamentarono di. L'eccezione del Governo è respinta perciò.
3. Conclusione
36. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) I richiedenti
37. I richiedenti presentarono che le condizioni degli accordi di contratto d'affitto con bastoni erano “protetto” con la Re-affitto di Proprietà Urbana (la Regolamentazione) Ordinanza con la virtù dell'emendamento di Atto V di 1955 che vollero dire che non solo era i proprietari limitati (siccome loro ancora sono) rinnovare automaticamente il contratto d'affitto su una base annuale e così non poteva terminare il contratto d'affitto, loro furono proibiti anche dall'imporre qualsiasi aumento in affitto. Loro considerarono che le Regolamentazioni infine introdussero nel 2014 quale purché per la possibilità di un aumento (all'interno di parametri severi, controllati) ciononostante non basti alterare il disproportionality della misura.
38. I richiedenti notarono che secondo legge il contratto d'affitto non terminerà mai e si sosterrà, mentre volendo dire indefinitamente che i richiedenti non godranno mai la loro proprietà come i suoi proprietari, e che, in che luce di qualsiasi operazione di vendita eventuale soffrirà da una riduzione di prezzo. Le misure legislative introdussero anche così, fallito di incontrare il “la prevedibilità” il requisito poiché la legge non offrì una data di conclusione per il contratto d'affitto in oggetto.
39. Nei richiedenti ' vede la misura non perseguì per qualsiasi interesse pubblico fin da un'area significativa all'interno del pianterreno della proprietà era usato un chiaramente fine commerciale, vale a dire come una sbarra e ristorante aperto al pubblico che generò migliaia di euros per anno. Questa attività economica fu travestita sotto il nome di un bastone di nastro di ‘' che non fu usato solamente per il beneficio dei suoi membri. I richiedenti presentarono che il fine di proteggere bastoni di nastro non dovrebbe essere abusato e prolungò ad una situazione dove un bastone di nastro è usato per generare reddito e profitti per il beneficio dell'affittuario. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, l'uso come un ristorante non era un'attività subordinata per il beneficio e godimento esclusivo dei suoi membri ma un'attività reddito-generatrice ed autostabile. Effettivamente l'accordo di gestione entrato in col ristorante mostrò che il secondo stava pagando annualmente il bastone di nastro EUR 17,000 per l'uso di parte del pianterreno. Inoltre, i richiedenti considerarono che mentre accettò che un bastone di nastro aveva il suo ruolo culturale e sociale, non c'era ragione perché tale bastone ebbe bisogno di operare nell'edificio di un multi-piano in un primo luogo nella città di capitale del Malta. Lo stesso scopo culturale sarebbe potuto essere realizzato da una proprietà più modesta.
40. Inoltre, nessun equilibrio equo era stato previsto fra i richiedenti il diritto essenziale di ' per godere della loro proprietà e la comunità a grande. Prima di tutti, l'affitto loro ricevettero annualmente di EUR 1,164.69 (nel 2014) comparò al valore di noleggio di mercato che lo stesso anno, di EUR 269,100 annualmente, era sproporzionato. I richiedenti presentarono che EUR 1,164.69 era annualmente anche sproporzionato prima di 2014, determinato che, per esempio, calcoli basati sull'indice dei prezzi di proprietà mostrarono, che in 2004 affitto avrebbe lavorato fuori a due terzo di che affitto [cioé. circa EUR 179,400]. Le Regolamentazioni introdotte soltanto nel 2014 diedero un 10% aumento sull'affitto per gli anni 2014 a 2016 ed un 5% aumento trascurabile per gli anni 2016 fino a 2023. L'affitto da 2023 onwards saranno regolati con l'indice di inflazione che era generalmente sostanzialmente bassa per istanza il tasso di inflazione per l'anno 2014 era 0.31% ed il tasso per 2013 era 1.38%. Le Regolamentazioni offrirono anche all'anno un premio di 5% sui profitti dell'affittuario. Comunque, profitti di tesi non erano prevedibili poiché i profitti possono variare da anno ad anno. Il fatto rimase che (nel 2017) i richiedenti stavano ricevendo un affitto di circa EUR 3,000 mentre il valore di mercato di noleggio era cento volte come molto (EUR 350,000 annualmente secondo un rapporto competente presentato alla Corte).
41. Come un risultato di una legge decadi promulgarono prima inoltre, i richiedenti furono sbarrati dal richiedere un affitto più equo. Né loro avevano avuto qualsiasi le altre via di ricorso, salvi per i procedimenti costituzionali che respinsero la loro rivendicazione su ricorso.
42. In replica alla contesa del Governo che i richiedenti la valutazione di ' era troppo alta, i richiedenti presentarono alla Corte un schema Statale che mostra che il Governo stava affittando le sue proprie proprietà a tassi sostanziali che erano abbassi solamente leggermente che tassi di mercato. Effettivamente in che schema che la proprietà del Governo ha proporsi per uso commerciale, situò nella stessa area come che dei richiedenti, fu elencato ad un tasso di noleggio di EUR 500 per metro di piazza (a livello di pianterreno ed i pavimenti più alti a 25% e 20% rispettivamente del tasso di pianterreno) e sarebbe affittato fuori per un termine di determinate. Questo era in contrasto rigido con l'affitto ricevuto coi richiedenti di EUR 1,164.69 per 865 metri di piazza.
43. I richiedenti considerarono che come individui privati loro non dovrebbero essere oppressi con ‘che finanzia ' o ‘che patrocinano ' i sociali ed interessi culturali della comunità. Effettivamente siccome stettero in piedi cose simile carico sopportò solamente coi padroni di casa di bastoni affittati. Effettivamente i richiedenti considerarono che la conclusione del Governo - che un affitto annuale di EUR 2,000 3,000 era proporzionato - quando il valore di mercato era più vicino ad un affitto annuale di EUR 350,000, confinato con sul cinico.
(b) Il Governo
44. Senza pregiudizio alle osservazioni sopra come all'assenza di un'interferenza, il Governo presentò, che qualsiasi interferenza sarebbe stata legale, nella conformità con Capitolo 69 delle Leggi del Malta (Capitolo 109 al tempo quando il contratto d'affitto fu entrato in).
45. Qualsiasi interferenza aveva perseguito anche un scopo legittimo, vale a dire la protezione dell'identità culturale di cittadini maltesi. Nella prospettiva del Governo, bastoni di nastro ebbero un ruolo molto importante in cultura maltese per aumentare ed incentivare i talenti musicali e locali e così un interesse pubblico persistè anche se tale servizio culturale fu dato con un'entità privata come nella causa presente. Il Governo spiegò che bastoni di nastro erano istituzioni prominenti e centri sociali in tutte le città e villaggi ed i due Valetta unisca bastona goduto praticamente un status nazionale nel panorama culturale maltese. Loro notarono che simile bastoni non potessero funzionare nei piccoli locali appartati siccome loro erano al cuore della festa di village/town e che nei giorni prima della festa e durante le persone di festa verrebbe insieme al bastone a socializzare mentre marzi di nastro furono giocati nel centre del villaggio o città. Inoltre, dato che bastoni erano di solito dipendenti su donazioni, il fatto che loro generarono un po' di reddito da un'attività commerciale non elimini l'elemento di interesse pubblico, dato la loro funzione primaria.
46. Il Governo presentò che in 1946 ed anni susseguenti (si previde che il contratto d'affitto sarebbe rimasto in vigore per un massimo di sedici anni e così scadrebbe nel 1962) verso EUR 1,645 come lacerato come stabilito con contratto era un affitto sostanziale. Ancora non si poteva dire successivamente, che sia un affitto basso, sino a 2004, a meno che fu comparato ad affitti accusati alle entità commerciali o a persone maltesi che lottarono per pagare affitti alti. Il Governo enfatizzò che la valutazione di noleggio presentò coi richiedenti (EUR 269,100 annualmente nel 2014) era eccessivo ed i richiedenti non avevano mostrato che c'era stato chiunque pagherà quel l'importo. Effettivamente il Governo aveva, durante procedimenti nazionali, presentò annualmente una valutazione di noleggio di EUR 93,000 (nel 2014). Il Governo presentò che in cause dove c'era un interesse pubblico per i proprietari di misura non era valori di mercato dovuti. Nella luce del sopra, il Governo considerò così, che era evidente che i richiedenti non avevano sofferto di un carico sproporzionato relativo all'importo di affitto pagabile sino a 2014.
47. Seguendo le Regolamentazioni introdotte nel 2014, l'affitto pagabile aumentò entro 10% (da quell'applicabile l'anno di fronte a) ogni anno fino a 2016 (cioé. secondo legge, nel 2015 l'affitto pagabile ai richiedenti EUR 1,281.20 era annualmente ed in 2016 EUR 1,409.27 annualmente). Come da 1 gennaio 2016 l'affitto aumentato entro 5% e continuerà a fare così fino a 2023, seguendo aumenterà quale ogni anno secondo l'indice dell'inflazione. Come da 2015 l'inquilino doveva anche pagare un affitto supplementare calcolato al tasso di 5% sul reddito annuale derivato col bastone. Effettivamente nel 2015 l'affitto annuale e totale pagato ai richiedenti col KOBC era EUR 2,876. 26 ed in 2016 EUR 3,017.20 che nella prospettiva del Governo erano un aumento considerevole all'affitto pagò prima dei 2014 emendamenti. Così, il Governo presentò che ad un equilibrio equo era stato giunto.
48. Il Governo presentò anche che il paragone allo schema Statale menzionato coi richiedenti non era sostenibile come che schema previde per acquisire negozi su un'enfiteusi provvisoria per quaranta cinque anni. Il Governo presentò che un empyhteutae è accordato un vero diritto sulla proprietà che lo dà un titolo a per esercitare tutti i diritti di proprietà durante il periodo attinente e così suo o il suo status era più simile a che di un padrone di casa che un affittuario. Inoltre, un empyhteutae aveva un obbligo per colpire ogni mantenimento necessario diversamente da affittuario.
49. Il Governo insistè che non ci fosse impatto arbitrario o imprevedibile sui richiedenti dati che il loro antenato avesse conosciuto le condizioni applicabili e limitazioni quando lui firmò il contratto nel 1964. In qualsiasi evento che il Governo ha considerato che là esistè le salvaguardie procedurali, ma che la Corte non dovrebbe guardare nella questione data che gli antenati erano consapevoli del regime applicabile nel 1964.
2. La valutazione della Corte
50. La Corte prima ha sostenuto che affitto-controlla schemi e restrizioni sul diritto di un richiedente per terminare il contratto d'affitto di un inquilino costituisca controllo dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Segue che la causa dovrebbe essere esaminata sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Hutten Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, §§ 160 161 ECHR 2006 VIII, e Bittó ed Altri c. la Slovacchia, no.30255/09, § 101 28 gennaio 2014).
51. La Corte reitera che in ordine per un'interferenza per essere compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere legale, deve essere nell'interesse generale e deve essere proporzionato, che è, deve prevedere un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 107 ECHR 2000 io, e J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) la Terra Ltd c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 75 ECHR 2007 III). La Corte esaminerà questi requisiti a turno.
(un) Se le autorità maltesi osservarono il principio della legalità
52. Il primo requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà è legale. In particolare, il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1, mentre recognising che Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso di proprietà, le materie il loro diritto alla condizione che sia esercitato con eseguendo “le leggi.” Inoltre, il principio della legalità presuppone che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale sono sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro richiesta (veda, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 147, il 2004-V di ECHR, ed Amato Gauci c. il Malta, n. 47045/06, § 53 15 settembre 2009).
53. Al giorno d'oggi causa che la misura che colpisce i richiedenti da 1967 onwards era in conformità con Capitolo 69 delle Leggi del Malta, e la sua legislazione sussidiaria. Il fatto mero che la legge previde per un rinnovamento indefinito del contratto d'affitto, un elemento che gioca una parte nella valutazione della proporzionalità dell'interferenza non basti fare in se stesso la legge imprevedibile. L'interferenza era perciò “legale” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) Se la misura perseguì un “scopo legittimo nell'interesse generale”
54. Una misura mirò a controllare che l'uso di proprietà può essere giustificato solamente se è mostrato, inter l'alia, essere “nella conformità con l'interesse generale.” A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che in che è il “generale” o “pubblico” interessi (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, §§ 165). In situazioni dove l'operazione di legislazione di affitto-controllo coinvolge ampio-raggiungendo a conseguenze per individui numerosi e ha conseguenze economiche e sociali per il paese nell'insieme, le autorità non solo devono avere la discrezione considerevole nello scegliendo la forma e decidere su sulla misura di controllo l'uso di proprietà ma anche nel decidere sul tempismo appropriato per l'esecuzione delle leggi attinenti. Ciononostante, che la discrezione, comunque considerevole, non è illimitato ed il suo esercizio non può comportare conseguenze a variazione con gli standard di Convenzione (veda Fleri Soler e Camilleri c. il Malta, n. 35349/05, § 76 ECHR 2006 X). Questi principi non fanno domanda necessariamente comunque, nella stessa maniera dove un'interferenza che effettua proprietà che appartiene ad individui privati non è tirata garantendo il benessere sociale di inquilini od ostacolando homelessness (l'ibid. § 77). In simile cause gli effetti delle misure di affitto-controllo sono soggetto a scrutinio più vicino al livello europeo (l'ibid., nel collegamento con requisitioned della proprietà per uso come uffici statali).
55. Siccome presentato col Governo ed anche accettato coi richiedenti (veda paragrafo 39 sopra), un bastone di nastro ha un ruolo culturale e sociale in società maltese. In conseguenza la Corte può accettare che la misura intraprese un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico. Ciononostante, le altre considerazioni in questo collegamento possono essere attinenti alla proporzionalità della misura. In particolare, la Corte reitera che l'uso di proprietà per ragioni altro che garantire il benessere sociale di inquilini ed ostacolare homelessness sono un fattore attinente nel valutare il risarcimento a causa del proprietario (veda Fleri Soler e Camilleri c. il Malta (soddisfazione equa), n. 35349/05, § 18 17 luglio 2008).
(il c) Se le autorità maltesi previdero un equilibrio equo
56. In ogni causa che comporta una violazione allegato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve accertare se con ragione dell'interferenza dello Stato, la persona riguardata dovuto per sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo (veda Amato Gauci, citato sopra, § 57). Nel valutare ottemperanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve fare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in problema, mentre tenendo presente “pratico ed effettivo.” Deve guardare dietro a comparizioni e deve investigare le realtà della situazione si lamentarono di. Che valutazione non solo può comportare le condizioni dell'affitto ricevute con padroni di casa individuali e la misura dell'interferenza dello Stato con libertà di contratto e relazioni contrattuali nel mercato di contratto d'affitto, ma anche l'esistenza di salvaguardie procedurali ed altre che assicurano che l'operazione del sistema ed il suo impatto sui diritti di proprietà di un padrone di casa è né arbitraria né imprevedibile. Incertezza-sia sé legislativo, amministrativo o sorgendo da pratiche fece domanda con le autorità-è un fattore per essere preso in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato (veda Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia, [GC], n. 22774/93, § 54, il 1999-V di ECHR, e Broniowski citato sopra, § 151).
57. La Corte osserva che nella causa presente che il contratto d'affitto era soggetto a rinnovamento con operazione di legge ed i richiedenti nessuna possibilità di sfrattare l'inquilino aveva. Inoltre, i richiedenti non erano capaci di fissare l'affitto-o piuttosto aumentare l'affitto stabilito più di settanta anni fa con predecessore loro. Era solamente nel 2014 che le Regolamentazioni che aumentano l'affitto per essere pagato entrarono in vigore, e quelle regolamentazioni non permisero ciononostante i richiedenti di esporre l'affitto loro.
58. In relazione all'affitto che i richiedenti ricevettero i richiami di Corte che l'essere di uso ha reso dei locali era come un bastone di nastro come opposto a, per esempio, alloggio sociale, e così che si direbbe che la situazione nella causa presente comporti un grado di interesse pubblico che è marcato significativamente meno, che nelle altre cause e quale non giustifica tale riduzione sostanziale comparata col valore di noleggio di mercato libero (veda, mutatis mutandis, Zammit ed Attard Cassar citato sopra, § 75).
59. Come all'affitto pagabile da 1967 a 2013 (prima delle 2014 Regolamentazioni) la Corte nota che i richiedenti erano pagati annualmente EUR 1,164.69, quel è un affitto di verso EUR 97 per mese per la proprietà di un multi-piano di 864 metri di piazza in una prima ubicazione nella città di capitale. La Corte considera che mentre è probabile che questo sarebbe stato un affitto appropriato negli anni sessanta (il contratto d'affitto originale a che prezzo fu inteso di scadere nel 1962), e possibilmente negli anni settanta, non si poteva dire che sia, così decadi più tardi, per le ragioni seguenti.
60. Prendendo 2004 - un anno si appellò su con le parti che la Corte osserva che i richiedenti chiesero che un affitto di mercato per che anno sarebbe annualmente nel vicinato di EUR 179,000 mentre loro stavano ricevendo annualmente EUR 1,164.69. Il Governo non presentò qualsiasi cifre in relazione a quello periodo (nonostante ammettendo che c'era una rapida espansione nel mercato di proprietà, veda paragrafo 89 sotto). La Corte osserva che il Governo accettò implicitamente che l'affitto applicabile era un affitto basso (veda paragrafo 46 sopra). Effettivamente, contrari all'asserzione del Governo, la Corte non vede ragione perché l'affitto applicabile non dovrebbe essere comparato “affitti accusarono alle entità commerciali o a persone maltesi” quali sono i comparatori attinenti e perciò l'affitto applicabile a loro è precisamente che che costituisce un valore di mercato corrente. Così, accettando anche che i richiedenti che la valutazione di ' è sul lato alto, la Corte considera che, come trovato con la prima istanza giurisdizione costituzionale che esaminò la proporzionalità della misura, l'affitto ricevuto coi richiedenti non poteva essere considerato in qualsiasi il modo proporzionato.
61. Prendendo 2014-un anno si appellò anche su con le parti-la Corte osserva che secondo i richiedenti il rapporto di esperto di ' il valore di noleggio annuale della proprietà per 2014 era annualmente EUR 269,100, mentre secondo il rapporto del Governo, per che stesso anno, era annualmente EUR 93,000. I richiedenti stavano ricevendo anche sulla base della valutazione più bassa del Governo, così, 1.25% del valore di noleggio di mercato. Inoltre, a che stesso tempo, mentre i richiedenti stavano ricevendo solamente annualmente EUR 1,164.69 per affitto in riguardo dell'edificio intero, il KOBC stava ricevendo annualmente in affitto EUR 17,000 dal supplire-affittare solamente parte del pianterreno. Contrari alla dichiarazione del Governo, la Corte considera che il disproportionality nella causa presente è chiaro e manifestazione.
62. Come per il periodo che segue 2014, e l'introduzione delle Regolamentazioni, la Corte nota che in termini pratici la formula migliorata tradusse negli affitti seguenti per i richiedenti: EUR 2,876. 26 in 2015 ed EUR 3,017.20 nel 2016. La Corte nota che, mentre le Regolamentazioni prima concederono per più duplice l'affitto ricevuto coi richiedenti, ancora corrispose a circa 3% del valore di noleggio valutati col Governo per l'anno 2014 (e circa 1% di quel valutò coi richiedenti). Era anche circa EUR 14,000 meno che l'affitto che il KOBC stava ottenendo per l'uso di parte del primo piano con la facilità di servizio buffet. La Corte considera così che la situazione che segue i 2014 resti sproporzionato, e senza qualsiasi azione con la legislatura, è probabile che rimanga così indefinitamente.
63. La Corte reitera che controllo Statale su livelli di affitto incorrono in una sfera che è soggetto ad un margine ampio della valutazione con lo Stato, e la sua richiesta può provocare riduzioni spesso significative nell'importo di affitto addebitabile. Ciononostante, questo non può condurre a risultati che sono manifestamente irragionevoli (veda, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci citato sopra, § 62). Mentre i richiedenti non hanno diritto ad ottenere affitto a valore di mercato, la Corte osserva che, nonostante i recenti emendamenti, l'importo di affitto è moltissimo più basso del valore di mercato dei locali. Inoltre, la restrizione sui richiedenti i diritti di ' sono a posto da cinquanta anni poiché la Convenzione entrò in vigore in riguardo del Malta, e rimarrà nell'assenza così perpetuamente di qualsiasi azione con la legislatura per stabilire l'equilibrio richiesto. Questi elementi devono essere pesati contro gli interessi a giochi nella causa presente che non è quelli di evitare homelessness ma di migliorare le attività sociali e culturali, comprendendo quelli di una natura commerciale.
64. Mentre la Corte ha accettato sopra che la misura complessiva era, in principio, nell'interesse generale il fatto che là anche esiste un interesse privato e fondamentale di una natura commerciale non può essere trascurato. In simile circostanze, Stati e la Corte nel suo ruolo direttivo, deve essere vigilante per assicurare che misure, come quell'in questione, non genera un squilibrio che impone un carico eccessivo su padroni di casa mentre permette inquilini di fare profitti gonfiati. È anche in simile contesti che salvaguardie procedurali ed effettive divenute indispensabile (veda, mutatis mutandis, Zammit ed Attard Cassar citato sopra, § 63). Il Governo dibattè che là esistè le salvaguardie procedurali, senza menzionare che che questi erano, mentre preferendo appellarsi sul fatto che i richiedenti avevano nessuno diritto lamentarsi settanta anni fa determinato i loro antenati la conoscenza di ' delle leggi applicabili. La Corte nota che l'argomento secondo è stato respinto ripetutamente con la Corte, siccome era fatto in paragrafo 35 della causa presente. Dalle informazioni disponibile alla Corte, non erano viali - altro che procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali che i richiedenti potrebbero intraprendere migliorare la loro situazione (se circostanze così richiesto). Alla richiesta della legge stessa mancarono di conseguenza, salvaguardie procedurali ed adeguate mirate a realizzando un equilibrio fra gli interessi degli inquilini e quelli dei proprietari (veda, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci citato sopra, § 62, Anthony Aquilina c. il Malta, n. 3851/12, § 66, 11 dicembre 2014 e Statileo c. Croatia, n. 12027/10, § 128 10 luglio 2014).
65. Avendo valutato tutti gli elementi sopra, e nonostante il margine della valutazione concesso ad un Stato nello scegliendo la forma e decidere su sulla misura di controllo l'uso di proprietà in simile cause, i costatazione di Corte che, avendo riguardo ad all'uso reso della proprietà, l'affitto estremamente basso dei locali e la mancanza delle salvaguardie procedurali nella richiesta della legge che un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo è stato imposto sui richiedenti che hanno avuto nascere e continuare a sopportare una parte significativa dei sociali e costi finanziari di sostenere un costume locale con provvedendo il bastone di nastro con locali per le sue attività incluso le attività commerciali. Segue che lo Stato maltese andò a vuoto a prevedere l'equilibrio equo e richiesto fra gli interessi generali della comunità e la protezione dei richiedenti il diritto di ' al godimento della loro proprietà.
66. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione
67. I richiedenti si lamentarono di una violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 siccome loro erano discriminati contro con riguardo ad al godimento della loro proprietà, poiché siccome stette in piedi la legge, loro furono obbligati per rinnovare il loro accordo di affitto su una base annuale, mentre persone che hanno affitti commerciali erano state liberate da simile obbligo per emendamenti introdotti al Codice civile nel 2009. Articolo 14 letture siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
Ammissibilità di A.
68. Secondo la causa-legge stabilita della Corte, Articolo 14 della Convenzione completa le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. Benché la richiesta di Articolo 14 non presupponga una violazione di quelle disposizioni-ed a questa misura è autonomo-non ci può essere stanza per richiesta sua a meno che i fatti in problema incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di uno o più del secondo (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Van Raalte c. i Paesi Bassi, 21 febbraio 1997, § 33 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997 io; Petrovic c. l'Austria, 27 marzo 1998, § 22 le Relazioni 1998 II; Zarb Adami c. il Malta, n. 17209/02, § 42 ECHR 2006 VIII; e Konstantin Markin c. la Russia [GC], n. 30078/06, § 124 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti)).
69. La Corte considera che i fatti in questione incorra all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e che Articolo 14 è perciò applicabile nella causa presente.
70. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) I richiedenti
71. I richiedenti considerarono che, contrari a quel sostenne con la corte nazionale, i comparatori nella causa presente non erano gli altri padroni di casa di un bastone, ma padroni di casa di altri contratti d'affitto commerciali come per Articolo 1531I del Codice civile. Affitti legislazione in Malta distinse largamente fra locali residenziali e commerciali. Era ampiamente comunque, chiaro che locali usarono come un bastone di nastro di ‘' non sia residenziale in natura, particolarmente se una parte significativa dei locali fosse operata commercialmente. Padroni di casa di contratti d'affitto commerciali e padroni di casa di un bastone di nastro erano relativamente così, in un ‘situazione simile ' e, il diritto di godimento di proprietà dovrebbe fare domanda così sia indiscriminatamente. Loro ricordarono che la Convenzione proibì la discriminazione sulle basi di status, e che status incluse lo status dei richiedenti come i padroni di casa. Loro si appellarono su Berger Krall ed Altri c. la Slovenia (n. 14717/04, 12 giugno 2014).
72. I richiedenti presentarono che secondo Articolo 1531I del Codice civile, contratti d'affitto commerciali che furono protegguti con legge (di fronte agli emendamenti introdotti con Atto X di 2009) fu liberalizzato nel senso che una data di conclusione è stata stabilita (non più tardi che 2028). Questo diede l'opportunità ai padroni di casa di un contratto d'affitto commerciale per godere una volta la loro proprietà l'accordo di contratto d'affitto termina (nel 2028). Inoltre, lo costituì fattibile un investitore a lungo termine comprare locali commerciali, nonostante un contratto d'affitto in marcia, in prospettiva della conoscenza che proprietà della proprietà sarebbe ritornata all'interno di un futuro prevedibile. I richiedenti erano discriminati comunque, contro poiché, siccome stette in piedi la legge, loro furono obbligati per rinnovare il loro accordo di contratto d'affitto su una base annuale.
73. I richiedenti presentarono che l'argomento del Governo nel quale i problemi di affitto erano dati con un pezzo a pezzo maniera non sia sostenibile poiché quasi una decade era passata fin dai 2009 emendamenti e non c'erano indicazioni di qualsiasi misura per essere preso in riguardo di persone nei richiedenti la situazione di '. I richiedenti considerarono anche che il Governo stava tentando di ingannare finora la Corte in come sé non aveva ragione che i 2009 emendamenti in relazione a locali commerciali furono collegati all'importo di affitto che una proprietà stava generando. Effettivamente loro non erano, né loro furono collegati allo status della società, il suo reddito o il tipo di esercizio d'impresa eseguito. Tutti i locali commerciali erano stati inclusi irrispettosi del valore dell'affitto. Similmente, tutti i bastoni di nastro erano stati esclusi irrispettosi del valore dell'affitto, o qualsiasi l'altra considerazione. Così, non era vero che i locali commerciali meritarono la più grande attenzione perché il loro affitto non era alto abbastanza per padroni di casa. Similmente, il fatto che la proprietà in questione fu affittato come un bastone di nastro non voglia dire che che individui privati potrebbero essere privati indefinitamente dell'uso della loro proprietà, ad un affitto di 1% il suo valore di mercato, lasciando così proprietari terrieri piacere i richiedenti essere i soli portando il carico attinente.
(b) Il Governo
74. Il Governo ammise che i richiedenti erano stati trattati differentemente da proprietari di locali commerciali. Comunque, loro opinarono che la distinzione aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole. Il Governo presentò che contratti d'affitto commerciali erano stati liberati dall'obbligo di rinnovamento come da 2028 come parte di una riforma di legge di affitto mirò ad afferrare i vecchi contratti d'affitto creati prima di 1995. Gli affitti applicabile a quelli contratti d'affitto fu allacciato a valori dei primi 1900s quale creò un carico sproporzionato su proprietari. Il Governo notò anche che la posizione di proprietari di locali affittò come bastoni di nastro era stato migliorato anche per la riforma con vuole dire dei 2014 emendamenti che aumentarono il loro affitto - una misura che non fu fatta domanda a proprietari di locali commerciali.
75. Il Governo presentò che in un'area complicato come controllo lacerato che sviluppò su un periodo di ottanta anni il fatto che le autorità afferrarono pezzo a pezzo il problema per prevedere per quelle cause che sollevarono il più interessato non poteva costituire la discriminazione. Effettivamente i richiedenti che stavano ricevendo annualmente EUR 1,164.69 erano migliori via che padroni di casa che stavano ricevendo molto meno per locali commerciali. Il Governo presentò che lo Stato aveva obiettivo e ragioni giustificabili basate su valutazioni economiche quando introdusse simile riforme. Inoltre, loro considerarono che bastoni di nastro come istituzioni sociali che contribuiscono all'identità del paese stavano meritando più di protezione che locali commerciali cui contratti d'affitto controllati dove essendo messo in fase fuori.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) principi di Generale
76. La Corte reitera che nel godimento dei diritti e le libertà garantito con la Convenzione, Articolo 14 riconosce protezione contro trattamento diverso, senza una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole, di persone in situazioni simili. Per i fini di Articolo 14, una differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se sé “non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole”, quel è, se non persegue un “scopo legittimo” o se non c'è un “relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso.” Inoltre, gli Stati Contraenti godono un certo margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifici un trattamento diverso. La sfera del margine della valutazione varierà secondo le circostanze, l'argomento e lo sfondo, ma la Corte devono determinare nell'ultima istanza se i requisiti di Convenzione si sono stati attenuti con. Poiché la Convenzione è un sistema per la protezione di diritti umani prima e primo, la Corte deve avere comunque riguardo ad al cambio condiziona in Stati Contraenti e risponde, per esempio a qualsiasi emergendo consentimento come agli standard per essere realizzato (veda Fabris c. la Francia [GC], n. 16574/08, § 56 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti)).
(b) la Richiesta alla causa presente
77. La Corte considera che i richiedenti, come padroni di casa di proprietà controllata affittati fuori come bastoni di nastro sono in una situazione comparabile a padroni di casa di proprietà controllata affittati fuori per uso commerciale, siccome loro sono ambo le persone soggetto a proprietà controllate che non sono usate per il benessere sociale di inquilini od ostacolare homelessness.
78. Siccome ammesso col Governo (veda paragrafo 74 sopra) i richiedenti, comunque furono trattati differentemente finora in come diversamente da padroni di casa la cui proprietà controllata fu affittata fuori per uso commerciale i richiedenti non tragga profitto dal cambio di legge che permette alla loro proprietà di essere libero (dalle condizioni imposte) come di 2028 come previsto coi 2009 emendamenti.
79. Mentre la Corte può accettare che seguendo sentenze ripetute di violazioni in riguardo delle leggi di controllato-affitto in Malta, il feltro Statale obbligò a tentare di migliorare la situazione di proprietari la cui proprietà era soggetto a simile leggi di affitto o le altre affitto-leggi che avrebbero potuto sollevare gli stessi problemi, la Corte deve accertare se una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole è stata approvvigionata col Governo come a perché proprietari di proprietà, come i richiedenti che erano bastoni di nastro di alloggio fu trattato differentemente dalle loro cose uguale (compari Cassar c. il Malta, n. 50570/13, § 80 30 gennaio 2018).
80. I richiedenti considerarono che non c'era stata giustificazione obiettiva dietro a tale scelta legislativa. Il Governo considerò che la giustificazione obiettiva per l'esclusione dei richiedenti dagli emendamenti attinenti era il fatto che era più importante per proteggere bastoni di nastro che proprietà usò per uso commerciale, e che in qualsiasi l'evento i richiedenti avevano avuto gli altri benefici che non erano stati fatti domanda a proprietari di proprietà affittati per fini commerciali. Il Governo sia anche della prospettiva che i proprietari di proprietà hanno affittato per fini commerciali stava soffrendo di più dei richiedenti come un risultato delle leggi di affitto applicabili prima della riforma e che era per che ragione che la riforma afferrò in primo luogo il gruppo secondo e poi il gruppo di persone nei richiedenti la posizione di '.
81. La Corte è pronta accettare che lo Stato doveva cominciare in qualche luogo da a migliorare la situazione di proprietari che patiscono gli effetti di affitti controllati (veda Cassar, citato sopra, § 81); davvero il Governo presentò che migliorare la situazione di padroni di casa di fini commerciali era una priorità, sia perché simile proprietari stavano soffrendo di più e perché locali commerciali meritarono minore protezione, così gli emendamenti in che riguardo era stato un primo passo. La Corte reitera che nessuna discriminazione è rivelata come un risultato di un particolare eletto di essere di data per il principio di un regime legislativo e nuovo e trattamento differenziale che sorgono fuori di un cambio legislativo non è discriminatorio dove ha una giustificazione ragionevole ed obiettiva negli interessi della buona amministrazione della giustizia (veda Amato Gauci, citato sopra, § 71). Mentre il Governo andò a vuoto a provare la loro rivendicazione che persone che affittano fuori proprietà per fini commerciali stavano soffrendo di più delle persone nei richiedenti ' posiziona, il fatto che locali commerciali meritarono minore protezione è per il fine di questa parte della valutazione un argomento accettabile. La Corte è così pronta accettare che la scelta del Governo al tempo di decretare i 2009 emendamenti incorse all'interno del loro margine della valutazione e fu giustificata ragionevolmente. La questione rimane, se la situazione che persiste dopo che data era anche ragionevole ed allineato.
82. Mentre il Governo si frenò dall'affermare che situazioni come quelli dei richiedenti sarebbero state date con in una maniera simile nel futuro vicino, loro, comunque dibatterono che misure diverse erano state prese in riguardo dei richiedenti. Loro si riferirono ai 2014 emendamenti. La Corte nota che già ha trovato sopra (veda divide in paragrafi 62 e 66 sopra) che i 2014 emendamenti erano di piccolo conforto ai richiedenti che continuarono a soffrire di una violazione dei loro diritti di proprietà. Effettivamente più che otto anni sono passati fin dai 2009 emendamenti e la situazione di persone nei richiedenti ' posiziona resti lo stesso. Secondo il Governo questo livello diverso di miglioramento fu giustificato perché bastoni di nastro stavano meritando più di protezione. Di conseguenza, la Corte accetta che la ragione dietro ai richiedenti ' continuò esclusione dall'emendamento si lamentò di era precisamente la volontà del Governo per continuare a preservare dogane locali ed in particolare il funzionare di bastoni di nastro che in se stesso non sono irragionevoli.
83. La Corte considera che se le misure globali prese col Governo in riguardo di persone nei richiedenti ' posiziona portata l'equilibrio richiesto fra gli interessi a giochi, sarebbe possibile a costatazione che la differenza in trattamento intraprese un scopo legittimo e che c'era una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Al giorno d'oggi causa che la misura si è lamentata di coi richiedenti è che, a norma di legge attualmente, la loro proprietà non sarà “rilasciò” nel 2028, mentre che dei loro comparatori voglia. Così, tale azione verrà ad essere solamente in riguardo del loro comparatore nel tempo di ' di dieci anni. Dalle parti osservazioni di ' che la Corte non può concludere che l'ulteriore miglioramento ai richiedenti la situazione di ' non conseguirà sino a simile data, addirittura più così nella luce della violazione sostenuta con la Corte nella causa presente in relazione ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda paragrafo 66 sopra). Tenendo presente le considerazioni precedenti, i costatazione di Corte che la differenza esistente e corrente in trattamento, in legge si lamentò di coi richiedenti, a questo stadio sia considerato ragionevolmente giustificato.
84. Segue che non c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione, in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
85. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
86. Nell'assenza di una possibilità della proprietà che è ritornata a loro, i richiedenti chiesero danno patrimoniale che corrisponde ad EUR 10,400,694 più 8% interessano (tasso nazionale) loro patirono 1967 a 2017 a per compensare per la perdita di valore di noleggio.
87. Loro notarono che, sulla mano del una, basato sui richiedenti la valutazione di ' di 2014, da 1955 fino a 2014 l'affitto che sarebbe dovuto essere ricevuto avrebbe corrisposto a verso EUR 15 milione. Sull'altra mano con prendendo in considerazione la valutazione degli imputati l'affitto che sarebbe dovuto essere ricevuto sarebbe stato circa EUR 5 milione che ancora era una somma considerevole. Così, il risarcimento di EUR 300,000 assegnò ai richiedenti con la primo-istanza giurisdizione costituzionale era una molto conservativa, benché uno che, nelle circostanze, i richiedenti erano stati disposti per accettare. Comunque, i richiedenti notarono che loro ancora stavano patendo la violazione che persisterebbe ad l'infinitum. Loro presentarono perciò un rapporto di architetto aggiornato e nuovo datò 2017 quale valutò un valore di noleggio equo per che anno come essendo annualmente EUR 352,550 (comprendendo EUR 111,750 per il pianterreno come locali commerciali, EUR 58,800 per il mezzanino ed EUR 91,000 ognuno per il secondo e terzo pavimento affittò fuori come uffici). Il rapporto prese in considerazione che le proprietà trovate nella stessa strada come i richiedenti la proprietà di ' e le particolari caratteristiche e caratteristiche della proprietà in questione. Sulla base di che rapporto ed i calcoli attinenti indietro la datazione l'affitto per ognuno degli anni attinenti (per esempio, l'affitto nel 1967 è valutato come essendo verso EUR 74,352, che in 1980 come essendo verso EUR 153,958 e che in 2000 come EUR 255,316), la quota di affitto totale era EUR 10,488,115.82 da che doveva davvero essere dedotto gli affitti ricevette cioé. EUR 87,421.76.
88. I richiedenti chiesero anche EUR 300,000 in non danno patrimoniale.
89. Il Governo presentò che c'era una rapida espansione in proprietà fissa il prezzo di solamente in circa il 2004 e che in qualsiasi evento che le valutazioni competenti hanno presentato coi richiedenti sia esorbitante. Nella loro prospettiva, la loro propria valutazione era più affidabile e mostrò un valore di noleggio annuale nel 2014 come essendo EUR 93,000 per anno. Nella loro prospettiva un'assegnazione di EUR 20,000 bastò così, coprire gli anni da 2004 a 2014 (data degli emendamenti) e che nessun interesse era dovuto su che importo come procedimenti di Convenzione non dovrebbe essere un ceppo a rivendicazioni nazionali per danno. Loro considerarono anche che un'assegnazione di EUR 5,000, congiuntamente bastò come danno non-patrimoniale.
2. La valutazione della Corte
90. La Corte deve procedere determinare il risarcimento i richiedenti sono concessi ad in riguardo della perdita di controllo, uso e godimento della proprietà dei quali loro hanno sofferto. La Corte già ha trovato che mentre l'affitto pagò ai richiedenti sarebbe stato un affitto appropriato negli anni sessanta che non era così decadi più tardi (veda paragrafo 59 sopra), trovò anche una violazione per sia il periodo di fronte ad e dopo 2014, i richiedenti sono di conseguenza il risarcimento dovuto sino alla data di questa sentenza.
91. La Corte nota la differenza significativa fra il Governo solamente valutazione (di 2014) e le valutazioni presentarono coi richiedenti. Mentre è vero che la proprietà è l'edificio di un quattro-piano, la Corte osserva che la parte principale del suo pianterreno che è stato usando come un ristorante, e quale i richiedenti che architetto di ' valutato nel 2017 ad EUR 111,750 era affittato fuori nel 2014 ad EUR 17,000. Inoltre, l'affitto stabilito volentieri coi richiedenti gli antenati di ' fino a 1962 che la Corte fondò essere appropriata per anni sessanta, era annualmente EUR 1,164.69, comunque il calcolo retrodatato presentato con le stime di richiedenti il mercato affittato per che anno come essendo EUR 74,352. La Corte considera perciò che tale stima non ha fondamento ragionevole nella realtà del tempo. Con che in mente, e notando che i pavimenti superiori sono più bassi in prezzo (come anche mostrato coi richiedenti la valutazione di ') sembrerebbe che la valutazione del Governo è più vicina alla realtà effettiva. Nel valutare il danno patrimoniale subito coi richiedenti, la Corte ha considerato così, le stime previste il più lontano appropriato in e ha avuto riguardo ad alle informazioni disponibile a sé su valori di noleggio sulla proprietà maltese introduca sul mercato durante il periodo attinente. Prende anche in considerazione che i richiedenti sono stati soddisfatti con l'assegnazione di EUR 300,000 accordato con la primo-istanza corte nazionale. A che importo deve essere aggiunto una somma in riguardo dell'affitto annuale perso per il periodo 2013 per datare.
92. La Corte reitera che obiettivi legittimi nel “interesse pubblico”, come quelli perseguiti in misure di riforma economica o misure realizzare la più grande giustizia sociale disegnò, può richiedere meno che rimborso del pieno valore di mercato (veda Ghigo c. il Malta (soddisfazione equa), n. 31122/05, § 18 17 luglio 2008). Al giorno d'oggi la causa comunque, la Corte ricorda (compari Fleri Soler e Camilleri, (soddisfazione equa), citato sopra, § 18).
93. Inoltre, le somme già ricevute coi proprietari per il periodo attinente devono essere dedotte.
94. La Corte reitera che si intende che un'assegnazione per danno patrimoniale sotto Articolo 41 della Convenzione metta il richiedente, il più lontano possibile, nella posizione lui avrebbe goduto avuto la violazione non accaduta. Considera perciò che interesse dovrebbe essere aggiunto all'assegnazione sopra per compensare col tempo per deprezzamento dell'assegnazione. Come così, il tasso di interesse dovrebbe riflettere le condizioni economiche e nazionali, come livelli dell'inflazione e tassi degli interessi (l'ibid., § 20). La Corte considera così che un uno-via pagamento di 5% interesse dovrebbe essere aggiunto all'importo sopra (veda Ghigo (soddisfazione equa), citato sopra, § 20).
95. Da adesso, la Corte assegna i richiedenti, congiuntamente EUR 592,000 sotto questo capo.
96. La Corte considera che i richiedenti hanno dovuto subire sentimenti della frustrazione e sottolinea, mentre avendo riguardo ad alla natura delle violazioni. Assegna così i richiedenti, congiuntamente EUR 8,000 sotto questo capo.
Costi di B. e spese
97. I richiedenti chiesero anche EUR 17,013.87 (come per ricevute attinenti) per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali (incluso per procedimenti di nuovo processo) e la Corte.
98. Il Governo non contestò l'EUR 4,204.28 che rappresenta i richiedenti ' costa di procedimenti nazionali ma dibattè che i richiedenti non avevano mostrato che l'EUR 6,077.53 rimanente in imputati ' costa loro erano stati ordinati per pagare davvero era stato pagato. Loro presentarono anche che costa per procedimenti di fronte a questa Corte non dovrebbe eccedere EUR 2,000.
99. La Corte considera, sulla mano del una, che i costi di procedimenti di nuovo processo non sono dovuti, sé che è una via di ricorso straordinaria che non ebbe bisogno di essere perseguita per i fini dei procedimenti di fronte a questa Corte. D'altra parte come continuamente reiterò con questa Corte qualsiasi somma in costi giudiziali ordinata con le corti nazionali (per i fini di esaurire procedimenti nazionali e regolari) rimanga pagabile coi richiedenti, e così deve essere assegnato. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 10,700, congiuntamente costi coprenti sotto tutti i capi.
Interesse di mora di C.
100. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara, unanimamente, la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene, unanimamente, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

3. Sostiene, con quattro voti a tre, che c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

4. Sostiene, unanimamente,
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare i richiedenti, congiuntamente entro tre mesi dalla data sui quali la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 592,000 (cinquecento e novanta-due mila euros), in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 8,000 (otto mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'iii) EUR 10,700 (dieci mila settecento euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

5. Respinge, unanimamente, il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 23 ottobre 2018, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stefano Phillips Branko Lubarda
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, le opinioni separate e seguenti sono annesse a questa sentenza:
(un) opinione concordante di Giudice Dedov;
(b) congiunga dissentendo in parte opinione di Giudici Keller, Serghides e Schukking.
B.L.
J.S.P.


OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DI GIUDICE DEDOV
È difficile per la Corte per valutare una causa sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione sempre. Non ci sono nessuna consistenza o la chiarezza nella sua metodologia. Nella causa di Slivenko c. la Lettonia ([GC], n. 48321/99, 9 ottobre 2003), la Corte trovò una violazione di Articolo 8 perché non c'erano nessuno ostacoli formali per impedire ai richiedenti del divenire residenti permanenti della Lettonia; i richiedenti non si potevano riguardare siccome mettendo in pericolo la sicurezza nazionale della Lettonia con ragione di appartenere alla famiglia di un ufficiale militare sovietico e precedente (veda § 127 della sentenza di Slivenko). I richiedenti in che causa si appellò anche su Articolo 14, mentre lamentandosi che loro erano stati rimossi dalla Lettonia come membri sia della parola russa minoranza etnica e della famiglia di un ufficiale militare russo e precedente. Quegli argomenti, basato su trattamento diverso di una minoranza etnica, molto era più forte, e la Corte considerò che non era necessario per decidere sui richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8, in prospettiva della sua sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
Allo stesso tempo, nella causa di A.H. ed Altri c. la Russia (n. 6033/13, 17 gennaio 2017), la Corte esaminò l'azione di reclamo (concernendo trattamento diverso di genitori adottivi Stati Uniti e quelli dagli altri paesi) sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8, mentre ignorando il margine assoluto della valutazione nella sfera dell'adozione internazionale. La Corte, senza prevedere qualsiasi il chiarimento, preferì esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14 che non è autonomo scelse di sfruttare una linea più forte di argomento-incluso la discriminazione sulla base della nazionalità-e poi sostenne che non era necessario per esaminare l'azione di reclamo di centro sotto Articolo 8. In questa area la Corte deve essere accurata per evitare standard duplici.
È stabilito bene che Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. I giudici dovrebbero prendere questo principio in considerazione e dovrebbero stabilire dove è l'azione di reclamo di centro sotto la disposizione effettiva o sotto Articolo 14. Nella causa di Biao c. la Danimarca ([GC], n. 38590/10, 24 maggio 2016), l'azione di reclamo di centro concernè le autorità danesi il rifiuto di ' per accordare il richiedente e la sua riunione di famiglia di moglie in Danimarca sulla base del requisito di sequestro sotto legge nazionale. Il requisito di sequestro era così il problema principale della causa. Il richiedente insistè che le autorità avessero preso la loro decisione come un risultato di una differenza ingiustificata in trattamento fra cittadini danesi di origine etnica danese e cittadini danesi di altra origine etnica. Nella causa di Biao, potrebbe essere accettato, che il problema di discriminazione sotto Articolo 14 era più importante ed era ragionevole per non esaminare solamente la causa sotto Articolo 8. I giudici che dissentono presero posizioni diverse come a se era necessario per esaminare Articolo 8 se non ci sarebbe stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8. Giudice Jäderblom preferì non esaminare separatamente la richiesta sotto Articolo 8, mentre giudici Villiger, Mahoney e Kjølbro lo considerarono necessario esaminare la richiesta sotto Articolo 8 preso da solo. In prospettiva loro, era comunque, chiaro che non c'era stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione, poiché il richiedente femmina non aveva cravatte con Danimarca e la loro vita di famiglia in Danimarca non era fattibile.
Ugualmente, la Corte non può esaminare l'azione di reclamo se è prematuro, per esempio, se le autorità nazionali non hanno emesso la definitivo decisione. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, noi abbiamo ambo il criterio in posto che abilitò la Corte per esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14 sui meriti: l'azione di reclamo fu basata sulle disposizioni di legge nazionale che stabilisce trattamento diverso per padroni di casa commerciali e bastoni di nastro; benché le disposizioni attinenti divenissero effettive come da 2028, loro furono decretati nel 2008, e così le autorità nazionali già hanno espresso le loro prospettive sul problema. Fin dalla legislazione di affitto in Malta distinta largamente fra locali residenziali e commerciali, la differenza in trattamento potrebbe essere giustificata perciò dovuta al margine ampio della valutazione ed il principio di sussidiarietà. Non è per il giudice internazionale, ma per le autorità nazionali, risolvere problemi sociali, incluso quelli sorgendo dal rinnovamento automatico di accordi di contratto d'affitto.
Più primo nella sentenza, la Corte trovò una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa di un'interferenza sproporzionata coi diritti di proprietà di proprietari che affittano locali per unire bastoni (veda le conclusioni in paragrafi 65 e 66 della sentenza). La Corte ha trovato che un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo fu imposto sui richiedenti, mentre sorge principalmente dall'affitto estremamente basso di questi locali. Fin da Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ed Articolo 14 si riferiscono a problemi diversi (economico e sociale) ed a problemi diversi (affitto basso e rinnovamento obbligatorio del contratto d'affitto), un esame della Corte dei loro meriti è giustificato nella causa presente.

?
CONGIUNGA DISSENTENDO IN PARTE OPINIONE DI GIUDICI KELLER, SERGHIDES E SCHUKKING
1. Noi votammo contro punto 3 della parte operativa perché, in particolare, noi non possiamo seguire il ragionamento in paragrafo 83 della sentenza; noi avremmo preferito un approccio più cauto sulla parte della Corte riguardo al problema se la legge maltese in oggetto era discriminatorio.
2. Dove lo stesso set di fatti o circostanze genera rivendicazioni Articolo 14 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo, sotto N.ro 1, la Corte l'ha trovato ripetutamente “non necessario esaminare” la rivendicazione precedente (veda, per esempio, la Cipro c. la Turchia [GC], n. 25781/94, 10 maggio 2001; Herrmann c. la Germania [GC], n. 9300/07, 26 giugno 2012; Willis c. il Regno Unito, n. 36042/97, 11 giugno 2002; Schneider c. il Lussemburgo, n. 2113/04, 10 luglio 2007; Alexandrou c. la Turchia, n. 16162/90, 20 gennaio 2009; Andreou Papi c. la Turchia, n. 16094/90, 22 settembre 2009; Strati c. la Turchia, n. 16082/90, 22 settembre 2009; Vrahimi c. la Turchia, n. 16078/90, 22 settembre 2009; ed Olymbiou c. la Turchia, n. 16091/90, 27 ottobre 2009).
3. Così, questa Corte ha sostenuto che “avendo riguardo ad alle sue sentenze sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1,... c'è nessun bisogno di dare una direttiva separata sull'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1” (veda Herrmann c. la Germania, § 105). Nella nostra prospettiva, il problema in questa causa con riguardo ad ad Articolo 14 è analogo, e deve seguire questa linea di cause.
4. Mentre Articolo 14 non ha separatamente esistenza indipendente dalle altre disposizioni della Convenzione, gioca un “l'importante ruolo autonomo completando le altre disposizioni normative della Convenzione ed i Protocolli: Articolo 14... individui di salvaguardie... da qualsiasi la discriminazione nel godimento dei diritti e le libertà espose avanti in quelle altre disposizioni” (veda Marckx c. il Belgio, n. 6833/74, § 32 13 giugno 1979).
5. Trovare che non è accaduta una violazione di Articolo 14 è una conclusione che è completamente distinta dal sostenere che è non necessario per esaminare il problema.





DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è domenica 09/02/2020.

Se volete sapere come funziona LA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, qui c'è uno schema:

I COSTI DELLA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, IN SINTESI

Consulenza iniziale: esame di atti e consigli

Gratuita
Per richiederla cliccate qui: Colloquio telefonico gratuito

Eventuale successiva assistenza, se richiesta

Da concordare:

  • Con accordo scritto (a garanzia dell'espropriato)
  • Con pagamento posticipato (si paga con i soldi che si ottengono dall'Amministrazione)
  • Col criterio: SE NON OTTIENI NON PAGHI

Se sei assistito da un professionista aderente all'Associazione pagherai solo a risultato raggiunto, "con i soldi" dell'Amministrazione.

Non si deve pagare se non si ottiene il risultato stabilito. Tutto ciò viene pattuito, a garanzia dell'espropriato, sempre con un contratto scritto. E' ammesso solo il rimborso spese vive: ad. es. 1.000 euro per il DAP (tutelarsi e opporsi senza contenzioso) o 2.000 euro per il contenzioso.

Per vedere l'ACCORDO TIPO per l'assistenza, cliccate qui Vademecum gratuito e andate a pag. 20

Ricordate che il principale custode dei vostri diritti siete voi stessi.
E' quindi essenziale capire ciò che accade e ciò che accadrà.

Se volete sapere come si svolge la PROCEDURA ESPROPRIATIVA e come tutelarvi nelle varie fasi, abbiamo predisposto una breve sintesi degli strumenti da utilizzare.
Potete esaminarla cliccando qui: Come Tutelarsi in tre passi