Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF CHRISTIAN BAPTIST CHURCH IN WROC?AW v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,35,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 32045/10/2018
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 05/04/2018
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible (Art. 35) Admissibility criteria
(Art. 35-3-a) Ratione materiae No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings Article 6-1 - Fair hearing)
Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings Article 6-1 - Reasonable time) Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage Just satisfaction) Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)



FIRST SECTION






CASE OF CHRISTIAN BAPTIST CHURCH
IN WROC?AW v. POLAND

(Application no. 32045/10)










JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG

5 April 2018




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Christian Baptist Church v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, President,
Kristina Pardalos,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Jovan Ilievski, judges,
and Abel Campos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 13 March 2018,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 32045/10) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by the Christian Baptist Church - II Local Community in Wroc?aw (II Zbór Ko?cio?a Chrze?cijan Baptystów we Wroc?awiu – hereinafter “the applicant church”), on 9 June 2010.
2. The applicant church was represented by Ms D. Bober, and subsequently by Ms D. Przybylska-F?fara, lawyers practising in Wroc?aw. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms J. Chrzanowska of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant church alleged, in particular, a violation of Articles 6 of the Convention and 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 4 February 2015 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant is a legal entity, a local community of the Christian Baptist Church in the Republic of Poland operating on the basis of the Act of 30 June 1995 on Relations Between the Republic of Poland and the Christian Baptist Church Act (ustawa o stosunku Pa?stwa Polskiego do Ko?ciola Chrze?cijan Baptystów w RP – hereinafter “the 1995 Act”) with its seat in Wroc?aw.
6. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
A. Background to the case
7. The case concerns a property with a four-storey building and another building dedicated to sacral purposes in Wroc?aw. Before World War II the property was used by the Baptist Commune belonging to the Bund Evangelisch-Freikirchlicher Gemeinden in Deutschland operating on the territory of the German Reich. The property number was 1077/42. It measured 0.785 ha.
8. On 4 September 1946 the Wroc?aw Governor (Wojewoda Wroc?awski) decided that the property in question should become subject to the applicant church’s management (przej?cie w zarz?d) on the basis of section 2(4) of the 1946 Decree on abandoned property (dekret o maj?tkach opuszczonych i poniemieckich – hereinafter “the 1946 Decree”).
9. In 1956 the applicant church lodged a request to be registered in the land and mortgage register as the owner of the property and the request was granted. The property was registered under the number 945.
10. On 23 April 1959 the Minister of the Economy announced a new interpretation of section 2 (4) of the 1946 Decree.
11. On 23 June 1959 the District Residential Buildings Board for Wroc?aw-Krzyki (Dzielnicowy Zarz?d Budynków Mieszkalnych) decided that all kinds of property which were subject to the church’s management were to pass into the ownership of the State and ordered that the applicant church transfer the property in question to the State. The order did not concern the part of the property which was dedicated exclusively to sacral purposes.
12. On 19 August 1966 a new land-register entry 35905 was opened for the property no. 1077/42. The land-register entry 945 was however not closed.
13. In 1968 the property was registered under the land-register number 35905 was given a new plot number 9 and its area was recalculated. The new measurement was 0.371 ha. It appears that the plot number 9 constituted only a part of the previous property number 1077/42 and comprised only the building dedicated to sacral purposes.
14. The remaining part of the original property number 1077/42, which comprised the four-storey building, was given new plot numbers 39 and 33/5. It measured 0.325 ha and a new land-register entry 63650 was opened for it. In 1977 the State was registered as the owner of this property and, after the reform of the local governments of 1990, the property was transferred to the City of Wroc?aw.
15. The present application concerns the right to the property referred to above in paragraph 14.
B. Administrative proceedings
16. On 9 May 1996 the applicant church requested that the Wroc?aw Governor issue a decision confirming the applicant church’s ownership of the property in question. It relied on the newly enacted 1995 Act (see paragraphs 47-50 below).
17. On 12 September 1996 the Wroc?aw Governor refused to issue a decision which would confirm that the property in question belonged to the applicant church. The Governor found that the applicant church had failed to satisfy a requirement laid down in section 39 of the 1995 Act, specifically that it had not possessed the property in question on the day of entry into force of the Act relied upon. The Governor further held that:
“... in the circumstances of the case, section 40 of the Act likewise cannot be applied because the property in question is located on territory which was not part of Poland before 1 September 1939. The fact that the property was owned by an organisational unit of the Baptist Church operating in the German Reich does not constitute a basis to claim return of ownership because its ownership was transferred to the State under the [1946 Decree].”
18. On 23 September 1996 the applicant church appealed against this decision to the Minister of the Interior and Administration.
19. On 18 February 1998 the applicant church sent a letter to the Minister, specifying that the time-limits laid down in the Code of Administrative Proceedings had been exceeded and requested that the Minister issue a decision.
20. On 1 July 1998 the Minister replied that the length of the proceedings was attributable to amendments of the 1995 Act and informed the applicant church that the relevant decision would be issued by 15 August 1998.
21. This time-limit was not respected and therefore, on 12 January 1999, the applicant church lodged with the Supreme Administrative Court a complaint in respect of the alleged inactivity of the administrative authority.
22. On 5 March 1999, before examination of the applicant church’s complaint, the Minister of the Interior and Administration issued a decision, annulling the challenged decision and ordering the return of the case to the Governor. The Minister ordered that, when re-examining the case, the Governor should take into account the amended section 4 of the 1995 Act.
23. In view of the fact that the Minister had issued a decision, on 28 April 1999 the applicant church withdrew the complaint of 12 January 1999 concerning the inactivity of the administrative authority.
24. After remittal of the case, on 24 March 1999, the Governor of Lower Silesia (Wojewoda Dolno?l?ski) asked the Wroc?aw Commune whether there was any property available which could be granted to the applicant church in return for the property in question. It appears that the Governor’s letter was left without reply.
25. On 29 May 1999 the Governor requested from the Minister of the Interior and Administration an official interpretation of the amended section 4 of the 1995 Act “in view of the many doubts as regards the proper interpretation of this provision”.
26. On 20 June 2000 the Minister replied that, since the administrative authorities were bound by provisions of law binding on the day of decision, it was irrelevant that the applicant church’s original request had been lodged when section 4 of the 1995 Act had had different wording.
27. On 21 July 2000 the applicant church asked the Governor to issue a decision in its case, pointing out that the time-limits laid down in the Code of Administrative Proceedings had been exceeded.
28. On 20 October 2000 the applicant church lodged a complaint (za?alenie) with the Minister of the Interior and Administration that the Governor had exceeded the statutory time-limits and had failed to issue a decision on the merits or to justify the delay in the proceedings.
29. On 7 December 2000 the applicant church lodged a complaint with the Supreme Administrative Court about the alleged inactivity of the Governor.
30. On 1 March 2001 the Minister of the Interior and Administration found the applicant church’s complaint of 20 October 2000 well founded and ordered the Governor to issue a decision on the merits before 30 April 2001.
31. On 30 April 2001 the Governor stayed the proceedings.
32. On 7 July 2001 the applicant church appealed against the decision to stay the proceedings.
33. On 17 December 2001 the Minister of the Interior and Administration allowed the appeal, finding that the proceedings should not have been stayed, annulled the challenged decision and returned the case to the Governor.
34. On 12 March 2002 the Supreme Administrative Court examined the applicant church’s complaint against the inactivity of the administrative authority and ordered the Governor of Lower Silesia to issue a decision on the merits within the time-limit of thirty days.
35. On 21 June 2002 the Governor’s office gave a decision and refused to return the property in question to the applicant church. It found that the applicant church, although registered as owner under the land-register number 945 and treated in the past by the administrative authorities as owner, had never in fact owned the property, which had only been left under the applicant church’s administration (oddane w zarz?d).
36. On 12 July 2002 the applicant church appealed.
37. On 23 September 2002 the Minister of the Interior and Administration annulled the challenged decision and returned the case for re-examination to the Governor. The Minister found, among other things, that the Governor had had no right to question the validity of the entry in the land register.
38. On 23 February 2003 the applicant church complained to the Governor about the delay in the proceedings.
39. On 8 February 2007 the Governor’s office gave a procedural decision in which it held that owing to the particularly complicated nature of the case, the decision on the merits could not be issued within the statutory time-limits and set a new deadline for decision of 30 June 2007.
40. On 18 June 2007 the Governor of Lower Silesia gave a decision on the merits and refused to return to the applicant church the property in question. The Governor relied on the amended 1995 Act and found that the applicant church had failed to satisfy the requirements laid down in section 4 of the Act, namely that it could not be a legal successor of the Church which had not operated on the territory of Poland before 1 September 1939.
41. On 11 July 2007 the applicant church appealed.
42. On 6 February 2008 the Minister of the Interior and Administration upheld the challenged decision.
43. On 11 March 2008 the applicant church lodged a complaint with the Warsaw Regional Administrative Court.
44. On 12 September 2008 the Warsaw Regional Administrative Court dismissed the applicant church’s complaint.
45. On 10 November 2008 the applicant church lodged a complaint against the Regional Administrative Court’s judgment with the Supreme Administrative Court.
46. On 13 October 2009 the Supreme Administrative Court dismissed the applicant church’s complaint. The judgment was served on the applicant church’s lawyer on 6 January 2010.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relations Between the Republic of Poland and the Christian Baptist Church Act of 30 June 1995 (ustawa o stosunku Pa?stwa Polskiego do Ko?cio?a Chrze?cijan Baptystów w RP – hereinafter “the 1995 Act”)
47. At the time the applicant church lodged the first request for return of the property, section 4 of the 1995 Act provided as follows:
“The [Baptist] Church and its legal entities are the legal successors of Baptist local communities [zbór] and organisations operating on the current territory of the Republic of Poland before 1 September 1939.”
48. On 30 May 1998 a new version of Article 4 of the 1995 Act came into force. Section 4 after amendments provides as follows:
“The (Baptist) Church and its legal entities are the legal successors of Baptist local communities and organisations operating on the territory of the Republic of Poland before 1 September 1939.”
49. Section 39 of the 1995 Act, in so far as relevant, provides as follows:
“1. Properties or parts thereof which on the day of entry into force of this Act are in the possession of the Church or its legal entities become ipso iure their property if:
1) they were in the possession of the legal entities referred to in section 4 of the Act;
...”
50. Section 40 of the 1995 Act provides, in so far as relevant, as follows:
“1. Proceedings for the return of the nationalised property or parts thereof, which is not in the possession of the Church or its legal entities referred to in section 39 paragraph 1, (1) are instituted upon the request of the Church or its legal entities notwithstanding the legal basis and method of nationalisation; the above does not concern property nationalised after 1945 for which compensation was paid ...”
B. Decree of 8 March 1946 on abandoned property (dekret o maj?tkach opuszczonych i poniemieckich – “the 1946 Decree”)
51. Article 2(4) of the 1946 Decree provided that the ownership of the abandoned property of German and Gda?sk public legal entities was transferred ex lege to the “relevant Polish legal entities”.
C. Resolution of the Supreme Court of 19 December 1959
52. On 19 December 1959 the Supreme Court issued a resolution of seven judges (I CO 42/59) in which it held that organisational units of religious communities operating on the territory of the People’s Republic of Poland (Polska Rzeczpospolita Ludowa) could not be considered “relevant legal entities” within the meaning of Article 2 § 4 of the 1946 Decree, because in the Polish legal system they had no “public” nature.
D. Constitutional Court’s judgment of 8 November 2005
53. Following a constitutional complaint lodged by the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk, on 8 November 2005, the Constitutional Court issued a judgment in which it found that section 7(1) of the Act of 26 June 1997 amending the 1995 Act was consistent with Articles 2 and 64 § 2 of the Polish Constitution and was not inconsistent with Article 25 §§ 3 and 5 of the Constitution. This judgment was issued in identical circumstances to those in the applicant church’s case. The Constitutional Court found among other things that even though section 4 of the 1995 Act had been amended in the course of the administrative proceedings for return of property, the amendment had had no influence on the outcome of the proceedings.
The relevant parts of the Constitutional Court’s judgment read as follows:
“Pursuant to the amended section 4 of the 1995 Act the [Baptist] Church and its legal entities are the legal successors of Baptist churches [zbory], local communities and organisations operating on the territory of the Republic of Poland before 1 September 1939.
...
The complainant – the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk is indeed a legal entity, but in the light of documents and the hearing held it is indisputable that the property in question was owned by the Bund Evangelisch Freikirschlicher Gemeinden in Deutschland [“the Union”] and not by the Christian Baptist Church or its legal entities (including the Baptist community). During the hearing the complainant made a statement that the Union referred to above was a legal entity of corporate nature which owned properties like churches and other immovable properties including the property which is the subject matter of the present proceedings. This Union continues to operate on the territory of the German Federal Republic. The complainant – the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk – said that before 1 September 1939 the Union did not have (as such) a legal personality. Likewise, the claimant was not able to prove itself to be a legal successor of the Union referred to above.”
54. The Constitutional Court concluded this part of its reasoning with a statement that:
“Even assuming that on the basis of section 4 of the amended 1995 Act the property has been acquired ex lege (although the Constitutional Court does not share this opinion), acquiring the property in question ex lege is excluded because of the lack of the legal succession. It follows that the [Constitutional] Court does not share the complainant’s view presented at the hearing that there were statutory conditions for return of the property.”
55. The Constitutional Court further held that it was indisputable that the property in question had been taken over by the State on the basis of the 1946 Decree (see paragraph 51 above) and had not been in the possession of the Baptist Church or its legal entities. The Constitutional Court noted the resolution of the Supreme Court of 19 December 1959 (see paragraph 52 above) in which the Supreme Court held that that organisational units of religious communities operating on the territory of the People’s Republic of Poland could not be considered “relevant legal entities” within the meaning of Article 2 § 4 of the 1946 Decree and therefore the property of these organisational units had become the property of the State. The Constitutional Court concluded this part of its reasoning by a statement that “the claimant likewise did not acquire the property in question on the basis of the [1946 Decree].”
56. Subsequently the Constitutional Court examined the issue whether the claimant had a “legitimate expectation” to acquire the rights to the property in question and found that it was not the case. The relevant parts of its reasoning read as follows:
“The legal construction of return of nationalised property provided for in the [1995] Act consists of several steps ...; the governor [Wojewoda] has a wide range of assessment of factual circumstances and methods of [restoring] of property. The sole fact of being a legal successor within the meaning of section 4 of the 1995 Act constitutes only a basis for a request for the return of property, but does not oblige the governor to issue a positive decision. In the Constitutional Court’s view, a legitimate expectation to acquire property does not always appear on the final step of the proceedings consisting of several steps. Consequently, it must be found that although the [Baptist] Church might expect a favourable decision, that expectation could not be classified as “legitimate”, which [would thus] enjoy legal protection.
In the present case however the most important and decisive argument is the lack of status of legal successor on the part of the complainant. As found above, the complainant does not fulfill the basic statutory condition allowing it to claim return of property ... It follows that even on the basis of section 4 [of the 1995 Act] in its version before the amendment the complainant had no basis to reasonably expect to be granted the property. The amendment of section 4 had therefore no decisive [zasadniczy] impact on the complainant’s legal situation. To explain the issue in simple words: the complainant commenced proceedings to be granted rights to property that neither the complainant nor its legal predecessors ever owned.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
57. The applicant church maintained that the situation in issue infringed its right to the peaceful enjoyment of its possessions, as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
58. The Government raised a preliminary objection that the applicant church had not exhausted all the remedies afforded by Polish law in that it had failed to lodge a constitutional complaint under Article 79 § 1 of the Constitution questioning the compatibility with the Constitution of the provisions on which the decisions in its case were based. They admitted however that the constitutionality of the relevant provision had been already examined in the Constitutional Court’s judgment of 8 November 2005 (see paragraph 53 above) after a constitutional complaint lodged by the Baptist Church of the Gda?sk Community in an identical factual situation. The Government concluded that had the applicant church lodged an identical constitutional complaint, the proceedings would most probably have been discontinued in view of the fact that the matter had already been examined.
59. The applicant church argued that it should not be required to lodge a constitutional complaint and to challenge the constitutionality of section 4(2) of the 1995 Act since the matter had already been examined by the Constitutional Court in the judgment relied on by the Government.
60. The Court notes that the constitutionality of section 4(2) of the 1995 Act was indeed a subject matter of the Constitutional Court’s examination. The Constitutional Court found that section 4(2) of the 1995 was consistent with Articles 2 and 64 of the Constitution.
61. In these circumstances the Court holds that it would be unreasonable to require the applicant church to lodge a constitutional complaint alleging the incompatibility of the same legal provisions with the same constitutional provisions in similar factual circumstances.
62. It follows that the Government’s plea of inadmissibility on the grounds of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
B. Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
63. The Government further contended that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was not applicable to the present case. They maintained that the applicant church had no existing possessions that would be protected under this provision. Likewise, in the Government’s opinion the applicant church had no “legitimate expectation” to be granted the property in question.
64. The applicant church maintained that it had possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol 1. In this connection it submitted that the State had treated it as the owner of the impugned property for several years after 1946 and that in 1959 the property had been nationalised in violation of the law in force at that time. The 1995 Act was passed with a view to compensating the loss suffered by churches. According to the applicant church the 1995 Act in its original wording had granted it the right to compensation and it had lodged its application at the relevant time. The further amendments to the 1995 Act had deprived the applicant church of its ability to obtain the compensation sought. The applicant church concluded that it had an asset protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
1. General principles
65. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see Van der Mussele v. Belgium, judgment of 23 November 1983, Series A no. 70, p. 23, § 48, and Slivenko v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II).
66. An applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions related to his or her “possessions” within the meaning of this provision. “Possessions” can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right. By way of contrast, the hope of recognition of a property right which has been impossible to exercise effectively cannot be considered a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, nor can a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfillment of the condition (see Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, §§ 82-83, ECHR 2001-VIII, and Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, § 69, ECHR 2002-VII).
67. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 cannot be interpreted as imposing any general obligation on the Contracting States to restore property which was transferred to them before they ratified the Convention. Nor does Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 impose any restrictions on the Contracting States’ freedom to determine the scope of property restitution and to choose the conditions under which they agree to restore property rights of former owners (see Jantner v. Slovakia, no.39050/97, § 34, 4 March 2003).
68. The hope that a long-extinguished property right may be revived cannot be regarded as a “possession”; nor can a conditional claim which has lapsed as a result of a failure to fulfill the condition. In particular, the Contracting States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation with regard to the exclusion of certain categories of former owners from such entitlements. Where categories of owners are excluded in this way, their claims for restitution cannot provide the basis for a “legitimate expectation” attracting the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Gratzinger and Gratzingerova, cited above, §§ 69-74).
69. However, in certain circumstances, a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining an “asset” may also enjoy the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Thus, where a proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, the person in whom it is vested may be regarded as having a “legitimate expectation” if there is a sufficient basis for the interest in national law, for example where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming its existence (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 52, ECHR 2004-IX). However, no legitimate expectation can be said to arise where there is a dispute as to the correct interpretation and application of domestic law and the applicant’s submissions are subsequently rejected by the national courts (see Kopecký, cited above, § 50).
2. Application of the above principles to the present case
70. The Court notes that on 9 May 1996 the applicant church, which claimed to be a legal successor of the Baptist communities which had operated before 1 September 1939 on the current territory of Poland, lodged a request to be issued with a decision confirming its ownership of property and a building situated in Wroc?aw on the basis of sections 39, 40 and 4(2) of the 1995 Act (see paragraph 16 above). On 12 September 1996 the administrative authority of first instance dismissed the applicant church’s request, holding that the applicant church had failed to satisfy the statutory requirements to be granted property (see paragraph 17 above). The applicant church appealed and, before the appeal was examined, the relevant provisions of the 1995 Act were amended (see paragraph 48 above). The applicant church consequently claimed that it was the amendment referred to above which had played a decisive role in the dismissal of its request.
71. In this respect the Court notes that a constitutional complaint concerning identical circumstances was examined by the Constitutional Court, which in its judgment of 8 November 2005 found that the complainant – the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk – could not claim to have had a legitimate expectation to be granted property because (i) the legal construction of return of property required a governor to issue a decision of constitutive nature; lodging a request did not in any way guarantee a positive outcome to a case and (ii) the complainant could not be granted property because it did not fulfill the basic legal requirement laid down in the relevant provisions, that is to say it was not a legal successor of the previous owner. The Constitutional Court added that the amendment of section 4(2) of the 1995 Act had not significantly changed the situation of the complainant since it lacked the necessary feature authorising it to claim property both before and after the 1997 amendment (see paragraph 56 above).
72. The Court considers that this reasoning made by the Constitutional Court following a constitutional complaint filed by the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk may also be applied to the present case. Indeed, similarly to the case of the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk, the applicant church failed to show either in the proceedings before the domestic authorities or before this Court that the property in question had been owned before 1 September 1939 by an entity referred to in section 4 of the 1995 Act in its original wording. The Court notes in this connection that the applicant church could have lodged a separate constitutional complaint if it considered that its legal situation differed significantly from that of the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk. However, the applicant church chose not to do it. On the contrary, it submitted that the matter had already been examined by the Constitutional Court and it would not have been reasonable to expect that it to lodge an identical constitutional complaint.
73. For these reasons and in view of the decisions of the domestic administrative authorities referred to above and the Constitutional Court’s finding that the provisions of the 1995 Act either in its original wording or after the 1997 amendment could not constitute for the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk a basis for its legitimate expectation to be granted the property requested (see paragraph 56 above), the Court finds that similarly to the Christian Baptist Church in Gda?sk also the applicant church in the circumstances of the present case did not have any “existing possessions” or “legitimate expectation” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and that, therefore, this provision is not applicable to the present case (see Nadbiskupija Zagrebacka v. Slovenia (dec.) no. 60376/00, 27 May 2004).
74. It follows that the applicant church’s complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must be rejected, in accordance with Article 35 § 3 of the Convention, as incompatible ratione materiae with the Convention and protocols thereto.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF THE ALLEGED UNFAIRNESS OF THE PROCEEDINGS
75. The applicant church complained that the prolonged examination of its request had led to a situation in which the final decision had been given after the amendment to the 1995 Act, which had had to be applied retroactively and had deprived it of the right to claim restoration of its property. It relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads, in so far as relevant, as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. Admissibility
76. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
77. The applicant church complained that the proceedings in its case had been unfair because in their course the relevant law had been amended which had resulted in an unfavourable decision refusing the applicant church a right to claim back the property in question.
78. The Government submitted that the amendment of the 1995 Act had been a direct consequence of entry into force of the Polish Constitution of 2 April 1997 which stipulates that all churches and other religious organisations have equal rights. The amendment had therefore been necessary and proportionate because it had aimed at equalising the situation of all churches in Poland. Without the amendment the applicant church would have been placed in a more favourable position vis-à-vis other churches and religious organisations in Poland. They further submitted that in order to counterbalance that amendment, churches had been given the possibility to be restored property which had served sacral purposes and property to extend their farm holdings. The Government further argued that the first administrative decision in the applicant church’s case had been issued before the amendment of the 1995 Act and already by that time the administrative authority had found that the applicant church could not be considered a legal successor of the previous owner of the property in question. Thus, the amendment to the 1995 Act had not deprived the applicant church of any “assets”. They concluded that the administrative decisions had been subsequently examined by the administrative courts which had not found unlawfulness in the decisions given by the Governor of Lower Silesia and the Minister of the Interior and Administration.
79. The Court reiterates that it has previously found that applicability to current awards of compensation and to pending proceedings cannot in itself give rise to a problem under the Convention since the legislature is not, in theory, prevented from intervening in civil cases to amend the existing legal position by means of an immediately applicable law (see Zielinski and Pradal and Gonzalez and Others v. France [GC], nos. 24846/94 and 34165/96 to 34173/96, § 57, ECHR 1999 VII, Scordino v. Italy (no 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 131 CEDH 2006 V, OGIS-Institut Stanislas, OGEC Saint-Pie X and Blanche de Castille and Others v. France, nos. 42219/98 and 54563/00, § 61, 27 May 2004). It has constantly held that, under Article 6 of the Convention, the legislature is not precluded in civil matters from adopting new retrospective provisions to regulate rights arising under existing laws in so far as there appear to be compelling grounds in the general interest (see National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society v. the United Kingdom, 23 October 1997, § 112, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997 VII).
80. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that the first decision was indeed given by the administrative authority on 12 September 1996, that is to say before the amendment to section 4 of the 1995 Act came into force. By that decision the applicant church’s request to be granted the property was refused, because, according to the Wroc?aw Governor, it did not satisfy the requirements laid down in sections 39 and 40 of the 1995 Act (see paragraphs 49 and 50 above). The Court considers that the legislative change was justified by the compelling grounds since it was aimed at harmonisation of the legal situation of all churches (see paragraph 78 above). What is more, it was made at the early stage of the proceedings (see, by contrast, Papageorgiou v. Greece, 22 October 1997, § 38, Reports 1997 VI) which distinguishes the case from other cases dealt with by the Court in which the legislative changes altered the course of proceedings which had been pending for years and in which an enforceable judgment had been adopted (see Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 49, Series A no. 301 B; and Tarbuk v. Croatia, no. 31360/10, § 54, 11 December 2012). Furthermore, as noted above (see paragraph 72), the legislative amendment did not deprive the applicant church of any “legitimate expectation” to acquire property, because that expectation had not been generated even under the original wording of the 1995 Act. The present case must be distinguished from the circumstances in the case of Scordino v. Italy (no 1) (cited above) where the legislative amendment extinguished, with retrospective effect, an essential part of claims for compensation, in very large amounts, that owners of expropriated land could have claimed from the expropriating authorities. The Court agrees with the Government’s submission that in these circumstances the applicant church was not deprived of any “assets”.
81. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that the applicant church was not deprived of its right to fair trial.
It follows that in the present case there was no violation of Article 6 of the Convention on account of the alleged unfairness of the proceedings.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF THE EXCESSIVE LENGTH OF PROCEEDINGS
82. The applicant church further complained of excessive length of the proceedings for return of property. It relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, the relevant part of which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing within a reasonable time ...”
83. The Government submitted that they wished to refrain from expressing their opinion on the merits of this complaint. They added however that the proceedings in question had been very complex since they had concerned a difficult legal problem.
A. Admissibility
84. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
85. The Court first notes that the period to be taken into consideration started with the appeal lodged by the applicant church on 23 September 1996 (see paragraph 18 above) (see König v. Germany, 28 June 1978, § 98, Series A no. 27, Janssen v. Germany, no. 23959/94, § 40, 20 December 2001, and Mitkova v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 48386/09, § 49, 15 October 2015). It ended on 13 October 2009 when the Supreme Administrative Court gave its judgment dismissing the applicant church’s complaint (see paragraph 46 above). It therefore lasted over thirteen years, in the course of which the case was examined several times by administrative authorities on different levels and by two instances of the administrative courts.
86. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicant and the relevant authorities and what was at stake for the applicant in the dispute (see, among many other authorities, Frydlender v. France [GC], no.30979/96, § 43, ECHR 2000 VII).
87. The Court accepts that the case might have presented some difficulties for the domestic administrative authorities particularly in view of the fact that it involved complicated issues and concerned property which before 1 September 1939 had been located outside of the territory of Poland. Also, the introduction of legislative changes to the relevant provisions in the course of the proceedings might have influenced their overall length. In the Court’s view, these reasons are however not capable of explaining such lengthy proceedings. Given that the Government did not provide any other reason to that effect and the fact that the applicant church did not in any way contribute to the length of these proceedings, the Court cannot but find that the applicant church was deprived of its right to a “hearing within a reasonable time”.
88. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of the excessive length of proceedings.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
89. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
90. The applicant church claimed 2,786,202.04 Polish zlotys (PLN) in respect of pecuniary damage and PLN 300,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
91. The Government considered these amounts excessive
92. The Court does not discern any causal link between the violation found – that concerns the excessive length of proceedings only – and the pecuniary damage alleged; it therefore rejects this claim. On the other hand, it awards the applicant church EUR 5,200 in respect of non pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
93. The applicant church also claimed PLN 16,000 for the costs and expenses, including PLN 8,000 incurred before the domestic courts. It further submitted that the costs of proceedings before the Court had amounted to PLN 3,978.30.
94. The Government, relying on the Court’s case-law (Zimmermann and Steiner v. Switzerland, 13 July 1983, § 36, Series A no. 66), recalled that a party seeking reimbursement of costs and expenses must prove that they were necessarily incurred and that they were reasonable as to quantum.
95. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 1,850 covering costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
96. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaints concerning Article 6 of the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 of the Convention on account of the alleged unfairness of the proceedings;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention on account of excessive length of proceedings;

4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant church, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 5,200 (five thousand two hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 1,850 (one thousand eight hundred and fifty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant church, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant church’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 5 April 2018, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Abel Campos Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile (l'Art. 35) criterio di ammissibilità
(L'Art. 35-3-un) il materiae di Ratione Nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - l'udienza corretta)
Violazione di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - il termine ragionevole) danno Patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinse (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa) danno Non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)



PRIMA LA SEZIONE






CAUSA CHIESA BATTISTA CRISTIANA
IN WROCAW? C. POLONIA

(Richiesta n. 32045/10)










SENTENZA



STRASBOURG

5 aprile 2018




Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Chiesa battista cristiana c. la Polonia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, Presidente
Kristina Pardalos,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Jovan Ilievski, giudici
ed Abel Campos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 13 marzo 2018,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 32045/10) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con la Chiesa battista cristiana - II la Comunità Locale in Wrocaw ?(II Zbór Kocioa Chrzecijan ?Baptystów noi Wrocawiu?-in seguito “la chiesa di richiedente”), 9 giugno 2010.
2. La chiesa di richiedente fu rappresentata col Sig.ra D. Bober, e successivamente col Sig.ra D. Przybylska-Ffara?, avvocati che praticano in Wrocaw.? Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra J. Chrzanowska del Ministero di Affari Esteri.
3. La chiesa di richiedente addusse, in particolare, una violazione di Articoli 6 della Convenzione e 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
4. 4 febbraio 2015 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente è una persona giuridica, una comunità locale della Chiesa battista cristiana nella Repubblica di Polonia che opera sulla base dell'Atto di 30 giugno 1995 su Relazioni Fra la Repubblica di Polonia ed il Chiesa Atto battista cristiano (l'ustawa o stosunku Pastwa ?Polskiego fa Kociola ?Chrzecijan Baptystów w RP-in seguito “l'Atto del 1995”) col suo posto in Wrocaw.?
6. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato con le parti, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
Sfondo di A. alla causa
7. La causa concerne una proprietà con l'edificio di un quattro-piano ed un altro edificio dedicò a fini sacri in Wrocaw.? Di fronte a Mondo Guerra II che la proprietà è stata usata col Comune battista che fa parte al Bund Evangelisch-Freikirchlicher Gemeinden di Deutschland che opera sul territorio del Reich tedesco. Il numero di proprietà era 1077/42. Misurò 0.785 ha.
8. 4 settembre 1946 il ?Governatore di Wrocaw (Wojewoda Wrocawski) decise che la proprietà in oggetto dovrebbe divenire soggetto alla gestione della chiesa di richiedente (il przejcie ?w zarzd?) sulla base di sezione 2(4) del Decreto del 1946 su proprietà abbandonata (il dekret opuszczonych di majtkach di o i poniemieckich-in seguito “il Decreto del 1946”).
9. Nel 1956 la chiesa di richiedente depositata una richiesta per essere registrata nella terra ed ipotecare registro come il proprietario della proprietà e la richiesta fu accordata. La proprietà fu registrata sotto il numero 945.
10. 23 aprile 1959 il Ministro dell'Economia annunciò un'interpretazione nuova di sezione 2 (4) del Decreto del 1946.
11. 23 giugno 1959 il Distretto Edifici Consiglio Residenziale per Wrocaw-Krzyki ?(Dzielnicowy Zarzd ?Budynków Mieszkalnych) decise che qualche i generi di proprietà che era soggetto alla gestione della chiesa erano passare nella proprietà dello Stato ed ordinarono che il trasferimento di chiesa di richiedente la proprietà in oggetto allo Stato. L'ordine non concernè la parte della proprietà che fu dedicata esclusivamente a fini sacri.
12. 19 agosto 1966 un terra-registro nuovo entrata 35905 fu aperta per la proprietà n. 1077/42. Il terra-registro che entrata 945 non è stata chiusa comunque.
13. Nel 1968 la proprietà fu registrata sotto il terra-registro numero 35905 fu dato un'area nuova numero 9 e la sua area fu ricalcolato. La misurazione nuova era 0.371 ha. Sembra che l'area numero 9 costituì solamente una parte della proprietà precedente numero 1077/42 e comprised che solamente l'edificio ha dedicato a fini sacri.
14. La parte rimanente della proprietà originale numero 1077/42 che il comprised l'edificio del quattro-piano, fu dato area nuova numera 39 e 33/5. Misurò 0.325 ha ed un terra-registro nuovo che entrata 63650 è stata aperta per sé. Nel 1977 lo Stato fu registrato come il proprietario di questa proprietà e, dopo la riforma dei governi locali di 1990, la proprietà fu trasferita alla Città di Wrocaw.?
15. Le preoccupazioni applicative e presenti il diritto alla proprietà assegnata a sopra in paragrafo 14.
B. procedimenti Amministrativi
16. In 9 maggio 1996 la chiesa di richiedente richiese che il ?problema di Governatore di Wrocaw una decisione che conferma la proprietà della chiesa di richiedente della proprietà in oggetto. Si appellò sui di recente decretarono 1995 Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 47-50 sotto).
17. 12 settembre 1996 il ?Governatore di Wrocaw rifiutò di emettere una decisione che confermerebbe che la proprietà in oggetto appartenne alla chiesa di richiedente. Il Governatore fondò che la chiesa di richiedente era andata a vuoto a soddisfare un requisito posato in giù in sezione 39 dell'Atto del 1995, specificamente che non aveva posseduto la proprietà in oggetto nel giorno di entrata in vigore dell'Atto si appellato su. Il Governatore sostenne inoltre quel:
“... nelle circostanze della causa, sezione 40 dell'Atto non può essere fatta domanda similmente, perché la proprietà in oggetto è localizzato su territorio che non era parte della Polonia di fronte a 1 settembre 1939. Il fatto che la proprietà fu posseduta con un'unità di organisational della Chiesa battista che opera nel Reich tedesco non costituisca una base per chiedere ritorna di proprietà perché la sua proprietà fu trasferita allo Stato sotto il [1946 Decreto].”
18. 23 settembre 1996 la chiesa di richiedente piacque contro questa decisione al Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione.
19. 18 febbraio 1998 la chiesa di richiedente spedì una lettera al Ministro, mentre specificando che i tempo-limiti posarono in giù nel Codice di Procedimenti Amministrativi erano stati ecceduti ed erano stati richiesti che il problema di Ministro una decisione.
20. 1 luglio 1998 il Ministro rispose che la lunghezza dei procedimenti era attribuibile ad emendamenti dell'Atto del 1995 ed informato la chiesa di richiedente che la decisione attinente sarebbe emessa in 15 agosto 1998.
21. Questo tempo-limite non fu rispettato e 12 gennaio 1999, la chiesa di richiedente depositò perciò, con la Corte amministrativa Suprema un'azione di reclamo in riguardo dell'inattività allegato dell'autorità amministrativa.
22. Di fronte ad esame dell'azione di reclamo della chiesa di richiedente, il Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione emise una decisione 5 marzo 1999, mentre annullando la decisione impugnata ed ordinando il ritorno della causa al Governatore. Il Ministro ordinò che, quando riesaminando la causa, il Governatore dovrebbe prendere in considerazione la sezione 4 corretta dell'Atto del 1995.
23. In prospettiva del fatto che il Ministro aveva emesso una decisione, 28 aprile 1999 la chiesa di richiedente ritirò l'azione di reclamo di 12 gennaio 1999 riguardo all'inattività dell'autorità amministrativa.
24. Dopo rinvio della causa, 24 marzo 1999, il Governatore di Silesia più Basso (Wojewoda Dolnolski?) chiese al ?Comune di ?Wrocaw ?se c'era qualsiasi la proprietà disponibile quale potrebbe essere accordato alla chiesa di richiedente in ritorno per la proprietà in oggetto. Sembra che la lettera del Governatore fu lasciata senza replica.
25. In 29 maggio 1999 il Governatore richiese dal Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione un'interpretazione ufficiale della sezione 4 corretta dell'Atto del 1995 “in prospettiva dei molti dubbi come riguardi l'interpretazione corretta di questa disposizione.”
26. 20 giugno 2000 il Ministro rispose che, poiché le autorità amministrative furono legate con disposizioni di legge che lega nel giorno di decisione, era irrilevante che la richiesta originale della chiesa di richiedente era stata depositata quando sezione 4 dell'Atto del 1995 aveva avuto enunciazione diversa.
27. 21 luglio 2000 la chiesa di richiedente chiese al Governatore di emettere una decisione nella sua causa, mentre indicò che i tempo-limiti posarono in giù nel Codice di Procedimenti Amministrativi era stato ecceduto.
28. 20 ottobre 2000 la chiesa di richiedente presentò un reclamo (lo zaalenie?) col Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione che il Governatore aveva ecceduto i tempo-limiti legali e non era riuscito ad emettere una decisione sui meriti o giustificare il ritardo nei procedimenti.
29. 7 dicembre 2000 la chiesa di richiedente presentò un reclamo con la Corte amministrativa Suprema dell'inattività allegato del Governatore.
30. 1 marzo 2001 il Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione trovò bene l'azione di reclamo della chiesa di richiedente di 20 ottobre 2000 fondata ed ordinò che il Governatore emettesse una decisione sui meriti di fronte a 30 aprile 2001.
31. 30 aprile 2001 il Governatore sospese i procedimenti.
32. 7 luglio 2001 la chiesa di richiedente piacque contro la decisione di sospendere i procedimenti.
33. 17 dicembre 2001 il Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione concedè il ricorso, mentre trovando che i procedimenti non sarebbero dovuti essere sospesi, sarebbero dovuti essere annullati la decisione impugnata e sarebbero dovuti essere restituiti la causa al Governatore.
34. 12 marzo 2002 la Corte amministrativa Suprema esaminò l'azione di reclamo della chiesa di richiedente contro l'inattività dell'autorità amministrativa ed ordinò che il Governatore di Silesia più Basso emettesse una decisione sui meriti all'interno del tempo-limite di trenta giorni.
35. 21 giugno 2002 l'ufficio del Governatore diede una decisione e rifiutò di restituire la proprietà in oggetto alla chiesa di richiedente. Fondò che la chiesa di richiedente, benché registrato come proprietario sotto il terra-registro numero 945 e trattò di passato con le autorità amministrative come proprietario, non aveva mai infatti possedette la proprietà che era stata lasciata solamente sotto l'amministrazione della chiesa di richiedente (l'oddane w zarzd?).
36. 12 luglio 2002 la chiesa di richiedente piacque.
37. 23 settembre 2002 il Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione annullò la decisione impugnata e restituì la causa per riesame al Governatore. Il Ministro fondò, fra le altre cose che il Governatore aveva avuto nessuno diritto mettere in dubbio la validità dell'entrata nel registro di terra.
38. 23 febbraio 2003 la chiesa di richiedente si lamentò al Governatore del ritardo nei procedimenti.
39. 8 febbraio 2007 l'ufficio del Governatore diede una decisione procedurale nella quale contenne che dovendo alla natura particolarmente complicata della causa, la decisione sui meriti non poteva essere emessa all'interno dei tempo-limiti legali e potrebbe essere esposta un termine massimo nuovo per decisione di 30 giugno 2007.
40. 18 giugno 2007 il Governatore di Silesia più Basso diede una decisione sui meriti e rifiutò di ritornare alla chiesa di richiedente la proprietà in oggetto. Il Governatore si appellò sui corressero 1995 Atto e fondò che la chiesa di richiedente era andata a vuoto a soddisfare i requisiti posati in giù in sezione 4 dell'Atto, vale a dire che non potesse essere un successore legale della Chiesa che non aveva operato sul territorio della Polonia di fronte a 1 settembre 1939.
41. 11 luglio 2007 la chiesa di richiedente piacque.
42. 6 febbraio 2008 il Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione sostenne la decisione impugnata.
43. 11 marzo 2008 la chiesa di richiedente presentò un reclamo con la Varsavia Corte amministrativa Regionale.
44. 12 settembre 2008 la Varsavia Corte amministrativa Regionale respinse l'azione di reclamo della chiesa di richiedente.
45. 10 novembre 2008 la chiesa di richiedente presentò un reclamo contro la sentenza della Corte amministrativa Regionale con la Corte amministrativa Suprema.
46. 13 ottobre 2009 la Corte amministrativa Suprema respinse l'azione di reclamo della chiesa di richiedente. La sentenza fu notificata sull'avvocato della chiesa di richiedente 6 gennaio 2010.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
Relazioni di A. Fra la Repubblica di Polonia ed il Chiesa Atto battista cristiano di 30 giugno 1995 (l'ustawa o stosunku Pastwa ?Polskiego fa Kocioa ?Chrzecijan ?Baptystów w RP-in seguito “l'Atto del 1995”)
47. Al tempo la chiesa di richiedente depositò la prima richiesta per ritorno della proprietà, sezione 4 dell'Atto del 1995 previde siccome segue:
“Il [Battista] Chiesa e le sue persone giuridiche sono i successori legali delle comunità locali battiste [lo zbór] ed organizzazioni che operano sul territorio corrente della Repubblica della Polonia di fronte a 1 settembre 1939.”
48. In 30 maggio 1998 una versione nuova di Articolo 4 dell'Atto del 1995 entrò in vigore. Sezione 4 dopo che emendamenti prevedono siccome segue:
“Il (Battista) Chiesa e le sue persone giuridiche sono i successori legali delle comunità locali battiste ed organizzazioni che operano sul territorio della Repubblica della Polonia di fronte a 1 settembre 1939.”
49. Sezione 39 dell'Atto del 1995, in finora come attinente, prevede siccome segue:
“1. Proprietà o parti al riguardo quali nel giorno di entrata in vigore di questo Atto sono nella proprietà della Chiesa o le sue persone giuridiche successa la loro proprietà ipso iure se:
1) loro erano nella proprietà delle persone giuridiche assegnata ad in sezione 4 dell'Atto;
...”
50. Sezione 40 dell'Atto del 1995 prevede, in finora come attinente, siccome segue:
“1. Procedimenti per il ritorno di al riguardo la proprietà nazionalizzata o parti che non sono nella proprietà della Chiesa o le sue persone giuridiche assegnato ad in sezione 39 paragrafo 1, (1) è avviato sulla richiesta della Chiesa o le sue persone giuridiche nonostante la base legale e metodo di nationalisation; il sopra non concerne proprietà nazionalizzata dopo 1945 per che fu pagato il risarcimento...”
B. Decree di 8 marzo 1946 su proprietà abbandonata (il dekret ?opuszczonych di majtkach di o i poniemieckich-“il Decreto del 1946”)
51. Articolo 2(4) del Decreto del 1946 previde che la proprietà della proprietà abbandonata di tedesco e Gdask persone giuridiche ?pubbliche furono trasferite ex il lege al “persone giuridiche polacche ed attinenti.”
Decisione di C. della Corte Suprema di 19 dicembre 1959
52. 19 dicembre 1959 la Corte Suprema emise una decisione di sette giudici (io CO 42/59) in che sostenne che unità di organisational di comunità religiose che operano sul territorio della Repubblica delle Persone della Polonia (Polska Rzeczpospolita Ludowa) non poteva essere considerato “persone giuridiche attinenti” all'interno del significato di Articolo 2 § 4 del Decreto del 1946, perché nell'ordinamento giuridico polacco loro avevano nessuno “pubblico” la natura.
D. la sentenza di Corte Costituzionale di 8 novembre 2005
53. Seguendo un'azione di reclamo costituzionale depositata con la Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask?, 8 novembre 2005, la Corte Costituzionale emise una sentenza nella quale fondò che sezione 7(1) dell'Atto di 26 giugno 1997 che corregge l'Atto del 1995 era coerente con Articoli 2 e 64 § 2 della Costituzione polacca e non era incoerente con Articolo 25 §§ 3 e 5 della Costituzione. Questa sentenza fu emessa in circostanze identiche a quelli nella causa della chiesa di richiedente. La Corte Costituzionale trovata fra le altre cose che anche se sezione 4 dell'Atto del 1995 era stata corretta nel corso dei procedimenti amministrativi per ritorno di proprietà, l'emendamento non aveva avuto influenza sulla conseguenza dei procedimenti.
Le parti attinenti della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale lessero siccome segue:
“Facendo seguito alla sezione 4 corretta dell'Atto del 1995 il [Battista] Chiesa e le sue persone giuridiche sono i successori legali di chiese battiste [lo zbory], le comunità locali ed organizzazioni che operano sul territorio della Repubblica della Polonia di fronte a 1 settembre 1939.
...
Il reclamante-la Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask ?è davvero una persona giuridica, ma nella luce di documenti e l'udienza sostenuta è indisputabile che la proprietà in oggetto fu posseduto col Bund Evangelisch Freikirschlicher Gemeinden in Deutschland [“l'Unione”] e non con la Chiesa battista cristiana o le sue persone giuridiche (incluso la comunità battista). Durante l'ascolti il reclamante reso una dichiarazione che l'Unione ha assegnato a sopra era una persona giuridica di natura sociale che possedette proprietà come chiese e gli altri patrimoni immobiliari incluso la proprietà che è l'argomento dei procedimenti presenti. Questa Unione continua ad operare sul territorio della Repubblica Federale tedesca. Il reclamante-la Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask-detto che prima 1 settembre 1939 l'Unione non aveva (come simile) una personalità legale. Similmente, il rivendicatore non era in grado provarsi per essere un successore legale dell'Unione assegnato a sopra.”
54. La Corte Costituzionale concluse questa parte del suo ragionamento con una dichiarazione che:
“Presumendo anche che sulla base di sezione 4 dei corressero 1995 Atto la proprietà è stata acquisita ex il lege (benché la Corte Costituzionale non divida questa opinione), acquisendo la proprietà in oggetto ex lege è escluso a causa della mancanza della successione legale. Segue che il [Costituzionale] Corte non divide la prospettiva del reclamante presentata all'udienza che c'erano condizioni legali per ritorno della proprietà.”
55. La Corte Costituzionale sostenne inoltre che era indisputabile che la proprietà in oggetto era stato preso finito con lo Stato sulla base del Decreto del 1946 (veda paragrafo 51 sopra) e non era stato nella proprietà della Chiesa battista o le sue persone giuridiche. La Corte Costituzionale notò la decisione della Corte Suprema di 19 dicembre 1959 (veda paragrafo 52 sopra) in che sostenne la Corte Suprema che che unità di organisational di comunità religiose che operano sul territorio della Repubblica delle Persone della Polonia non potevano essere considerate “persone giuridiche attinenti” all'interno del significato di Articolo 2 § 4 del Decreto del 1946 e perciò la proprietà di queste unità di organisational era divenuta la proprietà dello Stato. La Corte Costituzionale concluse questa parte del suo ragionamento con una dichiarazione che “il rivendicatore non acquisì similmente la proprietà in oggetto sulla base del [1946 Decreto].”
56. Successivamente la Corte Costituzionale esaminò il problema se il rivendicatore aveva un “l'aspettativa legittima” acquisire i diritti alla proprietà in oggetto e fondare che non era la causa. Le parti attinenti del suo ragionamento lessero siccome segue:
“La costruzione legale di ritorno di proprietà nazionalizzata previde per nel [1995] Atto consiste di molti passi...; il governatore [Wojewoda] ha una serie ampia di valutazione di circostanze fattuale e metodi di [ripristinando] di proprietà. Il risuoli fatto di essere un successore legale all'interno del significato di sezione 4 dell'Atto del 1995 costituisce solamente una base per una richiesta per il ritorno di proprietà, ma non obbliga il governatore ad emettere una decisione positiva. Nella prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale, un'aspettativa legittima per acquisire proprietà non sembra sempre sul definitivo passo dei procedimenti che consistono di molti passi. Di conseguenza, deve essere trovato che benché il [Battista] è probabile che Chiesa si aspetti una decisione favorevole come la quale l'aspettativa non poteva essere classificata “legittimo” che [così] goda tutela giuridica.
Al giorno d'oggi la causa comunque il più importante e decisivo argomento è la mancanza di status di successore legale da parte del reclamante. Come trovato sopra, il reclamante non adempie alla condizione legale e di base che gli concede chiedere ritorni di proprietà... Segue che anche sulla base di sezione 4 [dell'Atto del 1995] nella sua versione di fronte all'emendamento il reclamante non aveva nessuna base per aspettarsi ragionevolmente di essere accordato la proprietà. L'emendamento di sezione 4 aveva perciò nessuno decisivo [lo zasadniczy] impatto sulla situazione legale del reclamante. Spiegare il problema nelle semplici parole: il reclamante cominciò procedimenti per essere accordato diritti a proprietà che né il reclamante né i suoi legali predecessori mai possedettero.”
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
57. La chiesa di richiedente sostenne che la situazione in problema infranse il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, come garantito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
L'Esaurimento di A. di via di ricorso nazionali
58. Il Governo sollevò una difficoltà preliminare che la chiesa di richiedente non aveva esaurito tutte le via di ricorso riconobbe con legge polacca in che non era riuscito a presentare un reclamo costituzionale sotto Articolo 79 § 1 della Costituzione che mette in dubbio la compatibilità con la Costituzione delle disposizioni sulla quale le decisioni nella sua causa furono basate. Loro ammisero comunque che la costituzionalità della disposizione attinente già era stata esaminata nella sentenza della Corte Costituzionale di 8 novembre 2005 (veda paragrafo 53 sopra) dopo che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale depositò con la Chiesa battista della ?Comunità di Gdask in una situazione che riguarda i fatti ed identica. Il Governo concluse quel aveva la chiesa di richiedente presentato un reclamo costituzionale ed identico, i procedimenti più probabilmente sarebbero stati cessati in prospettiva del fatto che la questione già era stata esaminata.
59. La chiesa di richiedente dibattè che non dovrebbe essere richiesto di presentare un reclamo costituzionale ed impugnare la costituzionalità di sezione 4(2) dell'Atto del 1995 poiché la questione già era stata esaminata con la Corte Costituzionale nella sentenza si appellata su col Governo.
60. La Corte nota che la costituzionalità di sezione 4(2) dell'Atto del 1995 un argomento dell'esame della Corte Costituzionale era davvero. La Corte Costituzionale fondò che sezione 4(2) dei 1995 era coerente con Articoli 2 e 64 della Costituzione.
61. In queste circostanze la Corte sostiene che sarebbe irragionevole per costringere la chiesa di richiedente a presentare un reclamo costituzionale che adduce l'incompatibilità delle stesse disposizioni legali con le stesse disposizioni costituzionali in circostanze fattuale simili.
62. Segue che la dichiarazione del Governo dell'inammissibilità per motivi della non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinto.
L'Applicabilità di B. di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
63. Il Governo contese inoltre che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non era applicabile alla causa presente. Loro sostennero che la chiesa di richiedente non aveva nessuno proprietà esistenti che sarebbero proteggute sotto questa disposizione. Nell'opinione del Governo la chiesa di richiedente aveva similmente, nessuno “l'aspettativa legittima” essere accordato la proprietà in oggetto.
64. La chiesa di richiedente sostenne che aveva proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo 1. In questo collegamento presentò che lo Stato l'aveva trattato come il proprietario della proprietà contestata per molti anni dopo 1946 e che nel 1959 la proprietà era stata nazionalizzata in violazione del diritto vigente a quel il tempo. Il Legge del 1995 fu approvato con una prospettiva a compensando la perdita subita con chiese. Secondo la chiesa di richiedente l'Atto del 1995 nella sua enunciazione originale l'aveva accordato il diritto al risarcimento ed aveva depositato la sua richiesta al tempo attinente. Gli ulteriori emendamenti all'Atto del 1995 avevano spogliato la chiesa di richiedente della sua capacità di ottenere il risarcimento chiesta. La chiesa di richiedente concluse che aveva un bene protegguto sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
1. Principi Generali
65. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà (veda il der di Van Mussele c. Belgio, sentenza di 23 novembre 1983 la Serie Un n. 70, p. 23, § 48, e Slivenko c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II).
66. Un richiedente può addurre una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente in finora come le decisioni contestate riferite a suo o lei “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. “Le proprietà” può essere uno “proprietà esistenti” o i beni, incluso rivendicazioni in riguardo dei quali il richiedente può dibattere che lui o lei hanno almeno un “l'aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà. Con modo di contrasto, la speranza di riconoscimento di un diritto di proprietà che è stato impossibile per esercitare non può essere considerata efficacemente, un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, né inscatola una rivendicazione condizionale che cade come un risultato della non-adempimento della condizione (veda Principe Hans-Adamo II del Liechtenstein c. la Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, §§ 82-83, ECHR 2001-VIII, e Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. la Repubblica ceca (il dec.) [GC], n. 39794/98, § 69 ECHR 2002-VII).
67. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non può essere interpretato come imponendo qualsiasi obbligo generale sugli Stati Contraenti per ripristinare proprietà che fu trasferita a loro prima che loro ratificarono la Convenzione. Né fa Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 impone qualsiasi restrizioni sugli Stati Contraenti la libertà di ' per determinare la sfera di restituzione di proprietà e scegliere le condizioni sotto le quali loro sono d'accordo a ripristinare diritti di proprietà di proprietari precedenti (veda Jantner c. la Slovacchia, no.39050/97, § 34 4 marzo 2003).
68. La speranza che un diritto di proprietà lungo-estinto può essere rianimato non può essere riguardata come un “la proprietà”; né inscatola una rivendicazione condizionale che è caduta come un risultato di un insuccesso per adempiere alla condizione. In particolare, gli Stati Contraenti godono un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo ad all'esclusione di certe categorie di proprietari precedenti da simile diritti. Dove categorie di proprietari sono escluse così in, le loro rivendicazioni per restituzione non possono offrire la base per un “l'aspettativa legittima” attirando la protezione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Gratzinger e Gratzingerova, citato sopra, §§ 69-74).
69. Comunque, nelle certe circostanze, un “l'aspettativa legittima” di ottenere un “il bene” può godere anche la protezione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Così, dove è nella natura di una rivendicazione un interesse di proprietà riservato, la persona in chi è assegnato legalmente può essere riguardato siccome avendo un “l'aspettativa legittima” se c'è una base sufficiente per l'interesse in legge nazionale, per esempio dove là è stabilito causa-legge delle corti nazionali che confermano la sua esistenza (veda Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 52 ECHR 2004-IX). Comunque, si può dire che nessuna aspettativa legittima sorga, dove c'è una controversia come all'interpretazione corretta e la richiesta di diritto nazionale e le osservazioni del richiedente è respinto successivamente con le corti nazionali (veda Kopecký, citato sopra, § 50).
2. La richiesta dei principi sopra alla causa presente
70. La Corte nota che in 9 maggio 1996 la chiesa di richiedente che chiese di essere un successore legale delle comunità battiste che avevano azionato prima 1 settembre 1939 sul territorio corrente della Polonia depositata una richiesta per essere emessa con una decisione che conferma la sua proprietà di proprietà ed un edificio situò in Wrocaw ?sulla base di sezioni 39, 40 e 4(2) dell'Atto del 1995 (veda paragrafo 16 sopra). 12 settembre 1996 l'autorità amministrativa di prima istanza respinse la richiesta della chiesa di richiedente, mentre sostenendo che la chiesa di richiedente era andata a vuoto a soddisfare i requisiti legali per essere accordata proprietà (veda paragrafo 17 sopra). La chiesa di richiedente piacque e, prima che il ricorso fosse esaminato, le disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto del 1995 furono corrette (veda paragrafo 48 sopra). La chiesa di richiedente affermò di conseguenza che era l'emendamento assegnato a sopra che aveva giocato un ruolo decisivo nel proscioglimento della sua richiesta.
71. In questo riguardo la Corte nota che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale che concerne circostanze identiche fu esaminata con la Corte Costituzionale che nella sua sentenza di 8 novembre 2005 fondò che il reclamante-la Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask?-non poteva chiedere di avere avuto un'aspettativa legittima per essere accordato proprietà perché (i) la costruzione legale di ritorno di proprietà costrinse un governatore ad emettere una decisione di natura costitutiva; depositando una richiesta non faceva in qualsiasi garanzia di modo una conseguenza positiva ad una causa e (l'ii) il reclamante non poteva essere accordato proprietà perché non adempiè il requisito giuridico di base posato in giù nelle disposizioni attinenti che sono dirlo non era un successore legale del proprietario precedente. La Corte Costituzionale aggiunse che l'emendamento di sezione 4(2) dell'Atto del 1995 la situazione del reclamante non era cambiata significativamente poiché sé mancò l'authorising della caratteristica necessario sé per chiedere proprietà sia prima e dopo l'emendamento del 1997 (veda paragrafo 56 sopra).
72. La Corte considera che questo ragionamento reso con la Corte Costituzionale seguente che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale registrata con la Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask può ?essere fatta domanda anche alla causa presente. La chiesa di richiedente andò a vuoto similmente alla causa della Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask, effettivamente, ad o mostrare nei procedimenti di fronte alle autorità nazionali o di fronte a questa Corte che la proprietà in oggetto era stato posseduto prima 1 settembre 1939 con un'entità assegnata ad in sezione 4 dell'Atto del 1995 nella sua enunciazione originale. La Corte nota in questo collegamento che la chiesa di richiedente avesse potuto presentare un reclamo costituzionale e separato se considerasse che la sua situazione legale differì significativamente da che della Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask.? Comunque, la chiesa di richiedente scelse di non farlo. Sul contrario, presentò, che la questione già era stata esaminata con la Corte Costituzionale e non sarebbe stato ragionevole per aspettarsi che sé per presentare un reclamo costituzionale ed identico.
73. Per queste ragioni ed in prospettiva delle decisioni delle autorità amministrative e nazionali assegnata a sopra e la Corte Costituzionale sta trovando che le disposizioni dell'Atto del 1995 o nella sua enunciazione originale o dopo che l'emendamento del 1997 non potesse costituire per la Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask ?una base per la sua aspettativa legittima essere accordato la proprietà richiesta (veda paragrafo 56 sopra), i costatazione di Corte che similmente alla Chiesa battista cristiana in Gdask neanche la chiesa di richiedente nelle circostanze della causa presente aveva qualsiasi “proprietà esistenti” o “l'aspettativa legittima” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e che, perciò, questa disposizione non è applicabile alla causa presente (veda Nadbiskupija Zagrebacka c. la Slovenia (il dec.) n. 60376/00, 27 maggio 2004).
74. Segue che l'azione di reclamo della chiesa di richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere respinto, nella conformità con Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione, come ratione materiae incompatibile con la Convenzione e protocolli inoltre.
II. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 6 DI LA CONVENZIONE SU CONTO DI L'INIQUITÀ ALLEGATO DI I PROCEDIMENTI
75. La chiesa di richiedente si lamentò che l'esame prolungato della sua richiesta aveva condotto ad una situazione nella quale la definitivo decisione era stata data dopo l'emendamento all'Atto del 1995 che aveva dovuto essere fatto domanda retroattivamente e l'aveva spogliato del diritto per chiedere restituzione della sua proprietà. Si appellò finora su Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che legge in come attinente, siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...”
Ammissibilità di A.
76. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
77. La chiesa di richiedente si lamentò che i procedimenti nella sua causa erano stati ingiusti perché nel loro corso la legge attinente era stata corretta quale aveva dato luogo ad una decisione di unfavourable che rifiuta la chiesa di richiedente un diritto per chiedere di nuovo la proprietà in oggetto.
78. Il Governo presentò che l'emendamento dell'Atto del 1995 era stato una conseguenza diretta di entrata in vigore della Costituzione polacca di 2 aprile 1997 quale conviene che tutte le chiese e le altre organizzazioni religiose hanno diritti uguali. L'emendamento era stato perciò necessario e proporzionato perché aveva mirato ad equalising la situazione di tutte le chiese in Polonia. Senza l'emendamento la chiesa di richiedente sarebbe stata messa vis-à-vis in una posizione più favorevole le altre chiese ed organizzazioni religiose in Polonia. Loro presentarono inoltre che per controbilanciare che emendamento, chiese erano state date la possibilità essere ripristinate proprietà che aveva notificato fini sacri e proprietà per prolungare le loro partecipazione azionaria di fattoria. Il Governo dibattè inoltre che la prima decisione amministrativa nella causa della chiesa di richiedente era stata emessa di fronte all'emendamento dell'Atto del 1995 e già con che tempo l'autorità amministrativa aveva trovato che la chiesa di richiedente non poteva essere considerata un successore legale del proprietario precedente della proprietà in oggetto. Così, l'emendamento all'Atto del 1995 non aveva spogliato la chiesa di richiedente di qualsiasi “i beni.” Loro conclusero che le decisioni amministrative erano state esaminate successivamente con le corti amministrative che non avevano trovato l'illegalità nelle decisioni date col Governatore di Silesia più Basso ed il Ministro dell'Interno ed Amministrazione.
79. La Corte reitera che prima ha trovato che l'applicabilità ad assegnazioni correnti del risarcimento ed a procedimenti pendenti aumento non può dare in se stesso ad un problema sotto la Convenzione poiché la legislatura non è, in teoria, ostacolò dall'intervenire in giudizi civili per correggere la posizione legale ed esistente con vuole dire di un immediatamente legge applicabile (veda Zielinski e Pradal e Gonzalez ed Altri c. la Francia [GC], N. 24846/94 e 34165/96 a 34173/96, § 57 ECHR 1999 VII, Scordino c. l'Italia (nessuno 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 131 CEDH 2006 V, OGIS-Institut Stanislas Santo-torta di OGEC X ed il de di Blanche Castille ed Altri c. la Francia, N. 42219/98 e 54563/00, § 61 27 maggio 2004). Continuamente ha contenuto che, sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione, la legislatura non è preclusa in questioni civili dall'adottare disposizioni di retrospettiva nuove per regolare diritti che derivano sotto finora leggi vigente in come là sembri stia obbligando i motivi nell'interesse generale (veda Cittadino & Edificio Società Provinciale, Leeds Edificio Società Permanente e Yorkshire Building la Società c. il Regno Unito, 23 ottobre 1997, § 112 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997 VII).
80. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte nota che la prima decisione fu data davvero con l'autorità amministrativa 12 settembre 1996, quel è dire di fronte all'emendamento a sezione 4 dell'Atto del 1995 entrò in vigore. Con che decisione la richiesta della chiesa di richiedente per essere accordato la proprietà fu rifiutata, perché, secondo il ?Governatore di Wrocaw, non soddisfece i requisiti posati in giù in sezioni 39 e 40 dell'Atto del 1995 (veda divide in paragrafi 49 e 50 sopra). La Corte considera che il cambio legislativo fu giustificato coi motivi irresistibili poiché fu puntato contro di harmonisation della situazione legale di tutte le chiese (veda paragrafo 78 sopra). Che che è più, fu reso alla fase iniziale dei procedimenti (veda, con contrasto, Papageorgiou c. la Grecia, 22 ottobre 1997, § 38 le Relazioni 1997 VI) quale distingue la causa dalle altre cause date con con la Corte nella quale i cambi legislativi alterarono il corso di procedimenti che erano pendenti da anni ed in che era stata adottata una sentenza esecutiva (veda Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. la Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 49 la Serie Un n. 301 B; e Tarbuk c. Croatia, n. 31360/10, § 54 11 dicembre 2012). Inoltre, come notato sopra (veda paragrafo 72), l'emendamento legislativo non spogliò la chiesa di richiedente di qualsiasi “l'aspettativa legittima” acquisire proprietà, perché che l'aspettativa non era stata generata addirittura sotto l'enunciazione originale dell'Atto del 1995. La causa presente deve essere distinta dalle circostanze nella causa di Scordino c. l'Italia (nessuno 1) (citò sopra) dove l'emendamento legislativo estinse, con effetto di retrospettiva, una parte essenziale di rivendicazioni per il risarcimento, in importi molto grandi che proprietari di terra espropriata avrebbero potuto chiedere dalle autorità che espropriano. La Corte si confa con l'osservazione del Governo che in queste circostanze la chiesa di richiedente non fu privata di qualsiasi “i beni.”
81. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per abilitare la Corte per concludere che la chiesa di richiedente non fu privata del suo diritto a processo equanime.
Segue che nella causa presente non era nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione su conto dell'iniquità allegato dei procedimenti.
III. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 6 DI LA CONVENZIONE SU CONTO DI LA LUNGHEZZA ECCESSIVA DI PROCEDIMENTI
82. La chiesa di richiedente si lamentò inoltre di lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti per ritorno di proprietà. Si appellò su Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, la parte attinente di che legge siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti all'interno di un termine ragionevole...”
83. Il Governo presentò che loro desiderarono frenarsi dall'esprimere la loro opinione sui meriti di questa azione di reclamo. Loro aggiunsero comunque che i procedimenti in oggetto era stato molto complesso poiché loro avevano concernito un problema legale e difficile.
Ammissibilità di A.
84. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
85. La Corte prima nota che il periodo per essere preso nell'esame cominciò col ricorso depositato con la chiesa di richiedente 23 settembre 1996 (veda paragrafo 18 sopra) (veda König c. la Germania, 28 giugno 1978, § 98 la Serie Un n. 27, Janssen c. la Germania, n. 23959/94, § 40, 20 dicembre 2001, e Mitkova c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia, n. 48386/09, § 49 15 ottobre 2015). Terminò 13 ottobre 2009 quando la Corte amministrativa Suprema diede la sua sentenza che respinge l'azione di reclamo della chiesa di richiedente (veda paragrafo 46 sopra). Durò perciò più di tredici anni, nel corso del quale la causa fu esaminata molte volte con autorità amministrative su livelli diversi e con due istanze delle corti amministrative.
86. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza di procedimenti deve essere valutata nella luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento al criterio seguente: la complessità della causa, la condotta del richiedente e le autorità attinenti e cosa era in pericolo per il richiedente nella controversia (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Frydlender c. la Francia [GC], no.30979/96, § 43 ECHR 2000 VII).
87. La Corte accetta che è probabile che la causa avrebbe presentato particolarmente delle difficoltà per le autorità amministrative e nazionali in prospettiva del fatto che comportò problemi complicati e proprietà interessata che di fronte a 1 settembre 1939 era stato localizzato fuori del territorio della Polonia. Anche, l'introduzione di cambi legislativi alle disposizioni attinenti nel corso dei procedimenti avrebbe influenzato la loro lunghezza complessiva. Nella prospettiva della Corte, queste ragioni non sono comunque capaci di spiegare così lungo procedimenti. Dato che il Governo non previde qualsiasi l'altra ragione a quell'effetto ed il fatto che la chiesa di richiedente non faceva in qualsiasi modo contribuisce alla lunghezza di questi procedimenti, la Corte non può ma trova che la chiesa di richiedente fu privata del suo diritto ad un “ascolti all'interno di un termine ragionevole.”
88. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione su conto della lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti.
IV. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
89. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
90. La chiesa di richiedente chiese 2,786,202.04 zlotys polacchi (PLN) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e PLN 300,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
91. Il Governo considerò questi importi eccessivo
92. La Corte non discerne qualsiasi collegamento causale fra la violazione fondò-quel concerne solamente la lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti-ed il danno patrimoniale addusse; respinge perciò questa rivendicazione. D'altra parte assegna EUR 5,200 la chiesa di richiedente in riguardo di non danno patrimoniale.
Costi di B. e spese
93. La chiesa di richiedente chiese anche PLN 16,000 per i costi e spese, incluso PLN 8,000 incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali. Presentò inoltre che i costi di procedimenti di fronte alla Corte avevano corrisposto a PLN 3,978.30.
94. Il Governo, appellandosi sulla causa-legge della Corte (Zimmermann e Steiner c. la Svizzera, 13 luglio 1983, § 36 la Serie Un n. 66), richiamò che una parte che chiede rimborso di costi e spese deve provare che loro necessariamente furono incorsi in e che loro erano ragionevoli come a quantum.
95. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare 1,850 costi di copertura la somma di EUR sotto tutti i capi.
Interesse di mora di C.
96. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo ad Articolo 6 della Convenzione ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione su conto dell'iniquità allegato dei procedimenti;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione su conto di lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti;

4. Sostiene
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare la chiesa di richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, essere convertito nella valuta dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 5,200 (cinque mila duecento euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 1,850 (milli ottocento e cinquanta euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico della chiesa di richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

5. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della chiesa di richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 5 aprile 2018, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Abel Campos Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 20/02/2020.