Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF T?BET MENTE? AND OTHERS v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,04,35,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 57818/10/2018
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 24/10/2017
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions
Remainder inadmissible (Art. 35) Admissibility criteria
No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings
Article 6-1 - Fair hearing)


SECOND SECTION







CASE OF T?BET MENTE? AND OTHERS v. TURKEY

(Applications nos. 57818/10, 57822/10, 57825/10, 57827/10 and 57829/10)










JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

24 October 2017


FINAL

24/01/2018

This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Tibet Mente? and Others v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Robert Spano, President,
Julia Laffranque,
I??l Karaka?,
Nebojša Vu?ini?,
Paul Lemmens,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 26 September 2017,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in five applications (nos. 57818/10, 57822/10, 57825/10, 57827/10, 57829/10) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by five Turkish nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 9 August 2010.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in ?zmir. The Turkish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the final judgment in their case, dismissing their claims for overtime pay, had amounted to a denial of justice which had run contrary to the prohibition of forced labour.
4. On 26 May 2014 the application was communicated to the Government under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
5. Third-party comments were received from the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC), which had been given leave by the President to intervene in the written procedure (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 2 of the Rules of Court).
6. On 24 September 2015, the Vice-President of the Section decided, under Rule 54 § 2 (c), to invite the parties to submit further observations on whether there had been a violation of Article 4 § 2 of the Convention owing to the fact that the applicants had worked overtime without any remuneration and in excess of the limits permitted by the national legislation.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
7. The applicants were born in 1967, 1965, 1968, 1960 and 1958 respectively and live in ?zmir.
8. The facts of the case may be summarised as follows.
9. The applicants have been employed in the duty-free shops at ?zmir Adnan Menderes Airport since 1993. They are members of the Tekg?da Work Union, which had signed a collective labour agreement with the General Directorate of Monopolies on Spirits and Tobacco, the applicants’ employer and formerly a State-run enterprise.
10. During their employment the applicants operated in “work and rest cycles”. Accordingly, in the four months of the summer period they worked continuously for twenty-four hours and rested the next twenty-four hours. For the remaining eight months of the year, the winter period, they worked for twenty-four hours and rested for the next forty-eight hours. Their work schedule did not take account of weekends or public holidays as the duty free shops remained open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. As regards rest breaks and periods, section 22 of their collective labour agreement provided that such periods would be counted as working time and that they could not be subject to wage deductions.
11. On 10 October 2003 the applicants, with the assistance of their lawyer, instituted individual and separate proceedings against their employer before the ?zmir Labour Court. They claimed compensation for the overtime hours they had worked beyond the legal working time for the previous five years of their employment. They referred to the Labour Code in force at the material time and to their collective agreement. Both documents defined overtime as work in excess of the regular forty-five-hour working week and provided for remuneration for such work at one and a half times the regular hourly rate.
12. On 1 November 2003 the applicants instituted new proceedings against their employer before the ?zmir Labour Court and requested further remuneration for work done on weekends and public holidays and compensation for annual leave that they had not taken.
13. Having regard to the common background of the applicants’ complaints in both sets of proceedings, the ?zmir Labour Court decided to join each applicant’s proceedings and to seek an expert report concerning the calculation of their claims for overtime, weekend and public holiday pay and remuneration for unused annual leave.
14. On 14 July 2004 the expert submitted a report in which he noted, inter alia, that clause 25 (c) of the collective agreement concluded between the parties provided for an entitlement to overtime pay, calculated on the basis of one and half times the hourly rate. He further referred to an official audit report by the Ministry of Labour, dated 10 September 2003, which noted that during the preceding summer period, between the months of June and September, workers at the company in question had worked overtime of 139.5 hours in months which had thirty-one calendar days and 135 hours in the remaining months. In the previous winter period, between October and May, they had worked 22.5 hours and fifteen hours of overtime respectively. The hours worked in excess of the legal working time should have been remunerated accordingly. According to the expert report, the applicants’ employer had previously been cautioned, on 25 November 1996, by the Ministry of Labour concerning its practices on working hours.
15. On the basis of his examination of the company’s timekeeping records, the expert calculated the number of hours worked as overtime in respect of each applicant, deducting three hours of rest per each day worked.
16. The expert determined that the employer did not owe anything to the applicants for weekend and public holiday work as the remuneration for those days had been in accordance with the applicable regulations. The expert also noted that the applicants could not claim any compensation for unused annual leave as they were still working at the company and such leave was only payable at the end of a contract.
17. The applicants raised a number of objections to the expert report. They stated that the timekeeping records used for the calculation did not reflect the actual hours worked as they were unofficial copies kept by the employer, which were not signed by employees. In that regard, the applicants submitted that they had worked for more hours than established by the expert. They requested that the court take other evidence into account, including the defendant employer’s shift orders, which detailed who would work when and for how long, as well as reports from the Regional Labour Inspectorate. They also submitted that the deduction of three hours of rest per day was not based on fact but was an assumption by the expert. The applicants submitted that in any event the expert’s hypothetical conclusion on rest periods could not be relied on because the collective agreement had expressly provided for the inclusion of such periods as a part of working time. The applicants raised no objections to the expert’s conclusion on the dismissal of their claims for pay for work at the weekend and on public holidays and for unused annual leave.
18. In submissions of 22 July 2004, the defendant employer raised objections to the expert report and also argued that the timekeeping documents could not be relied on as they were unofficial copies. It also maintained that it had been unable to pay overtime in full owing to a lack of funds from the State. It submitted that the applicants had in any event been aware of the working arrangements and had never requested a transfer to another unit of the General Directorate of Monopolies.
19. The ?zmir Labour Court asked the expert to supplement his report with findings concerning the parties’ objections.
20. On 4 July 2005, the expert submitted a supplement to his report, in which he corrected his findings concerning the rest periods in the light of the applicants’ objection and calculated the hours they had worked as twenty-four in the course of a twenty-four-hour shift. He maintained his findings regarding the timesheets, submitting that his in situ examination of the workplace and comparisons between the official record and the employer’s copies had not revealed any inconsistencies.
21. On 12 September 2005 the ?zmir Labour Court found in favour of the applicants in part and awarded them the amounts given in the expert’s report in respect of the unpaid overtime. It rejected their claims for pay for weekend and public holiday work and for unused annual leave.
22. Both parties appealed to the Court of Cassation.
23. On 17 April 2006 the Court of Cassation quashed the decision and remitted the case. It found that the Labour Court had not taken into account any time that could have been used for rest periods and that therefore the calculation of overtime could not be deemed accurate. It also stated that the overtime calculation should be based on weekly working hours rather than the monthly working time used in the expert report.
24. In the resumed proceedings, the ?zmir Labour Court requested that the expert amend the report in light of the Court of Cassation’s decision.
25. On 11 September 2007 the expert revised the findings as ordered and concluded that the applicants were likely to have had a minimum of three hours for rest during a twenty-four-hour shift. The expert therefore recalculated their entitlement to overtime on the basis of twenty-one hours of actual work and compared it with the legal working week of forty five hours.
26. On 26 May 2008 the ?zmir Labour Court awarded the applicants compensation for overtime as determined in the revised expert report.
27. The defendant employer appealed, arguing that the presumption established in the case-law of the Court of Cassation that a person could not work more than fourteen hours in the course of a twenty-four-hour shift should be applied to the facts of the dispute. The Court of Cassation then quashed the first-instance judgment on 28 October 2008 and remitted the case on the following grounds:
“It can be seen from the case file that during the summer months [the applicants] worked for 24 hours and subsequently rested for 24 hours; and in the winter months they worked for 24 hours and subsequently rested for 48 hours. However, as determined by the well-established case-law of the Grand Chamber of the Court of Cassation’s Civil Division, in workplaces where there are 24-hour shifts, after the deduction of time spent on certain activities such as resting, eating and fulfilling other needs, a person can only work for 14 hours a day ... This approach must also be followed in the present case.”
28. In the resumed proceedings, the ?zmir Labour Court decided to follow the decision of the Court of Cassation and another expert report was drawn up for that purpose. The report, dated 21 July 2009, calculated the applicants’ daily working time as fourteen hours, in line with the Court of Cassation’s presumption of fact. The calculation in the new report led to no overtime being found for the weeks in which the applicants had worked three days as the working time was less than the legal limit of forty-five hours. For the weeks in which the applicants had worked four days, the report calculated the total working time as fifty-six hours, leading to an assessment in the report of nine hours of overtime. On 28 December 2009 the ?zmir Labour Court rendered a final judgment in the applicants’ case, based on the expert report of 21 July 2009. As a result of that interpretation, some of the applicants’ claims were dismissed entirely, while the others were awarded almost ninety percent less than the previous expert report had calculated.
29. On 25 January 2010 the applicants appealed against the decision and maintained that the fact that they had worked continuously for twenty-four hours had already been confirmed by the legal records of the Ministry of Labour, both parties’ witness statements and other evidence in the file, including the expert reports overturned by the Court of Cassation. Although they had proven that fact, the judgment had been based on the presumption that working for more than fourteen hours a day was physically impossible.
30. On 18 March 2010 the Court of Cassation upheld the ?zmir Labour Court’s decision without responding to the applicants’ objections.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relevant domestic law
31. The relevant provisions of the Labour Code (Law no. 1475), as in force during the relevant period and as applicable to the dispute before the domestic courts, read as follows:
Article 35
“Overtime pay
...
a) Overtime shall not exceed three hours a day,
b) The total amount of overtime in a year cannot exceed 90 working days,
c) Each hour of overtime shall be remunerated at one and a half times the regular hourly rate.
...
d) Overtime work is subject to authorisation beforehand by the Regional Directorate of Labour.
...”
Article 61
“Working time
a) The maximum working time is forty-five hours a week.
Where six days a week are worked in a workplace, the daily working time shall not exceed 7.5 hours ...”
Article 62
“Periods considered as hours of work
...
c) times when the employee has no work to perform pending the arrival of new work, but remains at the employer’s disposal.”
Article 64
“Employees shall be entitled to rest periods ... in accordance with customary work practices in the following manner:
...
c) one hour [break] for work which lasts more than seven and a half hours.
...
Above-mentioned rest periods are not counted as working time.”
32. The relevant provisions in the applicants’ collective bargaining agreement provided as follows:
“Article 22 - Working Time
...
Rest breaks are counted as worked time and such rest periods may not be deducted from employee’s wages.”
“Article 25 – Overtime
...
Hours worked beyond the forty-five hour work week is overtime.
...
Overtime is remunerated one and half times the regular hourly rate. ”
33. A distinction is made in Turkish labour law jurisprudence between mandatory labour code provisions which are absolute and those which can be changed in favour of employees. Accordingly, parties cannot derogate from rules that are of an absolutely mandatory nature, whereas it is accepted in respect of some of the rules that individual and collective agreements can provide for terms that are more favourable for employees than those in the Labour Code. Accordingly, provisions relating to rest periods are mandatory and parties may not derogate from them, however, they may lay down more favourable rules.
B. Relevant domestic case-law
34. The presumption that only fourteen hours can be accepted as actual working time in places where a single shift consists of twenty-four hours was first established by the Grand Chamber of the Court of Cassation’s Civil Division (Yarg?tay Hukuk Genel Kurulu) in decision no. E.2006/9 107, K.2006/144. It was issued on 5 April 2006 in a case concerning a dispute about overtime pay for security workers who worked twenty four hour shifts at a radio relay station. As with the present applicants, the security workers also operated on the basis of continuous work of twenty-four hours and time off for the subsequent twenty-four hours. The Court of Cassation found it established in that case that the workers had not worked continuously for that period as they had been paired up by the employer to allow one person to work and the other to rest. According to the Grand Chamber of the Court of Cassation’s Civil Division, that arrangement meant that each worker spent an average of twelve hours on duty, of which one hour had in any case to be set aside for the mandatory rest period. In decisions adopted on 14 June 2006 and 21 March 2007, which concerned similar disputes involving other radio relay station workers, the Grand Chamber of the Court of Cassation’s Civil Division held that irrespective of whether the work was carried out in shifts or pairs, the actual time worked would be taken as fourteen hours in workplaces where twenty-four-hour work shifts were the norm. According to those decisions, an average person would not be able to work continuously for twenty-four hours and would need to take an average of ten hours off for their physical needs, such as resting, sleeping and eating (no. E.2006/9-374, K.2006/382, and E.2007/9 176, K.2007/164).
35. There are no specific rules of evidence with respect to overtime claims. Unless there is written evidence, such as payroll documents signed without reservation by employees, the Court of Cassation regards overtime to be a matter of fact and therefore allows any evidence to be called in proof, including witnesses (see, for example, the decision of the Ninth Civil Division of the Court of Cassation, E.2008/939, K.2008/5619, adopted on 21 March 2008).
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL LAW AND OTHER MATERIAL
36. The European Social Charter provides, as relevant:
Article 2 – The right to just conditions of work
“With a view to ensuring the effective exercise of the right to just conditions of work, the Contracting Parties undertake:
1. to provide for reasonable daily and weekly working hours, the working week to be progressively reduced to the extent that the increase of productivity and other relevant factors permit;
2. to provide for public holidays with pay;
3. to provide for a minimum of two weeks annual holiday with pay;
4. to provide for additional paid holidays or reduced working hours for workers engaged in dangerous or unhealthy occupations as prescribed;
5. to ensure a weekly rest period which shall, as far as possible, coincide with the day recognised by tradition or custom in the country or region concerned as a day of rest.”
Article 4 – The right to a fair remuneration
“With a view to ensuring the effective exercise of the right to safe and healthy working conditions, the Contracting Parties undertake:
1. to recognise the right of workers to a remuneration such as will give them and their families a decent standard of living;
2. to recognise the right of workers to an increased rate of remuneration for overtime work, subject to exceptions in particular cases;
3. to recognise the right of men and women workers to equal pay for work of equal value;
4. to recognise the right of all workers to a reasonable period of notice for termination of employment;
5. to permit deductions from wages only under conditions and to the extent prescribed by national laws or regulations or fixed by collective agreements or arbitration awards.
The exercise of these rights shall be achieved by freely concluded collective agreements, by statutory wage fixing machinery, or by other means appropriate to national conditions.”
37. The European Social Charter (revised) provides, as relevant:
Article 2 – The right to just conditions of work
“With a view to ensuring the effective exercise of the right to just conditions of work, the Parties undertake:
1. to provide for reasonable daily and weekly working hours, the working week to be progressively reduced to the extent that the increase of productivity and other relevant factors permit;
2. to provide for public holidays with pay;
3. to provide for a minimum of four weeks’ annual holiday with pay;
4. to eliminate risks in inherently dangerous or unhealthy occupations, and where it has not yet been possible to eliminate or reduce sufficiently these risks, to provide for either a reduction of working hours or additional paid holidays for workers engaged in such occupations;
5. to ensure a weekly rest period which shall, as far as possible, coincide with the day recognised by tradition or custom in the country or region concerned as a day of rest;
6. to ensure that workers are informed in written form, as soon as possible, and in any event not later than two months after the date of commencing their employment, of the essential aspects of the contract or employment relationship;
7. to ensure that workers performing night work benefit from measures which take account of the special nature of the work.”
Article 4 – The right to a fair remuneration
“With a view to ensuring the effective exercise of the right to a fair remuneration, the Parties undertake:
1. to recognise the right of workers to a remuneration such as will give them and their families a decent standard of living;
2. to recognise the right of workers to an increased rate of remuneration for overtime work, subject to exceptions in particular cases;
3. to recognise the right of men and women workers to equal pay for work of equal value;
4. to recognise the right of all workers to a reasonable period of notice for termination of employment;
5. to permit deductions from wages only under conditions and to the extent prescribed by national laws or regulations or fixed by collective agreements or arbitration awards.
The exercise of these rights shall be achieved by freely concluded collective agreements, by statutory wage-fixing machinery, or by other means appropriate to national conditions.”
38. Turkey has ratified both the European Social Charter and the revised European Social Charter, on 24 November 1989 and 27 June 2007 respectively. At the time of depositing the instrument of ratification, Turkey made a declaration enumerating the provisions of the European Social Charter it considered itself bound by. The list included neither Article 2 nor paragraph 2 of Article 4. According to the declaration made at the time of depositing the instrument of ratification of the Revised European Social Charter, Turkey considers itself bound, among other provisions, by paragraph 1 of Article 2 and by paragraph 2 of Article 4.
39. The European Committee of Social Rights noted in its Conclusions (2010, Turkey) that fines for failure to comply with the legal requirements on working time were very low: 100 million to 500 million Turkish Lira (about 50 to 260 euros). It therefore asked for more information on the supervision of working time regulations by the Labour Inspection. It noted in later Conclusions (2014, Turkey) that the working time regulations in force were not in conformity with Article 2 § 1 of the Charter on the grounds that the legislation in force (Law no. 4857) allowed weekly working time of up to sixty-six hours.
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
40. Given that the applications concern similar complaints and raise identical issues under the Convention, the Court decides to join them pursuant to Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
41. The applicants complained that their right to payment for overtime work, as established during the proceedings before the first-instance court, had been denied to them as a result of a presumption that had been unjustifiably applied by the Court of Cassation. The applicants relied on Article 6 of the Convention, the relevant part of which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
42. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
43. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
44. The applicants argued that the presumption applied to their case by the Court of Cassation had been manifestly unreasonable. They submitted that the Court of Cassation had not explained why such a presumption had automatically been applied when the facts established before the first instance court had led to the conclusion that they had worked more than fourteen hours. Moreover, the applicants argued that the presumption developed in the case-law of the Court of Cassation that a person could work no more than fourteen hours over a shift of twenty-four hours contradicted domestic law, which contained no such provisions. Finally, they submitted that the presumption of a maximum working time of such length had the undesirable consequence of protecting employers, who would be able to avoid paying employees who worked longer than fourteen hours. In the applicants’ opinion, the effects of such an interpretation encouraged, rather than discouraged, excessive working hours.
45. The Government argued that the Court of Cassation on 17 April 2006 and 28 October 2008 had quashed the judgments of the first instance court on the grounds that the latter had not taken adequate account of times reserved for rest periods. According to the Government, the Court of Cassation’s decision could not be deemed to have been insufficiently reasoned as the court had relied expressly on its case-law, which had previously established that working time could not exceed fourteen hours in workplaces where twenty four-hour shifts operated. Finally, the Government argued that it was for the national court to assess the evidence before them and to interpret the law to be applied to the facts of the case. In that regard, they considered that the applicants had had the benefit of a fully adversarial trial.
2. The third-party intervener’s comments
46. The ETUC agreed with the applicants that the reasoning provided by the Court of Cassation had been insufficient. It stated that the circumstances of the present case revealed a systemic problem in the Turkish employment context regarding health and safety at work. In that regard, they referred to the conclusions of the European Committee of Social Rights, which had found that working time in Turkey did not comply with the standards of the European Social Charter.
3. The Court’s assessment
47. The Court reiterates that according to its established case-law, reflecting a principle linked to the proper administration of justice, the judgments of courts and tribunals should adequately state the reasons on which they are based (see, among others, Tatishvili v. Russia, no. 1509/02, § 58, ECHR 2007 I). The right to a fair trial cannot be seen as effective unless the requests and observations of the parties are truly “heard”, that is to say, properly examined by the tribunal (see Carmel Saliba v. Malta, no. 24221/13, § 64, 29 November 2016, and the references provided therein). The Court has thus held that one of the functions of a reasoned decision is to demonstrate to the parties that they have been heard. Moreover, a reasoned decision affords a party the possibility to appeal against it, as well as the possibility of having the decision reviewed by an appellate body.
48. The extent to which this duty to give reasons applies may vary according to the nature of the decision and must be determined in the light of the circumstances of the case (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 26, ECHR 1999 I). It is moreover necessary to take into account, inter alia, the diversity of the submissions that a litigant may bring before the courts and the differences existing in the Contracting States with regard to statutory provisions, customary rules, legal opinion and the presentation and drafting of judgments. That is why the question whether a court has failed to fulfil the obligation to state reasons, deriving from Article 6 of the Convention, can only be determined in the light of the circumstances of the case (see Ruiz Torija v. Spain, 9 December 1994, § 29, Series A no. 303?A). The Court will not, in principle, intervene, unless the decisions reached by the domestic courts appear arbitrary or manifestly unreasonable and provided that the proceedings as a whole were fair, as required by Article 6 § 1 (see, inter alia, Khamidov v. Russia, no. 72118/01, § 170, 15 November 2007, and Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish and Others v. Romania [GC], no. 76943/11, § 90, ECHR 2016 (extracts)).
49. It flows from the above-mentioned case-law that a domestic judicial decision cannot be described as arbitrary to the point of prejudicing the fairness of proceedings unless no reasons are provided for it or the reasons given are based on a manifest factual or legal error committed by the domestic court, resulting in a “denial of justice” (see Moreira Ferreira v. Portugal (no. 2) [GC], no. 19867/12, § 85, 11 July 2017).
50. Lastly, the Court reiterates that it is not its task to take the place of the domestic courts. It is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to resolve problems of interpretation of domestic legislation (see Nejdet ?ahin and Perihan ?ahin v. Turkey [GC], no. 13279/05, § 49, 20 October 2011 and the cases cited therein). Furthermore, the Court has no jurisdiction under Article 6 of the Convention to substitute its own findings of fact or law for those of domestic courts, which are in the best position to assess the evidence before them and apply the relevant domestic law (see, inter alia, Kansal v. The United Kingdom (dec.) no. 21413/02, 28 January 2003).
51. In the present case, the Court notes that the applicants’ complaints relate mainly to the presumption of fact applied by the Court of Cassation to their case. The applicants argue that the presumption developed in the case law of the Court of Cassation concerning what would be counted as overtime was without a legal basis and had been applied to the facts of their case without any relevant justification.
52. The Court notes at the outset that the applicants were able to submit their arguments at both levels of proceedings, which complied with the requirement of an adversarial trial. The Court of Cassation, having examined the circumstances of their case, the arguments of the parties and the findings of the first-instance court, came to the conclusion that the approach it had taken concerning overtime in workplaces with twenty four hour shifts in its well-established case-law, which had up to then concerned only radio relay station workers, had also to be followed in the applicants’ situation (see paragraph 27). It reasoned in that connection that it would not be possible for an employee to work continuously for twenty-four hours without setting aside any time for rest. Therefore, in the opinion of the Court, it cannot be convincingly argued that the Court of Cassation’s decision to quash the first-instance court’s judgment lacked reasoning or failed to take into account the arguments of the applicants. Nor does the fact that the Court of Cassation gave an unfavorable interpretation of domestic law suggest, in and of itself, that its reasoning suffered from arbitrariness or manifest unreasonableness.
53. The Court considers that the core of the applicants’ arguments was that the Court of Cassation should have interpreted the law, including its own case-law, as entitling employees to overtime pay when they were physically present at the workplace, regardless of whether they actually performed any tasks. According to the applicants, such a line of interpretation would have been the correct approach to take on the facts of their case, which had been duly established by the first-instance court. Although the Court is mindful of the fact that the Court of Cassation’s interpretation of the domestic law had a direct effect on the outcome of the proceedings, it is unable to agree with the applicants that the interpretation as such constituted a procedural flaw in the conduct of the domestic proceedings so as to render them unfair. For the Court, the reasoning given by the Court of Cassation pertained to the substantive limitation on the right to overtime in the particular context of twenty-four-hour shift work. It is not for this Court to question under Article 6 of the Convention whether the domestic courts’ interpretation of what counts as overtime hours was appropriate since that would effectively involve substituting its own views for those of the domestic courts as to the proper interpretation and content of domestic law (see, mutatis mutandis, Z and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 29392/95, § 101, ECHR 2001 V). The Court reiterates in that regard that it is a principle of Convention case-law that Article 6 does not in itself guarantee any particular content for civil rights and obligations in national law. The Court may not create by way of interpretation of Article 6 § 1 a substantive right which has no legal basis in the State concerned (see, mutatis mutandis, Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish and Others, cited above, § 88). In the Court’s view, the Court of Cassation’s well-established case-law defined the contours of the right to overtime and the substantive limitations on it. The case-law seems to have taken into account the customary practices of workplaces with a twenty-four-hour work shift and time off for the next twenty four or forty-eight hours. It thus concluded that out of twenty four hours spent at the workplace, only fourteen would be considered as working time given the time that would need to be set aside for rest, which was in accordance with the domestic law. Finally, it has been consistent in the application of the principles derived from its case-law to employees in similar conditions. Against this background, the Court does not have sufficient grounds to conclude that the Court of Cassation’s interpretation of domestic law was based on a manifest factual or legal error, resulting in a “denial of justice” (see Moreira Ferreira, cited above, § 85).
54. Having regard to the considerations set out above, the Court considers that the domestic courts’ reasoning in the applicants’ case was sufficient for the purposes of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. It therefore concludes that there has been no violation of that provision.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
55. The applicants submitted that erroneous decisions by the domestic courts had deprived them of their right to be awarded compensation for the overtime hours they had worked, as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
56. The Government contested their argument, stating that the applicants had not had “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as their claims could not be considered as either recognised or enforceable since there had not been a sufficient basis in the domestic case-law to confirm their right to overtime pay beyond a period of fourteen hours.
57. The third-party intervener submitted that under domestic law the applicants had had a right to be paid for their overtime work and that the dismissal of their claims on the basis of the fourteen-hour presumption had constituted an unjustified interference with their right to earned income. It argued further that the presumption applied by the Court of Cassation had had no legal basis.
58. The Court reiterates that an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004-IX).
59. In the light of its case-law, the Court does not view the existence of a “genuine dispute” or an “arguable claim” as a criterion for determining whether there is a legitimate expectation protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Where the proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, it may be regarded as an asset only where it has a sufficient basis in national law, for example if it is based on either a legislative provision or a legal act bearing on the property interest in question (see Saghinadze and Others v. Georgia, no. 18768/05, § 103, 27 May 2010) or where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming it (Kopecký, cited above, § 52, and Brezovec v. Croatia, no. 13488/07, § 39, 29 March 2011).
60. Similarly, no legitimate expectation can be said to arise where there is a dispute as to the correct interpretation and application of domestic law and the applicant’s submissions are subsequently rejected by the national courts (see Kopecký, cited above, § 50, and Anheuser Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 65, ECHR 2007 I).
61. Having regard to its findings under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention that the interpretation given by the Court of Cassation to entitlement to overtime pay beyond fourteen hours was a substantive limitation on the right existing under domestic law (see paragraph 53 above), the Court concludes that the applicants did not have an enforceable claim and that their interpretation of domestic law was rejected by the domestic courts on the basis of the Court of Cassation’s well-established case law. The Court is therefore not satisfied that the applicants’ claims to overtime beyond fourteen hours in the course of a twenty-four-hour shift were sufficiently established to constitute a “possession” falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
62. It follows that the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 4 OF THE CONVENTION
63. In the present case the applicants alleged that the dismissal of their claims for overtime amounted to forced and compulsory labour in breach of Article 4 of the Convention, the relevant parts of which, read as follows:
“...
2. No one shall be required to perform forced or compulsory labour.
3. For the purpose of this article the term ‘forced or compulsory labour’ shall not include:
(a) any work required to be done in the ordinary course of detention imposed according to the provisions of Article 5 of [the] Convention or during conditional release from such detention;
(b) any service of a military character or, in case of conscientious objectors in countries where they are recognised, service exacted instead of compulsory military service;
(c) any service exacted in case of an emergency or calamity threatening the life or well-being of the community;
(d) any work or service which forms part of normal civic obligations.”
64. The Government contested that argument and submitted that nothing in the case indicated that the applicants had worked against their will. According to the information submitted by the Government, the applicants had continued to work for the same employer after lodging their applications with the Court.
65. The applicants did not reply to the Government’s observations.
66. The ETUC argued in its submission that the circumstances of the present applications might not fulfil the high threshold set by the jurisprudence of the Court relating to Article 4 of the Convention. However, in their view, excessive working time, albeit voluntarily accepted by the applicants, in and of itself ran contrary to international standards of employment law. Having regard to the importance of the issue from the standpoint of the health and safety of workers, the ETUC invited the Court to examine this part of the applicants’ complaints under Article 8 of the Convention and to scrutinise whether the excessive working hours in question had constituted an unjustified interference with the applicants’ private lives.
67. The Court reiterates that the first adjective in the phrase “forced or compulsory labour” refers to physical or mental constraint. As regards the second adjective, it cannot refer just to any form of legal compulsion or obligation. For example, work to be carried out in pursuance of a freely negotiated contract cannot be regarded as falling within the scope of Article 4 on the sole ground that one of the parties has undertaken with the other to do that work and will be subject to sanctions if he does not honour his promise. What there has to be is work “exacted ... under the menace of any penalty” and also performed against the will of the person concerned, that is work for which he “has not offered himself voluntarily” (see Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 34, Series A no. 70, and more recently, Chowdury and Others v. Greece, no. 21884/15, § 90, ECHR 2017). The Court has held previously that the notion of “penalty” is to be understood in the broad sense, as confirmed by the use of the term “any penalty”. The “penalty” may go as far as physical violence or restraint, but it can also take subtler forms, of a psychological nature, such as threats to denounce victims to the police or immigration authorities when their employment status is illegal (see C.N. and V. v. France, no. 67724/09, § 77, 11 October 2012).
68. In the present case the Court notes at the outset that the applicants accepted their work willingly, including the work and rest cycle arrangement at the workplace. There is no indication of any sort of physical or mental coercion either on part of the applicants or their employer. In the absence of such evidence, the mere possibility that the applicants could have been sanctioned with a dismissal had they rejected to work under the impugned arrangement does not amount to menace of a penalty within the meaning of Article 4 of the Convention.
69. Therefore, the Court concludes that this complaint is incompatible ratione materiae with the Convention and must be dismissed in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT,
1. Decides, unanimously, to join the applications;

2. Declares, unanimously, the complaint under Article 6 § 1 admissible;

3. Holds, by four votes to three, that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;

4. Declares, by a majority, the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention inadmissible;

5. Declares, unanimously, the complaint under Article 4 of the Convention inadmissible.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 24 October 2017, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Robert Spano
Registrar President


In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following separate opinions are annexed to this judgment.
(a) Concurring opinion of Judge Lemmens;
(b) Joint partly dissenting opinion of Judges Karaka?, Vu?ini? and Laffranque.
R.S.
S.H.N.



CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE LEMMENS
1. I agree with the judgment in so far as it concludes that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. However, in my opinion, this issue could be disposed of in a more straightforward way .
2. The applicants allege that the dismissal of their claims amounted to a denial of justice (see paragraph 3 of the judgment). More specifically, they complain about the application of the presumption that one can work only for fourteen hours in a twenty-four-hour shift (see paragraph 44 of the judgment). This presumption was established by the Court of Cassation in decisions of 2006 and 2007 (see paragraph 34 of the judgment). It was indeed applied in the applicants’ case, with reference to the Court of Cassation’s “well-established case-law” (see paragraph 27 of the judgment).
As the majority correctly reiterate, it is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law (see paragraph 50 of the judgment; see also, for recent confirmation of this principle, Medžlis Islamske Zajednice Br?ko and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina [GC], no. 17224/11, § 71, 27 June 2017, and Satakunnan Markkinapörssi Oy and Satamedia Oy v. Finland [GC], no. 931/13, § 144, ECHR 2017 (extracts)). Unless the domestic court’s decision is arbitrary or manifestly unreasonable, the Court will not intervene (see paragraph 48 of the judgment). Having regard to the subsidiary nature of the Court’s supervisory function, the threshold for arbitrariness or manifest unreasonableness is high (see paragraph 49 of the judgment).
The above-mentioned presumption is part of Turkish domestic law. It is for the domestic courts to determine its scope, and to determine whether or not it applies where individual labour contracts or collective bargaining agreements provide for more than fourteen-hour working periods. I cannot see anything arbitrary or unreasonable in their finding that the presumption, with all its characteristics under the Court of Cassation’s case-law, is applicable to the facts of the applicants’ case.
This should be sufficient, in my opinion, to reject the applicants’ complaint under Article 6 § 1.
3. The judgment goes on to consider the complaint from the point of view of the obligation for a court to give reasons for its decision and to reply to the parties’ arguments (see the principles mentioned in paragraphs 47-48).
I wonder whether this is an answer to the complaint actually brought by the applicants. They do not seem to complain about any formal shortcoming in the reasoning of the Court of Cassation: rather, they complain about the substance of that court’s reasoning.
Be that as it may, like the majority, I do not to see any irregularity in the reasoning of the courts. First of all, what more should domestic courts say when they hold that a presumption is of a general nature and applies to all cases of working shifts of twenty-four hours? Moreover, the applicants criticise the decision of the Court of Cassation of 28 October 2008 (see paragraph 27 of the judgment), but they lose sight of the fact that their case was subsequently heard again by the ?zmir Labour Court, which in its judgment of 28 December 2009 gave its own reasons for the dismissal of their claims (see paragraph 28 of the judgment).
4. In sum, the complaint brought by the applicants under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention is of a “fourth-instance” nature, and it is not for the Court to deal with such a complaint (see, among other authorities, Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish and Others v. Romania [GC], no. 76943/11, § 90, ECHR 2016 (extracts), and De Tommaso v. Italy [GC], no. 43395/09, § 170, ECHR 2017 (extracts)). The complaint does not need long explanations to justify its dismissal.
Of course, it is open to the applicants to complain about the content of Turkish law, in particular about the presumption applied in their case. But this is then not a complaint about a violation of Article 6 § 1, a provision which guarantees a fair procedure.
Actually, the applicants do complain about violations of provisions of the Convention guaranteeing substantive rights, namely Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 4 of the Convention. However, these complaints are rejected (see paragraphs 55-69 of the judgment), for reasons with which I fully agree.
5. I would like to conclude by observing that the Court does not seem to be the most appropriate forum for addressing the applicants’ complaints.
The substance of their complaints is that the presumption applied in their case leads to excessive working hours and prevents them from receiving a fair remuneration. These are issues that touch upon the right to just conditions of work and the right to a fair remuneration, guaranteed respectively by Articles 2 and 4 of the Revised European Social Charter (see paragraph 37 of the judgment). Turkey ratified the Revised European Social Charter and agreed to be bound by, among other provisions, Article 2 § 1, dealing with reasonable working hours, and Article 4 § 2, dealing with remuneration for overtime work (see paragraph 38 of the judgment).
It seems to me that this is therefore a matter that might better be raised with the European Committee of Social Rights.

?
JOINT PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES KARAKA?, VU?INI? AND LAFFRANQUE
We do not agree with the majority that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
It is clear that it is not the primary task of the Court to interpret domestic law, but it will examine whether the proceedings as a whole complied with the requirements of Article 6 of the Convention, including the obligation to give reasons for the judgments given. According to the established case-law, the judgments of courts and tribunals should adequately state the reasons on which they are based (see Tatishvili v. Russia, no. 1509/02, § 58, ECHR 2007 I).
The question whether a court has failed to fulfil the obligation to state reasons, deriving from Article 6 of the Convention, can only be determined in the light of the circumstances of the case (see Ruiz Torija v. Spain, 9 December 1994, § 29, Series A no. 303-A). Without requiring a detailed answer to every argument put forward by a complainant, this obligation nevertheless presupposes that a party to judicial proceedings can expect a specific and express reply to those submissions which are decisive for the outcome of the proceedings in question (ibid., § 30; see also, Hiro Balani v. Spain, 9 December 1994, § 28, Series A no. 303-B; Gheorghe v. Romania, no. 19215/04, § 43, 15 March 2007; and Deryan v. Turkey, no. 41721/04, § 33, 21 July 2015).
In the present case, the first-instance court established certain facts by seeking a detailed expert opinion on three occasions, and found that the applicants had a right to overtime pay. Among those facts, it was undisputed that the applicable collective bargaining agreement had expressly provided for the inclusion of rest periods as working time and their remuneration as such. This provision, which was in accordance with the domestic law, was relevant to the facts of the applicants’ case (see paragraph 33 of the judgment).
The Ministry of Labour’s official audit report, which was mentioned in the expert opinion, remarked on and criticised the impugned practice of a working time of twenty-four hours and contained a recommendation that workers should be paid for those overtime hours. Furthermore, the defendant employer did not contest the fact that the workers at the place of work in question had been employed on the basis of twenty-four-hour shifts and that the business remained fully operational during that time. In fact, the employer’s submissions attributed the inability to compensate workers for overtime in full to a lack of funds from the State budget. Finally, domestic law provided that time spent by employees waiting for work, when they were still at the disposal of their employer, should be counted as working time (see paragraph 31 of the judgment).
The Court of Cassation quashed the first-instance court’s decision on technical grounds on 17 April 2006, without applying its existing and well established case-law. It then overturned on 28 October 2008 the first instance judgment, which was based on the new expert report recalculating the amounts following the Court of Cassation decision of 17 April 2006, without referring to the established facts, the parties’ submissions or the applicable collective agreement. This time the decision was based solely on what appears to be a conclusive presumption formulated in the Court of Cassation’s recent case-law in a series of cases that involved workers at radio relay stations.
In that regard, the Court of Cassation failed to justify why such a presumption of fact counted for more than the actual facts of the case which had already been established by the first-instance court. Nor did it explain why the express provisions of the collective agreement, providing for rest periods to be included as working time, did not apply to the applicants’ situation, although the relevant domestic legal framework allowed the parties to an employment contract to designate rules that were more favourable for employees than those in the Labour Code (see paragraph 33 of the judgment). The majority, like the Court of Cassation, did not take into consideration the collective bargaining agreement providing for the remuneration of rest periods as working time (see paragraph 10 and the reasoning in that regard in paragraph 53), although this was a relevant law in the applicant’s situation.
Moreover, the applicants’ case concerned a situation that was different from that of the radio relay station workers. Given that the proper facts of the applicants’ case had been established by the first instance court, and that their entitlement to remuneration for rest periods under their collective bargaining agreement was not contested, the Court of Cassation was required to justify why the presumption, which had been developed in a different factual context, would also apply to the applicants’ case. The merits of their case should therefore have been distinguished and determined on the specific facts of that case rather than on the basis of unsupported assumptions.
In that regard, we see no necessity to examine whether the principles enunciated in the presumption itself were fair or not. The automatic application of this presumption to the applicants’ situation, without any additional details or reasons specific to that judgment being provided, deprived the applicants of fair proceedings.
In our view there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
We also voted against point 4 of the operative provisions concerning the inadmissibility of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
We think that the applicants had an enforceable claim such as to constitute a possession falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni
Resto inammissibile (Art. 35) criterio di ammissibilità
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - udienza corretta)


SECONDA SEZIONE







CAUSA TBET ?MENTE? ED ALTRI C. TURCHIA

(Richieste N. 57818/10, 57822/10, 57825/10 57827/10 e 57829/10)










SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

24 ottobre 2017


DEFINITIVO

24/01/2018

Questa sentenza è divenuta definitivo sotto Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Tibet Mente ?ed Altri c. la Turchia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Robert Spano, Presidente
Julia Laffranque,
Il ?Karaka?,
Nebojša Vuini?,
Paul Lemmens,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 26 settembre 2017,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in cinque richieste (N. 57818/10, 57822/10 57825/10, 57827/10 57829/10) contro la Repubblica di Turchia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con cinque cittadini turchi, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 9 agosto 2010.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in ?zmir. Il Governo turco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che la definitivo sentenza nella loro causa, respingendo che le loro rivendicazioni per lavoro straordinario, paga, aveva corrisposto ad un rifiuto di giustizia che aveva funzionato contrario alla proibizione di forzato lavori.
4. In 26 maggio 2014 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
5. Commenti di terzo-parte furono ricevuti dalla Sindacato Confederazione europea (ETUC) che era stato dato permesso col Presidente per intervenire nella procedura scritto (l'Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 44 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte).
6. 24 settembre 2015 il Vicepresidente della Sezione decise, sotto Decida 54 § 2 (il c), invitare le parti a presentare le ulteriori osservazioni su se c'era stata una violazione di Articolo 4 § 2 della Convenzione che deve al fatto che i richiedenti avevano lavorato lavoro straordinario senza qualsiasi la rimunerazione ed in eccesso dei limiti permesso con la legislazione nazionale.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
7. I richiedenti nacquero nel 1967, 1965, 1968 1960 e 1958 rispettivamente e vive in ?zmir.
8. I fatti della causa possono essere riassunti siccome segue.
9. I richiedenti hanno avuto un lavoro nei negozi esenti da dazio a ?zmir Adnan Menderes Aeroporto fin da 1993. Loro sono membri della Tekgda ?Lavoro Unione che aveva firmato un collettivo operano accordo con la Generale Direzione di Monopoli su Spiriti e Tabacco, i richiedenti il datore di lavoro di ' e precedentemente un'impresa di Stato-corsa.
10. Durante il loro lavoro i richiedenti operarono in “lavoro e cicli di resto.” Nei quattro mesi del periodo di estate loro lavorarono continuamente di conseguenza, per ventiquattro ore e rimasero le prossime ventiquattro ore. Per il rimanendo otto mesi dell'anno, il periodo di inverno loro lavorarono per ventiquattro ore e rimasero per le prossime quaranta-otto ore. Il loro orario di lavoro non prese conto di fine-settimana o feste di pubblico come i negozi esenti da dazio rimase ventiquattro ore aperte per giorno, sette giorni per settimana. Siccome interruzioni di resto di riguardi e periodi, sezione 22 del loro collettivo opera accordo previde che simile periodi sarebbero contati come lavorando tempo e che loro non potessero essere soggetto a deduzioni salariali.
11. 10 ottobre 2003 i richiedenti, con l'assistenza del loro avvocato, individuo avviato e procedimenti separati contro il loro datore di lavoro di fronte allo ?zmir Operi Corte. Loro dissero il risarcimento per le ore di lavoro straordinario che loro avevano lavorato oltre il legali lavorando tempo per i cinque anni precedenti del loro lavoro. Loro assegnarono l'Operi Codice in vigore al tempo di materiale ed al loro accordo collettivo. Sia documenti definirono lavoro straordinario come lavoro in eccesso della quaranta-cinque-ora regolare settimana lavorativa e purché per rimunerazione per simile lavoro a quell'e un mezzo calcola il tasso orario e regolare.
12. 1 novembre 2003 i richiedenti avviati procedimenti nuovi contro il loro datore di lavoro di fronte allo ?zmir Operano Corte e richiesero l'ulteriore rimunerazione per lavoro fatto su fine-settimana e feste pubbliche ed il risarcimento per permesso annuale che loro non avevano preso.
13. Avendo riguardo ad allo sfondo comune dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' in sia espone di procedimenti, gli ?zmir Lavorano Corte decise di congiungere i procedimenti di ogni richiedente e chiedere un rapporto competente riguardo al calcolo delle loro rivendicazioni per lavoro straordinario, fine-settimana e festa pubblica pagano e rimunerazione per permesso annuale e non usato.
14. 14 luglio 2004 l'esperto presentò un rapporto nel quale lui notò, inter l'alia che clausola 25 (il c) dell'accordo collettivo concluso fra le parti previste per un diritto a lavoro straordinario paghi, calcolò sulla base di uno e mezze volte il tasso orario. Lui si riferì inoltre ad un rendiconto di certificazione ufficiale col Ministero di Lavori, 10 settembre 2003 datato che celebre che durante il periodo di estate precedente, fra i mesi di giugno e settembre lavoratori alla società in oggetto aveva lavorato lavoro straordinario di in mesi 139.5 ore che avevano trentun giorni di calendario e 135 ore di mesi rimanenti. Fra ottobre e maggio, loro avevano lavorato rispettivamente 22.5 ore e quindici ore di lavoro straordinario di periodo di inverno precedente. Le ore lavorate in eccesso del legale che lavora tempo sarebbero dovute essere rimunerate di conseguenza. Secondo il rapporto competente, i richiedenti che il datore di lavoro di ' prima era stato avvertito, 25 novembre 1996, col Ministero di Operi concernendo le sue pratiche su orari di lavoro.
15. Sulla base del suo esame del timekeeping della società registra, l'esperto calcolò il numero di ore lavorato come lavoro straordinario in riguardo di ogni richiedente, mentre deducendo tre ore di resto per ogni giorno funzionò.
16. L'esperto determinò che il datore di lavoro non dovette qualsiasi cosa ai richiedenti per fine-settimana e lavoro di festa pubblico come la rimunerazione per quelli giorni era stato in conformità con le regolamentazioni applicabili. L'esperto notò anche che i richiedenti non potessero chiedere qualsiasi il risarcimento per permesso annuale e non usato siccome loro ancora stavano lavorando alla società e simile permesso era solamente pagabile alla fine di un contratto.
17. I richiedenti sollevarono un numero di eccezioni al rapporto competente. Loro affermarono che gli archivi di timekeeping usarono per il calcolo non riflettè le ore effettive lavorate siccome loro erano copie non ufficiali tenute col datore di lavoro che non fu firmato con impiegati. In che riguardo a, i richiedenti presentarono che loro avevano lavorato per più ore che stabilì con l'esperto. Loro richiesero che la corte prende l'altra prova in considerazione, incluso il turno del datore di lavoro di imputato ordina che dettagliò chi avrebbero funzionato quando e per quanto tempo, così come rapporti dal Regionale Operano Inspectorate. Loro presentarono anche che la deduzione di tre ore di resto non fu basata su fatto al giorno ma era un'assunzione con l'esperto. I richiedenti presentarono che in qualsiasi l'evento la conclusione ipotetica dell'esperto in periodi di resto non poteva essere appellatasi su perché l'accordo collettivo aveva previsto espressamente per l'inclusione di simile periodi come una parte di lavorare tempo. I richiedenti non sollevati difficoltà alla conclusione dell'esperto sul proscioglimento delle loro rivendicazioni per pagano per lavoro al fine-settimana e su feste pubbliche e per permesso annuale e non usato.
18. In osservazioni di 22 luglio 2004, il datore di lavoro di imputato eccezioni in rilievo al rapporto competente ed anche dibattè che i documenti di timekeeping non potevano essere appellatisi su siccome loro erano copie non ufficiali. Sostenne anche che non era stato capace di pagare lavoro straordinario nell'il pieno dovere ad una mancanza di finanziamenti dallo Stato. Presentò che i richiedenti avevano in qualsiasi evento stato consapevole delle disposizioni che lavorano e non aveva richiesto mai un trasferimento ad un'altra unità della Generale Direzione di Monopoli.
19. Gli ?zmir Lavorano Corte chiese all'esperto di completare il suo rapporto con sentenze riguardo alle parti le eccezioni di '.
20. 4 luglio 2005, l'esperto presentò un supplemento al suo rapporto nel quale lui corresse le sue sentenze riguardo ai periodi di resto nella luce dei richiedenti l'eccezione di ' e calcolò le ore che loro avevano lavorato come ventiquattro nel corso di una venti-quattro-ora turno. Lui mantenne le sue sentenze riguardo al timesheets, mentre presentando che il suo in esame di situ del posto di lavoro e paragoni fra il documento ufficiale e le copie del datore di lavoro non avevano rivelato qualsiasi le discordanze.
21. 12 settembre 2005 gli ?zmir Operano Corte trovata in favore dei richiedenti in parte ed assegnarono loro gli importi dati nel rapporto dell'esperto in riguardo del lavoro straordinario non retribuito. Respinse le loro rivendicazioni per paghi per fine-settimana e lavoro di festa pubblico e per permesso annuale e non usato.
22. Sia parti fecero appello alla Corte di Cassazione.
23. 17 aprile 2006 la Corte di Cassazione annullò la decisione e rinviò la causa. Fondò che il Lavori Corte non aveva preso in considerazione qualsiasi tempo che potrebbe essere usato da periodi di resto e che perciò il calcolo di lavoro straordinario non poteva essere ritenuto accurato. Affermò anche che il calcolo di lavoro straordinario dovrebbe essere basato su orari di lavoro settimanali piuttosto che il mensile lavorando tempo usato nel rapporto competente.
24. Nei procedimenti ricapitolati, gli ?zmir Operano Corte richiesta che l'esperto corregge il rapporto in luce della Corte della decisione della Cassazione.
25. 11 settembre 2007 l'esperto revisionò le sentenze siccome ordinato e concluso che i richiedenti avrebbero avuto probabilmente un minimo di tre ore per resto durante una venti-quattro-ora turno. L'esperto ricalcolò perciò il loro diritto a lavoro straordinario sulla base di ventun ore di lavoro effettivo e lo comparò con la settimana lavorativa legale di quaranta cinque ore.
26. In 26 maggio 2008 gli ?zmir Operano Corte assegnata il risarcimento di richiedenti per lavoro straordinario come determinata nel rapporto competente e riveduto.
27. Il datore di lavoro di imputato fece appello, mentre dibatte che la presunzione stabilì nella causa-legge della Corte di Cassazione che una persona non poteva lavorare più di quattordici ore nel corso di una venti-quattro-ora turno dovrebbe essere fatto domanda ai fatti della controversia. La Corte di Cassazione annullò poi la sentenza di primo-istanza 28 ottobre 2008 e rinviò la causa sui motivi seguenti:
“Può essere visto dall'archivio di causa che durante i mesi di estate [i richiedenti] lavorò per 24 ore e successivamente rimase per 24 ore; e di mesi di inverno loro lavorarono per 24 ore e successivamente rimasero per 48 ore. Comunque, come determinato con la causa-legge ben stabilita della Grande Camera della Corte della Divisione Civile di Cassazione, in posti di lavoro dove c'è 24-ora sposta, dopo che la deduzione di tempo spese su certe attività come rimanendo, mentre mangiando ed adempiendo alle altre necessità, una persona può lavorare solamente per 14 ore per giorno... Questo approccio deve essere seguito anche nella causa presente.”
28. Nei procedimenti ricapitolati, gli ?zmir Lavorano, Corte decisa di seguire la decisione della Corte di Cassazione ed un altro rapporto competente fu disegnata su per quel il fine. Il rapporto, 21 luglio 2009 datato calcolò i richiedenti ' tempo che lavora quotidiano come quattordici ore, in linea con la Corte della presunzione della Cassazione di fatto. Il calcolo nel rapporto nuovo condotto a nessun lavoro straordinario che è trovato per le settimane nelle quali i richiedenti avevano lavorato tre giorni come il tempo che lavora era meno che il limite legale di quaranta-cinque ore. Per le settimane nelle quali i richiedenti avevano lavorato quattro giorni, il rapporto calcolò il tempo che lavora totale come cinquanta-sei ore, mentre conducendo ad una valutazione nel rapporto di nove ore di lavoro straordinario. 28 dicembre 2009 che gli zmir Operano Corte rese una definitivo sentenza nei richiedenti la causa di ', basato sul rapporto competente di 21 luglio 2009. Come un risultato di che interpretazione, alcuni dei richiedenti che le rivendicazioni di ' sono state respinte completamente mentre gli altri furono assegnati meno pressoché novanta percento che il rapporto competente e precedente aveva calcolato.
29. 25 gennaio 2010 i richiedenti fecero appello contro la decisione e sostennero che il fatto che loro lavoravano da ventiquattro ore continuamente già era stato confermato coi documenti legali del Ministero di Lavori, sia festeggia ' testimonia a dichiarazioni e l'altra prova nell'archivio, incluso i rapporti competenti rovesciati con la Corte di Cassazione. Benché loro avevano provato che fatto, la sentenza era stata basata sulla presunzione che lavorare per più di quattordici ore per giorno era fisicamente impossibile.
30. 18 marzo 2010 che la Corte di Cassazione ha sostenuto gli ?zmir Operano la decisione di Corte senza rispondere ai richiedenti le eccezioni di '.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. diritto nazionale Attinente
31. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Operi Codice (la Legge n. 1475), come in vigore durante il periodo attinente e come applicabile alla controversia di fronte alle corti nazionali, legga siccome segue:
Articolo 35
“Lavoro straordinario paga
...
un) Lavoro straordinario non eccederà tre ore per giorno,
b) L'importo totale di lavoro straordinario in un anno non può eccedere 90 giornate lavorative,
c) Ogni ora di lavoro straordinario sarà rimunerata a quell'e un mezzo calcola il tasso orario e regolare.
...
d) lavoro di Lavoro straordinario è in anticipo soggetto ad auorizzazione con la Direzione Regionale di Lavori.
...”
Articolo 61
“Lavorando tempo
un) La massimo che lavora tempo è quaranta-cinque ore per settimana.
Dove sei giorni per settimana sono funzionati in un posto di lavoro, il quotidiano lavorando tempo non eccederà 7.5 ore...”
Articolo 62
“Periodi considerarono come ore di lavoro
...
c) i tempi quando l'impiegato non ha nessun lavoro per compiere durante l'arrivo di lavoro nuovo, ma rimane alla disposizione del datore di lavoro.”
Articolo 64
“Impiegati saranno concessi per rimanere periodi... nella conformità con lavoro consueto pratica nella maniera seguente:
...
c) un'ora [l'interruzione] per lavoro che dura più di sette ed un mezze ore.
...
Periodi di resto summenzionati non sono contati come lavorando tempo.”
32. Le disposizioni attinenti nei richiedenti ' che accordo di mercanteggiamento collettivo ha offerto siccome segue:
“Articolo 22 - Lavorando Time
...
Interruzioni di resto sono contate come tempo lavorato e simile periodi di resto non può essere dedotto dal salario di impiegato.”
“Articolo 25-Lavoro straordinario
...
Ore lavorate oltre la settimana di lavoro di quaranta-cinque ore sono lavoro straordinario.
...
Lavoro straordinario è rimunerato uno e mezze volte il tasso orario e regolare. ”
33. Una distinzione è fatta in turco opera la giurisprudenza di legge fra obbligatorio operi disposizioni di codice che sono assolute e quelli che possono essere cambiati in favore di impiegati. Di conseguenza, parti non possono derogare a da articoli che sono di una natura assolutamente obbligatoria, mentre è accettato in riguardo di alcuni degli articoli che accordi individuali e collettivi possono offrire per termini che sono più favorevoli per impiegati che quelli nell'Operi Codice. Di conseguenza, approvvigiona relativo a periodi di resto è obbligatorio e parti non possono derogare a da loro, comunque loro possono posare in giù articoli più favorevoli.
B. giurisprudenza nazionale ed Attinente
34. La presunzione che solamente quattordici ore possono essere accettate come momento di entrata che lavora effettivo mette dove un solo turno consiste di ventiquattro ore fu stabilito con la Grande Camera della Corte della Divisione Civile di Cassazione prima (Yargtay ?Hukuk Genel Kurulu) in decisione n. E.2006/9 107, K.2006/144. Fu emesso 5 aprile 2006 in una causa riguardo ad una controversia di lavoro straordinario paghi per lavoratori di sicurezza che lavorarono venti turni di quattro ore ad una stazione di ricambio di radio. Come coi richiedenti presenti, i lavoratori di sicurezza operarono anche sulla base di lavoro continuo di ventiquattro ore e calcolano via per le ventiquattro ore susseguenti. La Corte di Cassazione fondò stabilì in che causa per la quale i lavoratori non avevano lavorato continuamente che periodo siccome loro erano stati appaiati su col datore di lavoro per permettere una persona di lavorare e l'altro rimanere. Secondo la Grande Camera della Corte della Divisione Civile di Cassazione che disposizione ha voluto dire che ogni lavoratore spese una media di dodici ore su dovere, di quale ora aveva in qualsiasi causa per essere accantonato per il periodo di resto obbligatorio. In decisioni adottate il 2006 e 21 marzo 2007 di 14 giugno che controversie simili ed interessate che comportano gli altri radio ricambio stazione lavoratori, la Grande Camera della Corte della Divisione Civile di Cassazione sostenne che irrispettoso di se il lavoro fu eseguito in turni o paia, il tempo effettivo lavorato sarebbe impiegato come quattordici ore in posti di lavoro dove venti-quattro-ora turni di lavoro erano la norma. Secondo quelle decisioni, una persona media non sarebbe in grado lavorare per ventiquattro ore continuamente ed avrebbe bisogno di prendere una media di dieci ore via per le loro necessità fisiche, come rimanendo mentre dorme e mangiando (n. E.2006/9-374, K.2006/382, ed E.2007/9 176 K.2007/164).
35. Non ci sono nessuno specifici articoli di prova riguardo a rivendicazioni di lavoro straordinario. A meno che là è scritto prova, come documenti di libro paga firmati senza riserva con impiegati la Corte di Cassazione rigurado lavoro straordinario per essere una questione di fatto e perciò concede qualsiasi prova per essere chiamato in prova, incluso testimoni (veda, per esempio, la decisione della nona Divisione Civile della Corte di Cassazione, E.2008/939, K.2008/5619 adottò 21 marzo 2008).
III. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE E ALTRO MATERIALE
36. Lo Statuto Sociale europeo prevede, come attinente:
Articolo 2-Il diritto alle condizioni eque di lavoro
“Con una prospettiva ad assicurando l'esercizio effettivo del diritto alle condizioni eque di lavoro, l'impresa di Parti Contraente:
1. prevedere per orari di lavoro quotidiani e settimanali ragionevoli, la settimana lavorativa per essere ridotto progressivamente alla misura che l'aumento della produttività e l'altra licenza di fattori attinente;
2. prevedere per feste pubbliche con paga;
3. prevedere per un minimo del festa annuale di due settimane con paga;
4. prevedere per feste pagate e supplementari od orari di lavoro ridotto per lavoratori prese parte in occupazioni pericolose o poco sane siccome prescritto;
5. assicurare un periodo di resto settimanale che può, il più lontano possibile coincide col giorno riconosciuto con tradizione o costume nel paese o regione riguardò come un giorno di resto.”
Articolo 4-Il diritto ad una rimunerazione equa
“Con una prospettiva ad assicurando l'esercizio effettivo del diritto a cassaforte e le condizioni che lavorano sane, l'impresa di Parti Contraente:
1. riconoscere il diritto di lavoratori ad una rimunerazione come darà loro e le loro famiglie un standard di vita decente;
2. riconoscere il diritto di lavoratori ad un tasso aumentato di rimunerazione per lavoro di lavoro straordinario, soggetto ad eccezioni nelle particolari cause;
3. riconoscere il diritto di uomini e lavoratori di donne per uguagliare paga per lavoro di valore uguale;
4. riconoscere il diritto di tutti i lavoratori ad un periodo ragionevole di avviso per conclusione di lavoro;
5. permettere solamente deduzioni da salarii sotto le condizioni ed alla misura prescritta con leggi nazionali o regolamentazioni o fissò con accordi collettivi o assegnazioni di arbitrato.
L'esercizio di questi diritti sarà realizzato con accordi collettivi e liberamente conclusi, con sistema di fissazione salariale e legale o con altro vuole dire appropriato alle condizioni di cittadino.”
37. Lo Statuto Sociale europeo (riveduto) prevede, come attinente:
Articolo 2-Il diritto alle condizioni eque di lavoro
“Con una prospettiva ad assicurando l'esercizio effettivo del diritto alle condizioni eque di lavoro, l'impresa di Parti:
1. prevedere per orari di lavoro quotidiani e settimanali ragionevoli, la settimana lavorativa per essere ridotto progressivamente alla misura che l'aumento della produttività e l'altra licenza di fattori attinente;
2. prevedere per feste pubbliche con paga;
3. prevedere per un minimo del ' di quattro settimane festa annuale con paga;
4. eliminare rischi in occupazioni inerentemente pericolose o poco sane, e dove non è stato ancora possibile eliminare o sufficientemente ridurre questi rischi, prevedere per o una riduzione di orari di lavoro o feste pagate e supplementari per lavoratori prese parte in simile occupazioni;
5. assicurare un periodo di resto settimanale che può, il più lontano possibile coincide col giorno riconosciuto con tradizione o costume nel paese o regione riguardò come un giorno di resto;
6. assicurare che lavoratori sono informati in forma scritto, al più presto possibile ed in qualsiasi l'evento non più tardi che due mesi dopo la data di cominciare il loro lavoro, degli aspetti essenziali del contratto o relazione di lavoro;
7. assicurare che lavoratori che compiono beneficio di lavoro serale da misure che prendono conto della natura speciale del lavoro.”
Articolo 4-Il diritto ad una rimunerazione equa
“Con una prospettiva ad assicurando l'esercizio effettivo del diritto ad una rimunerazione equa, l'impresa di Parti:
1. riconoscere il diritto di lavoratori ad una rimunerazione come darà loro e le loro famiglie un standard di vita decente;
2. riconoscere il diritto di lavoratori ad un tasso aumentato di rimunerazione per lavoro di lavoro straordinario, soggetto ad eccezioni nelle particolari cause;
3. riconoscere il diritto di uomini e lavoratori di donne per uguagliare paga per lavoro di valore uguale;
4. riconoscere il diritto di tutti i lavoratori ad un periodo ragionevole di avviso per conclusione di lavoro;
5. permettere solamente deduzioni da salarii sotto le condizioni ed alla misura prescritta con leggi nazionali o regolamentazioni o fissò con accordi collettivi o assegnazioni di arbitrato.
L'esercizio di questi diritti sarà realizzato con accordi collettivi e liberamente conclusi, con sistema di salario-fissazione legale o con altro vuole dire appropriato alle condizioni di cittadino.”
38. Turchia ha ratificato sia lo Statuto Sociale europeo e lo Statuto Sociale europeo e riveduto, il 1989 e 27 giugno 2007 di 24 novembre rispettivamente. Al tempo di depositare lo strumento di ratifica, Turchia rese, una dichiarazione che enumera le disposizioni dello Statuto Sociale europeo sé si considerò confine con. Il ruolo né incluse Articolo 2 né divide in paragrafi 2 di Articolo 4. Secondo la dichiarazione resa al tempo di depositare lo strumento di ratifica dello Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto, Turchia si considera confine, fra le altre disposizioni con paragrafo 1 di Articolo 2 e con paragrafo 2 di Articolo 4.
39. Il Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali notò nelle sue Conclusioni (2010, Turchia) che multe per inosservanza coi requisiti giuridici su lavorare tempo erano molto basse: 100 milioni a 500 di milione Lira turca (approssimativamente 50 a 260 euros). Chiese perciò ulteriori informazioni sulla soprintendenza di lavorare regolamentazioni di tempo con l'Operi Ispezione. Notò in più tardi Conclusioni (2014, Turchia) che le regolamentazioni di tempo che lavorano in vigore non erano in conformità ad Articolo 2 § 1 dello Statuto per motivi che la legislazione vigente (la Legge n. 4857) concedè lavorando ogni settimana tempo di su a sessanta-sei ore.
LA LEGGE
I. UNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
40. Dato che le richieste concernono azioni di reclamo simili ed aumento problemi identici sotto la Convenzione, la Corte decide di congiungerli facendo seguito Decidere 42 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte.
II. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
41. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il loro diritto a pagamento per lavoro di lavoro straordinario, come stabilito durante i procedimenti di fronte alla corte di primo-istanza, era stato negato a loro come un risultato di una presunzione che era stata fatta domanda ingiustificabilmente con la Corte di Cassazione. I richiedenti si appellarono su Articolo 6 della Convenzione, la parte attinente di che legge siccome segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge.”
42. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
43. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
44. I richiedenti dibatterono che la presunzione fece domanda alla loro causa con la Corte di Cassazione era stato manifestamente irragionevole. Loro presentarono che la Corte di Cassazione non aveva spiegato perché tale presunzione era stata fatta domanda automaticamente quando i fatti stabilirono prima che il primo giudice di prima istanza aveva condotto alla conclusione che loro avevano lavorato più di quattordici ore. Inoltre, i richiedenti dibatterono che la presunzione sviluppò nella causa-legge della Corte di Cassazione che una persona potrebbe lavorare non più di quattordici ore su un turno di ventiquattro ore contraddissero diritto nazionale che contenne nessuno simile disposizioni. Infine, loro presentarono che la presunzione di un massimo che lavora tempo di simile lunghezza aveva la conseguenza indesiderabile di proteggere datori di lavoro che sarebbero in grado evitare pagare impiegati che lavorarono più da molto di quattordici ore. Nei richiedenti l'opinione di ', gli effetti di tale interpretazione incoraggiarono, piuttosto che orari di lavoro scoraggiati, eccessivi.
45. Il Governo dibatté che la Corte di Cassazione il 2006 e 28 ottobre 2008 di 17 aprile aveva annullato le sentenze del primo giudice di prima istanza per motivi che i secondi non avevano preso conto adeguato di tempi riservato per periodi di resto. Secondo il Governo, la Corte della decisione della Cassazione non poteva essere ritenuta per essere stata ragionata insufficientemente come la corte, si era appellato espressamente sulla sua causa-legge che prima aveva stabilito che lavorando tempo non potesse eccedere quattordici ore in posti di lavoro dove venti turni di quattro ore operarono. Infine, il Governo dibattè che era per la corte nazionale per valutare la prova di fronte a loro ed interpretare la legge per essere fatto domanda ai fatti della causa. In che riguardo a, loro considerarono che i richiedenti avevano avuto il beneficio di un pienamente processo contradditorio.
2. I commenti delle terze parti intervenute
46. L'ETUC si confece coi richiedenti che il ragionamento previde con la Corte di Cassazione era stato insufficiente. Affermò che le circostanze della causa presente rivelarono un problema sistematico nel contesto di lavoro turco riguardo a salute e la sicurezza a lavoro. In che riguardo a, loro si riferirono alle conclusioni del Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali che avevano trovato che lavorando momento di entrata Turchia non si attenne con gli standard dello Statuto Sociale europeo.
3. La valutazione della Corte
47. La Corte reitera che secondo la sua causa-legge stabilita, riflettendo un principio collegato all'amministrazione corretta della giustizia, le sentenze di corti e tribunali dovrebbero affermare adeguatamente le ragioni sulle quali loro sono basati (veda, fra altri, Tatishvili c. la Russia, n. 1509/02, § 58 ECHR 2007 io). Il diritto ad un processo equanime non può essere visto come effettivo a meno che le richieste ed osservazioni delle parti veramente sono “ascoltò”, quel è dire, in modo appropriato esaminò col tribunale (veda Carmel Saliba c. il Malta, n. 24221/13, § 64, 29 novembre 2016, ed i riferimenti offrirono therein). La Corte ha sostenuto così che una delle funzioni di una decisione ragionata è dimostrare alle parti che loro è stato ascoltato. Inoltre, una decisione ragionata riconosce una parte la possibilità di fare appello contro sé, così come la possibilità di avere la decisione fece una rassegna con un corpo di appello.
48. La misura alla quale fa domanda questo dovere di dare ragioni può variare secondo la natura della decisione e deve essere determinata nella luce delle circostanze della causa (veda García Ruiz c. la Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 26 ECHR 1999 io). È inoltre necessario per prendere in considerazione, inter l'alia, la diversità delle osservazioni che un contendente può portare di fronte alle corti e le differenze che esistono negli Stati Contraenti con riguardo ad a disposizioni legali, articoli consueti, opinione giuridica e la presentazione e redigendo di sentenze. Quel è perché la questione se una corte è andata a vuoto ad adempiere l'obbligo per affermare ragioni, mentre derivando da Articolo 6 della Convenzione, può essere determinato solamente nella luce delle circostanze della causa (veda Ruiz Torija c. la Spagna, 9 dicembre 1994, § 29 la Serie Un n. 303A?). La Corte non vuole, in principio, intervenga, a meno che le decisioni giunsero alle corti nazionali sembri arbitrario o manifestamente irragionevole e purché che i procedimenti nell'insieme era equo, come richiesto con Articolo 6 § 1 (veda, inter l'alia, Khamidov c. la Russia, n. 72118/01, § 170, 15 novembre 2007, ed il Lupeni greco Parrocchia cattolica ed Altri c. la Romania [GC], n. 76943/11, § 90 ECHR 2016 (gli estratti)).
49. Fluisce dalla causa-legge summenzionata che una decisione giudiziale e nazionale non può essere descritta come arbitrario al punto di prejudicing l'equità di procedimenti a meno che nessuno ragione è offerto per sé o la ragione date è basato su una manifestazione che errore che riguarda i fatti o legale ha commesso con la corte nazionale, mentre risultando in un “rifiuto della giustizia” (veda Moreira Ferreira c. il Portogallo (n. 2) [GC], n. 19867/12, § 85 11 luglio 2017).
50. Infine, la Corte reitera che non è il suo compito da succedere. È primariamente per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti chiarire problemi di interpretazione di legislazione nazionale (veda ?ahin di Nejdet e l'ahin di Perihan c. la Turchia [GC], n. 13279/05, § 49, 20 ottobre 2011 e le cause citati therein). Inoltre, la Corte non ha giurisdizione sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione per sostituire le sue proprie sentenze di fatto o legge per quelli di corti nazionali che sono nella migliore posizione per valutare la prova di fronte a loro e fare domanda il diritto nazionale attinente (veda, inter l'alia, Kansal c. Il Regno Unito (il dec.) n. 21413/02, 28 gennaio 2003).
51. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte nota che i richiedenti che le azioni di reclamo di ' riferiscono principalmente alla presunzione di fatto fatta domanda con la Corte di Cassazione alla loro causa. I richiedenti dibattono che la presunzione sviluppò nel diritto giurisprudenziale della Corte di Cassazione che riguarda che che sarebbe contato come lavoro straordinario era senza una base legale ed era stato fatto domanda ai fatti della loro causa senza qualsiasi la giustificazione attinente.
52. La Corte nota all'inizio che i richiedenti erano in grado presentare i loro argomenti a sia livelli di procedimenti che si attennero col requisito di un processo di adversarial. La Corte di Cassazione, avendo esaminato le circostanze della loro causa, gli argomenti delle parti e le sentenze della corte di primo-istanza venne alla conclusione che l'approccio che aveva preso riguardo a lavoro straordinario in posti di lavoro con venti turni di quattro ore nella sua causa-legge ben stabilita alla quale aveva su poi ha concernito solamente radio ricambio stazione lavoratori, doveva essere seguito anche nei richiedenti la situazione di ' (veda paragrafo 27). Ragionò in che il collegamento che non sarebbe possibile per un impiegato per lavorare per ventiquattro ore senza accantonare continuamente qualsiasi tempo per resto. Nell'opinione della Corte, non può essere dibattuto convincentemente perciò, che la Corte della decisione della Cassazione per annullare la sentenza della corte di primo-istanza mancata ragionamento o non riuscì a prendere in considerazione gli argomenti dei richiedenti. Né fa il fatto che la Corte di Cassazione diede un'interpretazione sfavorevole di diritto nazionale suggerisca, in e di sé, che il suo ragionamento patì arbitrarietà o l'irragionevolezza di manifestazione.
53. La Corte considera che il centro dei richiedenti gli argomenti di ' erano che la Corte di Cassazione avrebbe dovuto interpretare la legge, incluso la sua propria causa-legge come dando un titolo ad impiegati a lavoro straordinario paga quando loro erano fisicamente presenti al posto di lavoro, nonostante se loro davvero compierono qualsiasi i compiti. Secondo i richiedenti, tale linea di interpretazione sarebbe stata l'approccio corretto per assumere i fatti della loro causa che era stata stabilita debitamente con la corte di primo-istanza. Benché la Corte sia attenta del fatto che la Corte dell'interpretazione della Cassazione del diritto nazionale aveva un effetto diretto sulla conseguenza dei procedimenti, non è capace di convenire coi richiedenti che l'interpretazione come simile costituì così un vizio procedurale nella condotta dei procedimenti nazionali come renderli ingiusto. Per la Corte, il ragionamento dato con la Corte di Cassazione concernita alla limitazione effettiva sul diritto a lavoro straordinario nel particolare contesto di venti-quattro-ora lavoro di turno. Non è per questa Corte per interrogare sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione se il nazionale corteggia l'interpretazione di ' di che che conta come ore di lavoro straordinario era appropriato poiché quel coinvolgerebbe sostituendo efficacemente le sue proprie prospettive per quelli delle corti nazionali come all'interpretazione corretta e contenuto di diritto nazionale (veda, mutatis mutandis, Z ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 29392/95, § 101 ECHR 2001 V). La Corte reitera in che riguardo a che è un principio di causa-legge di Convenzione che Articolo 6 non garantisce in se stesso qualsiasi il particolare contenuto per diritti civili ed obblighi in legge nazionale. La Corte non può creare con modo di interpretazione di Articolo 6 § 1 un diritto effettivo che non ha base legale nello Stato riguardato (veda, mutatis mutandis, il Lupeni greco Parrocchia cattolica ed Altri, citato sopra, § 88). Nella prospettiva della Corte, la Corte della causa-legge ben stabilita di Cassazione definì i contorni del diritto a lavoro straordinario e le limitazioni effettive su sé. La causa-legge sembra avere preso in considerazione le pratiche consuete di posti di lavoro con una venti-quattro-ora turno di lavoro e calcolare via per le prossime venti quattro o quaranta-otto ore. Concluse così che fuori di venti quattro ore spese al posto di lavoro, solamente quattordici sarebbero considerati come lavorare tempo dato il tempo che avrebbe bisogno di essere accantonato per resto che era in conformità col diritto nazionale. Infine, è stato coerente nella richiesta dei principi derivata dalla sua causa-legge ad impiegati in condizioni simili. Contro questo sfondo, la Corte non ha i motivi sufficienti per concludere che la Corte dell'interpretazione della Cassazione di diritto nazionale fu basata su una manifestazione errore che riguarda i fatti o legale, mentre risulta in un “rifiuto della giustizia” (veda Moreira Ferreira, citato sopra, § 85).
54. Avendo riguardo ad alle considerazioni esposte fuori sopra, la Corte considera, che il nazionale corteggia ' che ragiona nei richiedenti la causa di ' era sufficiente per i fini di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Conclude perciò che non c'è stata violazione di quel la disposizione.
III. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
55. I richiedenti presentarono che decisioni erronee con le corti nazionali li avevano spogliati del loro diritto per essere assegnato il risarcimento per le ore di lavoro straordinario loro avevano lavorato, come garantito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
56. Il Governo contestò il loro argomento, mentre affermando che i richiedenti non avevano avuto “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 come le loro rivendicazioni non poteva essere considerato o come riconobbe o esecutivo poiché non c'era stata una base sufficiente nella causa-legge nazionale per confermare il loro diritto a lavoro straordinario paghi oltre un periodo di quattordici ore.
57. Le terze parti intervenute presentarono che sotto diritto nazionale i richiedenti avevano avuto un diritto per essere pagati per il loro lavoro di lavoro straordinario e che il proscioglimento delle loro rivendicazioni sulla base della quattordici -ora presunzione aveva costituito un'interferenza ingiustificata col loro diritto a redditi da lavoro. Dibattè inoltre che la presunzione fece domanda con la Corte di Cassazione non aveva avuto base legale.
58. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente in finora come le decisioni contestate riferisca a “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di quel la disposizione. “Le proprietà” può essere uno “proprietà esistenti” o i beni, incluso rivendicazioni in riguardo dei quali il richiedente può dibattere che lui o lei hanno almeno un “l'aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (veda Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 ECHR 2004-IX).
59. Nella luce della sua causa-legge, la Corte non vede l'esistenza di un “controversia genuina” o un “rivendicazione difendibile” come un criterio per determinare se c'è un'aspettativa legittima protegguta con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Dove è nella natura di una rivendicazione l'interesse di proprietà riservato, può essere considerato solamente un bene dove ha una base sufficiente in legge nazionale, per esempio se è basato su una disposizione legislativa o un atto legale che nasce sull'interesse di proprietà in oggetto (veda Saghinadze ed Altri c. la Georgia, n. 18768/05, § 103 27 maggio 2010) o dove là è stabilito causa-legge delle corti nazionali che lo confermano (Kopecký, citato sopra, § 52, e Brezovec c. Croatia, n. 13488/07, § 39 29 marzo 2011).
60. Similmente, si può dire che nessuna aspettativa legittima sorga, dove c'è una controversia come all'interpretazione corretta e la richiesta di diritto nazionale e le osservazioni del richiedente è respinto successivamente con le corti nazionali (veda Kopecký, citato sopra, § 50, ed Anheuser Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 65 ECHR 2007 io).
61. Avendo riguardo ad alle sue sentenze sotto Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione che l'interpretazione data con la Corte di Cassazione a diritto a lavoro straordinario pagano oltre quattordici ore una limitazione effettiva era sul diritto che esiste sotto diritto nazionale (veda paragrafo 53 sopra), la Corte conclude che i richiedenti non avevano una rivendicazione esecutiva e che la loro interpretazione di diritto nazionale fu respinta con le corti nazionali sulla base della Corte del diritto giurisprudenziale ben stabilito di Cassazione. La Corte non si soddisfa perciò che i richiedenti che ' chiede a lavoro straordinario oltre quattordici ore nel corso di una venti-quattro-ora turno sufficientemente furono stabiliti per costituire un “la proprietà” incorrendo all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
62. Segue che l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è ratione materiae incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 e deve essere respinto in conformità con Articolo 35 § 4.
IV. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 4 DELLA CONVENZIONE
63. Nella presente causa che i richiedenti hanno addotto che il proscioglimento delle loro rivendicazioni per lavoro straordinario corrisposto a forzato ed obbligatorio lavora in violazione di Articolo 4 della Convenzione, le parti attinenti di che, legga siccome segue:
“...
2. Nessuno sarà costretto a compiere forzato od obbligatorio lavori.
3. Per il fine di questo articolo il termine ‘costrinse od obbligatorio lavori ' non includerà:
(un) di qualsiasi lavoro costretto ad essere fatto nel corso ordinario della detenzione impose secondo le disposizioni di Articolo 5 [il] la Convenzione o durante la libertà condizionale da simile detenzione;
(b) qualsiasi servizio di un carattere militare o, in causa di obiettori di coscienza in paesi dove loro sono riconosciuti, servizio esigè invece di servizio militare ed obbligatorio;
(il c) qualsiasi servizio esigè in causa di un'emergenza o calamità che minacciano la vita o benessere della comunità;
(d) qualsiasi lavoro o servizio che formano parte di obblighi civici e normali.”
64. Il Governo contestò che argomento e presentò che nulla nella causa indicata che i richiedenti avevano lavorato contro la loro volontà. Secondo le informazioni presentate col Governo, i richiedenti avevano continuato a lavorare per lo stesso datore di lavoro dopo avere depositato le loro richieste con la Corte.
65. I richiedenti non risposero alle osservazioni del Governo.
66. L'ETUC dibatté nella sua osservazione che è probabile che le circostanze delle richieste presenti non adempiano la soglia alta esponga con la giurisprudenza della Corte relativo ad Articolo 4 della Convenzione. Comunque, nella loro prospettiva, tempo che lavora eccessivo, benché accettò volontariamente coi richiedenti, in e di sé contrario funzionò a standard internazionali di legge di lavoro. Avendo riguardo ad all'importanza del problema dal posto d'osservazione della salute e la sicurezza di lavoratori, l'ETUC invitò la Corte ad esaminare questa parte dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione e scrutare se gli orari di lavoro eccessivi in oggetto aveva costituito un'interferenza ingiustificata coi richiedenti ' le vite private.
67. La Corte reitera che il primo aggettivo nella frase “forzato od obbligatorio lavori” si riferisce a costrizione fisica o mentale. Come riguardi il secondo aggettivale, non può assegnare equo a qualsiasi forma di coercizione legale od obbligo. Per esempio, lavori essere eseguito nell'adempimento di un contratto liberamente negoziato non può essere considerato incorrendo all'interno della sfera di Articolo 4 sul risuoli base che una delle parti si è impegnata con l'altra per fare che lavoro e sarà soggetto a sanzioni se lui non onora la sua promessa. Che che deve là essere è lavoro “esigè... sotto la minaccia di qualsiasi la sanzione penale” ed anche compiè contro la volontà della persona riguardata, quel è lavoro per che lui “non si è offerto volontariamente” (veda il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 34 la Serie Un n. 70, e più recentemente, Chowdury ed Altri c. la Grecia, n. 21884/15, § 90 ECHR 2017). La Corte prima ha sostenuto che la nozione di “la sanzione penale” sarà capito nel senso largo, come confermato con l'uso del termine “qualsiasi la sanzione penale.” Il “la sanzione penale” può andare come lontano come la violenza fisica o limitazione, ma può prendere anche forme più sottili, di una natura psicologica come minacce per denunciare vittime alla polizia o autorità di immigrazione quando il loro status di lavoro è illegale (veda C.N. e V. c. la Francia, n. 67724/09, § 77 11 ottobre 2012).
68. Al giorno d'oggi causa che la Corte nota all'inizio che i richiedenti accettarono volentieri il loro lavoro, incluso il lavoro e disposizione di ciclo di resto al posto di lavoro. Non c'è indicazione di qualsiasi genere di coercizione fisica o mentale o su parte dei richiedenti o il loro datore di lavoro. Nell'assenza di simile prova, la possibilità mera che i richiedenti sarebbero potuti essere sanzionati con un proscioglimento li avuti respinto per lavorare la disposizione contestata sotto non corrisponde minacciare di una sanzione penale all'interno del significato di Articolo 4 della Convenzione.
69. Perciò, la Corte conclude che questa azione di reclamo è ratione materiae incompatibile con la Convenzione e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE,
1. Decide, unanimamente, congiungere le richieste;

2. Dichiara, unanimamente, l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 6 § 1 ammissibile;

3. Sostiene, con quattro voti a tre, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;

4. Dichiara, con una maggioranza, l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione inammissibile;

5. Dichiara, unanimamente, l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 4 della Convenzione inammissibile.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 24 ottobre 2017, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Robert Spano
Cancelliere Presidente


Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, le opinioni separate e seguenti sono annesse a questa sentenza.
(un) opinione concordante di Giudice Lemmens;
(b) Congiunga dissentendo in parte opinione di Giudici Karaka?, Vuini ?e Laffranque.
R.S.
S.H.N.



OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE LEMMENS
1. Io concordo finora con la sentenza in come sé conclude che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Nella mia opinione, questo problema potrebbe essere disposto comunque, di in un modo più diritto.
2. I richiedenti adducono che il proscioglimento delle loro rivendicazioni corrispose ad un rifiuto della giustizia (veda paragrafo 3 della sentenza). Più specificamente, loro si lamentano della richiesta della presunzione che uno può funzionare solamente per quattordici ore in una venti-quattro-ora turno (veda paragrafo 44 della sentenza). Questa presunzione fu stabilita con la Corte di Cassazione in decisioni di 2006 e 2007 (veda paragrafo 34 della sentenza). Fu fatto domanda davvero nei richiedenti la causa di ', con riferimento alla Corte di Cassazione “causa-legge ben stabilita” (veda paragrafo 27 della sentenza).
Come la maggioranza correttamente reiteri, è primariamente per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti interpretare e fare domanda diritto nazionale (veda paragrafo 50 della sentenza; veda anche, per recente conferma di questo principio, Medžlis Islamske Zajednice Brko ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina [GC], n. 17224/11, § 71, 27 giugno 2017, e Satakunnan Markkinapörssi Oy e Satamedia Oy c. la Finlandia [GC], n. 931/13, § 144 ECHR 2017 (gli estratti)). A meno che la decisione della corte nazionale è arbitraria o manifestamente irragionevole, la Corte non interverrà (veda paragrafo 48 della sentenza). Avendo riguardo ad alla natura sussidiaria della funzione direttiva della Corte, la soglia per l'arbitrarietà o l'irragionevolezza di manifestazione è alta (veda paragrafo 49 della sentenza).
La presunzione summenzionata è parte di diritto nazionale turco. È per le corti nazionali per determinare la sua sfera, e determinare se o non fa domanda dove individuo lavora contratti o accordi di mercanteggiamento collettivi prevedono per più di quattordici-ora che lavora periodi. Io non posso vedere qualsiasi cosa arbitrario o irragionevole nella loro sentenza che la presunzione, con tutte le sue caratteristiche sotto la Corte della causa-legge della Cassazione è applicabile ai fatti dei richiedenti la causa di '.
Questo dovrebbe essere sufficiente, nella mia opinione, respingere i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 6 § 1.
3. La sentenza segue a considerare l'azione di reclamo dal punto di vista dell'obbligo per una corte dare ragioni per la sua decisione e rispondere alle parti gli argomenti di ' (veda i principi menzionati in paragrafi 47-48).
Io mi chiedo se questa davvero è una risposta all'azione di reclamo portata coi richiedenti. Loro non sembrano lamentarsi di qualsiasi difetto formale nel ragionamento della Corte di Cassazione: piuttosto, loro si lamentano della sostanza di che corte sta ragionando.
Sia che come sé, come la maggioranza, io faccio non vedere qualsiasi l'irregolarità nel ragionamento delle corti. Prima di tutti che che più corti nazionali dovrebbero dire quando loro contengono che una presunzione è di una natura generale e fa domanda a tutte le cause di lavorare turni di ventiquattro ore? Inoltre, i richiedenti criticano la decisione della Corte di Cassazione di 28 ottobre 2008 (veda paragrafo 27 della sentenza), ma loro perdono vista del fatto che la loro causa fu ascoltata successivamente di nuovo con lo ?zmir Opera Corte che nella sua sentenza di 28 dicembre 2009 diede le sue proprie ragioni per il proscioglimento delle loro rivendicazioni (veda paragrafo 28 della sentenza).
4. In somma, l'azione di reclamo portata coi richiedenti sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione è di un “la quarto-istanza” la natura, e non è per la Corte per trattare con tale azione di reclamo (veda, fra le altre autorità, il Lupeni greco Parrocchia cattolica ed Altri c. la Romania [GC], n. 76943/11, § 90 ECHR 2016 (gli estratti), e De Tommaso c. l'Italia [GC], n. 43395/09, § 170 ECHR 2017 (gli estratti)). L'azione di reclamo non ha bisogno di chiarimenti lunghi giustificare il suo proscioglimento.
Chiaramente, è aperto ai richiedenti per lamentarsi del contenuto di legge turca, in particolare della presunzione fatta domanda nella loro causa. Ma questa non è poi un'azione di reclamo di una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1, una disposizione che garantisce una procedura equa.
Davvero, i richiedenti si lamentano di violazioni di disposizioni della Convenzione che garantisce diritti effettivi, vale a dire Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ed Articolo 4 della Convenzione. Comunque, queste azioni di reclamo sono respinte (veda divide in paragrafi 55-69 della sentenza), per ragioni con le quali io concordo pienamente.
5. Gradirei concludere con osservando che la Corte non sembri essere il foro più appropriato per rivolgersi i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di '.
La sostanza delle loro azioni di reclamo è che la presunzione fece domanda nei loro piombi di causa ad orari di lavoro eccessivi ed impedisce loro dal ricevere una rimunerazione equa. Questi sono problemi che toccano sul diritto alle condizioni eque di lavoro ed il diritto ad una rimunerazione equa, garantì rispettivamente con Articoli 2 e 4 dello Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto (veda paragrafo 37 della sentenza). Turchia ratificò lo Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto e disse di sì di essere legata con, fra le altre disposizioni l'Articolo 2 § 1, trattando con orari di lavoro ragionevoli ed Articolo 4 § 2, trattando con rimunerazione per lavoro di lavoro straordinario (veda paragrafo 38 della sentenza).
Sembra a me che questa è perciò una questione che sarebbe sollevata meglio col Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali.

?
OPINIONE CONGIUNTA IN PARTE DISCORDANTE DEI GIUDICI KARAKA?, VUINI ?E LAFFRANQUE
Noi non conveniamo con la maggioranza che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
È chiaro che non è il compito primario della Corte per interpretare diritto nazionale, ma esaminerà se i procedimenti nell'insieme si attenne coi requisiti di Articolo 6 della Convenzione, incluso l'obbligo dare ragioni per le sentenze dato. Secondo la causa-legge stabilita, le sentenze di corti e tribunali dovrebbero affermare adeguatamente le ragioni sulle quali loro sono basati (veda Tatishvili c. la Russia, n. 1509/02, § 58 ECHR 2007 io).
La questione se una corte è andata a vuoto ad adempiere l'obbligo per affermare ragioni, mentre derivando da Articolo 6 della Convenzione, può essere determinato solamente nella luce delle circostanze della causa (veda Ruiz Torija c. la Spagna, 9 dicembre 1994, § 29 la Serie Un n. 303-un). Senza richiedere una risposta particolareggiata ad ogni argomento fissi in avanti con un reclamante, questo obbligo presuppone ciononostante che una parte a procedimenti giudiziali può aspettarsi una specifica ed espressa replica a quelle osservazioni in oggetto le quali sono decisive per la conseguenza dei procedimenti (l'ibid., § 30; veda anche, Hiro Balani c. la Spagna, 9 dicembre 1994, § 28 la Serie Un n. 303-B; Gheorghe c. la Romania, n. 19215/04, § 43 15 marzo 2007; e Deryan c. la Turchia, n. 41721/04, § 33 21 luglio 2015).
Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la corte di primo-istanza stabilì i certi fatti con chiedendo un'opinione competente e particolareggiata su tre occasioni, e fondò che i richiedenti avevano un diritto a lavoro straordinario paghi. Fra quelli fatti, era incontrastato che l'accordo di mercanteggiamento collettivo ed applicabile aveva previsto espressamente per l'inclusione di periodi di resto come lavorando tempo e la loro rimunerazione come così. Questa disposizione che era in conformità col diritto nazionale era attinente ai fatti dei richiedenti la causa di ' (veda paragrafo 33 della sentenza).
Il Ministero di Operi rendiconto di certificazione ufficiale che fu menzionato nell'opinione competente remarked su e criticò la pratica contestata di un tempo che lavora di ventiquattro ore e contenne una raccomandazione che lavoratori dovrebbero essere pagati per quegli ore di lavoro straordinario. Inoltre, il datore di lavoro di imputato non contestò il fatto che i lavoratori al posto di lavoro in oggetto aveva avuto un lavoro sulla base di venti-quattro-ora turni e che gli affari rimase completamente operativo durante quel il tempo. Infatti, le osservazioni del datore di lavoro attribuirono l'incapacità per compensare lavoratori per lavoro straordinario in pieno ad una mancanza di finanziamenti dal bilancio Statale. Infine, diritto nazionale previde che tempo speso con impiegati che aspettano lavoro, quando loro ancora erano alla disposizione del loro datore di lavoro, dovrebbe essere contato come lavorando tempo (veda paragrafo 31 della sentenza).
La Corte di Cassazione annullò la decisione della corte di primo-istanza su motivi tecnici 17 aprile 2006, senza fare domanda il suo esistendo e bene stabilì causa-legge. Rovesciò poi 28 ottobre 2008 la prima sentenza di istanza che fu basata sul rapporto competente e nuovo che ricalcola gli importi seguente la Corte di decisione di Cassazione di 17 aprile 2006 senza riferirsi ai fatti stabiliti, le parti le osservazioni di ' o l'accordo collettivo ed applicabile. Questa volta la decisione fu basata solamente su che che sembra essere una presunzione conclusiva formulò nella Corte della recente causa-legge di Cassazione in una serie di cause che hanno comportato lavoratori a stazioni di ricambio di radio.
In che riguardo a, la Corte di Cassazione andò a vuoto a giustificare perché tale presunzione di fatto contò per più dei fatti effettivi della causa che già era stata stabilita con la corte di primo-istanza. Né spiegò perché le disposizioni espresse dell'accordo collettivo, mentre prevedendo per periodi di resto per essere incluso come lavorando tempo, non fece domanda ai richiedenti la situazione di ', benché la struttura legale nazionale ed attinente permettesse le parti ad un contratto di lavoro per designare articoli che erano più favorevoli per impiegati che quelli nell'Operi Codice (veda paragrafo 33 della sentenza). La maggioranza, come la Corte di Cassazione non prese nell'esame l'accordo di mercanteggiamento collettivo che prevede per la rimunerazione di periodi di resto come lavorando tempo (veda paragrafo 10 ed il ragionamento in che riguardo ad in paragrafo 53), benché questa fosse una legge attinente nella situazione del richiedente.
Inoltre, i richiedenti la causa di ' concernè una situazione dalla quale era diversa che dei radio ricambio stazione lavoratori. Dato che i fatti corretti dei richiedenti che la causa di ' era stata stabilita col primo giudice di prima istanza, e che il loro diritto a rimunerazione per periodi di resto sotto il loro accordo di mercanteggiamento collettivo non fu contestato, la Corte di Cassazione fu costretta a giustificare perché la presunzione che era stata sviluppata in un contesto che riguarda i fatti e diverso avrebbe fatto domanda anche ai richiedenti la causa di '. I meriti della loro causa sarebbero dovuti essere distinti perciò e deciso sugli specifici fatti di che causa piuttosto che sulla base di assunzioni senza sostegno.
In che riguardo a, noi non vediamo nessuna necessità di esaminare se i principi enunciarono nella presunzione stessa era equo o non. La richiesta automatica di questa presunzione ai richiedenti la situazione di ' senza qualsiasi dettagli supplementari o ragioni specifico a quello sentenza che è prevista, deprivato i richiedenti di procedimenti equi.
Nella nostra prospettiva è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Noi votammo anche contro punto 4 delle disposizioni operative riguardo all'inammissibilità dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Noi pensiamo che i richiedenti avevano una rivendicazione esecutiva come costituire una proprietà che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 26/03/2020.