Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SPAHI? AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,06,46,P1-1

NUMERO: 20514/15/2017
STATO: Bosnia Herzegovina
DATA: 14/11/2017
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions
Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Enforcement proceedings
Article 6-1 - Access to court)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)
Respondent State to take individual measures (Article 46-2 - Individual measures)
Respondent State to take measures of a general character (Article 46-2 - General measures)
Pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)
Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)


FOURTH SECTION








CASE OF SPAHI? AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

(Applications nos. 20514/15 and 15 others – see appended list)








JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

14 November 2017


FINAL

14/02/2018

This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
?

In the case of Spahi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Ganna Yudkivska, President,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Iulia Motoc,
Carlo Ranzoni,
Georges Ravarani, judges,
and Andrea Tamietti, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 17 October 2017,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in 16 applications (nos. 20514/15, 20528/15, 20774/15, 20821/15, 20847/15, 20852/15, 20914/15, 20921/15, 20928/15, 20975/15, 21141/15, 21143/15, 21147/15, 21224/15, 21237/15 and 21239/15) against Bosnia and Herzegovina lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by 16 citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina on 20 April 2015. A list of the applicants with their personal details is set out in the appendix.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Travnik. The Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Government”) were represented by their Deputy Agent at the time, Ms Z. Ibrahimovi?.
3. The applicants complained of the non-enforcement of final domestic judgments in their favour.
4. On 31 August 2015 the applications were communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. By five judgments of the Travnik Municipal Court (“the Municipal Court”) of 5 March 2009, 18 January 2012, 31 March 2010, 30 April 2012 and 13 June 2011, which became final on 17 June 2010, 13 February 2012, 1 September 2010, 12 March 2013 and 21 July 2011, respectively, the Central Bosnia Canton (Srednjobosanski kanton, “the CB Canton”; one of the ten cantons of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina) was ordered to pay the applicants various sums in respect of unpaid work-related benefits together with default interest at the statutory rate and legal costs.
6. The writs of execution issued by the Municipal Court on 23 September 2010, 14 June 2012, 4 October 2010, 13 February 2013 and 25 October 2011, respectively, were transferred to the competent bank and were listed among the charges on the debtor’s account. On several occasions thereafter the bank informed the Municipal Court that the enforcement was not possible because the budgetary funds intended for that purpose had already been spent.
7. On 26 February 2013 and 7 January 2014 the Ministry of Finance of the CB Canton (“the Ministry”) informed the bank that no funds for the enforcement of final judgments had been provided in the cantonal budget for 2013 and 2014 and that, accordingly, the final judgments against the canton could not be enforced.
8. However, on 9 January 2015, upon the applicants’ enquiry, the Ministry informed them that in 2013 the canton had designated 620,000 convertible marks (BAM) for the enforcement of judgments and BAM 605,900 in 2014 for the same purpose.
9. The applicants complained of the non-enforcement to the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Constitutional Court”). On 17 September 2014 (decision no. AP 3438/12) and 26 February 2015 (decision no. AP 4242/14), the Constitutional Court found a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in the applicants’ and five other cases, on account of the prolonged non-enforcement of the final judgments in their favour. It ordered the government of the CB Canton to take the necessary steps in order to secure the payment of the cantonal debt arising from the final judgments within a reasonable time. Although some of the applicants submitted a claim for non-pecuniary damages, the Constitutional Court did not award any compensation.
The relevant part of the decision of 17 September 2014 reads as follows:
“36. ... The court notes that the judgments [in favour of the appellants] have not been enforced due to the lack of funds on the debtor’s bank account.
...
39. The Constitutional Court reiterates that under the Constitution of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Article 1 of the European Convention all levels of government must secure respect for individual human rights, including the right to enforcement of final judgments under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and the right to property under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention ... The scope of that obligation is not reduced in the present case, notwithstanding the large number of judgments ... [T]he Constitutional Court notes that in Jeli?i? v. BiH, and again in ?oli? and Others v. BiH, the European Court of Human Rights reiterated that ‘it is not open to a State authority to cite lack of funds as an excuse for not honouring a judgment debt. Admittedly, a delay in the execution of a judgment may be justified in particular circumstances, but the delay may not be such as to impair the essence of the right protected under Article 6 § 1’ ...
40. The Constitutional Court agrees with the position taken by the European Court ... it is nevertheless aware of the effects the global economic crisis had on Bosnia and Herzegovina...The court notes that the federal and the cantonal governments had taken certain steps with the view to enforcement of final court decisions. Section 138 of the Federal Enforcement Procedure Act 2003 provides that the final judgments against the Federation and the cantons shall be enforced within the amount of budgetary funds designated for that purpose ... and that the creditors shall enforce their claims in the order in which they acquired the enforcement titles ...
...
42. The court finds that the crux of the problem in the present case is that the CB Canton did not identify the exact number of unenforced judgments and the aggregate debt ... without which it is impossible to know when all the creditors will realise their claims against this canton. Furthemore, there should exist a centralised and transparent database of all the claims listed in chronological order according to the time the judgments became final. It should include the enforcement time-frame and a list of partial payments, if any. This will also help to avoid abuses of the enforcement procedure. These measure and adequate funds in the annual budget would ensure that all the final judgments are enforced within a reasonable time ... and the CB Canton would ensure the respect of its obligations from Article 6 § 1 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
...
44. The court considers that the adoption of section 138 of the Enforcement Procedure Act 2003 had a legitimate aim, because the enforcement of a large number of judgments at the same time would jeopardise the normal functioning of the cantons. However, the limitation of the enforcement in the present case is contrary to the principle of proportionality enshrined in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which requires that a fair balance is struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights ... Section 138 places a disproportionate burden on the appellants ... they are placed in a situation of absolute uncertainty as regards the enforcement of their claims ...
...
46. In order to comply with its positive obligation, the government of the CB Canton must, as explained above, calculate the total amount of the aggregate debt arising from the final judgments and prepare a comprehensive and transparent database ... This court will not specify what a reasonable time-limit should be ... but, in any event, it must be in accordance with Article 6 § 1 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
...
47. ... The current situation does not give any guarantees to the appellants that their claims against the CB Canton will be enforced within a reasonable time”.
10. The Constitutional Court’s decision of 26 February 2015 follows the same legal reasoning.
11. On 19 January 2016 Mr Jasmin Hodži? and Ms Jasmina Mezildži? concluded out-of-court settlements with the government of the CB Canton pursuant to which part of their principal claims were to be paid within 15 days following the settlement. They renounced the remaining principal claim and default interest. The legal costs were to be settled by a separate agreement. From the information available in the case it transpires that no such agreement has been concluded.
12. As regards the rest of the applicants, the final judgments in their favour have not yet been enforced.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Constitution of the CB Canton
13. Article 19 of the Constitution of the CB Canton (Ustav Srednjobosanskog kantona, Official Gazette of the CB Canton nos. 1/97, 5/97, 2/98, 7/98, 8/98, 10/00, 8/03, 2/04 and 14/04) provides that in accordance with the Constitution of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Federation and the CB Canton are responsible for ensuring the implementation of human rights within their jurisdictions. The cantonal government is responsible for the enforcement of final judgments of the federal and the cantonal courts (Article 53 § b).
B. Enforcement Procedure Act 2003 of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
14. Section 138 of the Enforcement Procedure Act 2003 (Zakon o izvršnom postupku, Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina nos. 32/03, 52/03, 33/06, 39/06, 39/09, 35/12 and 46/16) provides for the limitation of enforcement of final judgments against the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the cantons: these will be enforced only within the amount of funds provided for that purpose in the federal and cantonal budgets which cannot be lower than 0,3% of the total budget (section 138 (3) and (6)). The enforcement will be carried out in a chronological order according to the time the judgments became final. The statutory prescription period does not apply to these claims (section 138 (5)).
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
15. Given their common factual and legal background, the Court decides to join these 16 applications pursuant to Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
16. The applicants complained of the non-enforcement of the final domestic judgments indicated in paragraph 5 above. They relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Article 6 § 1, in so far as relevant, provides:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The Government’s objections as to the admissibility
17. The Government argued that Ms Ljiljana Simovi?, Mr Kazimir Juri?, Mr Abdulah Burek, Mr Amer Sunulahpaši?, Ms Nasira Kurtovi?, Mr Nidaz Ugarak, Mr Jasmin Hodži? and Ms Jasmina Mezildži? had submitted their applications outside the six-month time-limit laid down in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention. The final decision concerning their complaints was taken by the Constitutional Court on 17 September 2014. The Government further submitted that Mr Hodži? and Ms Mezildži? could no longer claim to be victims of the alleged violation within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention in view of the fact that they had settled their claims with the cantonal government.
18. The applicants submitted that the Constitutional Court’s decision of 17 September 2014 had been delivered to their representative on 24 October 2014. In support of that claim they submitted a letter of the Constitutional Court sent to their representative, Ms Kapetan, on 16 February 2016 confirming that the delivery date had been 24 October 2014. The applicants did not submit any comments as regards the Government’s second objection.
2. The Court’s assessment
19. In view of the applicants’ submission it is clear that the applications of Ms Ljiljana Simovi?, Mr Kazimir Juri?, Mr Abdulah Burek, Mr Amer Sunulahpaši?, Ms Nasira Kurtovi?, Mr Nidaz Ugarak, Mr Jasmin Hodži? and Ms Jasmina Mezildži? were introduced within the six-month time-limit from the notification of the decision of the Constitutional Court of 17 September 2014.
20. In any event, the Court notes that the alleged violation in the present case constitutes a continuous situation (see Arežina v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 66816/09, 3 July 2012). The final domestic judgments in the applicants’ favour have not yet been enforced. This is also true as regards Mr Hodži? and Ms Mezildži? since the legal costs ordered by final judgments have not yet been paid (see paragraph 11 above). Moreover, the Court notes that the settlements in issue were concluded almost five years after the judgments in the applicants’ favour became final. In that connection, the Court reiterates that in similar cases it found that an applicant may still claim to be a victim in relation to the period during which the decision of which he or she complained remained unenforced (see, mutatis mutandis, Dubenko v. Ukraine, no. 74221/01, § 36, 11 January 2005, and Runi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 28735/06 et al., § 16, 15 November 2011). Accordingly, they may still claim to be victims within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention.
21. The Government’s objections must therefore be dismissed.
3. Conclusion
22. The Court notes that the applications are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The applicants’ submissions
23. The applicants essentially maintained that the principle of the rule of law, which Bosnia and Herzegovina had undertaken to respect when it ratified the Convention, required that every judgment be enforced without delay. They submitted in particular that the government of the CB Canton had not complied with the decisions of the Constitutional Court. It had not prepared transparent and centralised database of all the claims and had not provided adequate funding in its annual budget for the enforcement of these claims.
2. The Government’s submission
24. The Government submitted that the respondent State and the government of the CB Canton had never disputed the applicants’ right to have their final judgments enforced. Every year the cantonal government designated substantial budgetary funds for that purpose. However, in view of the size of its public debt some delays in the enforcement were unavoidable. For example, in 2014 the aggregate debt concerning non-enforced judgments was BAM 18.108.485,54. The cantonal government kept updated record of its liabilities under final judgments and was looking for the best modalities for their payment.
3. The Court’s assessment
25. The general principles relating to the non-enforcement of domestic judgments were set out in Jeli?i? v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (no. 41183/02, §§ 38-39, ECHR 2006 XII). Notably, the Court has held that it is not open to authorities to cite lack of funds as an excuse for not honouring a judgment debt (see ibid., § 39; see also R. Ka?apor and Others v. Serbia, nos. 2269/06 et al., § 114, 15 January 2008, and Arba?iauskien? v. Lithuania, no. 2971/08, § 87, 1 March 2016). Admittedly, a delay in the execution of a judgment may be justified in particular circumstances, but the delay may not be such as to impair the essence of the right protected under Article 6 § 1 (see Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 35, ECHR 2002 III, and Teteriny v. Russia, no. 11931/03, § 41, 30 June 2005).
26. In addition, the Court reiterates that the impossibility of obtaining the execution of a final judgment in an applicant’s favour constitutes an interference with his or her right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions, as set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, among other authorities, Burdov, cited above, § 40; Jasi?nien? v. Lithuania, no. 41510/98, § 45, 6 March 2003; and Voytenko v. Ukraine, no. 18966/02, § 53, 29 June 2004).
27. In its decisions of 17 September 2014 and 26 February 2015 the Constitutional Court held that a prolonged non-enforcement of final judgments had violated the applicants’ rights guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The government of the CB Canton was ordered to take the necessary steps in order to secure the enforcement of final judgments within a reasonable time. The Constitutional Court held, in particular, that the cantonal government should identify the exact number of unenforced judgments and the amount of aggregate debt, and set up a centralised, chronological and transparent database which should include the enforcement time-frame and help avoid abuses of the enforcement procedure.
28. The Government submitted that the cantonal government had identified the amount of aggregate debt for 2014 and had kept a record of its liabilities. However, it would appear that the general measures as ordered by the Constitutional Court have not been implemented. It has not been shown that the cantonal government set up a database of all the claims and provided the enforcement time-frame. Furthermore, while the Court understands the difficulties created by the enormous public debt, it notes that there appear to be no precise economic policy governing the amount of annual budgetary funds for this purpose except for the statutory requirement that it cannot be lower than 0,3% of the total budget (see paragraph 14 above).
29. Therefore, the applicants’ situation remains unchanged. They are confronted by judgments in their favour which have not been enforced and are still in a situation of uncertainty as regards whether and when those judgments will be enforced. The Court takes note of the settlements reached between the government of the CB Canton and Mr Jasmin Hodži? and Ms Jasmina Mezildži?, but notes that the legal costs ordered by the final judgments have not yet been paid (see paragraph 11 above). Moreover, as already stated above the settlements were concluded almost five years after the judgments in favour of the applicants became final (see, mutatis mutandis, Fuklev v. Ukraine, no. 71186/01, § 85, 7 June 2005).
30. The domestic judgments under consideration in the present case became final between four and more than seven years ago. Such delays in enforcement were in the past considered to be excessive (see Jeli?i?, cited above, § 40; ?oli? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 1218/07 et al., 10 November 2009, § 15; and Runi? and Others, cited above, § 21). The Court does not see any reason to depart from that jurisprudence in the present case.
31. By failing for a considerable period of time to take the necessary measures to comply with the final judgments in the instant case, the authorities deprived the provisions of Article 6 § 1 of all useful effect and also prevented the applicants from receiving the money to which they were entitled. This amounted furthermore to a disproportionate interference with their peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see, among others, Khachatryan v. Armenia, no. 31761/04, § 69, 1 December 2009, and Voronkov v. Russia, no. 39678/03, § 57, 30 July 2015). Therefore, there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 thereto on account of the non enforcement of final and enforceable domestic judgments in the applicants’ favour.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
32. Article 46 of the Convention provides:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
33. The violation which the Court has found in the present case affects many people (see paragraph 24 above). There are already more than four hundred similar applications pending before the Court. Therefore, before examining the applicants’ individual claims for just satisfaction under Article 41 of the Convention, the Court wishes to consider what consequences may be drawn for the respondent State from Article 46 of the Convention. It reiterates that by virtue of Article 46 the High Contracting Parties have undertaken to abide by the final judgments of the Court in any case to which they are parties, execution being supervised by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe. It follows that a judgment in which the Court finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation not just to pay those concerned the sums awarded by way of just satisfaction under Article 41, but also to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures (see Assanidze v. Georgia [GC], no. 71503/01, § 198, ECHR 2004 II, and Greens and M.T. v. the United Kingdom, nos. 60041/08 and 60054/08, § 106, ECHR 2010 (extracts)). The State is obliged to take such measures also in respect of other persons in the applicants’ position, notably by implementing the general measures indicated by the Constitutional Court in the decisions of 17 September 2014 and 26 February 2015 (see, by analogy, Karanovi? v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 39462/03, § 28, 20 November 2007 and ?oli? and Others, cited above, § 17).
34. As regards the other similar applications lodged with the Court before the delivery of the present judgment, subject to their notification to the Government under Rule 54 § 2 (b) of the Rules of the Court, the Court considers that the respondent State must grant adequate and sufficient redress to all applicants. Such redress may be achieved through ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers in line with the Convention requirements and, notably, in accordance with the criteria set out in paragraphs 36 and 38 below (see Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 145, ECHR 2009-I; and ?oli? and Others, cited above, § 18).
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
35. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
36. In respect of pecuniary damage, the applicants sought the payment of the outstanding judgment debt. The Court reiterates that the most appropriate form of redress in non-enforcement cases is indeed to ensure full enforcement of the domestic judgments in question (see Jeli?i?, cited above, § 53, and Pejakovi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 337/04, 36022/04 and 45219/04, § 31, 18 December 2007). This principle equally applies to the present case. As regards Mr Jasmin Hodži? and Ms Jasmina Mezildži?, they still remain entitled to recover the amount of legal costs ordered by final domestic judgments in their favour.
37. Furthemore, the applicants claimed 1,500 euros (EUR) each in respect of non-pecuniary damage. The Government considered the amount claimed to be excessive.
38. The Court accepts that the applicants suffered distress, anxiety and frustration as a result of the respondent State’s failure to enforce final domestic judgments in their favour. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, it awards EUR 1,000, plus any tax that may be chargeable, to each of the applicants.
B. Costs and expenses
39. The applicants claimed EUR 716 each for cost and expenses incurred before the Constitutional Court and before the Court. In addition to that, OMISSIS each claimed EUR 62 for costs and expenses incurred in the domestic enforcement proceedings.
40. The Government considered the amounts claimed to be excessive.
41. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum (see, for example, Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000-XI). That is to say, the applicant must have paid them, or be bound to pay them, pursuant to a legal or contractual obligation, and they must have been unavoidable in order to prevent the breaches found or to obtain redress. The Court requires itemised bills and invoices that are sufficiently detailed to enable it to determine to what extent the above requirements have been met.
42. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 500, to each of the applicants, covering costs incurred domestically before the Constitutional Court and before this Court. As regards the costs incurred in the domestic enforcement proceedings, claimed by OMISSIS, the Court notes that they are integral part of the applicants’ pecuniary claim which has already been dealt with above.
C. Default interest
43. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Decides to join the applications;

2. Declares the applications admissible;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;

4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to secure payment of legal costs ordered by final domestic judgments in favour of Mr Jasmin Hodži? and Ms Jasmina Mezildži?, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention;
(b) that the respondent State is to secure full enforcement of the domestic judgments under consideration in the present case concerning the remaining applicants, less any amount which may have already been paid on that basis, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention; and
(c) in addition, that the respondent State is to pay all the applicants, within the same period, the following amounts, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, to each of the applicants, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 500 (five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, to each of the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(d) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 14 November 2017, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Andrea Tamietti Ganna Yudkivska
Deputy Registrar President



?
APPENDIX

OMISSIS

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni
Violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti di Esecuzione Articolo 6-1 - Accesso ad un tribunale)
Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà)
Stato rispondente deve prendere misure individuali (Articolo 46-2 - misure Individuali)
Stato rispondente deve prendere misure di carattere generale (Articolo 46-2 – misure generali)
Danno patrimoniale - assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale Soddisfazione equa)
Danno non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non –patrimoniale Soddisfazione equa)


QUARTA SEZIONE








CAUSA SPAHI? ED ALTRI C. BOSNIA E HERZEGOVINA

(Richieste N. 20514/15 e 15 altri-vedere ruolo anesso)








SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

14 novembre 2017


DEFINITIVO

14/02/2018

Questa sentenza è divenuta definitivo sotto Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.
?

Nella causa di Spahi ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Ganna Yudkivska, Presidente
Vincenzo A. De Gaetano,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Iulia Motoc,
Carlo Ranzoni,
Georges Ravarani, giudici
ed Andrea Tamietti, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato 17 ottobre 2017,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in 16 richieste (N. 20514/15, 20528/15 20774/15, 20821/15 20847/15, 20852/15 20914/15, 20921/15 20928/15, 20975/15 21141/15, 21143/15 21147/15, 21224/15 21237/15 e 21239/15) contro Bosnia e Herzegovina depositò con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con 16 cittadini di Bosnia e Herzegovina 20 aprile 2015. Un ruolo dei richiedenti coi loro dettagli personali è esposto fuori nell'appendice.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Travnik. Il Governo di Bosnia e Herzegovina (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente Aggiunto al tempo, il Sig.ra Z. Ibrahimovi.?
3. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione di definitivo sentenze nazionali nel loro favore.
4. 31 agosto 2015 le richieste furono comunicate al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Da cinque sentenze del Travnik Corte Municipale (“la Corte Municipale”) di 5 marzo 2009, 18 gennaio 2012, 31 marzo 2010 il 2012 e 13 giugno 2011 di 30 aprile che divenne definitivo 17 giugno 2010 13 febbraio 2012, 1 settembre 2010 il 2013 e 21 luglio 2011 di 12 marzo, rispettivamente il Cantone di Bosnia Centrale (kanton di Srednjobosanski, “il Cantone di CB”; uno dei dieci cantoni della Federazione di Bosnia e Herzegovina) fu ordinato per pagare i richiedenti le varie somme in riguardo di non retribuito lavoro-relativo trae profitto insieme con interesse di mora al tasso legale e spese processuali.
6. Gli ordini di esecuzione della sentenza emessi con la Corte Municipale 23 settembre 2010, 14 giugno 2012, 4 ottobre 2010 il 2013 e 25 ottobre 2011 di 13 febbraio, rispettivamente fu trasferito alla banca competente e fu elencato fra le accuse sul conto del debitore. Su molte occasioni la banca informò da allora in poi la Corte Municipale che l'esecuzione non era possibile perché i finanziamenti budgetari proporsi per che fine già era stato speso.
7. Il 2013 e 7 gennaio 2014 di 26 febbraio il Ministero di Finanza del Cantone di CB (“il Ministero”) informato la banca che nessuno finanziamenti per l'esecuzione di definitivo sentenze erano offerti nel bilancio cantonale dal 2013 e 2014 e che, di conseguenza, le definitivo sentenze contro il cantone non potevano essere eseguite.
8. Comunque, 9 gennaio 2015, sui richiedenti l'enquiry di ', il Ministero li informò che nel 2013 il cantone aveva designato 620,000 marchi convertibili (il BAM) per l'esecuzione di sentenze e BAM 605,900 in 2014 per lo stesso fine.
9. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione alla Corte Costituzionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina (“la Corte Costituzionale”). 17 settembre 2014 (la decisione n. AP 3438/12) e 26 febbraio 2015 (la decisione n. AP 4242/14), la Corte Costituzionale trovò una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nei richiedenti ' e cinque altre cause, su conto della non-esecuzione prolungata delle definitivo sentenze nel loro favore. Ordinò il governo del Cantone di CB per prendere i passi necessari per garantire il pagamento del debito cantonale che sorge dalle definitivo sentenze all'interno di un termine ragionevole. Benché alcuni dei richiedenti presentassero una rivendicazione per danni non-patrimoniali, la Corte Costituzionale non assegnò qualsiasi il risarcimento.
La parte attinente della decisione del 2014 letture di 17 settembre siccome segue:
“36. ... La corte nota che le sentenze [in favore degli appellanti] non è stato eseguito dovuto alla mancanza di finanziamenti sul conto bancario del debitore.
...
39. La Corte Costituzionale reitera che sotto la Costituzione di Bosnia e Herzegovina ed Articolo 1 della Convenzione europea tutti i livelli di governo devono garantire riguardo per diritti umani individuali, incluso il diritto ad esecuzione di definitivo sentenze sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed il diritto a proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione... La sfera di che obbligo non è ridotto nella causa presente, nonostante il grande numero di sentenze... [T]he che Corte Costituzionale nota che in Jelii ?c. BiH, e di nuovo in ?oli ?ed Altri c. BiH, la Corte europea di Diritti umani reiterò che ‘non è aperto ad un'autorità Statale per citare mancanza di finanziamenti come una scusa per non onorare un debito di sentenza. Per ammissione, un ritardo nell'esecuzione di una sentenza può essere giustificato nelle particolari circostanze, ma il ritardo non può essere come per danneggiare l'essenza del diritto protegguta sotto Articolo 6 § 1 '...
40. La Corte Costituzionale si confa con la posizione presa con la Corte europea... è ciononostante consapevole degli effetti la crisi economica e globale avuta su Bosnia e Herzegovina... La corte nota che i federali ed i governi cantonali avevano portato i certi passi con la prospettiva ad esecuzione di definitivo decisioni di corte. Sezione 138 dell'Esecuzione Procedura Federale che Atto 2003 offre che le definitivo sentenze contro la Federazione ed i cantoni saranno eseguiti all'interno dell'importo di finanziamenti budgetari designato per che fine... e che i creditori eseguiranno le loro rivendicazioni nell'ordine nel quale loro acquisirono l'esecuzione intitola...
...
42. I costatazione di corte che la croce del problema nella causa presente è che il Cantone di CB non identificò il numero esatto di sentenze di unenforced ed il debito globale... senza che è impossibile per sapere quando tutti i creditori si renderanno conto delle loro rivendicazioni contro questo cantone. Furthemore, là dovrebbe esistere un centralizzò e database trasparente di tutte le rivendicazioni elencò in ordine cronologico secondo il tempo che le sentenze sono divenute definitivo. Dovrebbe includere la tempo-cornice di esecuzione ed un ruolo di pagamenti a rate, se qualsiasi. Questo aiuterà anche ad evitare abusi della procedura di esecuzione. Questi misurano e finanziamenti adeguati nel bilancio annuale assicurerebbero che tutte le definitivo sentenze sono eseguite all'interno di un termine ragionevole... ed il Cantone di CB assicurerebbe il riguardo dei suoi obblighi da Articolo 6 § 1 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
...
44. La corte considera che l'adozione di sezione 138 dell'Esecuzione Procedura Atto 2003 aveva un scopo legittimo, perché l'esecuzione di un gran numero di sentenze allo stesso tempo metterebbe in pericolo il normale funzionando dei cantoni. Comunque, la limitazione dell'esecuzione nella causa presente è contraria al principio della proporzionalità custodito in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che quale richiede che un equilibrio equo è previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo... Sezione 138 posti un carico sproporzionato sugli appellanti... loro sono messi in una situazione dell'incertezza assoluta come riguardi l'esecuzione delle loro rivendicazioni...
...
46. Per attenersi col suo obbligo positivo il governo del Cantone di CB deve, siccome spiegato sopra, calcoli l'importo totale del debito globale che sorge dalle definitivo sentenze e prepari un database comprensivo e trasparente... Questa corte non specificherà che che dovrebbe essere un tempo-limite ragionevole... ma in qualsiasi l'evento, deve essere in conformità con Articolo 6 § 1 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
...
47. ... La situazione corrente non dà qualsiasi garantisce agli appellanti che le loro rivendicazioni contro il Cantone di CB saranno eseguite all'interno di un termine ragionevole.”
10. La decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 26 febbraio 2015 segue lo stesso ragionamento giuridico.
11. Sul 2016 Sig. Jasmin Hodži di 19 gennaio ?ed il Sig.ra Jasmina Mezildži accordi extragiudiziali conclusero col governo del Cantone di CB facendo seguito a che parte delle loro rivendicazioni principali sarebbe pagata entro 15 giorni che seguono l'accordo. Loro cederono la rivendicazione principale e rimanente ed interesse di mora. Le spese processuali sarebbero stabilite con un accordo separato. Dalle informazioni disponibile nella causa traspira che nessuno simile accordo è stato concluso.
12. Come riguardi il resto dei richiedenti, le definitivo sentenze nel loro favore non sono state eseguite ancora.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Costituzione del Cantone CB
13. Articolo 19 della Costituzione del Cantone di CB (Ustav il kantona di Srednjobosanskog, Ufficiale Pubblica del Cantone di CB N. 1/97, 5/97, 2/98 7/98, 8/98 10/00, 8/03 2/04 e 14/04) prevede che nella conformità con la Costituzione della Federazione di Bosnia e Herzegovina, la Federazione ed il Cantone di CB è responsabile per assicurare l'attuazione di diritti umani all'interno delle loro giurisdizioni. Il governo cantonale è responsabile per l'esecuzione di definitivo sentenze dei federali e le corti cantonali (l'Articolo 53 § b).
B. Esecuzione Procedura Atto 2003 della Federazione di Bosnia e Herzegovina
14. Sezione 138 dell'Esecuzione Procedura Atto 2003 (Zakon postupku di izvršnom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica della Federazione di Bosnia e Herzegovina N. 32/03, 52/03, 33/06 39/06, 39/09 35/12 e 46/16) prevede per la limitazione di esecuzione di definitivo sentenze contro la Federazione di Bosnia e Herzegovina ed i cantoni: questi saranno eseguiti solamente all'interno dell'importo di finanziamenti previsto per che fine nei federali e bilanci cantonali che non possono essere più bassi che 0,3% del bilancio totale (sezione 138 (3) e (6)). L'esecuzione sarà eseguita in un ordine cronologico secondo il tempo che le sentenze sono divenute definitivo. Il periodo di prescrizione legale non fa domanda a queste rivendicazioni (sezione 138 (5)).
LA LEGGE
I. UNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
15. Dato il loro terreno di proprietà comune sfondo che riguarda i fatti e legale, la Corte decide di congiungere queste 16 richieste facendo seguito Decidere 42 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte.
II. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE ED ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
16. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione delle definitivo sentenze nazionali indicata in paragrafo 5 sopra. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Articolo 6 § 1, in finora come attinente, prevede:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le eccezioni del Governo come all'ammissibilità
17. Il Governo dibattè che il Sig.ra Ljiljana Simovi?, il Sig. Kazimir Juri, il Sig. Abdulah Burek, il Sig. Amer Sunulahpaši, il Sig.ra Nasira Kurtovi, il Sig. Nidaz Ugarak, il Sig. Jasmin Hodži ed il Sig.ra Jasmina Mezildži avevano presentato le loro richieste fuori del tempo-limite di sei-mese posato in giù in Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione. La definitivo decisione che concerne le loro azioni di reclamo fu impiegata con la Corte Costituzionale 17 settembre 2014. Il Governo presentò inoltre che il Sig. Hodži ed il Sig.ra Mezildži non potessero chiedere più di essere vittime della violazione allegato all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione in prospettiva del fatto che loro avevano stabilito le loro rivendicazioni col governo cantonale.
18. I richiedenti presentarono che la decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 17 settembre 2014 era stata consegnata al loro rappresentante 24 ottobre 2014. In appoggio di che rivendicazione che loro hanno presentato una lettera della Corte Costituzionale spedita al loro rappresentante, il Sig.ra Kapetan 16 febbraio 2016 che conferma che il termine di resa era stato 24 ottobre 2014. I richiedenti non presentarono qualsiasi commenti come riguardi la seconda eccezione del Governo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
19. In prospettiva dei richiedenti l'osservazione di ' è chiaro che le richieste del Sig.ra Ljiljana Simovi?, il Sig. Kazimir Juri, il Sig. Abdulah Burek, il Sig. Amer Sunulahpaši, il Sig.ra Nasira Kurtovi, il Sig. Nidaz Ugarak, il Sig. Jasmin Hodži ed il Sig.ra Jasmina Mezildži furono introdotti all'interno del tempo-limite di sei-mese dalla notificazione della decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 17 settembre 2014.
20. In qualsiasi l'evento, la Corte nota che la violazione allegato nella causa presente costituisce una situazione continua (veda Arežina c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (il dec.), n. 66816/09, 3 luglio 2012). Le definitivo sentenze nazionali nei richiedenti il favore di ' non è stato eseguito ancora. Questo è anche vero come riguardi il Sig. Hodži ?ed il Sig.ra Mezildži poiché le spese processuali ordinarono con definitivo sentenze non è stato pagato ancora (veda paragrafo 11 sopra). Inoltre, la Corte nota che gli accordi in problema furono conclusi pressocché cinque anni dopo le sentenze nei richiedenti che il favore di ' è divenuto definitivo. In che il collegamento, la Corte reitera che in cause simili trovato che un richiedente ancora può chiedere di essere una vittima in relazione al periodo durante che la decisione della quale lui o lei si lamentarono unenforced rimasto (veda, mutatis mutandis, Dubenko c. l'Ucraina, n. 74221/01, § 36, 11 gennaio 2005, e Runi ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 28735/06 et al., § 16, 15 novembre 2011). Loro ancora possono dire di conseguenza, di essere vittime all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione.
21. Le eccezioni del Governo devono essere respinte perciò.
3. Conclusione
22. La Corte nota che le richieste non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazione dei richiedenti
23. I richiedenti essenzialmente sostennero che il principio dell'articolo di legge che Bosnia e Herzegovina si erano impegnati rispettare quando ratificò la Convenzione, richiesto che ogni sentenza sia eseguita senza ritardo. Loro presentarono in particolare che il governo del Cantone di CB non si era attenuto con le decisioni della Corte Costituzionale. Non aveva preparato trasparente ed aveva centralizzato database di tutte le rivendicazioni e non aveva offerto consolidamento adeguato nel suo bilancio annuale per l'esecuzione di queste rivendicazioni.
2. L'osservazione del Governo
24. Il Governo presentò che lo Stato rispondente ed il governo del Cantone di CB non avevano contestato mai i richiedenti il diritto di ' per avere le loro definitivo sentenze eseguito. Ogni anno il governo cantonale designò finanziamenti budgetari e sostanziali per quel il fine. In prospettiva della taglia del suo debito pubblico dei ritardi nell'esecuzione erano comunque, inevitabili. Nel 2014 il debito globale che concerne sentenze non-eseguite era BAM 18.108.485,54 per esempio. Il governo cantonale tenuto documento aggiornato delle sue responsabilità sotto definitivo sentenze e stava cercando le più buon modalità per il loro pagamento.
3. La valutazione della Corte
25. I principi generali relativo alla non-esecuzione di sentenze nazionali furono esposti fuori in Jelii ?c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (n. 41183/02, §§ 38-39 ECHR 2006 XII). Notevolmente, la Corte ha sostenuto che non è aperto ad autorità per citare mancanza di finanziamenti come una scusa per non onorare un debito di sentenza (veda ibid., § 39; veda anche R. Kaapor ?ed Altri c. Serbia, N. 2269/06 et al., § 114, 15 gennaio 2008, ed Arbaiauskien ?c. la Lituania, n. 2971/08, § 87 1 marzo 2016). Per ammissione, un ritardo nell'esecuzione di una sentenza può essere giustificato nelle particolari circostanze, ma il ritardo non può essere come per danneggiare l'essenza del diritto protegguta sotto Articolo 6 § 1 (veda Burdov c. la Russia, n. 59498/00, § 35 ECHR 2002 III, e Teteriny c. la Russia, n. 11931/03, § 41 30 giugno 2005).
26. In oltre, la Corte reitera che l'impossibilità di ottenere l'esecuzione di una definitivo sentenza nel favore di un richiedente costituisce un'interferenza con suo o il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà, come esponga fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, fra le altre autorità, Burdov, citato sopra, § 40; Jasinien ?c. la Lituania, n. 41510/98, § 45 6 marzo 2003; e Voytenko c. l'Ucraina, n. 18966/02, § 53 29 giugno 2004).
27. Nelle sue decisioni del 2014 e 26 febbraio 2015 di 17 settembre la Corte Costituzionale sostenne che una non-esecuzione prolungata di definitivo sentenze aveva violato i richiedenti diritti di ' garantiti con Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Il governo del Cantone di CB fu ordinato per prendere i passi necessari per garantire l'esecuzione di definitivo sentenze all'interno di un termine ragionevole. La Corte Costituzionale sostenne, in particolare, che il governo cantonale dovrebbe identificare il numero esatto di sentenze di unenforced e l'importo di debito globale, ed espose su un centralizzò, database cronologico e trasparente che dovrebbe includere la tempo-cornice di esecuzione e dovrebbe aiutare evita abusi della procedura di esecuzione.
28. Il Governo presentò che il governo cantonale identificava l'importo di debito globale dal 2014 ed aveva tenuto un documento delle sue responsabilità. Comunque, sembrerebbe che le misure generali siccome ordinato con la Corte Costituzionale non è stato implementato. Non è stato mostrato che il set statale e cantonale su un database di tutte le rivendicazioni e purché la tempo-cornice di esecuzione. Inoltre, mentre la Corte capisce le difficoltà create col debito pubblico ed enorme, nota che là sembra non essere nessuna politica economica e precisa che governa l'importo di finanziamenti budgetari ed annuali per questo fine a parte il requisito legale che non può essere più basso che 0,3% del bilancio totale (veda paragrafo 14 sopra).
29. Perciò, i richiedenti che la situazione di ' rimane immutata. Loro sono confrontati con sentenze nel loro favore che non è stato eseguito e è stato stato ancora in una situazione dell'incertezza come riguardi se e quando quelle sentenze saranno eseguite. Le prese di Corte notano degli accordi giunti al governo del Cantone di CB ed il Sig. Jasmin Hodži ?ed il Sig.ra Jasmina Mezildži, ma nota che le spese processuali ordinarono con le definitivo sentenze non è stato pagato ancora (veda paragrafo 11 sopra). Inoltre, come già affermato sopra degli accordi pressocché cinque anni furono conclusi dopo le sentenze in favore dei richiedenti divenne definitivo (veda, mutatis mutandis, Fuklev c. l'Ucraina, n. 71186/01, § 85 7 giugno 2005).
30. Le sentenze nazionali sotto la considerazione nella causa presente divennero definitivo fra quattro e più di sette anni fa. Simile ritardi in esecuzione erano di passato considerato per essere eccessivo (veda Jelii?, citato sopra, § 40; l'oli ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 1218/07 et al., 10 novembre 2009, § 15; e Runi ed Altri, citato sopra, § 21). La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare da che la giurisprudenza nella causa presente.
31. Fallendo per un periodo considerevole di tempo per prendere le misure necessarie per attenersi con le definitivo sentenze nella causa presente, le autorità spogliarono le disposizioni di Articolo 6 § 1 di ogni effetto utile ed anche impedirono ai richiedenti del ricevere i soldi al quale furono concessi loro. Questo corrispose inoltre ad un'interferenza sproporzionata col loro godimento tranquillo di proprietà (veda, fra altri, Khachatryan c. l'Armenia, n. 31761/04, § 69, 1 dicembre 2009, e Voronkov c. la Russia, n. 39678/03, § 57 30 luglio 2015). C'è stata perciò, una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 inoltre su conto del non esecuzione di definitivo e sentenze nazionali ed esecutive nei richiedenti il favore di '.
III. La richiesta Di Articolo 46 Di La Convenzione
32. Articolo 46 della Convenzione prevede:
“1. Le Parti Contraenti ed Alte si impegnano attenersi alla definitivo sentenza della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La definitivo sentenza della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato di Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione.”
33. La violazione che la Corte ha trovato nella causa presente colpisce molte persone (veda paragrafo 24 sopra). C'è già più che le quattrocento richieste simili pendente di fronte alla Corte. Prima di esaminare i richiedenti ' rivendicazioni individuali per la soddisfazione equa sotto Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte desidera perciò, considerare che conseguenze possono essere dedotte per lo Stato rispondente da Articolo 46 della Convenzione. Reitera che con virtù di Articolo 46 le Parti Contraenti ed Alte si sono impegnate attenersi alle definitivo sentenze della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti, esecuzione che è supervisionata col Comitato di Ministri del Consiglio dell'Europa. Segue che una sentenza nella quale la Corte trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per non pagare quelli concerniti le somme assegnate con modo della soddisfazione equa sotto Articolo 41, ma anche implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato di Ministri and/or generale ed appropriato misure individuali (veda Assanidze c. la Georgia [GC], n. 71503/01, § 198 ECHR 2004 II, e Verdure e M.T. c. il Regno Unito, N. 60041/08 e 60054/08, § 106 ECHR 2010 (gli estratti)). Lo Stato è obbligato per prendere anche simile misure in riguardo di altre persone nei richiedenti ' posizioni, notevolmente con implementando le misure generali indicate con la Corte Costituzionale nelle decisioni del 2014 e 26 febbraio 2015 di 17 settembre (veda, con analogia, Karanovi ?c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 39462/03, § 28, 20 novembre 2007 ed ?oli ?ed Altri, citato sopra, § 17).
34. Come riguardi le altre richieste simili depositarono con la Corte di fronte alla consegna della sentenza presente, soggetto alla loro notificazione al Governo sotto Articolo 54 § 2 (b) degli Articoli della Corte, la Corte considera, che lo Stato rispondente deve accordare compensazione adeguata e sufficiente a tutti i richiedenti. Simile compensazione può essere realizzata per ad soluzioni di hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatore ed unilaterali in linea coi requisiti di Convenzione e, notevolmente, nella conformità col criterio esposto fuori in paragrafi 36 e 38 sotto (veda Burdov c. la Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 145 ECHR 2009-io; ed ?oli ?ed Altri, citato sopra, § 18).
IV. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
35. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
36. In riguardo di danno patrimoniale, i richiedenti chiesero il pagamento del debito di sentenza insoluto. La Corte reitera che la forma più appropriata di compensazione in cause di non-esecuzione deve assicurare davvero la piena esecuzione delle sentenze nazionali in oggetto (veda Jelii?, citato sopra, § 53, e Pejakovi ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 337/04, 36022/04 e 45219/04, § 31 18 dicembre 2007). Questo principio fa domanda ugualmente alla causa presente. Come riguardi il Sig. Jasmin Hodži ed il Sig.ra Jasmina Mezildži, loro ancora rimangono concesso per recuperare l'importo di spese processuali ordinato con definitivo sentenze nazionali nel loro favore.
37. Furthemore, i richiedenti chiesero 1,500 euros (EUR) ognuno in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. Il Governo considerò l'importo chiese di essere eccessivo.
38. La Corte accetta che i richiedenti soffrirono dell'angoscia, l'ansia e la frustrazione come un risultato dell'insuccesso dello Stato rispondente per eseguire definitivo sentenze nazionali nel loro favore. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto con Articolo 41 della Convenzione, assegna EUR 1,000, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, ad ognuno dei richiedenti.
Costi di B. e spese
39. I richiedenti chiesero EUR 716 ognuno per costo e spese incorse in di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale e di fronte alla Corte. Oltre a che, OMISSIS ognuno chiese EUR 62 per costi e spese incorse in nei procedimenti di esecuzione nazionali.
40. Il Governo considerò gli importi chiesero di essere eccessivi.
41. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum (veda, per esempio, Iatridis c. la Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 2000-XI). Quel è dire, il richiedente li ha dovuti pagare, o sia legato per pagarli, facendo seguito ad un obbligo legale o contrattuale, e loro sono dovuti essere inevitabili per ostacolare le violazioni trovate od ottenere compensazione. La Corte richiede conti particolareggiati e fatture che sufficientemente sono dettagliate per abilitarlo per determinare a che misura i requisiti sopra sono state soddisfatte.
42. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 500, ad ognuno dei richiedenti costi coprenti incorsero in nazionalmente di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale e di fronte a questa Corte. Come riguardi i costi incorsero in nei procedimenti di esecuzione nazionali, chiesti con OMISSIS che la Corte nota che loro sono parte integrante dei richiedenti ' rivendicazione patrimoniale che già è stata data con sopra.
Interesse di mora di C.
43. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere le richieste;

2. Dichiara le richieste ammissibile;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;

4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente è garantire pagamento di spese processuali ordinato con definitivo sentenze nazionali in favore del Sig. Jasmin Hodži ?ed il Sig.ra Jasmina Mezildži, entro tre mesi della data sui quali la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione;
(b) che lo Stato rispondente è garantire la piena esecuzione delle sentenze nazionali sotto la considerazione nella causa presente riguardo ai richiedenti rimanenti, meno qualsiasi importo sul quale già è potuto essere pagato che base, entro tre mesi della data sui quali la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione; e
(il c) in oltre, che lo Stato rispondente è pagare tutti i richiedenti, entro lo stesso periodo gli importi seguenti, essere convertito nella valuta dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 1,000 (milli euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, ad ognuno dei richiedenti, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 500 (cinquecento euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, ad ognuno dei richiedenti, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(d) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

6. Respinge il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 14 novembre 2017, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Andrea Tamietti Ganna Yudkivska
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente



?
APPENDICE

OMISSIS



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è domenica 09/02/2020.

Se volete sapere come funziona LA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, qui c'è uno schema:

I COSTI DELLA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, IN SINTESI

Consulenza iniziale: esame di atti e consigli

Gratuita
Per richiederla cliccate qui: Colloquio telefonico gratuito

Eventuale successiva assistenza, se richiesta

Da concordare:

  • Con accordo scritto (a garanzia dell'espropriato)
  • Con pagamento posticipato (si paga con i soldi che si ottengono dall'Amministrazione)
  • Col criterio: SE NON OTTIENI NON PAGHI

Se sei assistito da un professionista aderente all'Associazione pagherai solo a risultato raggiunto, "con i soldi" dell'Amministrazione.

Non si deve pagare se non si ottiene il risultato stabilito. Tutto ciò viene pattuito, a garanzia dell'espropriato, sempre con un contratto scritto. E' ammesso solo il rimborso spese vive: ad. es. 1.000 euro per il DAP (tutelarsi e opporsi senza contenzioso) o 2.000 euro per il contenzioso.

Per vedere l'ACCORDO TIPO per l'assistenza, cliccate qui Vademecum gratuito e andate a pag. 20

Ricordate che il principale custode dei vostri diritti siete voi stessi.
E' quindi essenziale capire ciò che accade e ciò che accadrà.

Se volete sapere come si svolge la PROCEDURA ESPROPRIATIVA e come tutelarvi nelle varie fasi, abbiamo predisposto una breve sintesi degli strumenti da utilizzare.
Potete esaminarla cliccando qui: Come Tutelarsi in tre passi