Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF JOANNOU v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,35,P1-1

NUMERO: 53240/14/2017
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 12/12/2017
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions
Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (Art. 35) Admissibility criteria
(Art. 35-1) Exhaustion of domestic remedies
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Positive obligations
Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)
Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)
Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)



SECOND SECTION






CASE OF JOANNOU v. TURKEY

(Application no. 53240/14)






JUDGMENT





STRASBOURG

12 December 2017







This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Joannou v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Robert Spano, President,
Julia Laffranque,
Ledi Bianku,
I??l Karaka?,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Gri?co,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 14 November 2017,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 53240/14) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a British and Cypriot national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 28 October 2014.
2. The applicant, who had been granted legal aid, was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Nicosia. The Turkish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, a lack of effectiveness of the proceedings she had instituted before the Immovable Property Commission (“IPC) seeking compensation in respect of real property located in the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (the “TRNC”). She relied on Articles 6, 13 and 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 19 November 2015 the above complaint was communicated to the Government and the remainder of the application was declared inadmissible pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
5. The British Government and the Cypriot Government were informed of the proceedings. The British Government did not avail themselves of the right to intervene in the proceedings under Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b) of the Rules of Court. In a letter of 28 January 2016 the Cypriot Government indicated that they wished to exercise their right to intervene in the proceedings in accordance with Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b). However, at a later stage of the proceedings, in a letter of 21 October 2016, the Cypriot Government informed the Court that they had decided not to submit any written comments in the procedure.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1953 and lives in Enfield (United Kingdom).
A. Background to the case
7. The complaints raised in this application arise out of the Turkish military intervention in northern Cyprus in July and August 1974. The general context of the property issues arising in this connection is set out in the cases of Cyprus v. Turkey ([GC], no. 25781/94, §§ 13-16 and 28-33, ECHR 2001 IV), and Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (dec.) ([GC], nos. 46113/99 and 7 others, §§ 4-16, ECHR 2010).
8. In 1997 the applicant was gifted five plots of land, or shares in them, by her aunt, who died in 1998. In 2008 she was also gifted an additional share of one of the plots of land by her mother. According to the certificates of ownership provided by the Department of Lands and Surveys of the Republic of Cyprus, the applicant is the sole owner of four plots of land and owns a 9/16 share of the fifth plot.
9. The land lies in the village Koma Tou Yialou (Kumyali) in the “TRNC”. The total area of the land is some 18 dönüm.
10. In 2007 the applicant instructed a law firm in Nicosia, which duly obtained a valuation report on the land from a Turkish Cypriot chartered surveyor. The valuation report of 3 December 2007 assessed each of the five plots of land and provided valuations for them, which ranged from 500 pounds sterling (GBP) per dönüm to GBP 10,000 per dönüm.
11. In October 2011 the applicant obtained a further valuation report by a chartered surveyor from the Republic of Cyprus. This report valued the five plots of land, including the economic loss and interest (all calculated for the period between 1974 and 2011), at 2,690,962 euros (EUR) in total.
12. In February 2017 the applicant obtained a new valuation report from the Land Registration Office of the Republic of Cyprus which assessed the value of the property in question, including economic loss and interest accrued since 1997 (when the applicant became owner of the property) to December 2016, at EUR 2,088,366 in total.
B. The proceedings before the IPC
13. In May 2008 the applicant, through her Turkish Cypriot representatives, filed a claim with the IPC under Law no. 67/2005 (see paragraphs 41-43 below) ? supported by an affidavit ? claiming restitution of her property and/or compensation at the property’s current market value and damages for loss of use of the land in question. The total compensation sought was GBP 100,000 per dönüm (GBP 1,800,000 or approximately EUR 2,285,000).
14. In her affidavit the applicant attested that the property in question had been transferred to her after 1974 by her aunt, who had owned it since before 1974. The affidavit also attested that there were no mortgages, liabilities or restrictions on the property in question, that the applicant lived in South Cyprus in a house owned by a Turkish Cypriot, and that she was paying rent to the Republic of Cyprus. The file also contained the applicant’s identity documents (British passport and Cypriot identity card), certificates from the Republic of Cyprus Land Registry and Surveys Department concerning the ownership and legal status of the applicant’s plots of land (indicating no mortgages, liabilities or other restrictions), and a document issued by the relevant Cypriot authority showing that the applicant lived in a house owned by a Turkish Cypriot and had been billed 270 Cypriot pounds (CYP) by way of rent for the period 1 April 2003 to 30 June 2004.
15. The applicant’s claim was communicated to the “TRNC” Attorney General as provided under Law no. 67/2005 and the relevant IPC Rules (see paragraph 43 below).
16. On 5 May 2010, the Attorney General’s Office submitted an opinion to the IPC in reply to the applicant’s claim. It relied on an affidavit by the “TRNC” Director of the Land Registry and Surveys Department, who explained that their records showed that one of the registered owners of the property in question was Chrystollou Nicola Stavrinou (the applicant’s aunt), that Maria Nicola Stavrinou (the applicant’s mother) was the owner of part of one of the plots of land, and that the applicant had failed to demonstrate that she was the legal heir of the two registered owners. He also considered that the applicant’s compensation claim was excessive and unfounded.
17. A directions hearing before the IPC took place on 25 May 2010. The applicant’s representative stated that they had received the Attorney General’s opinion only on the day of the hearing and thus asked for an adjournment in order to prepare their case. The Attorney General’s representative did not object and the hearing was adjourned until 1 June 2010.
18. At a directions hearing on 1 June 2010 the applicant’s representative undertook to obtain a valuation report and a document showing that the plots of land had been transferred to the applicant by way of donation. The Attorney General’s representative requested that documents showing that the applicant was the legal heir of Chriystolleuo Nicola Stavrou [sic.] should be provided, as well as proof of the amount of rent she was paying for the Turkish Cypriot house where she lived in the South, or alternatively the lease agreement by which the house had been allocated to her. The Attorney General’s representative also undertook to submit a search document from the “TRNC” Land Registry and Surveys Department, and indicated that he reserved his right to submit and request further documents. The hearing was adjourned so that the parties could obtain the relevant documents.
19. On 3 June 2010 the Attorney General submitted the search document of the “TRNC” Land Registry and Surveys Department relating to the plots included in the applicant’s claim.
20. On 6 June 2012, through her representative, the applicant asked permission to amend her initial claim. She submitted that she had in the meantime become the sole owner of the plot of which she had previously owned a 5/6 share and that in October 2011 she had obtained a valuation report indicating that the value of her properties was EUR 2,690,962 (see paragraph 8 above).
21. At a preliminary hearing on 18 June 2012, after the Attorney General’s representative stated that he had no objections with regard to the amendment of the applicant’s claim; the President of the IPC accepted the amendment and instructed the applicant to submit her amended claim and the Attorney General’s Office to submit an opinion in that regard.
22. On 6 July 2012 the applicant complied with the order and amended her claim, seeking compensation in accordance with the new findings and developments concerning her property title.
23. On 20 November 2012 the applicant submitted the documents requested by the Attorney General’s representative on 1 June 2010 (see paragraph 18 above). In particular, the applicant submitted certificates issued by the head of the local community (mukhtar) explaining that there were inconsistencies in the spelling of the applicant’s aunt’s name in different documents. The mukhtar explained that the latter had held Cypriot identity document no. 327090 and had been variously known as: Christallou Nikola Stavrinou, Chriystallou Nicola Stavrinon, Christallou Nicola Stavrinou, Christalla Nikola and Chrystallou Nicola, but these were one and the same person. The mukhtar further certified that she had never married and that before her death she had gifted her immovable property to her sister’s daughter, the applicant (Andriani Ioannou, holder of a Cypriot identity card). In support of the mukhtar’s certificates, the applicant submitted her aunt’s identity documents (including a Cypriot identity document). The applicant also submitted documents showing the transfer of title from her aunt to her in respect of the plots of land in question. She also submitted documents showing that she had been allocated a Turkish Cypriot house in the South and had paid CYP 342 by way of rent for the period 1 June 2000 to 31 December 2001 and CYP 270 for the period 1 April 2003 to 30 June 2004.
24. A preliminary hearing before the IPC scheduled for 10 January 2013 was adjourned due to the absence of the Attorney General’s representative, who could not attend the hearing for family reasons.
25. At a preliminary hearing on 25 January 2013 the “TRNC” authorities were represented by the Attorney General’s representative and the under secretary of the Housing Affairs Department. They asked the applicant to submit the birth certificates of her aunt and her mother and a title deed for the property which she now owned in its entirety. The hearing was adjourned to enable the applicant to obtain the documents in question.
26. On 19 February 2013 the applicant submitted the requested documents, which also included documents confirming that her aunt had never been married.
27. At a preliminary hearing on 25 April 2013 the “TRNC” representatives asked the applicant to submit certificates from the mukhtar showing that the names Andriani Joannou, Andriani Ioannou and Andriani Georgiou Antoniou all referred to the applicant, and further certificates showing that her aunt had been variously known as Chrystollou Nicola Stavrinou, Chrystolleuo Nicola Stavriou, Chrystolleui Nicolou Stavriou, Nikola Hristallu (Nicola Hrystallou), Hristalla Nicola and Hrystallou Nicola (Nikola), and that her mother had been variously known as Maria Nicola Stavrinou, Maria Stavrinou, Maria Georgiou and Maria Georgios, and that their antecedent Nikolas Stavrinou (Nicolas Stavrinou), had also been known as Nicola Stavrinou and Nicola Stavrinu. The hearing was adjourned to permit the applicant to obtain the requested documents.
28. On 9 May 2013 the applicant submitted certificates from the mukhtar showing that the aforementioned different names referred to the same individuals, namely the applicant, her mother, her aunt and their antecedent, respectively. The mukhtar’s certificates also identified these individuals on the basis of their identity card numbers. A certificate dated 8 May 2013 indicated that the applicant’s mother was variously known as Maria Nicola (Nicolas, Nikola, Nikolas) Stavrinou and her aunt as Chrystolleui Nicolou Stavriou.
29. At a preliminary hearing on 24 October 2013, at which the applicant was also present, the “TRNC” representatives argued that the mukhtar’s certificates were incomplete and that the names Maria Nicola (Nicolas, Nikola, Nikolas) Stavrinou, for the applicant’s mother, and Chrystolleui Nicolou Stavriou, for the applicant’s aunt, should be added. The representative further argued that an official document should be submitted showing that the applicant’s aunt had not married and did not have any other heirs. He also requested a document showing that there were no liabilities attaching to the property in question. Upon production of these documents, the Attorney General’s representative would be prepared to settle the case by paying GBP 60,000 to the applicant.
30. In reply, the applicant’s representative stated that they would obtain the requested documents. However, he pointed out that they had already produced documents showing that the applicant’s aunt had never married and this was anyway apparent from the fact that she had never changed her last name. The applicant’s representative also pointed out that the applicant’s aunt had transferred the property in question to the applicant while she was still alive. He asked for an adjournment in order to consider the Attorney General’s settlement offer.
31. On 16 January 2014 the applicant’s representative asked that a hearing be held before the IPC.
32. A further examination of the case before the IPC took place on 1 March 2016. The President and members of the IPC questioned the applicant’s representative with regard to the instructions he had received from the applicant concerning the case. As the applicant was not present and could not be reached at that time to give clear instructions concerning the case, the hearing was adjourned.
33. On 9 March 2016 the applicant’s Turkish Cypriot representatives informed her representative in the Republic of Cyprus that the fact that an application had been lodged with the Court had caused them upset. They also stated that they would not represent the applicant in further proceedings.
34. A hearing before the IPC was held on 28 June 2016. The applicant’s Turkish Cypriot representative explained that she had informed the applicant of her wish to withdraw from the case. However, she was unable to provide an official document to that effect and the hearing was therefore adjourned in order for the representative to complete the formalities for withdrawal.
35. On 19 August 2016 the applicant took over the files from her Turkish Cypriot representatives.
36. At a hearing on 28 September 2016 the IPC accepted the applicant’s Turkish Cypriot representatives’ withdrawal from the case and decided that the applicant should be contacted directly during the future course of the proceedings. Another hearing was scheduled for 12 October 2016.
37. On 15 October 2016 the applicant informed the IPC that she had not received the summons to the hearing of 12 October 2016 until 13 October 2016.
38. A further meeting for the examination of the case, at which the applicant was personally present, was held on 2 March 2017. The “TRNC” representatives argued that the applicant should provide further documents showing the exact dates of birth of her mother and her aunt as well as the respective death certificates. Furthermore, they argued that the applicant could not be considered to be a legal heir of her aunt for the purpose of Law no. 67/2005 as she had obtained the property at issue from her aunt while the latter was still alive. The applicant contended that these arguments were being raised for the first time now and she therefore asked for a formal hearing to be opened in her case. The President of the IPC instructed the applicant that the opinions expressed by the “TRNC” representatives did not represent the official position of the IPC and that the matter would be decided after the examination of all the circumstances of the case. The proceedings before the IPC are still pending.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relevant domestic law
1. Constitution of the “TRNC” of 7 May 1985
39. Article 159 § 1 (b) and (c), in so far as relevant, provide as follows:
“(b) All immovable properties, buildings and installations which were found abandoned on 13 February 1975 when the Turkish Federated State of Cyprus was proclaimed or which were considered by law as abandoned or ownerless after the above-mentioned date, or which should have been in the possession or control of the public even though their ownership had not yet been determined ... and (c) ... shall be the property of the TRNC notwithstanding the fact that they are not so registered in the books of the Land Registry Office; and the Land Registry Office shall be amended accordingly.”
40. Article 159 § 4 reads as follows:
“In the event of any person coming forward and claiming legitimate rights in connection with the immovable properties included in sub-paragraphs (b) and (c) of § 1 above [concerning, inter alia, all immovable properties, buildings and installations which were found abandoned on 13 February 1975], the necessary procedure and conditions to be complied with by such persons for proving their rights and the basis on which compensation shall be paid to them, shall be regulated by law.”
2. Law for the compensation, exchange and restitution of immovable properties which are within the scope of sub-paragraph (b) of paragraph 1 of Article 159 of the Constitution, as amended by Laws nos. 59/2006 and 85/2007 (“Law no. 67/2005”)
41. The relevant provisions of Law no. 67/2005 are set out in the case of Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (cited above, §§ 35-37).
42. Section 22 of Law no. 67/2005 provides that Rules for the better implementation of the provisions of that Law may be prepared by the IPC, approved by the “TRNC” Council of Ministers and published in the Official Gazette.
43. In 2006 the IPC adopted its Rules (the English version available at http://www.tamk.gov.ct.tr) which, in the relevant part, provide:
Rule 3
Form of Application
“(8) The Ministry in the TRNC responsible for Housing Affairs and/or the Attorney General representing the Ministry and/or a natural or legal person who under the legislation of the TRNC is in possession of or holds the ownership of property shall within 30 working days file with the secretariat a defence or opinion prepared in accordance with Form 2 attached to these Rules and serve a certified copy thereof on the address of the applicant.
(9) The defence or opinion given by the Ministry in the TRNC responsible for Housing Affairs and/or the Attorney General representing the Ministry and/or a natural or legal person who under the legislation of the TRNC is in possession of or holds the ownership of property in accordance with the legislation in force in the TRNC shall consist of the summary of the facts in issue. If deemed necessary, the Ministry in the TRNC responsible for Housing Affairs and/or the Attorney General representing the Ministry and/or a natural or legal person who under the legislation of the TRNC is in possession of or holds the ownership of property shall attach to the defence or opinion an affidavit by persons who have knowledge on the matter.”
Rule 6
Friendly settlement agreement on the satisfaction of the applicant
“(1) The Ministry responsible for Housing Affairs shall execute the decision of the Commission relating to restitution, exchange, compensation in lieu of the immovable property, compensation for non-pecuniary damages due to loss of the right to respect for home and compensation for loss of use. In execution of such decision, the Ministry responsible for Housing Affairs shall prepare a draft friendly settlement agreement in accordance with Form 3 and serve it to the applicant who has demonstrated his legitimate rights together with an invitation letter.
(2) The invitation letter shall state that the applicant who has demonstrated his legitimate rights should either personally or through a representative come to sign the draft friendly settlement agreement within one month. Otherwise, the draft friendly settlement agreement will be deemed rejected and he shall have the right to apply to the High Administrative Court.
(3) Should the applicant who has demonstrated his legitimate rights either personally or through his representative accept the draft friendly settlement agreement, this draft shall be signed by the Minister responsible for Housing Affairs and by him or his representative.
(4) Should the friendly settlement agreement be rejected, or when it is deemed rejected according to sub-section (2) of this section, a disagreement document shall be served on the interested parties.
(5) In case a dispute is not resolved through a friendly settlement, the right of the interested parties to appeal to courts shall be preserved.”
Rule 7
The functioning and meetings of the Commission
“(1) Following the submission of the defence or opinion of the Ministry in the TRNC responsible for Housing Affairs and/or the Attorney General representing the Ministry and/or a natural or legal person who under the legislation of the TRNC is in possession of or holds the ownership of property in accordance with these Rules, the parties will be convened on a specified date for a meeting concerning the giving of directions regarding the application in the Chairman’s office or any other place he may determine which is convenient for the parties. The Chairman may, following the hearing of the views of the parties, give the necessary directions regarding further detail, the discovery or examination of further documents, the manner in which testimony will be heard, whether or not a site investigation shall be carried out, the persons who should be required to be present during the presentation and on other matters deemed appropriate.
The proceedings that would be attended by the foreign members shall be in English. In all other cases, it will be in Turkish. However, upon the request of the applicant, an interpreter shall be provided.
(2) The proceedings of the Commission shall be based on the documents. All material relating to the applications shall be translated into English for foreign members. Provided that if deemed appropriate the Commission may hear the views and arguments of the parties and take the oral or sworn testimony of the witnesses they may wish to call. The proceedings of the Commission shall be held at its own premises provided that if necessary the Commission may also use the existing courtrooms or chambers to be allocated to the Commission with the approval of the President of the Supreme Court.
The Commission, when it deems necessary, may delegate the task of on-site exploration of the immovable property and preparation of an exploration report by a group of three members.
(3) The Commission may at any stage of the proceedings on its own motion call any person to give evidence or produce any document for the purpose of reaching a fair decision. No such testimony will be given without prior notice to the parties. The parties’ rights to express their views on the matter of calling such witnesses shall be reserved. The proceedings of the Commission, other than those on the documents, shall be in public. However, the rights of the applicant to request confidential proceedings should be preserved and upon request all proceedings shall be in camera.
(4) The Commission shall take its decisions with the simple majority of those present during sittings with a quorum of the 2/3 of the total number of its members. For the purposes of this section, the Chairman and the Deputy Chairman are each to be counted as one member of the Commission. Those dissenting or in the minority may write their views and opinions separately. Such separate views and opinions shall be part of the decision. At the meetings the voting shall be in public. Those present at the meetings shall not be entitled to cast any abstention vote. In case of equality of votes, the matter voted upon shall be deemed to have been rejected. The decision of the Commission shall be signed by the Chairman and another member and shall be conveyed to the parties or served on their address for service after having been sealed by the seal of the Commission.
(5) The Commission shall, after hearing all the views and claims of the parties, announce its reasoned decision within three months. However, depending on its work load and the unique character of the application, the writing of the reasoned decision may be extended up to six months.”
B. Relevant practice
44. The relevant case-law of the “TRNC” Constitutional Court is summarised in the Demopoulos and Others case (cited above, §§ 38-39).
45. According to the English translation of the “TRNC” Supreme Court’s judgment in case no. 129/2015, in which it dealt with issues relating to the nature of the awards made by the IPC and their enforcement, the “TRNC” Supreme Court referred to section 14 of Law no. 67/2005, which provides that the decisions of the IPC have binding effect and are of an executory nature similar to judgments of the judiciary, and such decisions must be implemented without delay upon service thereof on the authorities concerned. The “TRNC” Supreme Court pointed out, however, that it was not entirely apparent from the relevant law how the awards should be executed. In this connection it referred to Rule 6 of the IPC Rules (see paragraph 43 above) and explained that, in order to make the awards executable, actions designed to implement execution of the IPC’s awards, as required under Rule 6, must be taken by the relevant Ministry. Accordingly, only an award finalised in this manner could be said to be legally executable in a manner similar to a judicial decision.
C. Cases before the IPC
46. According to the currently available statistical information (the IPC’s Monthly Bulletin no. 96, 13 November 2017; available at http://www.tamk.gov.ct.tr) a total of 6,369 applications have so far been lodged with the IPC. The IPC has finalised 1035 cases, of which twenty-five were concluded following a hearing of the case and a decision by the IPC and 1012 by means of friendly settlement. In the vast majority of finalised cases (845) compensation has been awarded, amounting in total to the sum of GBP 238,779.386, whereas in other cases other forms of redress have been ordered or the claims were rejected.
47. The applicant pointed to 144 cases pending before the IPC in which her representative, Mr A. Demetriades ? who was representing other applicants in those cases ? had complained before the IPC that the “TRNC” Attorney General had failed to submit initial observations in reply to the lodged applications within a reasonable period of time. The periods of time that had elapsed before the Attorney General’s submission of initial observations ranged from three months to five years.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL MATERIAL
A. United Nations
48. The United Nations’ activities aimed at resolving the property issues in northern Cyprus arising out of the Turkish military intervention have been summarised in Demopoulos and Others (cited above, §§ 7-16).
49. A number of further political initiatives have been taken at UN level, particularly within the framework of the mission of the Secretary General’s Special Adviser for Cyprus. The United Nations Security Council welcomed these initiatives in its Resolution 2263 (2016) of 28 January 2016 (S/RES/2263 (2016)) and called upon the parties to put further efforts into reaching convergence on the core issues in dispute.
B. Council of Europe
50. In the context of the execution of the Court’s judgment in the Inter State case of Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above), the Committee of Ministers is currently examining the general measures of execution required with respect to various issues identified in that judgment, including those relating to the immovable property of displaced Greek Cypriots that is located in the “TRNC” .
51. With respect to these measures, the following findings were made at the Committee of Ministers meeting in March 2017:
“...
Following the judgment of 22/12/2005 in the Xenides-Arestis case, an ‘Immovable Property Commission’ was set up in the northern part of Cyprus under ‘Law No. 67/2005 on the compensation, exchange or restitution of immovable property’. In its inadmissibility decision in Demopoulos and others, delivered on 5 March 2010, the Grand Chamber found that Law No. 67/2005, which set up the Immovable Property Commission in the northern part of Cyprus, ‘provides an accessible and effective framework of redress in respect of complaints about interference with the property owned by Greek Cypriots’ (§ 127 of that decision).
In the judgment Cyprus v. Turkey (just satisfaction), delivered on 12 May 2014, the Court found that Turkey had not yet complied with the conclusion of the main judgment according to which there had been a violation of the property rights of displaced persons as they had been denied access to and control, use and enjoyment of their property as well as any compensation for the interference with their property rights. The Court said that ‘the compliance’ with this conclusion ‘could not be consistent with any possible permission, participation, acquiescence or otherwise complicity in any unlawful sale or exploitation of Greek Cypriot homes and property in the northern part of Cyprus’.
The Court also said that ‘the Court’s decision in the case of Demopoulos and Others to the effect that cases presented by individuals concerning violation of property complaints were to be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies, cannot be considered, on its own, to dispose of the question of Turkey’s compliance with section III of the operative provisions of the principal judgment in the inter-State case’ (see § 63 of the judgment on just satisfaction of 12 May 2014).
b) Examination of the Committee of Ministers at its 1259th meeting (June 2016)
On 30 May 2016, the delegation of Cyprus also submitted a memorandum on the property rights of displaced persons (DH-DD(2016)688). The Turkish delegation submitted a memorandum on this issue on 3 June 2016 (DH-DD(2016)707).
In the Cypriot authorities’ view, in order to comply with the main judgment, Turkey had inter alia to introduce measures to put an end to all transfers of immovable property belonging to displaced Greek Cypriots and ban all construction activities on such properties without the consent of the owners. The Turkish authorities considered that Turkey had already taken the measures required for the execution of this part of the judgment with the setting-up of the Immovable Property Commission. They also referred to protective measures prohibiting the sale and improvement of property which had been returned to its owners by the Commission or which would be returned, in accordance with its decisions, after the solution of the Cypriot problem.
At its 1259th meeting (June 2016) (DH), the Committee decided to resume consideration of the issue of the homes and immovable property of displaced Greek Cypriots at its 1280th meeting (March 2017) (DH).”
52. On the basis of the above findings, the Committee of Ministers decided at its 1280th meeting to resume consideration of the issue of displaced Greek Cypriots’ property rights at its meeting in December 2017.
53. An issue still outstanding before the Committee of Ministers is the execution of the just satisfaction awards in thirty-three cases (designated as the Xenides-Arestis group; see the document containing the list of cases https://search.coe.int/cm/Pages/result_details.aspx?ObjectID=090000168072832d) in which the Court found violations of the Convention with regard to breaches of the property rights of displaced Greek Cypriots.
54. The following findings were noted following the Committee of Ministers meeting in September 2017 (footnote references omitted):
“a) Payment of the just satisfaction: In the Loizidou case the just satisfaction was paid in 2003. The cases of Alexandrou and Eugenia Michaelidou Developments and Michael Tymvios do not raise any issue in respect of the payment of just satisfaction, as the applicants concluded friendly settlements with the respondent State regarding Article 41 (see below under “individual measures concerning the applicants’ property”). The Turkish authorities paid the just satisfaction awarded in the Xenides Arestis judgment of 22 December 2005 in respect of costs and expenses.
As regards the Xenides-Arestis judgment of 07 December 2006, the sums awarded for material and moral damages and for costs and expenses have been due since 2007. In the Demades case, the sums awarded for just satisfaction have been due since 2009 and, in the more recent cases, since 2010-2012. In the Xenides-Arestis case the Committee of Ministers adopted two interim resolutions, in 2008 and 2010, strongly urging Turkey to pay the just satisfaction awarded by the European Court in the judgment of 7 December 2006, together with the default interest due. In the majority of these cases, the applicants or their representatives have addressed the Committee of Ministers on several occasions to complain about the lack of payment of the just satisfaction awarded to them.
At the 1208th meeting (September 2014) (DH), the Committee adopted an interim resolution deeply deploring that, to date, despite the interim resolutions adopted in the cases of Xenides-Arestis and Varnava, the Turkish authorities, on the ground that this payment could not be dissociated from the measures of substance in these cases, had not complied with their obligation to pay the amounts awarded by the Court to the applicants in those cases, as well as in 32 other cases in the Xenides-Arestis group.
In its interim resolution, the Committee also recalled that the then Chairmen of the Committee of Ministers had stressed on behalf of the Committee, in two letters addressed to the Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs, that the obligation to comply with the judgments of the Court was unconditional. The Committee declared that the continued refusal by Turkey to pay the just satisfaction awarded in the case of Varnava and in 33 cases of the Xenides-Arestis group was in flagrant conflict with its international obligations, both as a High Contracting Party to the Convention and as a member State of the Council of Europe. It exhorted Turkey to review its position and to pay without any further delay the just satisfaction awarded by the Court, as well as the default interest due.
At its 1214th meeting (December 2014) (DH), the Committee expressed its deepest concern in view of the lack of response from the Turkish authorities to the two letters sent by the Chairmanship of the Committee of Ministers to the Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs, as well as to the interim resolution adopted in September 2014. The Committee exhorted once again the Turkish authorities to review their position and to pay without further delay the just satisfaction awarded by the Court
At its 1230th (June 2015), 1236th (September 2015), 1243rd (December 2015) and 1250th (March 2016) meetings (DH), the Committee deeply deplored the lack of payment of the just satisfaction and exhorted once again the Turkish authorities to pay without further delay the sums awarded by the Court to the applicants, as well as the default interest due. The Committee also invited the Secretary General to raise the issue of payment of the just satisfaction in these cases in his contacts with the Turkish authorities, calling on them to take the measures necessary to pay it.
At its 1236th meeting (September 2015) (DH), the Committee also encouraged the authorities of the member States to do the same.
On 28 April 2016, the Secretary General sent a letter to the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Turkey trusting that the Turkish authorities would take the necessary measures to ensure the prompt payment of the just satisfaction awarded in these cases (see DH-DD(2016)573).
At its latest examinations of this issue (1259th, 1265th, 1273rd, 1280th and 1288th meetings (June, September, December 2016 and March and June 2017) (DH), the Committee firmly insisted once again on Turkey’s unconditional obligation to pay the just satisfaction awarded by the European Court in these cases and deeply deplored the absence of progress in this respect, again exhorting Turkey to comply with this obligation without further delay. The Committee agreed to resume consideration of this issue at their 1294th meeting (September 2017) (DH).
...
b) Individual measures concerning the applicants’ properties: The Committee decided to close its examination of the individual measures in one of these cases (Eugenia Michaelidou Developments and Michael Tymvios, decision taken at the 1043rd meeting (December 2008) (DH). In the Alexandrou case, the Turkish authorities having complied with the friendly settlement according to which they had to pay the applicant and return the immovable property at stake, it was noted that no further individual measures were needed (see the public notes of the 1092nd meeting (September 2010) (DH).
The Secretariat’s assessment of the individual measures in the cases of Loizidou, Xenides-Arestis, Demades and Eugenia Michaelidou Developments Ltd and Michael Tymvios is presented in the information document CM/Inf/DH(2010)21 of 17 May 2010. This assessment is valid for the other cases of this group in which the judgments on the just satisfaction became final after 2010.
The Turskish authorities presented their position in this respect in their memorandum of 3 June 2016 (DH-DD(2016)707).”
55. On the basis of the above findings, the Committee of Ministers decided to resume consideration of the Xenides-Arestis group of cases at its further meetings.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
56. The applicant complained that the procedure before the IPC by means of which she sought compensation for her property in the “TRNC” had been protracted and ineffective and thus in breach of Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
57. The Court finds that an issue related to the applicant’s claim for compensation before the IPC may arise under all the provisions relied upon by the applicant. In the circumstances of the case, and noting that the central tenet of the applicant’s grievance concerns her inability to obtain compensation for her property claim, the Court considers that the complaint should be examined solely under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for the approach, Kirilova and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 42908/98 and 3 others, §§ 87-88 and 125-127, 9 June 2005; Naydenov v. Bulgaria, no. 17353/03, §§ 48 and 86-87, 26 November 2009, and Shesti Mai Engineering OOD and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 17854/04, § 64, 20 September 2011).
58. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 provides as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ arguments
(a) The Government
59. Relying on the Court’s findings in the case of Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (cited above) concerning the effectiveness of the IPC remedy, the Government argued that the applicant had failed to properly exhaust the available domestic remedies since she had lodged her application with the Court before the relevant proceedings before the IPC had finished. In this connection, the Government pointed out that the applicant had failed to produce all the relevant documents before the IPC in due time and that she had amended her application for compensation in the course of the proceedings before the IPC. Moreover, for reasons unknown to the Government, the applicant had never submitted the available valuation reports to the IPC. The Government also stressed that the applicant had failed to reply to the settlement offer made by the “TRNC” authorities for compensation in the amount of GBP 60,000 and she had failed to produce the documents necessary for such a settlement to be effected. In the Government’s view, the applicant had had unsatisfactory communication with her representative before the IPC, which had led to a number of misconceptions on her part with regard to the functioning of the IPC. As a result, the applicant had prematurely lodged an application with the Court, while the relevant proceedings before the IPC were still ongoing. The Government thus considered that her application was premature and/or manifestly ill-founded.
(b) The applicant
60. The applicant contended that she had decided to apply to the Court at the time that she did because the proceedings before the IPC had not been fair and effective, particularly in view of the lengthy delay in reaching a decision in her case. She argued that the IPC had failed to come to a decision even though it was in possession of all the relevant information concerning her property claim. The IPC’s requests for further documents had in fact been aimed at delaying the proceedings and had clearly been used as tactics on the part of the authorities to create further obstacles to an effective resolution of her case. At the same time, the IPC had never asked her to produce the valuation report ? even though she had made reference to it when amending the claim ? and the respondent had never submitted a report of its own. In this connection, the applicant also argued that the subsequent amendment of her claim had been of a technical nature and not one that could justify the delay in the proceedings. She further contended that in the proceedings before the IPC she had merely had a position of spectator as the proceedings had been conducted hastily and without proper translation from Turkish. Moreover, in her view, the case was not very complex as her property title was evident and the identities of her mother and aunt were easily ascertainable from the available identity documents. Lastly, the applicant argued that the fact that the Xenides-Arestis group of cases remained unexecuted suggested that the IPC remedy was ineffective.
2. The Court’s assessment
61. The Court notes that the respondent Government did not raise an objection as regards the incompatibility ratione personae of the present application with the provisions of the Convention or of its Protocols. However, in view of the fact that the matter calls for consideration by the Court of its own motion (see, for instance, Sejdi? and Finci v. Bosnia and Herzegovina [GC], nos. 27996/06 and 34836/06, § 27, ECHR 2009), the Court finds it important to note that in the light of its findings in the cases of Loizidou v. Turkey ((merits), §§ 52-57, 18 December 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 VI), Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above, §§ 75 81) and Demopoulos and Others (cited above, §§ 89 and 103), the issues complained of fall within the jurisdiction of Turkey, which has, in the northern part of Cyprus, the obligation to secure to the applicants the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention.
62. The Court will therefore proceed on the assumption that Turkey is responsible for the circumstances complained of by the applicant. Having said that, the Court would stress that this does not in any way call into doubt either the view adopted by the international community regarding the establishment of the “TRNC” or the fact that the government of the Republic of Cyprus remains the sole legitimate government of Cyprus (see Cyprus v. Turkey, cited above, § 90, and Demopoulos and Others, cited above, § 89).
63. As to the Government’s preliminary objection of inadmissibility for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies due to the fact that the proceedings before the IPC are still pending, the Court finds that the question of exhaustion of domestic remedies is closely linked to the merits of the applicant’s complaint that she has been unable to obtain compensation for her property due to the protracted and ineffective proceedings before the IPC. The Court therefore considers that the Government’s objection should be joined to the merits of the applicant’s complaint.
64. The Court notes that the applicant’s complaint is not manifestly ill founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ arguments
(a) The applicant
65. The applicant submitted that there was no doubt that she was the owner of the plots of land in question. She had received them by way of a gift from her aunt, who had in turn received them from her father. The applicant further argued that the matter under examination in relation to her property claim had been considered in the light of the Court’s well established case-law in the cases of Loizidou (cited above) and Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above). In her view, however, it was paradoxical to assert that the IPC remedy was effective, as found in the Demopoulos and Others case (cited above), when the Xenides-Arestis group of cases and the just satisfaction arising from the Cyprus v. Turkey judgment could not be executed. She also pointed to a newspaper article, referring to an interview with the IPC’s President, alleging that Turkey had stopped financing IPC. Moreover, the proceedings before the IPC were ineffective due to the delaying and arbitrary practices of the “TRNC” authorities and the relevant statistics showed that a substantial number of cases were still pending before the IPC. In this connection, the applicant also argued that other applicants before the IPC faced various obstacles in proving their claims and in obtaining the payment of compensation awarded by the IPC.
66. The applicant further contended that since she had lodged her application with the IPC in May 2008 there had been no serious progress in the case and the examination of the substance of her claim had been repeatedly adjourned. In her view, the case in itself was not complex and there had been only one amendment of the claim of a purely technical nature. She contended that the IPC had not so far held a real hearing but only directions meetings for the purpose of assessing her case. The applicant considered that such delaying practices had been continuous, systemic and deliberate and had rendered the remedy before the IPC ineffective. In this connection the applicant pointed to the fact that she had repeatedly been requested to provide further irrelevant documents and certificates, such as those relating to her property title and the identity of her aunt, all of which were already known and available in the file. In particular, she had been requested to clarify the different spellings of her aunt’s name even though the identity documents had been available to the IPC and clearly attested to her aunt’s identity. Similarly, she had been asked to provide further documents concerning her property title, which required her to go through a time-consuming and costly procedure. This had in point of fact been completely unnecessary, because the certificates concerning her property title, including proof of the non-existence of any liabilities on her property, had already existed in the file.
67. The applicant also contended that she had been made an initial settlement offer of GBP 20,000, which she had not been prepared to accept, and then, at the meeting of 24 October 2013, this offer had been increased to GBP 60,000. At the same meeting before the IPC she had not been able to participate effectively as the proceedings had been conducted hastily and in Turkish, without the provision of adequate translation services. Moreover, on several other occasions, her representative had not been allowed to address the IPC on her behalf. On one occasion she had attempted to attend a meeting before the IPC ? on 25 April 2013 ? but the meeting had been adjourned. The applicant also contended that the IPC had failed to take the necessary measures to ensure effective administration of the proceedings. It had never requested the valuation reports from the parties and had failed to properly address the requests of the respondent “TRNC” Attorney General’s Office for the provision of further documents by declaring such documents unnecessary. In this connection, the applicant also pointed out that her aunt had lived in the occupied northern part of Cyprus and that all the relevant information on her identity and properties had been well known to the “TRNC” administration. In the applicant’s view, all this clearly demonstrated that the proceedings before the IPC had been ineffective.
(b) The Government
68. Relying on the case of Meleagrou and Others v. Turkey (dec.), no. 14434/09, 2 April 2013, the Government argued that the Court had confirmed its finding in Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (cited above) that the procedure before the IPC provided an adequate and effective remedy for Greek Cypriot property claims relating to properties located in northern Cyprus. However, in the Government’s view, the applicant in the case at issue had failed to avail herself properly of that remedy. In this connection, the Government argued that the applicant’s claim for damages had been excessive and she had asked for an adjournment of the preliminary examination of the case on 25 May 2010 to subsequently amend her compensation claim. However, her amended claim had not corresponded to the reality of the property market in northern Cyprus and the methods used in the 2011 valuation report had been inadequate and inaccurate. Moreover, it had taken her two years to submit the documents requested on 1 June 2010. In addition, the applicant had only been present for the examination of the case before the IPC on 24 October 2013 and it had been for her to substantiate her claim by providing the relevant documents, including those that could have clarified the confusion over the different spellings of the names.
69. In the Government’s view, the applicant’s impression that the IPC remedy was ineffective had not been objectively substantiated but had rather resulted from deficiencies in communication between her and her legal representatives. This was apparent from the fact that the applicant seemed to be unaware that her legal representatives had failed to submit the relevant documents showing the transfer of the property from her aunt to her and had likewise failed to present the relevant valuation reports. In this respect the Government explained that the transfer of properties by Greek Cypriots was not recorded in the “TRNC” registers and applicants were therefore required to produce the relevant documents showing their property title before the IPC. Moreover, the confusion over the spelling of the names could not be clarified on the basis of the identity documents and the mukhtar’s certificates had been needed in that respect. The Government also considered that the documents initially provided by the applicant to the IPC had not clearly shown that she had paid rent for the use of a Turkish Cypriot house. Moreover, the amendment of the applicant’s claim had necessitated the production of further relevant documents, which the applicant had failed to procure and present with the requisite diligence. The Government also stressed that the applicant and her representatives had failed to inform the IPC whether they would accept the friendly settlement offer by the “TRNC” Attorney General.
70. The Government furthermore contended that the execution of the Xenides-Arestis group of cases had nothing to do with the effectiveness of the IPC remedy as those cases had been decided prior to the Demopoulos and Others case (cited above), which had confirmed the effectiveness of the IPC. In the procedure before the IPC, compensation awards were executed and payments made in accordance with the relevant law and the timetable of execution. Moreover, the functions of the Court and the Committee of Ministers in this respect differed. With regard to the proceedings before the IPC, the Government pointed out that the applicant had been represented by lawyers who spoke both Turkish and English and the proceedings before the IPC, as well as the documents submitted to it, had been simultaneously translated into English as the IPC was also made up of two international members. The applicant and her representatives had been given every opportunity to address and to argue her case before the IPC. Moreover, under Rule 7(5) of the IPC Rules, a hearing should be completed within three months and exceptionally within six months. The Meleagrou and Others case (cited above) showed no issue of ineffectiveness arising in this respect. In addition, the Government considered that the significant number of cases decided by means of friendly settlement before the IPC also suggested that the mechanism functioned and there were only a few cases that ended before the High Administrative Court. Taking all these factors into account, in the Government’s view there was nothing to call into question the effectiveness and adequacy of the IPC remedy.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Preliminary points
71. The Court observes at the outset that it has been provided with official certificates of ownership from the Department of Lands and Surveys of the Republic of Cyprus proving that the applicant is the owner of the relevant property. There is also sufficient evidence before the Court showing that the applicant had received the property in question in 1997 by way of a gift from her aunt, who owned it prior to the Turkish military intervention in 1974, and that in 2008 she had received an additional share in one of the plots concerned from her mother (see paragraphs 8 and 18 above).
72. In these circumstances, in accordance with its findings in the cases of Loizidou (cited above, §§ 42-47 and 62), Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above, § 180), Demopoulos and Others (cited above, § 107) and Xenides-Arestis v. Turkey ((dec.), no. 46347/99, 14 March 2005, and (merits) § 28, 22 December 2005), for the purpose of its assessment under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the applicant must be regarded as the legal owner of the property in question.
73. With regard to the nature of the infringement of the property rights of displaced Greek Cypriots in the “TRNC”, in the Loizidou case (cited above, §§ 63-64) the Court reasoned as follows:
“63. However, as a consequence of the fact that the applicant has been refused access to the land since 1974, she has effectively lost all control over, as well as all possibilities to use and enjoy, her property. The continuous denial of access must therefore be regarded as an interference with her rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such an interference cannot, in the exceptional circumstances of the present case to which the applicant and the Cypriot Government have referred (see paragraphs 49-50 above), be regarded as either a deprivation of property or a control of use within the meaning of the first and second paragraphs of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, it clearly falls within the meaning of the first sentence of that provision as an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. In this respect the Court observes that hindrance can amount to a violation of the Convention just like a legal impediment (see, mutatis mutandis, the Airey v. Ireland judgment of 9 October 1979, Series A no. 32, p. 14, para. 25).
64. Apart from a passing reference to the doctrine of necessity as a justification for the acts of the "TRNC" and to the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks, the Turkish Government have not sought to make submissions justifying the above interference with the applicant’s property rights which is imputable to Turkey.
It has not, however, been explained how the need to rehouse displaced Turkish Cypriot refugees in the years following the Turkish intervention in the island in 1974 could justify the complete negation of the applicant’s property rights in the form of a total and continuous denial of access and a purported expropriation without compensation.
Nor can the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks involving both communities in Cyprus provide a justification for this situation under the Convention.
In such circumstances, the Court concludes that there has been and continues to be a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.”
74. The Court confirmed the above findings in the case of Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above, §§ 184-189) and in subsequent cases concerning the complaints of Greek Cypriots concerning interference with their property rights in the “TRNC” (see Demopoulos and Others, cited above, § 71; see also, for instance, Demades v. Turkey, no. 16219/90, §§ 44-46, 31 July 2003; Xenides-Arestis, cited above, §§ 29-32, and Lordos and Others v. Turkey, no. 15973/90, §§ 67-70, 2 November 2010).
75. The Court further notes, as it did in Demopoulos and Others (cited above, § 108), that the Turkish Government no longer contest their responsibility under the Convention for the areas under the control of the “TRNC” and that they have, in substance, acknowledged the right of Greek Cypriot owners to remedies for breaches of their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Indeed, in Demopoulos and Others, the Court recognised this acknowledgment as a significant factor in the provision of the IPC mechanism, which, by applying the Court’s findings in the earlier cases, most notably in the Xenides-Arestis pilot judgment (cited above), sought to secure effective redress for Convention violations identified in the Court’s judgments with regard to the property rights of Greek Cypriots in the “TRNC”.
76. With regard to the effectiveness of the IPC mechanism, in Demopoulos and Others (cited above, §§ 127-128), following a careful examination of all the relevant institutional and procedural aspects of that remedy, the Court reasoned as follows:
“127. The Court finds that Law no. 67/2005 provides an accessible and effective framework of redress in respect of complaints about interference with property owned by Greek Cypriots. The applicant property owners in the present cases have not made use of this mechanism and their complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must therefore be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. It is satisfied that Law no. 67/2005 makes realistic provision for redress in the current situation of occupation that is beyond this Court’s competence to resolve.
128. Lastly, it would stress that this decision is not to be interpreted as requiring that applicants make use of the IPC. They may choose not to do so and await a political solution. If, however, at this point in time, any applicant wishes to invoke his or her rights under the Convention, the admissibility of those claims will be decided in line with the principles and approach above. The Court’s ultimate supervisory jurisdiction remains in respect of any complaints lodged by applicants who, in conformity with the principle of subsidiarity, have exhausted available avenues of redress.”
77. Following the adoption of the Demopoulos and Others judgment, the Court declared inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies all applications that had not already been declared admissible and where the applicants had not presented a claim to the IPC in accordance with Law no. 67/2005 (see, for instance, Cacoyanni and Others v. Turkey (dec.), nos. 55254/00 et al., 1 June 2010; Papayianni and Others v. Turkey (dec.), nos. 479/07 et al., 6 July 2010; Marios Eleftheriades and Others v. Turkey (dec.), nos. 3882/02 et al., 5 October 2010; Papaioannou and Others v. Turkey (dec.), no. 58678/00, 7 December 2012; and Efthymiou and Others v. Turkey (dec.), nos. 40997/02, 7 May 2013).
78. For other applications which had been declared admissible or where the Court had ruled on the merits prior to the adoption of the Demopoulos and Others judgment, the Court proceeded with the adoption of judgments on the merits and/or awards of just satisfaction (see, for instance, Lordos and Others, cited above; see also Gavriel v. Turkey (just satisfaction), no. 41355/98, 22 June 2010; Solomonides v. Turkey (just satisfaction), no. 16161/90, 27 July 2010; Christodoulidou v. Turkey (just satisfaction), no. 16085/90, 26 October 2010; Anthousa Iordanou v. Turkey (just satisfaction), no. 46755/99, 11 January 2011; Loizou and Others v. Turkey (just satisfaction) (final judgment), no. 16682/90, 24 May 2011). These cases form part of the aforementioned Xenides-Arestis group of cases in the execution process (see paragraph 53 above).
79. The Court has also examined an application (Meleagrou and Others, cited above) ? lodged after Demopoulos and Others and where the applicants had presented their claims to the IPC ? which was declared inadmissible on the following two grounds. Firstly, as regards the applicants’ complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, Article 8 and Article 14 concerning certain plots of land owned by a registered company, the Court found that the complaints failed by reason of incompatibility ratione materiae on the grounds that, as shareholders, the applicants could not claim property rights in land owned by a company which was still in existence. As to the ongoing refusal to return certain of their plots of land to them, the Court found that, although the applicants had submitted claims for restitution to the IPC, they had not made claims either for exchange of land in the south of Cyprus or for pecuniary compensation, which would also have permitted the award of damages for loss of use or non-pecuniary compensation if restitution was not afforded. That failure meant the applicants had not made proper use of the IPC remedy. Secondly, in respect of the applicants’ complaints under Article 6 § 1, the Court found that there was no evidence that the proceedings had been unfair or that the IPC was biased or lacking independence. As regards their complaint as to the length of the proceedings the Court found that a period of four years and eight months (before the IPC and on appeal to the “TRNC’s” High Administrative Court) was not unreasonable given the newness of the proceedings and what had been involved in their adjudicating the applicants’ claims.
80. The applicant in the present case challenges the effectiveness of the IPC remedy, arguing that the procedure before the IPC by which she sought compensation for her property located in the “TRNC” has been protracted and ineffective. The Court will embark on its determination of these issues below, taking full account of the particular circumstances of the case and its findings in the aforementioned cases, particularly the principles laid down in the Demopoulos and Others judgment.
81. At this point, the Court finds it important to note that there is nothing in the applicant’s arguments and submissions which could, in itself, at present call into question the effectiveness of the IPC remedy as such. In particular, the Court is unable to accept the applicant’s argument that the difficulties in the execution of the just satisfaction awards in the Xenides Arestis group of cases undermine the effectiveness of the IPC remedy. In this context it should be remembered that the just satisfaction awards in the cases belonging to the Xenides-Arestis group have been adopted separately from the considerations relating to the assessment of the effectiveness of the IPC remedy in the Demopoulos and Others judgment (see paragraphs 77-78 above; see also Demopoulos and Others, cited above §§ 80-82; and the approach in Xenides-Arestis v. Turkey (just satisfaction), no. 46347/99, § 37, 7 December 2006, and Cyprus v. Turkey (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 25781/94, § 63 in fine, ECHR 2014).
82. Moreover, although it goes without saying that Contracting States are bound, in any event, to comply with the Court’s judgments (see Demopoulos and Others, cited above § 81), it should be noted that the above-mentioned difficulties concerning the just satisfaction awards in the Xenides-Arestis group of cases have arisen in the context of processes and considerations linked to the Committee of Ministers’ supervision of the execution of the Court’s judgments (see paragraphs 54 above). On the other hand, the IPC mechanism and the redress provided by that mechanism are dependent on the relevant domestic arrangements and mandatory budgetary inclusions (see paragraphs 41-43 and 45 above) that were found to be adequately established in the Demopoulos and Others judgment (cited above, § 125). At present, there is no conclusive evidence allowing the Court to call the adequacy of such arrangements into question.
83. In so far as the applicant asserted that the IPC mechanism was ineffective due to the significant number of cases pending before it and the alleged delaying and arbitrary practices of the “TRNC” authorities, the Court does not consider it possible, on the basis of the evidentiary material and information available to it, to reach such a general conclusion as to the functioning of the IPC remedy. The fact that there is currently a high number of pending claims cannot be relied on to prove that any particular claims have not been or will not be handled with due expedition (see Demopoulos and Others, cited above, § 125).
84. In this respect it is noted that in the above-cited Meleagrou and Others case, the Court did not find that the proceedings before the IPC had been unduly protracted or otherwise ineffective (see paragraph 79 above). Moreover, there are other cases before the Court showing that individual Greek Cypriot applicants have terminated their cases before the IPC in a satisfactory manner (see Alexandrou v. Turkey (just satisfaction and friendly settlement), no. 16162/90, 28 July 2009, and Angoulos Estate Ltd v. Turkey (dec.), no. 36115/03, 9 February 2010) and that the awards made by the IPC have been duly enforced (see Loizou v. Turkey (dec.), no. 50646/15, § 81, 3 October 2017).
85. It is, of course, possible that the particular structural arrangement of a remedy could result in an excessive length of proceedings in the implementation of that remedy and consequently to a detraction from its effectiveness (see, for instance, Bellizzi v. Malta, no. 46575/09, § 42, 21 June 2011). However, there is nothing at present persuading the Court to conclude that the possible delays or difficulties arising in the processing of particular cases before the IPC call into doubt its findings in the Demopoulos and Others case (cited above, §§ 124-126), according to which that remedy is accessible and capable of efficiently delivering redress.
86. Indeed, and without prejudice to its findings regarding the applicant’s specific arguments concerning her case before the IPC, the Court emphasises that it is perfectly possible that a remedy that is in general found to be effective operates inappropriately in the circumstances of a particular case. This does not, however, mean that the effectiveness of the remedy as such, or the obligation of other applicants to avail themselves of that remedy, should be called into question (see, for instance, V.K. v. Croatia, no. 38380/08, §§ 115-116, 27 November 2012). Nevertheless, the Court would stress that it remains attentive to the developments in the functioning of the IPC remedy and its ability to effectively address Greek Cypriot property claims.
87. Bearing in mind the above considerations, and without calling into question the effectiveness of the IPC remedy as such, the Court will deal below with the applicant’s allegations with regard to the manner in which the proceedings before the IPC operated in her particular case.
(b) General principles
88. The Court reiterates that the essential objective of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is to protect a person against unjustified interference by the State with the peaceful enjoyment of his or her possessions. However, by virtue of Article 1 of the Convention, each Contracting Party “shall secure to everyone within [its] jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in [the] Convention”. The discharge of this general duty may entail positive obligations inherent in ensuring the effective exercise of the rights guaranteed by the Convention, particularly where there is a direct link between the measures an applicant may legitimately expect from the authorities and his or her effective enjoyment of possessions (see, amongst many others, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 143, ECHR 2004 V; Önery?ld?z v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 134, ECHR 2004 XII; and Tunnel Report Limited v. France, no. 27940/07, § 36, 18 November 2010).
89. The boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 do not lend themselves to precise definition. The applicable principles are nonetheless similar. Whether the case is analysed in terms of a positive duty on the part of the State or in terms of an interference by a public authority which needs to be justified, the criteria to be applied do not differ in substance. In both contexts regard must be had to the fair balance to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole (see, for instance, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 69, Series A no. 52; Sargsyan v. Azerbaijan [GC], no. 40167/06, § 220, ECHR 2015; see also Tunnel Report Limited, cited above, § 37).
90. For the purposes of the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must determine whether a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. In each case involving an alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must ascertain whether by reason of the State’s action or inaction the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden. In assessing compliance with that requirement, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests at issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. In that context, it should be stressed that uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State’s conduct. Indeed, where an issue in the general interest is at stake, it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner (see Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, § 108, ECHR 2014; see also Kirilova and Others, cited above, § 106, with further references).
(c) Application of these principles in the present case
91. The Court notes that the applicant’s complaints concerning the ineffectiveness of the proceedings before the IPC in which she sought compensation for her property located in the “TRNC” revolve around two principal issues. The first concerns the alleged lack of adequate opportunity for the applicant and her representatives to participate effectively in the proceedings ? particularly in the light of the interpreting services provided ? and to address the IPC; and the second concerns the protracted length of the proceedings, which commenced in 2008 and are still ongoing. The Court will address these two issues in turn.
92. With regard to the former issue, as regards the complaint relating to the interpreting services, the Court has already observed in Demopoulos and Others (cited above, § 126), that the IPC works in Turkish and in English, that the latter is in common usage in Cyprus, and that interpreters are always available during IPC proceedings (see also paragraph 43 above, Rule 7(1) in fine of the IPC Rules). Moreover, the Court notes, as it did in Meleagrou and Others (cited above, § 19), that the applicant was represented by lawyers who understood both Turkish and English and that, in addition to the interpreting facilities at the hearings, the applicant was able to obtain English translations of key documents, which are now also available to the Court. In this connection, it is also noted that the applicant did not complain to the IPC at the time that the inadequate interpretation and translation facilities were impeding her effective participation in the proceedings. In view of these considerations, the Court finds that no indication of unfairness or a lack of effectiveness of the proceedings arises in the circumstances.
93. The same holds true for the applicant’s complaint that she and her representatives were unable to properly address the IPC during the proceedings. This complaint is unsubstantiated. The applicant’s representatives were given an adequate opportunity to address the IPC and during the proceedings they never raised the issue of their inability to present the applicant’s arguments properly. Nor is there any reason for the Court to doubt that the applicant would have been able to attend the proceedings before the IPC, if she had so wished, and to raise all the issues she considered relevant for her case. Accordingly, there is nothing that persuades the Court to conclude that in this respect the proceedings fell short of the requirement of effectiveness.
94. With regard to the allegedly protracted length of proceedings concerning the applicant’s compensation claim, the Court notes that, in contrast to Meleagrou and Others (cited above) ? where the proceedings lasted four years and eight months before the IPC and the High Administrative Court of the “TRNC” ? the proceedings in the case at issue commenced in May 2008 and to date they have been pending before the IPC for some nine years without a formal resolution of the case being reached. The Court has already found that such an inordinate length of proceedings concerning the resolution of an applicant’s property claim is capable of seriously undermining their remedial efficacy from the perspective of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for instance, Kirilova and Others, cited above, § 117, and Naydenov, cited above, §§ 81-84). Bearing that in mind, the Court considers that the Government would have to provide highly convincing and plausible reasons to persuade it to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
95. In this connection, the Court notes that a significant delay in the processing of the applicant’s compensation claim occurred in the initial stages of the proceedings before the IPC as it took the “TRNC” Attorney General two years to submit a reply to the applicant’s claim (see paragraphs 13 and 16 above). Although such an initial delay in itself is not sufficient to draw any conclusion concerning the lack of effectiveness of the proceedings, it nonetheless significantly contributed to an overall length of time which can be considered unacceptable for the resolution of a property claim under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
96. The Court also notes that the relevant IPC Rules require the competent “TRNC” authorities to submit their initial observations concerning a property claim within a period of thirty working days following submission of the claim (see paragraph 43 above, Rule 3(8) of the IPC Rules). However, although this time-limit was significantly overstepped in the case at issue, the IPC took no action aimed at ensuring that the parties’ submissions were properly obtained and administered. In this connection, the Court wishes to reaffirm the importance of administering justice without delays which might jeopardise its effectiveness and credibility. Indeed, the Court has already observed that excessive delays in the administration of justice constitute a significant threat, in particular as regards respect for the rule of law (see Di Mauro v. Italy [GC], no. 34256/96, § 23, ECHR 1999 V).
97. The Court furthermore notes that the course of the proceedings before the IPC was marked by repeated and successive requests by the “TRNC” authorities for the applicant to submit additional documents concerning her property claim. In this connection it should be noted that the IPC again remained passive as regards these repeated requests, making no effort to assess their reasonableness or relevance or to ensure that the parties’ submissions were properly obtained and administered. The Court considers that such a passive attitude on the part of the IPC may have contributed to a lack of coherence in the proceedings and prolongation of the examination of the case for a significant period of time.
98. In this connection it is salutary to reiterate that the Court is not a court of first instance; it does not have the capacity, nor is it appropriate for it to determine which documentary evidence should be submitted in proceedings (see, amongst other examples, Demopoulos and Others, cited above, § 69 in fine). The Court observes, for instance, that at the directions hearing in June 2010 the “TRNC” Attorney General’s representative requested that a document showing that the applicant used a Turkish Cypriot house in the South should be provided, even though such a document already existed in the file (see paragraphs 14 and 18 above). Similarly, at a preliminary hearing in April 2013 the “TRNC” representatives asked for additional certificates from the mukhtar, even though the applicant had already provided a certificate that left no doubt as to her and her aunt’s identity (see paragraphs 23 and 27 above).
99. Moreover, after the applicant had submitted all the requested documents in support of her initial and amended claim (see paragraphs 14, 23, 26 and 28 above), in October 2013, when the proceedings had already been pending for some five and a half years, the “TRNC” representatives asked for further documents to be provided. This request concerned in particular the clarification of the different spellings of the applicant’s mother’s and her aunt’s names, the marital status and succession of her aunt and the liabilities status of the property in question (see paragraph 29 above). However, the Court observes that the different spellings of the names had already been clarified several times by the mukhtar’s certificates, which also contained references to the numbers of the identity documents of the individuals in question. Furthermore, the marital status and the succession of the applicant’s aunt was apparent from the previously obtained documents (see paragraphs 23 and 26 above) and, in support of her initial claim, the applicant had already provided evidence that there were no mortgages, liabilities or other restrictions on the property in question (see paragraph 14 above). Similarly, the Court notes that it was clear from the outset that the applicant’s aunt had gifted the applicant the property in question while she was still alive in 1997, whereas an issue in that respect was raised for the first time at the meeting in March 2017, almost nine years after the applicant lodged the compensation claim.
100. The Court notes that, without having critically scrutinised the “TRNC” authorities’ requests, the IPC on numerous occasions adjourned the examination of the case. In this connection it is also noted that ? despite the applicant’s request of 16 January 2014 (see paragraph 31 above) ? the IPC scheduled a further examination of the case only two years later, in March 2016 (see paragraph 32 above), which again protracted the already lengthy proceedings unnecessarily. The further course of the proceedings was marked by the procedural issues relating to the applicant’s Turkish Cypriot representatives’ withdrawal from the case and the improper summoning of the applicant for the hearing on 12 October 2016 (see paragraphs 32-37 above) as well as an additional adjournment of the examination of the case in March 2017.
101. Having noted the above, the Court does not consider it insignificant that the applicant failed to duly submit some of the relevant documents in support of her application before the IPC (see paragraph 18 above) and that she provided some of the documents only two years later (see paragraph 22 above). However, it should be noted that in the meantime the applicant had acquired ownership of a further share of one of the five plots in question from her mother, which necessitated the amendment of her initial claim, and that in the period in question she had obtained a significant number of documents clarifying the circumstances of her property claim (see paragraphs 20-23 above).
102. The Court is also mindful of the applicant’s argument that the process of obtaining such documents was time-consuming (see paragraph 66 above; see also Demopoulos and Others, cited above, § 124 in fine). In any case, the Court does not consider it plausible that the period of nine years during which the proceedings have been pending before the IPC can be explained by the applicant’s conduct alone.
103. In the Court’s view, the protracted length of the proceedings in the case at hand was due chiefly to the IPC’s manner of proceeding. Much of it could have been avoided if the IPC had, from the outset, tried to identify the controversial points and gather evidence in relation to them in a more efficient manner (see paragraph 43 above, Rule 7(1) of the IPC Rules; and compare Finger v. Bulgaria, no. 37346/05, § 102, 10 May 2011, and Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 120, ECHR 2000 I). However, it failed to do so and thereby allowed the proceedings to drag on over a significant number of years without a final resolution of the case being reached.
104. In view of the above considerations, the Court finds that, in the present case, the IPC did not act with coherence, diligence and appropriate expedition concerning the applicant’s compensation claim as required under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
105. This is sufficient for the Court to conclude that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
106. It follows that the Government’s preliminary objection, which has been joined to the merits (see paragraph 63 above), must be rejected. However, the Court would stress that, for the present, the IPC remedy remains a remedy to be exhausted by other applicants who wish to invoke their rights under the Convention before the Court (see paragraphs 85-87 above; see also Demopoulos and Others, cited above, § 128).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
107. The applicant complained of a violation of Article 14 of the Convention on account of discriminatory treatment against her in the enjoyment of her right under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. She alleged that this discrimination had been based on her national and ethnic origin, language and religious beliefs.
108. The Government disputed that claim.
109. The Court points out that in previous cases relating to Greek Cypriot property claims in the northern part of Cyprus it has found that it was not necessary to carry out a separate examination of the admissibility and merits of the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention. The Court does not see any reason to depart from that approach in the present case (see, most recently, Lordos and Others, cited above, § 85).
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
110. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage
1. The parties’ submissions
111. With regard to the claim for pecuniary damage, within the period fixed for the submission of a claim for just satisfaction in accordance with Rule 60 of the Rules of Court, the applicant claimed restitution or, alternatively, compensation for the loss of use, interest and the current value of her plots of land. Her compensation claim was based on the 2011 valuation report and was set at EUR 2,690,962 (see paragraph 11 above). She stressed that this did not imply that she was seeking compensation for purported expropriation, since she considered that she was still the legal owner of the property in question. In respect of non-pecuniary damage, the applicant claimed EUR 100,000.
112. The Government argued that the applicant’s claim in respect of pecuniary damage was excessive and unfounded. The Government also considered the applicant’s claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage was unfounded in any respect.
2. The Court’s assessment
113. The Court would stress at the outset that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (see, amongst many others, Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 71243/01, § 33, ECHR 2014).
114. Contracting States that are parties to a case are in principle free to choose the means whereby they will comply with a judgment in which the Court has found a breach. This discretion as to the manner of execution of a judgment reflects the freedom of choice attaching to the primary obligation of the Contracting States under the Convention to secure the rights and freedoms guaranteed (Article 1). If the nature of the breach allows restitutio in integrum, it is for the respondent State to effect it, the Court having neither the power nor the practical ability to do so itself. If, on the other hand, national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 33, ECHR 2000?XI, and Kuri? and Others v. Slovenia (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 26828/06, § 80, ECHR 2014).
115. As a rule, the fact that an applicant may still receive an award in respect of pecuniary damage under the domestic legal proceedings does not deprive the applicant of his or her right to claim compensation under Article 41 of the Convention (see, for instance, Mikheyev v. Russia, no. 77617/01, § 155, 26 January 2006, and S.L. and J.L. v. Croatia (just satisfaction), no. 13712/11, § 15, 6 October 2016, with further references). However, exceptionally, if the circumstances of the case so warrant, the Court may decide not to grant compensation as the applicant can obtain compensation at domestic level (see, for instance, Mascolo v. Italy, no. 68792/01, § 55, 16 December 2004, and Bistrovi? v. Croatia, no. 25774/05, § 58, 31 May 2007).
116. As to the pecuniary damage claimed by the applicant, having regard to the procedural nature of the violation found under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, related to the IPC’s lack of coherence, diligence and appropriate expedition concerning the applicant’s compensation claim (see paragraph 104 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to award any amount in respect of pecuniary damage as the further course of the proceedings before the IPC, conducted in compliance with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, should allow the applicant to obtain compensation for her property claim (see, mutatis mutandis, Mascolo, cited above, § 55, and Bistrovi?, cited above, § 58).
117. On the other hand, the Court considers that the applicant must have sustained non-pecuniary damage – such as distress resulting from the ineffectiveness of the proceedings before the IPC – which is not sufficiently compensated by the finding of a violation. Ruling on an equitable basis, it awards the applicant EUR 7,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on this amount.
B. Costs and expenses
118. In the period fixed for submission of a claim for just satisfaction in accordance with Rule 60 of the Rules of Court, the applicant sought in total EUR 7,825 plus VAT, which covered the costs and expenses of her legal representation (EUR 6,325) and the cost of obtaining the valuation report (EUR 1,500).
119. The Government considered that the applicant’s claim was unfounded as she had failed to cooperate appropriately with her representatives before the IPC and before the Court.
120. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. Regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 6,325, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of her claim for costs and expenses incurred until the date of the present judgment.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Joins, unanimously, to the merits the Government’s preliminary objection concerning the non-exhaustion of domestic remedies and rejects it;

2. Declares, unanimously, the applicant’s complaint that the proceedings by which she sought compensation for her property located in the “TRNC” had been protracted and ineffective, under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, admissible;

3. Holds, unanimously, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

4. Holds, unanimously, that there is no need to examine separately the admissibility and merits of the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

5. Holds, by six votes to one,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 7,000 (seven thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 6,325 (six thousand three hundred and twenty-five euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

6. Dismisses, by six votes to one, the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 12 December 2017, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Robert Spano
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following separate opinions are annexed to this judgment:
(a) concurring opinion of Judge Karaka?;
(b) partly dissenting opinion of Judge Bianku.
R.S.
S.H.N.
CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE KARAKA?
I agree that there has been a procedural violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, as the central reason for finding a violation relates to the length of proceedings before the IPC (pending for almost ten years), I think that an examination under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention would have been more appropriate.
I think that Article 6 § 1 is applicable to the proceedings before the IPC (moreover, the parties did not contest this).
There is no doubt that there was a dispute before the IPC concerning the applicant’s property claim. Such a dispute was for the IPC to decide at first instance followed, if necessary, by the High Administrative Court at second instance (see Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (dec.) [GC], nos. 46113/99 and 7 others, §§ 35-37, ECHR 2010, citing sections 4 and 9 of Law no. 67/2005). So the applicant was obliged to obtain a ruling from the IPC in order to bring a case before the “TRNC” High Administrative Court, which is a body integrated into the domestic system of courts (see Cyprus v. Turkey [GC], no. 25781/94, §§ 90-102 and 236, ECHR 2001 IV, and Demopoulos and Others, cited above, §§ 92-98).
These considerations are sufficient for the Court to conclude that ? for the purpose of the applicant’s length-of-proceedings complaint – Article 6 § 1 is applicable to the proceedings before the IPC (see, for instance, Janssen v. Germany, no. 23959/94, § 40, 20 December 2001, and Boži? v. Croatia, no. 22457/02, § 26, 29 June 2006). This is true irrespective of the fact that the case has not yet been examined by the “TRNC” High Administrative Court, as the IPC has failed to adopt its decision over a prolonged period of time (compare Bici v. Albania, no. 5250/07, §§ 28 and 41-45, 3 December 2015). Indeed, the Court cannot overlook the length of proceedings before the IPC, as to do so would make the applicability of the reasonable-time guarantee under Article 6 § 1 wholly dependent on the IPC’s conduct and allow it to drag the proceedings on for years without them reaching the stage of the “TRNC” High Administrative Court, before which Article 6 § 1 would undoubtedly apply.
In view of this, it is clear that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention is applicable to the applicant’s complaint concerning the length of proceedings before the IPC.
On the merits, it is clear that the applicant failed to duly submit some of the relevant documents in support of her application before the IPC and that she provided some of the documents only two years later. However, in any case, the period of more than nine and a half years during which the proceedings have been pending before the IPC cannot be explained by the applicant’s conduct alone.
I agree that the protracted length of the proceedings in this case was due chiefly to the IPC’s manner of proceeding. Much of it could have been avoided if the IPC had, from the outset, tried to identify the controversial points and gather evidence in relation to them in a more efficient manner (see Rule 7(1) of the IPC Rules, cited in paragraph 43 of the judgment). However, it failed to do so and thereby allowed the proceedings to drag on over a significant number of years without a final resolution of the case being reached.
In sum, the length of the proceedings complained of is far from satisfying the reasonable-time requirement.
In the judgment the Court emphasises that the violation found does not call into question the effectiveness of the IPC remedy as such (see paragraphs 86-87 and 106 of the judgment).
As a result, having regard to the procedural nature of the violation found under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, relating to the IPC’s lack of coherence, diligence and appropriate expedition concerning the applicant’s compensation claim (see paragraph 104 of the judgment), the Court considers that it is not necessary to award any amount in respect of pecuniary damage. It takes the view that, as regards pecuniary damage, the proceedings before the IPC would still allow the applicant to obtain compensation for her property claim (see paragraph 116 of the judgment). For this reason the Court awards only non-pecuniary damage.
In view of the fact that the applicant’s property claim is still pending before the IPC, I find that her complaint concerning the length of proceedings should have been examined under Article 6 § 1 and that the remaining complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 should have been rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies pursuant to Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.

?
PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE BIANKU
I agree with the finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in this case. However, I do not agree with the conclusion of the majority as to points 5 and 6 of the operative part. I think that the Chamber should have reserved the Article 41 issue, with a view to possibly deciding later on the applicant’s claim for pecuniary damage in the event that the IPC procedure continues to be ineffective.
The choice adopted by the majority, firstly, does not reflect the case-law of the Court in similar cases; secondly, it does not take duly into account the circumstances of the case.
As to the first reason, the consistency of the case-law, it is sufficient to observe that in two recent Grand Chamber judgments concerning very similar violations of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 because of situations resulting from armed conflicts, the Court reserved the issue of Article 41 (see Sargsyan v. Azerbaijan [GC], no. 40167/06, § 283, ECHR 2015, and Chiragov and Others v. Armenia [GC], no. 13216/05, § 224, ECHR 2015). In my opinion, the “merely” procedural nature of the violation is not such an exceptional circumstance as to justify departing from the approach adopted in those cases, an approach which constitutes the long-standing case-law of the Court (see Papamichalopoulos and Others v. Greece (Article 50), 31 October 1995, § 34-46, Series A no. 330?B). The “procedural” breach at issue in fact led to the ineffectiveness of the IPC remedy in the applicant’s case. Accordingly, this remedy was not able to address the applicant’s property claim, and therefore the approach applied in other TRNC cases in which the IPC remedy was not effective should have been applied. In those cases the Court reserved the question of Article 41 and later determined the issue of pecuniary damage separately (see, for instance, the judgments in the case of Xenides-Arestis v. Turkey, no. 46347/99, § 36, 22 December 2005 (merits), and Xenides-Arestis (just satisfaction), 7 December 2006). This approach would not mean that today’s judgment contests the conclusion reached in Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (dec.) ([GC], nos. 46113/99 and 7 others, ECHR 2010) that the procedure before the IPC is a priori an effective remedy. But at the same time it would confirm that, where the Court considers that certain remedies are effective and therefore must be exhausted, the national authorities must consistently secure the effective operation of those remedies, such as the procedure before the IPC, to all individuals in all cases. Thus, while the procedure before the IPC remains a priori an effective remedy, cases like Demopoulos should not be interpreted to mean that the national authorities obtain an “increased margin of violation” in the name of subsidiarity and that the Court has given away all control over the way the Convention rights are applied in practice.
Secondly, I do not think that the solution offered by the majority in this case takes duly into account the circumstances of the case. Let me recall that the applicant was gifted several plots of land by her mother and aunt. These plots are located in Koma Tou Yialou (Kumyali), and her family lost effective use of their properties following the Turkish military intervention in northern Cyprus in July and August 1974 (see paragraph 7 of the judgment, with the references contained therein) and have not been able to access or use them since then. That was some forty-three years ago. Almost ten years ago the applicant initiated proceedings before the IPC with a view to obtaining compensation (see paragraph 13 of the judgment). In both Sargsyan and Chiragov, cited above, the Grand Chamber observed in relation to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that “the situation has continued to exist over a very lengthy period” (see Sargsyan, § 240, and Chiragov, § 200). If in those cases the expression “very lengthy” applied to situations that had continued since 1991, a fortiori it should apply to situations that have continued since 1974. Throughout all those years the applicant and her family have not had access to their properties. What can justify an invitation to wait almost fifty years to have access to one’s properties or to be compensated instead? As the majority rightly conclude in paragraphs 103 and 104 of the judgment, the proceedings before the IPC were so lengthy that they were in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In these circumstances it seems to me inappropriate to give no other option to the applicant but to wait for a solution which, in her case, has proved ineffective for almost ten years and therefore in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. If the issue of Article 41 had been reserved there would still be some hope that if the IPC proceedings continue to drag on and prove ineffective, as they have until now in the applicant’s case, judicial proceedings in Strasbourg would continue on the main issue of the case, namely compensation. Now they have become a remote possibility because the applicant would have to make a fresh application on the same subject-matter should the IPC continue to drag its feet.
For these reasons I believe that reserving the Article 41 issue in this case would have been the sound solution based on our case-law and the fairest approach to the resolution of the applicant’s claims and the effective protection of her property rights, in view of a violation that has continued to exist over a very, very lengthy period.

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni
Eccezione preliminare congiunta a meriti e respinta (l'Art. 35) criterio di ammissibilità
(Art. 35-1) esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - obblighi Positivi
Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà)
Danno patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinta (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)
Danno non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non- patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)



SECONDA SEZIONE






CAUSA JOANNOU C. TURCHIA

(Richiesta n. 53240/14)






SENTENZA





STRASBOURG

12 dicembre 2017







Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte nell’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Joannou c. Turchia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Robert Spano, Presidente
Julia Laffranque,
Ledi Bianku,
Il ?Karaka?,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Grico?,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 14 novembre 2017,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 53240/14) contro la Repubblica di Turchia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino britannico e cipriota, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 28 ottobre 2014.
2. Il richiedente che era stato accordato patrocinio gratuito fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Nicosia. Il Governo turco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, una mancanza dell'efficacia dei procedimenti lei aveva avviato di fronte alla Patrimonio immobiliare Commissione (“IPC) chiedendo il risarcimento in riguardo di beni immobili localizzò nel “Repubblica turca della Cipro Settentrionale” (il “TRNC”). Lei si appellò su Articoli 6, 13 e 14 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. 19 novembre 2015 che l'azione di reclamo sopra è stata comunicata al Governo ed il resto della richiesta fu dichiarato inammissibile facendo seguito Decidere 54 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
5. Il Governo britannico ed il Governo cipriota furono informati dei procedimenti. Il Governo britannico non si giovò a del diritto per intervenire nei procedimenti sotto Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Decidere 44 § 1 (b) degli Articoli di Corte. In una lettera di 28 gennaio 2016 il Governo cipriota indicò che loro desiderarono esercitare il loro diritto per intervenire nei procedimenti in conformità con Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Decidere 44 § 1 (b). Comunque, ad un più tardi stadio dei procedimenti, in una lettera di 21 ottobre 2016 il Governo cipriota informò la Corte che loro avevano deciso di non presentare qualsiasi commenti scritto nella procedura.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1953 e vive in Enfield (il Regno Unito).
A. Background della causa
7. Le azioni di reclamo sollevate in questa richiesta sorgono fuori dell'intervento militare turco in Cipro settentrionale in luglio ed agosto 1974. Il contesto generale della proprietà emette sorgendo in questo collegamento sia esposto fuori nelle cause della Cipro c. la Turchia ([GC], n. 25781/94, §§ 13-16 e 28-33, ECHR 2001 IV), e Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.) ([GC], N. 46113/99 e 7 altri, §§ 4-16 ECHR 2010).
8. Nel 1997 il richiedente fu donato cinque aree di terra, o quote in loro, con sua zia che morì nel 1998. Nel 2008 lei fu donata anche una quota supplementare di una delle aree di terra con sua madre. Secondo i certificati di proprietà previsti col Settore di Terre ed Esami della Repubblica della Cipro, il richiedente è, il risuoli proprietario di quattro aree di terra e possiede una quota del 9/16 della quinta area.
9. La terra giace nel villaggio Koma Tou Yialou (Kumyali) nel “TRNC.” L'area totale della terra è del dönüm del 18.
10. Nel 2007 il richiedente istruì una ditta legale in Nicosia che ottenne debitamente un rapporto di valutazione sulla terra da un turco Cypriot geometra noleggiato. Il rapporto di valutazione di 3 dicembre 2007 valutò ognuno delle cinque aree di terra e purché valutazioni per loro che variarono da 500 libbre genuino (GBP) per dönüm a GBP 10,000 per dönüm.
11. Ad ottobre 2011 il richiedente ottenne un ulteriore rapporto di valutazione con un geometra noleggiato dalla Repubblica della Cipro. Questo rapporto valutò le cinque aree di terra, incluso la perdita economica ed interesse (tutti calcolarono per il periodo fra il 1974 ed il 2011), a 2,690,962 euros (EUR) in totale.
12. A febbraio 2017 il richiedente ottenne un rapporto di valutazione nuovo dall'Ufficio della Registrazione della Terra della Repubblica di Cipro in oggetto la quale valutò il valore della proprietà, incluso perdita economica ed interesse accumulati fin da 1997 (quando il richiedente divenne proprietario della proprietà) a dicembre 2016, ad EUR 2,088,366 in totale.
B. I procedimenti di fronte all'IPC
13. In maggio 2008 il richiedente, per i suoi rappresentanti ciprioti turchi registrò una rivendicazione con l'IPC sotto Legge n. 67/2005 (veda divide in paragrafi 41-43 sotto) ?sostenne con un affidavit che chiede restituzione del suo risarcimento di and/or di proprietà al valore di mercato corrente della proprietà e danni per perdita di uso della terra in oggetto. Il risarcimento totale chiesto era GBP 100,000 per dönüm (GBP 1,800,000 o verso EUR 2,285,000).
14. Nel suo affidavit il richiedente attestò che la proprietà in oggetto era stato trasferito a lei dopo 1974 con sua zia che l'aveva posseduto poiché prima 1974. L'affidavit attestò anche che non c'erano nessuno ipoteche, le responsabilità o restrizioni sulla proprietà in oggetto, che il richiedente visse in Cipro Meridionale in un alloggio posseduto con un turco Cypriot, e che lei stava pagando affitto alla Repubblica della Cipro. L'archivio contenne anche l'identità del richiedente documenta (passaporto britannico e scheda di identità cipriota), certificati dalla Repubblica della Cipro Terra Cancelleria ed Esami Settore riguardo alla proprietà e la condizione giuridica delle aree del richiedente di terra (non indicando nessuno ipoteche, le responsabilità o le altre restrizioni), ed un documento emise con l'autorità cipriota ed attinente che mostra che il richiedente visse in un alloggio posseduto con un turco Cypriot ed era stato accreditato 270 libbre cipriothe (CYP) con modo di affitto per il periodo il 2003 a 30 giugno 2004 di 1 aprile.
15. La rivendicazione del richiedente fu comunicata il “TRNC” Avvocato General come previsto sotto Legge n. 67/2005 e gli IPC Rules attinenti (veda paragrafo 43 sotto).
16. L'Ufficio dell'Avvocato Generale presentò un'opinione all'IPC in replica alla rivendicazione del richiedente in 5 maggio 2010. Si appellò su un affidavit col “TRNC” Direttore della Terra Cancelleria ed Esami Settore che spiegarono che i loro archivi mostrarono che uno dei proprietari registrati della proprietà in oggetto era Chrystollou Nicola Stavrinou (la zia del richiedente), che Maria Nicola Stavrinou (la madre del richiedente) era il proprietario di parte di una delle aree di terra, e che il richiedente non era riuscito a dimostrare che lei era l'erede legale dei due proprietari registrati. Lui considerò anche che la rivendicazione di risarcimento del richiedente era eccessiva ed infondata.
17. Un direzioni ascoltano di fronte all'IPC succedè in 25 maggio 2010. Il rappresentante del richiedente affermò che loro avevano ricevuto solamente l'opinione dell'Avvocato Generale nel giorno dell'udienza e così avevano chiesto un aggiornamento per istruire la loro processo. Il rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale non obiettò e l'udienza fu aggiornata sino a 1 giugno 2010.
18. Ad un direzioni ascolti 1 giugno 2010 il rappresentante del richiedente si impegnò ottenere un rapporto di valutazione ed un'esposizione di documento che le aree di terra erano state trasferite al richiedente con modo di donazione. Il rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale richiese che esposizione di documenti che il richiedente era l'erede legale di Chriystolleuo Nicola Stavrou [sic.] dovrebbe essere previsto, così come prova dell'importo di affitto che lei stava pagando per l'alloggio cipriota turco dove lei visse nel Sud, o alternativamente l'accordo di contratto d'affitto col quale l'alloggio era stato assegnato a lei. Il rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale si impegnò anche presentare un documento di ricerca dal “TRNC” la Terra Cancelleria ed Esami Settore, ed indicò che lui riservò il suo diritto per presentare e richiedere gli ulteriori documenti. L'udienza fu aggiornata così che le parti potrebbero ottenere i documenti attinenti.
19. 3 giugno 2010 l'Avvocato General presentò il documento di ricerca del “TRNC” la Terra Cancelleria ed Esami Settore relativo alle aree incluse nella rivendicazione del richiedente.
20. Per il suo rappresentante, il richiedente chiese a permesso di correggere la sua rivendicazione iniziale 6 giugno 2012. Lei presentò che lei era divenuta nel frattempo il risuoli proprietario dell'area del quale lei prima aveva posseduto una quota del 5/6 e che ad ottobre 2011 lei aveva ottenuto un rapporto di valutazione che indica che il valore delle sue proprietà era EUR 2,690,962 (veda paragrafo 8 sopra).
21. Ad un'udienza preliminare 18 giugno 2012, dopo che il rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale affermò che lui non aveva eccezioni con riguardo ad all'emendamento della rivendicazione del richiedente; il Presidente dell'IPC accettò l'emendamento ed istruì il richiedente a presentarla corresse rivendicazione e l'Ufficio dell'Avvocato Generale per presentare un'opinione in quel riguardo a.
22. 6 luglio 2012 il richiedente approvò l'ordine e corresse la sua rivendicazione, mentre chiedendo il risarcimento in conformità con le sentenze nuove e sviluppi che concernono il suo titolo di proprietà.
23. 20 novembre 2012 il richiedente presentò i documenti richiesti col rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale 1 giugno 2010 (veda paragrafo 18 sopra). In particolare, il richiedente presentò certificati emessi col capo della comunità locale (il mukhtar) spiegando che c'erano discordanze nella compitazione del nome della zia del richiedente in documenti diversi. I mukhtar spiegarono che i secondi avevano contenuto documento di identità cipriota n. 327090 ed era stato variamente noto come: Christallou Nikola Stavrinou, Chriystallou Nicola Stavrinon, Christallou Nicola Stavrinou, Christalla Nikola e Chrystallou Nicola ma queste erano uno e la stessa persona. I mukhtar certificarono inoltre che lei non si era sposata mai e che prima la sua morte lei aveva donato il suo patrimonio immobiliare alla figlia di sua sorella, il richiedente (Andriani Ioannou, possessore di una scheda di identità cipriota). In appoggio dei certificati dei mukhtar, il richiedente presentò, l'identità di sua zia documenta (incluso un documento di identità cipriota). Il richiedente presentò anche il trasferimento di titolo esposizione di documenti da sua zia a lei in riguardo delle aree di terra in oggetto. Lei presentò anche esposizione di documenti che lei era stata assegnata un alloggio cipriota turco nel Sud ed aveva pagato CYP 342 con modo di affitto per il periodo il 2000 a 31 dicembre 2001 di 1 giugno e CYP 270 per il periodo il 2003 a 30 giugno 2004 di 1 aprile.
24. Un'udienza preliminare di fronte all'IPC elencò per 10 gennaio 2013 fu aggiornato dovuto all'assenza del rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale che non poteva frequentare l'udienza per ragioni di famiglia.
25. Ad un'udienza preliminare 25 gennaio 2013 il “TRNC” autorità furono rappresentate col rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale ed il sotto segretario del Settore degli Affari dell'Alloggio. Loro chiesero al richiedente di presentare i certificati di nascita di sua zia e sua madre ed un atto di titolo per la proprietà che lei ora possedette nella sua interezza. L'udienza fu aggiornata per abilitare il richiedente per ottenere i documenti in oggetto.
26. 19 febbraio 2013 il richiedente presentò i documenti richiesti che anche inclusero documenti che confermano che sua zia non si era sposata mai.
27. Ad un'udienza preliminare 25 aprile 2013 il “TRNC” rappresentanti chiesero al richiedente di presentare certificati dal mukhtar che mostra che i nomi Andriani Joannou, Andriani Ioannou ed Andriani Georgiou Antoniou tutti si riferirono al richiedente, e gli ulteriori certificati che mostrano che sua zia era stata variamente noto come Chrystollou Nicola Stavrinou, Chrystolleuo Nicola Stavriou, Chrystolleui Nicolou Stavriou Nikola Hristallu (Nicola Hrystallou), Hristalla Nicola e Hrystallou Nicola (Nikola), e che sua madre era stata variamente noto come Maria Nicola Stavrinou, Maria Stavrinou, Maria Georgiou e Maria Georgios, e che il loro Nikolas Stavrinou antecedente (Nicolas Stavrinou), era stato anche noto come Nicola Stavrinou e Nicola Stavrinu. L'udienza fu aggiornata per permettere il richiedente per ottenere i documenti richiesti.
28. In 9 maggio 2013 il richiedente presentò certificati dal mukhtar che mostra che i nomi diversi e summenzionati si riferirono agli stessi individui, vale a dire il richiedente, sua madre, sua zia ed il loro antecedente rispettivamente. I certificati dei mukhtar identificarono anche questi individui sulla base dei loro numeri di scheda di identità. Un certificato datò 8 maggio 2013 indicò che la madre del richiedente era variamente noto come Maria Nicola (Nicolas, Nikola Nikolas) Stavrinou e sua zia come Chrystolleui Nicolou Stavriou.
29. A 24 ottobre 2013 un'udienza preliminare alla quale il richiedente era anche presente, il “TRNC” rappresentanti dibatterono che i certificati dei mukhtar erano incompleti e che i nomi Maria Nicola (Nicolas, Nikola Nikolas) Stavrinou, per la madre del richiedente e Chrystolleui Nicolou Stavriou, per la zia del richiedente dovrebbe essere aggiunto. Il rappresentante dibattè inoltre che un documento ufficiale dovrebbe essere presentato esposizione che la zia del richiedente non si era sposata e non aveva qualsiasi gli altri eredi. Lui richiese anche un'esposizione di documento che non c'erano nessuno passività che allegano alla proprietà in oggetto. Su produzione di questi documenti, il rappresentante dell'Avvocato Generale sarebbe preparato per stabilire la causa con pagando GBP 60,000 al richiedente.
30. In replica, il rappresentante del richiedente affermò, che loro avrebbero ottenuto i documenti richiesti. Comunque, lui indicò che loro già avevano prodotto esposizione di documenti che la zia del richiedente non si era sposata mai e questo era evidente dal fatto in ogni modo che lei non l'aveva cambiata mai lo scorso nome. Il rappresentante del richiedente indicò anche che la zia del richiedente aveva trasferito la proprietà in oggetto al richiedente mentre lei ancora era viva. Lui chiese un aggiornamento per considerare l'offerta di accordo dell'Avvocato Generale.
31. 16 gennaio 2014 il rappresentante del richiedente chiese che un'udienza sia contenuta di fronte all'IPC.
32. Un ulteriore esame della causa di fronte all'IPC ebbe luogo 1 marzo 2016. Il Presidente e membri dell'IPC interrogarono il rappresentante del richiedente con riguardo ad alle istruzioni lui aveva ricevuto dal richiedente riguardo alla causa. Siccome il richiedente non era presente e non poteva essere raggiunto a che tempo per dare istruzioni chiare riguardo alla causa, l'udienza fu aggiornata.
33. 9 marzo 2016 i rappresentanti ciprioti turchi del richiedente informarono il suo rappresentante nella Repubblica della Cipro che il fatto che una richiesta era stata depositata con la Corte li aveva provocati sconvolgimento. Loro affermarono anche che loro non avrebbero rappresentato il richiedente negli ulteriori procedimenti.
34. Un'udienza prima che l'IPC fu sostenuto 28 giugno 2016. Il rappresentante cipriota turco del richiedente spiegò che lei aveva informato il richiedente del suo desiderio per ritirare dalla causa. Comunque, lei non era capace di offrire un documento ufficiale a che effetto e l'udienza furono aggiornate perciò in ordine per il rappresentante per completare le formalità per ritiro.
35. 19 agosto 2016 il richiedente prese gli archivi dai suoi rappresentanti ciprioti turchi.
36. Ad un'udienza 28 settembre 2016 l'IPC accettò il ritiro di ' i rappresentanti ciprioti turchi del richiedente dalla causa e decise che il richiedente dovrebbe essere contattato direttamente durante il corso futuro dei procedimenti. Un'altra udienza fu elencata per 12 ottobre 2016.
37. 15 ottobre 2016 il richiedente informò l'IPC che lei non aveva ricevuto la citazione all'udienza di 12 ottobre 2016 sino a 13 ottobre 2016.
38. Un inoltre riunione per l'esame della causa al quale il richiedente era personalmente presente, fu sostenuto 2 marzo 2017. Il “TRNC” rappresentanti dibatterono che il richiedente dovrebbe offrire le date esatte di nascita di sua madre e sua zia l'ulteriore esposizione di documenti così come i rispettivi certificati di morte. Inoltre, loro dibatterono che non si poteva considerare che il richiedente sia un erede legale di sua zia per il fine di Legge, n. 67/2005 siccome lei aveva ottenuto la proprietà in questione da sua zia mentre il secondo ancora era vivo. Il richiedente contese che questi argomenti erano sollevati per la prima volta ora e lei chiese perciò un'udienza formale per essere aperta nella sua causa. Il Presidente dell'IPC istruì il richiedente col quale le opinioni hanno espresso il “TRNC” rappresentanti non rappresentarono la posizione ufficiale dell'IPC e che la questione sarebbe decisa dopo l'esame di tutte le circostanze della causa. I procedimenti di fronte all'IPC ancora sono pendenti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. diritto nazionale Attinente
1. Costituzione del “TRNC” di 7 maggio 1985
39. Articolo 159 § 1 (b) e (il c), in finora come attinente, preveda siccome segue:
“(b) Tutti i patrimoni immobiliari, edifici ed installazioni che state trovate abbandonate 13 febbraio 1975 quando il turco Federated Stato della Cipro fu proclamato o quali furono considerati con legge come abbandonato od ownerless dopo la data summenzionata, o quale sarebbe dovuto essere nella proprietà o controllo del pubblico anche se la loro proprietà non era stata determinata ancora... e (il c)... sia la proprietà del TRNC nonostante il fatto che loro non sono registrati così nei libri dell'Ufficio della Cancelleria della Terra; e l'Ufficio della Cancelleria della Terra sarà corretto di conseguenza.”
40. Articolo 159 § 4 letture siccome segue:
“Nell'evento di qualsiasi persona venendo in avanti e chiedendo diritti legittimi in collegamento coi patrimoni immobiliari incluse in supplire-paragrafo (b) e (il c) di § 1 sopra [riguardando, inter alia, tutti i patrimoni immobiliari, edifici ed installazioni che furono trovati abbandonati 13 febbraio 1975], la procedura necessaria e le condizioni per essere attenutosi con con simile persone per provare i loro diritti e la base sulle quali il risarcimento sarà pagato a loro, sarà regolato con legge.”
2. Legge per il risarcimento, cambio e restituzione di patrimoni immobiliari che sono all'interno della sfera di supplire-paragrafo (b) di paragrafo 1 di Articolo 159 della Costituzione, corretto con Leggi N. 59/2006 e 85/2007 (“la Legge n. 67/2005”)
41. Le disposizioni attinenti di Legge n. 67/2005 sono esposti fuori nella causa di Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia (citò sopra, §§ 35-37).
42. Sezione 22 di Legge n. 67/2005 prevedono che Articoli per la migliore attuazione delle disposizioni di che Legge può essere preparata con l'IPC, approvò col “TRNC” Consiglio di Ministri e pubblicò nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi.
43. Nel 2006 l'IPC adottò i suoi Articoli (la versione inglese disponibile a http://www.tamk.gov.ct.tr) quali, nella parte attinente prevedono:
Decida 3
Forma della Richiesta
“(8) il Ministero nel TRNC responsabile per and/or di Affari di Alloggio l'Avvocato General che rappresenta l'and/or di Ministero una naturale o legale persona che sotto la legislazione del TRNC è in proprietà di o sostiene la proprietà di proprietà all'interno di 30 giornate lavorative registri col segretariato una difesa od opinione preparò in conformità con Forma 2 attaccato a questi Articoli e notifica al riguardo una copia autenticata sull'indirizzo del richiedente.
(9) la difesa od opinione data col Ministero nel TRNC responsabile per and/or di Affari di Alloggio l'Avvocato General che rappresenta l'and/or di Ministero una naturale o legale persona che sotto la legislazione del TRNC è in proprietà di o sostiene la proprietà di proprietà in conformità con la legislazione vigente nel TRNC consisterà del riassunto dei fatti in problema. Se è ritenuto necessario, il Ministero nel TRNC responsabile per and/or di Affari di Alloggio l'Avvocato General che rappresenta l'and/or di Ministero una naturale o legale persona che sotto la legislazione del TRNC è in proprietà di o sostiene la proprietà di proprietà allegherà alla difesa od opinione un affidavit con persone che hanno conoscenza sulla questione.”
Decida 6
Accordo di regolamento amichevole sulla soddisfazione del richiedente
“(1) il Ministero responsabile per Alloggio Affari eseguirà la decisione della Commissione relativo a restituzione, scambi, il risarcimento al posto del patrimonio immobiliare, il risarcimento per danni non-patrimoniali dovuto a perdita del diritto per rispettare per casa ed il risarcimento per perdita di uso. In esecuzione di simile decisione, il Ministero responsabile per Alloggio Affari preparerà un accordo di regolamento amichevole di bozza in conformità con Forma 3 e lo notificherà al richiedente che ha dimostrato insieme i suoi diritti legittimi con una lettera di invito.
(2) la lettera di invito affermerà che il richiedente che ha dimostrato i suoi diritti legittimi o deve personalmente o per un rappresentante venuto a firmare l'accordo di regolamento amichevole di bozza entro un mese. Altrimenti, l'accordo di regolamento amichevole di bozza sarà ritenuto respinto e lui avrà diritto a fare domanda alla Corte amministrativa Alta.
(3) debba il richiedente che o ha dimostrato personalmente i suoi diritti legittimi o per il suo rappresentante accetti l'accordo di regolamento amichevole di bozza, questa bozza sarà firmata col Ministro responsabile per Alloggio Affari e con lui o il suo rappresentante.
(4) debba l'accordo di regolamento amichevole sia respinto, o quando è ritenuto respinto secondo supplire-sezione (2) di questa sezione, un documento di disaccordo sarà notificato sulle parti interessate.
(5) in causa una controversia non è risolta per un regolamento amichevole, il diritto delle parti interessate per fare appello a corti sarà preservato.”
Decida 7
Il funzionare e riunioni della Commissione
“(1) seguendo l'osservazione della difesa od opinione del Ministero nel TRNC responsabile per and/or di Affari di Alloggio l'Avvocato General che rappresenta l'and/or di Ministero una persona fisica o legale che sotto la legislazione del TRNC è in proprietà di o sostiene la proprietà di proprietà in conformità con questi Articoli, le parti saranno convenute su una data specificata per una riunione riguardo al dare di direzioni riguardo alla richiesta nell'ufficio del Presidente o qualsiasi l'altro posto che lui può determinare quale è conveniente per le parti. Il Presidente può, mentre seguendo l'udienza delle prospettive delle parti, dia le direzioni necessarie che riguardano l'ulteriore dettaglio, la scoperta o esame di ulteriori documenti, la maniera nella quale sarà ascoltata testimonianza se o non un'indagine di luogo sarà eseguita, le persone che dovrebbero essere costrette ad essere presente durante la presentazione e su altre questioni ritenute appropriato.
I procedimenti che sarebbero frequentati coi membri esteri saranno in inglesi. In tutte le altre cause, sarà in turco. Sulla richiesta del richiedente, un interprete sarà offerto comunque.
(2) i procedimenti della Commissione saranno basati sui documenti. Ogni materiale relativo alle richieste sarà tradotto nell'inglesi per membri esteri. Purché che se è ritenuto appropriato la Commissione può ascoltare le prospettive ed argomenti delle parti e può prendere gli orale o può giurare testimonianza dei testimoni che loro possono desiderare chiamare. I procedimenti della Commissione saranno contenuti ai suoi propri locali previde che se necessario la Commissione può usare anche le sala d'udienza esistenti o camere per essere assegnata alla Commissione con l'approvazione del Presidente della Corte Suprema.
La Commissione, quando ritiene necessario, può delegare il compito dell'esplorazione di su-luogo del patrimonio immobiliare e preparazione di un rapporto di esplorazione con un gruppo di tre membri.
(3) la Commissione può a qualsiasi stadio dei procedimenti su sua propria chiamata di istanza qualsiasi persona per dare prova o produzione qualsiasi documento per il fine di giungere ad una decisione equa. Nessuno simile testimonianza sarà data senza avviso precedente alle parti. Le parti i diritti di ' per esprimere le loro prospettive sulla questione di chiamare simile testimoni saranno riservati. I procedimenti della Commissione, altro che quelli sui documenti, sarà in pubblico. Comunque, i diritti del richiedente per richiedere procedimenti riservati dovrebbero essere preservati e su richiesta tutti i procedimenti saranno in macchina fotografica.
(4) la Commissione prenderà le sue decisioni con la semplice maggioranza di quelli presenti durante sedute con un quorum dei 2/3 del numero totale dei suoi membri. Per i fini di questa sezione, il Presidente ed il Presidente Aggiunto sono ognuno per essere contati come un membro della Commissione. Quelli che dissentono o nella minoranza le loro prospettive ed opinioni possono scrivere separatamente. Simile prospettive separate ed opinioni saranno parte della decisione. Alle riunioni la votazione sarà in pubblico. Quelli presentano alle riunioni non sarà concesso per gettare qualsiasi voto di astensione. In causa dell'uguaglianza di voti, la questione votata su sarà ritenuta per essere stata respinta. La decisione della Commissione sarà firmata col Presidente ed un altro membro e sarà portata alle parti o sarà notificato sul loro indirizzo per servizio dopo stato stato sigillato col sigillo della Commissione.
(5) la Commissione può, dopo ascolti tutte le prospettive e rivendicazioni delle parti, annunci la sua decisione ragionata entro tre mesi. Comunque, dipendendo dal suo carico di lavoro ed il carattere unico della richiesta, la scrittura della decisione ragionata può essere prolungata su a sei mesi.”
B. pratica Attinente
44. La causa-legge attinente del “TRNC” Corte Costituzionale è riassunta nel Demopoulos ed Altri la causa (citò sopra, §§ 38-39).
45. Secondo la traduzione inglese del “TRNC” la sentenza di Corte Suprema in causa n. 129/2015 in che trattò con problemi relativo alla natura delle assegnazioni resi con l'IPC e la loro esecuzione, il “TRNC” Corte Suprema si riferì a sezione 14 di Legge n. 67/2005 che prevedono che le decisioni dell'IPC hanno effetto vincolante e sono di una natura esecutiva simile a sentenze dell'ordinamento giudiziario, e simile decisioni devono essere implementate al riguardo senza ritardo su servizio sulle autorità riguardate. Il “TRNC” Corte Suprema indicò, comunque, che non era completamente evidente dalla legge attinente come le assegnazioni dovrebbero essere eseguite. In questo collegamento assegnò Decidere 6 dell'IPC Rules (veda paragrafo 43 sopra) e spiegò che per fare le assegnazioni eseguibile azioni progettarono per implementare esecuzione delle assegnazioni dell'IPC, come richiesto sotto Articolo 6, deve essere preso col Ministero attinente. Di conseguenza, si potrebbe dire che solamente un'assegnazione resa definitivo in questa maniera sia giuridicamente eseguibile in una maniera simile ad una decisione giudiziale.
Cause di C. di fronte all'IPC
46. Secondo l'attualmente informazioni statistiche e disponibili (il Bollettino Mensile dell'IPC n. 96, 13 novembre 2017; disponibile a http://www.tamk.gov.ct.tr) un totale delle 6,369 richieste è stato depositato finora con l'IPC. L'IPC ha reso definitivo 1035 cause delle quali venticinqui furono conclusi seguenti un'udienza della causa ed una decisione entro gli IPC e 1012 con vuole dire di regolamento amichevole. Nella maggioranza enorme di cause rese definitivo (845) il risarcimento è stato assegnato, mentre corrispondendo in totale alla somma di GBP 238,779.386, mentre nelle altre cause le altre forme di compensazione sono state ordinate o le rivendicazioni furono respinte.
47. Il richiedente aguzzò a 144 cause pendente di fronte all'IPC in che il suo rappresentante, il Sig. A. Demetriades ?che stava rappresentando gli altri richiedenti in quelle cause si era lamentato prima l'IPC che il “TRNC” Avvocato General era andato a vuoto a presentare osservazioni iniziali in replica alle richieste depositate entro un periodo ragionevole di tempo. I periodi di tempo che era passato prima l'osservazione dell'Avvocato Generale di osservazioni iniziali variarono da tre mesi a cinque anni.
III. MATERIALE INTERNAZIONALE ED ATTINENTE
A. Nazioni Unite
48. Le Nazioni Unito che le attività di ' hanno tirato chiarendo i problemi di proprietà in Cipro settentrionale che sorge fuori dell'intervento militare turco sono state riassunte in Demopoulos ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 7-16).
49. Un numero di ulteriori iniziative politiche è stato preso a livello di ONU, particolarmente all'interno della struttura della missione del Consulente Speciale del Segretario Generale per la Cipro. Il Consiglio della Sicurezza delle Nazioni Unito diede il benvenuto queste iniziative nella sua Decisione 2263 (2016) di 28 gennaio 2016 (S/RES/2263 (2016)) e fece appello alle parti per mettere gli ulteriori sforzi in giungendo a convergenza sul centro emette in controversia.
Consiglio di B. dell'Europa
50. Nel contesto dell'esecuzione della sentenza della Corte nell'Inter causa Statale della Cipro c. la Turchia (citò sopra), il Comitato di Ministri sta esaminando attualmente le misure generali di esecuzione richieste riguardo ai vari problemi identificati in che sentenza, incluso quelli relativo al patrimonio immobiliare di Cypriots greco e spostato nel quale è localizzato il “TRNC.”
51. Riguardo a queste misure, le sentenze seguenti furono rese al Comitato di riunione di Ministri a marzo 2017:
“...
Seguendo la sentenza di 22/12/2005 nella causa di Xenides-Arestis, una ‘Patrimonio immobiliare Commissione ' fu esposto su nella parte settentrionale della Cipro sotto Legge di ‘N.ro 67/2005 sul risarcimento, cambio o restituzione di patrimonio immobiliare '. Nella sua decisione di inammissibilità in Demopoulos ed altri, consegnò 5 marzo 2010, la Grande Camera fondò che Legge N.ro 67/2005 che prepararono la Patrimonio immobiliare Commissione nella parte settentrionale della Cipro ‘fornisce ad una struttura accessibile ed effettiva di compensazione in riguardo di azioni di reclamo di interferenza la proprietà posseduta con Cypriots ' greco (§ 127 di che decisione).
Nella sentenza la Cipro c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa), consegnò in 12 maggio 2014, la Corte fondò che Turchia non si era attenuta ancora con la conclusione della sentenza principale secondo che c'era stata una violazione dei diritti di proprietà di deportati siccome loro erano stati negati accesso ad e controllo, uso e godimento della loro proprietà così come qualsiasi il risarcimento per l'interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà. Disse la Corte che ‘l'ottemperanza ' con questa conclusione ‘non poteva essere coerente con qualsiasi il possibile permesso, partecipazione l'acquiescenza o altrimenti la complicità in qualsiasi vendita illegale o lo sfruttamento di case cipriothe greche e proprietà nella parte settentrionale di ' di Cipro.
Disse anche la Corte che ‘la decisione della Corte nella causa di Demopoulos ed Altri all'effetto che cause presentarono con individui riguardo a violazione di azioni di reclamo di proprietà sarebbe respinto per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali, non può essere considerato, da solo, sbarazzarsi della questione dell'ottemperanza della Turchia con sezione III delle disposizioni operative della sentenza principale nella causa di inter-stato ' (veda § 63 della sentenza sulla soddisfazione equa di 12 maggio 2014).
b) Esame del Comitato di Ministri alla sua 1259 riunione (giugno 2016)
In 30 maggio 2016, la delegazione della Cipro presentò anche un memorandum sui diritti di proprietà di deportati (DH-DD(2016)688). La delegazione turca presentò un memorandum su questo problema 3 giugno 2016 (DH-DD(2016)707).
Nelle autorità cipriothe ' vede per attenersi con la sentenza principale, Turchia aveva inter alia per introdurre misure per porre fine a tutti i trasferimenti di patrimonio immobiliare che appartiene a Cypriots greco e spostato e proibire tutte le attività di costruzione su simile proprietà senza il beneplacito dei proprietari. Le autorità turche considerarono che Turchia già aveva preso le misure richieste per l'esecuzione di questa parte della sentenza col setting-su della Patrimonio immobiliare Commissione. Loro si riferirono anche a misure protettive che proibiscono la vendita e miglioramento di proprietà che era stata ritornata ai suoi proprietari con la Commissione o quali sarebbero ritornati, nella conformità con le sue decisioni, dopo la soluzione del problema cipriota.
Alla sua 1259 riunione (giugno 2016) (DH), il Comitato decise di riprendere considerazione del problema delle case e patrimonio immobiliare di Cypriots greco e spostato al suo 1280th che incontra (marzo 2017) (DH).”
52. Sulla base delle sentenze sopra, il Comitato di Ministri decise al suo 1280th che incontra riprendere considerazione del problema di Cypriots greco e spostato diritti di proprietà di ' alla sua riunione a dicembre 2017.
53. Un problema ancora insoluto di fronte al Comitato di Ministri è l'esecuzione della soddisfazione equa assegna in trenta-tre cause (designò come il Xenides-Arestis raggruppi; veda il documento che contiene il ruolo di cause https://search.coe.int/cm/Pages/result_details.aspx?ObjectID=090000168072832d) in che la Corte trovò violazioni della Convenzione con riguardo ad a violazioni dei diritti di proprietà di Cypriots greco e spostato.
54. Le sentenze seguenti furono notate seguenti il Comitato di riunione di Ministri a settembre 2017 (riferimenti di nota in calce omisero):
“un) Pagamento della soddisfazione equa: Nella causa di Loizidou la soddisfazione equa fu pagata nel 2003. Le cause di Alexandrou ed Eugenia Michaelidou Sviluppi e Michael Tymvios non sollevano qualsiasi problema in riguardo del pagamento della soddisfazione equa, siccome i richiedenti conclusero regolamenti amichevoli con lo Stato rispondente riguardo ad Articolo 41 (veda sotto sotto “misure individuali riguardo ai richiedenti la proprietà di '”). Le autorità turche pagarono la soddisfazione equa assegnata nel Xenides la sentenza di Arestis di 22 dicembre 2005 in riguardo di costi e spese.
Come riguardi la sentenza di Xenides-Arestis di 07 dicembre 2006, le somme assegnarono per materiale e danni morali e per costi e spese è dovuto dal 2007. Nella causa di Demades, le somme assegnate per la soddisfazione equa sono dovute dal 2009 e, nelle più recenti cause, fin da 2010-2012. Nella causa di Xenides-Arestis il Comitato di Ministri adottò due decisioni provvisorie, nel 2008 e 2010 esortando fortemente Turchia a pagare la soddisfazione equa assegnò con la Corte europea nella sentenza di 7 dicembre 2006, insieme con la quota di interesse di mora. Nella maggioranza di queste cause, i richiedenti o i loro rappresentanti hanno rivolto il Comitato di Ministri su molte occasioni per lamentarsi della mancanza di pagamento della soddisfazione equa assegnò a loro.
Alla 1208 riunione (settembre 2014) (DH), il Comitato adottò una decisione provvisoria che deplora profondamente che, datare, nonostante le decisioni provvisorie adottate nelle cause di Xenides-Arestis e Varnava le autorità turche, sulla base che questo pagamento non poteva essere dissociato dalle misure di sostanza in queste cause non si erano attenute col loro obbligo per pagare gli importi assegnati con la Corte ai richiedenti in quelle cause, così come in 32 altre cause nel gruppo di Xenides-Arestis.
Nella sua decisione provvisoria, il Comitato richiamò anche, che il poi Presidenti del Comitato di Ministri avevano sottolineato in favore del Comitato, in due lettere rivolte al Ministro turco di Affari Esteri che l'obbligo per attenersi con le sentenze della Corte era incondizionato. Il Comitato dichiarò che il rifiuto continuato di Turchia per pagare la soddisfazione equa assegnata nella causa di Varnava ed in 33 cause del gruppo di Xenides-Arestis era in conflitto flagrante coi suoi obblighi internazionali, sia come una Parte Contraente ed Alta alla Convenzione e come un Stato membro del Consiglio dell'Europa. Esortò Turchia a fare una rassegna la sua posizione e pagare senza qualsiasi l'ulteriore ritardo la soddisfazione equa assegnata con la Corte, così come la quota di interesse di mora.
Alla sua 1214 riunione (dicembre 2014) (DH), il Comitato espresse la sua preoccupazione più profonda di prospettiva della mancanza di risposta dalle autorità turche alle due lettere spedite con la Presidenza del Comitato di Ministri al Ministro turco di Affari Esteri, così come alla decisione provvisoria adottata a settembre 2014. Il Comitato ancora una volta esortò le autorità turche a fare una rassegna la loro posizione e pagare senza l'ulteriore ritardo la soddisfazione equa assegnata con la Corte
Ai suoi 1230 (giugno 2015), 1236 (settembre 2015), 1243 (dicembre 2015) e 1250 (marzo 2016) le riunioni (DH), il Comitato deplorò profondamente la mancanza di pagamento della soddisfazione equa ed ancora una volta esortò le autorità turche a pagare senza l'ulteriore ritardo le somme assegnate con la Corte ai richiedenti, così come la quota di interesse di mora. Il Comitato invitò anche il Segretario General a sollevare il problema di pagamento della soddisfazione equa in queste cause nei suoi contatti con le autorità turche, mentre chiamando su loro per prendere le misure necessarie pagarlo.
Alla sua 1236 riunione (settembre 2015) (DH), il Comitato incoraggiò anche le autorità del membro Stati per fare lo stesso.
28 aprile 2016, il Segretario General spedì una lettera al Ministro per Affari Esteri di Turchia che ha fiducia che le autorità turche avrebbero preso le misure necessarie per assicurare il pagamento pronto della soddisfazione equa assegnato in queste cause (veda DH-DD(2016)573).
Ai suoi ultimi esami di questo problema (1259, 1265, 1273, 1280th e 1288 riunioni (giugno, settembre, dicembre 2016 e marzo e giugno 2017) (DH), il Comitato insistè fermamente ancora una volta sull'obbligo incondizionato di Turchia pagare la soddisfazione equa assegnata con la Corte europea in queste cause e profondamente deplorò l'assenza di progresso in questo riguardo, mentre esortando di nuovo Turchia ad attenersi con questo obbligo senza l'ulteriore ritardo. Il Comitato fu d'accordo a riprendere considerazione di questo problema alla loro 1294 riunione (settembre 2017) (DH).
...
b) misure Individuali riguardo ai richiedenti le proprietà di ': Il Comitato decise di chiudere il suo esame delle misure individuali in una di queste cause (Eugenia Michaelidou Sviluppi e Michael Tymvios, decisione presa alla 1043 riunione (dicembre 2008) (DH). Nella causa di Alexandrou, le autorità turche che si sono attenute col regolamento amichevole secondo il quale loro avevano pagare il richiedente e restituire il patrimonio immobiliare in pericolo, si notò che di nessuno ulteriori misure individuali furono avute bisogno (veda il pubblico nota della 1092 riunione (settembre 2010) (DH).
La valutazione del Segretariato delle misure individuali nelle cause di Loizidou, Xenides-Arestis, Demades ed Eugenia Michaelidou Sviluppi Ltd e Michael Tymvios è presentato nel documento di informazioni CM/Inf/DH(2010)21 di 17 maggio 2010. Questa valutazione è valida per le altre cause di questo gruppo nelle quali le sentenze sulla soddisfazione equa divennero definitivo dopo 2010.
Le autorità di Turskish presentarono la loro posizione in questo riguardo nel loro memorandum di 3 giugno 2016 (DH-DD(2016)707).”
55. Sulla base delle sentenze sopra, il Comitato di Ministri decise di riprendere considerazione del gruppo di Xenides-Arestis di cause alle sue ulteriori riunioni.
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
56. Il richiedente si lamentò che la procedura di fronte all'IPC con vuole dire di che lei chiese il risarcimento per la sua proprietà nel “TRNC” era stato protratto ed inefficace e così in violazione di Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
57. I costatazione di Corte che un problema ha riferito alla rivendicazione del richiedente per il risarcimento di fronte all'IPC possono derivare tutte le disposizioni si appellate su col richiedente sotto. Nelle circostanze della causa, e notando che il dogma centrale del danno del richiedente concerne la sua incapacità per ottenere il risarcimento per la sua rivendicazione di proprietà, la Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo dovrebbe essere esaminata solamente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, per l'approccio, Kirilova ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 42908/98 e 3 altri, §§ 87-88 e 125-127, 9 giugno 2005; Naydenov c. la Bulgaria, n. 17353/03, §§ 48 e 86-87, 26 novembre 2009, e Shesti Mai Engineering OOD ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, n. 17854/04, § 64 20 settembre 2011).
58. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 prevede siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
(a) Il Governo
59. Appellandosi sulle sentenze della Corte nella causa di Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia (citò sopra) riguardo all'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC, il Governo dibattè, che il richiedente non era riuscito ad in modo appropriato esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali e disponibili poiché lei aveva depositato la sua richiesta con la Corte di fronte ai procedimenti attinenti di fronte all'IPC aveva finito. In questo collegamento, il Governo indicò, che il richiedente non era riuscito a produrre tutti i documenti attinenti di fronte all'IPC in tempo dovuto e che lei aveva corretto la sua richiesta per il risarcimento nel corso dei procedimenti di fronte all'IPC. Inoltre, per ragioni ignoto al Governo, il richiedente non aveva presentato mai, la valutazione disponibile riporta all'IPC. Il Governo sottolineò anche che il richiedente non era riuscito a rispondere all'offerta di accordo rese col “TRNC” autorità per il risarcimento nell'importo di GBP 60,000 e lei non era riuscita a produrre i documenti necessario per tale accordo per essere effettuato. Nella prospettiva del Governo, il richiedente aveva avuto comunicazione insoddisfacente col suo rappresentante di fronte all'IPC col quale aveva condotto ad un numero di equivoci da parte sua riguardo ad al funzionare dell'IPC. Di conseguenza, il richiedente prematuramente aveva depositato una richiesta con la Corte, mentre i procedimenti attinenti di fronte all'IPC ancora erano in corso. Il Governo considerò così che la sua richiesta era manifestamente and/or prematuro mal-fondato.
(b) Il richiedente
60. Il richiedente contese che lei aveva deciso di fare domanda alla Corte al tempo che lei faceva perché i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC non erano stati equi ed effettivi, particolarmente in prospettiva del lungo ritardo nel giungere ad una decisione nella sua causa. Lei dibattè che l'IPC era andato a vuoto a venire ad una decisione anche se era in proprietà di tutte le informazioni attinenti che concernono la sua rivendicazione di proprietà. Le richieste dell'IPC per ulteriori documenti avuti infatti stato mirato a rimandando i procedimenti e chiaramente era usato come tattiche da parte delle autorità per creare gli ulteriori ostacoli ad una decisione effettiva della sua causa. Allo stesso tempo, l'IPC non aveva chiesto mai a lei di produrre il rapporto di valutazione anche se ?lei aveva fatto riferimento a sé quando correggendo la rivendicazione ed il convenuto non aveva presentato mai un rapporto di suo proprio. In questo collegamento, il richiedente dibattè anche, che l'emendamento susseguente della sua rivendicazione era stato di una natura tecnica e nessuno che potrebbero giustificare il ritardo nei procedimenti. Lei contese inoltre che nei procedimenti di fronte all'IPC lei aveva avuto soltanto una posizione di spettatore come i procedimenti era stato condotto con fretta e senza traduzione corretta dal turco. Nella sua prospettiva, la causa non era inoltre, molto complessa come il suo titolo di proprietà era evidente e le identità di sua madre e zia erano facilmente accertabili dai documenti di identità disponibili. Infine, il richiedente dibattè che il fatto che i Xenides-Arestis raggruppano di cause rimase unexecuted suggerito che la via di ricorso di IPC era inefficace.
2. La valutazione della Corte
61. La Corte nota che il Governo rispondente non sollevò una difficoltà come riguardo l’incompatibilità ratione personae della richiesta presente con le disposizioni della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli. Comunque, in prospettiva del fatto che la questione manda a chiamare la considerazione con la Corte di sua propria istanza (veda, per istanza, Sejdi ?e Finci c. Bosnia e Herzegovina [GC], N. 27996/06 e 34836/06, § 27 ECHR 2009), la Corte lo trova importante notare che nella luce delle sue sentenze nelle cause di Loizidou c. la Turchia ((i meriti), §§ 52-57, 18 dicembre 1996 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996 VI), la Cipro c. la Turchia (citò sopra, §§ 75 81) e Demopoulos ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 89 e 103), i problemi si lamentarono di incorra all'interno della giurisdizione di Turchia che ha nella parte settentrionale della Cipro, l'obbligo per garantire ai richiedenti i diritti e le libertà esposero fuori nella Convenzione.
62. La Corte procederà perciò sull'assunzione che Turchia è responsabile per le circostanze si lamentò di col richiedente. Avendo detto che, la Corte sottolineerebbe che questo non fa in qualsiasi chiamata di modo in dubbio o la prospettiva adottata con la comunità internazionale riguardo alla costituzione del “TRNC” o il fatto che il governo della Repubblica di resti di Cipro il risuoli governo legittimo della Cipro (veda Cipro c. la Turchia, citato sopra, § 90, e Demopoulos ed Altri, citato sopra, § 89).
63. Come all'eccezione preliminare del Governo dell'inammissibilità per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali dovuto al fatto che i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC ancora sono pendenti, i costatazione di Corte che la questione dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali è collegata da vicino ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente che lei non è stata capace di ottenere il risarcimento per la sua proprietà a causa dei prolungati e procedimenti inefficaci di fronte all'IPC. La Corte considera perciò che l'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere congiunta ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente.
64. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente non è manifestamente mal fondato all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Le parti gli argomenti di '
(un) Il richiedente
65. Il richiedente presentò che c'era senza dubbio che lei era il proprietario delle aree di terra in oggetto. Lei li aveva ricevuti con modo di un regalo da sua zia a turno che aveva li ricevette da suo padre. Il richiedente dibattè inoltre che la questione sotto esame in relazione alla sua rivendicazione di proprietà era stata considerata nella luce della causa-legge bene stabilita della Corte nelle cause di Loizidou (citò sopra) e la Cipro c. la Turchia (citò sopra). Nella sua prospettiva, comunque era paradossale per asserire che la via di ricorso di IPC era effettiva, come trovato nel Demopoulos ed Altri la causa (citò sopra), quando i Xenides-Arestis raggruppano di cause e la soddisfazione equa che sorgono dalla Cipro c. sentenza di Turchia non poteva essere eseguita. Lei aguzzò anche ad un articolo di giornale, mentre riferendosi ad un colloquio col Presidente dell'IPC, adducendo che Turchia aveva fermato di finanziare IPC. Inoltre, i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC erano inefficaci a causa del differire e pratiche arbitrarie del “TRNC” autorità e le statistiche attinenti mostrarono che un numero sostanziale di cause ancora sia pendente di fronte all'IPC. In questo collegamento, il richiedente dibattè anche, che gli altri richiedenti di fronte all'IPC affrontarono i vari ostacoli nel provare le loro rivendicazioni e nell'ottenere il pagamento del risarcimento assegnato con l'IPC.
66. Il richiedente contese inoltre che poiché lei aveva depositato la sua richiesta con l'IPC in maggio 2008 non c'erano stati progressi seri nella causa e l'esame della sostanza della sua rivendicazione era stato aggiornato ripetutamente. Nella sua prospettiva, la causa non era in se stesso complessa e c'era stato solamente uno emendamento della rivendicazione di un puramente natura tecnica. Lei contese che l'IPC non aveva sostenuto finora una vera udienza ma solamente riunioni di direzioni per il fine di valutare la sua causa. Il richiedente considerò che simile pratiche che differiscono erano state continue, sistematiche ed intenzionali ed avevano reso la via di ricorso di fronte all'IPC inefficace. In questo collegamento il richiedente aguzzò al fatto che lei era stata richiesta ripetutamente di offrire gli ulteriori documenti irrilevanti e certificati, come quelli relativo al suo titolo di proprietà e l'identità di sua zia tutti di che già fu conosciuta e disponibile nell'archivio. In particolare, lei era stata richiesta di chiarificare le compitazioni diverse del nome di sua zia anche se i documenti di identità erano stati disponibili all'IPC e chiaramente avevano attestato all'identità di sua zia. Similmente, lei si aveva chiesto ad offrire gli ulteriori documenti che concernono il suo titolo di proprietà che la costrinse a superare una procedura lunga e costosa. Questo aveva in punto di fatto stato completamente non necessario, perché i certificati che concernono il suo titolo di proprietà, incluso prova della non-esistenza di qualsiasi le responsabilità sulla sua proprietà, già era esistito nell'archivio.
67. Il richiedente contese anche che lei era stata fatta un'offerta di accordo iniziale di GBP 20,000 che lei non era stata preparata per accettare, ed alla riunione di 24 ottobre 2013, questa offerta era stata aumentata poi, a GBP 60,000. Alla stessa riunione di fronte all'IPC lei non era stata in grado partecipare efficacemente come i procedimenti era stato condotto con fretta ed in turco, senza la disposizione di servizi di traduzione adeguati. Al suo rappresentante non era stato permesso inoltre, per rivolgere l'IPC sul suo conto su molte altre occasioni. Su un'occasione che lei aveva tentato di presenziare una riunione di fronte all'IPC ?su 25 aprile 2013 ma la riunione era stato aggiornato. Il richiedente contese anche che l'IPC era andato a vuoto a prendere le misure necessarie per assicurare amministrazione effettiva dei procedimenti. Non aveva richiesto mai i rapporti di valutazione dalle parti e non era riuscito ad in modo appropriato rivolgere le richieste del convenuto “TRNC” l'Ufficio di Avvocato Generale per la disposizione di ulteriori documenti dichiarando simile documenti non necessario. In questo collegamento, il richiedente indicò anche, che sua zia aveva vissuto nella parte settentrionale ed occupata della Cipro e che tutte le informazioni attinenti sulla sua identità e proprietà erano state conosciute bene il “TRNC” l'amministrazione. Nella prospettiva del richiedente, tutti questo chiaramente dimostrò, che i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC erano stati inefficaci.
(b) Il Governo
68. Appellandosi sulla causa di Meleagrou ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.), n. 14434/09, 2 aprile 2013 che il Governo ha dibattuto che la Corte aveva confermato la sua sentenza in Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia (citò sopra) che la procedura di fronte all'IPC offrì una via di ricorso adeguata ed effettiva per proprietà cipriota greca chiede relativo a proprietà localizzate in Cipro settentrionale. Comunque, nella prospettiva del Governo, il richiedente nella causa in questione non era riuscito ad in modo appropriato giovarsi a di quel la via di ricorso. In questo collegamento, il Governo dibattè, che la rivendicazione del richiedente per danni era stata eccessiva e lei aveva chiesto un aggiornamento dell'esame preliminare della causa in 25 maggio 2010 per correggere successivamente la sua rivendicazione di risarcimento. Comunque, lei corresse rivendicazione non aveva corrisposto alla realtà del mercato di proprietà in Cipro settentrionale ed i metodi usati nel rapporto di valutazione del 2011 era stato inadeguato ed impreciso. Inoltre, l'aveva presa due anni per presentare i documenti richiesti 1 giugno 2010. In oltre, il richiedente era stato solamente presente per l'esame della causa di fronte all'IPC 24 ottobre 2013 ed era stato per lei per provare la sua rivendicazione con offrendo i documenti attinenti, incluso quelli che avrebbero potuto chiarificare la confusione sulle compitazioni diverse dei nomi.
69. Nella prospettiva del Governo, l'impressione del richiedente che la via di ricorso di IPC era inefficace non era stata provata obiettivamente ma aveva dato luogo piuttosto dalle deficienze a comunicazione fra lei ed i suoi rappresentanti legali. Questo era evidente dal fatto che il richiedente sembrò non sapere che i suoi rappresentanti legali non erano riusciti a presentare il trasferimento della proprietà l'esposizione di documenti attinente da sua zia a lei e non erano riusciti similmente a presentare i rapporti di valutazione attinenti. In questo riguardo il Governo spiegò che il trasferimento di proprietà di Cypriots greco non fu registrato nel “TRNC” registri e richiedenti furono costretti perciò a produrre l'esposizione di documenti attinente il loro titolo di proprietà di fronte all'IPC. Inoltre, la confusione sulla compitazione dei nomi non poteva essere chiarificata sulla base dell'identità documenta e dei certificati dei mukhtar erano stati avuti bisogno in quel il riguardo. Il Governo considerò anche che inizialmente i documenti previdero col richiedente all'IPC non aveva mostrato chiaramente che lei aveva pagato affitto per l'uso di un alloggio cipriota turco. Inoltre, l'emendamento della rivendicazione del richiedente aveva reso necessario la produzione di ulteriori documenti attinenti che il richiedente non era riuscito a procurare e presentare con la diligenza richiesta. Il Governo sottolineò anche che il richiedente ed i suoi rappresentanti non erano riusciti ad informare l'IPC se loro accetterebbero l'offerta di regolamento amichevole col “TRNC” Avvocato General.
70. Il Governo contese inoltre che l'esecuzione del gruppo di Xenides-Arestis di cause non aveva niente per fare con l'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC come quelle cause era stato deciso prima del Demopoulos ed Altri la causa (citò sopra) che aveva confermato l'efficacia dell'IPC. Nella procedura di fronte all'IPC, assegnazioni di risarcimento furono eseguite, e pagamenti resero in conformità con la legge attinente e l'orario di esecuzione. Inoltre, le funzioni della Corte ed il Comitato di Ministri in questo riguardo differito. Con riguardo ad ai procedimenti di fronte all'IPC, il Governo indicò, che il richiedente era stato rappresentato con avvocati che parlarono sia turco ed inglesi ed i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC, così come i documenti presentarono a sé, era stato tradotto simultaneamente nell'inglesi come l'IPC fu reso anche su di due membri internazionali. Il richiedente ed i suoi rappresentanti erano stati dati ogni opportunità di rivolgere e dibattere la sua causa di fronte all'IPC. Inoltre, sotto Decida 7(5) degli Articoli di IPC, un'udienza dovrebbe essere completata entro tre mesi ed insolitamente entro sei mesi. Il Meleagrou ed Altri la causa (citò sopra) non mostrò nessun problema di inefficacia che sorge in questo riguardo. In oltre, il Governo considerò che il numero significativo di cause decise con vuole dire anche di regolamento amichevole di fronte all'IPC suggerì che il meccanismo funzionò e c'erano solamente alcune cause che hanno terminato di fronte alla Corte amministrativa Alta. Prendendo tutti questi fattori in considerazione, nella prospettiva del Governo era nulla per chiamare in questione l'efficacia e l'adeguatezza della via di ricorso di IPC.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) punti Preliminari
71. La Corte osserva all'inizio al quale è stato fornito certificati ufficiali di proprietà dal Settore di Terre ed Esami della Repubblica di Cipro che prova che il richiedente è il proprietario della proprietà attinente. C'è anche prova sufficiente di fronte all'esposizione di Corte che il richiedente aveva ricevuto la proprietà in oggetto nel 1997 con modo di un regalo da sua zia che lo possedette prima dell'intervento militare turco nel 1974 e che nel 2008 lei aveva ricevuto una quota supplementare in una delle aree riguardata da sua madre (veda divide in paragrafi 8 e 18 sopra).
72. In queste circostanze, nella conformità con le sue sentenze nelle cause di Loizidou (citò sopra, §§ 42-47 e 62), la Cipro c. la Turchia (citò sopra, § 180), Demopoulos ed Altri (citò sopra, § 107) e Xenides-Arestis c. la Turchia ((il dec.), n. 46347/99, 14 marzo 2005 e (i meriti) § 28, 22 dicembre 2005), per il fine della sua valutazione sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il richiedente deve essere considerato il proprietario legale della proprietà in oggetto.
73. Con riguardo ad alla natura della violazione dei diritti di proprietà di Cypriots greco e spostato nel “TRNC”, nella causa di Loizidou (citò sopra, §§ 63-64) la Corte ragionò siccome segue:
“63. Comunque, come una conseguenza del fatto che il richiedente è stato rifiutato accesso alla terra fin da 1974, lei ha perso efficacemente ogni controllo finito, così come tutte le possibilità di usare e godere, la sua proprietà. Il rifiuto continuo di accesso deve essere considerato perciò un'interferenza coi suoi diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Tale interferenza non può, nelle circostanze eccezionali della causa presente a che il richiedente ed il Governo cipriota ha assegnato (veda divide in paragrafi 49-50 sopra), sia considerato o una privazione di proprietà o un controllo di uso all'interno del significato dei primo e secondo paragrafi di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Chiaramente incorre comunque, all'interno del significato della prima frase di che approvvigiona come un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di proprietà. In questo riguardo la Corte osserva che ostacolo può corrispondere ad una violazione della Convenzione equo come un impedimento legale (veda, mutatis mutandis, l'Airey c. sentenza di Irlanda di 9 ottobre 1979, Serie Un n. 32, p. 14, parà. 25).
64. Separatamente da un riferimento passeggero alla dottrina della necessità come una giustificazione per gli atti del "TRNC" ed al fatto che diritti di proprietà erano la materia di discorsi intercomunali, il Governo turco non ha cercato di fare osservazioni che giustificano l'interferenza sopra coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente che sono imputabili a Turchia.
Comunque, non è stato spiegato come il bisogno a rehouse spostato rifugiati ciprioti turchi negli anni che seguono l'intervento turco nell'isola nel 1974 potrebbe giustificare la negazione completa dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente nella forma di un rifiuto totale e continuo di accesso ed un'espropriazione stabilita senza il risarcimento.
Né inscatola il fatto che diritti di proprietà erano la materia di discorsi di intercommunal che comportano le ambo le comunità in Cipro offra una giustificazione per questa situazione sotto la Convenzione.
In simile circostanze, la Corte conclude, che c'è stato e continua ad essere una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.”
74. La Corte confermò le sentenze sopra nella causa della Cipro c. la Turchia (citò sopra, §§ 184-189) ed in cause susseguenti riguardo alle azioni di reclamo di Cypriots greco riguardo ad interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà nel “TRNC” (veda Demopoulos ed Altri, citato sopra, § 71; veda anche, per istanza, Demades c. la Turchia, n. 16219/90, §§ 44-46 31 luglio 2003; Xenides-Arestis, citato sopra, §§ 29-32, e Lordos ed Altri c. la Turchia, n. 15973/90, §§ 67-70 2 novembre 2010).
75. La Corte nota inoltre, come sé faceva in Demopoulos ed Altri (citò sopra, § 108), che il Governo turco non contesta più la loro responsabilità sotto la Convenzione per le aree sotto il controllo del “TRNC” e che loro hanno, in sostanza, diede credito al diritto di proprietari ciprioti greci a via di ricorso per violazioni dei loro diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Effettivamente, in Demopoulos ed Altri, la Corte riconobbe questo riconoscimento come un fattore significativo nella disposizione del meccanismo di IPC che, con facendo domanda le sentenze della Corte nelle più prime cause, più notevolmente nella sentenza di pilota di Xenides-Arestis (citò sopra), cercò di garantire compensazione effettiva per violazioni di Convenzione identificò nelle sentenze della Corte con riguardo ad ai diritti di proprietà di Cypriots greco nel “TRNC.”
76. Con riguardo ad all'efficacia del meccanismo di IPC, in Demopoulos ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 127-128), seguendo un esame accurato di tutti gli aspetti istituzionali e procedurali attinenti di che via di ricorso, la Corte ragionò siccome segue:
“127. I costatazione di Corte che la Legge n. 67/2005 forniscono ad una struttura accessibile ed effettiva di compensazione in riguardo di azioni di reclamo di interferenza proprietà posseduta con Cypriots greco. I proprietari di proprietà di richiedente nelle cause presenti non si sono avvalsi di questo meccanismo e le loro azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere respinto perciò per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali. È soddisfatto che Legge n. 67/2005 costituiscono disposizione realistica compensazione nella situazione corrente di occupazione che è oltre la competenza di questa Corte per risolvere.
128. Infine, sottolineerebbe che questa decisione non sarà interpretata siccome richiedendo che richiedenti si avvalgono dell'IPC. Loro possono scegliere di non fare così ed attende una soluzione politica. Comunque, se a questo punto in tempo qualsiasi richiedente desidera invocare suo o i suoi diritti sotto la Convenzione, l'ammissibilità di quelle rivendicazioni sarà decisa in linea coi principi e si sarà avvicinata sopra. L'ultima giurisdizione direttiva della Corte rimane in riguardo di qualsiasi azioni di reclamo depositarono con richiedenti che, in conformità al principio di sussidiarietà, ha esaurito viali disponibili di compensazione.”
77. Facendo seguire sentenza l'adozione dei Demopoulos ed Altri, la Corte dichiarò inammissibile per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali tutte le richieste che già non erano state dichiarate ammissibile e dove i richiedenti non avevano presentato una rivendicazione all'IPC in conformità con Legge n. 67/2005 (veda, per istanza, Cacoyanni ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.), N. 55254/00 et al., 1 giugno 2010; Papayianni ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.), N. 479/07 et al., 6 luglio 2010; Mario Eleftheriades ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.), N. 3882/02 et al., 5 ottobre 2010; Papaioannou ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.), n. 58678/00, 7 dicembre 2012; ed Efthymiou ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.), N. 40997/02, 7 maggio 2013).
78. Per altre richieste che erano state dichiarate ammissibile o dove la Corte aveva deciso sui meriti prima dell'adozione dei Demopoulos ed Altri sentenza, la Corte procedè con l'adozione di sentenze sulle assegnazioni di and/or di meriti della soddisfazione equa (veda, per istanza, Lordos ed Altri, citato sopra; veda anche Gavriel c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa), n. 41355/98, 22 giugno 2010; Solomonides c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa), n. 16161/90, 27 luglio 2010; Christodoulidou c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa), n. 16085/90, 26 ottobre 2010; Anthousa Iordanou c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa), n. 46755/99, 11 gennaio 2011; Loizou ed Altri c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa) (definitivo sentenza), n. 16682/90, 24 maggio 2011). Queste cause formano parte del gruppo di Xenides-Arestis summenzionato di cause nell'esecuzione tratti (veda paragrafo 53 sopra).
79. La Corte ha esaminato anche una richiesta (Meleagrou ed Altri, citato sopra) ?depositò dopo Demopoulos ed Altri e dove i richiedenti avevano presentato le loro rivendicazioni all'IPC che fu dichiarato inammissibile sul seguente i due motivi. In primo luogo, come riguardi i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, Articolo 8 ed Articolo 14 certe aree che riguardano di terra possedute con una società registrata, la Corte fondò che le azioni di reclamo andarono a vuoto con ragione di materiae di ratione di incompatibilità per motivi che, come azionisti, i richiedenti non potevano chiedere diritti di proprietà in terra posseduta con una società che era ancora in esistenza. Come al rifiuto in corso la Corte fondò ritornare certo delle loro aree di terra a loro, che, benché i richiedenti avessero presentato rivendicazioni per restituzione all'IPC, loro non avevano costituito o rivendicazioni cambio di terra nel sud della Cipro o per risarcimento patrimoniale che avrebbe permesso anche il risarcimento danni per perdita di uso o il risarcimento non-patrimoniale se restituzione non fosse riconosciuta. Che insuccesso volle dire i richiedenti non si erano avvalsi corretto della via di ricorso di IPC. In secondo luogo, in riguardo dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 6 § 1, la Corte fondò che non c'era prova che i procedimenti erano stati ingiusti o che l'IPC fu influenzato o mancando l'indipendenza. Come riguardi la loro azione di reclamo come alla lunghezza dei procedimenti la Corte trovata che un periodo di quattro anni ed otto mesi (di fronte all'IPC e su ricorso al “TRNC” Corte amministrativa Alta) non era irragionevole determinato la novità dei procedimenti e cosa era stata comportata nell'il loro aggiudicare i richiedenti le rivendicazioni di '.
80. Il richiedente nella causa presente impugna l'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC, mentre dibattendo che la procedura di fronte all'IPC con la quale lei chiese il risarcimento per la sua proprietà localizzò nel “TRNC” è stato protratto ed inefficace. La Corte imbarcherà sotto sulla sua determinazione di questi problemi, mentre prendendo il pieno conto delle particolari circostanze della causa e le sue sentenze nelle cause summenzionate, particolarmente i principi posarono in giù nel Demopoulos ed Altri la sentenza.
81. A questo punto, la Corte lo trova importante notare che non c'è niente negli argomenti del richiedente ed osservazioni che potevano, in se stesso attualmente chiami in questione l'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC come così. In particolare, la Corte non è capace di accettare l'argomento del richiedente che le difficoltà nell'esecuzione della soddisfazione equa assegnano nel Xenides Arestis raggruppi di cause mini l'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC. In questo contesto dovrebbe essere ricordato che la soddisfazione equa assegna nelle cause che appartengono al gruppo di Xenides-Arestis è stato adottato separatamente dalle considerazioni relativo alla valutazione dell'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC nel Demopoulos ed Altri la sentenza (veda divide in paragrafi 77-78 sopra; veda anche Demopoulos ed Altri, §§ 80-82 sopra e citato; e l'approccio in Xenides-Arestis c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa), n. 46347/99, § 37, 7 dicembre 2006, e la Cipro c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 25781/94, § 63 in multa ECHR 2014).
82. Inoltre, benché vada senza dire che Stati Contraenti sono legati in qualsiasi l'evento, attenersi con le sentenze della Corte (veda Demopoulos ed Altri, § 81 sopra e citato), dovrebbe essere notato che le difficoltà summenzionate riguardo alle assegnazioni di soddisfazione eque nel Xenides-Arestis raggruppano di cause è sorto nel contesto di processi e le considerazioni collegato al Comitato di Ministri la soprintendenza di ' dell'esecuzione delle sentenze della Corte (veda divide in paragrafi 54 sopra). D'altra parte il meccanismo di IPC e la compensazione previde con che meccanismo è dipendente sulle disposizioni nazionali ed attinenti ed inclusioni budgetarie ed obbligatore (veda divide in paragrafi 41-43 e 45 sopra) quel fu trovato essere stabiliti adeguatamente nel Demopoulos ed Altri la sentenza (citò sopra, § 125). Non c'è attualmente, nessuna prova inoppugnabile che permette alla Corte di chiamare l'adeguatezza di simile disposizioni in questione.
83. In finora come il richiedente asserito che il meccanismo di IPC era inefficace a causa del numero significativo di cause pendente di fronte a sé e l'allegato differendo e pratiche arbitrarie del “TRNC” le autorità, la Corte non lo considera possibile, sulla base del materiale probatorio ed informazioni disponibile a sé, giungere a tale conclusione generale come al funzionare della via di ricorso di IPC. Il fatto che c'è attualmente un numero alto di rivendicazioni pendenti non può essere appellatosi su per provare che qualsiasi le particolari rivendicazioni non sono state o non saranno maneggiate con spedizione dovuta (veda Demopoulos ed Altri, citato sopra, § 125).
84. In questo riguardo è notato che nel Meleagrou sopra-citato ed Altri la causa, la Corte non trovò che i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC erano stati protratti impropriamente o altrimenti inefficaci (veda paragrafo 79 sopra). Ci sono inoltre, le altre cause di fronte all'esposizione di Corte che richiedenti ciprioti greci ed individuali hanno terminato le loro cause di fronte all'IPC in una maniera soddisfacente (veda Alexandrou c. la Turchia (soddisfazione equa e regolamento amichevole), n. 16162/90, 28 luglio 2009, ed Appezzamento di terreno di Angoulos Ltd c. la Turchia (il dec.), n. 36115/03, 9 febbraio 2010) e che le assegnazioni resero con l'IPC è stato eseguito debitamente (veda Loizou c. la Turchia (il dec.), n. 50646/15, § 81 3 ottobre 2017).
85. È, chiaramente, possibile che la particolare disposizione strutturale di una via di ricorso potesse dare luogo ad una lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti nell'attuazione di che via di ricorso e di conseguenza ad una detrazione dalla sua efficacia (veda, per istanza, Bellizzi c. il Malta, n. 46575/09, § 42 21 giugno 2011). Non c'è comunque, nulla persuadendo attualmente la Corte a concludere che i possibili ritardi o le difficoltà che sorgono nella lavorazione di particolari cause di fronte all'IPC chiamano in dubbio le sue sentenze nel Demopoulos ed Altri la causa (citò sopra, §§ 124-126) secondo che che via di ricorso è accessibile e capace di consegnare efficientemente compensazione.
86. Effettivamente, e senza pregiudizio alle sue sentenze riguardo agli specifici argomenti del richiedente che concernono la sua causa di fronte all'IPC, la Corte enfatizza, che è perfettamente possibile che una via di ricorso che è in generale fondò essere effettiva opera inopportunamente nelle circostanze di una particolare causa. Comunque, questo non vuole dire che l'efficacia della via di ricorso come così, o l'obbligo di altri richiedenti per giovarsi a di che via di ricorso, dovrebbe essere chiamato in questione (veda, per istanza, V.K. c. Croatia, n. 38380/08, §§ 115-116 27 novembre 2012). Ciononostante, la Corte sottolineerebbe che rimane attento agli sviluppi nell'il funzionare della via di ricorso di IPC e la sua capacità di rivolgere efficacemente rivendicazioni di proprietà cipriothe greche.
87. Tenendo presente le considerazioni sopra, e senza chiamare in questione l'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC come così, la Corte tratterà sotto con le dichiarazioni del richiedente con riguardo ad alla maniera nella quale i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC operarono nella sua particolare causa.
(b) principi di Generale
88. La Corte reitera che l'obiettivo essenziale di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è proteggere una persona contro interferenza ingiustificata con lo Stato col godimento tranquillo di suo o le sue proprietà. Comunque, con virtù di Articolo 1 della Convenzione, ogni Parte Contraente “garantirà ad ognuno entro [suo] la giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definirono in [il] la Convenzione.” Il pagamento di questo dovere generale può comportare obblighi positivi inerenti nell'assicurare l'esercizio effettivo dei diritti garantito con la Convenzione, particolarmente dove c'è un collegamento diretto fra le misure un richiedente legittimamente può aspettarsi dalle autorità e suo o il suo godimento effettivo di proprietà (veda, fra molti altri, Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 143 ECHR 2004 V; Öneryldz ?c. la Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 134 ECHR 2004 XII; e Relazione di Tunnel Limitò c. la Francia, n. 27940/07, § 36 18 novembre 2010).
89. I confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non si presta a definizione precisa. I principi applicabili sono nondimeno simili. Se la causa è analizzata in termini di un dovere positivo da parte dello Stato o in termini di un'interferenza con un'autorità pubblica che ha bisogno di essere giustificata, il criterio per essere fatto domanda non differisce in sostanza. In ambo i contesti riguardo a deve essere avuto all'equilibrio equo per essere previsto fra gli interessi che competono dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme (veda, per istanza, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 69 la Serie Un n. 52; Sargsyan c. Azerbaijan [GC], n. 40167/06, § 220 ECHR 2015; veda anche Relazione di Tunnel Limitata, citato sopra, § 37).
90. Per i fini della prima frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve determinare se un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. In ogni causa che comporta una violazione allegato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve accertare se con ragione dell'azione dello Stato o inazione la persona riguardata dovuto per sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo. Nel valutare ottemperanza con che requisito, la Corte deve fare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in questione, mentre tenendo presente “pratico ed effettivo.” In che contesto, dovrebbe essere sottolineato che l'incertezza-sia sé legislativo, amministrativo o sorgendo da pratiche fece domanda con le autorità-è un fattore per essere preso in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato. Effettivamente, dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale, è in carica sulle autorità pubbliche per agire nel buon tempo, in una maniera appropriata e coerente (veda Ališi ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, § 108 ECHR 2014; veda anche Kirilova ed Altri, citato sopra, § 106, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
(il c) la Richiesta di questi principi nella causa presente
91. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente riguardo all'inefficacia dei procedimenti di fronte all'IPC nella quale lei chiese il risarcimento per la sua proprietà localizzarono nel “TRNC” giri circa due problemi principali. Le prime preoccupazioni la mancanza allegato dell'opportunità adeguata per il richiedente ed i suoi rappresentanti per partecipare efficacemente ?particolarmente nei procedimenti nella luce dei servizi che interpretano previde e rivolgere l'IPC; e le secondo preoccupazioni la lunghezza prolungata dei procedimenti che cominciarono nel 2008 ed ancora sono in corso. La Corte rivolgerà questi due problemi a turno.
92. Con riguardo ad al problema precedente, come riguardi l'azione di reclamo relativo ai servizi che interpretano, la Corte già ha osservato in Demopoulos ed Altri (citò sopra, § 126), che l'IPC lavora in turco ed in inglesi, che il secondo è in comune uso in Cipro, e che interpreti sono disponibili durante i procedimenti di IPC sempre (veda anche paragrafo 43 sopra, Decida 7(1) in multa dell'IPC Rules). Inoltre, la Corte nota, come sé faceva in Meleagrou ed Altri (citò sopra, § 19), che il richiedente fu rappresentato con avvocati che capirono sia turco e l'inglese e che, oltre agli installazioni che interpreta alle udienze, il richiedente era in grado ottenere traduzioni inglese di documenti di chiave che ora sono anche disponibili alla Corte. In questo collegamento, è notato anche, che il richiedente non si lamentò all'IPC al tempo che l'interpretazione inadeguata ed installazioni di traduzione stavano impedendo la sua partecipazione effettiva nei procedimenti. In prospettiva di queste considerazioni, i costatazione di Corte che nessuna indicazione dell'iniquità o una mancanza dell'efficacia dei procedimenti deriva nelle circostanze.
93. Lo stesso contiene vero per l'azione di reclamo del richiedente che lei ed i suoi rappresentanti non erano capaci di in modo appropriato rivolgere l'IPC durante i procedimenti. Questa azione di reclamo è non comprovata. I rappresentanti del richiedente furono dati un'opportunità adeguata di rivolgere l'IPC e durante i procedimenti loro non sollevarono mai il problema della loro incapacità per in modo appropriato presentare gli argomenti del richiedente. Né è là qualsiasi ragione per la Corte di dubitare che il richiedente sarebbe stato in grado frequentare i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC, se lei avesse desiderato così, e sollevare tutti i problemi lei considerò attinente per la sua causa. Non c'è di conseguenza, nulla che persuade la Corte a concludere che in questo riguardo i procedimenti incorsero brevemente del requisito dell'efficacia.
94. Con riguardo ad al presumibilmente lunghezza prolungata di procedimenti riguardo alla rivendicazione di risarcimento del richiedente, la Corte nota che, in contrasto a Meleagrou ed Altri (citò sopra) ?dove i procedimenti durarono quattro anni ed otto mesi di fronte all'IPC e la Corte amministrativa Alta del “TRNC” i procedimenti nella causa in questione cominciò in maggio 2008 e datare loro sono stati pendenti di fronte all'IPC per dei nove anni senza una decisione formale della causa che è raggiunta. La Corte già ha trovato che tale lunghezza immoderata di procedimenti riguardo alla decisione della rivendicazione di proprietà di un richiedente è capace di minare la loro efficacia riparatore dalla prospettiva di Articolo 1 di Protocollo seriamente N.ro 1 (veda, per istanza, Kirilova ed Altri, citato sopra, § 117, e Naydenov, citato sopra, §§ 81-84). Nascendo che in mente, la Corte considera, che il Governo dovrebbe offrire convincendo estremamente e ragioni plausibili di persuaderlo a giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella causa presente.
95. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che un ritardo significativo nella lavorazione della rivendicazione di risarcimento del richiedente accaduta negli stadi iniziali dei procedimenti di fronte all'IPC come sé prese il “TRNC” Avvocato General due anni per presentare una replica alla rivendicazione del richiedente (veda divide in paragrafi 13 e 16 sopra). Benché tale ritardo iniziale non sia in se stesso sufficiente per disegnare qualsiasi conclusione riguardo alla mancanza dell'efficacia dei procedimenti, contribuì nondimeno significativamente ad una lunghezza complessiva di tempo che può essere considerato inaccettabile per la decisione di una rivendicazione di proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
96. La Corte nota anche che gli Articoli di IPC attinenti richiedono il competenti “TRNC” autorità per presentare le loro osservazioni iniziali riguardo ad una rivendicazione di proprietà entro un periodo di trenta giornate lavorative osservazione seguente della rivendicazione (veda paragrafo 43 sopra, Decida 3(8) degli Articoli di IPC). Comunque, benché questo tempo-limite fosse oltrepassato significativamente nella causa in questione, l'IPC non intentò nessuna causa mirata ad assicurando che le parti le osservazioni di ' in modo appropriato furono ottenute e furono amministrate. In questo collegamento, la Corte desidera riaffermare l'importanza di amministrare la giustizia senza ritardi che metterebbero in pericolo la sua efficacia e la credibilità. La Corte già ha osservato effettivamente, che ritardi eccessivi nell'amministrazione della giustizia costituiscono una minaccia significativa, in particolare come riguardo di riguardi per l'articolo di legge (veda Di Mauro c. l'Italia [GC], n. 34256/96, § 23 ECHR 1999 V).
97. La Corte nota inoltre che il corso dei procedimenti prima che l'IPC fu marcato con richieste ripetute e successive col “TRNC” autorità per il richiedente per presentare documenti supplementari che concernono la sua rivendicazione di proprietà. In questo collegamento dovrebbe essere notato che l'IPC rimase di nuovo passivo come riguarda queste richieste ripetute, mentre fabbricando valutare la loro ragionevolezza o attinenza o assicurare nessun sforzo che le parti le osservazioni di ' in modo appropriato furono ottenute e furono amministrate. La Corte considera che tale atteggiamento passivo da parte dell'IPC ha potuto contribuire ad una mancanza di coesione nei procedimenti e prolungamento dell'esame della causa per un periodo significativo di tempo.
98. In questo collegamento è salutare per reiterare che la Corte non è un giudice di prima istanza; non ha la veste, né è sé appropriato per sé determinare prova documentaria dovrebbe essere presentata quale in procedimenti (veda, fra gli altri esempi, Demopoulos ed Altri, citato sopra, § 69 in multa). La Corte osserva, per istanza che alle direzioni ascolta a giugno 2010 il “TRNC” il rappresentante di Avvocato Generale richiese che un'esposizione di documento che il richiedente usò un alloggio cipriota turco nel Sud dovrebbe essere previsto, anche se tale documento già esistè nell'archivio (veda divide in paragrafi 14 e 18 sopra). Similmente, ad un'udienza preliminare ad aprile 2013 il “TRNC” rappresentanti chiesero certificati supplementari dal mukhtar, anche se il richiedente già aveva offerto un certificato che senza dubbio ha lasciato come a lei e l'identità di sua zia (veda divide in paragrafi 23 e 27 sopra).
99. Inoltre, dopo che il richiedente aveva presentato tutti i documenti richiesti in appoggio della sua iniziale ed aveva corretto rivendicazione (veda divide in paragrafi 14, 23 26 e 28 sopra), ad ottobre 2013, quando i procedimenti già erano pendenti da dei cinque ed un mezzi anni, il “TRNC” rappresentanti chiesero gli ulteriori documenti per essere previsti. Questa richiesta riguardò in particolare la chiarificazione delle compitazioni diverse dei nomi della madre del richiedente e sua zia, lo status maritale e successione di sua zia e lo status di passività della proprietà in oggetto (veda paragrafo 29 sopra). Comunque, la Corte osserva che le compitazioni diverse dei nomi già erano state chiarificate molte volte coi certificati dei mukhtar in oggetto i quali anche contennero riferimenti ai numeri dei documenti di identità degli individui. Inoltre, lo status maritale e la successione della zia del richiedente erano evidenti dai documenti prima ottenuti (veda divide in paragrafi 23 e 26 sopra) e, in appoggio della sua rivendicazione iniziale, il richiedente già aveva offerto prova in oggetto la quale non c'erano nessuno ipoteche, le responsabilità o le altre restrizioni sulla proprietà (veda paragrafo 14 sopra). Similmente, la Corte nota che era chiaro dall'inizio che la zia del richiedente aveva donato il richiedente la proprietà in oggetto mentre lei ancora era viva nel 1997, mentre un problema in che riguardo fu sollevato alla riunione a marzo 2017 per la prima volta, pressoché nove anni dopo che il richiedente depositò la rivendicazione di risarcimento.
100. La Corte nota che, senza avere scrutato criticamente il “TRNC” autorità che ' richiede, l'IPC su occasioni numerose aggiornò l'esame della causa. In questo collegamento è notato anche che ?nonostante la richiesta del richiedente di 16 gennaio 2014 (veda paragrafo 31 sopra) l'IPC elencò solamente due anni più tardi un ulteriore esame della causa, a marzo 2016 (veda paragrafo 32 sopra) che di nuovo protrasse il già lungo i procedimenti inutilmente. L'ulteriore corso dei procedimenti fu marcato coi problemi procedurali relativo ai rappresentanti ciprioti turchi del richiedente il ritiro di ' dalla causa e l'improprio che chiama in causa del richiedente per l'udienza 12 ottobre 2016 (veda divide in paragrafi 32-37 sopra) così come un aggiornamento supplementare dell'esame della causa a marzo 2017.
101. Avendo notato il sopra, la Corte non lo considera insignificante che il richiedente non riuscì a presentare debitamente alcuni dei documenti attinenti in appoggio della sua richiesta di fronte all'IPC (veda paragrafo 18 sopra) e che lei offrì solamente due anni più tardi alcuni dei documenti (veda paragrafo 22 sopra). Comunque, si dovrebbe notare che nel frattempo il richiedente aveva acquisito proprietà di un'ulteriore quota di una delle cinque aree in oggetto da sua madre che rese necessario l'emendamento della sua rivendicazione iniziale e che nel periodo in oggetto lei aveva ottenuto un numero significativo di documenti che chiarificano le circostanze della sua proprietà chieda (veda divide in paragrafi 20-23 sopra).
102. La Corte è anche attenta dell'argomento del richiedente che l'elaborazione di ottenere simile documenti era lunga (veda paragrafo 66 sopra; veda anche Demopoulos ed Altri, citato sopra, § 124 in multa). In qualsiasi la causa, la Corte non lo considera plausibile che il periodo di nove anni durante il quale i procedimenti sono stati pendenti di fronte all'IPC può essere spiegato con la condotta del richiedente da solo.
103. Nella prospettiva della Corte, la lunghezza prolungata dei procedimenti nella causa a mano era principalmente dovuta alla maniera dell'IPC di procedere. Molto di si avrebbe potuto evitare se l'IPC avesse, dall'inizio, tentò di identificare i punti controversi e raggruppare prova in relazione a loro in una maniera più efficiente (veda paragrafo 43 sopra, Decida 7(1) degli Articoli di IPC; e compara Dito c. la Bulgaria, n. 37346/05, § 102, 10 maggio 2011, e Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 120 ECHR 2000 io). Comunque, non riuscì a fare così e con ciò permise ai procedimenti di trascinare su su un numero significativo di anni senza una definitivo decisione della causa che è raggiunta.
104. In prospettiva delle considerazioni sopra, i costatazione di Corte che, al giorno d'oggi la causa, l'IPC non agì con coesione, diligenza e la spedizione appropriata riguardo alla rivendicazione di risarcimento del richiedente come richiesto sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
105. Questo è sufficiente per la Corte per concludere che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
106. Segue che l'eccezione preliminare del Governo che è stata congiunta ai meriti (veda paragrafo 63 sopra), deve essere respinto. Comunque, la Corte sottolineerebbe che, per il presente, gli IPC rimediano a resti una via di ricorso per essere esaurito con gli altri richiedenti che desiderano invocare i loro diritti sotto la Convenzione di fronte alla Corte (veda divide in paragrafi 85-87 sopra; veda anche Demopoulos ed Altri, citato sopra, § 128).
II. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
107. Il richiedente si lamentò di una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione su conto di trattamento discriminatorio contro lei nel godimento del suo diritto sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Lei addusse che questa discriminazione era stata basata sulla sua origine nazionale ed etnica, lingua e credenze religiose.
108. Il Governo contestò quel la rivendicazione.
109. La Corte indica che in cause precedenti relativo a proprietà cipriota greca afferma nella parte settentrionale della Cipro che ha trovato che non era necessario per eseguire un esame separato dell'ammissibilità e meriti dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione. La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare da che approccio nella causa presente (veda, più recentemente, Lordos ed Altri, citato sopra, § 85).
III. APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
110. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale
1. Le osservazioni delle parti

111. Con riguardo ad alla rivendicazione per danno patrimoniale, entro il periodo fissato per l'osservazione di una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa in conformità con Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte il richiedente chiese restituzione o, alternativamente, il risarcimento per la perdita di uso, interessi ed il valore corrente delle sue aree di terra. La sua rivendicazione di risarcimento fu basata sul rapporto di valutazione del 2011 e fu esposta ad EUR 2,690,962 (veda paragrafo 11 sopra). Lei sottolineò che questo non implicò che lei stava chiedendo il risarcimento per l'espropriazione stabilita, poiché lei considerò che lei ancora era il proprietario legale della proprietà in oggetto. In riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, il richiedente chiese EUR 100,000.
112. Il Governo dibattè che la rivendicazione del richiedente in riguardo di danno patrimoniale era eccessiva ed infondata. Il Governo anche considerato la rivendicazione del richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale era infondato in qualsiasi il riguardo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
113. La Corte sottolineerebbe all'inizio che una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione le sue conseguenze in tale modo come ripristinare il più lontano possibile la situazione che esiste di fronte alla violazione (veda, fra molti altri, Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 71243/01, § 33 ECHR 2014).
114. Stati contraenti che sono parti ad una causa sono in principio libero scegliere i mezzi da che cosa loro si atterranno con una sentenza nella quale la Corte ha trovato una violazione. Questa discrezione come alla maniera di esecuzione di una sentenza la libertà di scelta che allega all'obbligo primario degli Stati Contraenti sotto la Convenzione per garantire i diritti e le libertà garantita riflette (Articolo 1). Se la natura della violazione concede restitutio in integrum, è per lo Stato rispondente per effettuarlo, la Corte che né ha il potere né la capacità pratica di fare così sé. Se, d'altra parte legge nazionale non concede-o concede solamente parziale-riparazione per essere reso, Articolo 41 conferisce poteri la Corte per riconoscere la vittima simile soddisfazione siccome sembra a sé per essere appropriato (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 33, ECHR 2000XI?, e Kuri ?ed Altri c. la Slovenia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 26828/06, § 80 ECHR 2014).
115. Come un articolo, il fatto che un richiedente ancora può ricevere un'assegnazione in riguardo di danno patrimoniale sotto i procedimenti legali e nazionali non spogli il richiedente di suo o il suo diritto per chiedere il risarcimento sotto Articolo 41 della Convenzione (veda, per istanza, Mikheyev c. la Russia, n. 77617/01, § 155, 26 gennaio 2006, e S.L. e J.L. c. Croatia (soddisfazione equa), n. 13712/11, § 15, 6 ottobre 2016 con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Comunque, insolitamente, se le circostanze della causa così garanzia, la Corte può decidere di non accordare il risarcimento come il richiedente può ottenere il risarcimento a livello nazionale (veda, per istanza, Mascolo c. l'Italia, n. 68792/01, § 55, 16 dicembre 2004, e Bistrovi ?c. Croatia, n. 25774/05, § 58 31 maggio 2007).
116. Come al danno patrimoniale chiesto col richiedente, mentre avendo riguardo ad alla natura procedurale della violazione trovata sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, relativo alla mancanza dell'IPC di coesione, diligenza e la spedizione appropriata riguardo alla rivendicazione di risarcimento del richiedente (veda paragrafo 104 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario per assegnare qualsiasi importo in riguardo di danno patrimoniale come l'ulteriore corso dei procedimenti di fronte all'IPC, condusse in ottemperanza coi requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, dovrebbe permettere il richiedente di ottenere il risarcimento per la sua rivendicazione di proprietà (veda, mutatis mutandis, Mascolo citato sopra, § 55, e Bistrovi?, citato sopra, § 58).
117. D'altra parte la Corte considera che il richiedente ha dovuto subire danno non-patrimoniale-come angoscia che è il risultato dell'inefficacia dei procedimenti di fronte all'IPC-quale sufficientemente non è compensato con la sentenza di una violazione. Decidendo su una base equa, assegna EUR 7,000 il richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo importo.
Costi di B. e spese
118. Nel periodo fissato per osservazione di una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa in conformità con Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte, il richiedente chiese in EUR 7,825 totale più IVA che coprì i costi e spese della sua rappresentanza legale (EUR 6,325) ed il costo di ottenere il rapporto di valutazione (EUR 1,500).
119. Il Governo considerò che la rivendicazione del richiedente era infondata siccome lei non era riuscita a cooperare propriamente coi suoi rappresentanti di fronte all'IPC e di fronte alla Corte.
120. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Essendo avuto riguardo ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 6,325, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo della sua rivendicazione per costi e spese incorse in sino alla data della sentenza presente.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Congiunge, unanimamente, ai meriti l'eccezione preliminare del Governo che concerne la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali e lo respinge;

2. Dichiara, unanimamente, l'azione di reclamo del richiedente nella quale i procedimenti coi quali lei chiese il risarcimento per la sua proprietà hanno localizzato il “TRNC” era stato protratto ed inefficace, sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, ammissibile;

3. Sostiene, unanimamente, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

4. Sostiene, unanimamente, che c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare separatamente l'ammissibilità e meriti dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

5. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno,
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 7,000 (sette mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 6,325 (sei mila trecento e venticinqui euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

6. Respinge, con sei voti ad uno, il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 12 dicembre 2017, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Robert Spano
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, le opinioni separate e seguenti sono annesse a questa sentenza:
(un) opinione concordante di Giudice Karaka;?
(b) dissentendo in parte opinione di Giudice Bianku.
R.S.
S.H.N.
OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE KARAKA?
Io concordo che c'è stata una violazione procedurale di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Comunque, come la ragione centrale per trovare una violazione riferisce alla lunghezza di procedimenti di fronte all'IPC (pendente per pressocché dieci anni), io penso che un esame sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione sarebbero stati più appropriati.
Io penso che Articolo 6 § 1 è applicabile ai procedimenti di fronte all'IPC (inoltre, le parti non contestarono questo).
C'è senza dubbio che c'era una controversia di fronte all'IPC riguardo alla rivendicazione di proprietà del richiedente. Tale controversia era per l'IPC per decidere istanza seguita per prima, se necessario, con la Corte amministrativa Alta a seconda istanza (veda Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.) [GC], N. 46113/99 e 7 altri, §§ 35-37, ECHR 2010 che cita sezioni 4 e 9 di Legge n. 67/2005). Quindi il richiedente fu obbligato per ottenere una direttiva dall'IPC per portare una causa prima il “TRNC” Corte amministrativa Alta che è un corpo integrò nel sistema nazionale di corti (veda Cipro c. la Turchia [GC], n. 25781/94, §§ 90-102 e 236, ECHR 2001 IV, e Demopoulos ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 92-98).
Queste considerazioni sono sufficienti per la Corte per concludere che ?per il fine dell'azione di reclamo di lunghezza-di-procedimento del richiedente-l'Articolo 6 § 1 è applicabile ai procedimenti di fronte all'IPC (veda, per istanza, Janssen c. la Germania, n. 23959/94, § 40, 20 dicembre 2001, e Boži ?c. Croatia, n. 22457/02, § 26 29 giugno 2006). Questo è vero irrispettoso del fatto che la causa non è stata esaminata ancora col “TRNC” Corte amministrativa Alta, siccome l'IPC è andato a vuoto ad adottare la sua decisione su un periodo prolungato di tempo (compari Bici c. l'Albania, n. 5250/07, §§ 28 e 41-45, 3 dicembre 2015). Effettivamente, la Corte non può trascurare la lunghezza di procedimenti di fronte all'IPC, come fare farebbe così l'applicabilità della garanzia di ragionevole-tempo sotto Articolo 6 § 1 completamente dipendente sulla condotta dell'IPC e gli concede trascinare i procedimenti su per anni senza loro arrivando allo stadio del “TRNC” Corte amministrativa Alta di fronte a che Articolo che 6 § 1 farebbero domanda indubbiamente.
In prospettiva di questo, è chiaro che Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione è applicabile all'azione di reclamo del richiedente riguardo alla lunghezza di procedimenti di fronte all'IPC.
Sui meriti, è chiaro che il richiedente non riuscì a presentare debitamente alcuni dei documenti attinenti in appoggio della sua richiesta di fronte all'IPC e che lei offrì solamente due anni più tardi alcuni dei documenti. Comunque in qualsiasi la causa, il periodo di più di nove ed un mezzi anni durante il quale i procedimenti sono stati pendenti di fronte all'IPC non può essere spiegato con la condotta del richiedente da solo.
Io concordo che la lunghezza prolungata dei procedimenti in questa causa era principalmente dovuta alla maniera dell'IPC di procedere. Molto di si avrebbe potuto evitare se l'IPC avesse, dall'inizio, tentò di identificare i punti controversi e raggruppare prova in relazione a loro in una maniera più efficiente (veda Articolo 7(1) degli Articoli di IPC, citò in paragrafo 43 della sentenza). Comunque, non riuscì a fare così e con ciò permise ai procedimenti di trascinare su un numero significativo di anni senza una definitivo decisione della causa che è raggiunta.
In somma, la lunghezza dei procedimenti si lamentò di è lontano dal soddisfare il requisito di ragionevole-tempo.
Nella sentenza la Corte enfatizza che la violazione trovata non chiama in questione l'efficacia della via di ricorso di IPC come simile (veda divide in paragrafi 86-87 e 106 della sentenza).
Di conseguenza, avendo riguardo ad alla natura procedurale della violazione trovata sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, relativo alla mancanza dell'IPC di coesione, diligenza e la spedizione appropriata riguardo alla rivendicazione di risarcimento del richiedente (veda paragrafo 104 della sentenza), la Corte considera che non è necessario per assegnare qualsiasi importo in riguardo di danno patrimoniale. Prende la prospettiva che, come riguardi danno patrimoniale, i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC ancora permetterebbero il richiedente di ottenere il risarcimento per la sua rivendicazione di proprietà (veda paragrafo 116 della sentenza). Per questa ragione la Corte assegna danno solamente non-patrimoniale.
In prospettiva del fatto che la rivendicazione di proprietà del richiedente ancora è pendente di fronte all'IPC, io trovo che la sua azione di reclamo riguardo alla lunghezza di procedimenti sarebbe dovuta essere esaminata sotto Articolo 6 § 1 e che l'azione di reclamo rimanente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 sarebbe dovuto essere respinto per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.

?
OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENDO DEL GIUDICE BIANKU
Io concordo con la sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in questa causa. Comunque, io non accetto con la conclusione della maggioranza come punti 5 e 6 della parte operativa. Io penso che la Camera avrebbe dovuto riservare l'Articolo 41 problema, con una prospettiva a decidendo più tardi possibilmente la rivendicazione del richiedente per danno patrimoniale nell'evento che la procedura di IPC continua ad essere inefficace.
La scelta adottata con la maggioranza, in primo luogo non riflette la causa-legge della Corte in cause simili; non prende debitamente in secondo luogo, in considerazione le circostanze della causa.
Come alla prima ragione, la consistenza della causa-legge, è sufficiente per osservare che in due recenti Grandi sentenze di Camera che concernono violazioni molto simili di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa di situazioni che sono il risultato di conflitti armati, la Corte riservò il problema di Articolo 41 (veda Sargsyan c. Azerbaijan [GC], n. 40167/06, § 283, ECHR 2015, e Chiragov ed Altri c. l'Armenia [GC], n. 13216/05, § 224 ECHR 2015). Nella mia opinione, il “soltanto” natura procedurale della violazione non è tale circostanza eccezionale come giustificare abbandonando dall'approccio adottò in quelle cause, un approccio che costituisce la causa-legge di vecchia data della Corte (veda Papamichalopoulos ed Altri c. la Grecia (Articolo 50), 31 ottobre 1995, § 34-46 la Serie Un n. 330B?). Il “procedurale” la violazione in questione infatti condusse all'inefficacia della via di ricorso di IPC nella causa del richiedente. Di conseguenza, questa via di ricorso non era in grado rivolgere la rivendicazione di proprietà del richiedente, e perciò l'approccio fatto domanda nelle altre cause di TRNC nelle quali la via di ricorso di IPC non era effettiva sarebbe dovuto essere fatto domanda. In quelle cause la Corte riservò la questione di Articolo 41 e più tardi determinò separatamente il problema di danno patrimoniale (veda, per istanza, le sentenze nella causa di Xenides-Arestis c. la Turchia, n. 46347/99, § 36 22 dicembre 2005 (i meriti), e Xenides-Arestis (soddisfazione equa), 7 dicembre 2006). Questo approccio non vorrebbe dire che la sentenza di oggi contesta la conclusione giunta a Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.) ([GC], N. 46113/99 e 7 altri, ECHR 2010) che la procedura di fronte all'IPC è un priori una via di ricorso effettiva. Ma allo stesso tempo confermerebbe che, dove la Corte considera che le certe via di ricorso sono effettive e perciò devono essere esaurite, le autorità nazionali devono garantire costantemente l'operazione effettiva di quelle via di ricorso, come la procedura di fronte all'IPC, a tutti gli individui in tutte le cause. Così, mentre la procedura di fronte all'IPC rimane un priori una via di ricorso effettiva, cause come Demopoulos non dovrebbero essere interpretate per volere dire che le autorità nazionali ottengono un “aumentò margine di violazione” nel nome di sussidiarietà e che la Corte ha dato via ogni controllo sul modo i diritti di Convenzione sono fatti domanda in pratica.
In secondo luogo, io non penso che la soluzione offrì con la maggioranza in questa causa prende debitamente in considerazione le circostanze della causa. Mi lasci richiamo che il richiedente fu donato molte aree di terra con sua madre e zia. Queste aree sono localizzate in Koma Tou Yialou (Kumyali), e la sua famiglia perse uso effettivo delle loro proprietà che seguono l'intervento militare turco in Cipro settentrionale in luglio ed agosto 1974 (veda paragrafo 7 della sentenza, coi riferimenti therein contennero) e non è stato in grado ad accesso o li ha usati poiché poi. Quel era dei quaranta-tre anni fa. Pressocché dieci anni fa il richiedente iniziò procedimenti di fronte all'IPC con una prospettiva ad ottenendo il risarcimento (veda paragrafo 13 della sentenza). In Sargsyan e Chiragov, citato sopra, la Grande Camera osservò in relazione ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che “la situazione ha continuato ad esistere su un molto lungo periodo” (veda Sargsyan, § 240, e Chiragov, § 200). Se in quelle cause l'espressione “molto lungo” fece domanda a situazioni che continuavano dal 1991, un fortiori che dovrebbe fare domanda a situazioni che continuano dal 1974. In tutto tutti quegli anni il richiedente e la sua famiglia non ha avuto accesso alle loro proprietà. Cosa può giustificare un invito per aspettare pressocché cinquanta anni per avere accesso alle proprietà di uno o essere compensato invece? Come la maggioranza esattamente concluda in paragrafi 103 e 104 della sentenza, i procedimenti di fronte all'IPC erano così lungo che loro erano in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. In queste circostanze sembra a me improprio non dare altra scelta al richiedente ma aspettare una soluzione che, nella sua causa, si ha dimostrato inefficace per pressocché dieci anni e perciò in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Se il problema di Articolo 41 fosse stato riservato ci sarebbe ancora alcuni sperano che se i procedimenti di IPC continuano a trascinare su e dimostrarsi inefficace, siccome loro ora hanno sino a nella causa del richiedente, procedimenti giudiziali in Strasbourg continuerebbero sul problema principale della causa, vale a dire il risarcimento. Ora loro sono divenute una possibilità remota perché il richiedente dovrebbe fare una richiesta nuova sulla stessa materia-questione se l'IPC avesse dovuto continuare a trascinare i suoi piedi.
Per queste ragioni io credo che riservare l'Articolo 41 problema in questa causa sarebbe stata la soluzione di suono basata sulla nostra causa-legge e l'approccio più equo alla decisione delle rivendicazioni del richiedente e la protezione effettiva dei suoi diritti di proprietà, in prospettiva di una violazione che ha continuato ad esistere su un molto, molto lungo periodo.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 20/02/2020.