Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: AFFAIRE ORLANDI ET AUTRES c. ITALIE

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,12,14,08

NUMERO: 26431/12/2017
STATO: Italia
DATA: 14/12/2017
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions
Violation of Article 8 - Right to respect for private and family life (Article 8-1 - Respect for family life)
Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)



FIRST SECTION






CASE OF ORLANDI AND OTHERS v. ITALY

(Applications nos. 26431/12; 26742/12; 44057/12 and 60088/12)










JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

14 December 2017




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Orlandi and Others v. Italy,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Kristina Pardalos, President,
Guido Raimondi,
Aleš Pejchal,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Jovan Ilievski, judges,
and Abel Campos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 12 September and 14 November 2017,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the last-mentioned date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in four applications (nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, 44057/12 and 60088/12) against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by eleven Italian nationals and one Canadian national, OMISSIS
2. The applicants in application no. 60088/12 were represented by OMISSIS; the remaining applicants were represented by OMISSIS all lawyers practising in Italy. The Italian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Ersiliagrazia Spatafora.
3. The applicants alleged that the authorities’ refusal to register their marriages contracted abroad, and more generally the impossibility of obtaining legal recognition of their relationship, in so far as the Italian legal framework did not allow for marriage between persons of the same sex nor did it provide for any other type of union which could give them legal recognition, breached their rights under Articles 8, 12 and 14.
4. On 3 December 2013 the Chamber to which the case was allocated decided that the complaints under Article 8 alone and Article 14 in conjunction with Articles 8 and 12 were to be communicated to the Government. It further decided to join the cases. On the same day it decided to grant anonymity to two of the applicants in application no. 26431/12 under Rule 47 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
5. Written observations were also received from FIDH, AIRE Centre, ILGA-Europe, ECSOL, UFTDU and UDU jointly, as well as from the Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti, the Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights, Alliance Defending Freedom, and ECLJ (European Centre for Law and Justice), which had been given leave to intervene by the Vice-President of the Chamber (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention). Mr Pavel Parfentev on behalf of seven Russian NGOS (Family and Demography Foundation, For Family Rights, Moscow City Parents Committee, Saint-Petersburg City Parents Committee, Parents Committee of Volgodonsk City, Regional Charity Social Organization Parent’s Culture Centre “Svetlitsa”, and social organization “Peterburgskie mnogodetki”) and three Ukrainian NGOS (the Parental Committee of Ukraine, the Orthodox Parental Committee, and the social organisation Health Nation), had also been given leave to intervene by the Vice-President of the Chamber. However, no submissions have been received by the Court.
6. On 15 December 2016 the President of the Section to which the case was allocated requested the applicants, under Rule 54 § 2 (a) of the Rules of Court, to submit factual information.
7. By letters of 29 December 2016, 30 January 2017 and 7 April 2017, the applicants in applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, 44057/12 submitted their reply, which was sent to the Government for information.
8. The letter of request sent to the applicants’ legal representative in application no. 60088/12, as well as a subsequent letter, returned to the Court undelivered.
9. By a letter of 24 June 2017 the Government submitted a factual update which was transmitted to the applicants for information.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
10. The applicants’ details can be found in the Annex.
A. The background to the case
1. Ms Francesca Orlandi and Ms Elisabetta Mortagna
11. These two applicants met in February 2007, and in 2009 they entered into a stable and committed relationship with each other.
12. On 11 October 2009 OMISSIS moved to Toronto, Ontario, Canada for work purposes. A month later the two applicants decided to get married and on 27 August 2010 they married in Toronto.
13. In the meantime, on 2 April 2010, Ms M.’s employment came to an end and as a result she was no longer entitled to a residence permit. She therefore returned to Italy and since then has been cohabiting with OMISSIS.
14. On 18 April 2011 their physical cohabitation was registered and since then they have been considered as a family unit for statistical purposes.
15. On 9 September 2011 the two applicants asked the Italian Consulate in Toronto to transmit to the Civil Status Office in Italy the relevant documents for the purposes of registration of their marriage.
16. On 8 November 2011 the relevant documents were transferred.
17. On 13 December 2011 the Commune of Ferrara informed the two applicants that it was not possible to register their marriage. The decision noted that the Italian legal order did not allow marriage between same-sex couples, and that although the law did not specify that couples had to be of the opposite sex, doctrine and jurisprudence had established that Article 29 of the Constitution referred to the traditional concept of marriage, understood as being a marriage between persons of the opposite sex. Thus, the spouses being of different sex was an essential element to qualify for marriage. Moreover, according to Circular no. 2 of 26 March 2001 of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, a marriage contracted abroad between persons of the same sex, one of whom was Italian, could not be registered in so far as it was contrary to the norms of public order.
2. Mr D.P. and Mr G.P.
18. These two applicants, who live in Italy, met in 2007 and entered into a stable and committed relationship with each other.
19. On 9 January 2008 they started cohabiting in G.P.’s apartment, although D.P. maintained formal residence in his own apartment. In 2009 G.P. purchased a second property which, in the absence of any legal recognition, for practical and fiscal reasons remained in his name only. In 2010 G.P. purchased, through a mandate in the name of D.P (for the purposes of purchasing such property), a garage. In June 2011 the couple moved into D.P.’s apartment and established their home there. They have since been considered as a family unit for statistical purposes.
20. On 16 August 2011 the two applicants got married in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. On 10 October 2011 they opened a joint bank account. On 12 January 2012, before a notary, the two applicants appointed each other reciprocally as guardians in the event of incapacitation (amministratore di sostegno).
21. Following the applicants’ request, on 7 January 2012, the Italian Consulate in Toronto transmitted to the Civil Status Office in Italy the relevant documents for the purposes of registration of their marriage.
22. On 20 January 2012, the Commune of Peschiera Borromeo informed the two applicants that it was not possible to register their marriage. The decision noted that the Italian legal order did not allow marriage between same-sex couples. Moreover, according to Circular no. 2 of 26 March 2001 of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, a marriage contracted abroad between persons of the same sex, one of whom was Italian, could not be registered in so far as it was contrary to the norms of public order.
23. Following the entry into force of the new law (see paragraph 97 below), on 12 September 2016 the two applicants requested that their marriage be transcribed as a civil union. According to the applicants’ submissions of 30 January 2017 their request was still pending and no reply had yet been received.
24. According to documents dated 31 March 2017 submitted to this Court in June 2017, by the Government, the applicants’ marriage was transcribed as a civil union on 21 November 2016. A certification of this registration, submitted by the Government, is dated 16 May 2017.
3. OMISSIS
25. The two applicants met in Italy in 2002 and entered into a stable and committed relationship with each other. OMISSIS, who is Canadian, did not have a residence permit in Italy at the time, OMISSIS therefore travelled repeatedly to Canada.
26. On 18 July 2005 the couple married in Vancouver, Canada. In the same year Mr Isita designated Mr Bray as his heir. In 2007 Mr Isita retired and moved to Canada permanently, although he maintained formal residence in Italy.
27. In 2004 the two applicants had purchased some land together; in 2007 the couple purchased a further piece of land, and in 2008 they purchased a house and in 2009 a commercial property with an annexed cottage. In 2009 they also opened a joint bank account.
28. On 10 October 2011 they asked the Civil Status Office to register their marriage contracted in Canada.
29. On 25 November 2011 the Commune of Naples informed the two applicants that no such registration was possible. The decision noted that the Italian legal order did not allow marriage between same-sex couples as reiterated in Circular no. 55 of 2007 issued by the Ministry of Internal Affairs.
30. Following guidance from the Mayor of Naples, directing the Civil Status Office of the commune to register such marriages (see below), OMISSIS re-submitted an application to have their marriage registered. According to information sent to the applicants by email, their request was granted on 6 August 2014. However, further to the circular issued on 7 October 2014 by the Ministry of Internal Affairs (see paragraph 89 below) the registration was cancelled on an unspecified date.
31. On an unspecified date, following the entry into force of the new law, the two applicants requested that their marriage be transcribed as a civil union. According to the applicants’ submissions of 30 January 2017 their request was still pending and no reply had yet been received.
32. According to undated documents submitted to this Court in June 2017, by the Government, the applicants’ marriage was transcribed as a civil union on 27 October 2016. A certification of this registration, submitted by the Government, is dated 29 March 2017.
4. OMISSIS
33. These two applicants met in October 1995, and a month later entered into a stable and committed relationship with each other.
34. In 1996 OMISSIS purchased a house in Rome, Italy and in spring 1998 the two applicants started to cohabit there. There they established their common residence.
35. In 1998 the two applicants symbolically celebrated their union before their friends and family. In 2001 OMISSIS allowed limited access to his bank account in favour of OMISSIS. In 2005 the two applicants drafted wills nominating each other as each other’s heirs.
36. On 9 September 2008 the two applicants got married in Berkeley, California.
37. In 2009 the applicants purchased property together and opened a joint bank account.
38. Following their request of the same day, on 29 September 2011 the Commune of Rome informed the applicants that the registration of their marriage was not possible, as it was contrary to the norms of public order.
39. On 1 October 2011 the couple filed a declaration with the Rome “Registry of civil unions” to the effect that they were entering into a civil union and constituting a de facto couple. The declaration is acknowledged by the relevant authorities, but has only symbolic value (see relevant domestic law and practice below).
40. Following guidance from the Mayor of Rome directing the Civil Status Office of the commune to register such marriages (see below), on 15 October 2014 OMISSIS re submitted an application to have their marriage registered. Their request was also granted and the marriage was registered. However, further to the circular issued on 7 October 2014 by the Ministry of Internal Affairs (see paragraph 89 below) by a decision of the Prefect of Rome of 31 October 2014 the above-mentioned registration was cancelled.
41. On 23 November 2016, following the entry into force of the new law and their request to that effect, the applicants’ marriage was transcribed as a civil union.
5. OMISSIS
42. These two applicants met in July 1993 and immediately entered into a committed and stable relationship with each other. A few weeks later OMISSIS moved in with OMISSIS in La Spezia, Italy.
43. In 1997 the couple moved to Milan, Italy.
44. In 1998 OMISSIS moved to Germany for employment purposes, maintaining a long-distance relationship with Mr Dal Molin; however they met every week.
45. In 1998 OMISSIS purchased a property in Milan with financial assistance from OMISSIS.
46. In 2000 OMISSIS returned to Italy; the couple moved to OMISSIS and continued cohabiting.
47. In 2007 OMISSIS moved to the Netherlands, again for work purposes, maintaining however, a long-distance relationship with regular weekly visits to Italy.
48. After being in a relationship for fifteen years, on 12 July 2008 the couple got married in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In November 2008 the couple opened a joint bank account.
49. In 2009 OMISSIS eft his job in Italy and moved to the Netherlands. As he was unemployed, he was totally dependent on his spouse. OMISSIS also supported financially Mr D.M’s mother, a victim of Alzheimer’s disease. They are under a system of separation of estates; however, their accounts are in joint names and their wills indicate each other as heirs.
50. On 28 October 2011 the applicants requested the General Consulate in Amsterdam to transmit to the respective Civil Status Offices in Italy the relevant documents for the purposes of registration of their marriage.
51. On 29 November 2011 the Commune of Mediglia informed the applicants that the registration of their marriage was not possible, as it was contrary to the norms of public order. No reply was received from the Commune of Milan.
52. Following the guiding decision by the Mayor of Milan, mentioned above, the applicants also re-submitted an application to have their marriage registered. According to the information provided by the applicants on 30 January 2017, their marriage was never registered.
53. However, on 4 October 2016, following the entry into force of the new law and their request to that effect, the applicants’ marriage was transcribed as a civil union.
6. OMISSIS
54. The two applicants married in The Hague on 1 June 2002.
55. On 12 March 2004, the applicants being resident in Latina, Italy, they requested the Civil Status Office to register their marriage contracted abroad.
56. On 11 August 2004 their request was rejected in accordance with the advice of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of 28 February 2004. The decision noted that the Italian legal order did not provide for the possibility of two Italian nationals of the same sex contracting marriage; this was a matter contrary to internal public order.
57. On 19 April 2005 the applicants lodged proceedings before the competent Tribunal of Latina, requesting the registration of their marriage in the light of DPR 396/2000 (see relevant domestic law below).
58. By a decision of 10 June 2005 the Latina Tribunal rejected the applicants’ claim. It noted that the registration of the marriage was not possible, because if such a marriage had been contracted in Italy it would not have been considered valid according to the current state of the law, as it failed to fulfil the most basic requirement, that of having a female and a male. In any event, the marriage contracted by the applicants had no consequence in the Italian legal order in so far as a marriage between two persons of the same sex, although validly contracted abroad, ran counter to international public order. Indeed same-sex marriage was in contrast with Italy’s history, tradition and culture, and the fact that so few European Union (EU) countries had provided such legislation went to show that it was not in line with the common principles of international law.
59. An appeal by the applicants was rejected by a decision of the Rome Court of Appeal, filed in the relevant registry on 13 July 2006. The Court of Appeal noted that such registration could not take place, given that their marriage lacked one of the essential requisites to amount to the institution of marriage in the domestic order, namely the spouses being of different sexes.
60. On 17 July 2007 the two applicants appealed to the Court of Cassation. In particular they highlighted, inter alia, that public order referred to in Article 18 of Law no. 218/95, had to be interpreted as international public order not national public order, and thus it had to be established whether same-sex marriage was against that order, in the light of international instruments.
61. By a judgment of 15 March 2012 (no. 4184/12) the Court of Cassation rejected the appeal and confirmed the previous judgment. Noting the Court’s case-law in Schalk and Kopf v. Austria, (no. 30141/04, ECHR 2010) it acknowledged that a marriage contracted abroad by two persons of the same sex was indeed existent and valid, however, it could not be registered in Italy in so far as it could not give rise to any legal consequence.
62. The Court of Cassation referred to its case-law, to the effect that civil marriages contracted abroad by Italian nationals had immediate validity in the Italian legal order as a result of the Civil Code and international private law. This would be so in so far as the marriage had been contracted in accordance with the laws of the foreign state in which it had been contracted, and that the relevant substantive requirements concerning civil status and the capacity to marry (according to Italian law) subsisted, irrespective of any non-observance of Italian regulations regarding the issuing of the banns or the subsequent registration. The former were subject solely to administrative sanctions and the latter were not conducive of any legal effects – since registration had the mere significance of giving publicity to a deed or act which was already valid on the basis of the locus regit actum principle. Thus, had the marriage been contracted by persons of the opposite sex, in the absence of any other fundamental requirements it would have been valid and conducive of legal effects in the Italian legal order. In that case the Civil Status Officer would have no option but to register the marriage. However, the case-law had shown that the opposite sex of the spouses was the most indispensable requirement for the “existence” of a marriage as a legally relevant act, irrespective of the fact that this was not stated anywhere explicitly in the relevant laws. Thus, the absence of such a requirement placed in question not only the validity of the marriage, but its actual existence, meaning that it would not be conducive to any legal effects (as opposed to a nullity). It followed that according to the ordinary law of the land, two same-sex spouses had no right to have their marriage contracted abroad registered.
63. The Court of Cassation considered that the said refusal could not be based on the ground that such a marriage ran counter to public order (as dictated by the relevant circulars), but that the refusal was simply a consequence of the fact that it could not be recognised as a marriage in the Italian legal order.
64. The Court of Cassation went on to note that the social reality had changed, yet the Italian order had not granted same-sex couples the right to marry as concluded in the Court of Cassation judgment no. 358/10 (which it cited extensively). Indeed the question whether or not to allow same-sex marriage, or the registration thereof, was not a matter of EU law, it being left to regulation by Parliament. However, the Italian legal order was also made up of Article 12 of the Convention as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights in Schalk and Kopf (cited above); in that case the Court considered that the difference of sex of spouses was irrelevant, legally, for the purposes of marriage. It followed that, irrespective of the fact that it was a matter to be dealt with by the national authorities, it could no longer be a prerequisite for the “existence” of marriage. Moreover, the Court of Cassation noted that persons of the same sex living together in a stable relationship had the right to respect for their private and family life under Article 8 of the Convention; therefore, even if they did not have the right to marry or to register a validly contracted marriage abroad, in the exercise of the right to freely live with the inviolable status of a couple, they could bring actions before the relevant courts to claim, in specific situations related to their fundamental rights, treatment which was uniform with that afforded by law to married couples.
65. In conclusion, the Court of Cassation found that the claimants had no right to register their marriage. However, this was so not because the marriage did not “exist” or was “invalid” but because of its inability to produce (as a marriage deed) any legal effect in the Italian order.
II. DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Private international law
66. Law no. 218 of 31 May 1995 regarding the reform of the Italian system of private international law, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
Article 16
“i) Foreign law shall not be applied if its effects are contrary to public order.
ii) In such cases, another law shall apply, in accordance with other connecting criteria provided in relation to the same subject matter. In the absence of any such connecting criteria, Italian law shall apply.”
Article 17
“The following provisions are without prejudice to the prevalence of Italian laws which in view of their object and scope shall be applied notwithstanding reference to the foreign law.”
Article 18
“Legal certificates released abroad shall not be registered in Italy if they are against public order.”
Article 27
“Capacity to enter into marriage and other conditions required to enter into marriage are regulated by the national law of each spouse at the time of the marriage, this without prejudice to the unmarried status (stato libero) of any of the spouses, obtained as a result of an Italian judgment or one which has been recognised in Italy.”
Article 28
“A marriage is valid, in relation to form, if it is considered as such by the law of the country where it is celebrated or by the national law of at least one of the spouses at the time of the marriage or by the law of the common state of residence at the time of the marriage.”
Article 29
“i) Personal relations between spouses are regulated by the national law common to both parties.
ii) Personal relations between spouses who have different nationalities or several nationalities common to both are regulated by the law of the state where their matrimonial life is mostly spent.”
Article 65
“Foreign documents concerning the status of individuals and the existence of family relations are recognised under Italian law if released by public authority of the State whose law is recognised by the present law ... unless those documents violate the public order...”
B. The Civil Code
67. Title VI of the First Book of the Civil Code deals with marriage, and is divided into six chapters (which are again divided into sections). Chapter III deals with the celebration of a civil marriage. Its Articles 115 and 130, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Article 115
“A citizen is subject to the provisions of section one [conditions to contract marriage] of this Chapter even when contracting marriage in a foreign state according to the form applicable in such foreign state ...”
Article 130
“Nobody is entitled to claim the title of spouse and the legal consequences of marriage unless a certified copy of the celebration as recorded in the family registers is presented.”
Article 131
“A factual reality reflecting the recognition by society of a civil status, which is in conformity with the marriage deed, sanctions any defect of form present in the marriage deed.”
68. Other pertinent provisions of the Civil Code read, in so far as relevant, as follows:
Article 167
“Each or both spouses may by public deed, or a natural third person may by means of a will, create a patrimonial fund for the needs of the family, assigning selected property, real estates or other goods which are recorded in the official Italian registers, or bonds.”
Article 230 bis
“1. In the absence of contractual relationships, family members who work permanently for the family business are entitled to maintenance, to the financial increments of the business, and to a share in the business, according to the type and standard of work done.
3. The notion of family member includes: the spouse, relatives within the third degree, and in-laws within the second degree. A family business is a business in which the spouse, relatives within the third degree, and in-laws within the second degree, work.”
Article 408
“... A guardian in the event of incapacity may be chosen by the interested person, by means of a public deed or an authenticated private deed.”
Article 540
“The surviving spouse is entitled to half of the entire estate of the deceased, subject to the provisions of Article 542 if there are surviving children.
Irrespective of whether there are any siblings or parents of the deceased, the surviving spouse is entitled to live in the family house and to use its furniture, whether it is their common possession or solely belongs to the deceased.”
Article 1321
“A contract is an agreement between two or more parties with the intent to establish, regulate or extinguish a patrimonial relationship between them.”
Article 1372
“Obligations arising from contracts have the force of law between the contracting parties ... They have no effects on third parties unless so provided by law.”
C. Decree no. 396/2000
69. Registration of civil status acquired abroad is provided for by the Decree of the President of the Republic no. 396 of 3 November 2000 entitled “Regulation of the revision and simplification of the legal order of civil status pursuant to Article 2 (12) of Law no. 127 of 15 May 1997” (DPR 396/2000). Its Article 16, regarding marriages contracted abroad, reads as follows:
“When both spouses are Italian nationals or one is an Italian national and the other a foreigner, a marriage abroad may be contracted before the competent diplomatic or consular authorities or before the local authorities according to the law of the place. In the latter case a copy of the marriage deed shall be deposited with the diplomatic and consular authority.”
70. Article 17 relates to the transmission of the deed, and according to Article 18 deeds contracted abroad may not be registered if they are contrary to public order.
71. For the purposes of guidance on the application of DPR 396/2000 the Ministry of Internal Affairs issued various circulars. Circular no. 2 of 26 March 2001 of the Ministry of Internal Affairs expressly provided that a marriage between two persons of the same sex, contracted abroad, cannot be registered in the Civil Status Registry in so far as it is contrary to the norms of public order. Similarly, Circular no. 55 of 18 October 2007 provided that the Italian legal order does not allow homosexual marriage, and a request for registration of such a marriage contracted abroad must be refused, it being considered contrary to the internal public order. These circulars are binding on the Officer for Civil Status, who is competent to ascertain that the requisites of law are fulfilled for the purposes of registration.
72. In the Italian legal order marriage registration does not produce any ulterior legal effects (non ha natura costitutiva); it serves the purpose of acknowledgment in the public domain (significato certificativo, efficacia dichiarativa) in so far as it gives publicity to a deed or act which is already valid on the basis of the locus regit actum principle (the rule providing that, when a legal transaction which complies with the formalities required by the law of the country where it is carried out is also valid in the country where it is to be given effect).
D. Domestic jurisprudence
1. Marriage (and civil unions)
73. Extracts from relevant judgments read as follows:
Decision of 3 April 2009 of the Venice Tribunal
“The difference of sex constitutes an indispensable prerequisite, fundamental to marriage, to such an extent that the opposite hypothesis, namely that of persons of the same sex, is legally inexistent and certainly extraneous to the definition of marriage, at least in the light of the current legal framework.”
Rome Court of Appeal decision of 13 July 2006 and Treviso Tribunal decision of 19 May 2010
“[Marriage between two persons of the same sex] may not be registered in the Italian Civil Status Registry because it does not fulfil one of the essential requisites necessary for marriage in the internal order, namely the difference of sex of the spouses.”
Constitutional Court judgment no. 138/2010
74. The Italian Constitutional Court in its judgment no. 138 of 15 April 2010 declared inadmissible the constitutional challenge (submitted by persons in a similar situation to those of the applicants) to Articles 93, 96, 98, 107, 108, 143, 143 bis and 231 of the Italian Civil Code, as it was directed to the obtainment of additional norms not provided for by the Constitution (diretta ad ottenere una pronnunzia additiva non costituzionalmente obbligata). The case had been referred to it by the ordinary courts in the ambit of a procedure challenging the refusal of the authorities to issue marriage banns for the claimants’ same-sex marriage.
75. The Constitutional Court considered Article 2 of the Italian Constitution, which provided that the Republic recognises and guarantees the inviolable rights of the person, as an individual and in social groups where personality is expressed, as well as the duties of political, economic and social solidarity against which there was no derogation. It noted that by social group one had to understand any form of community, simple or complex, intended to enable and encourage the free development of any individual by means of relationships. Such a notion included homosexual unions, understood as a stable cohabitation of two people of the same sex, who have a fundamental right to freely express their personality in a couple, obtaining – in time and by the means and limits to be set by law – a juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties. However, this recognition, which necessarily requires general legal regulation, aimed at setting out the rights and duties of the partners in a couple, could be achieved in other ways apart from the institution of marriage between homosexuals. As shown by the different systems in Europe, the question of the type of recognition was left to regulation by Parliament, in the exercise of its full discretion. Nevertheless, the Constitutional Court clarified that without prejudice to Parliament’s discretion, it could however intervene according to the principle of equality in specific situations related to a homosexual couple’s fundamental rights, where the same treatment between married couples and homosexual couples was called for. The court would in such cases assess the reasonableness of the measures.
76. It went on to consider that it was true that the concepts of family and marriage could not be considered “crystallised” in reference to the moment when the Constitution came into effect, given that constitutional principles must be interpreted bearing in mind the changes in the legal order and the evolution of society and its customs. Nevertheless, such an interpretation could not be extended to the point where it affects the very essence of legal norms, modifying them in such a way as to include phenomena and problems which had not been considered in any way when it was enacted. In fact it appeared from the preparatory work to the Constitution that the question of homosexual unions had not at all been debated by the assembly, despite the fact that homosexuality was not unknown. In drafting Article 29 of the Constitution, the assembly had discussed an institution with a precise form and an articulate discipline provided for by the Civil Code. Thus, in the absence of any such reference, it was inevitable to conclude that what had been considered was the notion of marriage as defined in the Civil Code, which came into effect in 1942 and which at the time, and still today, established that spouses had to be of the opposite sex. Therefore, the meaning of this constitutional precept could not be altered by a creative interpretation. In consequence, the constitutional norm did not extend to homosexual unions, and was intended to refer to marriage in its traditional sense.
77. Lastly, the court considered that, in respect of Article 3 of the Constitution regarding the principle of equality, the relevant legislation did not create an unreasonable discrimination, given that homosexual unions could not be considered equivalent to marriage. Even Article 12 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 9 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights did not require full equality between homosexual unions and marriages between a man and a woman, as this was a matter of Parliamentary discretion to be regulated by national law, as evidenced by the different approaches existing in Europe.
78. Similarly, the Italian Constitutional Court, in its judgments nos. 276/2010 of 7 July 2010 filed in the registry on 22 July 2010, and 4/2011 of 16 December 2010 filed in the registry on 5 January 2011, declared manifestly ill-founded claims that the above-mentioned articles of the Civil Code (in so far as they did not allow marriage between persons of the same sex) were not in conformity with Article 2 of the Constitution. The Constitutional Court reiterated that juridical recognition of homosexual unions did not require a union equal to marriage, as shown by the different approaches undertaken in different countries, and that under Article 2 of the Constitution it was for the Parliament, in the exercise of its discretion, to regulate and supply guarantees and recognition to such unions.
79. Generally, domestic jurisprudence until 2012 seemed to indicate that the impossibility of registering a homosexual marriage contracted abroad was a result of the fact that it could not be considered a marriage. However, this line of jurisprudence was put aside in the Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184/12 (in the case of the applicants) concerning the refusal of registration of same-sex marriages contracted abroad, and a further development occurred in 2014, as follows:
Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184/2012
80. See paragraphs 61-65 above
Judgment of the Tribunal of Grosseto of 3 April 2014
81. In the mentioned judgment, delivered by a court of first instance, it was held that the refusal to register a foreign marriage was unlawful. The court thus ordered the competent public authority to proceed with its registration. While the order was being executed, the case was appealed against by the State. By a judgment of 19 September 2014 the Court of Appeal of Florence, having detected a procedural error, quashed the first-instance decision and remitted the case to the Tribunal of Grosseto. By a first-instance decision of 2 February 2015 the Tribunal of Grosseto again ordered the competent public authority to proceed with its registration.
Proceedings leading to the Court of Cassation judgment no. 2487/2017
82. On an unspecified date a certain GLD and RLH (a same-sex couple, one of whom was an Italian national) had requested their marriage contracted in France to be registered in the Civil Status Office of the relevant commune. However, the relevant mayor had refused their request. The couple instituted proceedings against such a decision, but were unsuccessful before the first-instance Tribunal of Avellino.
83. By decree no. 1156, filed in the relevant registry on 8 July 2015, the Milan Court of Appeal found in favour of the claimants. Referring to the judgments of the Court of Cassation nos. 4148 of 2012 and 8097 of 2015, the Court of Appeal considered that since the marriage had been validly contracted in France, it could not be weakened because of a move to Italy, which would be discriminatory and would entail a breach of Article 12 of the Convention, as well as a breach of the right to free movement under European Union law. The Court of Appeal noted that the matter was regulated by Article 19 of legislative decree no. 396/2000 concerning registration of marriages contracted abroad, given that Article 28 of Law no. 218/1995 provided that a marriage was valid in respect of form if it is so considered in accordance with the laws of the country where it was contracted. It reiterated the principle that the same sex of the couple does not go against (non costitusice un limite) public order, be it national or international.
84. The judgment became final on 15 July 2016 given that the Court of Cassation in its judgment no. 2487/2017 of 31 January 2017 found that the appeals had not been lodged according to the relevant procedures.
2. Other relevant case-law
Judgment of the Tribunal of Reggio Emilia of 13 February 2012
85. In a case before the Tribunal of Reggio Emilia [at first–instance], the claimants (a same-sex couple) had not requested the tribunal to recognise their marriage entered into in Spain, but to recognise their right to family life in Italy, on the basis that they were related. The Tribunal of Reggio Emilia, by means of an ordinance of 13 February 2012, in the light of the EU directives and their transposition into Italian law, as well as the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, considered that such a marriage was valid for the purposes of obtaining a residence permit in Italy.
Constitutional Court judgment no. 170/14 of 11 June 2014
86. Judgment no. 170/14 of the Constitutional Court found a breach of the Constitution, as a result of the legally obligatory termination of a marriage, and the impossibility of the partners in that case (who had become same-sex partners following gender reassignment of one of the partners) to obtain an alternative recognition of their union. In that case the Constitutional Court also left to the legislature the task of urgently enacting another form of registered cohabitation, one which would protect the couple’s rights and obligations.
Court of Cassation judgment no. 8097/2015
87. In the light of the findings of the Constitutional Court judgment no. 170/14 of 11 June 2014, the Court of Cassation held that it was necessary to maintain in force the rights and obligations pertaining to the marriage (after one of the spouses had changed sex) until the legislator provided for an alternative means of recognition.
Judgment of the Court of Cassation no. 2400/15
88. In a case concerning the refusal to issue marriage bans to a same sex couple who had so requested, the Court of Cassation, in its judgment of 9 February 2015, rejected the claimants’ request. Having considered recent domestic and international case-law, it concluded that - while same sex couples had to be protected under Article 2 of the Italian Constitution and that it was for the legislator to take action to ensure recognition of the union between such couples - the absence of same sex-marriage was not incompatible with the applicable domestic and international system of human rights. Accordingly, the lack of same sex-marriage could not amount to discriminatory treatment, as the problem in the current legal system revolved around the fact that there was no other available union apart from marriage, be it for heterosexual or homosexual couples. However, it noted that the court could not establish through jurisprudence matters which went beyond its competence.
E. The recent progress of marriage registrations
89. Following decisions of some mayors (including the mayors of Bologna, Naples, Rome and Milan) to register same sex marriages validly contracted abroad, by a circular issued on 7 October 2014 by the Ministry of Internal Affairs, addressed to the Prefects of the Republic, the Government Commissioners of the Provinces of Bolzano and Trento, and the President of the Regional Government of Val D’Aosta, the following instruction was issued:
“Where mayors have issued directives concerning the registration of same-sex marriages issued abroad, and in the event that these directives have been enforced, you are requested to formally invite such mayors to withdraw such directives and cancel any such registrations which have already taken effect. At the same time you should warn them that in the absence of any action on their part the acts illegitimately affected will be annulled ex officio in accordance with the provisions of Article 21 nonies of Law no. 241 of 1990 and Article 54 (3) and (11) of legislative decree 267/2001.”
90. By a first-instance judgment no. 3907 of 12 February 2015 filed in the relevant registry on 9 March 2015, the Administrative Tribunal of Rome, Lazio, reiterating that there existed no right to have registered same sex marriages contracted abroad (and therefore confirming the legitimacy of the content of the circular of 7 October 2014), nevertheless declared the above order of 7 October 2004 null and void. Having examined the relevant legal framework, it considered that the Central Administrative Authority and Prefects were not competent to order the annulment of any such registrations, such competence being reserved solely to the judicial authorities.
91. This decision was overturned on appeal by the Supreme Administrative Court in its judgment of 8 October 2015, filed in the relevant registry on 26 October 2015.
92. The court noted that Article 27 and 28 of Law no. 218 of 31 May 1995 provided that the subjective conditions for the validity of a marriage are to be regulated by the national law of each spouse to be, and that a marriage is valid, in respect of its form, if it is considered to be valid according to the law of the place where it has been celebrated or the national law of at least one of the spouses. Furthermore, Article 115 of the Civil Code explicitly subjected Italian nationals to the relevant civil laws in relation to the conditions necessary to contract marriage, even if the marriage is contracted abroad. A combined reading of those provisions demands the identification of the mandatory substantive requirements (particularly, the status and capacity of the spouses-to-be) which would allow such a marriage to produce its ordinary legal effects in the national legal order. The difference in sex of the spouses to be was the first condition for the validity of a marriage according to the relevant articles of the civil code, and in line with the long cultural and legal tradition of the institution of marriage. It followed that same-sex marriage was devoid of one of the essential elements enabling it to produce any legal effect in the Italian legal order.
In consequence, a State official whose duty it is to ensure (before registering a marriage) that all the formal and substantive requirements have been fulfilled, would be unable to register a same-sex marriage contracted abroad in so far as it does not fulfil the requirement of having a “husband and wife” as required by law (section 64 of Law no. 396/2000). For this reason such a marriage could not be registered, even assuming it were not against public order.
Quite apart from this inability arising from the ordinary Italian legal order, relying on the relevant constitutional court judgments (nos. 138 of 2010 and no. 170 of 2014) the court found that neither could any obligation be derived from the constitution or international instruments to which Italy was a party. Nor could the recent ECtHR judgment in Oliari and Others v. Italy (nos. 18766/11 and 36030/11, 21 July 2015) supersede the obstacles created by Article 29 of the Constitution as interpreted by the domestic courts. Indeed that judgment had solely found for the need to introduce a relevant legal framework for the protection of same-sex unions, and reiterated that the introduction of same-sex marriage was a matter to be left to the State. The same conclusions had to be reached even in connection with the rights to freedom of movement and residence as understood in the relevant EU legislation, in so far as the recognition of same sex-marriages celebrated abroad fell outside the scope of EU legislation. It followed that in the absence of a right to same-sex marriage, the latter could not be compared to heterosexual marriage. Indeed, admitting the registration of same-sex marriages obtained abroad, irrespective of the absence of legislation to that effect, would mean superseding the choice of the national parliament.
In relation to the nullity of the order of 7 October 2014, it noted that the mayor was subordinate to the Minister and, in line with the relevant norms, in circumstances such as the present one the Prefect had the power ex officio to quash any illegitimate measures taken by the mayor. Indeed the power of the ordinary judge to delete such registrations risked creating uncertainty on such a delicate matter, because of the independence of such a body and the possibility of conflicting decisions. It followed that the appeal was upheld and the first-instance decision quashed.
93. In more or less the same time, similar proceedings were on-going in connection with the Mayor of Milan’s decision of 9 October 2014 to register a same-sex marriage obtained abroad and the circular of 7 October 2014 (inviting the mayors to cancel such registrations), and the subsequent cancellation, ex officio, of such registrations by means of a decree of 4 November 2014 as well as further annotations made on 11 February 2015 resulting from the latter decree.
94. By a first-instance judgment no. 20137 of 2015, the Administrative Tribunal of Lombardia, found in favour of the mayor and annulled the subsequent impugned acts (but not the circular of 7 October 2014). It considered that in his supervisory powers a Prefect can issue orders or directives in the ambit of the functioning of the Civil Status Office. However, the Prefect cannot issue an act of annulment in the context of registrations of same-sex marriages obtained abroad, given that the applicable laws give the power to rectify or annul erroneously-registered marriages only to the ordinary judicial authorities.
95. By means of a judgment no. 05048/16 of the Supreme Administrative Court, published on 1 December 2016, the first-instance decision to annul the impugned acts was confirmed on the basis of a different reasoning. Having analysed all the relevant laws and jurisprudence, the Supreme Administrative Court found that no law had attributed to the Minister for Internal affairs (or the Prefect) the power of annulling acts performed by mayors in order to register marriages. Indeed such power was attributed to the Government in its collegial composition. Further, it was not for the court to determine during such proceedings whether the decisions of the mayors to register such marriages were legitimate or not.
96. A set of similar proceedings concerning the registrations made by the Mayor of Udine was also on-going at the same time, and was decided in favour of the mayor in a first-instance judgment no. 228 of 2015 of the Administrative Tribunal of Friuli Venezia Giulia, which annulled the impugned acts. The judgment was confirmed on appeal by means of a judgment no. 05047/16 of the Supreme Administrative Court published on 1 December 2016 on the basis of the reasoning referred to in the previous paragraph.
F. Civil unions
97. By Law no. 76 of 20 May 2016, hereinafter “Law no. 76/2016”, entitled “Regulation of civil unions between people of the same sex and the rules relating to cohabitation”, the Italian legislator provided for civil unions in Italy. The latter legislation came into force on 5 June 2016.
98. The same legislation, in particular its Article 28 (a) and (b), provided that within six months from its entry into force, the Italian Government was delegated to adopt legislative decrees providing for the modification of relevant laws concerning private international law, in order to provide for the applicability of same-sex civil unions as provided in Italian law, to persons who have contracted marriage, civil union or any other corresponding union abroad.
99. By decree no. 144 of the President of the Council of Ministers of 23 July 2016, which came into force on 29 July 2016, transitory provisions were adopted pending the relevant legislative decrees mentioned above (under Article 28). In particular, it was provided that marriages or civil unions contracted abroad are to be registered through the consular offices.
100. On 19 January 2017 three legislative decrees (nos. 5, 6 and 7 of 19 January 2017) were adopted in line with the above requirements and on 27 February 2017 the relative decrees allowing for the entry into force of such measures as well as legislative changes to other relevant laws were adopted by the Ministry for the Interior.
101. Until then Italian domestic law did not provide for any alternative union to marriage, either for homosexual couples or for heterosexual ones. The former had thus no means of recognition (see also Oliari and Others, cited above, § 43, concerning a report of 2013 prepared by Professor F. Gallo (then President of the Constitutional Court)).
102. Nevertheless, some cities had established registers of “civil unions” between unmarried persons of the same sex or of different sexes: among others are the cities of Empoli, Pisa, Milan, Florence and Naples. However, the registration of “civil unions” of unmarried couples in such registers has a merely symbolic value.
G. Cohabitation agreements prior to Law no. 76/2016
103. Before the adoption of Law no. 76/2016, cohabitation agreements were not specifically provided for in Italian law.
104. Protection of cohabiting couples more uxorio had been derived from Article 2 of the Italian Constitution, as interpreted in various court judgments over the years (post 1988). In more recent years (2012 onwards) domestic judgments had also considered cohabiting same-sex couples as deserving such protection.
105. In order to fill the lacuna in the written law, with effect from 2 December 2013 it had been possible to enter into “cohabitation agreements”, namely a private deed, which did not have a specified form provided by law, and which may be entered into by cohabiting persons, be they in a parental relationship, partners, friends, simple flatmates or carers, but not by married couples. Such contracts mainly regulated the financial aspects of living together, cessation of the cohabitation, and assistance in the event of illness or incapacity .
III. INTERNATIONAL LAW AND PRACTICE
106. The relevant Council of Europe materials can be found in Oliari and Others (cited above, §§ 56-61).
IV. EUROPEAN UNION LAW
107. The relevant European Union law can be found in Oliari and Others (cited above, §§ 62-64).
108. Of particular interest is Directive 2004/38/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on the right of citizens of the Union and their family members to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States. Its Article 2 contains the following definition:
“ ‘Family member’ means:
(a) the spouse
(b) the partner with whom the Union citizen has contracted a registered partnership, on the basis of the legislation of a Member State, if the legislation of the host Member State treats registered partnerships as equivalent to marriage in accordance with the conditions laid down in the relevant legislation of the host Member State.
(c) the direct descendants who are under the age of 21 or are dependants and those of the spouse or partner as defined in point (b)
(d) the dependent direct relative in the ascending line and those of the spouse or partner as defined in point (b);”
109. According to the European Commission «Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council on guidance for better transposition and application of Directive 2004/38/EC on the right of citizens of the Union and their family members to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States» COM(2009) 313 final (pg. 4):
“Marriages validly contracted anywhere in the world must be in principle recognized for the purpose of the application of the Directive.
Forced marriages, in which one or both parties is married without his or her consent or against his or her will, are not protected by international or Community law. ...
Member States are not obliged to recognise polygamous marriages, contracted lawfully in a third country, which may be in conflict with their own legal order. ...
The Directive must be applied in accordance with the non-discrimination principle enshrined in particular in Article 21 of the EU Charter.”
V. COMPARATIVE LAW
A. Council of Europe member States
110. The comparative law material available to the Court on the introduction of official forms of non-marital partnership within the legal systems of Council of Europe (CoE) member States shows that fifteen countries (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) recognise same-sex marriage.
111. Nineteen member States (Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy (as from 2016), Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) authorise some form of civil partnership for same-sex couples (by itself or besides marriage). In certain cases such a union may confer the full set of rights and duties applicable to the institute of marriage, and thus be equal to marriage in everything but name, as for example in Malta. Portugal does not have an official form of civil union. Nevertheless, the law recognises de facto civil unions , which have automatic effect and do not require the couple to take any formal steps for recognition. Denmark, Finland, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Ireland and Iceland used to provide for registered partnership in the case of same-sex unions, this was however abolished in favour of same-sex marriage.
112. It follows that to date (2017) twenty-seven countries out of the forty seven CoE member states have already enacted legislation permitting same sex couples to have their relationship recognised as a legal marriage or as a form of civil union or registered partnership.
113. According to information available to the Court (dated July 2015), concerning the practice of twenty-seven member States which did not at the time provide for same sex-marriage (Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Lithuania, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia, Switzerland, Turkey and Ukraine), concerning the registration of same-sex marriages contracted abroad, the following situation emerges: all of these member States, with the exception of Andorra, Malta, as well as Estonia (following a court ruling of 2016), refuse to allow same-sex couples to register domestically a same sex marriage validly contracted abroad. The reasons for refusal vary; some member States base their position on the legal definition of marriage as a union between a man and a woman only, and some States go further and rely on grounds of public order, tradition and procreation.
114. The twenty-five member States which did not at the time allow same sex marriage registration can be divided into two groups: those that allowed for married same-sex couples to register their relationship as a same sex partnership (nine member States - Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia (until 2016), Finland, Germany, Ireland, Slovenia and Switzerland) and those that did not (the remaining sixteen member States). Of the EU member States surveyed none reported a distinction in their legislation between marriages obtained within the EU or elsewhere.
B. The United States
115. On 26 June 2015, in the case of Obergefell et al. v. Hodges, Director, Ohio Department of Health et al, the Supreme Court of the United States held that same-sex couples may exercise the fundamental right to marry in all States, and that there was no lawful basis for a State to refuse to recognise a lawful same-sex marriage performed in another State on the ground of its same-sex character (see for details, Oliari and Others, cited above, § 65).
THE LAW
I. PRELIMINARY ISSUES
A. Victim Status
116. As to the issue of some of the applicants having had their marriage registered (as a marriage), the applicants whose marriage was so registered considered that they remained victims of the alleged violations. In their original observations (prior to recent developments) the applicants noted firstly, that registration did not amount to a union giving recognition to their couple. Secondly, as to the complaint linked specifically to registration, they noted that in the light of the circular issued on 7 October 2014 such registration was bound to be withdrawn or annulled. In consequence their situation had not been remedied, nor had the violation been recognised.
117. The Court notes that the Government have not raised any objection in this respect. However, as recently reiterated in Buzadji v. the Republic of Moldova [GC], (no. 23755/07, §§ 68-70, 5 July 2016), victim status concerns a matter which goes to the Court’s jurisdiction and which it is not prevented from examining of its own motion. In the circumstances of the present case, the Court considers it appropriate to examine whether the applicants whose marriage was registered have lost their victim status.
118. The Court refers to the circular issued on 7 October 2014 by the Ministry of Internal Affairs (paragraph 89 above) according to which mayors were requested to cancel any registrations which had already been made, and informed that in the absence of such cancellations the registrations would be annulled ex officio. The applicants whose marriage was registered have confirmed that shortly after the circular was issued the registration in their respect was cancelled (see paragraphs 30 and 40 above). In these circumstances, the Court considers that the temporary registration of their marriage cannot therefore detract from their victim status.
119. Accordingly, the Court concludes that all the individuals in the present applications should be considered “victims” of the alleged violation concerning the authorities’ refusal to register their marriage (as a marriage) within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention.
B. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
120. The Government submitted that applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, and 44057/12 were inadmissible, as the applicants had failed to exhaust domestic remedies. In their view it could not be said that available remedies were not adequate. Domestic jurisprudence showed that the authorities gave particular attention to the issues raised and proposed novel solutions. They referred in particular to Constitutional Court judgment no. 138/10.
121. In relation to their complaint concerning the failed registration, the applicants submitted that it was for the Government to prove that there existed an effective domestic remedy at the time they lodged their applications with the Court; however, they had failed or were unable to do so. They further noted that rightly the Government did not rely on the judgment of the Tribunal of Grosseto of 3 April 2014, which was only a sporadic first-instance judgment, delivered after the introduction of the applications with the Court (they referred in this connection to Costa and Pavan v. Italy, no. 54270/10, § 38, 28 August 2012, and Sürmeli v. Germany [GC], no. 75529/01, § 110-112, ECHR 2006 VII).
122. Furthermore, in relation to their complaint regarding any means of legal recognition, the applicants submitted that the Government had also not proved, by means of examples, that the domestic courts could provide any legal recognition of their unions. Indeed, given that the flaw related to the law (or lack thereof) ordinary domestic courts were prevented from taking any remedial action. Within the domestic system the appropriate remedy would have been a challenge before the Constitutional Court, which the Court has already stated is not a remedy to be used, it not being directly accessible to the individual (see Scoppola v. Italy (no. 2) [GC], no. 10249/03, § 70, 17 September 2009). Moreover, in the present case such a challenge would not have been successful, given the precedent which lay in judgment no. 138/10, subsequently confirmed by other decisions.
123. The Court observes that at the time when all the applicants introduced their applications before the Court (April-September 2012) the case-law concerning the impossibility of registering such marriages was consolidated. The slightly different reasoning adopted in a judgment of 15 March 2012 (no. 4184/12) of the Court of Cassation in two of the applicants’ cases did not alter the unfavourable outcome. Moreover, by that time the Constitutional Court had already given its judgment no. 138/10, the findings of which were subsequently reiterated in two further Constitutional Court judgments (filed in the relevant registry on 22 July 2010 and 5 January 2011, see paragraph 78 above), also delivered before the applicants had introduced their applications with the Court. Thus, at the time when the applicants wished to complain about the alleged violations, namely shortly after the refusals by the Civil Status Offices to register their marriages, there was consolidated jurisprudence of the highest courts of the land indicating that their claims had no prospect of success. The Court further notes that the judgment of the Tribunal of Grosseto was delivered after the applicants had lodged their applications with the Court, and that it is only a first instance judgment, it follows that it has no relevance for the Court’s finding under this head.
124. Bearing in mind the above, the Court considers that there is no evidence enabling it to hold that at the date when the applications were lodged with the Court the remedies available in the Italian domestic system would have had any prospects of success concerning any of their complaints. It follows that the applicants in applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, and 44057/12 cannot be blamed for not pursuing a remedy which was ineffective. Thus, the Court accepts that there were special circumstances which absolved these applicants from their normal obligation to exhaust domestic remedies (see Vilnes and Others v. Norway, nos. 52806/09 and 22703/10, § 178, 5 December 2013).
125. It follows that in these circumstances the Government’s objection must be dismissed.
C. Other
1. The Government
126. On the specific circumstances of the case, the Government submitted that Ms Francesca Orlandi and Ms Elisabetta Mortagna, as well as Mr D.P. and Mr G.P., got married in Toronto, Canada, without being domiciled there, as they were domiciled in Italy. They referred to the recently amended (2013) Canadian law on the matter.
127. In respect of Mr Gianfranco Goretti and Mr Tommaso Giartosio, who got married in California, the Government noted that the law on homosexual marriage was abrogated by a referendum in 2008. The Government submitted that although this did not invalidate their marriage, the applicants failed to submit relevant documents proving the validity of their marriage entered into on 9 September 2008, at a time when the law on homosexual marriage was being assessed by the domestic courts.
128. As to OMISSISand OMISSIS, the Government submitted that the two applicants, who married in the Netherlands, had not presented their marriage certificates, nor had they submitted the relevant marriage law, which provided for same sex-marriage since 2001. They noted that the said law provided for exceptions including in relation to the recognition of marriages abroad, and that it also explicitly stated that in order to contract marriage one of the partners must have Dutch nationality or residence in the Netherlands, and if the other partner is a non national or a non-permanent resident, he or she must provide documentation in relation to his juridical position in connection with his residence permit for the purpose of marriage.
129. In conclusion the Government submitted that the marriages contracted abroad by the applicants had not fulfilled the requirements of the places where the marriages took place. Indeed the applicants had not proved to this Court that they had fulfilled the said requirements, and neither had they made available the relevant documents proving their juridical statuses. All this would have in fact been necessary for the registration of such marriages in a foreign country. Following recent developments (during these proceedings), the Government nonetheless submitted that those marriages which were registered by the Offices of Civil Status, in application of Italian law on the subject matter, were so registered even though they had not been in conformity with the applicable foreign laws. They thus asked the Court to assess the legitimacy and validity of the marriage acts at issue for the purposes of the admissibility of the relevant applications.
2. The applicants
(a) Applications nos. 26431/12; 26742/12; 44057/12
130. The applicants submitted that both before the domestic courts and before the Court they had produced certified copies of their marriage certificates released by the competent authorities of the place of the celebration of their marriages. It followed that they had submitted sufficient proof as to the validity of their marriages. Furthermore, the refusal of the Italian authorities had solely been based on the fact that they were same sex couples, and not because of any doubt as to the validity of the marriages contracted.
(b) Application no. 60088/12
131. The applicants submitted that the three Italian courts that had examined their request had not questioned the existence of the requirements necessary for the celebration of their marriage in the Netherlands. The Court of Cassation itself in its judgment (no. 4184/12) had stated that the registration was impossible because of the rules of public order and not because the marriage was null and void. Furthermore, the Government had not during those proceedings objected to the validity of their marriage, and by virtue of Article 115 (1) of the Italian Code of Civil Procedure (if the defendant does not contest the facts alleged by the claimant, those facts are considered proved) it had been established that their marriage was valid. As stated by the Government in a different context, the Court was not a fourth instance court, and thus it was not for it to assess the validity of such marriages, because such validity depended on the law of the State where it was celebrated, while the present case concerned discriminatory treatment at the hands of the Italian authorities.
3. The Court’s assessment
132. The Court notes, firstly, that it is not for it to assess the validity, according to the laws of the contracting State, of the marriages contracted by the applicants - a matter which has not been determined by the domestic authorities whose responsibility it is to make such assessments (see paragraph 92 above).
133. It further notes that whether the applicants’ marriages were valid or not, according to the laws of the contracting State, is beyond the scope of the applicants’ complaints, as the refusals of which they complained were not based on that ground (see, mutatis mutandis, Paji? v. Croatia, no. 68453/13, § 75, 23 February 2016) - the veracity of which remains, thus, hypothetical.
134. Indeed, the basis of the applicants’ complaints is that the authorities refused to register their marriages contracted abroad on the ground that they had been marriages between persons of the same sex. The Court observes that from the documents submitted to it there is no doubt that the applicants have contracted marriages (in different countries) and that the refusal of the registration of such marriages was based on the fact that the applicants were same-sex couples and on nothing else.
135. The Court notes that its assessment is confined to the specific case before it, and therefore, in the present case, to the determination of whether the authorities’ refusal to register the applicants’ marriage solely on the ground that they were same-sex spouses constituted a breach of the invoked provisions. The Court’s assessment is, thus, without prejudice to any other reasons for refusal which could have been detected by the domestic authorities or which may still be raised by the domestic authorities in future (if the applicants had to make other attempts to register their marriage).
136. In consequence, the objection raised by the Government has no relevance to the admissibility of the complaints, and is therefore dismissed.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 14 IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLES 8 AND 12 OF THE CONVENTION
137. The applicants complained about the refusal to register their marriages, contracted abroad, and the fact that they could not marry or have any other legal recognition of their family union in Italy. They considered that the situation was discriminatory and based solely on their sexual orientation. They cited Article 8, 12 and 14. The provisions they cited read as follows:
Article 8
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Article 12
“Men and women of marriageable age have the right to marry and to found a family, according to the national laws governing the exercise of this right.”
Article 14
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
138. The Court reiterates that it is the master of the characterisation to be given in law to the facts of the case (see, for example, Gatt v. Malta, no. 28221/08, § 19, ECHR 2010). In the present case the Court considers that the complaints raised by the applicants are to be examined solely under Article 8 alone and under Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Articles 8 and 12.
A. Admissibility
1. Applicability of the provisions
139. The applicants submitted that the relationship of a same-sex couple living in a stable de facto relationship fell within the notion of family life, even more so if this was coupled with an act of marriage produced by foreign authorities. Thus, there was no doubt that Article 14 applied in conjunction with Article 8 in the present case.
140. As to the application of Article 14, in conjunction with Article 12, the applicants submitted that in Schalk and Kopf v. Austria (no. 30141/04, ECHR 2010) the Court held that it “would no longer consider that the right to marry enshrined in Article 12 must in all circumstances be limited to marriage between two persons of the opposite sex. Consequently, it cannot be said that Article 12 is inapplicable to the applicants’ complaint”. The applicants noted that in that case the applicants were a same-sex couple living in a stable relationship and wishing to get married. In their view, since the Court found that Article 12 applied in that case, it followed that Article 14 in conjunction with Article 12 also applied in the present case.
141. The Government did not contest expressly the applicability of the provisions.
142. As the Court has consistently held, Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. Although the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of those provisions – and to this extent it is autonomous – there can be no room for its application unless the facts at issue fall within the ambit of one or more of the latter (see, for instance, E.B. v. France [GC], no. 43546/02, § 47, 22 January 2008; Karner v. Austria, no. 40016/98, § 32, ECHR 2003 IX; and Petrovic v. Austria, 27 March 1998, § 22, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998 II).
143. The Court notes that it is undisputed that the relationship of a same-sex couple like the applicants falls within the notion of “private life” within the meaning of Article 8. Similarly, the Court has already held that the relationship of a cohabiting same-sex couple living in a stable de facto partnership falls within the notion of “family life” (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, § 94). It follows that the facts of the present applications fall within the notion of “private life” as well as “family life” within the meaning of Article 8.
144. The Court also reiterates that there is no reason why a State’s acknowledgment of the real marital status of a person, be it, inter alia, married, single, divorced, widow or widower, should not form part of his or her personal and social identity, and indeed psychological integrity protected by Article 8. Therefore, registration of a marriage, being a recognition of an individual’s legal civil status, which undoubtedly concerns both private and family life, comes within the scope of Article 8 § 1 (see Dadouch v. Malta, no. 38816/07, § 48, 20 July 2010).
145. As to Article 12, the Court notes that in Schalk and Kopf it found that it would no longer consider that the right to marry must in all circumstances be limited to marriage between two persons of the opposite sex, and therefore that Article 12 was applicable to the applicants, a same sex couple seeking to marry, but that Article 12 of the Convention did not impose an obligation on the respondent Government to grant a same-sex couple like the applicants access to marriage (§§ 61-63). The same was reiterated in Hämäläinen v. Finland [GC], (no. 37359/09, § 96, ECHR 2014), and in Oliari and Others v. Italy (nos. 18766/11 and 36030/11, §§ 191-192, 21 July 2015), where the Court held that while it is true that some Contracting States have extended marriage to same-sex partners, Article 12 cannot be construed as imposing an obligation on the Contracting States to grant access to marriage to same-sex couples. More recently, the Court, in Chapin and Charpentier v. France, (no. 40183/07, 9 June 2016) also considered that Article 12 applied to the applicants, a same-sex couple seeking to marry (§ 31). Since the Court has already held Article 12 to be applicable to a same sex-couple wishing to marry, the provision must also be applicable to same-sex couples who are already married under the domestic system of another State.
146. Consequently, the provisions to be examined by the Court, namely both Article 8 and Article 14 taken in conjunction with Articles 8 and 12 of the Convention, apply in the present case.
2. Conclusion
147. The Court notes that the complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants in applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12 and 44057/12
148. The applicants submitted that the violations arose as a result of an administrative practice and a vacuum in the legal system which existed at the time, which amounted to a structural deficiency.
(i) Lack of marriage registration
149. The applicants submitted that as a same-sex couple married abroad they were undoubtedly in the same position as different-sex couples married abroad as regards their request for registration of their marriage. Yet they had suffered different, disadvantageous treatment, as they had been refused registration of their marriage. This refusal also amounted to an interference with their rights to family life and to marry, since the decisions of public authorities jeopardised a relationship of marriage that two adult and consenting persons had created to regulate their private and family life (they referred, mutatis mutandis, to Negrepontis-Giannisis v. Greece (no. 56759/08, § 57, 3 May 2011).
150. The applicants did not dispute that registration of the marriage did not imply recognition of the legal effects of the marriage deed. Nevertheless, through the registration of their foreign marriage they sought to obtain, vis-à-vis the public authorities and society at large, the publicity of their situation, namely that they had a common project of life, that they regarded themselves as a family, and that they reciprocally committed to this aim with the ensuing responsibilities.
151. The applicants submitted that as adduced by the competent authorities the only reason for the refusal was the same-sex nature of their marriage. Thus, the aim allegedly pursued by the refusal of registration was the protection of the “internal” public order (as per Circular no. 2 of 26 March 2001, mentioned above). This aim was rather general, as it allegedly included fundamental, ethical, economic, political and social principles of the legal order. However, the Government had failed to explain which specific fundamental principles had to be defended against the registration of same-sex marriages. Thus, it could only be deduced that the difference in treatment was aimed solely at protecting a concept of marriage as a heterosexual legal institution and an abstract idea of traditional family. Nevertheless, the applicants noted that the Court of Cassation (judgment no. 4184/12) acknowledged that a foreign same-sex marriage may no longer be considered non-existent. It had found that the refusal of its registration was simply a consequence of the fact that it could not be recognised as a marriage in the Italian legal order (marriage being defined as a union between a man and a woman), irrespective of any considerations relating to the protection of public order. The applicants noted that in such a context the Civil Status Offices and the domestic courts were prevented from carrying out a proportionality assessment, namely whether giving publicity to a same-sex union would jeopardise internal public order. The situation was such that the lack of recognition of same-sex unions, despite a constitutional obligation on the legislature to fill this gap, also prevented domestic authorities from registering the marriage deed at least as a civil union, while reserving the institution of marriage to opposite-sex couples. It followed that the refusal was not genuinely aimed at protecting fundamental principles of legal order, which in fact do not oppose, but actually require, the recognition of same-sex unions.
152. The applicants submitted that even assuming that there existed an aim which was legitimate, given that no proportionality assessment was carried out by the authorities and that no such assessment was guaranteed by the legislature - which failed to give effect to the Constitutional Court’s pronouncement - it could not be said that the refusal was necessary to achieve the aim at issue. No other reasons had been advanced to justify its necessity.
(ii) Lack of civil unions
153. The applicants made submissions on the lines of those made in the case of Oliari and Others (cited above, §§ 105-121).
154. The applicants further submitted that the unreasonable and unjustified treatment suffered by them affected not only their family life under Article 8 but also their rights under Article 12. They considered that in the absence of an alternative to marriage to obtain recognition of their union, the requirements of strict proportionality for the justification of the measure were not satisfied (they referred, mutatis mutandis, to Parry v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 42971/05, ECHR 2006 XV), and there was consequently a violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 12. In this connection they relied on the dissenting opinions in the judgment of Schalk and Kopf.
155. In conclusion the applicants reiterated that same-sex unions could not be considered as being against the internal public order, their legal recognition being required by Article 2 of the Italian Constitution as repeatedly held by the Italian Constitutional Court. Thus, the notion of marriage as a heterosexual institution could still be safeguarded if the applicants’ marriages were at least recognised (re-characterised) as same sex unions for the purposes of registration. Given that compliance with domestic legislation was no justification for non-compliance with treaty obligations, the obligatory refusal of at least a civil union in the present case had failed to strike a fair balance between the applicants’ right to respect for family life and the demand of society at large. At the same time the State was also violating the applicants’ rights in so far as it had failed to comply with its positive obligation to give appropriate legal recognition to their unions, as also demanded repeatedly by the Italian Constitutional Court. It followed that their effective exercise of a fundamental right existing under domestic law was hindered by the failure of the legislature to act.
(b) The applicants in application no. 60088/12
(i) Lack of marriage registration
156. The applicants stressed that the fact that it was impossible for them to register their marriage obtained abroad amounted to discriminatory treatment. They considered that a) the marriage registered abroad was valid and produced all legal effects and consequences which are proper of a legal marriage recognised and regulated by the law of the State in which the marriage was registered or celebrated; b) it was a marriage that in all its characteristics and aspects is identical to marriage as legally recognised by Italian law; c) in addition, contrary to the submission by the Italian Court of Cassation and as explained below, the marriage registered abroad would produce full legal consequences within the Italian legal system. This did not, however, mean, inter alia, that the State had the duty to allow same-sex marriage in Italy, or to extend to same-sex couples the full legal protection given to heterosexual married couples.
157. The Government had ignored that they were European citizens, and that Article 9 of the European Charter did not distinguish between married same-sex or different-sex couples (for example, in application of Article 9 and Directive 2004/38/EC recognising the right of EU citizens to move and reside freely within the territory of member states, the decision of 13 February 2012 of the Tribunal of Reggio Emilia, paragraph 85 above) and that each European citizen who was married was entitled to free movement within the EU, regardless of who he or she was married to and where they married. It followed that the European norms concerning married couples also applied in Italy and must apply to the applicants, who were legally married in another EU state. Thus, contrary to that held by the Court of Cassation in judgment no. 4184/12, same-sex marriage celebrated abroad produced legal effects in the Italian system every time the marital status represented a pre-requisite for the application in Italy of EU norms (as explained in the Reggio Emilia Tribunal’s judgment). In connection with the last-mentioned judgment the applicants considered that since an Italian citizen’s marriage to a non-EU same-sex partner was registered, the failure to register their marriage discriminated against them on the basis of their nationality (as they were both Italian).
158. In the light of the recent interpretation of Article 12 of the Convention and the explicit wording of Article 9 of the EU Charter marriage was no longer considered as the union of a man and a woman. Thus, all EU norms concerning marriage referred to both heterosexual and homosexual married couples. This interpretation had to be equally valid in Italy, it being bound by these European instruments. It followed, that since the applicants were legally married, it was those laws which should apply to them and not laws concerning unprotected persons or cohabitants. In this connection, registration represented an indirect recognition of the conjugal status of same-sex couples, which allowed them entitlement to those rights recognised under EU law (such as free movement) by virtue of their being EU citizens, in addition to all situations in which EU norms would have applied in Italy. The applicants noted that registration of their marital status had value for several legal purposes, including the payment of taxes, protection from foreign creditors, and avoiding bigamy. It followed that in a globalised era such registration was important for ensuring clarity in international relations between citizens in different countries.
159. The applicants submitted that it could no longer be said that same sex marriage was against public order (as confirmed by the Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184/12). Indeed it was not the Italian public order that was at issue in the present case but the international public order, as the norms to be interpreted were norms of international private law. As the Court of Cassation had pointed out (decision of 26 April 2013, no. 10070, which quoted another two decisions of the Court of Cassation of 6 December 2002, no. 17349 and of 23 February 2006, no. 4040), it is the “international public order” which is included in the principles of international private law. Therefore the applicants argued that the international public order did not merely mirror Italian fundamental legal principles as provided by the Constitution or by other Italian legal statutes. Instead, it encapsulated the Italian fundamental principles that in turn derive from a plurality of sources of law and in particular from the interaction of the Italian system with the Charter and the Convention.
160. The applicants noted that, if, as the Court of Cassation had pointed out (judgment no. 4184/12), the notion of marriage under Italian law included same-sex marriage (in line with the Charter and the Convention), then it was contradictory to argue that a same-sex marriage celebrated abroad was against the international public order. Despite this judgment and the decision in Schalk and Kopf, the Italian authorities continued to apply the regulations issued by the Ministry of the Interior. Furthermore, the guidelines used by the registrars of civil status simply referred to public order, without clarifying whether it was national or international; those guidelines also indicated that judgment no. 4184/12 was irrelevant in relation to registrations. The applicants disputed that Article 16 of Law no. 218/95 was applicable to the circumstances of the case, as that provision governed the application in Italy of foreign law, but the applicants were not asking the authorities to apply Dutch law (to give them the right and protection they would have obtained under Dutch law), but simply to register their marriage celebrated abroad and thus to obtain the limited effects of registration under Italian law, namely certification that the marriage was valid, which could be used every time conjugal status needed to be proved for the application of a specific law.
161. The applicants referred to other relevant domestic case-law (see paragraphs 86 and 88 above), in particular Constitutional Court judgment no. 170/14, which considered that the notion of marriage as defined in Schalk and Kopf was irrelevant for the purposes of Italian law and the definition of marriage.
(ii) Lack of civil unions
162. The applicants noted that to avoid a finding of a violation the Government argued that same-sex couples were in fact protected (by means of cohabitation agreements). The reality was that the public authorities were reluctant to advance the rights of same-sex couples, and the few rights which had been gained over the past decade were the result of litigation and court proceedings. Thus, such protection deriving from case-law and not legal statute constituted only an indirect protection. It was also left to the judge to decide when such protection was required after the same sex couple had proved that i) they were cohabiting in a stable relationship, ii) that the right they were seeking to enjoy was a right enjoyed by heterosexuals, and that a different degree of protection was unreasonable. Such discretion created uncertainty and would often need direction by the Constitutional Court. Moreover, it burdened persons in the applicants’ situation with having to go to court and prove cohabitation in order to obtain the relevant protections. In that connection the applicants noted the relevance of having their marriage registered (and thus having the validity of their marriage controlled and certified by the authorities) to enable them to fulfil the burden of proof concerning the stability of their relationship. They also noted that this approach to protection did not distinguish between cohabiting same-sex couples and married same-sex couples, despite the latter being granted recognition and protection in all jurisdictions in which same-sex marriage was regulated.
163. As to the “register of civil unions”, and contracts of cohabitation the applicants made submissions in line with those made in Oliari and Others (cited above).
(c) The Government’s submissions
164. The Government referred to the domestic jurisprudence on the matter which they considered relevant for their defence of the present case. They noted that the domestic courts had acknowledged the existence of same-sex couples and their right to protection in specific circumstances and to equal treatment, which could be guaranteed by the courts acting in line with their common sense (judgments no. 559/1989 and 404/1998 in relation to leases and state housing in respect of cohabitations more uxorio). This notion of family was further confirmed by the Court of Cassation in its judgment no. 4184/12, which prompted various communes and regions to create a register of civil unions, or a register of de facto unions, which served to register the existence of such couples, an action in fact taken by Mr Gianfranco Goretti and Mr Tommaso Giartosio. However, the existence of such measures of registration in various regions and communes did not oblige the State to recognise such unions as a marriage, but solely to consider their existence as a family within a regulatory framework in line with the internal order of the State – the only requirement of the Convention (as interpreted in jurisprudence) on the subject matter.
165. The Government submitted that same-sex couples wishing to give a legal framework to various aspects of their community life could enter into cohabitation agreements. Such agreements enabled same-sex couples to regulate aspects related to, for example: the manner of dealing with joint expenses and the opening of joint bank accounts; the criteria for the allocation of ownership of assets acquired during the cohabitation; the procedure for the distribution of assets in the event of termination of cohabitation; as well as acts of testamentary disposition in favour of the cohabiting partner (as for example the right to continue a lease following the decease of a partner, as established by judgment no. 404/1998). Furthermore, under Article 408 of the Civil Code it was possible to nominate a person living under the same roof as guardian in the event of incapacitation, as had in fact been done by Mr D.P. and Mr G.P. In the Government’s view cohabitation agreements were the appropriate juridical instrument to give their union the status of family before the law, without any discrimination based on their sexual orientation.
166. As to marriage registration, the Government submitted that since the applicants’ marriages were invalid according to the laws of the countries within which they were contracted they could not be registered, in the light of both international and domestic public order. In their view, the Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184/12 rejected claims (lodged by only two of the applicants) on the basis of Article 18 of Law no. 396/00 on the ground that such registration would have been contrary to domestic public order. That judgment had further held that such a marriage could not have produced any legal effect in Italy. Nevertheless, according to that judgment same-sex marriages contracted aboard remained valid in respect of form, for the purposes of the law of the country within which they were contracted or of the national law of at least one of the spouses, but not for Italian law, which did not allow same-sex marriage. The Government submitted that marriage fell within the sphere of domestic public order, which included situations which, although not totally internal, were significantly linked to the Italian legal order. They noted that in the light of the conflict of laws and in the absence of any criteria of liaison between foreign and Italian law under Article 16 of Law no. 218/1995, the domestic courts applied national law. It followed that the interference had been in accordance with the law.
167. The Government submitted that the refusal in respect of Mr Garullo and Mr Ottocento was based on internal public order, which was composed of ethical, economic, political and social principles enabling the cohabitation of Italian society and other contracting states which had not provided for same-sex marriage.
168. The Government further submitted that some individuals had also been successful in registering their marriages. Indeed, the first-instance Tribunal of Grosseto, by a decision of 2 April 2014, ordered the Civil Status Office to register a same-sex marriage contracted in New York in 2012 (see paragraph 81 above).
169. The Government submitted that there were no discriminatory intentions behind the state of the law in force which did not allow them to register their marriage; it would have been otherwise had the Italian legislator provided for a law specifically prohibiting same-sex marriage, as still existed in certain states.
170. They observed that the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union left it to States to decide on the matter. Similarly, in Schalk and Kopf the Court, in the absence of a European consensus, also left it to States to choose the extent of the rights to be afforded to same-sex couples. They further noted that in Gas and Dubois v. France (no. 25951/07, § 66, ECHR 2012) the Court held that a right to same-sex marriage cannot be derived from Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8, and that where a State chooses to provide same-sex couples with an alternative means of recognition it enjoys a certain margin of appreciation as regards the exact status conferred. As acknowledged by the Court and the Italian courts the national legislator was better placed than the Court to develop the institution of family and the relations between adults and children, as well as the notion of marriage. They noted that the delicate and complex questions of marriage as well as the civil rights of same-sex couples were subject to democratic debate in various countries, including Italy, in the light of the developing case-law of the Court as well as the non-binding acts of the Council of Europe. In this respect they noted that Italy developed an “LGBT national strategy 2013-15”, which it had submitted to the Council of Europe.
171. In conclusion they highlighted that the Convention did not provide homosexual couples with the right to marry, and such a reading of Article 12 would require a consensus among States which could be provided in an additional protocol.
(d) The third-party interveners
(i) Prof Robert Wintemute on behalf of the non-governmental organisations FIDH (Fédération Internationale des ligues de Droit de l’Homme), AIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe), ILGA-Europe (European Region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association), ECSOL (European Commission on Sexual Orientation Law), UFTDU (Unione forense per la tutela dei diritti umani) and LIDU (Lega Italiana dei Diritti dell’Uomo).
(?) Positive obligation to provide some means of recognition
172. The intervention in connection with the provision of some means of recognition is summarised in Oliari and Others (cited above, §§ 134-139).
(?) Discrimination
173. The intervention in connection with the alleged discrimination is summarised in Oliari and Others (cited above, §§ 140-144).
174. Those intervening further noted that Articles 14 and 8 can also be interpreted in the present case as requiring that the foreign marriages of same-sex couples be recognised as equivalent to the civil union or other alternative to legal marriage that must be provided to same-sex couples. A model can be found in s. 215 of the United Kingdom’s Civil Partnership Act 2004, prior to its amendment by the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013:
“(1) Two people [of the same sex] are to be treated as having formed a civil partnership as a result of having registered an overseas relationship [which includes a marriage in any country in which same-sex couples may marry] if, under the relevant law, they (a) had capacity to enter into the relationship, and (b) met all requirements necessary to ensure the formal validity of the relationship.”
175. Finally, in this connection the interveners noted that the EU’s European Parliament adopted, on 4 February 2014, a resolution on a roadmap against homophobia and discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity calling on the European Commission to “make proposals for the mutual recognition of the effects of all civil status documents across the EU, in order to reduce discriminatory legal and administrative barriers for citizens and their families who exercise their right to free movement”, which includes marriages registered in other EU member states.
(ii) Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti (ARCD)
176. The intervention is summarised in Oliari and Others (cited above, §§ 144-148).
(iii) The Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights
177. The intervener shed light on Poland’s situation. They noted that according to the Polish constitution marriage was defined as a union between a man and a woman which fell under the protection of the Polish State. The constitution did not define the notion of family. They explained that since 2003 proposals and draft laws made by NGOs or political parties in favour of same-sex partnerships had been repeatedly dismissed or discontinued. At the time of the submissions there were two draft laws on registered partnerships being analysed by Parliament. They noted that a lot of the debate, including amongst the public and scholars, concentrated on whether the constitution precluded forms of partnership which provided legal protection for same-sex couples. In the meantime figures from the Centre for Public Opinion Research (Poland) showed that in 2013 social support for same-sex partnership in Poland was on the increase.
178. On 28 November 2012 the Polish Supreme Court delivered a resolution (no. III CZP65/12), by which it formulated the obligation of connection with lease agreements following a homosexual partner’s death.
179. However, in Poland the lack of legal recognition of same sex unions showed the unequal position reserved to same-sex couples in various domains, as confirmed by jurisprudence.
180. Poland does not recognize same-sex partnerships concluded abroad, and they cannot be registered with the Civil Status Registry (nor added as an informal entry), as this would be contrary to the Civil Status Registry Act (judgment of the Polish Supreme Administrative Court of 19 June 2003 – no. II OSK 475/12). In that light the current practice was to deny legal recognition /registration of same-sex partnerships or marriages. However, in the view of the interveners, the legal framework including the Polish Constitution did not preclude registration of partnerships contracted abroad.
181. The Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights considered that there was no justification for the situation in Poland, which did not provide at least minimum legal recognition of same-sex couples.
(iv) Alliance Defending Freedom
182. The intervener referred to the Court’s case-law concerning the invoked provisions as well as that related to the margin of appreciation of States, particularly on sensitive issues.
183. According to their analysis of international jurisprudence, eleven of the thirteen countries that considered marriage to include same-sex couples had done so without the involvement of judicial bodies. In particular, they referred to the restraint concerning marriage redefinition shown by the judicial authorities of France, Germany and Italy. Thus, like the Court, the practice of judicial bodies was to show restraint by either deferring to the legislature or rejecting the claims altogether. The European Court of Justice had also considered that the Convention solely protected traditional marriage between two persons of opposite biological sex (K.B. v National Health Service Pensions Agency and Secretary of State for Health, case no. C-117/01 (2003) § 55).
184. Despite an emerging consensus towards same-sex unions, there existed a strong counter-trend towards recognising marriage solely between a man and a woman. As of 2010 thirty-five nations had legal provisions specifying that marriage was exclusively between a man and a woman, and since then more countries had followed in that direction, such as Hungary and Croatia, which had amended their constitutions to that effect, and Slovenia, which had voted against a redefinition of marriage.
185. They considered that legal protection of same-sex partners could be established through private contract law, however, legal recognition of marriage centred on the family and it was for the State legislature to redefine marriage. In any event, they considered that legalising same sex “marriage” led to various social harms, including consequences for freedom of religion and expression.
(v) European Centre for Law and Justice (ECLJ)
(?) Positive obligation to provide some means of recognition
186. The intervention in connection with the provision of some means of recognition is summarised in Oliari and Others (cited above, §§ 149-158).
(?) Marriage registration
187. The interveners noted the Court’s earlier case-law, which held that “the right to marry guaranteed by Article 12 refers to the traditional marriage between persons of opposite biological sex. This appeared also from the wording of the Article which made it clear that Article 12 was mainly concerned to protect marriage as the basis of the family” (Sheffield and Horsham v. the United Kingdom, 30 July 1998, § 66, Reports 1998 V). They considered that the right to marry was not an individual right, but merely an accessory right to the right to found a family, which was the reason why in various texts it was referred to as “the right to marry and found a family”.
188. The ECLJ submitted that the absence of a right to marry for same sex persons within the Convention was not disputable. Indeed, same sex marriage did not form part of the European public order, and Italy could not be forced to give effect (through registration) to same-sex marriages celebrated abroad, which were against its own public order. It was therefore legitimate for the national judge to put aside the rules of private international law by invoking the notion of public order, the content of which was to be defined freely by States. It was not for other States, who may have opted to permit their non-nationals to marry, or to permit their nationals to marry non-nationals (despite contrasting laws), to impose their new definition of marriage on other States.
189. They noted that apart from national public order there existed a European public order. Indeed the Luxembourg court held that “while it is not for the Court to define the content of the public policy of a Contracting State, it is nonetheless required to review the limits within which the courts of a Contracting State may have recourse to that concept for the purpose of refusing recognition of a judgment emanating from another Contracting State” . In the interveners’ view the principal instrument of public order was the European Convention on Human Rights, which did not provide homosexuals with the right to marry as also confirmed in the more recent Schalk and Kopf judgment. It followed that even subject to supervision Italy had been in conformity with the European public order.
190. They considered that the Italian State could not be obliged to recognise the applicants’ situations just because they were presented with a fait accompli following what could in certain circumstances be considered matrimonial shopping (crossing a border for a short period of time in order to be able to marry). In the ECLJ’s view, to impose on a State the recognition of marriages obtained abroad would be against the spirit of the Convention, and beyond the Court’s competence. While it was true that Italy recognised different-sex marriages obtained abroad, it should not be the same for same-sex marriages.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Article 8
191. The applicant’s complaints under this provision mainly relate to the fact that on their return to Italy they were refused registration of their marriage, either as a marriage or under any other form, depriving them of any legal protection or associated rights.
192. The Court reiterates that States are still free, under Article 12 of the Convention as well as under Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8, to restrict access to marriage to different-sex couples (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, § 108 and Chapin and Charpentier, cited above, § 39). The same holds for Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 12 (see Oliari and Others, cited above, § 193). Nevertheless, the Court has acknowledged that same-sex couples are in need of legal recognition and protection of their relationship (see Oliari and Others, cited above, § 165 and the case-law cited therein). Indeed, in Oliari and Others the Court concluded that in the absence of a prevailing community interest being put forward by the Italian Government, against which to balance the applicants’ momentous interests, and in the light of domestic courts’ conclusions on the matter which remained unheeded, the Italian Government had overstepped their margin of appreciation and failed to fulfil their positive obligation to ensure that the applicants had available a specific legal framework providing for the recognition and protection of their same-sex unions (§ 185). There had thus been a breach of Article 8 (§ 187).
193. The Court notes that, following the judgment in Oliari and Others (cited above), by means of Law no. 76/2016, the Italian legislator provided for civil unions in Italy. By subsequent decrees it was provided that persons who had contracted marriage, civil union or any other corresponding union abroad could register their union as a civil union in terms of Italian law (see paragraphs 97 to 100 above). The latter legislation came into being in 2017 (see paragraph 100 above) and most of the applicants have recently benefited from it.
194. The Court has already held, in respect of various domestic legislations, that civil unions provide an opportunity to obtain a legal status equal or similar to marriage in many respects (see for example, Schalk and Kopf, § 109, concerning Austria, Hämäläinen, § 83, in connection with the Finnish system, and Chapin and Charpentier, §§ 49 and 51, concerning France, all cited above). The Court considers that, in principle, such a system would prima facie suffice to satisfy Convention standards. The applicants also acknowledged either explicitly or implicitly that it would have sufficed, to safeguard everyone’s interests, had the authorities registered their marriage at least as a civil union (see paragraphs 151, 155 and 156 above) in so far as the applicants would have had the ability to have their relationships recognised in some form in the domestic system.
195. The Court notes that the new Italian legislation providing for civil unions (and registration of marriages contracted abroad as civil unions), also appears to give more or less the same protection as marriage with respect to the core needs of a couple in a stable and committed relationship, and the Court is not called upon in the present case to examine any differences in the detail of these, a matter which is beyond the scope of this case.
196. The Court reiterates in this connection that in proceedings originating in an individual application it has to confine itself, as far as possible, to an examination of the concrete case before it (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, § 103). Given that at present it is open to the applicants to enter into a civil union, or have their marriage registered as a civil union, the Court must solely determine whether the refusals to register the applicants’ marriage in any form with the result that they were left in a legal vacuum and devoid of any protection, prior to 2016-17, violated their rights under Article 8.
197. While the essential object of Article 8 is to protect the individual against arbitrary action by the public authorities, there may in addition be positive obligations inherent in effective ‘respect’ for family life. However, the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under this provision do not lend themselves to precise definition. The applicable principles are, nonetheless, similar. In both contexts regard must be had to the fair balance that has to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole; and in both contexts the State enjoys a certain margin of appreciation (see Jeunesse v. the Netherlands [GC], no. 12738/10, § 106, 3 October 2014 and Wagner and J.M.W.L. v. Luxembourg, no. 76240/01, § 118, 28 June 2007).
198. The Court does not consider it necessary to decide whether it would be more appropriate to analyse the case as one concerning a positive or a negative obligation since it is of the view that the core issue in the present case is precisely whether a fair balance was struck between the competing interests involved (see, mutatis mutandis, Dickson v. the United Kingdom, no. 44362/04, § 71, 18 April 2006).
199. As to the lack of civil unions, the Court notes that the Government’s observations in this respect are in line with those made in the case of Oliari and Others, relating to the same period of time – 2015 being the crucial time on which the Oliari and Others judgment is based (see Oliari and Others, cited above, § 164). As in that case, in the present case, the Government did not put forward a prevailing community interest against which to balance the applicants’ momentous interests which persisted until the legislation concerning civil unions came into force and until which time the applicants in the present case continued to suffer the consequences of being unable to benefit from a specific legal framework providing for the recognition and protection of their same-sex unions.
200. Similarly, as to the failure to register the marriages, the Government failed to indicate any legitimate aim for such refusal, save for a general phrase concerning “internal public order” (see paragraph 167 above), which however, the Court observes, is not in line with domestic jurisprudence (Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184/12, see paragraphs 61-65 above, whose findings were reiterated thereafter). In that connection, the Court notes that, unlike other provisions of the Convention, Article 8 does not enlist the notion of “public order” as one of the legitimate aims in the interests of which a State may interfere with an individual’s rights. However, bearing in mind that it is primarily for the national legislation to lay down the rules regarding validity of marriages and to draw the legal consequences (see Green and Farhat v. Malta, (dec.), no. 38797/07, 6 July 2010), the Court has previously accepted that national regulation of the registration of marriage may serve the legitimate aim of the prevention of disorder (see ibid. and Dadouch, cited above, § 54). Thus, the Court can accept for the purposes of the present case that the impugned measures were taken for the prevention of disorder, in so far as the applicants’ position was not provided for in domestic law.
201. Indeed, the crux of the case at hand is precisely that the applicants’ position was not provided for in domestic law, specifically the fact that the applicants could not have their relationship - be it a de facto union or a de jure union recognised under the law of a foreign state – recognised and protected in Italy under any form.
202. The Court notes the Government’s submission that, in the area in question, the Contracting States enjoyed a substantial margin of appreciation.
203. It reiterates that the scope of the States’ margin of appreciation will vary according to the circumstances, the subject matter and the context; in this respect one of the relevant factors may be the existence or non-existence of common ground between the laws of the Contracting States (see, for example, Wagner and J.M.W.L. and Negrepontis-Giannisis, both cited above, § 128 and § 69 respectively). Accordingly, on the one hand, where there is no consensus within the member States of the Council of Europe, either as to the relative importance of the interest at stake or as to the best means of protecting it, particularly where the case raises sensitive moral or ethical issues, the margin will be wide. On the other hand, where a particularly important facet of an individual’s existence or identity is at stake, the margin allowed to the State will normally be restricted (see Van der Heijden v. the Netherlands [GC], no. 42857/05, § 60, 3 April 2012, Mennesson v. France, no. 65192/11, § 77, ECHR 2014 (extracts); and Paradiso and Campanelli v. Italy [GC], no. 25358/12, § 182, ECHR 2017).
204. As to legal recognition of same-sex couples, the Court notes the movement that has continued to develop rapidly in Europe since the Court’s judgment in Schalk and Kopf and continues to do so. Indeed at the time of the Oliari and Others judgment, there was already a thin majority of CoE States (twenty-four out of forty seven) that had already legislated in favour of such recognition and the relevant protection. The same rapid development had been identified globally, with particular reference to countries in the Americas and Australasia, showing the continuing international movement towards legal recognition (see Oliari and Others, cited above, § 178). To date, twenty-seven countries out of the forty seven CoE member states have already enacted legislation permitting same sex couples to have their relationship recognised (either as a marriage or as a form of civil union or registered partnership) (see paragraph 112 above).
205. The same cannot be said about registration of same-sex marriages contracted abroad in respect of which there is no consensus in Europe. Apart from the member States of the Council of Europe where same-sex marriage is permitted, the comparative law information available to the Court (limited to twenty-seven countries where same-sex marriage was not, at the time, permitted) showed that only three of those twenty seven other member States allowed such marriages to be registered, despite the absence (to date or at the relevant time) in their domestic law of same-sex marriage (see paragraph 113 above). Thus, this lack of consensus confirms that the States must in principle be afforded a wide margin of appreciation, regarding the decision as to whether to register, as marriages, such marriages contracted abroad.
206. Apart from the above, in determining the margin of appreciation, the Court must also take account of the fact that the issues in the present case concern facets of an individual’s existence and identity (see, for example, Oliari and Others, cited above, § 177).
207. As to the interests of the State and the community at large, in respect of the failure to register such marriages, the Court can accept that to prevent disorder Italy may wish to deter its nationals from having recourse in other States to particular institutions which are not accepted domestically (such as same-sex marriage) and which the State is not obliged to recognise from a Convention perspective. Indeed the refusals in the present case are the result of the legislator’s choice not to allow same sex marriage - a choice not condemnable under the Convention. Thus, the Court considers that there is also a State’s legitimate interest in ensuring that its legislative prerogatives are respected and therefore that the choices of democratically elected governments do not go circumvented.
208. The Court notes that the refusal to register the applicants’ marriage did not deprive them of any rights previously recognised in Italy (had there been any), and that the applicants could still benefit, in the State where they contracted marriage, from any rights and obligations acquired through such marriage.
209. However, the decisions refusing to register their marriage under any form, thus leaving the applicants in a legal vacuum (prior to the new laws), failed to take account of the social reality of the situation. Indeed, as the law stood before the introduction of Law no. 76/2016 and subsequent decrees, the authorities could not formally acknowledge the legal existence of the applicants’ union (be it de facto or de jure as it was recognised under the law of a foreign state). The applicants thus encountered obstacles in their daily life and their relationship was not afforded any legal protection. No prevailing community interests have been put forward to justify the situation where the applicants’ relationship was devoid of any recognition and protection.
210. The Court considers that, in the present case, the Italian State could not reasonably disregard the situation of the applicants which corresponded to a family life within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention, without offering the applicants a means to safeguard their relationship. However, until recently, the national authorities failed to recognise that situation or provide any form of protection to the applicants’ union, as a result of the legal vacuum which existed in Italian law (in so far as it did not provide for any union capable of safeguarding the applicants’ relationship before 2016). It follows that the State failed to strike a fair balance between any competing interests in so far as they failed to ensure that the applicants had available a specific legal framework providing for the recognition and protection of their same-sex unions.
211. In the light of the foregoing, the Court considers that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention in that respect.
(b) Article 14
212. Having regard to its finding under Article 8, the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine whether, in this case, there has also been a violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 or 12.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
213. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
214. The applicants in applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, and 44057/12 claimed 10,000 euros (EUR) each, namely EUR 3,000 for the failure to register their marriage and EUR 7,000 for the lack of legal recognition of their relationship, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, as well as interest and tax on those amounts. They also request the Court to indicate measures under Article 46 for the purposes of redressing the structural problem in the law. The applicants in application no. 60088/12 claimed EUR 15,000 jointly in non-pecuniary damage.
215. The Government made no comment in respect of the applicants’ claims.
216. The Court notes that the situation in Italy has changed pending proceedings before this Court; thus there is no room for indicating any measures under Article 46. It, however, awards the applicants EUR 5,000 each in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
217. The applicants in applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, and 44057/12 also claimed EUR 13,862 (as per itemised bill of costs according to the relevant Italian law) plus interests for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court. The applicants in application no. 60088/12 claimed EUR 12,586.50 for professional fees calculated in line with the relevant Italian law in connection with proceedings before this Court, as well as an estimated EUR 2,500 for travel expenses.
218. The Government made no comment in respect of the applicants’ claims.
219. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award to the applicants in application no. 60088/12 the sum of EUR 9,000, jointly, and the applicants in applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, and 44057/12 the sum of EUR 10,000, jointly, for the proceedings before the Court.
C. Default interest
220. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares, by a majority, the applications admissible;

2. Holds, by 5 votes to 2, that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention;

3. Holds, unanimously, that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 14 in connection with Articles 8 and 12 of the Convention;

4. Holds, by 5 votes to 2,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros) each, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 9,000 (nine thousand euros), jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants in application no. 60088/12, in respect of costs and expenses;
(iii) EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros), jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants in applications nos. 26431/12, 26742/12, and 44057/12 in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points.

5. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 14 December 2017, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Abel Campos Kristina Pardalos
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following separate opinions are annexed to this judgment:
(a) concurring opinion of Judge Koskelo;
(b) dissenting opinion of Judges Pejchal and Wojtyczek.
K.P.
A.C.
?
APPENDIX
OMISSIS



CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE KOSKELO
1. Like the majority, I have voted in favour of finding a violation of Article 8 in this case. Regrettably, however, I am unable to subscribe to the reasoning adopted by the majority.
2. The present case raises two issues (see paragraph 3 of the judgment). The first issue is whether there has been a violation of Article 8 because of the refusal by the Italian authorities to register the applicants’ same-sex marriages contracted abroad (foreign same-sex marriages) as marriages for the purposes of Italian law.
3. The second issue is whether there has been a violation of Article 8 because until 5 June 2016, that is, the entry into force of Law no. 76/2016, the Italian legal order did not provide for a specific legal framework concerning civil unions/registered partnerships between persons of the same sex. Because of this lack of a legal framework, the applicants were also unable to have their foreign same-sex marriages registered as civil unions/registered partnerships.
4. As the Court’s case-law stands, the conclusions to be drawn on both issues are, in my opinion, quite straightforward.
The first issue: refusal to register foreign same-sex marriages as marriages
5. The registration of civil status, in the present context the registration of a marriage contracted abroad, is an act of recognition of that status for the purposes of the domestic legal order. In its judgment of 15 March 2012 (see paragraphs 61-62 of the present judgment), the Italian Court of Cassation found that foreign same-sex marriages could not be registered as marriages. In that judgment, the Court of Cassation carried out what appears to be a normal exercise in the application of private international law.
6. When a domestic legal order is faced with a question of recognition of a foreign status, the first step of the analysis is qualification. The qualification is about determining whether a foreign marriage is capable of being qualified as a marriage, that is, whether it falls within the scope of the domestic norms regulating the recognition of foreign marriages. Under the established principles of private international law, that qualification is subject to lex fori, which therefore determines whether a foreign marriage can be qualified as a marriage. In the present case, the Italian Court of Cassation has concluded that under Italian law a foreign same-sex marriage cannot be qualified as a marriage for the purposes of the norms of Italian law governing the recognition of foreign marriages. This means that, according to the domestic court, a foreign same-sex marriage could not be registered as marriage because such a marriage is incapable of producing the legal effects attaching to a marriage under the Italian legal order.
7. As far as the Convention is concerned, the established position under the Court’s case-law is that the Convention does not impose on the Contracting States any obligation to grant same-sex couples access to marriage. In Schalk and Kopf v. Austria (no. 30141/04, ECHR 2010), this conclusion was reached both in application of Article 12 and in application of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8.
8. On this basis, given that there is no Convention obligation incumbent on the Contracting Parties to allow same-sex marriage, it seems clear that the Convention cannot additionally impose on those Contracting States which do not provide for such marriages any obligation to recognize foreign same-sex marriages as marriages for the purposes of their own legal order. Consequently, the refusal by the Italian authorities to register the applicants’ same-sex marriages as marriages does not give rise to a violation of Article 8 of the Convention.
9. Although the Convention does not oblige a State such as Italy to register foreign same-sex marriages as marriages, with the consequence that such foreign marriages would be subject to all the legal effects attaching to marriage under Italian law, it cannot be excluded that there may be situations where the State’s obligations under Article 8 to respect private and family life, either alone or in conjunction with Article 14, may become engaged on the grounds of a failure to acknowledge the manifested stable and committed relationship between a couple, based, as the case may be on a foreign same-sex marriage. This, however, is a separate matter. It appears that the Constitutional Court of Italy has, as a matter of domestic constitutional law, expressed a similar position (see paragraph 75 of the present judgment). However, no particular circumstances or grievances of this nature are at issue before this Court on the basis of the present applications.
The second issue: refusal to provide any other kind of legal framework for same-sex unions
10. This issue was the subject of the Court’s judgment in the case of Oliari and Others v. Italy (nos. 18766/11 and 36030/11, 21 July 2015), where the Court addressed the situation prevailing under Italian law until 5 June 2016, namely that same-sex couples, who are unable to marry, were unable to have access to a specific legal framework (such as that for civil unions or registered partnerships) capable of providing them with the recognition of their status and guaranteeing to them certain rights relevant to a couple in a stable and committed relationship (see Oliari and Others, § 167). The Court found that Italy was in violation of Article 8 in that it had failed to ensure that the applicants had available a specific legal framework providing for recognition and protection for their same-sex unions, it being understood that it was not necessary for this to be in the form of allowing same-sex marriage (ibid., § 185).
11. Given the Court’s conclusion in Oliari and Others, it is clear that the applicants in the present case were, until the entry into force of the recent legislative amendments, victims of the same underlying failure by the Italian state as the applicants in Oliari and Others. This is so because, as far as the present applicants are concerned, the absence of a specific legal framework governing “civil unions” or “registered partnerships” between same-sex couples also had the effect that their foreign same-sex marriages could not be recognised in Italy in any form, that is, neither as marriages nor as “civil unions” or “registered partnerships”.
Conclusion
12. On the basis of the above, I conclude that there has been no violation of Article 8 of the Convention on account of the Italian authorities’ refusal to register the applicants’ foreign same-sex marriages as marriages for the purposes of Italian law.
13. By contrast, there has been a violation of Article 8 because, until the entry into force of Law no. 76/2016 and the associated legislative amendments, no specific legal framework was available in Italy providing for recognition and protection for same-sex unions and, as a result, the applicants’ foreign same-sex marriages could not be given recognition in Italy in any form.
The majority reasoning
14. The majority develop a reasoning which focuses on the refusal of registration to the same-sex couples and which, in my view, unnecessarily confuses the issues arising in the present case.
15. Initially, in the context of the question of admissibility, the judgment (by reference to Dadouch v. Malta, no. 38816/07, § 48, 20 July 2010) acknowledges that the registration of a marriage constitutes a recognition of legal civil status (see paragraph 144 of the present judgment). When addressing the merits of the case, however, the majority set out on a line of argument which blurs rather than clarifies the analysis.
16. In the majority judgment, the assessment of the complaints is opened by suggesting that the “refused registration of the applicants’ marriages, either as marriage or under any other form”, was a measure “depriving them of any legal protection or associated rights” (see paragraph 191). This is where the confusion begins. It is reiterated in paragraph 196, where the majority consider that what the Court must determine is whether the applicants’ rights under Article 8 were violated by “the refusals to register the applicants’ marriages in any form, with the result that they were left in a legal vacuum and devoid of any protection”.
17. It must be reiterated that the refusal to register the applicants’ marriages as marriages was due to the position under substantive Italian law, enshrined at the level of the Constitution, according to which marriage is restricted to persons of the opposite sex. As a corollary of this legal position, a foreign same-sex marriage is not capable of producing the same legal effects as a marriage under substantive Italian law. This in turn is the reason why the applicants’ foreign same-sex marriages were not recognized, and thus not registered, as marriages for the purposes of the Italian legal order.
18. Similarly, the refusal to register the applicants’ marriages “under any other form” was due to the position prevailing (until 2016) under substantive Italian law, according to which there was no specific legal framework for the recognition and protection of same-sex couples in the form of “civil unions” or “registered partnerships”.
19. Thus, it is not correct to suggest that what deprived the applicants, as couples living in stable same-sex unions, of “any legal protection” was the absence of registration. What deprived them of specific legal protection as couples was the absence of substantive legislation providing for a legal framework governing the union of same-sex couples, either as marriages or under another kind of status. In other words, the absence of registration was not the cause but the consequence of the substantive legal situation prevailing in Italy until the adoption of Law no. 76/2016 and related legislative measures.
20. It is worth adding that, as a matter of domestic constitutional law, the Italian Constitutional Court had already stated, prior to the enactment of Law no. 76/2016, that without prejudice to Parliament’s discretion, it could however intervene according to the principle of equality in specific situations related to a homosexual couple’s fundamental rights, where the same treatment between married couples and homosexual couples was called for. That court would in such cases assess the reasonableness of the measures (see paragraph 75 of the present judgment). Apparently the Constitutional Court did not consider that such contextual protection (prior to the new legislative framework) could or should have been dependent on any prior registration of the same-sex couples concerned. Even from this point of view, therefore, it is not correct to suggest that it is the absence of registration that has deprived the applicants of any protection to which they would otherwise be entitled under domestic law.
21. It is also important to note that as a matter of data protection law, State authorities are not allowed to proceed to the registration of personal data, such as those relating to the private or family relationships of individuals, unless there is a clear legal basis, with a pre-defined purpose, for such measures. These requirements are accentuated under EU law, to which Italy as Member State is subject, including requirements on data processing based on consent (Directive 95/46/EC; to be replaced as from 25 May 2018 by the General Data Protection Regulation (EU)2016/679). It would seem contradictory to envisage a positive obligation incumbent on the State to register people’s intimate relationships in the absence of specific legislation based on clearly defined and justified purposes.
22. For the applicant couples, what matters are the legal effects rather than any act of registration, irrespective of its legal significance. The suggestion that the State should be under a positive obligation derived from Article 8 to provide publicity to the applicants’ common project of life (see paragraph 150) – independently from an obligation to provide legal protection for their status as partners in a couple – appears rather bizarre. This is even more so in the light of current conditions, where individuals dispose of ample and easy possibilities to make public, without State assistance, any aspect of their private lives that they wish to share with others.
23. In the present judgment, the majority take, in my view, a superfluous and misguided detour around the issue of registration, before finally arriving at the conclusion that – indeed – the failure imputable to the respondent State consists, not in the refusal of registration, but in the failure to “ensure that the applicants had available a specific framework providing for the recognition and protection of their same-sex unions” (see paragraph 210 of the present judgment). In other words, the violation of Article 8 is basically the same as that found in the case of Oliari and Others v. Italy. Under this approach, the absence of registration as such does not raise a distinct issue in the present context.
24. With the legislative changes that have been introduced in Italy through Law no. 76/2016, these aspects of the matter will no longer be of any special importance in the respondent State. Similar issues will, however, arise in those Contracting States where the legislative situation remains similar to that previously prevailing in Italy. Therefore, I think it would have been helpful if the majority could have been persuaded to produce a judgment with a clearer and more analytically coherent reasoning.

DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES PEJCHAL AND WOJTYCZEK
1. We respectfully disagree with the view of our colleagues that there has been a violation of the Convention in the instant case. Our objections concern the methodology of treaty interpretation, the methodology for ascertaining whether Convention rights have been upheld and also the application of the relevant principles and rules of law in the instant case.
2. The Convention is an international treaty which must be expounded according to the rules of treaty interpretation established in international law and codified in the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties.
We note in this context that the Preamble to the Convention presents the Convention as one of the first steps for the collective enforcement of certain of the rights stated in the Universal Declaration. The Preamble refers also to further realisation of rights as one of the methods for the achievement of greater unity between the member States of the Council of Europe. It follows that the role of the Convention is the protection of a limited number of rights, defined therein. Further realisation of human rights must serve the purpose of achieving greater unity between the members of the Council of Europe and is to be undertaken by way of international treaties.
The mandate of the European Court of Human Rights is defined in Article 19 of the Convention in the following terms: to ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the High Contracting Parties in the Convention and the Protocols thereto. While the Court must interpret and clarify the provisions of the Convention in the context of the new cases that are brought before it, it is not mandated to change the scope of the engagements undertaken by the High Contracting Parties and in particular to adapt the Convention to societal changes. The Court should be the servant, not the master, of the Convention.
Moreover, the Preamble to the Convention refers to two tools for the maintenance of fundamental freedoms: effective political democracy and a common understanding and observance of human rights. Effective political democracy requires the existence and functioning of legislatures elected according to the standards set forth in Article 3 of Protocol No 1. In this context, the task of adapting the Convention to the evolution of the societies in European States belongs to the High Contracting Parties, and necessarily presupposes the participation of democratically elected legislatures. In our view, even identical societal developments in all the States Parties to the Convention cannot alter the scope of their engagements under the Convention. This applies a fortiori to societal changes which occur in only some European States. Changes which occur in some States can never affect the scope of the other States’ engagements.
3. The European Convention on Human Rights should not be read in a legal vacuum but placed in the context of the most important international human-rights instruments. The Preamble of the Convention refers to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which aims at securing the universal and effective recognition and observance of the Rights therein declared. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights sets out the following rights in Article 16:
“(1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.
(2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.
(3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.”
The minimum universally binding human rights standards have been set forth in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Article 23 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights has the following wording:
“1. The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.
2. The right of men and women of marriageable age to marry and to found a family shall be recognized.
3. No marriage shall be entered into without the free and full consent of the intending spouses.
4. States Parties to the present Covenant shall take appropriate steps to ensure equality of rights and responsibilities of spouses as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution. In the case of dissolution, provision shall be made for the necessary protection of any children.”
In both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights marriage is understood as a union between a man and a woman. Moreover, in both instruments the family – based upon marriage between a man and a woman – was declared the natural and fundamental group unit of society and as being entitled to protection by society and the State. Marriage is the only “legal framework” for family life mentioned in those documents.
The Human Rights Committee has expressed the following view concerning the meaning of Article 23 of the Covenant:
“Given the existence of a specific provision in the Covenant on the right to marriage, any claim that this right has been violated must be considered in the light of this provision. Article 23, paragraph 2, of the Covenant is the only substantive provision in the Covenant which defines a right by using the term “men and women”, rather than “every human being”, “everyone” and “all persons”. Use of the term “men and women”, rather than the general terms used elsewhere in Part III of the Covenant, has been consistently and uniformly understood as indicating that the treaty obligation of States parties stemming from article 23, paragraph 2, of the Covenant is to recognize as marriage only the union between a man and a woman wishing to marry each other.” (Communication No. 902/1999, Ms. Juliet Joslin et al. v. New Zealand, CCPR/C/75/D/902/1999, views adopted on 17 July 2002).
It follows that the two above-mentioned instruments differentiate the legal status of heterosexual and homosexual couples. There is no doubt that between heterosexual and homosexual couples there are certain similarities and certain differences. However, from the axiological perspective of the two international instruments, the differences prevail over the similarities. It follows that their situations are not comparable for the purpose of assessing the permissibility of legal differentiations in the field of family law.
4. Article 8 § 1 of the Convention states that “everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence”. Under Article 12 of the Convention, “men and women have the right to marry and to found a family, according to national laws governing the exercise of this right”. It transpires from those provisions that the family unit is founded primarily by a man and a woman through marriage.
The right to respect for one’s private and family life, home and correspondence presupposes an obligation on the State to refrain from interfering with the freedom of the right-holder. Positive action is required from the State primarily to ensure protection from interference by private parties and to impose sanctions for undue interference by public authorities or by private parties.
Much broader positive obligations on the State stem from Article 12, which imposes the obligation to recognise marriage as social and legal institution. Moreover, Article 5 of Protocol No. 7 requires that family law ensures equality between spouses. This last provision emphasises not only the rights but also the responsibilities of the spouses. Contracting a marriage entails not only rights and protection but also responsibilities and duties vis-à-vis the other spouse, children and society. Moreover, the Court’s case-law stresses the obligation to protect the best interests of children. Legislation on family law should therefore protect the best interests of children and, especially, ensure a stable family environment, free from State interference.
Article 8 of the Convention, as interpreted according to the applicable rules of treaty interpretation, does not impose upon the High Contracting Parties an obligation to provide for other legal institutions (such as civil unions) for the development of family life. In particular, there is no obligation to ensure that persons have available specific legal frameworks providing for the recognition and protection of their unions, be they from different sexes or same-sex. This matter belongs to the exclusive domestic jurisdiction of the High Contracting Parties.
The reasoning of the majority refers to the need for protection and recognition (see paragraph 192 of the judgment). There is no doubt that the State authorities in the exercise of their sovereign powers must take into consideration social realities and societal changes as well as the legitimate needs of their citizens. However, needs do not entail per se Convention rights. It is not clear which legitimate needs should entail positive obligations under Article 8 of the Convention. Under the approach proposed by the majority it would be necessary to establish objective criteria for identifying the needs entailing positive obligations for the States.
We agree with the view that under Articles 8 and 12 the States enjoy a broad margin of appreciation. In our view, however, it is not correct to state that they have a broad margin of appreciation when setting up legal frameworks for recognition of interpersonal unions other than marriage (within the meaning of Article 12). In reality, they preserve their complete freedom of action in this respect, since the issue falls outside Convention regulation.
5. Article 12 has been interpreted in many judgments and decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. The Court has expressed, in particular, the following views in this respect:
“In the Court’s opinion, the right to marry guaranteed by Article 12 ... refers to the traditional marriage between persons of opposite biological sex. This appears also from the wording of the Article which makes it clear that Article 12 ... is mainly concerned to protect marriage as the basis of the family” (Rees v. the United Kingdom, 17 October 1986, § 49, Series A no. 106).
“The Court recalls that the right to marry guaranteed by Article 12 refers to the traditional marriage between persons of opposite biological sex. This appears also from the wording of the Article which makes it clear that Article 12 is mainly concerned to protect marriage as the basis of the family. Furthermore, Article 12 lays down that the exercise of this right shall be subject to the national laws of the Contracting States. The limitations thereby introduced must not restrict or reduce the right in such a way or to such an extent that the very essence of the right is impaired. However, the legal impediment in the United Kingdom on the marriage of persons who are not of the opposite biological sex cannot be said to have an effect of this kind (see the above-mentioned Rees judgment, p. 19, §§ 49 and 50)” (Sheffield and Horsham v. the United Kingdom, 30 July 1998, § 66, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998 V)”
“... the Court observes that marriage has deep-rooted social and cultural connotations which may differ largely from one society to another. The Court reiterates that it must not rush to substitute its own judgment in place of that of the national authorities, who are best placed to assess and respond to the needs of society (see B. and L. v. the United Kingdom, cited above, § 36).” (Schalk and Kopf v. Austria, no. 30141/04, § 62, ECHR 2010).”
“The Court has accepted that the protection of the family in the traditional sense is, in principle, a weighty and legitimate reason which might justify a difference in treatment (see Karner, cited above, § 40, and Kozak, cited above, § 98)”( X and Others v. Austria [GC], no. 19010/07, § 138, ECHR 2013).”
More recently:
“The Court reiterates that Article 12 of the Convention is a lex specialis for the right to marry. It secures the fundamental right of a man and woman to marry and to found a family. Article 12 expressly provides for regulation of marriage by national law. It enshrines the traditional concept of marriage as being between a man and a woman (see Rees v. the United Kingdom, cited above, § 49). While it is true that some Contracting States have extended marriage to same-sex partners, Article 12 cannot be construed as imposing an obligation on the Contracting States to grant access to marriage to same-sex couples (see Schalk and Kopf v. Austria, cited above, § 63)” (Hämäläinen v. Finland [GC], no. 37359/09, § 96, ECHR 2014).”
We agree with those views, which have their basis in the Convention as expounded under the applicable rules of treaty interpretation. They are in harmony with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. We note furthermore that the Preamble to the Convention contains a reference to a common understanding of human rights and to a common heritage of political traditions, ideals, freedom and the rule of law. The understanding of marriage as a stable union of a man and a woman underlying family life is part of the common legal heritage.
6. In a number of cases the Court has also addressed the issue of the possible “extension” of marriage. In the instant case the majority expresses the following view in this respect: “The Court reiterates that States are still free, under Article 12 of the Convention as well as under Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8, to restrict access to marriage to different-sex couples (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, § 108, and Chapin and Charpentier, cited above, § 108)” (see paragraph 192 of the principal judgment).
In this context we note firstly that that the terms “to marry” and “marriage” have become polysemes. Marriage in its initial meaning presupposes the community of lives between a man and a woman. We note in this context the following definitions of marriage: “Nuptiae sunt coniunctio maris et feminae et consortium omnis vitae, divini et humani iuriscommunicatio” (Modestinus, Digesta Iustiniani 23.2.1); “Nuptiae autem sive matrimonium est viri et mulieris coniunctio, individuam consuetudinem vitae continens” (Institutiones Iustiniani, 1.10). The complementariness of the biological sexes of the two spouses is a constitutive element of marriage. Moreover, marriage in this meaning is - by definition - a social institution open to procreation. The fact that certain married couples may suffer from infertility does not affect its social function.
Marriage in its second meaning designates a union of two persons living together. The term “marriage” in this second sense has a different connotation and a different denotation to the term “marriage” as used in the first meaning. This second meaning has developed only recently.
Granting access to marriage within the meaning of Article 12 to same-sex couples is conceptually impossible. “Extending” the scope of the right to marry to homosexual couples presupposes that the term “marriage” is used in a different meaning (that is, the second meaning explained above). Thus, Article 12 cannot be applicable to same-sex couples wishing to marry or to same-sex couples who are already married under the domestic system of another State (see paragraph 145 in fine). The “extension” of the scope of marriage to homosexual couples not only affects the denotation but also substantially changes the connotation of the term “marriage”.
Secondly, the majority states that “States are still free...” (emphasis added). This suggests the Court intends to revise this view in the future. We strongly disagree with such an approach, which presupposes that the scope of treaty obligations may be adapted by the Court on the basis of societal changes and - what is more - that those societal changes can and will develop in only one direction. The Court has no mandate to favour or inhibit societal changes. The States remain free to decide on different issues under the Convention until such time as this treaty has been modified by the masters of the treaty.
7. The majority notes a rapid development towards legal “recognition” of same-sex couples (see paragraph 204 of the judgment) as well as the lack of consensus regarding the registration of same-sex marriages contracted abroad (see paragraph 205 of the judgment). We note that marriage is constitutionally defined as a union between a man and a woman in a growing number of European States: Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Serbia, Slovakia and Ukraine.
8. The majority considers that the facts of the present application fall within the notion of private life as well as family life within the meaning of Article 8 (see paragraph 143 of the judgment) and draws the conclusion that these Articles apply in the present case. In our view this assertion is based upon a fundamental methodological error.
That certain facts of a case fall within the meaning of private or family life does not in itself mean that Articles 8 or 12 are applicable. A Convention provision protecting a human right is applicable in certain circumstances if it offers at least a prima facie protection against the alleged interference with this right. What matters here are not the factual circumstances presented by an applicant, but the grievances raised in the application. This may be illustrated by the following fictitious example. A couple who wish to marry travel by plane to the place of the marriage ceremony, but their flight is delayed. Such facts may prima facie fall within the scope of private and family life for the purpose of Article 8. This does not, however, mean that Articles 8 or 12 are applicable if the grievance raised concerns the compensation claims in respect of the delay, since Articles 8 and 12 do not protect couples who wish to marry from such inconveniences.
The majority has expressed the following view in paragraph 145: “Since the Court has already held Article 12 to be applicable to a same sex-couple wishing to marry, the provision must also be applicable to same-sex couples who are already married under the domestic system of another State”.
We note in this respect that the premise referred to in this sentence is false: it is not correct to state that in Chapin and Charpentier v. France, (no. 40183/07, 9 June 2016) the Court also considered that Article 12 applied to the applicants, a same-sex couple seeking to marry (see § 31 of that judgment). In that case, the Court considered that Article 12 applied to the specific grievance raised by the applicants for the purpose of assessing that grievance from the viewpoint of that provision. Whether Article 12 is applicable to couples who are already married under the domestic system of another State depends upon the grievance they raise. If, for instance, a married couple complains that their home has been unlawfully expropriated, Article 12 does not apply, in that it does not protect against expropriation.
The methodological fallacy identified above may lead to the application of a provision to grievances that fall beyond the scope of negative or positive prima facie obligations under that provision. It also gives the false impression that State obligations that might arise in a new case have already been established in a previous case. In order to answer the question whether a provision protecting a human right applies it is necessary to have previously established, with sufficient precision, the scope of the State obligations stemming from the relevant provision.
9. The majority expresses the following views in the present judgment:
“197. While the essential object of Article 8 is to protect the individual against arbitrary action by the public authorities, there may in addition be positive obligations inherent in effective ‘respect’ for family life. However, the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under this provision do not lend themselves to precise definition. The applicable principles are, nonetheless, similar. In both contexts regard must be had to the fair balance that has to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole; and in both contexts the State enjoys a certain margin of appreciation (see Jeunesse v. the Netherlands [GC], no. 12738/10, § 106, 3 October 2014, and Wagner and J.M.W.L. v. Luxembourg, no. 76240/01, § 118, 28 June 2007).
198. The Court does not consider it necessary to decide whether it would be more appropriate to analyse the case as one concerning a positive or a negative obligation since it is of the view that the core issue in the present case is precisely whether a fair balance was struck between the competing interests involved (see, mutatis mutandis, Dickson v. the United Kingdom, no. 44362/04, § 71, 18 April 2006).”
We do not agree with the view that the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 8 do not lend themselves to precise definition. Although in many cases numerous State actions and omissions of different types are entangled, there is, in our view, a clear distinction between the obligation to act and the obligation to refrain from acting. The methodology to be followed in respect of the two types of obligations is different. If the State acts in a domain protected from State interference, it must demonstrate that this interference serves a legitimate aim and is really necessary to achieve this aim. It must also show that the interference has a basis in domestic law. If a State refrains from acting or acts without due diligence, the question whether the interference has a basis in domestic law does not arise, but it is necessary to verify whether there is an obligation to act at all and to establish the meaning and scope of any such obligation. It must also be shown that an obligation to act may be inferred from specific provisions of the Convention under the applicable rules of treaty interpretation. The meaning of the obligation imposed upon the States has to be established with the necessary precision. The Court may establish a violation of a positive obligation to act only if it previously identifies the scope and meaning of this obligation and shows that it stems from the provisions of the Convention. It may also verify whether domestic legislation contains the necessary provisions empowering public authorities to act as required under the Convention,
The present case clearly concerns the existence and scope of an obligation on State authorities to act. However, the majority has not established with sufficient precision the meaning and the scope of the legal rule which has been allegedly infringed by the domestic authorities. The scope of State obligations to act under Article 8 remains completely unclear.
10. The majority also expresses the following views in the present judgment:
“201. Indeed, the crux of the case at hand is precisely that the applicants’ position was not provided for in domestic law, specifically the fact that the applicants could not have their relationship - be it a de facto union or a de jure union recognised under the law of a foreign state – recognised and protected in Italy under any form.”
“201. The Court considers that, in the present case, the Italian State could not reasonably disregard the situation of the applicants which corresponded to a family life within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention, without offering the applicants a means to safeguard their relationship. However, until recently, the national authorities failed to recognise that situation or provide any form of protection to the applicants’ union, as a result of the legal vacuum which existed in Italian law (in so far as it did not provide for any union capable of safeguarding the applicants’ relationship before 2016). It follows that the State failed to strike a fair balance between any competing interests in so far as they failed to ensure that the applicants had available a specific legal framework providing for the recognition and protection of their same-sex unions”.
We observe in this respect that any couple, be they heterosexual or homosexual, have the means to preserve their relationship without any assistance from the State. The ability to live a happy life as a couple does not depend on any positive action by the State authorities but on the absence of State interference. We note - en passant - that in Italy as in other European States a growing number of heterosexual couples decide freely neither to marry nor to enter into a civil union and find their situation fully satisfactory. They assert their right to live their family lives outside any legal framework provided by legislation. Whatever the available legal frameworks, there will necessarily be substantial groups of persons who consider that those frameworks do not fit their needs.
We note, furthermore, that the terms “recognition” and “protection” are vague and ambiguous. It is not clear which concrete measures are required to ensure recognition and protection, nor is it easy to identify the inconveniences against which protection is required. In any event, a marriage or a civil union are not the only possible forms of recognition or protection. The States authorities can recognise cohabiting couples by taking their needs into consideration and can ensure them protection by refraining from undue interference and by granting certain positive rights. In this context, we note that it is not correct to state that the national authorities failed to recognise or to protect same-sex couples. All cohabiting couples were recognised in many Italian laws and could benefit from various rights. For instance, all cohabiting couples are recognised in tax law and the tax regime applicable to cohabiting couples is aligned with the tax regime applicable to married couples (as a result of Constitutional Court judgment no. 179/1976). Similarly, housing legislation protects a partner in the event of the other partner’s death or where a couple separate (as a result of Constitutional Court judgment no. 559/1989). It has not been shown in the instant case that the protection afforded to the applicant couples has been insufficient.
11. The present judgment relies on the judgment in the case of Oliari and Others v. Italy (nos. 18766/11 and 36030/11, 21 July 2015). In that case, the Court held that “in Italy the need to recognise and protect such relationships has been given a high profile by the highest judicial authorities, including the Constitutional Court and the Court of Cassation. ... In such cases, the Constitutional Court, notably and repeatedly called for a juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties of homosexual unions ..., a measure which could only be put in place by Parliament” (Oliari, § 180).
The Court also considered that “this repetitive failure of legislators to take account of Constitutional Court pronouncements or the recommendations therein relating to consistency with the Constitution over a significant period of time, potentially undermines the responsibilities of the judiciary...” (Oliari, § 184).
Furthermore, Judge Mahoney in his concurring opinion to that judgment, joined by Judges Tsotsoria and Vehabovi?, considered it decisive the fact that the Italian State had chosen, through its highest courts, notably the Constitutional Court, to declare that two people of the same sex living in stable cohabitation are invested by the Italian Constitution with a fundamental right to obtain juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties attaching to their union.
In our assessment the approach adopted in the Oliari v. Italy judgment, and in the concurring opinion thereto, is mistaken. The Italian Constitutional Court expressed its views in the reasoning, not in the operative part of its decisions. The dicta cannot be considered binding upon the Italian Parliament. Such a situation cannot be compared to the failure to execute an obligation imposed by a judgment of a constitutional court in its operative part, which is binding upon the State authorities.
12. We note the following inconsistency in the judgment. In paragraph 200 the majority identifies the prevention of disorder as the value underlying the authorities’ attitude. On other hand, the majority do not see any prevailing interest put forward to justify the situation created by the authorities’ attitude (see paragraph 209 of the judgment). The weight of the conflicting values at stake has not been assessed.
13. For the reasons explained above, the applications should have been declared inadmissible as manifestly ill-founded. Moreover, in our view the applicants can no longer claim to have victim status, in that their unions have been finally registered as civil unions under Italian law or can be registered as such if they so request. Furthermore, certain applicants (the authors of applications nos. 3 and 5) do not reside in Italy. In principle, positive obligations on the States do not apply to persons residing abroad. It is not clear how their civil status under Italian law can affect the quality of their life abroad. The question whether these applicants remain within the jurisdiction of Italy within the meaning of Article 1 has not been addressed.
14. To sum up: in our view the majority have departed from the applicable rules of Convention interpretation and have imposed positive obligations which do not stem from this treaty. Such an adaptation of the Convention comes within the exclusive powers of the High Contracting Parties. We can only agree with the principle: “no social transformation without representation”.

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni
Violazione dell’ Articolo 8 - Diritto per rispettare per la vita privata e famigliare (Articolo 8-1 - Riguardo per la vita di famiglia)
Danno non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non -patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)



PRIMA LA SEZIONE






CAUSA ORLANDI ED ALTRI C. ITALIA

(Richieste N. 26431/12; 26742/12; 44057/12 e 60088/12)










SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

14 dicembre 2017




Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Orlandi ed Altri c. l'Italia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Kristina Pardalos, Presidente
Guido Raimondi,
Aleš Pejchal,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Jovan Ilievski, giudici
ed Abel Campos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 12 settembre e 14 novembre 2017,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata sulla data scorso-menzionata:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in quattro richieste (N. 26431/12, 26742/12 44057/12 e 60088/12) contro la Repubblica italiana depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con undici cittadini italiani ed un cittadino canadese, OMISSIS
2. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 60088/12 furono rappresentati con OMISSIS; i richiedenti rimanenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS tutti gli avvocati che praticano in Italia. Il Governo italiano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Ersiliagrazia Spatafora.
3. I richiedenti addussero che le autorità il rifiuto di ' per registrare i loro matrimoni contratti all'estero, e più generalmente l'impossibilità di ottenere riconoscimento legale di relazione loro, in finora come la struttura legale italiana non lasci spazio a matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso né sé preveda per qualsiasi l'altro tipo di unione che potrebbe darli riconoscimento legale, violò i loro diritti sotto Articoli 8, 12 e 14.
4. 3 dicembre 2013 la Camera alla quale fu assegnata la causa decise che le azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 8 da solo ed Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articoli 8 e 12 sarebbero comunicati al Governo. Decise inoltre di congiungere le cause. Nello stesso giorno decise di accordare l'anonimia a due dei richiedenti in richiesta n. 26431/12 sotto Articolo 47 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
5. Osservazioni scritto furono ricevute anche congiuntamente da FIDH, Centre di AIRE, ILGA-Europa, ECSOL, UFTDU ed UDU, così come dall'Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti, il Fondamento di Helsinki per Diritti umani Alleanza che Difende la Libertà, ed ECLJ (Centre europeo per Legge e la Giustizia) che era stato dato permesso per intervenire col Vicepresidente della Camera (l'Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione). Il Sig. Pavel Parfentev in favore di sette NGOS russi (Famiglia e Fondamento di Demografia, Per Famiglia Diritti Mosca Genitori Comitato Urbano, Santo-Petersburg Genitori Comitato Urbano, Genitori Comitato di Volgodonsk la Carità Urbana, Regionale il Centre di Cultura di Organizzazione Genitore Sociale “Svetlitsa”, ed organizzazione sociale “il mnogodetki di Peterburgskie”) e tre NGOS ucraini (il Comitato Parentale di Ucraina, il Comitato Parentale ed Ortodosso, e la Nazione della Salute dell'organizzazione sociale), era stato dato anche permesso per intervenire col Vicepresidente della Camera. Comunque, nessuno osservazione è stato ricevuto con la Corte.
6. 15 dicembre 2016 il Presidente della Sezione al quale la causa fu assegnata richiese i richiedenti, sotto Decida 54 § 2 (un) degli Articoli di Corte, presentare informazioni che riguarda i fatti.
7. Con lettere di 29 dicembre 2016, il 2017 e 7 aprile 2017 di 30 gennaio, i richiedenti in richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12 che 44057/12 hanno presentato la loro replica che fu spedita al Governo per informazioni.
8. La richiesta spedì ai richiedenti il rappresentante legale di ' in richiesta n. 60088/12, così come una lettera susseguente, ritornata alla Corte giacente.
9. Con una lettera di 24 giugno 2017 il Governo presentò un aggiornamento che riguarda i fatti che fu trasmesso ai richiedenti per informazioni.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
10. I richiedenti i dettagli di ' possono essere trovati nell'Annetta.
A. Lo sfondo alla causa
1. Il Sig.ra Francesca Orlandi ed il Sig.ra Elisabetta Mortagna
11. Questi due richiedenti si incontrarono a febbraio 2007, e nel 2009 loro entrarono l'un con l'altro in una relazione stabile ed impegnata.
12. Sul 2009 OMISSIS di 11 ottobre si trasferì a Toronto, Ontario, Canada per fini di lavoro. Un mese più tardi i due richiedenti decisero di sposarsi e 27 agosto 2010 che loro si sono sposati in Toronto.
13. Nel frattempo, 2 aprile 2010, il Sig.ra M. ' lavoro di s finì e di conseguenza lei non fu concessa più ad un permesso di soggiorno. Lei ritornò perciò in Italia e da allora poi sta coabitando con OMISSIS.
14. 18 aprile 2011 la loro coabitazione fisica fu registrata e da allora poi loro sono stati considerati come un'unità di famiglia per fini statistici.
15. 9 settembre 2011 i due richiedenti chiesero al Consolato italiano in Toronto per trasmettere allo Status Ufficio Civile in Italia i documenti attinenti per i fini di registrazione del loro matrimonio.
16. 8 novembre 2011 i documenti attinenti furono trasferiti.
17. 13 dicembre 2011 il Comune di Ferrara informò i due richiedenti che non era possibile registrare il loro matrimonio. La decisione notò che l'ordine legale italiano non concedè matrimonio fra stesso-sesso accoppia, e che benché la legge non specificò che coppie dovevano essere del sesso opposto, dottrina e la giurisprudenza aveva stabilito che Articolo 29 della Costituzione si riferì al concetto tradizionale di matrimonio, capito come essendo un matrimonio fra persone del sesso opposto. Così, i consorti che sono di sesso diverso erano un elemento essenziale per qualificare per matrimonio. Inoltre, secondo Circolare n. 2 26 marzo 2001 del Ministero di Affari Interni, un matrimonio contrasse all'estero fra persone dello stesso sesso, uno di chi era italiano, non poteva essere registrato finora in come sé era contrario alle norme di ordine pubblico.
2. Il Sig. D.P. ed il Sig. G.P.
18. Questi due richiedenti che vivono in Italia si incontrarono nel 2007 ed entrarono l'un con l'altro in una relazione stabile ed impegnata.
19. 9 gennaio 2008 loro cominciarono a coabitare in G.P. ' appartamento di s, benché D.P. residenza formale e sostenuta nel suo proprio appartamento. In 2009 G.P. acquistato una seconda proprietà che, nell'assenza di qualsiasi riconoscimento legale, per ragioni pratiche e fiscali rimaste solamente nel suo nome. In 2010 G.P. acquistato, per un mandato nel nome di D.P (per i fini di acquistare simile proprietà), un garage. A giugno 2011 la coppia passò a D.P. ' appartamento di s e stabilito la loro casa là. Loro sono stati considerati da allora come un'unità di famiglia per fini statistici.
20. 16 agosto 2011 i due richiedenti si sposarono in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 10 ottobre 2011 loro aprirono un conto bancario unito. Di fronte ad un notaio, i due richiedenti nominarono reciprocamente l'un l'altro come guardiani nell'evento di incapacitation 12 gennaio 2012, (sostegno di di di amministratore).
21. Seguendo i richiedenti ' richiede, il Consolato italiano in Toronto trasmise allo Status Ufficio Civile in Italia i documenti attinenti per i fini di registrazione del loro matrimonio 7 gennaio 2012.
22. 20 gennaio 2012, il Comune di Peschiera Borromeo informò i due richiedenti che non era possibile registrare il loro matrimonio. La decisione notò che l'ordine legale italiano non concedè matrimonio fra coppie di stesso-sesso. Inoltre, secondo Circolare n. 2 26 marzo 2001 del Ministero di Affari Interni, un matrimonio contrasse all'estero fra persone dello stesso sesso, uno di chi era italiano, non poteva essere registrato finora in come sé era contrario alle norme di ordine pubblico.
23. Seguendo l'entrata in vigore della legge nuova (veda paragrafo 97 sotto), 12 settembre 2016 i due richiedenti richiesero che il loro matrimonio sia trascritto come un'unione civile. Secondo i richiedenti le osservazioni di ' di 30 gennaio 2017 la loro richiesta ancora era pendente e nessuna replica era stata ricevuta ancora.
24. Secondo documenti 31 marzo 2017 presentato a questa Corte in giugno 2017, col Governo datò i richiedenti che il matrimonio di ' è stato trascritto come un'unione civile 21 novembre 2016. Una certificazione di questa registrazione, presentata col Governo è datata 16 maggio 2017.
3. OMISSIS
25. I due richiedenti si incontrarono in Italia nel 2002 ed entrarono l'un con l'altro in una relazione stabile ed impegnata. OMISSIS che è canadese non aveva un permesso di soggiorno in Italia al tempo, OMISSIS perciò il travelled ripetutamente a Canada.
26. 18 luglio 2005 la coppia si sposò in Vancouver, Canada. Di stesso anno il Sig. Isita designò il Sig. Bray come il suo erede. Nel 2007 il Sig. Isita andò in pensione e si trasferì permanentemente a Canada, benché lui mantenesse residenza formale in Italia.
27. Nel 2004 i due richiedenti avevano acquistato insieme della terra; nel 2007 la coppia acquistò un ulteriore appezzamento di terreno, e nel 2008 loro acquistarono un alloggio e nel 2009 una proprietà commerciale con un cottage annesso. Nel 2009 loro aprirono anche un conto bancario unito.
28. 10 ottobre 2011 loro chiesero allo Status Ufficio Civile di registrare il loro matrimonio contratto in Canada.
29. 25 novembre 2011 il Comune di Napoli informò i due richiedenti che nessuno simile registrazione era possibile. La decisione notò che l'ordine legale italiano non concedè matrimonio fra stesso-sesso accoppia siccome reiterato in Circolare n. 55 di 2007 emessi col Ministero di Affari Interni.
30. Guida seguente dal Sindaco di Napoli, dirigendo lo Status Ufficio Civile del comune per registrare simile matrimoni (veda sotto), OMISSIS re-presentò una richiesta per avere il loro matrimonio registrato. Secondo informazioni spedite ai richiedenti con e-mail, la loro richiesta fu accordata 6 agosto 2014. Comunque, inoltre alla circolare emessa 7 ottobre 2014 col Ministero di Affari Interni (veda paragrafo 89 sotto) la registrazione fu annullata su una data non specificata.
31. Su una data non specificata, seguendo l'entrata in vigore della legge nuova, i due richiedenti richiesero che il loro matrimonio sia trascritto come un'unione civile. Secondo i richiedenti le osservazioni di ' di 30 gennaio 2017 la loro richiesta ancora era pendente e nessuna replica era stata ricevuta ancora.
32. Secondo documenti non datati presentati a questa Corte in giugno 2017, col Governo i richiedenti che il matrimonio di ' è stato trascritto come un'unione civile 27 ottobre 2016. Una certificazione di questa registrazione, presentata col Governo è datata 29 marzo 2017.
4. OMISSIS
33. Questi due richiedenti si incontrarono ad ottobre 1995, ed un mese più tardi entrò l'un con l'altro in una relazione stabile ed impegnata.
34. Nel 1996 OMISSIS acquistò un alloggio a Roma, l'Italia ed in primavera 1998 che i due richiedenti hanno avviato coabitare là. Là loro stabilirono la loro residenza comune.
35. Nel 1998 i due richiedenti celebrarono simbolicamente la loro unione di fronte ai loro amici e famiglia. Nel 2001 OMISSIS concedè accesso limitato al suo conto bancario in favore di OMISSIS. Nel 2005 i due richiedenti redassero volontà che nominano l'un l'altro come l'un l'altro eredi.
36. 9 settembre 2008 i due richiedenti si sposarono in Berkeley, California.
37. Nel 2009 i richiedenti acquistarono insieme proprietà ed aprirono un conto bancario unito.
38. Seguendo la loro richiesta dello stesso giorno, 29 settembre 2011 il Comune di Roma informò i richiedenti che la registrazione del loro matrimonio non era possibile, come sé era contrario alle norme di ordine pubblico.
39. 1 ottobre 2011 la coppia registrò una dichiarazione con la Roma “la Cancelleria di unioni civili” all'effetto che loro stavano entrando in un'unione civile e stavano costituendo una coppia de facto. Alla dichiarazione è data credito con le autorità attinenti, ma ha valore solamente simbolico (veda diritto nazionale attinente e pratichi sotto).
40. Guida seguente dal Sindaco di Roma che dirige lo Status Ufficio Civile del comune per registrare simile matrimoni (veda sotto), sul 2014 OMISSIS re di 15 ottobre una richiesta presentò avere il loro matrimonio registrato. La loro richiesta fu accordata anche ed il matrimonio fu registrato. Comunque, inoltre alla circolare emessa 7 ottobre 2014 col Ministero di Affari Interni (veda paragrafo 89 sotto) con una decisione del Prefetto di Roma di 31 ottobre 2014 la registrazione summenzionata fu annullata.
41. 23 novembre 2016, seguendo l'entrata in vigore della legge nuova e la loro richiesta a che effetto, i richiedenti che il matrimonio di ' è stato trascritto come un'unione civile.
5. OMISSIS
42. Questi due richiedenti si incontrarono a luglio 1993 ed immediatamente entrarono l'un con l'altro in una relazione impegnata e stabile. Alcuni settimane più tardi OMISSIS si mosse in con OMISSIS in La Spezia, Italia.
43. Nel 1997 la coppia si trasferì a Milano, Italia.
44. Nel 1998 OMISSIS si trasferì a Germania per fini di lavoro, mentre mantenendo una relazione interurbana col Sig. Dal Molin; comunque loro incontrarono ogni settimana.
45. Nel 1998 OMISSIS acquistò una proprietà a Milano con assistenza finanziaria da OMISSIS.
46. Nel 2000 OMISSIS ritornò in Italia; la coppia si trasferì ad OMISSIS e continuò coabitare.
47. Nel 2007 OMISSIS si trasferì ai Paesi Bassi, di nuovo per fini di lavoro sostenendo comunque, una relazione interurbana con visite settimanali e regolari ad Italia.
48. Dopo essere stato in una relazione per quindici anni, 12 luglio 2008 che la coppia si è sposata ad Amsterdam, i Paesi Bassi. A novembre 2008 la coppia aprì un conto bancario unito.
49. In 2009 OMISSIS eft il suo lavoro in Italia e si trasferì ai Paesi Bassi. Siccome lui era inutilizzato, lui era totalmente dipendente sul suo consorte. OMISSIS sostenne anche finanziariamente la madre del Sig. D.M, una vittima della malattia di Alzheimer. Loro sono sotto un sistema di separazione di appezzamenti di terreno; comunque, i loro conti sono in nomi di giuntura e le loro volontà indichi l'un l'altro come eredi.
50. 28 ottobre 2011 i richiedenti richiesero il Generale Consolato ad Amsterdam per trasmettere ai rispettivi Status Uffici Civili in Italia i documenti attinenti per i fini di registrazione del loro matrimonio.
51. 29 novembre 2011 il Comune di Mediglia informò i richiedenti che la registrazione del loro matrimonio non era possibile, come sé era contrario alle norme di ordine pubblico. Nessuna replica fu ricevuta dal Comune di Milano.
52. Seguendo la decisione che guida col Sindaco di Milano, menzionato sopra, i richiedenti re-presentarono anche una richiesta per avere il loro matrimonio registrato. Secondo le informazioni previste coi richiedenti 30 gennaio 2017, il loro matrimonio non fu registrato mai.
53. Comunque, 4 ottobre 2016, seguendo l'entrata in vigore della legge nuova e la loro richiesta a che effetto, i richiedenti che il matrimonio di ' è stato trascritto come un'unione civile.
6. OMISSIS
54. I due richiedenti si sposarono in Il Hague 1 giugno 2002.
55. 12 marzo 2004, i richiedenti che sono residente in Latina, Italia loro richiesero lo Status Ufficio Civile per registrare il loro matrimonio contratto all'estero.
56. 11 agosto 2004 la loro richiesta fu respinta in conformità col consiglio del Ministero di Affari Interni di 28 febbraio 2004. La decisione notò che l'ordine legale italiano non previde per la possibilità di due cittadini italiani dello stesso sesso matrimonio contraente; questo era un contrario di questione ad ordine pubblico interno.
57. 19 aprile 2005 i richiedenti depositarono procedimenti di fronte al Tribunale competente di Latina, mentre richiedendo la registrazione del loro matrimonio nella luce di DPR 396/2000 (veda diritto nazionale attinente sotto).
58. Con una decisione di 10 giugno 2005 il Tribunale di Latina respinse i richiedenti la rivendicazione di '. Notò che la registrazione del matrimonio non era possibile, perché se tale matrimonio fosse stato contratto in Italia sé non sarebbe stato considerato valido secondo lo stato corrente della legge, come sé adempiere il requisito più di base andò a vuoto che di avere una donna ed un maschio. In qualsiasi l'evento, il matrimonio contratto coi richiedenti non aveva finora conseguenza nell'ordine legale italiano in come un matrimonio fra due persone dello stesso sesso, benché contrasse validamente all'estero, corse cassa ad ordine pubblico internazionale. Effettivamente matrimonio di stesso-sesso era in contrasto con la storia dell'Italia, tradizione e la cultura, ed il fatto che europea Unione così poca (EU) paesi avevano previsto simile legislazione andò a mostrare che non era in linea coi principi comuni di diritto internazionale.
59. Un ricorso coi richiedenti fu respinto con una decisione della Corte d'appello di Roma, registrata nella cancelleria attinente 13 luglio 2006. La Corte d'appello notò che simile registrazione non potesse avere luogo, determinato che il loro matrimonio mancò uno del requisites essenziale a corrispondere all'istituzione di matrimonio nell'ordine nazionale, vale a dire i consorti che sono di sessi diversi.
60. 17 luglio 2007 i due richiedenti fecero appello alla Corte di Cassazione. In particolare loro accentuarono, inter alia che ordine pubblico ha assegnato ad in Articolo 18 di Legge n. 218/95, dovevano per essere interpretati come ordine pubblico internazionale ordine pubblico non cittadino e doveva così essere stabilito se matrimonio di stesso-sesso era contro che ordine, nella luce di strumenti internazionali.
61. Con una sentenza di 15 marzo 2012 (n. 4184/12) la Corte di Cassazione respinse il ricorso ed inveterato la sentenza precedente. Notando la causa-legge della Corte in Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria, (n. 30141/04, ECHR 2010) ammise che un matrimonio contrasse all'estero con due persone dello stesso sesso era davvero esistente e valido, comunque, non poteva essere registrato finora in Italia in come sé non poteva dare aumento a qualsiasi conseguenza legale.
62. La Corte di Cassazione si riferì alla sua causa-legge, all'effetto che matrimoni civili contrassero all'estero con cittadini italiani aveva la validità immediata nell'ordine legale italiano come un risultato del Codice civile e legge privata ed internazionale. Questo sarebbe così in finora come il matrimonio era stato contratto in conformità con le leggi dello stato estero nelle quali era stato contratto, e che i requisiti effettivi ed attinenti che concernono status civile e la veste di sposarsi (secondo legge italiana) si sostenne, irrispettoso di qualsiasi inosservanza di regolamentazioni italiane riguardo all'uscita del banns o la registrazione susseguente. I precedenti erano solamente soggetti a sanzioni amministrative ed il secondo non era contribuente di qualsiasi effetti legali-poiché registrazione aveva il significato mero di dare pubblicità ad un atto o atto che erano già validi sulla base del località regit actum principio. Così, aveva il matrimonio stato contratto con persone del sesso opposto, nell'assenza di qualsiasi gli altri requisiti fondamentali sarebbe stato valido e contribuente di effetti legali nell'ordine legale italiano. In che causa lo Status Ufficiale Civile non avrebbe scelta ma registrare il matrimonio. Comunque, la causa-legge aveva mostrato che il sesso opposto dei consorti era il requisito più indispensabile per il “l'esistenza” di un matrimonio come un atto giuridicamente attinente, irrispettoso del fatto che questo non fu affermato dovunque esplicitamente nelle leggi attinenti. Così, l'assenza di tale requisito mise in oggetto non solo la validità del matrimonio, ma la sua esistenza effettiva, volendo dire che non sarebbe contribuente a qualsiasi effetti legali (come opposto ad una nullità). Seguì che secondo la legge ordinaria della terra, due consorti di stesso-sesso avevano, nessuno diritto avere il loro matrimonio contratto all'estero registrato.
63. La Corte di Cassazione considerò che il rifiuto detto non poteva essere basato sulla base che tale matrimonio ha funzionato cassa ad ordine pubblico (siccome dettato con le circolari attinenti), ma che il rifiuto era semplicemente una conseguenza del fatto che non poteva essere riconosciuto come un matrimonio nell'ordine legale italiano.
64. La Corte di Cassazione seguì a notare che la realtà sociale era cambiata, ancora l'ordine italiano non aveva accordato stesso-sesso accoppia il diritto per sposarsi siccome concluso nella Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 358/10 (quale citò estensivamente). Effettivamente la questione se concedere matrimonio di stesso-sesso o no, o la registrazione al riguardo, non era una questione della legge di EU, sé che è lasciato a regolamentazione con Parlamento. L'ordine legale italiano fu reso anche comunque, su di Articolo 12 della Convenzione siccome interpretato con la Corte europea di Diritti umani in Schalk e Kopf (citò sopra); in che causa che la Corte ha considerato che la differenza di sesso di consorti era irrilevante, giuridicamente, per i fini di matrimonio. Seguì che, irrispettoso del fatto che era una questione per essere dato con con le autorità nazionali, non potrebbe essere più un requisito indispensabile per il “l'esistenza” di matrimonio. Inoltre, la Corte di Cassazione notò che persone dello stesso sesso che vive insieme in una relazione stabile avevano diritto a rispettare per loro privato e la vita di famiglia sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione; perciò, anche se loro non avevano diritto a sposarsi o registrare un validamente matrimonio contratto vivere liberamente con lo status inviolabile di una coppia, loro potrebbero portare all'estero, azioni di fronte alle corti attinenti per chiedere, nelle specifiche situazioni riferite a diritti essenziali loro nell'esercizio del diritto trattamento col quale era uniforme quel riconobbe con legge a coppie sposate.
65. In conclusione, la Corte di Cassazione trovata, che i rivendicatori avevano nessuno diritto registrare il loro matrimonio. Questo così non era comunque, perché il matrimonio non faceva “esista” o era “nullo” ma a causa della sua incapacità per produrre (come un atto di matrimonio) qualsiasi effetto legale nell'ordine italiano.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE E PRATICA
A. diritto internazionale Privato
66. Legge n. 218 di 31 maggio 1995 riguardo alla riforma del sistema italiano di diritto internazionale privato, in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
Articolo 16
“i) legge Estera non si farà domanda se i suoi effetti sono contrari ad ordine pubblico.
ii) In simile cause, un'altra legge farà domanda, nella conformità con l'altro criterio che connette previsto in relazione allo stesso argomento. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi simile criterio che connette, legge italiana farà domanda.”
Articolo 17
“Le disposizioni seguenti sono senza pregiudizio alla generalità di leggi italiane che in prospettiva del loro oggetto e sfera saranno fatte domanda nonostante riferimento alla legge estera.”
Articolo 18
“Certificati legali rilasciati all'estero non saranno registrati in Italia se loro sono contro ordine pubblico.”
Articolo 27
“Veste di entrare in matrimonio e le altre condizioni costretta ad entrare in matrimonio è regolata con la legge nazionale di ogni consorte al tempo del matrimonio, questo senza pregiudizio allo status non sposato (stato libero) di qualsiasi dei consorti, ottenne come un risultato di una sentenza italiana o uno che sono stati riconosciuti in Italia.”
Articolo 28
“Un matrimonio è valido, in relazione per formare, se è considerato come simile con la legge del paese dove è celebrato o con la legge nazionale di almeno uno dei consorti al tempo del matrimonio o con la legge dello stato comune di residenza al tempo del matrimonio.”
Articolo 29
“i) relazioni Personali fra consorti sono regolate con la legge nazionale comune a sia le parti.
ii) relazioni Personali fra consorti a che hanno nazionalità diverse o molte nazionalità comuni sia è regolato con la legge dello stato dove la loro vita matrimoniale è passata soprattutto.”
Articolo 65
“Documenti esteri riguardo allo status di individui e l'esistenza di relazioni di famiglia sono riconosciuti sotto legge italiana se è rilasciato con autorità pubblica dello Stato la cui legge è riconosciuta con la legge presente... a meno che quelli documenti violano l'ordine pubblico...”
B. Il Codice civile
67. Titolo che VI del primo Libro del Codice civile tratta con matrimonio, e è diviso in sei capitoli (quali sono divisi di nuovo in sezioni). Capitolo che III tratta con la celebrazione di un matrimonio civile. I suoi Articoli 115 e 130, in finora come attinente, legga siccome segue:
Articolo 115
“Un cittadino è soggetto alle disposizioni di sezione uno [le condizioni per contrarre matrimonio] di questo Capitolo anche quando matrimonio contraente in un stato estero secondo la forma applicabile in stato così estero...”
Articolo 130
“Nessuno è concesso per chiedere il titolo di consorte e le conseguenze legali di matrimonio a meno che una copia autenticata della celebrazione siccome registrato nei registri di famiglia è presentato.”
Articolo 131
“Una realtà che riguarda i fatti che riflette il riconoscimento con società di un status civile che è in conformità all'atto di matrimonio sanzioni qualsiasi disertano di forma presente nell'atto di matrimonio.”
68. Le altre disposizioni pertinenti del Codice civile lessero, in finora come attinente, siccome segue:
Articolo 167
“Ognuno o ambo i consorti possono con atto pubblico, o un naturale terza persona può con vuole dire di una volontà, crea un finanziamento di patrimonial per le necessità della famiglia, mentre assegnando proprietà selezionata, beni immobili o gli altri beni che sono registrati nei registri italiani ed ufficiali, od obbligazioni.”
Articolo 230 bis
“1. Nell'assenza di vincoli contrattuali, membri di famiglia che funzionano permanentemente per gli affari di famiglia sono concessi a mantenimento, agli incrementi finanziari degli affari ed ad una quota negli affari, secondo il tipo e standard di lavoro.
3. La nozione di membro di famiglia include: il consorte, parenti all'interno del di terzo grado e parente acquisito all'interno del di secondo grado. Un affari di famiglia è un affari in che il consorte, parenti all'interno del di terzo grado e parente acquisito all'interno del di secondo grado, lavoro.”
Articolo 408
“... Un guardiano nell'evento dell'incapacità può essere scelto con la persona interessata, con vuole dire di un atto pubblico o un atto privato ed autenticato.”
Articolo 540
“Il coniuge superstite è concesso alla metà dell'appezzamento di terreno intero del defunto, soggetto alle disposizioni di Articolo 542 se là sta scampando figli.
Irrispettoso di se c'è qualsiasi fratelli o genitori del defunto, il coniuge superstite è dato un titolo a vivere nell'alloggio di famiglia ed usare la sua mobilia, se è la loro proprietà comune o solamente appartiene al defunto.”
Articolo 1321
“Un contratto è un accordo fra due o più parti con l'intenzione per stabilire, regoli o estingua una relazione di patrimonial fra loro.”
Articolo 1372
“Obblighi che sorgono da contratti hanno il vigore di legge fra le parti contraenti... Loro non hanno effetti su terze parti a meno che così purché con legge.”
C. Decree n. 396/2000
69. Registrazione di status civile acquisita all'estero è offerta per col Decreto del Presidente della Repubblica n. 396 3 novembre 2000 concederono “Regolamentazione della revisione e la semplificazione dell'ordine legale di status civile facendo seguito ad Articolo 2 (12) di Legge n. 127 di 15 maggio 1997” (DPR 396/2000). Il suo Articolo 16, riguardo a matrimoni contratti all'estero legge siccome segue:
“Quando entrambi gli i consorti sono cittadini italiani o uno è un cittadino italiano e l'altro un straniero, un matrimonio può essere contratto all'estero di fronte alle autorità diplomatiche o consolare e competenti o di fronte alle autorità locali a norma di legge del posto. Nella causa seconda una copia dell'atto di matrimonio sarà depositata col diplomatico ed autorità consolare.”
70. Articolo 17 riferisce alla trasmissione dell'atto, e secondo Articolo 18 atti contratti all'estero non possono essere registrati se loro sono contrari ad ordine pubblico.
71. Per i fini di guida sulla richiesta di DPR 396/2000 il Ministero di Affari Interni emise le varie circolari. Circolare n. 2 26 marzo 2001 del Ministero di Affari Interni espressamente purché che un matrimonio fra due persone dello stesso sesso, contrasse all'estero, non può essere registrato finora nella Status Cancelleria Civile in come sé è contrario alle norme di ordine pubblico. Similmente, Circolare n. 55 18 ottobre 2007 purché che l'ordine legale italiano non concede matrimonio di omosessuale, ed una richiesta per registrazione di tale matrimonio contratta all'estero deve essere rifiutata, sé che è considerato contrario all'ordine pubblico interno. Queste circolari sono vincolanti per l'Ufficiale per Status Civile che è competente per accertare che ai requisites di legge sono adempiuti per i fini di registrazione.
72. Nella registrazione di matrimonio di ordine legale italiana non produca qualsiasi effetti legali ed ulteriori (non costitutiva di natura di ha); notifica il fine di riconoscimento nel dominio pubblico (significato certificativo, dichiarativa di efficacia) in finora come sé dà pubblicità ad un atto o atto che sono già validi sulla base del località regit actum principio (l'articolo che prevede che, quando un'operazione legale che si attiene con le formalità richiese con la legge del paese dove è eseguito è anche valido nel paese dove sarà dato effetto).
D. la giurisprudenza Nazionale
1. Matrimonio (ed unioni civili)
73. Estratti da sentenze attinenti lette siccome segue:
Decisione di 3 aprile 2009 del Tribunale di Venezia
“La differenza di sesso costituisce un requisito indispensabile indispensabile, fondamentale a matrimonio, a tale misura che l'ipotesi opposta, vale a dire che di persone dello stesso sesso, è giuridicamente inesistente e certamente estraneo alla definizione di matrimonio, almeno nella luce della struttura legale e corrente.”
Decisione di Corte d'appello di Roma di 13 luglio 2006 e decisione di Tribunale di Treviso di 19 maggio 2010
“[Matrimonio fra due persone dello stesso sesso] non può essere registrato nella Status Cancelleria Civile italiana perché non adempie uno del requisites essenziale necessario per matrimonio nell'ordine interno, vale a dire la differenza di sesso dei consorti.”
Sentenza di Corte costituzionale n. 138/2010
74. La Corte Costituzionale italiana nella sua sentenza n. 138 15 aprile 2010 dichiarato inammissibile la richiesta costituzionale (presentò con persone in una situazione simile a quelli dei richiedenti) ad Articoli 93, 96, 98, 107 108, 143 143 bis e 231 del Codice civile italiano, come sé fu diretto all'ottenimento di norme supplementari non previsto per con la Costituzione (il diretta ad ottenere una pronnunzia additiva non costituzionalmente obbligata). La causa si era stata riferita a sé con le corti ordinarie nell'ambito di una procedura che impugna il rifiuto delle autorità per emettere banns del matrimonio per i rivendicatori matrimonio di stesso-sesso di '.
75. La Corte Costituzionale considerò Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana che previde che la Repubblica riconosce e garantisce i diritti inviolabili della persona, come un individuo ed in gruppi sociali dove la personalità è espressa, così come i doveri della solidarietà politica, economica e sociale contro che non c'era derogazione. Notò che col sociale di gruppo capire qualsiasi forma della comunità, semplice o complesso intese di abilitare ed incoraggiare lo sviluppo gratis aveva di qualsiasi individuale con vuole dire di relazioni. Tale nozione incluse unioni di omosessuale, capì come una coabitazione stabile di due persone dello stesso sesso che ha un diritto essenziale per esprimere liberamente la loro personalità in una coppia mentre ottenne-in tempo e coi mezzi e limiti per essere esposto con legge-un riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri. Comunque, questo riconoscimento che necessariamente richiede regolamentazione legale e generale mirò ad esponendo fuori i diritti ed i doveri dei partner in una coppia, potrebbe essere realizzato separatamente negli altri modi dall'istituzione di matrimonio fra omosessuali. Siccome mostrato coi sistemi diversi in Europa, la questione del tipo di riconoscimento fu lasciata a regolamentazione con Parlamento, nell'esercizio della sua piena discrezione. Ciononostante, la Corte Costituzionale chiarificò che senza pregiudizio alla discrezione di Parlamento, potesse intervenire comunque secondo il principio dell'uguaglianza nelle specifiche situazioni riferite ai diritti essenziali di una coppia di omosessuale, dove lo stesso trattamento fra coppie sposate e coppie di omosessuale fu richiesto. La corte può in simile cause valuti la ragionevolezza delle misure.
76. Seguì a considerare che era vero che i concetti di famiglia e matrimonio non potevano essere considerati “cristallizzò” in riferimento al momento quando la Costituzione entrò in vigore, determinato che principi costituzionali devono essere interpretati che porta in mente i cambi nell'ordine legale e l'evoluzione di società e le sue dogane. Ciononostante, tale interpretazione non poteva essere prolungata al punto dove colpisce la molta essenza di norme legali, mentre li cambia in tale modo come includere fenomeni e problemi che non erano stati considerati in qualsiasi il modo quando fu decretato. Infatti sembrò dal lavoro preparatorio alla Costituzione che la questione di unioni di omosessuale non aveva a tutti stato dibattuto con la riunione, nonostante il fatto che l'omosessualità non era ignota. Nel redigere Articolo 29 della Costituzione, la riunione aveva discusso un'istituzione con una forma precisa ed una disciplina articolata previde per col Codice civile. Così, nell'assenza di qualsiasi simile riferimento, era inevitabile per concludere che che che era stato considerato era la nozione di matrimonio come definito nel Codice civile che entrò in vigore nel 1942 e quale al tempo, ed ancora oggi, stabilito che consorti dovevano essere del sesso opposto. Perciò, il significato di questo precetto costituzionale non poteva essere alterato con un'interpretazione creativa. In conseguenza, la norma costituzionale non prolungò ad unioni di omosessuale, e fu inteso di riferirsi a matrimonio nel suo senso tradizionale.
77. Infine, la corte considerò che, in riguardo di Articolo 3 della Costituzione riguardo al principio dell'uguaglianza, la legislazione attinente non creò una discriminazione irragionevole, determinato che unioni di omosessuale non potevano essere considerate equivalenti a matrimonio. Anche Articolo 12 della Convenzione europea su Diritti umani ed Articolo 9 dello Statuto di Diritti essenziali non richiese la piena uguaglianza fra unioni di omosessuale e matrimoni fra un uomo ed una donna, come questo una questione della discrezione Parlamentare era essere regolata con legge nazionale, siccome attestato con gli approcci diversi che esistono in Europa.
78. Similmente, la Corte Costituzionale italiana, nelle sue sentenze N. 276/2010 7 luglio 2010 registrarono nella cancelleria 22 luglio 2010, e 4/2011 16 dicembre 2010 registrarono nella cancelleria 5 gennaio 2011, rivendicazioni manifestamente mal-fondate e dichiarate che gli articoli summenzionati del Codice civile (in finora siccome loro non concederono matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso) non era in conformità ad Articolo 2 della Costituzione. La Corte Costituzionale reiterò che riconoscimento giuridico di unioni di omosessuale non richiese un'unione uguale a matrimonio, siccome mostrato con gli approcci diversi si impegnati in paesi diversi, e che sotto Articolo 2 della Costituzione era per il Parlamento, nell'esercizio della sua discrezione regolare ed approvvigionare garantiscono e riconoscimento a simile unioni.
79. Generalmente, la giurisprudenza nazionale finché 2012 sembrarono indicare che l'impossibilità di registrare un matrimonio di omosessuale contrasse all'estero era un risultato del fatto che non poteva essere considerato un matrimonio. Comunque, questa linea della giurisprudenza fu messa da parte nella Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184/12 (nella causa dei richiedenti) riguardo al rifiuto di registrazione di matrimoni di stesso-sesso contratto all'estero, ed un ulteriore sviluppo accadde nel 2014, siccome segue:
Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184/2012
80. Veda divide in paragrafi 61-65 sopra
Sentenza del Tribunale di Grosseto di 3 aprile 2014
81. Nella sentenza menzionata, consegnò con un giudice di prima istanza, si contenne che il rifiuto per registrare un matrimonio estero era illegale. La corte ordinò così l'autorità pubblica e competente per procedere con la sua registrazione. Mentre l'ordine era eseguito, la causa fu piaciuta contro con lo Stato. Con una sentenza di 19 settembre 2014 la Corte d'appello di Firenze, mentre avendo scoperto un errore procedurale, annullò la decisione di primo-istanza e rinviò la causa al Tribunale di Grosseto. Con una decisione di primo-istanza di 2 febbraio 2015 il Tribunale di Grosseto ordinò di nuovo l'autorità pubblica e competente per procedere con la sua registrazione.
Procedimenti che conducono alla Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 2487/2017
82. Su una data non specificata un certo GLD e RLH (una coppia di stesso-sesso, uno di chi era un cittadino italiano) aveva richiesto il loro matrimonio contratto in Francia per essere registrata nello Status Ufficio Civile del comune attinente. Comunque, il sindaco attinente aveva rifiutato la loro richiesta. La coppia avviò procedimenti contro tale decisione, ma era senza successo di fronte al primo-istanza Tribunale di Avellino.
83. Con decreto n. 1156, registrati nella cancelleria attinente 8 luglio 2015 che la Corte d'appello di Milano trovata in favore dei rivendicatori. Riferendosi alle sentenze della Corte di Cassazione N. 4148 di 2012 e 8097 di 2015, la Corte d'appello considerò che poiché il matrimonio era stato contratto validamente in Francia, non poteva essere indebolito a causa di una mossa ad Italia che sarebbe discriminatorio e comporterebbe una violazione di Articolo 12 della Convenzione, così come una violazione del diritto per liberare movimento sotto legge di Unione europea. La Corte d'appello notò che la questione fu regolata con Articolo 19 di decreto legislativo n. 396/2000 riguardo a registrazione di matrimoni contratta all'estero, determinato che Articolo 28 di Legge n. 218/1995 purché che un matrimonio era valido in riguardo di forma se è considerato così in conformità con le leggi del paese dove fu contratto. Reiterò il principio contro il quale lo stesso sesso della coppia non va (non limite di un di costitusice) l'ordine pubblico, sia sé cittadino o internazionale.
84. La sentenza divenne definitivo 15 luglio 2016 determinato che la Corte di Cassazione nella sua sentenza n. 2487/2017 31 gennaio 2017 fondarono che i ricorsi non erano stati depositati secondo le procedure attinenti.
2. Altra causa-legge attinente
Sentenza del Tribunale di Reggio Emilia di 13 febbraio 2012
85. In una causa di fronte al Tribunale di Reggio Emilia [a primo-istanza], i rivendicatori (una coppia di stesso-sesso) non aveva richiesto il tribunale per riconoscere il loro matrimonio entrato in in Spagna, ma riconoscere il loro diritto alla vita di famiglia in Italia, sulla base che loro sono stati riferiti. Il Tribunale di Reggio Emilia, con vuole dire di un'ordinanza di 13 febbraio 2012, nella luce dei che indica la direzione di EU e la loro trasposizione in legge italiana così come l'EU Charter di Diritti essenziali, considerato che tale matrimonio era valido per i fini di ottenere un permesso di soggiorno in Italia.
Sentenza di Corte costituzionale n. 170/14 11 giugno 2014
86. Sentenza n. 170/14 della Corte Costituzionale trovarono una violazione della Costituzione, come un risultato della conclusione giuridicamente obbligatoria di un matrimonio e l'impossibilità dei partner in che causa (chi era successo riassegnamento di genere seguente di uno dei partner partner di stesso-sesso) ottenere un riconoscimento alternativo della loro unione. In che causa che la Corte Costituzionale ha lasciato anche alla legislatura il compito di decretare urgentemente un'altra forma della coabitazione registrata, uno che proteggerebbe i diritti della coppia ed obblighi.
Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 8097/2015
87. Nella luce delle sentenze della sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 170/14 11 giugno 2014, la Corte di Cassazione sostenne che era necessario per sostenere in vigore i diritti ed obblighi che concernono al matrimonio (dopo che uno dei consorti aveva cambiato sesso) finché il legislatore previde per un'alternativa vuole dire di riconoscimento.
Sentenza della Corte di Cassazione n. 2400/15
88. In una causa riguardo al rifiuto la Corte di Cassazione, nella sua sentenza di 9 febbraio 2015 respinse i rivendicatori la richiesta di ' per emettere proibizioni di matrimonio ad una stessa coppia di sesso che aveva richiesto così. Avendo considerato la recente causa-legge nazionale ed internazionale, concluse che - mentre le stesse coppie di sesso dovevano essere proteggute sotto Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana e che era per il legislatore per intentare causa per assicurare riconoscimento dell'unione fra simile coppie - l'assenza di stesso sesso-matrimonio non era incompatibile col sistema nazionale ed internazionale applicabile di diritti umani. Di conseguenza, la mancanza di stesso sesso-matrimonio non poteva corrispondere a trattamento discriminatorio, come il problema nell'ordinamento giuridico corrente girato circa il fatto che non c'era separatamente altra unione disponibile da matrimonio, sia sé per eterosessuale o coppie di omosessuale. Comunque, notò che la corte non potesse stabilire tramite questioni di giurisprudenza che andarono oltre la sua competenza.
E. Il recente progresso di registrazioni di matrimonio
89. Decisioni seguenti di alcuni sindaci (incluso i sindaci di Bologna, Napoli, Roma e Milano) registrare gli stessi matrimoni di sesso contratti validamente all'estero, con una circolare emessa 7 ottobre 2014 col Ministero di Affari Interni rivolse ai Prefetti della Repubblica, i Commissari Statali delle Province di Bolzano e Trento ed il Presidente del Governo Regionale di Val D'Aosta, l'istruzione seguente fu emessa:
“Dove sindaci hanno emesso che indica la direzione riguardo alla registrazione di matrimoni di stesso-sesso emessa all'estero, e nell'evento che questi che indica la direzione sono stati eseguiti, Lei è richiesto di invitare formalmente simile sindaci a ritirare simile che indica la direzione ed annullare qualsiasi simile registrazioni che già hanno preso effetto. Allo stesso tempo Lei dovrebbe avvertirli che nell'assenza di qualsiasi azione da parte loro gli atti colpiti illegittimamente saranno annullati ex officio nella conformità con le disposizioni di Articolo 21 nonies di Legge n. 241 di 1990 ed Articolo 54 (3) e (11) di decreto 267/2001 legislativo.”
90. Con una sentenza di primo-istanza n. 3907 12 febbraio 2015 registrarono nella cancelleria attinente 9 marzo 2015, il Tribunale Amministrativo di Roma, Lazio che reitera che là esistè nessuno diritto avere registrato gli stessi matrimoni di sesso contratti all'estero (e confermando perciò la legittimità del contenuto della circolare di 7 ottobre 2014), ciononostante dichiarò l'ordine sopra di 7 ottobre 2004 privo di valore legale. Avendo esaminato la struttura legale ed attinente, considerò che l'Autorità Amministrativa e Centrale e Prefetti non erano competenti per ordinare l'annullamento di qualsiasi simile registrazioni, simile competenza che è riservata solamente alle autorità giudiziali.
91. Questa decisione fu rovesciata su ricorso con la Corte amministrativa Suprema nella sua sentenza di 8 ottobre 2015, registrata nella cancelleria attinente 26 ottobre 2015.
92. La corte notò che Articolo 27 e 28 di Legge n. 218 di 31 maggio 1995 purché che le condizioni soggettive per la validità di un matrimonio saranno regolate con la legge nazionale di ogni consorte per essere, e che un matrimonio è valido, in riguardo della sua forma, se si considera che sia valido a norma di legge del posto, dove è stato celebrato o la legge nazionale di almeno uno dei consorti. Articolo 115 del Codice civile sottopose esplicitamente inoltre, cittadini italiani alle leggi civili ed attinenti in relazione alle condizioni necessario contrarre matrimonio, anche se il matrimonio è contratto all'estero. Una lettura combinata di quelle richieste di disposizioni l'identificazione dei requisiti effettivi ed obbligatori (particolarmente, lo status e veste del consorte-a-sia) quali permetterebbero a tale matrimonio di produrre i suoi effetti legali ed ordinari nell'ordine legale e nazionale. La differenza in sesso dei consorti per essere era la prima condizione per la validità di un matrimonio secondo gli articoli attinenti del codice civile, ed in linea col lungo culturale e tradizione legale dell'istituzione di matrimonio. Seguì che matrimonio di stesso-sesso era privo di uno degli elementi essenziali che l'abilitano per produrre qualsiasi effetto legale nell'ordine legale italiano.
In conseguenza, un ufficiale Statale cui il dovere è assicurare (prima di registrare un matrimonio) che a tutti i formali e requisiti effettivi sono stati adempiuti, non sarebbe capace di registrare un matrimonio di stesso-sesso contratto all'estero finora in come sé non adempia il requisito di avere un “marito e moglie” come richiesto con legge (sezione 64 di Legge n. 396/2000). Per questa ragione tale matrimonio non poteva essere registrato, mentre presumerlo anche non era contro ordine pubblico.
Piuttosto separatamente da questa incapacità che sorge dall'ordine legale italiano ed ordinario, appellandosi sulle sentenze di corte costituzionali ed attinenti (N. 138 di 2010 e n. 170 di 2014) la corte fondò che né poteva qualsiasi obbligo sia derivato dalla costituzione o strumenti internazionali ai quali Italia era una parte. Né poteva la recente sentenza di ECtHR in Oliari ed Altri c. l'Italia (N. 18766/11 e 36030/11, 21 luglio 2015) sostituisca gli ostacoli creati con Articolo 29 della Costituzione siccome interpretato con le corti nazionali. Effettivamente che sentenza aveva trovato solamente per il bisogno di introdurre una struttura legale ed attinente per la protezione di unioni di stesso-sesso, e reiterò che l'introduzione di matrimonio di stesso-sesso era una questione per essere lasciata allo Stato. Le stesse conclusioni dovevano essere giunte anche a collegamento coi diritti alla libertà di circolazione e residenza siccome capito nella legislazione di EU attinente, in finora come il riconoscimento di stessi sesso-matrimoni celebrato all'estero incorra fuori della sfera della legislazione di EU. Seguì che nell'assenza di un diritto a matrimonio di stesso-sesso, i secondi non potevano essere comparati a matrimonio eterosessuale. Effettivamente, ammettendo la registrazione di matrimoni di stesso-sesso ottenuta all'estero, irrispettoso dell'assenza di legislazione a quell'effetto, intenderebbe sostituendo la scelta del parlamento nazionale.
In relazione alla nullità dell'ordine di 7 ottobre 2014, notò, che il sindaco era subordinato al Ministro e, in circostanze come il presente il Prefetto aveva il potere in linea con le norme attinenti, ex officio per annullare qualsiasi misure illegittime prese col sindaco. Effettivamente il potere del giudice ordinario per cancellare simile registrazioni rischiate creare l'incertezza su tale questione delicata, a causa dell'indipendenza di tale corpo e la possibilità di decisioni contraddittorie. Seguì che il ricorso fu sostenuto e la decisione di primo-istanza annullò.
93. In più o meno lo stesso tempo, procedimenti simili stavano su-andando in collegamento col Sindaco della decisione di Milano di 9 ottobre 2014 per registrare un matrimonio di stesso-sesso ottenuto all'estero e la circolare di 7 ottobre 2014 (invitando i sindaci ad annullare simile registrazioni), e l'annullamento susseguente, ex l'officio, di simile registrazioni con vuole dire di un decreto di 4 novembre 2014 così come le ulteriori annotazioni resero 11 febbraio 2015 che è il risultato del decreto secondo.
94. Con una sentenza di primo-istanza n. 20137 di 2015, il Tribunale Amministrativo di Lombardia trovarono in favore del sindaco ed annullarono i susseguenti contestarono atti (ma non la circolare di 7 ottobre 2014). Considerò che nei suoi poteri direttivi un Prefetto può emettere ordini o che indica la direzione nell'ambito del funzionare dello Status Ufficio Civile. Comunque, il Prefetto non può emettere un atto di annullamento nel contesto di registrazioni di matrimoni di stesso-sesso ottenuto all'estero, determinato che le leggi applicabili danno il potere per rettificare o annullare solamente matrimoni erroneamente-registrati alle autorità giudiziali ed ordinarie.
95. Con vuole dire di una sentenza n. 05048/16 della Corte amministrativa Suprema, pubblicò 1 dicembre 2016, la decisione di primo-istanza di annullare gli atti contestati fu confermata sulla base di un ragionamento diverso. Avendo analizzato tutte le leggi attinenti e la giurisprudenza, la Corte amministrativa Suprema fondò che nessuna legge aveva attribuito al Ministro per affari Interni (o il Prefetto) il potere di annullare atti compiuto con sindaci per registrare matrimoni. Effettivamente simile potere fu attribuito al Governo nella sua composizione collegiale. Inoltre, non era per la corte per determinare durante simile procedimenti se le decisioni dei sindaci di registrare simile matrimoni erano legittime o non.
96. Un set di procedimenti simili riguardo alle registrazioni rese col Sindaco di Udine stava su-andando anche allo stesso tempo, e fu deciso in favore del sindaco in una sentenza di primo-istanza n. 228 di 2015 del Tribunale Amministrativo di Friuli Venezia Giulia che annullò gli atti contestati. La sentenza fu confermata su ricorso con vuole dire di una sentenza n. 05047/16 della Corte amministrativa Suprema pubblicarono 1 dicembre 2016 sulla base del ragionamento assegnata a nel paragrafo precedente.
F. unioni Civili
97. Di Legge n. 76 di 20 maggio 2016, in seguito “la Legge n. 76/2016”, concedè “Regolamentazione di unioni civili fra persone dello stesso sesso e gli articoli relativo alla coabitazione”, il legislatore italiano previde per unioni civili in Italia. La legislazione seconda entrò in vigore 5 giugno 2016.
98. La stessa legislazione, in particolare il suo Articolo 28 (un) e (b), previde che entro sei mesi dalla sua entrata in vigore, il Governo italiano fu delegato per adottare decreti legislativi che prevedono per la modifica di leggi attinenti che concernono diritto internazionale privato per prevedere per l'applicabilità di stesso-sesso unioni civili come previsti in legge italiana, a persone che hanno contratto matrimonio, unione civile o qualsiasi l'altra unione corrispondente all'estero.
99. Con decreto n. 144 del Presidente del Consiglio di Ministri di 23 luglio 2016 che entrò in vigore 29 luglio 2016 disposizioni transitorie furono adottate durante i decreti legislativi ed attinenti menzionati sopra di (sotto Articolo 28). In particolare, fu offerto che matrimoni o unioni civili contrassero all'estero sarà registrato per gli uffici consolati.
100. Sul 2017 tre decreti legislativi di 19 gennaio (N. 5, 6 e 7 19 gennaio 2017) fu adottato in linea coi requisiti sopra e 27 febbraio 2017 i decreti relativi che lasciano spazio all'entrata in vigore di simile misure così come cambi legislativi alle altre leggi attinenti furono adottati col Ministero per l'Interno.
101. Sino a diritto nazionale poi italiano non preveda per qualsiasi unione alternativa a matrimonio, o per coppie di omosessuale o per uni eterosessuali. I precedenti non avevano così nessuno mezzi di riconoscimento (veda anche Oliari ed Altri, citato sopra, § 43, riguardo ad un rapporto di 2013 preparato con Professore F. Gallo (poi Presidente della Corte Costituzionale)).
102. Ciononostante, delle città avevano stabilito registri di “unioni civili” fra persone non sposate dello stesso sesso o di sessi diversi: fra altri le città di Empoli, Pisa, Milano, Firenze e Napoli sono. Comunque, la registrazione di “unioni civili” di coppie non sposate in simile registri un valore soltanto simbolico ha.
Accordi di Coabitazione di G. prima di Legge n. 76/2016
103. Di fronte all'adozione di Legge n. 76/2016, accordi di coabitazione non furono offerti specificamente per in legge italiana.
104. Protezione di coabitare coppie più uxorio era stata derivata da Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana, siccome interpretato nelle varie sentenze di corte durante il corso degli anni (posto 1988). Nei più recenti anni (2012 onwards) sentenze nazionali avevano considerato coabitare anche stesso-sesso accoppia come meritando simile protezione.
105. Con effetto da 2 dicembre 2013 era stato possibile entrare in per riempire la lacuna nella legge scritto “accordi di coabitazione”, vale a dire un atto privato che non aveva una forma specificata previsto con legge, e quale può essere entrato in coabitando persone, sia loro in una relazione parentale, partner, amici, i semplici flatmates o carers, ma non con coppie sposate. Simile contratti regolarono principalmente gli aspetti finanziari di vivere insieme, cessazione della coabitazione ed assistenza nell'evento di malattia o l'incapacità.
III. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE E PRATICA
106. Il Consiglio attinente dei materiali di Europa può essere trovato in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 56-61).
IV. UNIONE LEGGE EUROPEA
107. La legge di Unione europea ed attinente può essere trovata in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 62-64).
108. Di particolare interesse Direttiva 2004/38/EC del Parlamento europeo è e del Consiglio di 29 aprile 2004 sul diritto di cittadini dell'Unione ed i loro membri di famiglia per muoversi e risiedere liberamente all'interno del territorio del Membro Stati. Il suo Articolo 2 contiene la definizione seguente:
“Membro di Famiglia di ‘che ' vuole dire:
(un) il consorte
(b) il partner con chi il cittadino di Unione ha contratto un'associazione registrata, sulla base della legislazione di un Stato membro se la legislazione delle feste di Stato membro di oste avesse registrato associazioni come equivalente a matrimonio in conformità con le condizioni posate in giù nella legislazione attinente del cameriere Stato membro.
(il c) i discendenti diretti che sono sotto l'età di 21 o sono persone a carico e quelli del consorte o partner come definito in punto (b)
(d) il parente diretto e dipendente nella linea ascendente e quelli del consorte o partner come definito in punto (b);”
109. Secondo la Commissione europea «Comunicazione dalla Commissione al Parlamento europeo ed il Consiglio su guida per la migliore trasposizione e la richiesta di Direttiva 2004/38/EC sul diritto di cittadini dell'Unione ed i loro membri di famiglia per muoversi e risiedere liberamente all'interno del territorio del Membro Stati» COM(2009) 313 definitivo (il pg. 4):
“Matrimoni contratti validamente in qualsiasi parte del mondo devono essere in principio riconosciuto per il fine della richiesta del Direttiva.
Forzati matrimoni, in quale o ambo le parti si sposano senza suo o il suo beneplacito o contro suo o la sua volontà, non è protegguto con internazionale o legge di Comunità. ...
Membro Stati non sono obbligati a riconoscere matrimoni poligami, contratto legalmente in un terzo paese che può essere in conflitto col loro proprio ordine legale. ...
Il Direttiva deve essere fatto domanda in conformità col principio di non-discriminazione custodito in particolare in Articolo 21 dell'EU Charter.”
C. IL DIRITTO COMPARATO
Consiglio di A. del membro di Europa gli Stati
110. Il materiale di diritto comparato disponibile alla Corte sull'introduzione di forme ufficiali di associazione non-maritale all'interno degli ordinamenti giuridici di Consiglio dell'Europa (CoE) il membro gli show di Stati che quindici paesi (Belgio, Danimarca, Finlandia, Francia, Germania, Islanda, Irlanda, Lussemburgo, Malta, i Paesi Bassi, Norvegia, Portogallo, Spagna, Svezia ed il Regno Unito) riconosca matrimonio di stesso-sesso.
111. Diciannove membro gli Stati (Andorra, Austria Belgio, Cipro Croatia, la Repubblica ceca Estonia, Francia Grecia, Ungheria l'Italia (come da 2016), Liechtenstein, Lussemburgo, Malta, i Paesi Bassi, Slovenia, Spagna, Svizzera ed il Regno Unito) autorizzi della forma di associazione civile per stesso-sesso accoppia (da solo o inoltre matrimonio). Nelle certe cause tale unione può conferire il pieno set di diritti ed i doveri applicabile all'istituto di matrimonio, e così è uguale a matrimonio in tutto ma chiama, come per esempio in Malta. Portogallo non ha una forma ufficiale di unione civile. Ciononostante, la legge riconosce unioni civili e de facto che hanno effetto automatico e non costringono la coppia a prendere qualsiasi passi formali per riconoscimento. Danimarca, Finlandia, Germania, Norvegia, Svezia, Irlanda e l'Islanda prevedevano per associazione registrata nella causa di unioni di stesso-sesso, questo fu abolito in favore di matrimonio di stesso-sesso comunque.
112. Segue che datare (2017) ventisetti paesi fuori dei quaranta sette stati membro di CoE già ha decretato legislazione che permette lo stesso sesso accoppia avere la loro relazione riconosciuto come un matrimonio legale o come una forma di unione civile o associazione registrata.
113. Secondo informazioni disponibile alla Corte (luglio 2015 datato), riguardo alla pratica di ventisette membro Stati che non facevano al tempo prevedono per stesso sesso-matrimonio (Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bosnia e Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, la Repubblica ceca Estonia, Finlandia Germania, Grecia Irlanda, Lituania la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente di Macedonia, Malta, Moldavia, Monaco, Montenegro, Polonia, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia, Svizzera, Turchia e l'Ucraina), riguardo alla registrazione di matrimoni di stesso-sesso contratta all'estero, la situazione seguente emerge,: tutti di questi il membro Stati, con l'eccezione dell'Andorra il Malta, così come l'Estonia (seguendo una corte che decide di 2016), rifiuti di concedere stesso-sesso accoppia registrare nazionalmente un stesso matrimonio di sesso contratto validamente all'estero. Le ragioni per rifiuto variano; del membro la base di Stati la loro posizione sulla definizione legale di matrimonio come un'unione fra un uomo ed una donna solamente, e degli Stati vanno inoltre e si appellano sui motivi di ordine pubblico, tradizione e procreazione.
114. Il membro del venticinque Stati che non facevano al tempo concedono la stessa registrazione di matrimonio di sesso può essere divisa in due gruppi: quelli che hanno lasciato spazio a coppie di stesso-sesso sposate registrare la loro relazione come una stessa associazione di sesso (nove membro gli Stati - l'Austria, Croatia, Repubblica ceca l'Estonia (sino a 2016), Finlandia, Germania, Irlanda, Slovenia e la Svizzera) e quelli che non facevano (il rimanendo sedici membro gli Stati). Del membro di EU Stati osservarono nessuno riportò una distinzione nella loro legislazione fra matrimoni ottenuti all'interno dell'EU o altrove.
B. Gli Stati Uniti
115. 26 giugno 2015, nella causa di al di et di Obergefell. c. Hodges, Direttore, Settore di Ohio di al di et di Salute che la Corte Suprema degli Stati Uniti ha sostenuto che coppie di stesso-sesso possono esercitare il diritto essenziale per sposarsi in ogni Stati, e che non c'era base legale per un Stato per rifiutare di riconoscere un matrimonio di stesso-sesso legale compiè in un altro Stato sulla base del suo carattere di stesso-sesso (veda per dettagli, Oliari ed Altri, citato sopra, § 65).
LA LEGGE
IO. QUESTIONI PREGIUDIZIALI
A. Vittima Status
116. Come al problema di alcuni dei richiedenti che hanno avuto il loro matrimonio registrato (come un matrimonio), i richiedenti il cui matrimonio fu registrato così considerato che loro rimasero vittime delle violazioni allegato. Nelle loro osservazioni originali (prima dei recenti sviluppi) i richiedenti notarono in primo luogo, che registrazione non corrispose ad un'unione che dà riconoscimento alla loro coppia. In secondo luogo, come all'azione di reclamo specificamente collegata a registrazione, loro notarono, che nella luce della circolare emessa 7 ottobre 2014 simile registrazione fu legata per essere ritirata o fu annullata. In conseguenza la loro situazione non era stata rimediata a, né la violazione era stata riconosciuta.
117. La Corte nota che il Governo non ha sollevato qualsiasi eccezione in questo riguardo. Comunque, come recentemente reiterò in Buzadji c. la Repubblica della Moldavia [GC], (n. 23755/07, §§ 68-70 5 luglio 2016), status di vittima concerne una questione che va alla giurisdizione della Corte e quale sé non è impedito dall'esaminare di sua propria istanza. Nelle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte lo considera appropriato esaminare se i richiedenti il cui matrimonio fu registrato hanno perso il loro status di vittima.
118. La Corte si riferisce alla circolare emessa 7 ottobre 2014 col Ministero di Affari Interni (paragrafo 89 sopra) secondo che sindaci furono richiesti di annullare qualsiasi registrazioni che già erano state rese, ed informato che nell'assenza di simile annullamenti le registrazioni sarebbero annullate ex l'officio. I richiedenti il cui matrimonio fu registrato hanno confermato che brevemente dopo che la circolare fu emessa la registrazione nel loro riguardo fu annullato (veda divide in paragrafi 30 e 40 sopra). In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che la registrazione provvisoria del loro matrimonio non può detrarre perciò dal loro status di vittima.
119. Di conseguenza, la Corte conclude che tutti gli individui nelle richieste presenti dovrebbero essere considerati “le vittime” della violazione allegato riguardo alle autorità il rifiuto di ' per registrare il loro matrimonio (come un matrimonio) all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione.
L'Esaurimento di B. di via di ricorso nazionali
120. Il Governo presentò che le richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12, e 44057/12 erano inammissibili, siccome i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali. Nella loro prospettiva non poteva essere detto che via di ricorso disponibili non erano adeguate. La giurisprudenza nazionale mostrò che le autorità diedero la particolare attenzione ai problemi sollevati e proposero soluzioni di romanzo. Loro si riferirono in particolare a sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 138/10.
121. In relazione alla loro azione di reclamo riguardo alla registrazione fallita, i richiedenti presentarono, che era per il Governo per provare che là esistè una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva al tempo loro depositarono le loro richieste con la Corte; comunque, loro avevano fallito o erano stati incapace per fare così. Loro notarono inoltre che esattamente il Governo non si appellò sulla sentenza del Tribunale di Grosseto di 3 aprile 2014 che era solamente una sentenza di primo-istanza sporadica consegnata dopo l'introduzione delle richieste con la Corte (loro si riferirono in questo collegamento a Costa e Pavan c. l'Italia, n. 54270/10, § 38, 28 agosto 2012, e Sürmeli c. la Germania [GC], n. 75529/01, § 110-112 ECHR 2006 VII).
122. In relazione alla loro azione di reclamo riguardando qualsiasi vuole dire di riconoscimento legale, i richiedenti presentarono inoltre, che il Governo aveva provò neanche, con vuole dire di esempi che le corti nazionali potrebbero offrire qualsiasi riconoscimento legale delle loro unioni. Effettivamente, dato che il difetto riferì alla legge (o manca al riguardo) a corti nazionali ed ordinarie furono impedite di prendere qualsiasi azione riparatore. All'interno del sistema nazionale la via di ricorso appropriata sarebbe stata una richiesta di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale che già ha affermato la Corte non è una via di ricorso per essere usato, sé che non è direttamente accessibile all'individuo (veda Scoppola c. l'Italia (n. 2) [GC], n. 10249/03, § 70 17 settembre 2009). Inoltre, al giorno d'oggi la causa tale richiesta non avrebbe avuto successo il precedente che posò in sentenza n. 138/10, successivamente confermati con le altre decisioni.
123. La Corte osserva che al tempo quando tutti i richiedenti introdussero le loro richieste di fronte alla Corte (aprile-settembre 2012) la causa-legge riguardo all'impossibilità di registrare simile matrimoni fu consolidata. Il ragionamento lievemente diverso adottò in una sentenza di 15 marzo 2012 (n. 4184/12) della Corte di Cassazione in due dei richiedenti le cause di ' non alterarono la conseguenza di unfavourable. Inoltre, con che tempo la Corte Costituzionale già aveva dato la sua sentenza n. 138/10, le sentenze di che fu reiterato successivamente in due ulteriori sentenze di Corte Costituzionali (registrò nella cancelleria attinente il 2010 e 5 gennaio 2011 di 22 luglio, veda paragrafo 78 sopra), anche consegnò di fronte ai richiedenti aveva introdotto le loro richieste con la Corte. Così, al tempo quando i richiedenti desiderarono lamentarsi delle violazioni allegato, vale a dire brevemente dopo che i rifiuti degli Status Uffici Civili per registrare i loro matrimoni, là fu consolidato giurisprudenza delle corti più alte della terra che indica che le loro rivendicazioni non avevano nessuna prospettiva del successo. La Corte nota inoltre che la sentenza del Tribunale di Grosseto fu consegnata dopo che i richiedenti avevano depositato le loro richieste con la Corte, e che è solamente una prima sentenza di istanza, segue che non ha attinenza per la Corte sta trovando sotto questo capo.
124. Tenendo presente il sopra, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna prova che l'abilita per sostenere che alla data quando le richieste furono depositate con la Corte le via di ricorso disponibile nel sistema nazionale italiano avrebbe avuto qualsiasi prospettive di successo che riguarda qualsiasi delle loro azioni di reclamo. Segue che i richiedenti in richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12, e 44057/12 non possono essere biasimati per non intraprendere una via di ricorso che era inefficace. Così, la Corte accetta che c'erano circostanze speciali che assolsero questi richiedenti dal loro obbligo normale per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali (veda Vilnes ed Altri c. la Norvegia, N. 52806/09 e 22703/10, § 178 5 dicembre 2013).
125. Segue che in queste circostanze l'eccezione del Governo deve essere respinta.
C. Other
1. Il Governo
126. Sulle specifiche circostanze della causa, il Governo presentò, che il Sig.ra Francesca Orlandi ed il Sig.ra Elisabetta Mortagna, così come il Sig. D.P. ed il Sig. G.P., si sposò in Toronto, Canada, senza essere stabilito la residenza là siccome loro furono stabiliti la residenza in Italia. Loro si riferirono ai recentemente corressero (2013) legge canadese sulla questione.
127. In riguardo del Sig. Gianfranco Goretti ed il Sig. Tommaso Giartosio che si sposarono in California il Governo notò che la legge su matrimonio di omosessuale fu abrogata con un referendum nel 2008. Il Governo presentò che benché questo non invalidasse il loro matrimonio, i richiedenti non riuscirono a presentare documenti attinenti che provano la validità del loro matrimonio entrati in 9 settembre 2008, ad un tempo quando la legge su matrimonio di omosessuale era valutata con le corti nazionali.
128. Come ad OMISSISand OMISSIS, il Governo presentò, che i due richiedenti che si sposarono nei Paesi Bassi non avevano presentato i loro certificati di matrimonio, né loro avevano presentato il diritto matrimoniale attinente che previde per stesso sesso-matrimonio fin da 2001. Loro notarono che la legge detta previde all'estero per eccezioni incluso in relazione al riconoscimento di matrimoni, e che affermò anche esplicitamente che per contrarre matrimonio uno dei partner la nazionalità olandese o residenza devono avere nei Paesi Bassi, e se l'altro partner è un non cittadino o un residente non-permanente, lui o lei deve offrire la documentazione in relazione alla sua posizione giuridica in collegamento col suo permesso di soggiorno per il fine di matrimonio.
129. In conclusione il Governo presentò che i matrimoni contrassero all'estero coi richiedenti non aveva adempiuto ai requisiti dei posti dove i matrimoni ebbero luogo. Effettivamente i richiedenti avuti non provarono a questa Corte che loro avevano adempiuto ai requisiti detti, e né loro avevano reso disponibili i documenti attinenti che provano i loro status giuridici. Tutti questi avrebbero infatti stato necessario per la registrazione di simile matrimoni in un paese estero. Recenti sviluppi che seguono (durante questi procedimenti), il Governo presentò nondimeno che quelli matrimoni che furono registrati con gli Uffici di Status Civile, nella richiesta di legge italiana sull'argomento furono registrati così anche se loro non erano stati in conformità alle leggi estere ed applicabili. Loro chiesero così alla Corte di valutare la legittimità e la validità del matrimonio agisce in questione per i fini dell'ammissibilità delle richieste attinenti.
2. I richiedenti
(un) le Richieste N. 26431/12; 26742/12; 44057/12
130. I richiedenti presentarono che sia di fronte alle corti nazionali e di fronte alla Corte loro avevano prodotto copie autenticate dei loro certificati di matrimonio rilasciate con le autorità competenti del posto della celebrazione dei loro matrimoni. Seguì che loro avevano presentato prova sufficiente come alla validità dei loro matrimoni. Il rifiuto delle autorità italiane era stato basato solamente inoltre, sul fatto che loro erano lo stesso sesso accoppia, e non a causa di qualsiasi il dubbio come alla validità dei matrimoni contratta.
(b) la Richiesta n. 60088/12
131. I richiedenti presentarono che le tre corti italiane che avevano esaminato la loro richiesta non avevano messo in dubbio l'esistenza dei requisiti necessaria per la celebrazione del loro matrimonio nei Paesi Bassi. La Corte di Cassazione stessa nella sua sentenza (n. 4184/12) aveva affermato che la registrazione era impossibile a causa degli articoli di ordine pubblico e non perché il matrimonio era privo di valore legale. Inoltre, il Governo non aveva durante quelli procedimenti obiettati alla validità del loro matrimonio, e con virtù di Articolo 115 (1) del Codice italiano di Procedura Civile (se l'imputato non contesta i fatti addotti col rivendicatore, quelli fatti sono considerati provò) si aveva stabilito che il loro matrimonio era valido. Come affermato col Governo in un contesto diverso, la Corte non era un quarto giudice di prima istanza, e così non era per sé per valutare la validità di simile matrimoni, perché simile validità dipese dalla legge dello Stato dove fu celebrato, mentre la causa presente concernè trattamento discriminatorio per causa delle autorità italiane.
3. La valutazione della Corte
132. La Corte nota, in primo luogo, che non è per sé per valutare la validità, secondo le leggi dello Stato contraente dei matrimoni contratti coi richiedenti - una questione che non è stata determinata con le autorità nazionali cui la responsabilità è fare simile valutazioni (veda paragrafo 92 sopra).
133. Nota inoltre che se i richiedenti i matrimoni di ' erano validi o non, secondo le leggi dello Stato contraente, è oltre la sfera dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ', come i rifiuti dei quali loro si lamentarono non fu basato su che base (veda, mutatis mutandis, Paji ?c. Croatia, n. 68453/13, § 75 23 febbraio 2016) - la veracità di che resti, così ipotetico.
134. Effettivamente, la base dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sono che le autorità rifiutarono di registrare i loro matrimoni contratti all'estero sulla base che loro erano stati matrimoni fra persone dello stesso sesso. La Corte osserva che ci sono senza dubbio dai documenti presentati a sé che i richiedenti hanno contratto matrimoni (in paesi diversi) e che il rifiuto della registrazione di simile matrimoni fu basato sul fatto che i richiedenti erano stesso-sesso accoppia e su nulla altro.
135. La Corte nota che la sua valutazione è confinata alla specifica causa di fronte a sé, e perciò, al giorno d'oggi la causa, alla determinazione di se le autorità il rifiuto di ' per registrare solamente i richiedenti il matrimonio di ' sulla base che loro erano consorti di stesso-sesso costituì una violazione delle disposizioni invocate. La valutazione della Corte è, così, senza pregiudizio a qualsiasi le altre ragioni per rifiuto che sarebbe potuto essere scoperto con le autorità nazionali o quale ancora può essere sollevato con le autorità nazionali in futuro (se i richiedenti dovessero rendere altro tenta di registrare il loro matrimonio).
136. In conseguenza, l'eccezione sollevata col Governo non ha attinenza all'ammissibilità delle azioni di reclamo, e è respinto perciò.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 8 Di La Convenzione Ed Articolo 14 In Concomitanza Con Articoli 8 E 12 Di La Convenzione
137. I richiedenti si lamentarono del rifiuto per registrare i loro matrimoni, contrasse all'estero, ed il fatto che loro non potessero sposarsi o potrebbero avere qualsiasi l'altro riconoscimento legale della loro unione di famiglia in Italia. Loro considerarono che la situazione era solamente discriminatoria e basata sul loro orientamento sessuale. Loro citarono Articolo 8, 12 e 14. Le disposizioni loro citarono lettura siccome segue:
Articolo 8
“1. Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia, la sua casa e la sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza con un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto come è in conformità con la legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione di disturbo o incrimina, per la protezione di salute o morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
Articolo 12
“Uomini e donne di età adatta al matrimonio hanno diritto a sposarsi e fondare una famiglia, secondo le leggi nazionali che governano l'esercizio di questo diritto.”
Articolo 14
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
138. La Corte reitera che è il padrone del characterisation per essere dato in legge ai fatti della causa (veda, per esempio, Gatt c. il Malta, n. 28221/08, § 19 ECHR 2010). Al giorno d'oggi causa che la Corte considera che le azioni di reclamo sollevarono coi richiedenti sarà esaminato solamente da solo sotto Articolo 8 e sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con Articoli 8 e 12.
Ammissibilità di A.
1. L'applicabilità delle disposizioni
139. I richiedenti presentarono che la relazione di una coppia di stesso-sesso che vive in una relazione de facto e stabile incorse all'interno della nozione della vita di famiglia, addirittura più così se questo fosse accoppiato con un atto di matrimonio prodotto con autorità estere. C'era senza dubbio così, che Articolo 14 fece domanda in concomitanza con Articolo 8 nella causa presente.
140. Come alla richiesta di Articolo 14, in concomitanza con Articolo 12 i richiedenti presentarono che in Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria (n. 30141/04, ECHR 2010) la Corte sostenne che sé “considererebbe più che il diritto per sposarsi custodì in Articolo 12 debba in tutte le circostanze sia limitato a matrimonio fra due persone del sesso opposto. Di conseguenza, non si può dire che Articolo 12 è inapplicabile ai richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di '.” I richiedenti notarono che in che causa i richiedenti erano una coppia di stesso-sesso vivendo in una relazione stabile e desiderando sposarsi. Nella loro prospettiva, poiché la Corte fondò che Articolo 12 fece domanda in che causa, seguì che Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 12 anche fatto domanda nella causa presente.
141. Il Governo non contestò espressamente l'applicabilità delle disposizioni.
142. Siccome ha sostenuto costantemente la Corte, l'Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. Benché la richiesta di Articolo 14 non presupponga una violazione di quelle disposizioni-ed a questa misura è autonomo-non ci può essere stanza per richiesta sua a meno che i fatti in questione incorra all'interno dell'ambito di uno o più del secondo (veda, per istanza, E.B. c. la Francia [GC], n. 43546/02, § 47 22 gennaio 2008; Karner c. l'Austria, n. 40016/98, § 32 ECHR 2003 IX; e Petrovic c. l'Austria, 27 marzo 1998, § 22 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998 II).
143. La Corte nota che è incontrastato che la relazione di una coppia di stesso-sesso come i richiedenti incorre all'interno della nozione di “la vita privata” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8. La Corte già ha sostenuto similmente, che la relazione di una coppia di stesso-sesso che coabita che vive in un'associazione de facto e stabile incorre all'interno della nozione di “la vita di famiglia” (veda Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, § 94). Segue che i fatti delle richieste presenti incorrono all'interno della nozione di “la vita privata” così come “la vita di famiglia” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8.
144. La Corte reitera anche che non c'è ragione perché il riconoscimento di un Stato del vero status maritale di una persona, sia sé, inter l'alia, si sposò, singolo, accordò il divorzio a, vedova o vedovo, non dovrebbe formare parte di suo o lei l'identità personale e sociale, e davvero integrità psicologica protegguta con Articolo 8. Perciò, registrazione di un matrimonio, essendo un riconoscimento dello status civile legale di un individuo che indubbiamente riguarda sia privato e la vita di famiglia, viene all'interno della sfera di Articolo 8 § 1 (veda Dadouch c. il Malta, n. 38816/07, § 48 20 luglio 2010).
145. Come ad Articolo 12, la Corte nota, che in Schalk e Kopf trovato che non considererebbe più che il diritto per sposarsi deve in tutte le circostanze sia limitato a matrimonio fra due persone del sesso opposto, e perciò che Articolo 12 era applicabile ai richiedenti, una stessa coppia di sesso che cerca di sposarsi ma che Articolo 12 della Convenzione non impose un obbligo sul Governo rispondente per accordare una coppia di stesso-sesso come l'accesso di richiedenti a matrimonio (§§ 61-63). Lo stesso fu reiterato in Hämäläinen c. la Finlandia [GC], (n. 37359/09, § 96 ECHR 2014), ed in Oliari ed Altri c. l'Italia (N. 18766/11 e 36030/11, §§ 191-192 21 luglio 2015), dove la Corte sostenne che mentre è vero che alcuni Stati Contraenti hanno prolungato matrimonio a partner di stesso-sesso, Articolo 12 non può essere costruito come imponendo un obbligo sugli Stati Contraenti per accordare accesso a matrimonio a coppie di stesso-sesso. Più recentemente, la Corte, in Chapin e Charpentier c. la Francia, (n. 40183/07, 9 giugno 2016) anche considerò che Articolo 12 fece domanda ai richiedenti, una coppia di stesso-sesso che cerca di sposarsi (§ 31). Poiché la Corte già ha sostenuto Articolo 12 per essere applicabile ad una stessa sesso-coppia che desidera sposarsi, la disposizione deve essere anche applicabile a coppie di stesso-sesso che già si sposano sotto il sistema nazionale di un altro Stato.
146. Di conseguenza, le disposizioni per essere esaminato con la Corte, vale a dire Articolo 8 ed Articolo 14 presi in concomitanza con Articoli 8 e 12 della Convenzione fanno domanda nella causa presente.
2. Conclusione
147. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Merits
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) I richiedenti in richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12 e 44057/12
148. I richiedenti presentarono che le violazioni sorsero come un risultato di una pratica amministrativa ed un aspirapolvere nell'ordinamento giuridico che esistè al tempo che corrispose ad una deficienza strutturale.
(i) Mancanza di registrazione di matrimonio
149. I richiedenti presentarono che siccome si sposò all'estero una coppia di stesso-sesso loro erano indubbiamente nella stessa posizione come coppie di diverso-sesso si sposate all'estero come riguardi la loro richiesta per registrazione del loro matrimonio. Ancora loro avevano sofferto di trattamento diverso, svantaggioso, siccome loro erano stati rifiutati registrazione del loro matrimonio. Questo rifiuto corrispose anche ad un'interferenza con diritti loro alla vita di famiglia e sposarsi, una relazione di matrimonio mise in pericolo fin dalle decisioni di autorità pubbliche che due adulto ed acconsentendo persone aveva creato regolare loro privato e la vita di famiglia (loro assegnarono, mutatis mutandis, a Negrepontis-Giannisis c. la Grecia (n. 56759/08, § 57 3 maggio 2011).
150. I richiedenti non contestarono che registrazione del matrimonio non implicò riconoscimento degli effetti legali dell'atto di matrimonio. Per la registrazione di matrimonio estero loro loro cercarono ciononostante, di ottenere, vis-à-vis le autorità pubbliche e società a grande, la pubblicità di situazione loro, vale a dire che loro avevano un progetto comune della vita, che loro si considerarono una famiglia, e che loro commisero reciprocamente a questo scopo con le responsabilità che conseguono.
151. I richiedenti presentarono che siccome addotto con le autorità competenti la ragione sola per il rifiuto era la natura di stesso-sesso del loro matrimonio. Così, lo scopo perseguito presumibilmente col rifiuto di registrazione era la protezione del “interno” l'ordine pubblico (come per Circolare n. 2 26 marzo 2001, menzionato sopra). Questo scopo era piuttosto generale, come sé principi fondamentali, etici, economici, politici e sociali dell'ordine legale inclusero presumibilmente. Comunque, il Governo era andato a vuoto a spiegare gli specifici principi fondamentali avevano quale per essere difesi contro la registrazione di matrimoni di stesso-sesso. Si potrebbe dedurre solamente così, che la differenza in trattamento che proteggè un concetto di matrimonio come un'istituzione legale ed eterosessuale ed un'idea astratta di famiglia tradizionale fu tirata solamente. Ciononostante, i richiedenti notarono che la Corte di Cassazione (la sentenza n. 4184/12) ammise che un matrimonio di stesso-sesso estero non può essere considerato più non-esistente. Aveva trovato che il rifiuto della sua registrazione era semplicemente una conseguenza del fatto che non poteva essere riconosciuto come un matrimonio nell'ordine legale italiano (matrimonio che è definito come un'unione fra un uomo ed una donna), irrispettoso di qualsiasi le considerazioni relativo alla protezione di ordine pubblico. I richiedenti notarono che in tale contesto agli Status Uffici Civili e le corti nazionali furono impedite di eseguire una valutazione di proporzionalità, vale a dire se dando pubblicità ad un'unione di stesso-sesso metterebbe in pericolo ordine pubblico interno. La situazione era simile che la mancanza di riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso, nonostante un obbligo costituzionale sulla legislatura per colmare questo vuoto, autorità nazionali ed anche ostacolate dal registrare almeno l'atto di matrimonio come un'unione civile mentre riservando l'istituzione di matrimonio a coppie di opposto-sesso. Seguì che il rifiuto che proteggè principi fondamentali di ordine legale non fu tirato sinceramente che infatti non opponga, ma davvero richieda, il riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso.
152. I richiedenti presentarono che presumendo anche che là esistè un scopo che era legittimo, determinato che nessuna valutazione di proporzionalità fu eseguita con le autorità e che nessuno simile valutazione fu garantita con la legislatura - quale andò a vuoto a dare effetto alla dichiarazione della Corte Costituzionale - non si poteva dire che il rifiuto era necessario per realizzare lo scopo in questione. Nessuno altre ragioni erano state avanzate per giustificare la sua necessità.
(l'ii) Mancanza di unioni civili
153. I richiedenti fecero osservazioni sulle linee di quelli rese nella causa di Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 105-121).
154. I richiedenti presentarono inoltre che l'irragionevole e trattamento ingiustificato subirono con loro non solo colpì la loro vita di famiglia sotto Articolo 8 ma anche i loro diritti sotto Articolo 12. Loro considerarono che nell'assenza di un'alternativa a matrimonio i requisiti della proporzionalità severa per la giustificazione della misura non furono soddisfatti per ottenere riconoscimento della loro unione, (loro assegnarono, mutatis mutandis, Parare c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 42971/05, ECHR 2006 XV), e c'era di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 12. In questo collegamento loro si appellarono sulle opinioni che dissentono nella sentenza di Schalk e Kopf.
155. In conclusione i richiedenti reiterarono che unioni di stesso-sesso non potevano essere considerate come essere contro l'ordine pubblico interno, il loro riconoscimento legale che è richiesto con Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana come sostenuto ripetutamente con la Corte Costituzionale italiana. La nozione di matrimonio come un'istituzione eterosessuale ancora potrebbe essere salvaguardata così, se i richiedenti i matrimoni di ' furono riconosciuti almeno (il re-characterised) come le stesse unioni di sesso per i fini di registrazione. Dato che ottemperanza con legislazione nazionale non era giustificazione per inadempienza con obblighi di trattato, il rifiuto obbligatorio di almeno un'unione civile nella causa presente era andato a vuoto a prevedere un equilibrio equo fra i richiedenti il diritto di ' rispettare per la vita di famiglia e la richiesta di società a grande. Allo stesso tempo lo Stato stava violando anche finora i richiedenti i diritti di ' in come sé non era riuscito ad attenersi col suo obbligo positivo per dare riconoscimento legale ed appropriato alle loro unioni, come anche richiese ripetutamente con la Corte Costituzionale italiana. Seguì che il loro esercizio effettivo di un diritto essenziale che esiste sotto diritto nazionale fu impedito con l'insuccesso della legislatura per agire.
(b) I richiedenti in richiesta n. 60088/12
(i) Mancanza di registrazione di matrimonio
156. I richiedenti sottolinearono che il fatto che era impossibile per loro per registrare il loro matrimonio ottenuto all'estero corrisposto a trattamento discriminatorio. Loro considerarono che un) il matrimonio registrato all'estero era valido e produsse tutti gli effetti legali e conseguenze che sono corrette di un matrimonio legale riconosciute e regolò con la legge dello Stato nella quale il matrimonio fu registrato o celebre; b) era un matrimonio che in tutte le sue caratteristiche ed aspetti sono identici a matrimonio come riconobbe giuridicamente con legge italiana; il c) in oltre, contrari all'osservazione con la Corte italiana di Cassazione e siccome spiegato sotto, il matrimonio registrato all'estero produrrebbe le piene conseguenze legali all'interno dell'ordinamento giuridico italiano. Comunque, questo non volle dire, inter l'alia, che lo Stato aveva il dovere di concedere matrimonio di stesso-sesso in Italia, o prolungare a coppie di stesso-sesso la piena tutela giuridica dato a coppie sposate ed eterosessuali.
157. Il Governo aveva ignorato che loro erano cittadini europei, e che Articolo 9 dello Statuto europeo non distinse fra stesso-sesso sposato o diverso-sesso accoppia (per esempio, nella richiesta di Articolo 9 e Direttiva 2004/38/EC recognising il diritto dei cittadini di EU per muoversi e risiedere liberamente all'interno del territorio di stati membro, la decisione di 13 febbraio 2012 del Tribunale di Reggio Emilia divide in paragrafi 85 sopra) e che ogni cittadino europeo che si sposò fu concesso per liberare movimento all'interno dell'EU, nonostante chi lui o lei si sposarono ad e dove loro si sposarono. Seguì che le norme europee che concernono anche coppie sposate fecero domanda in Italia e devono fare domanda ai richiedenti che si sposarono giuridicamente in un altro stato di EU. Così, contrari a quel sostenne con la Corte di Cassazione in sentenza n. 4184/12, matrimonio di stesso-sesso celebrò effetti legali ed all'estero prodotti nell'ogni volta di sistema italiano lo status maritale rappresentato un pre-richiesto per la richiesta in Italia delle norme di EU (siccome spiegato nella sentenza del Reggio Emilia Tribunale). Nel collegamento con la sentenza scorso-menzionata i richiedenti considerarono che fin dal matrimonio di un cittadino italiano ad un non-EU partner di stesso-sesso fu registrato, l'insuccesso per registrare il loro matrimonio discriminò contro loro sulla base della loro nazionalità (siccome loro erano sia l'italiano).
158. Nella luce della recente interpretazione di Articolo 12 della Convenzione e l'enunciazione esplicita di Articolo 9 dell'EU Charter matrimonio non fu considerato più come l'unione di un uomo ed una donna. Così, tutte le norme di EU riguardo a matrimonio assegnato a sia eterosessuale ed omosessuale si sposò coppie. Questa interpretazione doveva essere ugualmente valida in Italia, sé che è legato con questi strumenti europei. Seguì, che poiché i richiedenti si sposarono giuridicamente, era quelle leggi che dovrebbero fare domanda a loro e non leggi che concernono persone indifese o coabitanti. In questo collegamento, registrazione rappresentò un riconoscimento indiretto dello status coniugale di coppie di stesso-sesso che li concederono diritto a quelli diritti riconosciuto sotto la legge di EU (come movimento gratis) con virtù del loro essere i cittadini di EU, oltre a tutte le situazioni nelle quali le norme di EU avrebbero fatto domanda in Italia. I richiedenti notarono che registrazione del loro status maritale aveva valore per molti fini legali, incluso il pagamento di tasse protezione da creditori estero, ed evitando bigamia. Seguì che in un'era di globalised simile registrazione era importante per assicurare la chiarezza in rapporti internazionali fra cittadini in paesi diversi.
159. I richiedenti presentarono che non potrebbe essere detto più che lo stesso matrimonio di sesso era contro ordine pubblico (come confermato con la Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184/12). Effettivamente non era l'ordine pubblico italiano che era in questione nella causa presente ma l'ordine pubblico internazionale, come le norme essere interpretate era norme di legge privata ed internazionale. Come la Corte di Cassazione aveva indicato (decisione di 26 aprile 2013, n. 10070 che citarono un'altra due decisioni della Corte di Cassazione di 6 dicembre 2002 n. 17349 e di 23 febbraio 2006, n. 4040), è il “ordine pubblico internazionale” quale è incluso nei principi di legge privata ed internazionale. Perciò i richiedenti dibatterono che l'ordine pubblico internazionale non rispecchiò soltanto italiano principi legali e fondamentali come previsto con la Costituzione o con gli altri statuti legali italiani. Invece, incapsulò i principi fondamentali italiani che a turno derivi da una molteplicità di fonti di legge ed in particolare dall'interazione del sistema italiano con lo Statuto e la Convenzione.
160. I richiedenti notarono che, se, come la Corte di Cassazione aveva indicato (la sentenza n. 4184/12), la nozione di matrimonio sotto legge italiana incluse matrimonio di stesso-sesso (in linea con lo Statuto e la Convenzione), poi era contraddittorio per dibattere che un matrimonio di stesso-sesso celebrò all'estero era contro l'ordine pubblico internazionale. Nonostante questa sentenza e la decisione in Schalk e Kopf, le autorità italiane continuarono a fare domanda le regolamentazioni emesse col Ministero dell'Interno. Inoltre, gli orientamenti usati semplicemente coi cancellieri di status civile si riferiti ad ordine pubblico, senza chiarificare se era nazionale o internazionale; quegli orientamenti indicarono anche che sentenza n. 4184/12 erano irrilevanti in relazione a registrazioni. I richiedenti contestarono che Articolo 16 di Legge n. 218/95 erano applicabili alle circostanze della causa, come che disposizione governò la richiesta in Italia di legge estera, ma i richiedenti non stavano chiedendo alle autorità di fare domanda legge olandese (darli il diritto e protezione loro avrebbero ottenuto sotto legge olandese), ma semplicemente registrare il loro matrimonio celebrato all'estero e così per ottenere gli effetti limitati di registrazione sotto legge italiana, vale a dire la certificazione che il matrimonio era valido che potrebbe essere usato ogni volta status coniugale ebbe bisogno di essere provò per la richiesta di una specifica legge.
161. I richiedenti si riferirono all'altro diritto nazionale attinente (veda divide in paragrafi 86 e 88 sopra), nella particolare sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 170/14 che considerato che la nozione di matrimonio come definito in Schalk e Kopf era irrilevante per i fini di legge italiana e la definizione di matrimonio.
(l'ii) Mancanza di unioni civili
162. I richiedenti notarono che evitare una sentenza di una violazione il Governo dibattè che coppie di stesso-sesso erano infatti protetto (con vuole dire di accordi di coabitazione). La realtà era che le autorità pubbliche erano riluttanti per avanzare i diritti di coppie di stesso-sesso, ed i pochi diritti che erano stati guadagnati sulla decade passata erano il risultato della causa ed atti. Così, simile protezione che deriva da causa-legge e statuto non legale costituì solamente una protezione indiretta. Fu lasciato anche al giudice per decidere quando simile protezione fu richiesta dopo la stessa coppia di sesso avuta provò che i) loro stavano coabitando in una relazione stabile, ii) che il diritto loro stavano cercando di godere era un diritto goduto con heterosexuals, e che un grado diverso di protezione era irragionevole. Simile discrezione creò l'incertezza ed avrebbe bisogno di direzione con la Corte Costituzionale spesso. Inoltre, oppresse persone nei richiedenti la situazione di ' col dovendo andare a corteggiare e provare la coabitazione per ottenere le protezioni attinenti. In che il collegamento i richiedenti notarono l'attinenza di avere il loro matrimonio registrata (ed avendo così la validità del loro matrimonio controllata e munito di certificato con le autorità) abilitarli per adempiere l'onere della prova riguardo alla stabilità della loro relazione. Loro notarono anche che questo approccio a protezione non distinse fra coabitando stesso-sesso accoppia e stesso-sesso sposato accoppia, nonostante il secondo essendo accordato riconoscimento e protezione in tutte le giurisdizioni nelle quali fu regolato matrimonio di stesso-sesso.
163. Come al “registro di unioni civili”, e contratti della coabitazione i richiedenti fecero osservazioni in linea con quelli resi in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra).
(il c) le osservazioni di Il Governo
164. Il Governo si riferì alla giurisprudenza nazionale sulla questione che loro considerarono attinenti per la loro difesa della causa presente. Loro notarono che le corti nazionali avevano dato credito all'esistenza di coppie di stesso-sesso ed il loro diritto a protezione nelle specifiche circostanze ed ad uguaglianza di trattamento che potrebbe essere garantita con la recitazione di corti in linea con senso comune loro (le sentenze n. 559/1989 e 404/1998 in relazione a contratti d'affitto ed alloggio statale in riguardo delle coabitazioni più uxorio). Questa nozione di famiglia fu confermata inoltre con la Corte di Cassazione nella sua sentenza n. 4184/12 che incitarono i vari comuni e regioni a creare un registro di unioni civili o un registro di unioni de facto che notificarono registrare l'esistenza di simile coppie un'azione infatti preso col Sig. Gianfranco Goretti ed il Sig. Tommaso Giartosio. Comunque, l'esistenza di simile misure di registrazione nelle varie regioni e comuni non obbligò lo Stato a riconoscere simile unioni come un matrimonio, ma solamente considerare la loro esistenza come una famiglia all'interno di una struttura regolatore in linea con l'ordine interno dello Stato-il requisito solo della Convenzione (siccome interpretato in giurisprudenza) sull'argomento.
165. Il Governo presentò che stesso-sesso accoppia desiderando dare una struttura legale ai vari aspetti di vita di comunità loro potrebbe entrare in accordi di coabitazione. Simile accordi abilitarono stesso-sesso accoppia regolare aspetti riferiti a, per esempio: la maniera di trattare con spese unite e l'apertura di conti bancari uniti; il criterio per l'allocazione di proprietà dei beni acquisita durante la coabitazione; la procedura per la distribuzione dei beni nell'evento di conclusione della coabitazione; così come atti della disposizione testamentaria in favore del partner che coabita (come per esempio il diritto per continuare un contratto d'affitto seguente il decesso di un partner, come stabilito con sentenza n. 404/1998). Sotto Articolo 408 del Codice civile era inoltre, possibile nominare una persona che vive lo stesso tetto come guardiano nell'evento di incapacitation sotto, siccome avuto infatti stato fatto col Sig. D.P. ed il Sig. G.P. Negli accordi di coabitazione di prospettiva del Governo lo strumento giuridico ed appropriato sia dare la loro unione lo status di famiglia di fronte alla legge senza qualsiasi la discriminazione basò sul loro orientamento sessuale.
166. Come a registrazione di matrimonio, il Governo presentò, che fin dai richiedenti i matrimoni di ' erano nulli secondo le leggi dei paesi entro le quali loro furono contratti che loro non potevano essere registrati, nella luce di sia ordine pubblico internazionale e nazionale. Nella loro prospettiva, la Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184/12 rivendicazioni respinte (depositò entro solamente due dei richiedenti) sulla base di Articolo 18 di Legge n. 396/00 sulla base che simile registrazione sarebbe stata contraria ad ordine pubblico nazionale. Che sentenza aveva contenuto inoltre che tale matrimonio non potesse produrre qualsiasi effetto legale in Italia. Ciononostante, secondo che matrimoni di stesso-sesso di sentenza contrassero a bordo di rimasto valido in riguardo di forma, per i fini della legge del paese entro la quale loro furono contratti o della legge nazionale di almeno uno dei consorti, ma non per legge italiana che non concedè matrimonio di stesso-sesso. Il Governo presentò che matrimonio incorse all'interno della sfera di ordine pubblico nazionale che situazioni incluse che, benché non totalmente interno, fu collegato significativamente all'ordine legale italiano. Loro notarono che nella luce del conflitto di leggi e nell'assenza di qualsiasi criterio di relazione fra legge estera ed italiana sotto Articolo 16 di Legge n. 218/1995, le corti nazionali fecero domanda legge nazionale. Seguì che l'interferenza era stata in conformità con la legge.
167. Il Governo presentò che il rifiuto in riguardo del Sig. Garullo ed il Sig. Ottocento fu basato su ordine pubblico interno che fu composto di principi etici, economici, politici e sociali che abilitano la coabitazione di società italiana e gli altri stati contraenti che non avevano previsto per matrimonio di stesso-sesso.
168. Il Governo presentò inoltre che alcuni individui avevano avuto successo anche nel registrare i loro matrimoni. Effettivamente, il primo-istanza Tribunale di Grosseto, con una decisione di 2 aprile 2014 ordinò lo Status Ufficio Civile per registrare un matrimonio di stesso-sesso contratto a New York nel 2012 (veda paragrafo 81 sopra).
169. Il Governo presentò che non c'erano intenzioni discriminatorie dietro allo stato del diritto vigente che non concedè loro registrare il loro matrimonio; sarebbe stato avuto altrimenti il legislatore italiano previsto per una legge che specificamente proibisce matrimonio di stesso-sesso, siccome ancora esistè nei certi stati.
170. Loro osservarono che lo Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea lo lasciò a Stati per decidere sulla questione. In Schalk e Kopf la Corte, nell'assenza di un consentimento europeo lo lasciò anche similmente, a Stati per scegliere la misura dei diritti per essere riconosciuta a coppie di stesso-sesso. Loro notarono inoltre che in Benzina e Dubois c. la Francia (n. 25951/07, § 66 ECHR 2012) la Corte sostenne che un diritto a matrimonio di stesso-sesso non può essere derivato da Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8, e che dove un Stato sceglie di fornire a coppie di stesso-sesso un'alternativa vuole dire di riconoscimento gode un certo margine della valutazione come riguardi che lo status esatto ha conferito. Siccome ammesso con la Corte e le corti italiane il legislatore nazionale fu messo meglio che la Corte per sviluppare l'istituzione di famiglia e le relazioni fra adulti e figli, così come la nozione di matrimonio. Loro notarono che i delicati e questioni complesse di matrimonio così come i diritti civili di coppie di stesso-sesso erano soggetto a dibattito democratico nei vari paesi, incluso l'Italia nella luce della causa-legge in sviluppo della Corte così come gli atti non-vincolanti del Consiglio dell'Europa. In questo riguardo loro notarono che Italia sviluppò un “LGBT la strategia 2013-15 nazionale” che aveva presentato al Consiglio dell'Europa.
171. In conclusione loro accentuarono che la Convenzione non fornì a coppie di omosessuale il diritto per sposarsi, e tale lettura di Articolo 12 richiederebbe un consentimento fra Stati che potrebbero essere offerti in un protocollo supplementare.
(d) L'interveners della terzo-parte
(i) Prof Robert Wintemute in favore delle organizzazioni non-governative FIDH (Fédération Internationale des ligues de Diritto de l'Homme), Centre di AIRE (Consiglio su Diritti Individuali in Europa), l'ILGA-Europa (Regione europea della Lesbica Internazionale, Gay, Ermafrodito, Trans ed Associazione di Intersex), ECSOL (Commissione europea su Orientamento Legge Sessuale), UFTDU (forense di Unione per la tutela dei diritti umani) e LIDU (Lega il dei di Italiana il dell'Uomo di Diritti).
(?) Obbligo positivo per offrire dei mezzi di riconoscimento
172. L'intervento nel collegamento con la disposizione di dei mezzi di riconoscimento è riassunto in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 134-139).
(?) La discriminazione
173. L'intervento nel collegamento con la discriminazione allegato è riassunto in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 140-144).
174. Quegli intervenendo inoltre notò che Articoli che 14 e 8 possono essere interpretati anche nella causa presente siccome richiedendo che i matrimoni esteri di coppie di stesso-sesso siano riconosciuti come equivalente all'unione civile o l'altra alternativa a matrimonio legale che deve essere offerto a coppie di stesso-sesso. Un modello può essere trovato in s. 215 dell'Associazione Civile del Regno Unito Agiscono 2004, prima del suo emendamento del Matrimonio (lo Stesso Sesso Accoppia) Atto 2013:
“(1) due persone [dello stesso sesso] sarà trattato siccome avendo formato un'associazione civile come un risultato di avere registrato una relazione estera [quale include un matrimonio in qualsiasi paese dove possono sposarsi coppie di stesso-sesso] se, sotto la legge attinente, loro (un) aveva veste di entrare nella relazione, e (b) soddisfece tutti i requisiti necessari assicurare la validità formale della relazione.”
175. In questo collegamento gli interveners infine notarono, che il Parlamento europeo dell'EU adottò, 4 febbraio 2014, una decisione su un roadmap contro homophobia e la discriminazione sui motivi di orientamento sessuale e l'identità di genere che chiamano sulla Commissione europea a “costituisca proposte il riconoscimento reciproco degli effetti di tutti i documenti di status civili attraverso l'EU per ridurre barriere legali ed amministrative discriminatorie per cittadini e le loro famiglie che esercitano il loro diritto per liberare movimento” che include matrimoni registrò negli altri stati membro di EU.
(l'ii) Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti (ARCD)
176. L'intervento è riassunto in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 144-148).
(l'iii) Il Fondamento di Helsinki per Diritti umani
177. Gli intervener versano luce sulla situazione della Polonia. Loro notarono che secondo il matrimonio di costituzione polacco fu definito come un'unione fra un uomo ed una donna che abbatterono la protezione dello Stato polacco sotto. La costituzione non definì la nozione di famiglia. Loro spiegarono che poiché 2003 proposte e leggi di bozza resero con NGOs o partiti politici in favore di associazioni di stesso-sesso era stato respinto ripetutamente o era stato cessato. Al tempo delle osservazioni erano due leggi di bozza su associazioni registrate che sono analizzate con Parlamento. Loro notarono che molto il dibattito, incluso fra il pubblico e studiosi, concentrato su se la costituzione precluse forme di associazione che offrì tutela giuridica per coppie di stesso-sesso. Nel frattempo cifre dal Centre per Demoscopia (la Polonia) mostrò che nel 2013 appoggio sociale per associazione di stesso-sesso in Polonia era in accrescimento.
178. 28 novembre 2012 la Corte Suprema polacca consegnò una decisione (n. III CZP65/12) con che formulò l'obbligo del collegamento con accordi di contratto d'affitto che seguono la morte di un partner di omosessuale.
179. In Polonia la mancanza di riconoscimento legale di stesse unioni di sesso mostrò comunque, la posizione disuguale riservata a coppie di stesso-sesso nei vari domini, come confermato con giurisprudenza.
180. Polonia non riconosce associazioni di stesso-sesso concluse all'estero, e loro non possono essere registrati con la Status Cancelleria Civile (né aggiunse come un'entrata informale), come questo sarebbe contrario all'Atto della Cancelleria dello Status Civile (sentenza della Corte amministrativa Suprema polacca di 19 giugno 2003-n. II OSK 475/12). In che luce la pratica corrente era negare riconoscimento legale / registrazione di associazioni di stesso-sesso o matrimoni. Nella prospettiva dell'interveners, la struttura legale incluso la Costituzione polacca non precluse comunque, registrazione di associazioni contratta all'estero.
181. Il Fondamento di Helsinki per Diritti umani considerato che non c'era giustificazione per la situazione in Polonia che non offrì almeno il minimo riconoscimento legale di coppie di stesso-sesso.
(l'iv) Alleanza che Difende la Libertà
182. Gli intervener si riferirono alla causa-legge della Corte riguardo alle disposizioni invocate così come quel riferì al margine della valutazione degli Stati, particolarmente su problemi sensibili.
183. Secondo la loro analisi della giurisprudenza internazionale, undici dei tredici paesi che hanno considerato che matrimonio includesse coppia di stesso-sesso avevano fatto, così senza il coinvolgimento di corpi giudiziali. In particolare, loro si riferirono alla limitazione riguardo a ridefinizione di matrimonio mostrata con le autorità giudiziali di Francia, Germania e l'Italia. Come la Corte, la pratica di corpi giudiziali era così, mostrare limitazione con entrambi deferring alla legislatura o respingendo insieme le rivendicazioni. La Corte di giustizia europea aveva considerato anche che la Convenzione proteggè solamente matrimonio tradizionale fra due persone di sesso biologico ed opposto (K.B. v Servizio Sanitario Statale Pensioni AGENZIA e Ministro di Stato per Salute, causa n. C-117/01 (2003) § 55).
184. Nonostante un consentimento che emerge verso unioni di stesso-sesso, là esistè solamente una cassa-trend forte verso matrimonio di recognising fra un uomo ed una donna. Come di 2010 trenta-cinque nazioni avevano disposizioni legali che specificano che matrimonio era esclusivamente fra un uomo ed una donna, e da allora poi più paesi avevano seguito in che direzione, come Ungheria e Croatia ai quali avevano corretto le loro costituzioni che effetto, e Slovenia che aveva votato contro una ridefinizione di matrimonio.
185. Loro considerarono che tutela giuridica di partner di stesso-sesso potrebbe essere stabilita per legge contraente e privata, comunque riconoscimento legale di centred di matrimonio sulla famiglia ed era per la legislatura Statale per ridefinire matrimonio. In qualsiasi l'evento, loro considerarono che legalising lo stesso sesso “il matrimonio” condusse ai vari danni sociali, incluso conseguenze per la libertà di religione ed espressione.
(v) Centre europeo per Legge e la Giustizia (ECLJ)
(?) Obbligo positivo per offrire dei mezzi di riconoscimento
186. L'intervento nel collegamento con la disposizione di dei mezzi di riconoscimento è riassunto in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra, §§ 149-158).
(?) Registrazione di matrimonio
187. Gli interveners notarono la più prima causa-legge della Corte che contenne che “il diritto per sposarsi garantì con Articolo 12 si riferisce al matrimonio tradizionale fra persone di sesso biologico ed opposto. Questo sembrò anche dall'enunciazione dell'Articolo che lo fece chiaro che Articolo 12 concernè principalmente per proteggere matrimonio come la base della famiglia” (Sheffield e Horsham c. il Regno Unito, 30 luglio 1998, § 66 le Relazioni 1998 V). Loro considerarono che il diritto per sposarsi non era un diritto individuale, ma soltanto un diritto di complice al diritto per fondare una famiglia che era la ragione perché nei vari testi fu assegnato a come “il diritto per sposarsi e fondare una famiglia.”
188. L'ECLJ presentò che l'assenza di un diritto per sposarsi per stesse persone di sesso all'interno della Convenzione non era disputabile. Effettivamente, lo stesso matrimonio di sesso non formò parte dell'ordine pubblico europeo, ed Italia non poteva essere costretta per dare effetto (per registrazione) a matrimoni di stesso-sesso celebrati all'estero che era contro il suo proprio ordine pubblico. Era perciò legittimo per il giudice nazionale per mettere da parte gli articoli di diritto internazionale privato con invocando la nozione di ordine pubblico, il contenuto di che sarebbe definito liberamente con gli Stati. Non era per altri Stati che hanno potuto optare di permettere i loro non-cittadini per sposarsi o permettere i loro cittadini per sposarsi non-cittadini (nonostante leggi contrastanti), imporre la loro definizione nuova di matrimonio sugli altri Stati.
189. Loro notarono che separatamente da ordine pubblico nazionale là esistè un ordine pubblico europeo. Effettivamente la corte di Lussemburgo contenne che “mentre non è per la Corte per definire il contenuto della politica pubblica di un Stato Contraente, è costretto nondimeno a fare una rassegna i limiti entro i quali le corti di un Stato Contraente possono avere ricorso a che concetto per il fine di rifiutare riconoscimento di una sentenza che emana da un altro Stato Contraente.” Nell'interveners ' vede lo strumento principale di ordine pubblico era la Convenzione europea su Diritti umani che non fornì ad omosessuali il diritto per sposarsi anche come confermati nel più recente Schalk e la sentenza di Kopf. Seguì che anche soggetto a soprintendenza Italia era stata in conformità all'ordine pubblico europeo.
190. Loro considerarono che lo Stato italiano non poteva essere obbligato per riconoscere i richiedenti le situazioni di ' equo perché loro furono presentati con un fait accompli che segue che che poteva nelle certe circostanze sia considerato acquisto matrimoniale (attraversando un confine per un periodo breve di ordine di momento di entrata per essere in grado sposarsi). Nella prospettiva dell'ECLJ, imporre su un Stato il riconoscimento di matrimoni ottenuto all'estero sarebbe contro lo spirito della Convenzione, ed oltre la competenza della Corte. Mentre era vero che Italia riconobbe matrimoni di diverso-sesso ottenuti all'estero, non dovrebbe essere lo stesso per matrimoni di stesso-sesso.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Articolo 8
191. Le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto questa disposizione riferiscono principalmente al fatto che sul loro ritorno ad Italia loro furono rifiutati registrazione del loro matrimonio, o come un matrimonio o sotto qualsiasi l'altra forma, spogliandoli di qualsiasi la tutela giuridica o associò diritti.
192. La Corte reitera che Stati ancora sono gratis, sotto Articolo 12 della Convenzione così come sotto Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8, restringere accesso a matrimonio a diverso-sesso accoppia, (veda Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, § 108 e Chapin e Charpentier, citato sopra, § 39). Lo stesso contiene per Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 12 (veda Oliari ed Altri, citato sopra, § 193). Ciononostante, la Corte ha ammesso che coppie di stesso-sesso sono in bisogno di riconoscimento legale e protezione della loro relazione (veda Oliari ed Altri, citato sopra, § 165 e la causa-legge citate therein). Effettivamente, in Oliari ed Altri che la Corte ha concluso che nell'assenza di un essere di interesse di comunità prevalente fissata in avanti col Governo italiano contro che bilanciare i richiedenti ' interessi gravi, e nella luce di nazionale corteggia le conclusioni di ' sulla questione che rimase inosservato, il Governo italiano aveva oltrepassato il loro margine della valutazione e non riuscì ad adempiere il loro obbligo positivo per assicurare che i richiedenti avevano disponibili una specifica struttura legale che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni di stesso-sesso (§ 185). C'era stata così una violazione di Articolo 8 (§ 187).
193. La Corte nota che, seguendo la sentenza in Oliari ed Altri (citò sopra), con vuole dire di Legge n. 76/2016, il legislatore italiano previde per unioni civili in Italia. Con decreti susseguenti fu offerto che persone che avevano contratto matrimonio, unione civile o qualsiasi l'altra unione corrispondente potrebbe registrare all'estero la loro unione come un'unione civile in termini di legge italiana (veda divide in paragrafi 97 a 100 sopra). La legislazione seconda entrò in essendo nel 2017 (veda paragrafo 100 sopra) e la maggior parte dei richiedenti hanno tratto profitto recentemente da sé.
194. La Corte già ha sostenuto, in riguardo di varie legislazioni nazionali, che unioni civili offrono un'opportunità di ottenere una condizione giuridica uguale o simile a matrimonio in molti riguardi (veda per esempio, Schalk e Kopf, § 109, riguardo all'Austria Hämäläinen, § 83, in collegamento col sistema finlandese e Chapin e Charpentier, §§ 49 e 51, riguardo alla Francia tutti citarono sopra). La Corte considera che, in principio, tale sistema può, prima facie bastano soddisfare standard di Convenzione. I richiedenti ammisero anche esplicitamente o implicitamente che sarebbe bastato, salvaguardare ognuno interessi, aveva le autorità registrato almeno il loro matrimonio come un'unione civile (veda divide in paragrafi 151, 155 e 156 sopra) in finora come i richiedenti avrebbe avuto la capacità di avere le loro relazioni riconosciuta in della forma nel sistema nazionale.
195. La Corte nota che la legislazione italiana e nuova che prevede per unioni civili (e registrazione di matrimoni contrasse all'estero come unioni civili), anche sembra dare più o meno la stessa protezione come matrimonio riguardo al centro ha bisogno di una coppia in una relazione stabile ed impegnata, e la Corte non è chiamata su nella causa presente per esaminare qualsiasi le differenze nel dettaglio di questi, una questione che è oltre la sfera di questa causa.
196. La Corte reitera in questo collegamento che in procedimenti che nascono da in una richiesta individuale sé deve confinarsi, il più lontano possibile ad un esame della causa concreta di fronte a sé (veda Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, § 103). Dato che attualmente è aperto ai richiedenti per entrare in un'unione civile, o ha il loro matrimonio registrato come un'unione civile, la Corte deve determinare solamente se i rifiuti per registrare i richiedenti il matrimonio di ' in qualsiasi forma col risultato che loro furono lasciati in un aspirapolvere legale e privo di qualsiasi protezione, prima di 2016-17 violò i loro diritti sotto Articolo 8.
197. Mentre l'oggetto essenziale di Articolo 8 è proteggere l'individuo contro azione arbitraria con le autorità pubbliche, là in oltre sia obblighi positivi inerenti in ‘effettivo rispetti ' per la vita di famiglia. Comunque, i confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto questa disposizione non si prestano a definizione precisa. I principi applicabili sono, nondimeno, simile. In ambo i contesti riguardo a deve essere avuto all'equilibrio equo che doveva essere previsto fra gli interessi che competono dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme; ed in ambo i contesti lo Stato gode un certo margine della valutazione (veda Jeunesse c. i Paesi Bassi [GC], n. 12738/10, § 106, 3 ottobre 2014 e Wagner e J.M.W.L. c. il Lussemburgo, n. 76240/01, § 118 28 giugno 2007).
198. La Corte non lo considera necessario decidere se sarebbe più appropriato per analizzare la causa come uno riguardo ad un positivo o un obbligo negativo poiché è della prospettiva che il problema di centro nella causa presente è precisamente se un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra gli interessi che competono coinvolti (veda, mutatis mutandis, Dickson c. il Regno Unito, n. 44362/04, § 71 18 aprile 2006).
199. Come alla mancanza di unioni civili, la Corte nota, che le osservazioni del Governo in questo riguardo sono in linea con quelli resi nella causa di Oliari ed Altri, relativo allo stesso periodo di tempo-2015 che sono il tempo cruciale su che l'Oliari ed Altri sentenza è basata (veda Oliari ed Altri, citato sopra, § 164). Come in che causa, al giorno d'oggi la causa, il Governo non mise in avanti un interesse di comunità prevalente contro che bilanciare i richiedenti ' interessi gravi che persisterono finché la legislazione che concerne unioni civili entrò in vigore e sino a che il tempo i richiedenti nella causa presente continuarono a soffrire delle conseguenze di non essere capace di trarre profitto da una specifica struttura legale che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni di stesso-sesso.
200. Similmente, come all'insuccesso per registrare i matrimoni, il Governo andò a vuoto ad indicare qualsiasi scopo legittimo per simile rifiuto, salvi per una frase generale che riguarda “ordine pubblico interno” (veda paragrafo 167 sopra) che comunque, la Corte osserva, non è in linea con giurisprudenza nazionale (Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184/12, veda divide in paragrafi 61-65 sopra le cui sentenze furono reiterate da allora in poi). In che il collegamento, la Corte nota che, diversamente da altre disposizioni della Convenzione, Articolo 8 non arruola la nozione di “l'ordine pubblico” come uno degli scopi legittimi negli interessi del quale un Stato può interferire coi diritti di un individuo. Comunque, tenendo presente che è primariamente per la legislazione nazionale a posi in giù gli articoli riguardo alla validità di matrimoni e disegnare le conseguenze legali (veda Verde e Farhat c. il Malta, (il dec.), n. 38797/07, 6 luglio 2010), la Corte prima ha accettato che regolamentazione nazionale della registrazione di matrimonio può notificare lo scopo legittimo della prevenzione di disturbo (veda ibid. e Dadouch, citato sopra, § 54). Così, la Corte può accettare per i fini della causa presente che le misure contestate furono prese per la prevenzione di disturbo, in finora come i richiedenti la posizione di ' non fu offerta per in diritto nazionale.
201. La croce della causa a mano è precisamente effettivamente, che i richiedenti che la posizione di ' non è stata offerta per in diritto nazionale, specificamente il fatto che i richiedenti non potessero avere la loro relazione - sia sé un'unione de facto o un'unione di jure di de riconobbe sotto la legge di un stato estero-riconobbe e proteggè in Italia sotto qualsiasi la forma.
202. La Corte nota l'osservazione del Governo che, nell'area in oggetto, gli Stati Contraenti goderono un margine sostanziale della valutazione.
203. Reitera che la sfera dello Stati ' provvede d'un margine della valutazione varierà secondo le circostanze, l'argomento ed il contesto; in questo riguardo uno dei fattori attinenti l'esistenza o la non-esistenza di base comune può essere fra le leggi degli Stati Contraenti (veda, per esempio, Wagner e J.M.W.L. e Negrepontis-Giannisis, sia citò sopra, § 128 e § 69 rispettivamente). Di conseguenza, sulla mano del una, dove non c'è consentimento all'interno del membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa, o come all'importanza relativa dell'interesse in pericolo o come al meglio vuole dire di proteggerlo, particolarmente dove la causa solleva problemi morali o etici e sensibili, il margine sarà ampio. D'altra parte dove è in pericolo una sfaccettatura particolarmente importante dell'esistenza di un individuo o l'identità, il margine concesso allo Stato normalmente sarà restretto (veda il der di Van Heijden c. i Paesi Bassi [GC], n. 42857/05, § 60, 3 aprile 2012 Mennesson c. la Francia, n. 65192/11, § 77 ECHR 2014 (gli estratti); e Paradiso e Campanelli c. l'Italia [GC], n. 25358/12, § 182 ECHR 2017).
204. Come a riconoscimento legale di coppie di stesso-sesso, la Corte nota il movimento che ha continuato a sviluppare rapidamente in Europa fin dalla sentenza della Corte in Schalk e Kopf e ha continuato a fare così. Effettivamente al tempo degli Oliari ed Altri la sentenza, c'era già una maggioranza sottile dei CoE Stati (ventiquattro fuori di quaranta sette) quel già aveva legiferato in favore di simile riconoscimento e la protezione attinente. Lo stesso sviluppo rapido era stato identificato globalmente, col particolare riferimento a paesi nell'Americas ed Australasia, mostrando il movimento internazionale che continua verso riconoscimento legale (veda Oliari ed Altri, citato sopra, § 178). Datare, ventisetti paesi fuori dei quaranta sette stati membro di CoE già ha decretato legislazione che permette lo stesso sesso accoppia avere la loro relazione riconosciuto (o come un matrimonio o come una forma di unione civile o associazione registrata) (veda paragrafo 112 sopra).
205. Gli stessi non possono essere detti su registrazione di matrimoni di stesso-sesso contratta all'estero in riguardo di che non c'è consentimento in Europa. Separatamente dal membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa dove matrimonio di stesso-sesso è permesso, le informazioni di diritto comparato disponibile alla Corte (limitato a ventisetti paesi dove non era matrimonio di stesso-sesso, al tempo, permise) mostrò che solamente tre di quelli sette del venti altro membro Stati permisero a simile matrimoni di essere registrati, nonostante l'assenza (datare o al tempo attinente) nel loro diritto nazionale di matrimonio di stesso-sesso (veda paragrafo 113 sopra). Così, questa mancanza di consentimento conferma che gli Stati devono in principio sia riconosciuto un margine ampio della valutazione, riguardo alla decisione come a se registrare, come matrimoni simile matrimoni contrassero all'estero.
206. Separatamente dal sopra, nel determinare il margine della valutazione la Corte deve prendere anche conto del fatto che i problemi nella causa presente sfaccettature interessate dell'esistenza di un individuo e l'identità (veda, per esempio, Oliari ed Altri, citato sopra, § 177).
207. Come agli interessi dello Stato e la comunità a grande, in riguardo dell'insuccesso per registrare simile matrimoni, la Corte può accettare, che ostacolare disturbo Italia può desiderare impedire i suoi cittadini dall'avere ricorso negli altri Stati alle particolari istituzioni che non sono accettate nazionalmente (come matrimonio di stesso-sesso) e quale lo Stato non è obbligato per riconoscere da una prospettiva di Convenzione. Effettivamente i rifiuti nella causa presente sono il risultato della scelta del legislatore per non concedere lo stesso matrimonio di sesso - una scelta non condannabile sotto la Convenzione. Così, la Corte considera che c'è anche l'interesse legittimo di un Stato nell'assicurare che le sue prerogative legislative sono rispettate e perciò che le scelte di governi democraticamente eletti non vanno circonvenuto.
208. La Corte nota che il rifiuto per registrare i richiedenti il matrimonio di ' non li spogliò di qualsiasi diritti prima riconobbero in Italia (era stato là qualsiasi), e che i richiedenti ancora potessero trarre profitto, nello Stato dove loro contrassero matrimonio da qualsiasi diritti ed obblighi acquisirono per simile matrimonio.
209. Comunque, le decisioni che rifiutano di registrare il loro matrimonio sotto qualsiasi la forma, lasciando così i richiedenti in un aspirapolvere legale (prima delle leggi nuove), non riuscì a prendere conto della realtà sociale della situazione. Effettivamente, siccome la legge stette in piedi di fronte all'introduzione di Legge n. 76/2016 e decreti susseguenti, le autorità non potevano dare credito formalmente all'esistenza legale dei richiedenti l'unione di ' (sia sé de facto o jure del de come sé fu riconosciuto sotto la legge di un stato estero). I richiedenti incontrarono così ostacoli in vita quotidiana loro e la loro relazione non fu riconosciuta qualsiasi la tutela giuridica. Nessuno interessi di comunità prevalenti sono stati fissati in avanti per giustificare la situazione dove i richiedenti la relazione di ' era priva di qualsiasi riconoscimento e protezione.
210. La Corte considera che, al giorno d'oggi la causa, lo Stato italiano non poteva trascurare ragionevolmente la situazione dei richiedenti che corrisposero ad una vita di famiglia all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 della Convenzione, senza offrire un mezzi di salvaguardare la loro relazione i richiedenti. Comunque, sino a recentemente, le autorità nazionali andarono a vuoto a riconoscere che situazione o prevede qualsiasi forma di protezione ai richiedenti l'unione di ', come un risultato dell'aspirapolvere legale che esistè in legge italiana (in finora come sé non preveda per qualsiasi l'unione capace di salvaguardare i richiedenti la relazione di ' di fronte a 2016). Segue che lo Stato andò a vuoto a prevedere un equilibrio equo fra qualsiasi competendo finora interessi in siccome loro non riuscirono ad assicurare che i richiedenti avevano disponibili una specifica struttura legale che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni di stesso-sesso.
211. Nella luce del precedente, la Corte considera, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione in quel il riguardo.
(b) Articolo 14
212. Avendo riguardo ad alla sua sentenza sotto Articolo 8, la Corte considera, che non è necessario per esaminare se, c'è stata anche una violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8 o 12 in questa causa.
IV. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
213. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
214. I richiedenti in richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12, e 44057/12 chiesero 10,000 euros (EUR) ognuno, vale a dire EUR 3,000 per l'insuccesso per registrare il loro matrimonio ed EUR 7,000 per la mancanza di riconoscimento legale della loro relazione, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale così come interessi e tassi su quegli importi. Loro richiedono anche la Corte per indicare misure sotto Articolo 46 per i fini di compensare il problema strutturale nella legge. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 60088/12 EUR 15,000 chiesti congiuntamente in danno non-patrimoniale.
215. Il Governo non fece commento in riguardo dei richiedenti le rivendicazioni di '.
216. La Corte nota che la situazione in Italia ha cambiato procedimenti pendenti di fronte a questa Corte; non c'è così stanza per indicare qualsiasi misura sotto Articolo 46. Comunque, assegna EUR 5,000 i richiedenti ognuno in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
Costi di B. e spese
217. I richiedenti in richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12, e 44057/12 EUR 13,862 anche chiesti (come per nota spese particolareggiata secondo la legge italiana ed attinente) più interessi per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alla Corte. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 60088/12 EUR 12,586.50 chiesti per compensi professionali calcolati in linea con la legge italiana ed attinente in collegamento con procedimenti di fronte a questa Corte, così come un EUR 2,500 valutato per spese di viaggio.
218. Il Governo non fece commento in riguardo dei richiedenti le rivendicazioni di '.
219. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare ai richiedenti in richiesta n. 60088/12 la somma di EUR 9,000, congiuntamente ed i richiedenti in richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12, e 44057/12 la somma di EUR 10,000, congiuntamente per i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte.
Interesse di mora di C.
220. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara, con una maggioranza, le richieste ammissibile;

2. Sostiene, con 5 voti a 2, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14 in collegamento con Articoli 8 e 12 della Convenzione;

4. Sostiene, con 5 voti a 2,
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euros) ognuno, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 9,000 (nove mila euros), congiuntamente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti in richiesta n. 60088/12, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(l'iii) EUR 10,000 (dieci mila euros), congiuntamente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti in richieste N. 26431/12, 26742/12, e 44057/12 in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale.

5. Respinge, unanimamente, il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 14 dicembre 2017, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Abel Campos Kristina Pardalos
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, le opinioni separate e seguenti sono annesse a questa sentenza:
(un) opinione concordante di Giudice Koskelo;
(b) dissentendo opinione di Giudici Pejchal e Wojtyczek.
K.P.
A.C.
?
APPENDICE
OMISSIS



OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DI GIUDICE KOSKELO
1. Come la maggioranza, io ho votato in favore di trovare una violazione di Articolo 8 in questa causa. Io non sono spiacevolmente comunque, capace di sottoscrivere al ragionamento adottò con la maggioranza.
2. La causa presente solleva due problemi (veda paragrafo 3 della sentenza). Il primo problema è se c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 a causa del rifiuto con le autorità italiane registrare i richiedenti matrimoni di stesso-sesso di ' contratti all'estero (matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri) come matrimoni per i fini di legge italiana.
3. Il secondo problema è se c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 perché sino a 5 giugno 2016, quel è, l'entrata in vigore di Legge n. 76/2016, l'ordine legale italiano non previde per una specifica struttura legale che concerne associazioni di unions/registered civili fra persone dello stesso sesso. A causa di questa mancanza di una struttura legale, i richiedenti non erano anche capaci di avere i loro matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri registrato come associazioni di unions/registered civili.
4. Come la causa-legge della Corte sta in piedi, le conclusioni per essere disegnato su sia problemi sono, nella mia opinione, piuttosto diritto.
Il primo problema: rifiuto per registrare matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri come matrimoni
5. La registrazione di status civile, al giorno d'oggi contesto che la registrazione di un matrimonio ha contratto all'estero, è un atto di riconoscimento di che status per i fini dell'ordine legale e nazionale. Nella sua sentenza di 15 marzo 2012 (veda divide in paragrafi 61-62 della sentenza presente), la Corte italiana di Cassazione fondò che matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri non potevano essere registrati come matrimoni. In che sentenza, la Corte di Cassazione portò fuori che che sembra essere un esercizio normale nella richiesta di diritto internazionale privato.
6. Quando un ordine legale e nazionale è affrontato con una questione di riconoscimento di un status estero, il primo passo dell'analisi è qualifica. La qualifica sta determinando circa se un matrimonio estero è capace di essere qualificato come un matrimonio che è se incorre all'interno della sfera delle norme nazionali che regolano il riconoscimento di matrimoni esteri. Sotto i principi stabiliti di diritto internazionale privato, che qualifica è soggetto a fori della legge che perciò determina se un matrimonio estero può essere qualificato come un matrimonio. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte italiana di Cassazione ha concluso che sotto legge italiana un matrimonio di stesso-sesso estero non può essere qualificato come un matrimonio per i fini delle norme di legge italiana che governa il riconoscimento di matrimoni esteri. Questo vuole dire che, secondo la corte nazionale, un matrimonio di stesso-sesso estero non poteva essere registrato come matrimonio perché tale matrimonio è incapace di produrre gli effetti legali che allegano ad un matrimonio sotto l'ordine legale italiano.
7. Come lontano siccome concerne la Convenzione, la posizione stabilita sotto la causa-legge della Corte è che la Convenzione non impone sugli Stati Contraenti qualsiasi obbligo per accordare stesso-sesso accoppia accesso a matrimonio. In Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria (n. 30141/04, ECHR 2010), a questa conclusione fu giunta sia nella richiesta di Articolo 12 e nella richiesta di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 8.
8. Su questa base, determinato che non c'è obbligo di Convenzione in carica sulle Parti Contraenti concedere matrimonio di stesso-sesso, sembra chiaro che la Convenzione non può imporre inoltre su quelli Stati Contraenti che non prevedono per simile matrimoni qualsiasi obbligo per riconoscere matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri come matrimoni per i fini del loro proprio ordine legale. Di conseguenza, il rifiuto con le autorità italiane per registrare i richiedenti matrimoni di stesso-sesso di ' come matrimoni non genera una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
9. Benché la Convenzione non obblighi un Stato come l'Italia per registrare matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri come matrimoni, con la conseguenza che matrimoni così esteri sarebbero soggetto a tutti gli effetti legali che allegano a matrimonio sotto legge italiana, non si può escludere che ci possono essere situazioni dove gli obblighi dello Stato sotto Articolo 8 per rispettare privato e la vita di famiglia, o da solo o in concomitanza con Articolo 14, può essere impegnato per motivi di un insuccesso per dare credito alla stalla manifestata e relazione impegnata fra una coppia, basato, siccome la causa può essere su un matrimonio di stesso-sesso estero. Comunque, questa è una questione separata. Sembra che la Corte Costituzionale dell'Italia ha, come una questione di legge costituzionale e nazionale, espresse una posizione simile (veda paragrafo 75 della sentenza presente). Comunque, nessuno particolari circostanze o danni di questa natura sono in questione di fronte a questa Corte sulla base delle richieste presenti.
Il secondo problema: rifiuto per prevedere qualsiasi l'altro genere di struttura legale per unioni di stesso-sesso
10. Questo problema era la materia della sentenza della Corte nella causa di Oliari ed Altri c. l'Italia (N. 18766/11 e 36030/11, 21 luglio 2015), dove la Corte rivolse la situazione che prevale sotto legge italiana fino a 5 giugno 2016, vale a dire che stesso-sesso accoppia che è incapace per sposarsi non era capace di avere accesso ad una specifica struttura legale (come che per unioni civili o associazioni registrate) capace di offrendoli col riconoscimento del loro status e garantire a loro i certi diritti attinente ad una coppia in una relazione stabile ed impegnata (veda Oliari ed Altri, § 167). La Corte fondò che Italia era in violazione di Articolo 8 in che non era riuscito ad assicurare che i richiedenti avevano disponibili una specifica struttura legale che prevede per riconoscimento e protezione per le loro unioni di stesso-sesso, sé che è capito che non era necessario per questo per essere nella forma di concedere matrimonio di stesso-sesso (l'ibid., § 185).
11. Dato la conclusione della Corte in Oliari ed Altri, è chiaro che i richiedenti nella causa presente erano, sino all'entrata in vigore dei recenti emendamenti legislativi, vittime dello stesso insuccesso fondamentale con lo stato italiano come i richiedenti in Oliari ed Altri. Questo è così perché, come lontano siccome concernono i richiedenti presenti, l'assenza di una specifica struttura legale che governa “unioni civili” o “associazioni registrate” fra coppie di stesso-sesso anche aveva l'effetto che i loro matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri non potevano essere riconosciuti in Italia in qualsiasi forma che è né come matrimoni né come “unioni civili” o “associazioni registrate.”
Conclusione
12. Sulla base del sopra, io concludo, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione su conto delle autorità italiane il rifiuto di ' registrare i richiedenti ' matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri come matrimoni per i fini di legge italiana.
13. Con contrasto, è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 perché, sino all'entrata in vigore di Legge n. 76/2016 e gli emendamenti legislativi ed associati, nessuna specifica struttura legale era disponibile in Italia che prevede per riconoscimento e protezione per unioni di stesso-sesso e, di conseguenza, i richiedenti ' matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri non potevano essere dati riconoscimento in Italia in qualsiasi la forma.
Il ragionamento di maggioranza
14. La maggioranza sviluppa un ragionamento che si concentra sul rifiuto di registrazione allo stesso-sesso accoppia e quale, nella mia prospettiva inutilmente confonde i problemi che sorgono nella causa presente.
15. Inizialmente, nel contesto della questione dell'ammissibilità, la sentenza (con riferimento a Dadouch c. il Malta, n. 38816/07, § 48 20 luglio 2010) ammette che la registrazione di un matrimonio costituisce un riconoscimento di status civile e legale (veda paragrafo 144 della sentenza presente). Quando rivolgendo i meriti della causa, comunque la maggioranza esposta fuori su una linea di argomento piuttosto che la quale macchia chiarifica l'analisi.
16. Nella sentenza di maggioranza, la valutazione delle azioni di reclamo ha aperto con suggerendo che il “rifiutò registrazione dei richiedenti i matrimoni di ', o come matrimonio o sotto qualsiasi l'altra forma”, era una misura “spogliandoli di qualsiasi la tutela giuridica o associò diritti” (veda paragrafo 191). Questo è dove la confusione comincia. È reiterato in paragrafo 196, dove la maggioranza considera che che che deve determinare la Corte è se i richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 8 furono violati con “i rifiuti per registrare i richiedenti i matrimoni di ' in qualsiasi la forma, col risultato che loro furono lasciati in un aspirapolvere legale e privo di qualsiasi la protezione.”
17. Si deve reiterare che il rifiuto per registrare i richiedenti i matrimoni di ' come matrimoni era dovuto alla posizione sotto legge italiana ed effettiva, custodita al livello della Costituzione secondo il quale matrimonio è restretto a persone del sesso opposto. Come un corollario di questa posizione legale, un matrimonio di stesso-sesso estero non è capace di produrre gli stessi effetti legali come un matrimonio sotto legge italiana ed effettiva. Questo a turno è la ragione perché i richiedenti ' che matrimoni di stesso-sesso esteri non sono stati riconosciuti, e così non registrato, come matrimoni per i fini dell'ordine legale italiano.
18. Similmente, il rifiuto per registrare i richiedenti i matrimoni di ' “sotto qualsiasi l'altra forma” era dovuto alla posizione che prevale (sino a 2016) sotto legge italiana ed effettiva secondo che non c'era specifica struttura legale per il riconoscimento e protezione di coppie di stesso-sesso nella forma di “unioni civili” o “associazioni registrate.”
19. Così, non ha ragione che che che deprivato i richiedenti, come coppie che vivono in unioni di stesso-sesso stabili di “qualsiasi la tutela giuridica” era l'assenza di registrazione. Cosa li spogliò di specifica tutela giuridica come coppie era l'assenza di legislazione effettiva che prevede per una struttura legale che governa l'unione di coppie di stesso-sesso, o come matrimoni o sotto qualche genere di status. Nelle altre parole, l'assenza di registrazione non era la causa ma la conseguenza della situazione legale ed effettiva che prevale in Italia sino all'adozione di Legge n. 76/2016 e misure legislative e relative.
20. Vale che, come una questione di legge costituzionale e nazionale, la Corte Costituzionale italiana già aveva affermato, prima della promulgazione di Legge n. 76/2016, che senza pregiudizio alla discrezione di Parlamento, potesse intervenire comunque secondo il principio dell'uguaglianza nelle specifiche situazioni riferite ai diritti essenziali di una coppia di omosessuale, dove lo stesso trattamento fra coppie sposate e coppie di omosessuale fu richiesto. Che corte può in simile cause valuti la ragionevolezza delle misure (veda paragrafo 75 della sentenza presente). Apparentemente la Corte Costituzionale non considerò che protezione così contestuale (prima della struttura legislativa e nuova) poteva o sarebbe dovuto essere dipendente su qualsiasi registrazione precedente delle coppie di stesso-sesso riguardò. Anche da questo punto di vista, perciò non ha ragione che è l'assenza di registrazione che ha spogliato i richiedenti di qualsiasi protezione alla quale loro sarebbero concessi altrimenti sotto diritto nazionale.
21. È anche importante per notare che come una questione di legge di protezione di dati, ad autorità Statali non è permesso di procedere alla registrazione di dati personali, come quelli relativo ai privati o relazioni di famiglia di individui a meno che c'è una base legale e chiara, con un fine pre-definito, per simile misure. Questi requisiti sono accentuati sotto legge di EU alla quale Italia come Stato membro è soggetta, incluso requisiti su elaborazione dati basata su beneplacito (Direttiva 95/46/EC; essere sostituito come da 25 maggio 2018 con la Generale Dati Protezione Regolamentazione (EU)2016/679). Sembrerebbe contraddittorio per prevedere un obbligo positivo in carica sullo Stato registrare le relazioni intime di persone nell'assenza di specifica legislazione basò su chiaramente definì e fini allineato.
22. Per le coppie di richiedente, che questioni sono gli effetti legali piuttosto che qualsiasi atto di registrazione, irrispettoso del suo significato legale. Il suggerimento che lo Stato dovrebbe essere sotto un obbligo positivo derivò da Articolo 8 per offrire pubblicità ai richiedenti ' progetto comune della vita (veda paragrafo 150)-indipendentemente da un obbligo offrire tutela giuridica per status loro come partner in una coppia-sembra piuttosto bizzarro. Questo è addirittura più così nella luce delle condizioni correnti, dove individui si sbarazzano di possibilità ampie e facili di rendere pubblico, senza assistenza Statale qualsiasi aspetto delle loro vite private che loro desiderano dividere con altri.
23. Al giorno d'oggi la sentenza, la maggioranza prende, nella mia prospettiva, un detour superfluo e fuorviato circa il problema di registrazione, prima di infine arrivare alla conclusione che-davvero-l'insuccesso imputabile allo Stato rispondente consiste, non nel rifiuto di registrazione, ma nell'insuccesso a “assicura che i richiedenti avevano disponibili una specifica struttura che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni di stesso-sesso” (veda paragrafo 210 della sentenza presente). Nelle altre parole, la violazione di Articolo 8 è fondamentalmente la stessa come che fondò nella causa di Oliari ed Altri c. l'Italia. Sotto questo approccio, l'assenza di registrazione come simile non sollevi un problema distinto nel contesto presente.
24. Coi cambi legislativi che sono stati introdotti in Italia per Legge n. 76/2016, questi aspetti della questione non saranno più di qualsiasi l'importanza speciale nello Stato rispondente. Comunque, problemi simili sorgeranno in quelli Stati Contraenti dove i resti di situazione legislativi simile a che prima prevalendo in Italia. Perciò, io penso che sarebbe stato utile se la maggioranza fosse potuta essere persuasa a produrre una sentenza con un ragionamento più chiaro ed analiticamente aderente.

OPINIONE CHE DISSENTE DI GIUDICI PEJCHAL E WOJTYCZEK
1. Noi non siamo d'accordo rispettosamente con la prospettiva dei nostri colleghi che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione nella causa presente. Le nostre eccezioni concernono la metodologia di interpretazione di trattato, la metodologia per accertare se diritti di Convenzione sono stati sostenuti ed anche la richiesta dei principi attinenti ed articoli di legge nella causa presente.
2. La Convenzione è un trattato internazionale che deve essere esposto secondo gli articoli di interpretazione di trattato stabilito in diritto internazionale e codificò nella Convenzione di Vienna sulla Legge di Trattati.
Noi notiamo in questo contesto che il Preambolo alla Convenzione presenta la Convenzione come uno dei primi passi per l'esecuzione collettiva di certo dei diritti affermati nella Dichiarazione Universale. Il Preambolo si riferisce anche all'ulteriore realizzazione di diritti come uno dei metodi per il conseguimento di più grande unità fra il membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa. Segue che il ruolo della Convenzione è la protezione di un numero limitato di diritti, therein definito. Inoltre realizzazione di diritti umani deve notificare il fine di realizzare la più grande unità fra i membri del Consiglio dell'Europa e si sarà impegnata con modo di trattati internazionali.
Il mandato della Corte europea di Diritti umani è definito in Articolo 19 della Convenzione nei termini seguenti: assicurare l'osservanza degli appuntamenti si impegnata con le Parti Contraenti ed Alte nella Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre. Mentre la Corte deve interpretare e deve chiarificare le disposizioni della Convenzione nel contesto delle cause nuove che lo sono portato prima, non è affidato per cambiare la sfera degli appuntamenti si impegnata con le Parti Contraenti ed Alte ed in particolare adattare la Convenzione a cambi di società. La Corte dovrebbe essere il servitore, non il padrone, della Convenzione.
Inoltre, il Preambolo alla Convenzione si riferisce a due attrezzi per il mantenimento delle libertà fondamentali: la democrazia politica ed effettiva ed una comprensione comune e l'osservanza di diritti umani. La democrazia politica ed effettiva richiede l'esistenza e funzionando di legislature elesse avanti secondo il set di standard in Articolo 3 di Protocollo Nessuno 1. In questo contesto, il compito di adattare la Convenzione all'evoluzione delle società in Stati europei appartiene alle Parti Contraenti ed Alte, e necessariamente presuppone la partecipazione di legislature democraticamente elette. Nella nostra prospettiva, sviluppi di società ed identici in tutti gli Stati Parties alla Convenzione non possono alterare anche la sfera dei loro appuntamenti sotto la Convenzione. Questo fa domanda un fortiori a cambi di società che accadono in solamente alcuni Stati europei. Cambi che accadono in degli Stati non possono colpire mai la sfera degli altri Stati gli appuntamenti di '.
3. La Convenzione europea su Diritti umani non dovrebbe essere letta in un aspirapolvere legale ma dovrebbe essere messa nel contesto dei più importanti strumenti di umano-diritto internazionali. Il Preambolo della Convenzione si riferisce alla Dichiarazione Universale di Diritti umani che dichiararono scopi a garantendo l'universale e riconoscimento effettivo e l'osservanza del therein di Diritti. La Dichiarazione Universale di set di Diritti umani fuori i diritti seguenti in Articolo 16:
“(1) uomini e donne di piena età senza qualsiasi limitazione a causa di razza, la nazionalità o religione, abbia diritto a sposarsi e fondare una famiglia. Loro sono concessi per uguagliare diritti come a matrimonio, durante matrimonio ed alla sua risoluzione.
(2) matrimonio sarà entrato solamente in col libero ed il pieno beneplacito dei consorti che proporsi.
(3) la famiglia è il naturale ed unità di gruppo e fondamentale di società e è concessa a protezione con società e lo Stato.”
Il minimo che standard di diritti umani universalmente vincolanti sono stati esposti nell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici e l'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Economici, Sociali e Culturali. Articolo 23 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici ha l'enunciazione seguente:
“1. La famiglia è il naturale ed unità di gruppo e fondamentale di società e è concessa a protezione con società e lo Stato.
2. Il diritto di uomini e donne di età adatta al matrimonio per sposarsi e fondare una famiglia sarà riconosciuto.
3. Nessun matrimonio sarà entrato in senza il libero ed il pieno beneplacito dei consorti che proporsi.
4. Stati Festeggia all'Alleanza presente prenderà passi appropriati per assicurare uguaglianza di diritti e le responsabilità di consorti come a matrimonio, durante matrimonio ed alla sua risoluzione. Nella causa della risoluzione, approvvigioni sarà costituito la protezione necessaria di qualsiasi i figli.”
In sia la Dichiarazione Universale di Diritti umani e l'Alleanza Internazionale su matrimonio di Diritti Civile e Politico è capita come un'unione fra un uomo ed una donna. Inoltre, in ambo gli strumenti la famiglia-basato su matrimonio fra un uomo ed una donna-fu dichiarato il naturale ed unità di gruppo e fondamentale di società e siccome essendo concesso a protezione con società e lo Stato. Matrimonio è il solo “struttura legale” per vita di famiglia menzionata in quelli documenti.
Il Diritti umani Comitato ha espresso la prospettiva seguente riguardo al significato di Articolo 23 dell'Alleanza:
“Determinato l'esistenza di una specifica disposizione nell'Alleanza sul diritto a matrimonio qualsiasi rivendicazione che questo diritto è stato violato deve essere considerata nella luce di questa disposizione. Articolo 23, divida in paragrafi 2, dell'Alleanza la disposizione effettiva e sola è nell'Alleanza che definisce un diritto con usando il termine “uomini e donne”, piuttosto che “ogni essere umano”, “ognuno” e “tutte le persone.” Uso del termine “uomini e donne”, piuttosto che i termini generali usati altrove in Parte III dell'Alleanza, è stato capito costantemente ed uniformemente siccome indicando che l'obbligo di trattato di parti di Stati che scaturiscono da articolo 23, divida in paragrafi 2, dell'Alleanza è riconoscere come matrimonio solamente l'unione fra un uomo ed una donna che desiderano sposarsi l'un l'altro.” (la Comunicazione N.ro 902/1999, la Sig.ra Juliet al di et di Joslin. c. Nuova Zelanda, CCPR/C/75/D/902/1999 prospettive adottarono 17 luglio 2002).
Segue che i due strumenti summenzionati rendono differente la condizione giuridica di eterosessuale e coppie di omosessuale. C'è senza dubbio che fra eterosessuale ed omosessuale accoppia ci sono le certe somiglianze e le certe differenze. Dalla prospettiva di axiological dei due strumenti internazionali, le differenze prevalgono su comunque, le somiglianze. Segue che le loro situazioni non sono comparabili per il fine di valutare il permissibility delle differenziazioni legali nel campo di diritto di famiglia.
4. Articolo 8 § 1 degli stati di Convenzione che “ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia, la sua casa e la sua corrispondenza.” Sotto Articolo 12 della Convenzione, “uomini e donne hanno diritto a sposarsi e fondare una famiglia, secondo leggi nazionali che governano l'esercizio di questo diritto.” Traspira da quelle disposizioni che l'unità di famiglia è fondata primariamente con un uomo ed una donna per matrimonio.
Il diritto per rispettare per uno privato e la vita di famiglia, casa e corrispondenza presuppone un obbligo sullo Stato per frenarsi dall'interferire con la libertà del diritto-possessore. Azione positiva è costretta primariamente dallo Stato ad assicurare protezione da interferenza con parti private ed imporre sanzioni per interferenza indebita con autorità pubbliche o con parti private.
Molti obblighi positivi e più larghi sul gambo Statale da Articolo 12 che impone l'obbligo per riconoscere matrimonio come istituzione sociale e legale. Inoltre, Articolo 5 di Protocollo N.ro 7 richiedono che diritto di famiglia assicuri l'uguaglianza fra consorti. Questa scorsa disposizione non solo enfatizza i diritti ma anche le responsabilità dei consorti. Contraendo un matrimonio non solo comporta diritti e protezione ma anche le responsabilità e vis-à-vis di doveri l'altro consorte, figli e società. Inoltre, la causa-legge della Corte sottolinea l'obbligo per proteggere i migliori interessi di figli. Legislazione su diritto di famiglia dovrebbe proteggere perciò i migliori interessi di figli e, specialmente, assicuri un ambiente di famiglia stabile, liberi da intromissione dello stato.
Articolo 8 della Convenzione, siccome interpretato secondo gli articoli applicabili di interpretazione di trattato, non imponga sulle Parti Contraenti ed Alte un obbligo per prevedere per altre istituzioni legali (come unioni civili) per lo sviluppo della vita di famiglia. In particolare, non c'è nessun obbligo da assicurare che persone hanno specifiche strutture legali disponibili che prevedono per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni, sia loro da sessi diversi o stesso-sesso. Questa questione appartiene alla giurisdizione nazionale ed esclusiva delle Parti Contraenti ed Alte.
Il ragionamento della maggioranza si riferisce al bisogno per protezione e riconoscimento (veda paragrafo 192 della sentenza). C'è senza dubbio che le autorità Statali nell'esercizio dei loro poteri supremi devono prendere nell'esame le realtà sociali e cambi di società così come le necessità legittime dei loro cittadini. Comunque, le necessità non comportano per diritti di Convenzione di se. Non è chiaro quale le necessità legittime dovrebbero comportare obblighi positivi sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Sotto l'approccio proposto con la maggioranza sé sarebbe necessario per stabilire criterio obiettivo per identificare le necessità che comportano obblighi positivi per gli Stati.
Noi conveniamo con la prospettiva che sotto Articoli 8 e 12 gli Stati godono un margine largo della valutazione. Nella nostra prospettiva, comunque non ha ragione che loro hanno un margine largo della valutazione quando esponendo su strutture legali per riconoscimento di unioni di interpersonal altro che il matrimonio (all'interno del significato di Articolo 12). In realtà, loro preservano la loro libertà completa di azione in questo riguardo, poiché il problema incorre fuori regolamentazione di Convenzione.
5. Articolo 12 è stato interpretato in molte sentenze e decisioni della Corte europea di Diritti umani. La Corte ha espresso, in particolare, le prospettive seguenti in questo riguardo:
“Nell'opinione della Corte, il diritto per sposarsi garantì con Articolo 12... si riferisce al matrimonio tradizionale fra persone di sesso biologico ed opposto. Questo sembra anche dall'enunciazione dell'Articolo che lo fa chiaro che Articolo 12... riguarda principalmente per proteggere matrimonio come la base della famiglia” (Rees c. il Regno Unito, 17 ottobre 1986, § 49 la Serie Un n. 106).
“I richiami di Corte che il diritto per sposarsi garantì con Articolo 12 si riferisce al matrimonio tradizionale fra persone di sesso biologico ed opposto. Questo sembra anche dall'enunciazione dell'Articolo che lo fa chiaro che Articolo 12 concerne principalmente per proteggere matrimonio come la base della famiglia. Inoltre, Articolo 12 posa in giù che l'esercizio di questo diritto sarà soggetto alle leggi nazionali degli Stati Contraenti. Le limitazioni con ciò introdotte non devono restringere o devono ridurre il diritto in tale modo o a tale misura che la molta essenza del diritto è danneggiata. Comunque, non si può dire che l'impedimento legale nel Regno Unito sul matrimonio di persone che non sono del sesso biologico ed opposto abbia un effetto di qualche genere, (veda la sentenza di Rees summenzionata, p. 19, §§ 49 e 50)” (Sheffield e Horsham c. il Regno Unito, 30 luglio 1998, § 66 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998 V)”
“... la Corte osserva che matrimonio ha connotazioni sociali e culturali stabili che possono differire grandemente da una società ad un altro. La Corte reitera che non deve precipitarsi sostituire la sua propria sentenza in posto di che delle autorità nazionali che sono messe meglio valutare e rispondere alle necessità di società (veda B. e L. c. il Regno Unito, citato sopra, § 36).” (Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria, n. 30141/04, § 62 ECHR 2010).”
“La Corte ha accettato che la protezione della famiglia nel senso tradizionale è, in principio, una ragione pesante e legittima che giustificerebbe una differenza in trattamento (veda Karner, citato sopra, § 40, e Kozak, citato sopra, § 98)” (X ed Altri c. l'Austria [GC], n. 19010/07, § 138 ECHR 2013).”
Più recentemente:
“La Corte reitera che Articolo 12 della Convenzione è un specialis della legge per sposarsi, per il diritto. Garantisce il diritto essenziale di un uomo e donna per sposarsi e fondare una famiglia. Articolo 12 prevede espressamente per regolamentazione di matrimonio con legge nazionale. Custodisce il concetto tradizionale di matrimonio come essendo fra un uomo ed una donna (veda Rees c. il Regno Unito, citato sopra, § 49). Mentre è vero che alcuni Stati Contraenti hanno prolungato matrimonio a partner di stesso-sesso, Articolo 12 non può essere costruito come imponendo un obbligo sugli Stati Contraenti per accordare accesso a matrimonio a stesso-sesso accoppia (veda Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria, citato sopra, § 63)” (Hämäläinen c. la Finlandia [GC], n. 37359/09, § 96 ECHR 2014).”
Noi concordiamo con quelle prospettive che hanno la loro base nella Convenzione siccome esposto sotto gli articoli applicabili di interpretazione di trattato. Loro sono in armonia con la Dichiarazione Universale di Diritti umani e l'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici. Noi notiamo inoltre che il Preambolo alla Convenzione contiene un riferimento ad una comprensione comune di diritti umani ed ad un'eredità comune di tradizioni politiche, ideals, la libertà e l'articolo di legge. La comprensione di matrimonio come un'unione stabile di un uomo ed una donna la vita di famiglia fondamentale è parte dell'eredità legale e comune.
6. In un numero di cause la Corte ha rivolto anche il problema del possibile “la proroga” di matrimonio. Nella causa presente la maggioranza esprime la prospettiva seguente in questo riguardo: “La Corte reitera che Stati ancora sono gratis, sotto Articolo 12 della Convenzione così come sotto Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8, restringere accesso a matrimonio a diverso-sesso accoppia, (veda Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, § 108, e Chapin e Charpentier, citato sopra, § 108)” (veda paragrafo 192 della sentenza principale).
In questo contesto noi notiamo in primo luogo che che i termini “sposarsi” e “il matrimonio” è divenuto polysemes. Matrimonio in significato iniziale suo presuppone la comunità delle vite fra un uomo ed una donna. Noi notiamo in questo contesto le definizioni seguenti di matrimonio: “Nuptiae sunt coniunctio maris et feminae et consorzio omnis vitae, divini et humani iuriscommunicatio” (Modestinus, Digesta Iustiniani 23.2.1); “Nuptiae autem sive matrimonium est viri et mulieris coniunctio, individuam consuetudinem vitae continens” (Institutiones Iustiniani, 1.10). Il complementariness dei sessi biologici dei due consorti è un elemento costitutivo di matrimonio. Inoltre, matrimonio in questo significato è - con definizione - un'istituzione sociale aperto a procreazione. Il fatto che le certe coppie sposate possono patire la sterilità non colpisca la sua funzione sociale.
Matrimonio nel suo secondo significato designa un'unione di due persone che vivono insieme. Il termine “il matrimonio” in questo secondo senso ha una connotazione diversa ed una denotazione diversa al termine “il matrimonio” come usato nel primo significato. Questo secondo significato ha sviluppato solamente recentemente.
Accesso che accorda a matrimonio all'interno del significato di Articolo 12 a coppie di stesso-sesso è concettualmente impossibile. “Prolungando” la sfera del diritto per sposarsi a coppie di omosessuale presuppone che il termine “il matrimonio” è usato in un significato diverso (quel è, il secondo significato spiegò sopra di). Così, Articolo 12 non può essere applicabile a coppie di stesso-sesso che desiderano sposarsi o a coppie di stesso-sesso di che già si sposano sotto il sistema nazionale un altro Statale (veda paragrafo 145 in multa). Il “la proroga” della sfera di matrimonio ad omosessuale non solo accoppia colpisce la denotazione ma anche sostanzialmente i cambi la connotazione del termine “il matrimonio.”
In secondo luogo, gli stati di maggioranza che “Stati ancora sono gratis...” (enfasi aggiunse). Questo suggerisce la Corte intende di revisionare questa prospettiva nel futuro. Noi non siamo d'accordo fortemente con tale approccio che presuppone che la sfera di obblighi di trattato può essere adattata con la Corte sulla base di cambi di società e - che che è più - che quelli cambi di società possono e svilupperanno in solamente uno direzione. La Corte non ha mandato a favore o interdice cambi di società. Gli Stati rimangono liberi decidere su problemi diversi sotto la Convenzione sino a simile tempo come questo trattato è stato cambiato coi padroni del trattato.
7. La maggioranza nota un sviluppo rapido verso legale “il riconoscimento” di coppie di stesso-sesso (veda paragrafo 204 della sentenza) così come la mancanza di consentimento riguardo alla registrazione di matrimoni di stesso-sesso contratta all'estero (veda paragrafo 205 della sentenza). Noi notiamo che matrimonio è definito costituzionalmente come un'unione fra un uomo ed una donna in un numero crescente degli Stati europei: Bulgaria, Croatia, Ungheria, Lettonia, Lituania, Macedonia, Moldavia, Montenegro, Polonia, Serbia, Slovacchia e l'Ucraina.
8. La maggioranza considera che i fatti della richiesta presente incorrono all'interno della nozione della vita privata così come la vita di famiglia all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 (veda paragrafo 143 della sentenza) e disegna la conclusione che questi Articoli fanno domanda nella causa presente. Nella nostra prospettiva questa asserzione è basata su un errore metodologico e fondamentale.
Che i certi fatti di una causa incorrono all'interno del significato di privato o la vita di famiglia non vuole dire in se stesso che Articoli 8 o 12 sono applicabili. Una disposizione di Convenzione che protegge un diritto umano è applicabile nelle certe circostanze se offre almeno una protezione di facie di prima contro l'interferenza allegato con questo diritto. Che che si importa qui non è le circostanze fattuale presentate con un richiedente, ma i danni sollevarono nella richiesta. Questo può essere illustrato con l'esempio fittizio e seguente. Una coppia che desidera sposarsi viaggio in aereo al posto della cerimonia di matrimonio, ma il loro volo è differito. Simile fatti possono prima facie incorrono all'interno della sfera di privato e la vita di famiglia per il fine di Articolo 8. Comunque, questo non vuole dire che Articoli 8 o 12 sono applicabili se il danno sollevasse riguarda il risarcimento chiede in riguardo del ritardo, fin da Articoli 8 e 12 non proteggono coppie che desiderano sposarsi da simile disturbi.
La maggioranza ha espresso la prospettiva seguente in paragrafo 145: “Poiché la Corte già ha sostenuto Articolo 12 per essere applicabile ad una stessa sesso-coppia che desidera sposarsi, la disposizione deve essere anche applicabile a coppie di stesso-sesso di che già si sposano sotto il sistema nazionale un altro Statale.”
Noi notiamo in questo riguardo che il locale ha assegnato ad in questa frase è falso: non ha ragione che in Chapin e Charpentier c. la Francia, (n. 40183/07, 9 giugno 2016) la Corte considerò anche che Articolo 12 fece domanda ai richiedenti, una coppia di stesso-sesso che cerca di sposarsi (veda § 31 di che sentenza). In che causa, la Corte considerò che Articolo 12 fece domanda allo specifico danno sollevato coi richiedenti per il fine di valutare che danno dal punto di vista di quel la disposizione. Se Articolo 12 è applicabile a coppie che già si sposano sotto il sistema nazionale di un altro Stato dipende sul danno che loro sollevano. Se, per istanza, una coppia sposata si lamenta, che la loro casa è stata espropriata illegalmente, Articolo 12 non fa domanda, in che non protegge contro l'espropriazione.
La fallacia metodologica identificata sopra di può condurre alla richiesta di una disposizione a danni sotto i quali incorrono oltre la sfera di negativo od obblighi di facie di prima positivi quel la disposizione. Dà anche l'impressione falsa che obblighi Statali che sorgerebbero in una causa nuova già sono stati stabiliti in una causa precedente. Per rispondere alla questione se una disposizione che protegge un diritto umano fa domanda è necessario per prima avere stabilito, con precisione sufficiente, la sfera degli obblighi Statali che scaturiscono dalla disposizione attinente.
9. La maggioranza esprime le prospettive seguenti nella sentenza presente:
“197. Mentre l'oggetto essenziale di Articolo 8 è proteggere l'individuo contro azione arbitraria con le autorità pubbliche, là in oltre sia obblighi positivi inerenti in ‘effettivo rispetti ' per la vita di famiglia. Comunque, i confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto questa disposizione non si prestano a definizione precisa. I principi applicabili sono, nondimeno, simile. In ambo i contesti riguardo a deve essere avuto all'equilibrio equo che doveva essere previsto fra gli interessi che competono dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme; ed in ambo i contesti lo Stato gode un certo margine della valutazione (veda Jeunesse c. i Paesi Bassi [GC], n. 12738/10, § 106, 3 ottobre 2014, e Wagner e J.M.W.L. c. il Lussemburgo, n. 76240/01, § 118 28 giugno 2007).
198. La Corte non lo considera necessario decidere se sarebbe più appropriato per analizzare la causa come uno riguardo ad un positivo o un obbligo negativo poiché è della prospettiva che il problema di centro nella causa presente è precisamente se un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra gli interessi che competono coinvolti (veda, mutatis mutandis, Dickson c. il Regno Unito, n. 44362/04, § 71 18 aprile 2006).”
Noi non conveniamo con la prospettiva che i confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto Articolo 8 non si prestano a definizione precisa. Benché in molte cause azioni Statali e numerose ed omissioni di tipi diversi siano impigliate, c'è, nella nostra prospettiva, una distinzione chiara fra l'obbligo agire e l'obbligo frenarsi dall'agire. La metodologia per essere seguito in riguardo dei due tipi di obblighi è diversa. Se gli atti Statali in un dominio protegguto da intromissione dello stato, deve dimostrare che questa interferenza notifica un scopo legittimo e è veramente necessaria per realizzare questo scopo. Deve mostrare anche che l'interferenza ha una base in diritto nazionale. Se un ritornelli Statali dall'agire o agisce senza diligenza dovuta, la questione se l'interferenza ha una base in diritto nazionale non sorga, ma è necessario per verificare se c'è un obbligo per agire a tutti e stabilire il significato e sfera di qualsiasi simile obbligo. Si deve mostrare anche che un obbligo per agire può essere dedotto dalle specifiche disposizioni della Convenzione sotto gli articoli applicabili di interpretazione di trattato. Il significato dell'obbligo imposto sugli Stati doveva essere stabilito con la precisione necessaria. La Corte può stabilire una violazione di un obbligo positivo per agire solamente se prima identifica la sfera e volendo dire di questo obbligo e show che argina dalle disposizioni della Convenzione. Può verificare anche se legislazione nazionale contiene le disposizioni necessarie che conferiscono poteri autorità pubbliche per agire come richieste sotto la Convenzione,
La causa presente chiaramente concerne l'esistenza e sfera di un obbligo su autorità Statali per agire. Comunque, la maggioranza non ha stabilito con precisione sufficiente il significato e la sfera dell'articolo legale che è stato infranto presumibilmente con le autorità nazionali. La sfera di obblighi Statali per agire Articolo 8 resti completamente poco chiaro sotto.
10. La maggioranza esprime anche le prospettive seguenti nella sentenza presente:
“201. La croce della causa a mano è precisamente effettivamente, che i richiedenti che la posizione di ' non è stata offerta per in diritto nazionale, specificamente il fatto che i richiedenti non potessero avere la loro relazione - sia sé un'unione de facto o un'unione di jure di de riconobbe sotto la legge di un stato estero-riconobbe e proteggè in Italia sotto qualsiasi la forma.”
“201. La Corte considera che, al giorno d'oggi la causa, lo Stato italiano non poteva trascurare ragionevolmente la situazione dei richiedenti che corrisposero ad una vita di famiglia all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 della Convenzione, senza offrire un mezzi di salvaguardare la loro relazione i richiedenti. Comunque, sino a recentemente, le autorità nazionali andarono a vuoto a riconoscere che situazione o prevede qualsiasi forma di protezione ai richiedenti l'unione di ', come un risultato dell'aspirapolvere legale che esistè in legge italiana (in finora come sé non preveda per qualsiasi l'unione capace di salvaguardare i richiedenti la relazione di ' di fronte a 2016). Segue che lo Stato andò a vuoto a prevedere un equilibrio equo fra qualsiasi competendo finora interessi in siccome loro non riuscirono ad assicurare che i richiedenti avevano disponibili una specifica struttura legale che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni di stesso-sesso.”
Noi osserviamo in questo riguardo che qualsiasi la coppia, sia loro eterosessuale od omosessuale, abbia i mezzi di preservare la loro relazione senza qualsiasi assistenza dallo Stato. La capacità di vivere una vita felice come una coppia non dipende su qualsiasi azione positiva con le autorità Statali ma sull'assenza di intromissione dello stato. Noi notiamo - en passant - che in Italia come negli altri Stati europei un numero crescente di coppie eterosessuali decide liberamente di né sposarsi né entrare in un'unione civile e trovare la loro situazione completamente soddisfacente. Loro asseriscono il loro diritto per vivere fuori le loro vite di famiglia qualsiasi struttura legale offrì con legislazione. Purchessia le strutture legali e disponibili, ci saranno necessariamente gruppi sostanziali di persone che considerano che quelle strutture non vanno bene le loro necessità.
Noi notiamo, inoltre, che i termini “il riconoscimento” e “la protezione” è vago ed ambiguo. Non è chiaro quale misure concrete sono costrette ad assicurare riconoscimento e protezione, né è sé facile identificare i disturbi contro i quali è richiesta protezione. In qualsiasi evento, un matrimonio o un'unione civile non sono le possibili forme sole di riconoscimento o protezione. Le autorità di Stati possono riconoscere coabitando coppie prendendo le loro necessità nell'esame e possono assicurarli protezione frenandosi da interferenza indebita ed accordando i certi diritti positivi. In questo contesto, noi notiamo, che non ha ragione che le autorità nazionali andarono a vuoto a riconoscere o proteggere coppie di stesso-sesso. Tutti coabitando coppie fu riconosciuto in molte leggi italiane e potrebbe trarre profitto dai vari diritti. Per istanza, tutti coabitando coppie è riconosciuto in diritto tributario ed il regime di tassa applicabile a coabitando coppie è allineato col regime di tassa applicabile a coppie sposate (come un risultato di sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 179/1976). Similmente, legislazione di alloggio protegge un partner nell'evento della morte dell'altro partner o dove una coppia separato (come un risultato di sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 559/1989). Non è stato mostrato nella causa presente che la protezione ha riconosciuto alle coppie di richiedente è stato insufficiente.
11. La sentenza presente si appella sulla sentenza nella causa di Oliari ed Altri c. l'Italia (N. 18766/11 e 36030/11, 21 luglio 2015). In che causa, la Corte sostenne che “in Italia il bisogno di riconoscere e proteggere simile relazioni è stato dato un profilo alto con le autorità giudiziali e più alte, incluso la Corte Costituzionale e la Corte di Cassazione. ... In simile cause, la Corte Costituzionale, notevolmente e ripetutamente mandò a chiamare un riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri di unioni di omosessuale..., una misura che potrebbe essere fissata solamente in posto con Parlamento” (Oliari, § 180).
La Corte considerò anche che “questo insuccesso ripetitivo di legislatori per prendere conto di dichiarazioni di Corte Costituzionali o i therein delle raccomandazioni relativo a consistenza con la Costituzione su un periodo significativo di tempo, potenzialmente mina le responsabilità dell'ordinamento giudiziario...” (Oliari, § 184).
Inoltre, Giudice Mahoney nella sua opinione concordante a che sentenza, congiunta con Giudici Tsotsoria e Vehabovi lo ?considerò decisivo il fatto che lo Stato italiano aveva scelto, per le sue corti più alte, notevolmente la Corte Costituzionale, dichiarare che due persone dello stesso sesso che vive in coabitazione stabile sono investite con la Costituzione italiana con un diritto essenziale per ottenere riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri che allegano alla loro unione.
Nella nostra valutazione l'approccio adottò nell'Oliari c. sentenza di Italia, e nell'opinione concordante inoltre, si sbaglia. La Corte Costituzionale italiana espresse le sue prospettive nel ragionamento, non nella parte operativa delle sue decisioni. I dicta non possono essere considerati vincolanti sul Parlamento italiano. Tale situazione non può essere comparata all'insuccesso per eseguire un obbligo imposto con una sentenza di una corte costituzionale nella sua parte operativa che sta legando sulle autorità Statali.
12. Noi notiamo la discordanza seguente nella sentenza. In paragrafo 200 la maggioranza identifica la prevenzione di disturbo come il valore che è posto sotto alle autorità l'atteggiamento di '. Su altra mano, la maggioranza non vede, qualsiasi interesse prevalente fissato in avanti per giustificare la situazione creato con le autorità l'atteggiamento di ' (veda paragrafo 209 della sentenza). Il peso dei valori contraddittori in pericolo non è stato valutato.
13. Per le ragioni spiegarono sopra di, le richieste sarebbero dovute essere dichiarate manifestamente inammissibili come mal-fondò. Nella nostra prospettiva i richiedenti possono chiedere più inoltre, di avere status di vittima, in che le loro unioni infine sono state registrate come unioni civili sotto legge italiana o possono essere registrate come simile se loro così richiede. Inoltre, i certi richiedenti (gli autori delle richieste N. 3 e 5) non risieda in Italia. In principio, obblighi positivi sugli Stati non fanno domanda a persone che risiedono all'estero. Non è chiaro come il loro status civile sotto legge italiana può colpire all'estero la qualità di vita loro. La questione se questi richiedenti rimangono all'interno della giurisdizione dell'Italia all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 non è stato rivolto.
14. Sommare su: nella nostra prospettiva la maggioranza ha abbandonato dagli articoli applicabili di interpretazione di Convenzione e ha imposto obblighi positivi che non scaturiscono da questo trattato. Tale adattamento della Convenzione viene all'interno dei poteri esclusivi delle Parti Contraenti ed Alte. Noi possiamo concordare solamente col principio: “nessuna trasformazione sociale senza rappresentanza.”



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 11/05/2020.