Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VARDANYAN AND NANUSHYAN v. ARMENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 35,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 8001/07/2016
STATO: Armenia
DATA: 27/10/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings
Article 6-1 - Access to court Fair hearing Equality of arms Impartial tribunal) Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) Pecuniary damage - reserved (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage Just satisfaction) Non-pecuniary damage - reserved (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)



FIRST SECTION






CASE OF VARDANYAN AND NANUSHYAN v. ARMENIA

(Application no. 8001/07)









JUDGMENT
(Merits)



STRASBOURG

27 October 2016





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Vardanyan and Nanushyan v. Armenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, President,
Ledi Bianku,
Kristina Pardalos,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Robert Spano,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Tim Eicke, judges,
and Abel Campos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 October 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 8001/07) against the Republic of Armenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by three Armenian nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 19 February 2007.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Yerevan. The Armenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr G. Kostanyan, Representative of the Republic of Armenia at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. Mr Armen Harutyunyan, the judge elected in respect of Armenia, was unable to sit in the case (Rule 28). Accordingly, the President of the Chamber decided to appoint Pauliine Koskelo to sit as an ad hoc judge (Rule 29 § 2 (b)).
4. The first applicant alleged, in particular, that he was arbitrarily deprived of his plot of land and that he was denied a fair trial in the ensuing proceedings. He further complained that he was unlawfully deprived of his house.
5. On 25 November 2010 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants are a family who lived in Yerevan in a house on a plot of land measuring 1,385.6 sq. m. in total and situated at 13 Byuzand Street. The second and third applicants are the first applicant’s wife and son.
A. The initial litigation related to the recognition of the first applicant’s ownership of the house and the plot of land
7. On an unspecified date the first applicant lodged a request with the Spandaryan District People’s Court of Yerevan seeking to invalidate an agreement concluded in 1933 between his grandparents and a state agency according to which their house, comprising the house itself and the plot of land, was transferred to that state agency. He thus sought recognition of his ownership rights for the above-mentioned house and the plot of land.
8. On 19 August 1994 the Spandaryan District Court granted the claim by annulling the above agreement and recognising the applicant as the owner of the house and the plot of land. No appeal was made against this judgment and it became final.
9. It appears that on 3 November 1994 an ownership certificate for the house and the plot of land was issued to the applicant by virtue of the judgment of 19 August 1994.
10. Upon application by the First Deputy to the President of the Supreme Court, on 9 February 1995 the Civil Panel of the Supreme Court quashed the judgment of 19 August 1994.
11. On 8 December 1995 the first applicant lodged a claim with the Civil Panel of the Supreme Court seeking recognition of his inheritance and ownership rights in respect of the house situated at 13 Byuzand Street. In the concluding part of the claim, the first applicant mentioned that he sought recognition of his inheritance rights both in respect of the house and the plot of land.
12. On 11 December 1995 the Civil Panel of the Supreme Court of Armenia examined the first applicant’s claim and decided to dismiss it.
13. On 22 September 1997 the Presidium of the Supreme Court quashed the judgment of 11 December 1995 and decided to grant the claim.
14. On 29 December 1998 the Plenary Session of the Court of Cassation (the highest judicial instance established by the Constitution of 1995 and functioning since 10 July 1998) examined the decision of 22 September 1997 upon a supervisory appeal lodged by the General Prosecutor’s Office and decided to leave it in force.
15. It appears that the first applicant was given a new ownership certificate in respect of the house and the plot of land which mentioned the decision of 22 September 1997 as a ground for the ownership right.
16. On an unspecified date the first applicant lodged a claim against third persons who owned two small premises situated on his plot of land.
17. On 18 July 2000 the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of Yerevan granted the first applicant’s claim. In particular, it found that the applicant’s ownership right to the plot of land situated at 13 Byuzand Street had been restored by the decision of of the Presidium of the Supreme Court of 22 September 1997, therefore any premises situated on it had to be recognised as being under his ownership as well.
B. Governmental programme on alienation of private property for public purposes
18. On 1 August 2002 the Government adopted Decree no. 1151-N, approving the expropriation zones of the real estate situated within the administrative boundaries of the Kentron District of Yerevan to be taken for State needs, having a total area of 345,000 sq. m. Byuzand Street was listed as one of the streets falling within such expropriation zones. A special body, the Yerevan Construction and Investment Project Implementation Agency (hereafter, “the Agency”) was set up to manage the implementation of the construction projects.
19. On 17 June 2004 the Government decided to contract out the construction of one of the sections of Byuzand Street to a private company, Vizkon Ltd. The latter was authorised to negotiate directly with the owners regarding the property subject to expropriation and, should such negotiations fail, to institute court proceedings on behalf of the State seeking forcible expropriation of such property. It appears that on 8 December 2004 Vizkon Ltd reached an agreement with Tosp Ltd, a valuation agency, for the latter to carry out a valuation of the immovable property situated at 13 Byuzand Street.
20. On 19 May 2005 Tosp Ltd carried out a valuation, according to which the market value of the applicants’ house was 54,494,000 Armenian Drams (AMD), while that of the plot of land was AMD 276,230,000.
C. Issue of a new ownership certificate to the first applicant
21. On 15 April 2005 the Agency held a meeting of its governing board, which included representatives of the Government, the State Real Estate Registry (the SRER), the Ministry of Finance and Economy, the Mayor’s Office and the Police Department, at which it was decided to issue a new type of ownership certificate to the first applicant for the house and the plot of land situated at 13 Byuzand Street.
22. On 13 May 2005 a new ownership certificate for the house and the plot of land was issued to the first applicant. As a ground for registration of the ownership right, it mentioned the judgment of the Spandaryan District People’s Court of Yerevan of 19 August 1994, the decision of the Presidium of the Supreme Court of 22 September 1997, the decision of the Plenary Session of the Court of Cassation of 29 December 1998 and the judgment of the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of Yerevan of 18 July 2000.
D. Proceedings disputing the first applicant’s title to the land (the first set of proceedings)
23. On 22 November 2005 Vizkon Ltd lodged a claim on behalf of the Mayor of Yerevan against the SRER, seeking to invalidate the registration of the first applicant’s ownership of the plot of land, claiming that it had never been recognised by any judicial act. It also requested that the first applicant be involved in the proceedings, as a third person whose rights were affected by the claim.
24. On 13 January 2006 the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of Yerevan granted the claim, finding that the first applicant’s ownership of the plot of land had never been recognised by a judicial act.
25. On 24 January 2006 the first applicant lodged an appeal against this judgment.
26. On 27 February 2006 the Court of Appeal dismissed the claim as unsubstantiated. In particular, it found that the first applicant’s right to the plot of land had been recognised by the decision of the Presidium of the Supreme Court of 22 September 1997 and the judgment of the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of 18 July 2000.
27. On an unspecified date, Vizkon Ltd lodged an appeal on points of law against this judgment.
28. On an unspecified date, the rapporteur, Judge H. of the Court of Cassation, presented to the first applicant an agreement of a friendly settlement with the Agency, Vizkon Ltd and the SRER. According to the proposal, the first applicant was to receive USD 390,000, a flat measuring 160 sq. m. and office premises measuring 40 sq. m. in the centre of Yerevan in exchange for his revocation of ownership of the house and the plot of land.
29. On 19 April 2006 the applicant sent a reply to the judge informing her of his refusal to sign a friendly settlement.
30. On 21 April 2006 the Court of Cassation held a hearing of the appeal with the participation of the parties. Having heard that the first applicant had refused to sign a friendly settlement with the Government, the Chairman of the Civil Chamber of the Court of Cassation, Judge M., who ex officio presided over the examination of the appeal, stated:
“Each party should come to a solution through compromise... If we continue dragging out this dispute, we will celebrate its hundredth anniversary... Name the day and the hour when it is convenient for you to come and express all your ideas in the presence of the parties before Judge H...but try to have an efficient discussion before Judge H. ... you have a lot of time until [then]. Have a meeting and a discussion, and try to find common points in the friendly settlement so that your discussion is efficient.”
With this, Judge M. closed the hearing.
31. On 5 May 2006 the Court of Cassation held another hearing of the appeal. On learning that the first applicant still refused to sign a friendly settlement, Judge M. stated:
“You have many times participated in the Chamber hearings and must have noticed that the Chamber always attaches importance to the fact of which party has refused to sign a reasonable friendly settlement. So this is the last time that we, the Chamber, give you an opportunity until the next hearing ... to discuss once more [the friendly settlement] issues and submit your reply to ... [Judge] H.”
With this, Judge M. closed the hearing.
32. It appears that the first applicant persisted in his reluctance to sign a friendly settlement.
33. On 28 July 2006 the Civil and Economic Chamber of the Court of Cassation, composed of Judge M., president, and Judges H., G. and A., quashed the judgment of 27 February 2006 and remitted the case for a fresh examination. The relevant parts of this decision read as follows:
“...It follows from the examination of [the relevant court decisions] that no ownership right of [the first applicant] had ever been recognised in respect of any plot of land, therefore there are no legal grounds for the registration of [the first applicant’s] ownership to the land.
...
In these circumstances, the arguments with regard to the violations of the substantive and procedural law raised in the appeal on points of law are substantiated since the above-mentioned court decisions have not recognised [the first applicant’s] ownership right to any plot of land, therefore there are no legal grounds for the registration of [the first applicant’s] title. Moreover, [the first applicant’s] title had been registered in respect of State-owned land without any legal basis.”
34. On 15 September 2006 the Civil Court of Appeal examined the claim anew and granted it, finding that the first applicant’s ownership right to the plot of land had not been recognised. In particular, it held:
“... it follows from the examination of [the relevant court decisions] that no ownership right of [the first applicant] had ever been recognised in respect of any plot of land ... Therefore, [the first applicant’s] ownership right in respect of the State owned plot of land was registered without any legal ground.”
35. On 12 February 2007 the first applicant lodged an appeal on points of law against this judgment arguing, inter alia, that the Court of Appeal had not been independent and impartial since it had been bound by the findings of the Court of Cassation expressed in the decision of 28 July 2006.
36. On 2 March 2007 the Court of Cassation declared the appeal inadmissible for lack of merit.
E. The proceedings concerning the expropriation of the house (the second set of proceedings)
37. On 25 December 2005 Vizkon Ltd informed the first applicant that the house he owned was situated within an alienation zone. It also informed him that his house had been valued by a licensed valuation organisation at AMD 54,494,000 and offered him, as the owner, this sum as compensation for alienation. An additional sum would be paid to him as a financial incentive in accordance with Government Decree no. 759-N of 19 May 2005, if he agreed to sign an agreement and to hand over the property within one month.
38. It appears that the first applicant did not accept the offer.
39. On 26 January 2006 the Yerevan Mayor’s Office instituted proceedings against the first applicant, seeking to terminate his ownership of the house by paying him compensation and to have him evicted. Vizkon Ltd also joined these proceedings as a third party.
40. On 18 April 2006 the Constitutional Court declared, inter alia, Government Decree no. 1151-N of 1 August 2002 and Article 218 of the Civil Code (the CC) to be unconstitutional, but decided that the impugned legal provisions had to remain effective until a law establishing a legal regime for expropriation was adopted but that, in any event, the latest date on which they would lose their legal force was 1 October 2006.
41. On 22 August 2006 the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of Yerevan examined the claim in the presence of the first applicant and a representative of the Mayor’s Office. The District Court decided to grant the claim, awarding the first applicant 54,494,000 Armenian drams and ordering his eviction. The District Court based its findings on Articles 218 221 and 283 of the Civil Code.
42. On 4 September 2006 the first applicant lodged an appeal, which was scheduled to be examined by the Civil Court of Appeal on 25 September 2006.
43. During the night of 24 to 25 September 2006 the first applicant felt unwell and was taken by ambulance to hospital, where he was diagnosed with impaired cardiac function.
44. On 25 September 2006, before the beginning of the hearing, the Court of Appeal received a written request lodged by the first applicant seeking adjournment of the hearing because of his health problems. It appears that a hospital certificate stating that he was in hospital was attached to the request.
45. On 25 September 2006 the Court of Appeal held a hearing in the absence of the first applicant and his representative but in the presence of representatives of the Mayor’s Office and Vizkon Ltd, who made their submissions in relation to the first applicant’s appeal, asking that it be rejected. As regards the first applicant’s request to reschedule the hearing, according to the record of the hearing, the Court of Appeal refused to adjourn it on the ground that the first applicant had a representative who had participated in the proceedings before the District Court. By the judgment adopted on the same date the Court of Appeal upheld the judgment of 22 August 2006 confirming the amount awarded by the District Court. The judgment stated that the first applicant had failed to appear despite having been duly summoned to the hearing.
46. On 2 October 2006 the first applicant, having undergone medical treatment, was discharged from the hospital.
47. On 20 December 2006 the first applicant lodged an appeal on points of law against the judgment of 25 September 2006.
48. On 16 January 2007 the Court of Cassation declared the first applicant’s appeal inadmissible for lack of merit.
49. The judgment of the Court of Appeal of 25 September 2006 entered into force at the time of its delivery and was immediately enforceable.
50. In May 2007 the first applicant sought to terminate the enforcement proceedings in respect of the judgment of 25 September 2006 with reliance on the Constitutional Court’s Decision of 18 April 2006, which had found Governmental Decree no. 1151-N and Article 218 of the CC incompatible with the Constitution.
51. On 11 June 2007 the Department for Execution of Judicial Acts enforced the judgment by demolishing the house.
52. On 6 July 2007 the Court of Appeal dismissed the first applicant’s application, finding that on 11 June 2007 the judgment had been enforced and the enforcement proceedings had been terminated.
F. The second and third applicants’ appeal against the judgment of 25 September 2006
53. On 18 May 2007 the second and third applicants lodged an appeal with the Court of Cassation against the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 25 September 2006 alleging that they had learned of the house expropriation proceedings against the first applicant only on 19 February 2007. In the appeal, the second and third applicants argued that they enjoyed the right of use of accommodation in respect of the first applicant’s house, therefore the expropriation proceedings also affected their proprietary rights. They thus claimed that the authorities had failed to make them parties to these proceedings and that the alleged deprivation of their property was not lawful and in the public interest.
54. On 24 July 2007 the Court of Cassation declared the appeal of 18 May 2007 inadmissible for lack of merit finding, inter alia, that the second and third applicants’ rights were not affected as the first applicant was the sole owner of the house in question.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Deprivation of property
55. For a summary of the relevant domestic provisions see the judgment in the case of Minasyan and Semerjyan v. Armenia (no. 27651/05, §§ 23-43, 23 June 2009).
B. The Code of Civil Procedure (as in force at the material time)
56. According to Article 33 §§ 1 and 3, the parties may terminate the proceedings at any stage by reaching a friendly settlement. Prior to the approval of the friendly settlement agreement, the court explains its procedural consequences to the parties.
57. Article 120 provides that the presiding judge informs the parties to the proceedings of their rights and obligations and starts the examination of the merits of the case. The presiding judge ascertains whether the plaintiff insists on his claims, whether the respondent admits the plaintiff’s claims and whether the parties are willing to reach a friendly settlement.
58. According to Article 215, cases are examined by the Court of Appeal in accordance with the rules applicable to proceedings before first instance courts.
59. According to Article 238 § 3, the Court of Cassation has no right to confirm or consider as established those circumstances which have not been established in the judgment or have been dismissed by the judgment, predetermine the credibility of evidence, the issues of prevalence of one piece of evidence in respect of another, or to address the question of the applicable provision of the material law and the judgment which must be adopted in the new examination of the case.
C. Government Decree no. 759-N of 19 May 2005 containing amendments to Government Decree no 950 of 5 October 2001 (?? ????????????? 2005?. ?????? 19-? ???????? ?? ????????????? 2001?. ?????????? 5-? ??? 950 ??????? ??? ??????????????? ????????? ?????)
60. Paragraph 7 provides that the market value of the real estate, which is determined by a licensed valuation organisation selected through a tender, shall serve as a basis for the determination of the amount of compensation for the real estate (land plots, buildings and constructions) situated within the alienation zone. With the purpose of speedy alienation of the real estate, financial incentives are paid on condition that the owner, within a period of ten working days following the receipt of the price offer, agrees to conclude a contract within one month and leave the property which is subject to demolition within the time-limit stipulated by the contract. The calculation of compensation is based on the following formula: the amount of the financial incentive is equal to 0.3 times the market value, if the market value of the real estate and the plot of land is 20,000,001 Armenian Drams or higher (paragraph 7 (d)). The compensation for the real estate and the plot of land to be paid to the owner is the market value plus the amount of the financial incentive.
D. The Decision of the Constitutional Court of 18 April 2006 on the Conformity of Article 218 of the Civil Code, Articles 104, 106 and 108 of the Land Code and the Government Decree no. 1151-N adopted on 1 August 2002 Concerning the Implementation of Construction Projects within the Administrative Boundaries of the Kentron District of Yerevan with Article 31 of the Constitution
61. The Constitutional Court, deciding on the application of the Armenian Ombudsman, found that Article 31 of the Constitution, as amended on 27 November 2005, required that the expropriation process be regulated by a law. This law should establish in clear terms the legal regime for expropriation of property for the needs of society and the State. The contested legal provisions, including Government Decree no. 1151-N and Article 218 the Code of Civil Procedure, failed to meet this requirement and were therefore incompatible with, inter alia, Article 31 of the Constitution. Relying on Article 102 (3) of the Constitution, the Constitutional Court decided that the impugned legal provisions had to remain effective until a law establishing a legal regime for expropriation was adopted but that, in any event, the latest date on which they would lose their legal effect was 1 October 2006.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
62. The first applicant complained that in the first set of proceedings the domestic courts violated the principle of the finality of judgments and that the Chairman of the Civil Chamber of the Court of Cassation was not impartial. He further complained that in the second set of proceedings the Court of Appeal held a hearing in his absence. He alleged a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which provides the following:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by an independent and impartial tribunal ...”
A. Admissibility
63. The Court notes that these complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The principle of legal certainty
64. The first applicant alleged that, by granting the claim of the Mayor of Yerevan in the first set of proceedings, the domestic courts had violated the principle of the finality of judgments. He argued that these proceedings in fact constituted an appeal in disguise against the final decision of the Presidium of the Supreme Court of 22 September 1997 as upheld by the Plenary Session of the Court of Cassation on 29 December 1998, whereby his ownership right in respect of the plot of land at issue had been recognised.
65. The Government claimed that the courts, in the first set of proceedings, had merely addressed the question of wrong interpretation of the judgment of the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of 18 July 2000 by the SRER, as a result of which it had issued a new ownership certificate to the applicant on 13 May 2005.
66. The Court reiterates that the right to a fair hearing before a tribunal, as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, must be interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention which declares, among other things, the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States. One of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law is the principle of legal certainty, which requires, inter alia, that where the courts have finally determined an issue, their ruling should not be called into question (see Brum?rescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999 VII).
67. Legal certainty presupposes respect for the principle of res judicata (see Brum?rescu, cited above, § 62), that is the principle of the finality of judgments. This principle requires that no party is entitled to seek a review of a final and binding judgment merely for the purpose of obtaining a rehearing and a fresh determination of the case. Higher courts’ powers of review should be exercised to correct judicial errors and miscarriages of justice, but not to carry out a fresh examination. The review should not be treated as an appeal in disguise, and the mere possibility of there being two views on the subject is not a ground for re-examination. A departure from that principle is justified only when made necessary by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character (see Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003 IX; Ro?ca v. Moldova, no. 6267/02, § 25, 22 March 2005).
68. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the first applicant’s ownership right to the plot of land had been recognised by the decision of the Presidium of the Supreme Court of 22 September 1997, which had been upheld by the decision of the Plenary Session of the Court of Cassation of 29 December 1998 and had thus become final and enforceable. Furthermore, the fact of the first applicant’s ownership was once again reaffirmed in the judgment of the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of Yerevan of 18 July 2000, which had also become final and enforceable (see paragraphs 13 and 17 above). The first applicant’s title in respect of the plot of land had been registered following the decision of 22 September 1997 and then re-registered on 13 May 2005 based on, inter alia, the same decision and the judgment of 18 July 2000 (see paragraphs 15 and 22 above).
69. Notwithstanding this, on 15 September 2006 the Civil Court of Appeal, in another set of proceedings initiated by the Mayor of Yerevan against the SRER, found the recognition of the first applicant’s title to have been unlawful and not based on any judicial act (see paragraph 34 above).
70. The Court observes that, by granting the Mayor’s claim, the domestic courts in the first set of proceedings in fact conducted an indirect re-examination of the question of whether the first applicant had title in respect of the plot of land, despite the existence of final judicial acts on the matter. This resulted in nullifying the legal effects of those judicial acts, although formally they still remained in force. The Court finds, therefore, that the decision of the Civil Court of Appeal of 15 September 2006 as upheld by the Court of Cassation on 2 March 2007 set at naught an entire judicial process which had ended in judicial decisions that were “irreversible” and thus res judicata and which moreover had been executed (see, mutatis mutandis, Brum?rescu, cited above, § 62). Nothing suggests that there were any circumstances of a substantial and compelling character justifying the re-examination of a matter which had previously been determined in final and binding judicial decisions. In view of the foregoing, the Court concludes that, by granting the claim lodged by the Mayor of Yerevan, the courts infringed the principle of legal certainty.
71. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in this respect.
2. Right to an impartial tribunal
72. The first applicant alleged that in the first set of proceedings Judge M., the Chairman of the Civil Chamber of the Court of Cassation, was not impartial as he had tried to compel him to sign a friendly settlement by implicitly threatening him with the negative effects of his refusal. He argued that Judge M. had postponed the hearings several times, clearly indicating that a decision unfavourable to him would be made if he were to continue to refuse to sign the friendly settlement. This threat was in fact realised since the decision of 28 July 2006, in breach of the requirements of Article 238 § 3 of the Code of Civil Procedure (the CCP) as in force at the material time, expressed the panel’s opinion that he had no ownership right to the land. This finding was simply reproduced in the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 15 September 2006.
73. The Government submitted that it had not been substantiated that Judge M. had any personal or functional bias towards the case at issue. He had not tried to compel the first applicant to sign a friendly settlement but merely acted in accordance with the relevant requirements of the procedure. In particular, under Article 120 of the CCP he was required, inter alia, to find out whether the parties were willing to sign a friendly settlement. Furthermore, according to Article 33 of the CCP the presiding judge, prior to the approval of the friendly settlement agreement, was required to explain to the parties its procedural consequences.
74. The Court reiterates at the outset that it is of fundamental importance in a democratic society that the courts inspire confidence in the public (see Padovani v. Italy, 26 February 1993, § 27, Series A no. 257 B). To that end Article 6 requires a tribunal falling within its scope to be impartial. Impartiality normally denotes the absence of prejudice or bias and its existence or otherwise can be tested in various ways. The Court has thus distinguished between a subjective approach, that is endeavouring to ascertain the personal conviction or interest of a given judge in a particular case, and an objective approach, that is determining whether he or she offered sufficient guarantees to exclude any legitimate doubt in this respect (see the recapitulation of the relevant principles in Kyprianou v. Cyprus [GC], no. 73797/01, §§ 118-121, ECHR 2005 XIII; and Morice v. France [GC], no. 29369/10, § 73, ECHR 2015).
75. As regards the subjective test, the personal impartiality of a judge must be presumed until there is proof to the contrary (see Padovani, cited above, § 26; Morel v. France, no. 34130/96, § 41, ECHR 2000 VI).
76. As to the objective test, when applied to a judicial body sitting as a bench it means determining whether, quite apart from the personal conduct of any of the members of that body, there are ascertainable facts which may raise justified doubts as to its impartiality. This implies that, in deciding whether in a given case there is a legitimate reason to fear that a particular judge or a body sitting as a bench lacks impartiality, the standpoint of the person concerned is important but not decisive. What is decisive is whether this fear can be held to be objectively justified (see Wettstein v. Switzerland, no. 33958/96, § 44; Micallef v. Malta [GC], no. 17056/06, § 96, ECHR 2009 ECHR 2000 XII).
77. The Court notes that the first applicant’s concerns regarding the impartiality of the Court of Cassation stemmed from the fact that Judge M., acting as the Chairman of the panel of the Civil and Economic Chamber of the Court of Cassation, had repeatedly persisted on his acceptance of the friendly settlement proposal.
78. As regards the subjective test, the Court notes that no evidence has been adduced in the present case which might suggest personal bias on the part of the individual judges of the Court of Cassation in the first set of proceedings, including Judge M.
79. As to the objective test, the Court observes that at the hearings of 21 April and 5 May 2006 in the first set of proceedings Judge M., who presided over the hearings before the Civil and Economic Chamber of the Court of Cassation, invited the first applicant to consider the friendly settlement proposal presented to him by the rapporteur in the case (see paragraphs 30 and 31 above).
80. The Court notes that, according to the provisions of the CCP referred to by the Government (see paragraph 73 above), the presiding judge enquires whether the parties are willing to enter into a friendly settlement and explains its procedural consequences. This is not an uncommon feature in the legal orders of the Contracting States and serves both the interests of procedural economy and the good administration of justice. However, taking into account the importance of the principle of judicial impartiality (see Buscemi v Italy, no. 29569/95, § 67, ECHR 1999-VI), judges enquiring into the parties’ willingness to enter into friendly settlements must exercise caution and refrain from using language that may, assessed objectively, justify that either of the parties legitimately fears that the judge in question lacks impartiality.
81. The Court points out that during the Chamber hearing of 5 May 2006, Judge M., according to a transcript submitted before the Court (see paragraph 31 above), referred to the first applicant’s knowledge of proceedings before the Chamber and his presumed awareness of the “importance” that the Chamber “always” attaches to the fact that a “party has refused to sign a reasonable friendly settlement”. Also, Judge M. explicitly indicated that the Chamber hearing in question would be the “last time” the Chamber would give the first applicant an “opportunity”, until the next hearing, to discuss and reply to a possible friendly settlement.
82. Viewed as a whole, and in context, the Court considers that Judge M.’s use of language during the hearing was clearly capable of raising a legitimate fear that the first applicant’s refusal to accept a friendly settlement offer might have an adverse influence on the Chamber’s consideration of the merits of his case. Therefore, the Court finds that Judge M.’s conduct, lacking in the necessary detachment demanded by the principle of judicial neutrality, raised an objectively justified fear that he lacked impartiality when deciding the applicant’s case within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
83. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention also in this respect.
3. Equality of arms
84. The first applicant lastly complained that in the second set of proceedings, the Court of Appeal did not postpone the hearing of 25 September 2006, which he was unable to attend because of bad health, whereas the representatives of his opponent party were present. In these circumstances, he was deprived of the opportunity to submit his arguments, while the Court of Cassation did not admit his appeal on points of law for examination.
85. The Government submitted that the Court of Appeal conducted the hearing of 25 September 2006 in the first applicant’s absence for the following reasons: the proceedings had lasted for a long time; the applicant was aware of the other party’s submissions; the court was familiar with the first applicant’s arguments and no new evidence was produced during that hearing which could affect the first applicant’s interests.
86. The Court reiterates that Article 6 of the Convention does not guarantee the right to personal presence before a civil court but enshrines a more general right to present one’s case effectively before the court and to enjoy equality of arms with the opposing side. Article 6 § 1 leaves to the State a free choice of the means to be used in guaranteeing litigants these rights (see Steel and Morris v. the United Kingdom, no. 68416/01, §§ 59-60, ECHR 2005 II). Thus, the questions of personal presence, the form of the proceedings – oral or written – and legal representation are interlinked and must be analysed in the broader context of the “fair trial” guarantee of Article 6. The Court should establish whether the applicant, a party to the civil proceedings, had been given a reasonable opportunity to have knowledge of and comment on the observations made or evidence adduced by the other party and to present his case under conditions that did not place him at a substantial disadvantage vis-à-vis his opponent (see Kr?má? and Others v. the Czech Republic, no. 35376/97, § 39, 3 March 2000; Dombo Beheer B.V. v. the Netherlands, 27 October 1993, § 33, Series A no. 274).
87. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that at the material time the proceedings before appellate courts were governed by the procedural rules applicable to proceedings before first instance courts (see paragraph 58 above), that is the proceedings upon appeal were also conducted orally. The Court further notes that the first applicant requested the Civil Court of Appeal to adjourn the hearing of 25 September 2006 because he was in hospital and had submitted relevant documentary proof, and that his request had reached the court before the hearing. Nevertheless, the Court of Appeal decided to hold the hearing in the presence of the representatives of the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and Vizkon Ltd. who made their submissions concerning the first applicant’s appeal (see paragraphs 44 and 45 above).
88. The Court observes that the reasons advanced by the Government for not adjourning the hearing of 25 September 2006 are not supported by the case file. Furthermore, it is not for the Court to speculate what arguments the applicant would or would not have put forward at the appeal hearing, had he been present. The Court further observes that the reason for not granting the first applicant’s request to postpone the hearing was merely the fact that he had a designated representative before the first instance court. The Court observes, however, that the first applicant’s representative was not present at the hearing. The Court also notes that the first applicant had become hospitalised for acute reasons just during the night before the hearing, and that it does not appear that his representative had in fact had adequate notice or opportunity to represent the applicant at the hearing but failed to do so. Under such circumstances, the Court concludes that the applicant was in fact deprived of any representation before the Court of Appeal and therefore, for reasons which could not be imputed to him, was unable to comment on the submissions of the representative of his opponent (see Ternovskis v. Latvia, no. 33637/02, §§ 69-75, 29 April 2014).
89. The Court lastly observes that the alleged shortcomings in the proceedings before the Court of Appeal were not subsequently remedied, since the first applicant’s appeal on points of law was to no avail (see paragraph 48 above).
90. Having regard to the requirements of the principle of the equality of arms and to the role of appearances in determining whether they have been complied with, the Court finds that the procedure followed did not enable the applicant to participate properly in the proceedings and thus deprived him of a fair hearing within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. In conclusion, there has been a violation of this provision also in this respect.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
91. The first applicant complained that the decision of the domestic courts to grant the claim of the Mayor of Yerevan in the first set of proceedings had resulted in arbitrary deprivation of his land. He further alleged that he was deprived of his house in violation of the guarantees of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
92. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Deprivation of the land
93. The first applicant submitted that he was arbitrarily deprived of his plot of land, of which his ownership had been unequivocally recognised by final and binding judgments and for which he had already been issued an ownership certificate.
94. The Government submitted that the first applicant’s ownership rights over the plot of land in question had not been recognised by any judicial act having legal force.
95. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 79, ECHR 2000 XII).
96. The Court notes that in its decision of 22 September 1997, the Presidium of the Supreme Court had recognised the first applicant as the lawful owner of the plot of land at issue. This decision was upheld by the Plenary Session of the Court of Cassation on 29 December 1998. Furthermore, the applicant’s title in respect of the land was once registered based on these decisions and then re-registered on 13 May 2005. The subsequent re-examination of the question of whether the first applicant had title in respect of the land, by the Civil Court of Appeal in its decision of 15 September 2006, deprived him of this possession and amounted to an interference with his right to property as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Brum?rescu, cited above, §§ 70 and 74). As the Court has already found that the final judicial act had been reviewed in violation of the principle of legal certainty, whereby no fair balance had been struck between the public interest and the protection of the applicant’s rights, it follows that there has also been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that respect (see, mutatis mutandis, Margushin v. Russia, no. 11989/03, § 40, 1 April 2010; and Karen Poghosyan v. Armenia, no. 62356/09, § 52, 31 March 2016).
2. Deprivation of the house
97. The first applicant submitted that the deprivation of his house had not been carried out under the conditions provided for by law since it had been effected in violation of the guarantees of Article 28 of the Constitution.
98. The Government forbore from making any submissions regarding this complaint.
99. The Court notes that it has already examined identical complaints in a number of cases against Armenia and concluded that the deprivation of property at the material time was not carried out in compliance with “conditions provided for by law” (see, for example, Minasyan and Semerjyan v. Armenia, no. 27651/05, §§ 69-77, 23 June 2009; Tunyan and Others v. Armenia, no. 22812/05, §§ 35-39, 9 October 2012). The Court does not see any reason to depart from that finding in the present case.
100. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention also in this respect.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
101. The first applicant complained that the deprivation of his house amounted also to a violation of Article 8 of the Convention which provides:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
102. Having regard to the conclusion reached on the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraphs 99 and 100 above), the Court does not consider it necessary to examine separately the complaint under Article 8 of the Convention, which raises similar issues (see Minasyan and Semerjyan, cited above, § 82).
IV. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
103. The applicants also raised a number of other complaints under Articles 6, 8 and 13 of the Convention.
104. Having regard to all the material in its possession, and in so far as these complaints fall within its competence, the Court finds that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. It follows that this part of the application must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
105. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
106. In respect of pecuniary damage, the first applicant claimed EUR 1,048,097.55 as the value of the expropriated house. The first applicant submitted that the most appropriate way for the Government to redress the pecuniary damage caused as a result of the unlawful dispossession of his plot of land would be to return the land to him. He submitted that the land had not yet been alienated to a private entity. In the event of the Government’s not being able to return the land, the first applicant stated that he was willing to consider an award of compensation and claimed a sum of EUR 10,381,842.05 which, according to him, represented the current market value of the land. The applicant further claimed EUR 12,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
107. The Government claimed that the first applicant could not claim compensation for the plot of land since it had never belonged to him. The Government further submitted that the amount of compensation claimed for the house was excessive and that it should be calculated based on the value of the house at the time of its expropriation. Lastly, the Government submitted that the amount of AMD 54,494,000 that the first applicant had already received in the domestic proceedings was adequate compensation for any pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage that he may have suffered.
108. In the circumstances of the present case, the Court considers that, as far as the award of damages is concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. That question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed, having regard to any agreement which might be reached between the Government and the first applicant (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
109. The first applicant did not claim any costs and expenses. Accordingly, the Court does not make any award under this head.
C. Default interest
110. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaints concerning the breach of the principle of legal certainty and equality of arms, lack of a fair hearing by an impartial tribunal and deprivation of property admissible as far as the first applicant is concerned and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention as far as the principles of legal certainty, impartiality and equality of arms are concerned;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

4. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 8 of the Convention;

5. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the first applicant to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the amount of damages to be awarded to the first applicant and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 27 October 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Abel Campos Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Violazione di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili
Articolo 6-1 - Accesso per corteggiare udienza corretta Uguaglianza di braccio tribunale Imparziale) Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - la Privazione di proprietà godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) danno Patrimoniale - riservato (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa) danno Non-patrimoniale - riservato (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)



PRIMA LA SEZIONE






CAUSA VARDANYAN E NANUSHYAN C. ARMENIA

(Richiesta n. 8001/07)









SENTENZA
(I meriti)



STRASBOURG

27 ottobre 2016





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Vardanyan e Nanushyan c. l'Armenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Presidente
Ledi Bianku,
Kristina Pardalos,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Robert Spano,
Pauliine Koskelo,
Tim Eicke, giudici
ed Abel Campos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 4 ottobre 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 8001/07) contro la Repubblica dell'Armenia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con tre cittadini Armeni, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 19 febbraio 2007.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Yerevan. Il Governo Armeno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. G. Kostanyan, Rappresentante della Repubblica dell'Armenia alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. Il Sig. Armen Harutyunyan, il giudice elesse in riguardo dell'Armenia, non era capace di riunirsi nella causa (Articolo 28). Di conseguenza, il Presidente della Camera decise di nominare Pauliine Koskelo per riunirsi come un ad giudice di hoc (l'Articolo 29 § 2 (b)).
4. Il primo richiedente addusse, in particolare, che lui fu privato arbitrariamente della sua area di terra e che lui fu negato un processo equanime nei procedimenti che conseguono. Lui si lamentò inoltre che lui fu privato illegalmente di alloggio suo.
5. 25 novembre 2010 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti sono una famiglia che visse in Yerevan in un alloggio su un'area di terra che misura 1,385.6 sq. metro. in totale e situato a 13 Strada di Byuzand. Il secondo e terzi richiedenti sono la moglie del primo richiedente e figlio.
A. che La causa iniziale ha riferito al riconoscimento della proprietà del primo richiedente dell'alloggio e l'area di terra
7. Su una data non specificata il primo richiedente depositò una richiesta con la Corte delle Spandaryan Distretto Persone di Yerevan che cerca di invalidare un accordo conclusa nel 1933 fra i suoi nonni ed un'agenzia statale secondo che il loro alloggio, mentre comprendendo l'alloggio sé e l'area di terra, fu trasferito a quel agenzia statale. Lui chiese così riconoscimento dei suoi diritti di proprietà per l'alloggio summenzionato e l'area di terra.
8. 19 agosto 1994 la Corte distrettuale di Spandaryan ammise il ricorso con annullando l'accordo sopra e recognising il richiedente come il proprietario dell'alloggio e l'area di terra. Nessun ricorso fu reso contro questa sentenza e divenne definitivo.
9. Sembra che 3 novembre 1994 un certificato di proprietà per l'alloggio e l'area di terra fu emesso al richiedente con virtù della sentenza di 19 agosto 1994.
10. 9 febbraio 1995 il Pannello Civile della Corte Suprema annullò la sentenza di 19 agosto 1994 sulla richiesta del primo Sostituto al Presidente della Corte Suprema.
11. 8 dicembre 1995 il primo richiedente depositò una rivendicazione col Pannello Civile della Corte Suprema che chiede riconoscimento della sua eredità e diritti di proprietà in riguardo dell'alloggio situato a 13 Strada di Byuzand. Nella parte finale della rivendicazione, il primo richiedente menzionò, che lui chiese riconoscimento dei suoi diritti di eredità sia in riguardo dell'alloggio e l'area di terra.
12. 11 dicembre 1995 il Pannello Civile della Corte Suprema dell'Armenia esaminò la rivendicazione del primo richiedente e decise di respingerlo.
13. 22 settembre 1997 il Presidium della Corte Suprema annullò la sentenza di 11 dicembre 1995 e decise di ammettere il ricorso.
14. 29 dicembre 1998 la Sessione Assoluta della Corte di Cassazione (l'istanza giudiziale e più alta stabilita con la Costituzione di 1995 e funzionando fin da 10 luglio 1998) esaminò la decisione di 22 settembre 1997 su un ricorso direttivo depositato con l'Ufficio del Generale Accusatore e decise di lasciarlo in vigore.
15. Sembra che il primo richiedente fu dato un certificato di proprietà nuovo in riguardo dell'alloggio e l'area di terra che menzionò la decisione di 22 settembre 1997 come una base per il diritto di proprietà.
16. Su una data non specificata il primo richiedente depositò una rivendicazione contro terza persona che possedettero due piccoli locali situati sulla sua area di terra.
17. 18 luglio 2000 il Kentron e Corte distrettuale di Nork-Marash di Yerevan ammisero il ricorso del primo richiedente. In particolare, fondò che il diritto di proprietà del richiedente all'area di terra situata a 13 Strada di Byuzand era stato ripristinato con la decisione di del Presidium della Corte Suprema di 22 settembre 1997, perciò qualsiasi locali situati su sé dovevano essere riconosciuti come essendo sotto come bene la sua proprietà.
B. programme Governativo sull'alienazione di proprietà privata per scopi di pubblica utilità
18. 1 agosto 2002 il Governo adottò Decreto n. 1151-N, approvando le zone di espropriazione del beni immobili situate all'interno dei confini amministrativi del Distretto di Kentron di Yerevan per essere preso per le necessità di Stato mentre avendo un'area totale di 345,000 sq. metro. Strada di Byuzand fu elencata come una delle strade che incorrono all'interno di simile zone di espropriazione. Un corpo speciale, la Costruzione di Yerevan ed Investimento Progetto Attuazione AGENZIA (in futuro, “l'AGENZIA”) sia esposto su maneggiare l'attuazione dei progetti di costruzione.
19. 17 giugno 2004 il Governo decise di contrarre fuori la costruzione di una delle sezioni di Strada di Byuzand ad una società privata, Vizkon Ltd. Il secondo fu autorizzato per negoziare direttamente coi proprietari riguardo alla proprietà soggetto all'espropriazione e, se simile negoziazioni dovessero andare a vuoto, avviare atti in favore della forzata espropriazione che chiede Statale di simile proprietà. Sembra che sul 2004 Vizkon Ltd di 8 dicembre un accordo giunse a Tosp Ltd, un'agenzia di valutazione per il secondo eseguire una valutazione del patrimonio immobiliare situò a 13 Strada di Byuzand.
20. Sul 2005 Tosp Ltd di 19 maggio eseguì una valutazione secondo che il valore di mercato dei richiedenti l'alloggio di ' era 54,494,000 Dracme Armene (AMD), mentre che dell'area di terra AMD 276,230,000 era.
C. Issue di un certificato di proprietà nuovo al primo richiedente
21. 15 aprile 2005 l'AGENZIA sostenne una riunione del suo asse che governa che rappresentanti inclusi del Governo, la Beni immobili Cancelleria Statale (il SRER), il Ministero di Finanza ed Economia, l'Ufficio del Sindaco ed il Polizia Settore al quale fu deciso di emettere un tipo nuovo di certificato di proprietà al primo richiedente per l'alloggio e l'area di terra situò a 13 Strada di Byuzand.
22. In 13 maggio 2005 un certificato di proprietà nuovo per l'alloggio e l'area di terra fu emesso al primo richiedente. Come una base per registrazione del diritto di proprietà, menzionò la sentenza della Corte delle Spandaryan Distretto Persone di Yerevan di 19 agosto 1994, la decisione del Presidium della Corte Suprema di 22 settembre 1997, la decisione della Sessione Assoluta della Corte di Cassazione di 29 dicembre 1998 e la sentenza del Kentron e Corte distrettuale di Nork-Marash di Yerevan di 18 luglio 2000.
Procedimenti di D. che contesta il titolo del primo richiedente alla terra (il primo set di procedimenti)
23. Sul 2005 Vizkon Ltd di 22 novembre una rivendicazione depositò in favore del Sindaco di Yerevan contro il SRER, cercando di invalidare la registrazione della proprietà del primo richiedente dell'area di terra chiedendo che non era stato riconosciuto mai con qualsiasi atto giudiziale. Richiese anche che il primo richiedente sia comportato nei procedimenti, come un terza persona i cui diritti furono colpiti con la rivendicazione.
24. 13 gennaio 2006 il Kentron e Corte distrettuale di Nork-Marash di Yerevan ammisero il ricorso, mentre trovando che la proprietà del primo richiedente dell'area di terra non era stata riconosciuta mai con un atto giudiziale.
25. 24 gennaio 2006 il primo richiedente depositò un ricorso contro questa sentenza.
26. 27 febbraio 2006 la Corte d'appello respinse la rivendicazione come non comprovato. In particolare, fondò che il diritto del primo richiedente all'area di terra era stato riconosciuto con la decisione del Presidium della Corte Suprema di 22 settembre 1997 e la sentenza del Kentron e Corte distrettuale di Nork-Marash di 18 luglio 2000.
27. Su una data non specificata, Vizkon Ltd depositò un ricorso su questioni di diritto contro questa sentenza.
28. Su una data non specificata, il relatore, Giudice H. della Corte di Cassazione, presentato al primo richiedente un accordo di un regolamento amichevole con l'AGENZIA, Vizkon Ltd ed il SRER. Secondo la proposta, il primo richiedente era ricevere USD 390,000, un misurando piatto 160 sq. metro. ed ufficio premette misurando 40 sq. metro. nel centre di Yerevan in cambio per la sua revoca di proprietà dell'alloggio e l'area di terra.
29. 19 aprile 2006 il richiedente spedì una replica al giudice che l'informa del suo rifiuto per firmare un regolamento amichevole.
30. 21 aprile 2006 la Corte di Cassazione sostenne un'udienza del ricorso con la partecipazione delle parti. Avendo ascoltato che il primo richiedente aveva rifiutato di firmare un regolamento amichevole col Governo, il Presidente della Camera Civile della Corte di Cassazione Giudice M. che ex officio presiederono sull'esame del ricorso, affermò:
“Ogni parte dovrebbe venire ad una soluzione per compromesso... Se noi continuiamo trascinare fuori questa controversia, noi celebreremo il suo centesimo anniversario... Chiami il giorno e l'ora quando è conveniente per Lei per venire ed esprimere tutte le Sue idee nella presenza delle parti di fronte a Giudice H... ma tenta di avere una discussione efficiente di fronte a Giudice H.... Lei ha molta volta sino a [poi]. Abbia una riunione ed una discussione, e tenti di trovare punti comuni nel regolamento amichevole così che la Sua discussione è efficiente.”
Con questo, Giudice M. chiuse l'udienza.
31. In 5 maggio 2006 la Corte di Cassazione sostenne un'altra udienza del ricorso. Su imparare che il primo richiedente ancora rifiutò di firmare un regolamento amichevole, Giudice M. affermò:
“Lei fa partecipare molte volte nelle udienze di Camera e ha dovuto notare che la Camera dà l'importanza al fatto del quale parte ha rifiutato di firmare un regolamento amichevole ragionevole sempre. Quindi questo è la scorsa volta che noi, la Camera La diamo un'opportunità sino alla prossimo udienza... ancora una volta discutere [il regolamento amichevole] i problemi e presenta la Sua replica a... [Il giudice] H.”
Con questo, Giudice M. chiuse l'udienza.
32. Sembra che il primo richiedente persistè nella sua riluttanza per firmare un regolamento amichevole.
33. 28 luglio 2006 il Civile e Camera Economica della Corte di Cassazione, composto di Giudice M., presidente, e Giudici H., G. ed A. annullarono la sentenza di 27 febbraio 2006 e rinviarono la causa per un esame nuovo. Le parti attinenti di questa decisione lessero siccome segue:
“... Segue dall'esame di [le decisioni di corte attinenti] che nessun diritto di proprietà di [il primo richiedente] mai era stato riconosciuto in riguardo di qualsiasi area di terra, non ci sono perciò motivi legali per la registrazione di [il primo richiedente] proprietà alla terra.
...
In queste circostanze, gli argomenti con riguardo ad alle violazioni dell'effettivo e legge procedurale sollevate nel ricorso su questioni di diritto è provato poiché le decisioni di corte summenzionate non hanno riconosciuto [il primo richiedente] diritto di proprietà a qualsiasi area di terra, non ci sono perciò motivi legali per la registrazione di [il primo richiedente] il titolo. Inoltre, [il primo richiedente] titolo era stato registrato in riguardo di terra Statale senza qualsiasi base legale.”
34. 15 settembre 2006 la Corte d'appello Civile esaminò di nuovo la rivendicazione e l'accordò, mentre trovando che il diritto di proprietà del primo richiedente all'area di terra non era stato riconosciuto. In particolare, contenne:
“... segue dall'esame di [le decisioni di corte attinenti] che nessun diritto di proprietà di [il primo richiedente] mai era stato riconosciuto in riguardo di qualsiasi area di terra... Perciò, [il primo richiedente] diritto di proprietà in riguardo dello Stato posseduto area di terra fu registrata senza qualsiasi base legale.”
35. 12 febbraio 2007 il primo richiedente depositò un ricorso su questioni di diritto contro questo sentenza dibattendo, inter l'alia, che la Corte d'appello non era stata indipendente ed imparziale poiché era stato legato con le sentenze della Corte di Cassazione espresse nella decisione di 28 luglio 2006.
36. 2 marzo 2007 la Corte di Cassazione dichiarò il ricorso inammissibile per mancanza di merito.
E. I procedimenti riguardo all'espropriazione dell'alloggio (il secondo set di procedimenti)
37. Sul 2005 Vizkon Ltd di 25 dicembre il primo richiedente che l'alloggio che lui ha posseduto è stato situato all'interno di una zona di alienazione informò. L'informò anche che il suo alloggio era stato valutato con un'organizzazione di valutazione di autorizzato ad AMD 54,494,000 e l'era stato offerto, come il proprietario questa somma come risarcimento per l'alienazione. Una somma supplementare sarebbe pagata a lui come un incentivo finanziario in conformità con Governo Decreto n. 759-N di 19 maggio 2005, se lui fosse d'accordo a firmare un accordo e dare sulla proprietà entro un mese.
38. Sembra che il primo richiedente non accettò l'offerta.
39. 26 gennaio 2006 l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan avviò procedimenti contro il primo richiedente, mentre chiedendo di terminare la sua proprietà dell'alloggio con pagandolo il risarcimento ed averlo sfrattò. Vizkon Ltd si unì anche a questi procedimenti come una terza parte.
40. 18 aprile 2006 la Corte Costituzionale dichiarò, inter l'alia, Decreto Statale n. 1151-N 1 agosto 2002 ed Articolo 218 del Codice civile (il CC) essere incostituzionale, ma decise che le disposizioni legali e contestate dovevano rimanere effettivo finché una legge che stabilisce un regime legale per l'espropriazione fu adottata ma che in qualsiasi l'evento, l'ultima data sulla quale loro perderebbero il loro vigore legale era 1 ottobre 2006.
41. 22 agosto 2006 il Kentron e Corte distrettuale di Nork-Marash di Yerevan esaminarono la rivendicazione nella presenza del primo richiedente ed un rappresentante dell'Ufficio del Sindaco. La Corte distrettuale decise di ammettere il ricorso, mentre assegnando 54,494,000 dracme Armene il primo richiedente ed ordinando il suo sfratto. La Corte distrettuale basò le sue sentenze su Articoli 218 221 e 283 del Codice civile.
42. 4 settembre 2006 il primo richiedente depositò un ricorso che fu elencato per essere esaminato con la Corte d'appello Civile 25 settembre 2006.
43. Durante la notte di 24 a 25 settembre 2006 il primo richiedente si sentì indisposto e fu preso con ambulanza per ricoverare in ospedale, dove lui fu diagnosticato con funzione cardiaca e danneggiata.
44. Di fronte all'inizio dell'udienza, la Corte d'appello ricevette una richiesta scritto depositata col primo richiedente che chiede aggiornamento dell'udienza a causa dei suoi problemi di salute 25 settembre 2006. Sembra che un certificato di ospedale che afferma che lui era in ospedale fu allegato alla richiesta.
45. 25 settembre 2006 la Corte d'appello sostenne un'udienza nell'assenza del primo richiedente ed il suo rappresentante ma nella presenza di rappresentanti dell'Ufficio del Sindaco e Vizkon Ltd che fecero le loro osservazioni in relazione al ricorso del primo richiedente che chiedono che sia respinto. Come riguardi la richiesta del primo richiedente per riprogrammare l'udienza, secondo il documento dell'udienza la Corte d'appello rifiutò di aggiornarlo sulla base che il primo richiedente aveva un rappresentante che aveva partecipato nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte distrettuale. Con la sentenza adottata sulla stessa data la Corte d'appello sostenne la sentenza di 22 agosto 2006 che conferma l'importo assegnata con la Corte distrettuale. La sentenza affermò che il primo richiedente non era riuscito a sembrare nonostante stato stato chiamato in causa debitamente all'udienza.
46. 2 ottobre 2006 il primo richiedente, mentre avendo subito trattamento medico, fu assolto dall'ospedale.
47. 20 dicembre 2006 il primo richiedente depositò un ricorso su questioni di diritto contro la sentenza di 25 settembre 2006.
48. 16 gennaio 2007 la Corte di Cassazione dichiarò il ricorso del primo richiedente inammissibile per mancanza di merito.
49. La sentenza della Corte d'appello di 25 settembre 2006 entrò in vigore al tempo della sua consegna ed immediatamente era esecutiva.
50. In maggio 2007 il primo richiedente cercò di terminare i procedimenti di esecuzione in riguardo della sentenza di 25 settembre 2006 con affidamento sulla Decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 18 aprile 2006 che aveva trovato Decreto Governativo n. 1151-N ed Articolo 218 del CC incompatibile con la Costituzione.
51. 11 giugno 2007 il Settore per Esecuzione di Atti Giudiziali eseguì la sentenza con demolendo l'alloggio.
52. 6 luglio 2007 la Corte d'appello respinse la richiesta del primo richiedente, mentre trovando che 11 giugno 2007 la sentenza era stata eseguita ed i procedimenti di esecuzione erano stati terminati.
F. Il secondo e terzi richiedenti che ' piace contro la sentenza di 25 settembre 2006
53. In 18 maggio 2007 il secondo e terzi richiedenti depositarono un ricorso con la Corte di Cassazione contro la sentenza della Corte d'appello di 25 settembre 2006 che adduce che loro avevano saputo solamente dei procedimenti di espropriazione di alloggio contro il primo richiedente 19 febbraio 2007. Nel ricorso, il secondo e terzi richiedenti dibatterono, che loro goderono il diritto di uso di alloggio in riguardo dell'alloggio del primo richiedente, perciò i procedimenti di espropriazione colpirono anche i loro diritti di proprietà riservati. Loro dissero così che le autorità erano andate a vuoto a fabbricarloro parti a questi procedimenti e che la privazione allegato della loro proprietà non era legale e nell'interesse pubblico.
54. 24 luglio 2007 la Corte di Cassazione dichiarò il ricorso di 18 maggio 2007 inammissibile per mancanza di merito trovare, inter l'alia che il secondo e terzi richiedenti i diritti di ' non furono colpiti come il primo richiedente era il risuoli proprietario dell'alloggio in oggetto.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
La Privazione di A. di proprietà
55. Per un riassunto delle disposizioni nazionali ed attinenti veda la sentenza nella causa di Minasyan e Semerjyan c. l'Armenia (n. 27651/05, §§ 23-43 23 giugno 2009).
B. Il Codice di Procedura Civile (come in vigore al tempo di materiale)
56. Secondo Articolo 33 §§ 1 e 3, le parti possono terminare i procedimenti a qualsiasi stadio con giungendo ad un regolamento amichevole. Prima dell'approvazione dell'accordo di regolamento amichevole, la corte spiega le sue conseguenze procedurali alle parti.
57. Articolo 120 prevede che il giudice che presiede informa le parti ai procedimenti dei loro diritti ed obblighi ed avvia l'esame dei meriti della causa. Il giudice che presiede accerta se il querelante insiste sulle sue rivendicazioni, se il convenuto ammette le rivendicazioni del querelante e se le parti sono disposte a giungere ad un regolamento amichevole.
58. Cause sono esaminate con la Corte d'appello in conformità con gli articoli applicabile secondo Articolo 215, a procedimenti di fronte a primi giudici di prima istanza.
59. Secondo Articolo 238 § 3, la Corte di Cassazione ha nessuno diritto confermare o considerare come stabiliti quelle circostanze che non sono state stabilite nella sentenza o sono state respinte con la sentenza, predetermini la credibilità di prova, i problemi della generalità di un pezzo di prova in riguardo di un altro o rivolgere la questione della disposizione applicabile della legge di materiale e la sentenza che devono essere adottate nell'esame nuovo della causa.
C. Governo Decreto n. 759-N del 2005 emendamenti che contengono di 19 maggio a Governo Decreto nessuno 950 5 ottobre 2001 (?2005.? ?????? 19 - ?2001.? ?????????? 5 - ?950?)
60. Divida in paragrafi 7 prevede che il valore di mercato del beni immobili che è determinato con un'organizzazione di valutazione di autorizzato selezionò per una nave appoggio, notificherà come una base per la determinazione dell'importo del risarcimento per il beni immobili (aree di terra, edifici e costruzioni) situato all'interno della zona di alienazione. Col fine dell'alienazione veloce del beni immobili, incentivi finanziari sono pagati, a condizione che il proprietario, entro un periodo di dieci giornate lavorative che seguono la ricevuta dell'offerta di prezzo è d'accordo a concludere un contratto entro un mese e lasciare la proprietà che è soggetto alla demolizione all'interno del tempo-limite convenne col contratto. Il calcolo del risarcimento è basato sulla formula seguente: l'importo dell'incentivo finanziario è uguale a 0.3 volte il valore di mercato, se il valore di mercato del beni immobili e l'area di terra è 20,000,001 Dracme Armene o più alto (paragrafo 7 (d)). Il risarcimento per il beni immobili e l'area di terra per essere pagato al proprietario è il valore di mercato più l'importo dell'incentivo finanziario.
D. La Decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 18 aprile 2006 sulla Conformità di Articolo 218 del Codice civile, Articoli 104, 106 e 108 del Terra Codice ed il Decreto Statale n. 1151-N adottarono 1 agosto 2002 Riguardo all'Attuazione di Costruzione Projects all'interno dei Confini Amministrativi del Distretto di Kentron di Yerevan con Articolo 31 della Costituzione
61. La Corte Costituzionale, mentre decidendo sulla richiesta del Difensore civile Armeno, fondi che Articolo 31 della Costituzione, corretto 27 novembre 2005, richiesto che l'elaborazione di espropriazione sia regolata con una legge. Questa legge dovrebbe stabilire in termini chiari il regime legale per l'espropriazione di proprietà per le necessità di società e lo Stato. Le disposizioni legali e contestate, incluso Governo Decreto n. 1151-N ed Articolo 218 il Codice di Procedura Civile, non riuscì a soddisfare questo requisito ed era perciò incompatibile con, inter alia, Articolo 31 della Costituzione. Appellandosi su Articolo 102 (3) della Costituzione, la Corte Costituzionale decise, che le disposizioni legali e contestate dovevano rimanere effettivo finché una legge che stabilisce un regime legale per l'espropriazione fu adottata ma che in qualsiasi l'evento, l'ultima data sulla quale loro perderebbero il loro effetto legale era 1 ottobre 2006.
LA LEGGE
IO. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DI LA CONVENZIONE
62. Il primo richiedente si lamentò che nel primo set di procedimenti le corti nazionali violarono il principio della finalità di sentenze e che il Presidente della Camera Civile della Corte di Cassazione non era imparziale. Lui si lamentò inoltre che nel secondo set di procedimenti la Corte d'appello sostenne un'udienza nella sua assenza. Lui addusse una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che offre il seguente:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale...”
Ammissibilità di A.
63. La Corte nota che queste azioni di reclamo non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Merits
1. Il principio della certezza legale
64. Il primo richiedente addusse che, ammettendo il ricorso del Sindaco di Yerevan nel primo set di procedimenti, le corti nazionali avevano violato il principio della finalità di sentenze. Lui dibattè che questi procedimenti infatti costituì un ricorso mascherato contro la definitivo decisione del Presidium della Corte Suprema di 22 settembre 1997 siccome sostenuto con la Sessione Assoluta della Corte di Cassazione 29 dicembre 1998, da che cosa il suo diritto di proprietà in riguardo dell'area di terra in questione era stato riconosciuto.
65. Il Governo affermò che le corti, nel primo set di procedimenti avevano rivolto soltanto la questione di interpretazione sbagliata della sentenza del Kentron e Corte distrettuale di Nork-Marash di 18 luglio 2000 col SRER, come un risultato del quale aveva emesso un certificato di proprietà nuovo al richiedente in 13 maggio 2005.
66. La Corte reitera che il diritto ad un'udienza corretta di fronte ad un tribunale, come garantito con Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, deve essere interpretato nella luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che dichiara, fra le altre cose l'articolo di legge per essere parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti. Uno degli aspetti fondamentali dell'articolo di legge è il principio di certezza legale che richiede inter l'alia che dove le corti infine hanno determinato un problema, la loro direttiva non dovrebbe essere chiamata in questione (veda Brumrescu ?c. la Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61 ECHR 1999 VII).
67. La certezza legale presuppone riguardo per il principio di res judicata (veda Brumrescu?, citato sopra, § 62), quel è il principio della finalità di sentenze. Questo principio richiede che nessuna parte sia concessa per chiedere soltanto una revisione di un definitivo e sentenza vincolante per il fine di ottenere un riesame ed una determinazione nuova della causa. Più alto corteggia ' motorizza di revisione dovrebbe essere esercitato per correggere errori giudiziali ed errori giudiziari, ma non eseguire un esame nuovo. La revisione non dovrebbe essere trattata come un ricorso mascherato, e la possibilità mera di là che è due prospettive sulla materia non è una base per riesame. Una partenza da che principio è giustificato solamente quando rese necessario con circostanze di un carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile (veda Ryabykh c. la Russia, n. 52854/99, § 52 ECHR 2003 IX; Roca ?c. la Moldavia, n. 6267/02, § 25 22 marzo 2005).
68. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte nota che il diritto di proprietà del primo richiedente all'area di terra era stato riconosciuto con la decisione del Presidium della Corte Suprema di 22 settembre 1997 che era stato sostenuto con la decisione della Sessione Assoluta della Corte di Cassazione di 29 dicembre 1998 ed era divenuto così definitivo ed esecutivo. Il fatto della proprietà del primo richiedente ancora una volta fu riaffermato inoltre, nella sentenza del Kentron e Corte distrettuale di Nork-Marash di Yerevan di 18 luglio 2000 che era divenuto anche definitivo ed esecutivo (veda divide in paragrafi 13 e 17 sopra). Il titolo del primo richiedente in riguardo dell'area di terra era stato registrato seguente la decisione di 22 settembre 1997 e poi re-registrato in 13 maggio 2005 basato su, inter alia, la stessa decisione e la sentenza di 18 luglio 2000 (veda divide in paragrafi 15 e 22 sopra).
69. Ciononostante questo, 15 settembre 2006 la Corte d'appello Civile, in un altro set di procedimenti iniziato col Sindaco di Yerevan contro il SRER trovò il riconoscimento del titolo del primo richiedente per essere stato illegale e non basato su qualsiasi atto giudiziale (veda paragrafo 34 sopra).
70. La Corte osserva che, con ammettendo il ricorso del Sindaco, le corti nazionali nel primo set di procedimenti infatti condusse un riesame indiretto della questione di se il primo richiedente aveva titolo in riguardo dell'area di terra, nonostante l'esistenza di definitivo atti giudiziali sulla questione. Questo diede luogo all'annullare gli effetti legali di quegli atti giudiziali, benché formalmente loro ancora rimanessero in vigore. La Corte trova, perciò, che la decisione della Corte d'appello Civile di 15 settembre 2006 siccome sostenuto con la Corte di Cassazione sul 2007 set di 2 marzo a niente un'elaborazione giudiziale ed intera che aveva terminato in decisioni giudiziali che erano “irreversibile” e così res judicata e quale era stato eseguito inoltre (veda, mutatis mutandis, Brumrescu ?citato sopra, § 62). Nulla suggerisce che c'era qualsiasi circostanze di un carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile giustificando il riesame di una questione che prima era stata determinata nel definitivo e legando decisioni giudiziali. In prospettiva del precedente, la Corte conclude, che, ammettendo il ricorso depositato col Sindaco di Yerevan, le corti infransero il principio della certezza legale.
71. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in questo riguardo.
2. Diritto ad un tribunale imparziale
72. Il primo richiedente addusse che nel primo set di procedimenti Giudice M., il Presidente della Camera Civile della Corte di Cassazione non era imparziale siccome lui aveva tentato di obbligarlo a firmare un regolamento amichevole con minacciandolo implicitamente con gli effetti negativi del suo rifiuto. Lui dibattè che Giudice M. aveva posticipato molte volte le udienze, mentre chiaramente indicò che un unfavourable della decisione a lui sarebbero stati resi se lui fosse continuare a rifiutare di firmare il regolamento amichevole. Questa minaccia era infatti comprese fin dalla decisione di 28 luglio 2006, in violazione dei requisiti di Articolo 238 § 3 del Codice di Procedura Civile (il CCP) come in vigore al tempo di materiale, espresse l'opinione del pannello che lui non aveva diritto di proprietà alla terra. Questa sentenza fu riprodotta semplicemente nella sentenza della Corte d'appello di 15 settembre 2006.
73. Il Governo presentò che non era stato provato che Giudice M. aveva qualsiasi la parzialità personale o funzionale verso la causa in questione. Lui non aveva tentato di obbligare il primo richiedente per firmare un regolamento amichevole ma soltanto aveva agito in conformità coi requisiti attinenti della procedura. In particolare, sotto Articolo 120 del CCP lui fu richiesto, inter l'alia, scoprire se le parti erano disposte a firmare un regolamento amichevole. Secondo Articolo 33 del CCP il giudice che presiede, prima dell'approvazione dell'accordo di regolamento amichevole fu costretto inoltre, a spiegare alle parti le sue conseguenze procedurali.
74. La Corte reitera all'inizio che è dell'importanza fondamentale in una società democratica che le corti inspirano la fiducia nel pubblico (veda Padovani c. l'Italia, 26 febbraio 1993, § 27 la Serie Un n. 257 B). A quello fine Articolo 6 richiede un tribunale che incorre all'interno della sua sfera per essere imparziale. L'imparzialità denota l'assenza di pregiudizio o la parzialità e la sua esistenza normalmente o altrimenti può essere esaminata nei vari modi. La Corte ha distinto così fra un approccio soggettivo che è endeavouring per accertare la condanna personale o interesse di un giudice determinato in una particolare causa ed un approccio obiettivo che sta determinando se lui o lei offrirono di escludere garanzie sufficienti qualsiasi dubbio legittimo in questo riguardo (veda la ricapitolazione dei principi attinenti in Kyprianou c. la Cipro [GC], n. 73797/01, §§ 118-121 ECHR 2005 XIII; e Morice c. la Francia [GC], n. 29369/10, § 73 ECHR 2015).
75. Come riguardi la prova soggettiva, l'imparzialità personale di un giudice deve essere presunta sino a là è impermeabile al contrario (veda Padovani, citato sopra, § 26; lo Spugnola giallo c. la Francia, n. 34130/96, § 41 ECHR 2000 VI).
76. Come alla prova obiettiva, quando fece domanda ad un corpo giudiziale che si riunisce come una panca sé intende determinando se, piuttosto separatamente dalla condotta personale di qualsiasi dei membri di che corpo, ci sono fatti accertabili che possono sollevare dubbi allineato come alla sua imparzialità. Questo implica che, nel decidere se in una causa determinata è una ragione legittima di temere che ad un particolare giudice o un corpo che si riuniscono come una panca manca l'imparzialità, il posto d'osservazione della persona riguardato è importante ma non decisivo. Che che è decisivo è se questa paura può essere contenuta per essere giustificata obiettivamente (veda Wettstein c. la Svizzera, n. 33958/96, § 44; Micallef c. il Malta [GC], n. 17056/06, § 96 ECHR 2009 ECHR 2000 XII).
77. La Corte nota che le preoccupazioni del primo richiedente riguardo all'imparzialità della Corte di Cassazione scaturita dal fatto che Giudice M., mentre comportandosi come il Presidente del pannello del Civile e Camera Economica della Corte di Cassazione, aveva persistito ripetutamente sulla sua accettazione della proposta di regolamento amichevole.
78. Come riguardi la prova soggettiva, la Corte nota che nessuna prova è stata addotta nella causa presente che suggerirebbe la parzialità personale da parte dei giudici individuali della Corte di Cassazione nel primo set di procedimenti, incluso Giudice M.
79. Come alla prova obiettiva, la Corte osserva, che alle udienze di 21 aprile e 5 maggio 2006 nel primo set di procedimenti Giudice M. che presiedè sulle udienze di fronte al Civile e Camera Economica della Corte di Cassazione invitò il primo richiedente per considerare la proposta di regolamento amichevole presentato a lui col relatore nella causa (veda divide in paragrafi 30 e 31 sopra).
80. La Corte nota che, secondo le disposizioni del CCP assegnate a col Governo (veda paragrafo 73 sopra), il giudice che presiede investiga se le parti sono disposte ad entrare in un regolamento amichevole e spiegano le sue conseguenze procedurali. Questa non è una caratteristica non comune negli ordini legali degli Stati Contraenti e notifica sia gli interessi di economia procedurale e la buona amministrazione della giustizia. Comunque, prendendo in considerazione l'importanza del principio dell'imparzialità giudiziale (veda Buscemi v Italia, n. 29569/95, § 67 ECHR 1999-VI), giudici che investigano nelle parti la buona volontà di ' per entrare in regolamenti amichevoli devono esercitare la cautela e devono frenarsi dall'usare lingua che può, valutò obiettivamente, giustificato che entrambe le parti legittimamente temono che il giudice in oggetto l'imparzialità di mancanze.
81. La Corte indica che durante la Camera ascolti di 5 maggio 2006, Giudice M. secondo una trascrizione presentata di fronte alla Corte (veda paragrafo 31 sopra), si riferì alla conoscenza del primo richiedente di procedimenti di fronte alla Camera e la sua consapevolezza presunta del “l'importanza” che la Camera “sempre” allega al fatto che un “parte ha rifiutato di firmare un regolamento amichevole ragionevole.” Giudice M. indicò esplicitamente anche, che la Camera ascolta in oggetto sarebbe il “la scorsa volta” la Camera darebbe il primo richiedente un “l'opportunità”, sino alla prossimo udienza, discutere e rispondere ad un possibile regolamento amichevole.
82. Visto nell'insieme, ed in contesto, la Corte considera, che Giudice M. ' uso di s di lingua durante l'udienza chiaramente era capace di alzata un legittimo tema che il rifiuto del primo richiedente per accettare che è probabile che un'offerta di regolamento amichevole abbia un'influenza avversa sulla considerazione della Camera dei meriti della sua causa. Perciò, i costatazione di Corte che Giudice M. che ' s conducono, mentre mancando nel distacco necessario richiese col principio della neutralità giudiziale, sollevò un obiettivamente giustificò teme che gli mancasse l'imparzialità quando decidendo la causa del richiedente all'interno del significato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
83. C'è stata di conseguenza anche una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in questo riguardo.
3. L'uguaglianza di braccio
84. Il primo richiedente si lamentò infine che nel secondo set di procedimenti, la Corte d'appello non posticipò l'udienza di 25 settembre 2006 che lui non era capace di frequentare a causa della cattiva salute, mentre i rappresentanti della sua parte concorrente erano presenti. In queste circostanze, lui fu privato dell'opportunità di presentare i suoi argomenti, mentre la Corte di Cassazione non ammise il suo ricorso su questioni di diritto per esame.
85. Il Governo presentò che la Corte d'appello condusse l'udienza di 25 settembre 2006 nell'assenza del primo richiedente per le ragioni seguenti: i procedimenti erano durati per molto tempo; il richiedente era consapevole delle osservazioni dell'altra parte; la corte era familiarizzato con gli argomenti del primo richiedente e nessuna prova nuova fu prodotto durante che ascolta quale potesse colpire gli interessi del primo richiedente.
86. La Corte reitera che Articolo 6 della Convenzione non garantisce il diritto a presenza personale di fronte ad una corte civile ma custodisce un diritto più generale per presentare efficacemente la causa di uno di fronte alla corte e godere dell'uguaglianza di braccio col lato avversario. Articolo 6 § 1 permessi allo Stato una scelta gratis dei mezzi essere usato nel garantire contendenti questi diritti (veda Acciaio e Maurizio c. il Regno Unito, n. 68416/01, §§ 59-60 ECHR 2005 II). Così, le questioni di presenza personale, la forma dei procedimenti-orale o scritto-e rappresentanza legale è collegata e deve essere analizzata nel contesto più largo del “il processo equanime” garantisca di Articolo 6. La Corte dovrebbe stabilire se il richiedente, una parte ai procedimenti civili era stato dato un'opportunità ragionevole di avere conoscenza di e fare commenti sulle osservazioni rese o prova addusse con l'altra parte e presentare la sua causa sotto condizioni che non l'hanno messo ad un vis-à-vis di svantaggio sostanziale il suo oppositore (veda Krmá ?ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 35376/97, § 39 3 marzo 2000; Dombo Beheer B.V. c. i Paesi Bassi, 27 ottobre 1993, § 33 la Serie Un n. 274).
87. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte nota che al tempo di materiale i procedimenti prima che corti di appello furono governate con gli articoli procedurali applicabile a procedimenti di fronte a primi giudici di prima istanza (veda paragrafo 58 sopra), quel è i procedimenti su ricorso fu condotto anche oralmente. La Corte nota inoltre che il primo richiedente richiese la Corte d'appello Civile per aggiornare l'udienza di 25 settembre 2006 perché lui era in ospedale ed aveva presentato prova di documentario attinente, e che la sua richiesta era giunta alla corte di fronte all'udienza. Ciononostante, la Corte d'appello decise di sostenere l'udienza nella presenza dei rappresentanti dell'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan e Vizkon Ltd. chi fece le loro osservazioni riguardo al ricorso del primo richiedente (veda divide in paragrafi 44 e 45 sopra).
88. La Corte osserva che le ragioni avanzarono col Governo per non aggiornare l'udienza di 25 settembre 2006 non è sostenuto con l'archivio di causa. Inoltre, non è per la Corte per speculare che argomenti il richiedente può o non avrebbe fissato in avanti al ricorso ascolti, l'aveva stato presente. La Corte osserva inoltre che la ragione per non accordare la richiesta del primo richiedente per posticipare l'udienza era soltanto il fatto che lui aveva un rappresentante designato di fronte al primo giudice di prima istanza. Comunque, la Corte osserva che il rappresentante del primo richiedente non era presente all'udienza. La Corte nota anche che il primo richiedente era stato ricoverato in ospedale per ragioni acute equo durante la notte di fronte all'udienza, e che non sembra che il suo rappresentante aveva infatti aveva avviso adeguato o l'opportunità di rappresentare il richiedente all'udienza ma non riuscì a fare così. Sotto simile circostanze, la Corte conclude che il richiedente era infatti deprivato di qualsiasi rappresentanza di fronte alla Corte d'appello e perciò, per ragioni che non potevano essere imputate a lui, non era capace di fare commenti sulle osservazioni del rappresentante del suo oppositore (veda Ternovskis c. la Lettonia, n. 33637/02, §§ 69-75 29 aprile 2014).
89. La Corte osserva infine che i difetti allegato nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte d'appello non furono rimediati a successivamente, fin dal ricorso del primo richiedente su questioni di diritto era inutilmente (veda paragrafo 48 sopra).
90. Avendo riguardo ad ai requisiti del principio dell'uguaglianza di braccio ed al ruolo di comparizioni nel determinare se loro si sono stati attenuti con, i costatazione di Corte che la procedura seguita non abilitarono il richiedente per in modo appropriato partecipare nei procedimenti e così lo spogliarono di un'udienza corretta all'interno del significato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. In conclusione, è stata anche una violazione di questa disposizione in questo riguardo.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
91. Il primo richiedente si lamentò che la decisione delle corti nazionali di ammettere il ricorso del Sindaco di Yerevan nel primo set di procedimenti aveva dato luogo alla privazione arbitraria della sua terra. Lui addusse inoltre che lui fu privato di alloggio suo in violazione delle garanzie di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
92. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. La privazione della terra
93. Il primo richiedente presentò che lui fu privato arbitrariamente della sua area di terra della quale la sua proprietà era stata riconosciuta inequivocabilmente con definitivo e sentenze vincolanti e per che lui già era stato emesso un certificato di proprietà.
94. Il Governo presentò che i diritti di proprietà del primo richiedente sull'area di terra in oggetto non era stato riconosciuto con qualsiasi atto giudiziale che ha vigore legale.
95. La Corte reitera che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza solamente privazione di proprietà “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso di proprietà con eseguendo “le leggi.” Inoltre, l'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (veda Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 79 ECHR 2000 XII).
96. La Corte nota che nella sua decisione di 22 settembre 1997, il Presidium della Corte Suprema aveva riconosciuto il primo richiedente come il proprietario legale dell'area di terra in questione. Questa decisione fu sostenuta con la Sessione Assoluta della Corte di Cassazione 29 dicembre 1998. Il titolo del richiedente in riguardo della terra fu registrato una volta inoltre, basato su queste decisioni e poi re-registrato in 13 maggio 2005. Il riesame susseguente della questione di se il primo richiedente aveva titolo in riguardo della terra, con la Corte d'appello Civile nella sua decisione di 15 settembre 2006 lo spogliò di questa proprietà e corrispose ad un'interferenza col suo diritto a proprietà come garantito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Brumrescu?, citato sopra, §§ 70 e 74). Siccome già ha trovato la Corte che il definitivo atto giudiziale era stato fatto una rassegna in violazione del principio della certezza legale, da che cosa nessun equilibrio equo era stato previsto fra l'interesse pubblico e la protezione dei diritti del richiedente, segue che c'è stata anche una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in che riguardo (veda, mutatis mutandis, Margushin c. la Russia, n. 11989/03, § 40 1 aprile 2010; e Karen Poghosyan c. l'Armenia, n. 62356/09, § 52 31 marzo 2016).
2. La privazione dell'alloggio
97. Il primo richiedente presentò che la privazione di alloggio suo non era stata eseguita sotto le condizioni previste per con legge poiché era stato effettuato in violazione delle garanzie di Articolo 28 della Costituzione.
98. Il Governo si astenne dal rendere qualsiasi osservazioni riguardo a questa azione di reclamo.
99. La Corte nota che già ha esaminato azioni di reclamo identiche in un numero di cause contro l'Armenia e concluse che la privazione di proprietà al tempo di materiale non fu portata fuori in ottemperanza con “le condizioni previdero per con legge” (veda, per esempio, Minasyan e Semerjyan c. l'Armenia, n. 27651/05, §§ 69-77 23 giugno 2009; Tunyan ed Altri c. l'Armenia, n. 22812/05, §§ 35-39 9 ottobre 2012). La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare da che trovando nella causa presente.
100. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione anche in questo riguardo.
III. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 8 DI LA CONVENZIONE
101. Il primo richiedente si lamentò che la privazione di alloggio suo corrispose anche ad una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione che prevede:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia, la sua casa e la sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza con un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto come è in conformità con la legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione di disturbo o incrimina, per la protezione di salute o morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
102. Avendo riguardo ad alla conclusione giunta all'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda divide in paragrafi 99 e 100 sopra), la Corte non lo considera necessario esaminare separatamente l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione che solleva problemi simili (veda Minasyan e Semerjyan, citato sopra, § 82).
IV. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ALLEGATO DI LA CONVENZIONE
103. I richiedenti sollevarono anche un numero di altre azioni di reclamo sotto Articoli 6, 8 e 13 della Convenzione.
104. Avendo riguardo ad a tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come queste azioni di reclamo incorra all'interno della sua competenza, i costatazione di Corte che loro non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e le libertà espose fuori nella Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli. Segue che questa parte della richiesta deve essere respinta come essendo mal-fondata manifestamente, facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
C. la Richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
105. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
106. In riguardo di danno patrimoniale, il primo richiedente chiese EUR 1,048,097.55 come il valore dell'alloggio espropriato. Il primo richiedente presentò che il modo più appropriato per il Governo di compensare il danno patrimoniale causato come un risultato dell'espropriazione illegale della sua area di terra sarebbe stato ritornargli la terra. Lui presentò che la terra non era stata alienata ancora ad un'entità privata. Nell'evento del Governo non sta essendo in grado restituire la terra, il primo richiedente affermò che lui era disposto a considerare un'assegnazione del risarcimento e chiese una somma di EUR 10,381,842.05 quale, secondo lui rappresentò il valore di mercato corrente della terra. Il richiedente chiese inoltre EUR 12,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
107. Il Governo affermò che il primo richiedente non potesse chiedere il risarcimento per l'area di terra poiché non aveva appartenuto mai a lui. Il Governo presentò inoltre che l'importo del risarcimento chiese per l'alloggio era eccessivo e che dovrebbe essere calcolato basato sul valore dell'alloggio al tempo della sua espropriazione. Infine, il Governo presentò che l'importo di AMD 54,494,000 che il primo richiedente già aveva ricevuto nei procedimenti nazionali era il risarcimento adeguato per qualsiasi danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale del quale lui ha potuto soffrire.
108. Nelle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte considera, che, come lontano siccome concerne il risarcimento danni, la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione. Che questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e la procedura susseguente fissò, mentre avendo riguardo ad a qualsiasi accordo che sarebbe giunto al Governo ed il primo richiedente (l'Articolo 75 §§ 1 e 4 degli Articoli di Corte).
Costi di B. e spese
109. Il primo richiedente non chiese qualsiasi costi e spese. Di conseguenza, la Corte non rende qualsiasi assegna sotto questo capo.
Interesse di mora di C.
110. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla violazione del principio della certezza legale e l'uguaglianza di braccio, mancanza di un'udienza corretta con un tribunale imparziale e la privazione di proprietà ammissibile come lontano siccome concerne il primo richiedente ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata come lontano come i principi una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione della certezza legale, l'imparzialità e l'uguaglianza di braccio riguarda;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

4. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione;

5. Sostiene che la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per decisione e di conseguenza,
(un) le riserve la questione detta;
(b) invita il Governo ed il primo richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo nella conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, le loro osservazioni scritto sull'importo di danni per essere assegnato al primo richiedente e, in particolare, notificare la Corte di qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere;
(il c) le riserve l'ulteriore procedura e delegati al Presidente della Camera il potere per fissare lo stesso se bisogno è.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 27 ottobre 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Abel Campos Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 11/05/2020.