Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF LEKI? v. SLOVENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 35,P1-1

NUMERO: 36480/07/2017
STATO: Slovenia
DATA: 14/02/2017
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 -Deprivation of property Peaceful enjoyment of possessions Possessions)


FOURTH SECTION









CASE OF LEKI? v. SLOVENIA

(Application no. 36480/07)










JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG


14 February 2017



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Leki? v. Slovenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
András Sajó, President,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Iulia Motoc,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer, judges,
Boštjan Zalar, ad hoc judge,
and Marialena Tsirli, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 24 January 2017,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 36480/07) against the Republic of Slovenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by OMISSIS. He was represented before the Court by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Ljubljana.
2. The Slovenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs B. Jovin Hrastnik, State Attorney.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the striking off of company L.E. from the court register had constituted a disproportionate interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, as it had meant that the company in which he was a shareholder had ceased to exist. Furthermore, he had become personally liable for the company’s debts.
4. On 28 November 2012 the application was communicated to the Government. Mr Marko Bošnjak, the judge elected in respect of Slovenia, was unable to sit in the case (Rule 28 of the Rules of Court). Accordingly, the President of the Fourth Section decided to appoint Mr Boštjan Zalar to sit as an ad hoc judge (Article 26 § 4 of the Convention and Rule 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1956 and lives in Ljubljana.
A. The applicant’s position in company L.E.
6. On 8 October 1992 the applicant acquired a share in L.E., a limited liability company based in Ljubljana. His name was entered in the court register of legal entities (hereinafter “the court register”) and he became one of nine equal registered members of the company, each holding an 11.11% share. The share capital of L.E. stood at 2,995,250 Slovenian tolars (SIT) (12,498.96 euros (EUR)).
7. Two of the founding members withdrew from company L.E. at the beginning of 1993. On 2 February 1993 the applicant, in addition to being a member, was also employed by company L.E. as head of its IT department. In addition, he provided assistance to the finance director.
8. On 19 February 1993 two key members and managers of company L.E. died in a car accident and two others were seriously injured. As a result, the company’s business operations could not be carried out and the company sustained a large financial loss. Moreover, its management was seriously undermined and during the course of 1993 all members except the applicant and another person withdrew from the company’s management board. Following those events, the applicant first assumed the role of acting director of company L.E. on 29 April 1993, and then the role of managing director on 23 February 1995. In that capacity he acted as the company’s representative.
9. Meanwhile, on 24 August 1993, the Railway Company of Slovenia (Slovenske železnice) had applied for an enforcement order against L.E. based on an authentic document for unpaid transport services. L.E. challenged the enforcement order and the parties were directed to settle the issue in contentious proceedings. The Railway Company lodged a civil action, claiming the payment of three sums totalling approximately SIT 5,000,000 (EUR 20,000).
10. In 1995, L.E. was converted into a limited liability company in accordance with section 580 of the Companies Act, which required companies falling under its jurisdiction to increase their share capital and to align their operations with the provisions of the Act (see paragraph 34 below). However, at the time of the conversion the company was no longer liquid or solvent.
11. On 6 May 1996 the applicant stepped down as managing director of L.E. following a decision of the general meeting of the company. The members failed to appoint a new managing director and henceforth the company existed without any management. The applicant’s resignation from the post of managing director was not entered in the court register of legal entities (hereinafter “the court register”).
12. On 19 June 1997 the members of company L.E. decided at its general meeting to apply for bankruptcy on account of the company’s insolvency. L.E. filed a bankruptcy petition with the competent court, but it was rejected as the company had failed to make the required advance payment to cover costs and expenses of the bankruptcy proceedings in the amount of SIT 150,000 (EUR 626). The members established that they could not incur the costs of bankruptcy and thus decided to wait for the courts to liquidate the company proprio motu, in accordance with the then applicable legislation, namely, the Compulsory Composition, Bankruptcy and Winding-Up Act as amended, which entered into force on 1 July 1997. The amendment to the Act authorised the courts to initiate bankruptcy proceedings of their own motion in certain specified circumstances (see paragraph 34 below).
13. On 31 July 1997 the applicant stopped working for company L.E. Moreover, by the end of 2000, another two members of the company had died.
14. In the civil proceedings initiated by the Railway Company against L.E. the applicant was summoned to appear at a hearing to be held on 22 November 2000. As he was unable to attend the hearing, he made written submissions explaining that the company had not been solvent for a number of years. On 22 November 2000 the District Court of Ljubljana rendered a judgment ordering L.E. to pay the Railway Company the three sums claimed.
B. The strike-off proceedings against company L.E.
15. Meanwhile, on 1 July 1999 the Compulsory Composition, Bankruptcy and Winding up Act was again amended, inter alia, to repeal the provisions on bankruptcy proprio motu. Moreover, on 23 July 1999 the Financial Operations of Companies Act (hereinafter “the FOCA”) entered into force. It introduced a measure decided proprio motu whereby insolvent and/or inactive companies were struck off from the court register without winding up. Thus those companies could be dissolved without the prior procedure of disposing of their assets and repaying – to the extent possible – their creditors. However, in order to ensure that creditors of struck-off companies were protected, the FOCA provided that the members of those companies would assume joint and several liability for the former companies’ debts.
16. On the basis of a notification from the Agency for Public Legal Records and Related Services that company L.E. had not performed any transactions through its bank account in a period of twelve consecutive months, on 19 January 2001 the Ljubljana District Court, acting in its capacity as the registry court, initiated proceedings to strike off the company from the court register.
17. On that day, the decision to initiate strike-off proceedings was entered in the court register and an unsuccessful attempt was made to serve it on the company at its registered office. The document was sent to the address of the company, but since no representative of the company was there to receive it, a delivery slip was left in its mailbox, informing the company that the relevant correspondence could be collected at the post office. On 12 February 2001 the document was returned to the registry court with the information that the addressee had failed to collect it. The registry court then served it by posting it on its notice board, as provided for by the Court Register of Legal Entities Act. According to the applicant, company L.E. had ceased to operate at the address of its registered office already in 1997 and had not been present at those or any other premises since. Moreover, there were no mailboxes at the office building at issue and all mail would have been left at the reception desk.
18. No objection was made to the decision to initiate strike-off proceedings either by company L.E. or by its members. Consequently, on 11 May 2001 the registry court issued a decision to strike off company L.E. from the court register. The decision was published in the Official Gazette on 30 May 2001. The registry court also attempted to serve the decision on company L.E. by sending it to the company’s address, but like the previous document it was returned on 4 June 2001 with the information that the addressee had failed to collect it. Again, the decision was posted on the registry court’s notice board. Neither company L.E. nor any of its members, who were entitled to lodge an appeal against the strike-off decision, appealed against the decision, so on 17 August 2001 it became final.
19. On 25 September 2001 company L.E. was struck off from the court register and thus ceased to exist. Notification of the strike-off was published in the Official Gazette on 6 February 2002.
20. The applicant stated that he had become aware that L.E. had been struck off from the court register on 22 December 2004, when an enforcement order was served on him for seizure of his property.
C. Enforcement proceedings against the applicant
21. Meanwhile, based on the judgment ordering L.E. to pay the Railway Company approximately EUR 20,000 (see paragraph 9 above), on 5 April 2002 the creditor lodged an application for enforcement with the Ljubljana Local Court against seven members of the company.
22. On 5 June 2002 the Ljubljana Local Court granted the creditor an enforcement order to seize the applicant’s personal possessions, which was later expanded to include his salary.
23. On 29 December 2004 the applicant lodged an objection to the enforcement order, arguing that the local court had failed to establish his actual role in company L.E. and to acknowledge his status of an “inactive member” (see paragraphs 48-49 below), which would have exonerated him from liability for the company’s debts. He maintained that the creditor’s claim against the company had arisen before he had joined it, and that he had only become involved in the management of the company because the two members who had previously performed that role had died. Moreover, the applicant was of the view that the onus rested on the creditor to establish that he had been an active member of the company, and that the matter should be examined in contentious civil proceedings. Lastly, he applied for a stay of enforcement.
24. On 12 March 2005 the applicant’s objection was dismissed. The Local Court found that the onus of proving his inactive status was on the applicant, and that he had failed to prove that he had not been an active member of L.E. The Local Court established that with his 11.11% share in the company, the applicant had enjoyed the rights of a minority member, and furthermore, he had been employed by the company and actively involved in its management since April 1993. In his capacity as acting director and later managing director, he had been authorised to act on behalf of the company. Moreover, even after the applicant had resigned as managing director, he had still been active in the operations of the company and had also signed the bankruptcy petition. The Local Court further dismissed the applicant’s request for a stay of enforcement, as he had failed to demonstrate that the enforcement would have caused him irreparable or serious damage. The applicant appealed against that decision, reiterating the arguments he had raised in the objection to the enforcement order.
25. On 6 May 2005 the applicant attended a hearing with regard to an objection to the enforcement order raised by D.P., another member of company L.E.
26. On 9 February 2006 the Higher Court of Ljubljana dismissed the applicant’s appeal on essentially the same grounds as the first-instance court, and the enforcement order thus became final. The court noted, inter alia, that the Constitutional Court had found the measure of “lifting the corporate veil” under the applicable Financial Operations of Companies Act to be in accordance with the principle of separation of a company’s assets from those of its member, and thus consistent with the Constitution. The Higher Court considered it irrelevant whether the applicant had become a member of L.E. before or after the creditor’s claim had arisen. Having joined the company, he had assumed its assets as well as its liabilities, and moreover, he had had the rights of a minority member. The Higher Court placed considerable emphasis on the fact that the applicant had been actively involved in the management of the company. It explained that the reasons for lifting the corporate veil under the FOCA were not identical to those provided for in the Companies Act. The FOCA established a non-rebuttable presumption that members of inactive companies intended to have the companies dissolved and, to that end, made it clear that they assumed joint and several liability for their outstanding debts (see paragraph 41 below).
27. On 5 May 2006 the applicant lodged two constitutional complaints before the Constitutional Court, one concerning the strike-off proceedings and the other the enforcement proceedings.
28. On 31 January 2007 the Constitutional Court rejected the applicant’s complaint regarding the strike-off proceedings. The decision was served on the applicant on 5 February 2007. The court observed that the applicant lacked legal interest in challenging the decision of the registry court, as company L.E. had already been struck off from the court register. Therefore, even a positive outcome of the constitutional complaint could not improve the applicant’s legal position. On 9 July 2007 the Constitutional Court rejected also the complaint regarding the enforcement proceedings, finding that the applicant’s human rights had manifestly not been violated. Reiterating that only active members of struck-off companies could be held liable for the companies’ debts, the Constitutional Court found that the lower courts had correctly established that the applicant’s active involvement in the management of company L.E. could not exempt him from personal liability for the latter’s debts.
29. In 2010 the enforcement order against the applicant’s salary was executed and part of each of the applicant’s monthly salaries was seized to pay off his debt. On 23 September 2011 the applicant reached an out-of-court settlement with the Railway Company and paid the agreed amount, and the application for enforcement against him was withdrawn. The proceedings against the applicant were terminated on 28 September 2011. In total, the applicant paid EUR 32,795 to his creditor.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Legislation preceding the Financial Operations of Companies Act
30. In 1988 the Undertakings Act entered into force in the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, providing a legal framework for the private ownership of undertakings (businesses). The Act provided that private businesses could be established by a wide range of investors with a relatively low share capital.
31. After it became independent, Slovenia enacted, in 1993, the Companies Act which replaced the Undertakings Act in its entirety. Under that Act, a limited liability company is a company whose share capital is comprised of the subscribed contributions of its members. A company may have a maximum of fifty members and is established by a contract concluded by the members in the form of a notarial deed. Each member obtains his or her business share in proportion to his or her stake in the total share capital. Members are not liable for the obligations of the limited liability company. A company director is required to enter the company in the court register. An application for entry in the register must include, inter alia, a list of members and their shares, the company’s name, activity and registered office. Any change in the data entered in the court register must be notified to the registry court within three days.
32. A limited liability company has one or more directors who are responsible for managing the operations of the company and representing the company. However, several important decisions regarding the management and operation of the company (such as the appointment of directors or distribution of profits) are adopted at a general meeting. Members whose business shares comprise at least one tenth of the total share capital may demand the convocation of a general meeting; in this regard, they are required to specify the issues on which the general meeting should decide, and the reasons for calling a general meeting. Moreover, such members may also request that a specific issue be included on the agenda of a general meeting that has already been called. Also, a company director is required to inform a member immediately of the company’s affairs at his or her request, and allow the member access to the company’s records and files.
33. With regard to the dissolution of a company, the Companies Act provides that a limited liability company must be dissolved, inter alia, if it goes bankrupt or if the company’s share capital is reduced below the statutory limit or if the members decide to wind it up. Any member whose business share amounts to at least one tenth of the total share capital may lodge an action before the competent court requesting that the company be dissolved, if he or she considers that the company’s aims cannot be achieved to a sufficient degree, or if there are any other reasonable grounds for the dissolution of the company. Moreover, the members of a limited liability company may decide to dissolve the company in the so-called summary proceedings, without the winding up, if all members of the company request the registry court to strike off the company from the court register. In this event, they must attach to the application a resolution on dissolving the company by summary procedure and a statement made by all members in the form of a notary deed to the effect that all the company’s obligations have been fulfilled, that any disputes with the employees have been settled and that the members assume joint and several liability for any potential outstanding obligations of the company. Any claims against the struck-off company can be enforced against its members within one year of the publication of the strike-off notice in the court register.
34. The Companies Act introduced important changes in the operation of companies and, inter alia, increased the minimum share capital required for the operation of limited liability companies. Existing companies were required to align themselves with the new, more constricting legislation within approximately a year and a half of the entry into force of the Act. Failing that, pursuant to section 580 of the Act companies were to be wound up and struck off the court register proprio motu, while their former members were to assume personal liability for the former companies’ debts. Subsequently, the Constitutional Court annulled the provision in part, distinguishing between members who were actively involved in the operation of a company and so-called “passive members” (decision no. U-I-135/00). In accordance with the decision of the Constitutional Court, only active former members could be held personally liable for a company’s debts (see paragraph 49 below).
35. In 1997 the legislature responded to the problem of a high number of inactive and insolvent companies by amending the then applicable Compulsory Composition, Bankruptcy and Winding Up Act. An amendment of 1 July 1997 authorised the courts to initiate of their own motion bankruptcy proceedings against companies which had failed to pay salaries for three consecutive months, or had blocked bank accounts, or which had been illiquid (lacking liquid assets) for the preceding twelve months. Insolvent companies which themselves filed for bankruptcy were required to make an advance payment covering the costs of publishing the notice of commencement of bankruptcy proceedings in the Official Gazette. The remaining costs of bankruptcy proceedings were paid from the bankruptcy estate; if the assets constituting the bankruptcy estate were not even sufficient to cover the costs of the proceedings, the bankruptcy panel initiated bankruptcy proceedings and concluded them immediately. The provisions on bankruptcy proceedings initiated proprio motu were repealed by another amendment to the Act, which entered into force on 1 July 1999, after it had been established that such manner of dealing with inactive companies was not a feasible solution given their large number (approximately 6,000 inactive companies at the beginning of 1998) and the high costs of instituting bankruptcy proceedings which was being incurred by the State.
B. Financial Operations of Companies Act
36. The FOCA was enacted on 24 June 1999 and published in the Official Gazette no. 54/99 of 8 July 1999. The Act entered into force on 23 July 1999 and introduced new means of dealing with inactive and/or insolvent companies. The legislature observed that a great number of private companies were unable to meet their liabilities, thus contributing to poor financial discipline in corporate legal transactions and putting their creditors in a precarious position. Thus, the Act required companies to conduct their business in such a manner that they were able at all times to fulfil their obligations in due time (section 5). Moreover, they were required to maintain adequate capital in proportion to the volume and type of operations and activities they carried out and to the risks to which they were exposed (section 6). In this connection, the company’s management had to ensure that the company conducted its business in accordance with the law and the principles of financial operations (section 8), that it regularly monitored the risks incurred in conducting those operations and that it took appropriate measures to hedge against such risks (section 9).
37. If a company became illiquid and thus unable to meet its maturing liabilities on time, the management had to adopt the necessary measures to re-establish liquidity and, if those measures did not bring results within the next two months, to file for bankruptcy or compulsory composition (section 12). Likewise, if a company became insolvent and its assets were no longer sufficient to meet its liabilities, the management was required to file for bankruptcy or compulsory composition within two months at the latest (section 13). If the management failed to comply with those obligations, they could be found personally liable for any damage caused to the company’s creditors as a result of such a failure. Moreover, under certain conditions, the supervisory board and the members of a company could also be found personally liable for any damage caused to the creditors.
38. Companies that failed to follow the prescribed procedures in order to re-establish solvency or terminate their operations in cases of insolvency were to be struck off the court register proprio motu without a prior winding-up procedure, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 3 of the FOCA. Under section 25, strike-off proceedings would be initiated if, inter alia, it could be presumed that the company in question had no assets. That was deemed to be the case if a company had made no transactions through its registered bank account for twelve consecutive months. Organisations effecting payment transactions for the company were required to inform the court responsible for maintaining the court register (the registry court) of the existence of such circumstances within a month of their onset (section 26(2)).
39. The registry court was to commence strike-off proceedings of its own motion after establishing that the conditions for striking off the company from the register had been met. The decision on the institution of proceedings was served on the company concerned and entered in the court register (section 29). An objection could be lodged within a two-month time-limit by either the company itself, a member of the company or a creditor, on the grounds that (i) the conditions for the strike-off had been erroneously established or were incomplete; (ii) another procedure for the dissolution of the company, namely compulsory composition, bankruptcy or winding up had been initiated or applied for; or (iii) a petition for bankruptcy had been filed on behalf of the company, and advance payment had been made for the initiation of bankruptcy proceedings, or the bankruptcy petitioner had been relieved from making the advance payment (section 30).
40. If no objection was made to the decision to commence strike-off proceedings or if such an objection had been dismissed, the registry court issued a decision to strike off the company from the court register, which was served on the company concerned and published in the Official Gazette (sections 32 and 33). An appeal against such a decision could be lodged within thirty days of its service on the company concerned or its publication in the Official Gazette by a person who had lodged an unsuccessful objection to the initiation of the strike-off proceedings, a member of the company or its creditor on the same grounds as the prior objection (section 34). If no appeal was lodged against the decision to strike off the company or if such an appeal was dismissed, the strike-off decision became final and the registry court struck off the company from the court register; a notice thereof was published in the Official Gazette (section 35).
41. In order to ensure that the creditors of struck-off companies were protected, the FOCA provided that company members would be personally liable for outstanding debts. The Act included a non-rebuttable presumption that members of inactive and/or insolvent companies intended to have their companies dissolved, but had failed to initiate winding-up or bankruptcy proceedings. Under the applicable provisions (section 27(4) of the FOCA in conjunction with section 394(1) of the Companies Act), company members were deemed to have agreed to assuming joint and several liability for any outstanding debts of the struck-off company. The company’s creditors could pursue their claims against the members for up to a year after the publication of the strike-off notice in the Official Gazette.
42. Due to the wide-reaching consequences of the FOCA, the provisions on measures to be taken in order to ensure that a company had adequate capital and was solvent became operational six months after the Act entered into force. The provisions of Chapter 3 regulating the strike-off procedure took effect even later. In this regard, the presumption that the company had no assets only took effect when a company had failed to make payments through its bank account for twelve consecutive months after the FOCA had entered into force, that is on 23 July 2000.
43. In 2007, the legislature, finding that the FOCA constituted an interference with a number of principles of corporate law and was having wide-reaching and adverse effects on the position of members of struck-off companies, decided to amend the Act and relieve company members of their personal liability for their company’s debts. The Amendment to the FOCA provided that all pending judicial and administrative proceedings in which creditors of struck-off companies were enforcing their claims against members of the companies were to be terminated proprio motu. A number of creditors, whose proceedings against former members of struck-off companies were pending and who were thus about to lose all possibility of repayment, lodged a constitutional complaint challenging the new regulation. The Constitutional Court, in decision no. U-I-117/07, upheld their complaint and annulled the challenged provisions, finding that they did not afford appropriate protection to creditors.
C. Financial Operations, Insolvency Proceedings and Compulsory Dissolution Act
44. On 15 January 2008 the Financial Operations, Insolvency Proceedings and Compulsory Dissolution Act was enacted to replace the Financial Operations of Companies Act. The new Act retained the possibility of striking off a company from the court register without a prior winding-up procedure, but under slightly different conditions.
45. Subsequently, the Act on Proceedings for the Enforcement or Exoneration of Shareholders’ Liability for Corporate Obligations (hereinafter “the Shareholders’ Liability for Corporate Obligations Act”), enacted on 19 October 2011, again relieved company members from personal liability for the debts of struck-off companies. Since the legislative solutions provided for in the Act were similar to those in the Amendment to the FOCA (see paragraph 43 above), the Constitutional Court was once again called upon to decide whether the Act struck a fair balance between the interests of members of struck-off companies and the companies’ creditors. The Constitutional Court reiterated that in cases where a creditor’s claims had been recognised by a judicial decision or where the judicial proceedings were pending, as well as in cases where a creditor had not yet lodged a claim against the former members of a struck-off company but had a legitimate expectation to do so, there were no constitutionally admissible reasons for interfering with the creditor’s acquired rights. However, the court allowed exoneration for former members of companies which had been struck off from the court register after the entry into force of the Act.
D. The Constitutional Court’s decision regarding the establishment of members’ and/or shareholders’ personal liability for the debts of a company (no. U-I-135/00)
46. The regulation introduced by the 1999 FOCA had been challenged before the Constitutional Court by a number of former members of struck-off companies. On 9 October 2002, the Constitutional Court had dismissed the challenge in part (Decision No. U-I-135/00), holding that the measure of striking off an inactive company that had no assets was not inconsistent with the Constitution. An economically inactive company did not conduct any business operations, nor did it generate income or make payments. At the same time, its financial situation was not known to its creditors, who relied on the presumption that it had at least a minimum amount of assets. For those reasons, non-operating companies posed a threat to the security of corporate legal transactions and to the position of their creditors.
47. The claimants had also alleged that they could not effectively protect their rights in the strike-off proceedings, as the documents on the initiation of proceedings as well as on the strike-off had not been served on them personally. In response to that argument, the Constitutional Court held that the service of documents on the company, together with a public notification in the court register of companies or in the Official Gazette, was adequate. It observed that the measure was applicable to various forms of companies, some of which belonged to a multitude of shareholders. The personal service of documents would be too time-consuming, and in certain cases impossible.
48. As regards the personal liability of former members or shareholders, the Constitutional Court emphasised that, indeed, in principle they could legitimately expect that their liability for the company’s obligations would not exceed the value of their share. However, companies were required to ensure that they were operating with adequate share capital, and that it did not fall below the statutory minimum. Companies which operated with insufficient share capital were considerably weaker economically than those which operated in accordance with the law, which affected the security of legal transactions as a whole. Nevertheless, the Constitutional Court recognised the variety of legal and factual positions of shareholders of struck-off companies and established a distinction between so-called “active shareholders”, who were in a position to influence the operation of a company, and “passive shareholders”, who exerted no such influence. It upheld the regulation insofar as it applied to the former category, but annulled it with respect to passive shareholders. In its reasoning the Constitutional Court established the criteria which the regular courts were required to consider in deciding on the position of former shareholders. Those criteria were based on the subjective conduct of shareholders and the extent of the consequences that such conduct could have on the operation of the company, that is on their knowledge of and involvement in the management of the company.
49. The courts deciding on the personal liability of shareholders were therefore primarily required to establish whether an individual member or shareholder had exerted influence on the respective company’s operations. They were to base their assessment on a number of criteria, notably the type of company (public limited company or a limited liability company), the status of individual shareholders (individuals or legal entities), and the internal relations between the shareholders. According to the Constitutional Court, the courts deciding on the issue of personal liability could in addition rely on the general criteria that the Companies Act determined with regard to the rule of disregarding a company’s legal personality, namely whether (i) an individual had abused the company in order to attain an objective which, as an individual, he or she should not have sought, or (ii) an individual had abused the company and thereby caused damage to its creditors, or (iii) an individual had used the assets of the company for his or her personal interests in violation of the law, or (iv) an individual had reduced the assets of the company to his or her benefit or for the benefit of another person, knowing that it would not be capable of meeting its liabilities to third parties.
THE LAW
I. THE GOVERNMENT’S PRELIMINARY OBJECTIONS
A. The parties’ submissions
50. The Government objected that the present application was inadmissible, arguing that, as regards the part referring to the strike-off procedure, the applicant had failed to comply with the six-month time-limit for lodging the application. Company L.E. was struck off from the court register in 2001 and both the decision to initiate strike-off proceedings (see paragraph 16 above) and the decision to strike off the company from the court register (see paragraph 18 above) had been executed some years before the applicant lodged a constitutional complaint challenging the strike-off. Accordingly, the Constitutional Court found that the applicant’s legal position could not be improved by quashing the impugned decisions and therefore concluded that the applicant had no legal interest in challenging them (see paragraph 28 above). In the view of the Government, the six-month time-limit for lodging an application before the Court had started to run on the day on which the decision striking off the company from the court register had become final, and the fact that the applicant had lodged a constitutional complaint some years later did not extend that time-limit.
51. Moreover, the Government observed that in the enforcement proceedings the applicant had reached an out-of-court settlement with the creditor (see paragraph 29 above). Noting that he had acknowledged the debt and paid it, the Government argued that he was no longer entitled to raise any objection to the statutory regulation imposing personal liability for the obligations of struck-off companies on their members.
52. In their further observations, however, the Government pointed out that the complaints related to the enforcement proceedings were not part of the present application, but must have been addressed in another application referred to by the applicant of which they had not been given notice.
53. The applicant argued out that the six-month time-limit for lodging an application before the Court ran from the date of the final decision of the domestic authorities. He was convinced that he had legitimately lodged two constitutional complaints challenging the strike-off decision and the enforcement order, respectively, at the time when he had become aware of both sets of proceedings. He emphasised that he could not have applied to the Court before he had acquired knowledge of the strike-off and his consequent personal liability, both of which had occurred three years after the strike-off. Given that one of his main complaints referred to lack of opportunity to participate in the strike-off proceedings owing to the domestic authorities’ failure to serve the relevant decisions on him, he was convinced that the Government’s objection of failure to observe the six-month time-limit could only be resolved by examining the merits of the case. As for enforcement, it was an integral part of the proceedings, and it was thus necessary to consider the strike-off and the enforcement proceedings as a whole.
54. Moreover, as regards the out-of-court settlement, the applicant pointed out that he had not himself created the obligation to pay the creditor, but had become liable for payment as a result of the strike-off. Having regard to the fact that the creditor could seize up to two thirds of the applicant’s monthly salary, the applicant had preferred to reach a settlement agreement whereby he had paid only a share of the company’s debt proportionate to his share in the former company in the form of a lump sum. Considering that he – as well as all other members of the company – had been jointly and severally liable to pay the entire sum owed by company L.E. to the Railway Company, the applicant considered the terms of the settlement to have been favourable to him. In sum, the settlement had been merely a means of avoiding greater damage to his property.
B. The Court’s assessment
55. As regards the applicant’s compliance with the six-month time-limit for lodging the application, the Court reiterates that the six-month period starts running from the date on which the applicant has sufficient knowledge of the final domestic decision (see Baghli v. France, no. 34374/97, § 31, ECHR 1999 VIII, and A.N. v. Lithuania, no. 17280/08, § 77, 31 May 2016). In the present case, the Constitutional Court’s decision rejecting the applicant’s constitutional complaint was rendered on 31 January 2007 and served on the applicant on 5 February 2007. The applicant lodged his application with the Court on 4 August 2007, that is within six months from the service of the Constitutional Court’s decision.
56. However, according to the Government, the date from which the six-month time-limit should be calculated was 17 August 2001, the day on which the decision striking off the company from the court register became final. The Court, noting that in many cases finality in the sense of res judicata does not correspond with the final domestic decision in the temporal sense, reiterates that, as regards applications against Slovenia, applicants are in principle required to lodge a constitutional complaint before applying to the Court (see Kuri? and Others v. Slovenia [GC], no. 26828/06, § 296, ECHR 2012 (extracts), and the references cited therein). Also, although the Constitutional Court took the view that even if a positive decision were rendered in the applicant’s case, his legal position could not be improved (see paragraph 28 above), his constitutional complaint was not rejected as having been lodged out of time.
57. The Government’s argument implies that a constitutional complaint should not be regarded as an effective remedy in the circumstances of the present case. However, considering that, as a rule, a constitutional complaint is regarded as an effective remedy which has to be exhausted, in the absence of clear arguments as to what alternative legal avenues, if any, the applicant had at his disposal once he had learnt of the strike-off, the Court cannot accept that the constitutional complaint should be disregarded for the purpose of calculating the six-month time-limit for lodging the application. The Court thus finds that the applicant complied with the six-month time-limit.
58. Moreover, as regards the Government’s argument that the out-of-court settlement precluded the applicant from making any complaints with regard to his personal liability for the debts of company L.E., the Court observes that the course of action chosen by the applicant cannot be interpreted as an acknowledgment that the debt he paid was legitimately owed by him. Moreover, prior to the settlement, the applicant had used what appear to be all the domestic legal avenues available to him for the purpose of challenging his liability for the payment of the debt in question. In addition, he had lodged the present application before the Court. As explained by the applicant, the terms of the settlement were more favourable to him than the liability imposed on him by virtue of the law, and he accepted the settlement solely to avoid incurring greater damage. The Court finds that the mere fact that the applicant discharged the duty imposed on him by one of the challenged decisions does not deprive him of his victim status within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention. Nor does it lead to the conclusion that the matter was resolved or that it is no longer justified to continue the examination of the application within the meaning of Article 37 § 1 (b) and (c) of the Convention.
59. Lastly, as regards the scope of the application, the Court observes that, in response to the applicant’s complaint regarding personal liability for debts, the parties were invited to submit their observations on the question of whether that liability had struck a fair balance between his rights protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the public interest. It is noted that in their observations on the admissibility and merits of the application, the Government made several references to the enforcement proceedings with regard to the facts as well as the law. Arguing that the applicant had legitimately been designated as an “active member” of the company, the Government also referred to the decisions that the domestic courts had delivered in the enforcement proceedings. Therefore, the Court will consider the enforcement proceedings in its assessment of the alleged violations in so far as the applicant’s personal liability was established in those proceedings.
60. Given the foregoing considerations, the preliminary objections of the Government must thus be rejected.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
61. Relying on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the applicant complained that his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions had been violated. He also complained, under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, that the strike-off from the court register had not been accompanied by procedural safeguards and that his right to a fair trial had thereby been violated.
62. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
63. Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, in so far as relevant, provides:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law. ...”
64. The Court reiterates that it is the master of the characterisation to be given in law to the facts of the case (see, among many authorities, Guerra and Others v. Italy, 19 February 1998, § 44, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-I). It has previously held that whilst Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements, it nevertheless implies that domestic law must provide for legal protection against arbitrary interference by the public authorities and that any interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must be accompanied by certain procedural guarantees (see Capital Bank AD v. Bulgaria, no. 49429/99, § 134, ECHR 2005-XII (extracts)). In the instant case the Court considers that the complaint about the lack of an effective judicial procedure for challenging the strike-off, which was raised by the applicant under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, is closely linked to the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and may accordingly be examined as part of the latter complaint (see, mutatis mutandis, Forminster Enterprises Limited v. the Czech Republic, no. 38238/04, § 59, 9 October 2008).
A. Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the cancellation of the applicant’s share in company L.E.
1. The parties’ submissions
65. The parties accepted that the applicant’s personal liability for the outstanding debts of company L.E. amounted to an interference with his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. The Court takes the same view. However, they disagreed on whether Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was applicable to the cancellation of the applicant’s share in company L.E., given that it no longer had any economic value.
66. The Government acknowledged that a share in a company in principle constituted a “possession” for the purpose of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, since it represented a set of rights including the right to manage the company and the right to a share in the profit. However, they pointed out that in the present case the company in question had not performed any business operations and had had no assets from which the creditor’s claim could be settled. Since the economic value of the applicant’s share in the struck-off company was thus questionable, the Government considered that the share could not be regarded as a “possession”. However, should the Court reach a different conclusion, the Government took the view that the measure whereby former members of struck-off companies were considered as universal legal successors to the companies and, accordingly, assumed responsibility not only for their liabilities, but also for any potential assets, amounted to control of the use of property.
67. The applicant disagreed, arguing that according to the Court’s established case-law, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was applicable to a share in a company. He pointed out that in the case of Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine (no. 48553/99, §§ 91-93, ECHR 2002-VII), the Court had found that a holder of a share in a company had not only an indirect claim on the company’s assets, but also other corresponding rights such as voting rights and the right to influence the company. Thus, according to the applicant, it was of little importance that company L.E. had had no assets at the time of the strike-off. Also in that case the company’s members had retained their voting rights, the right to influence the company and other corporate rights. Moreover, the cancellation of the applicant’s share in L.E. had directly affected his rights protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. The Court’s assessment
68. The Court observes that, in so far as the applicant has complained of the loss of his share in company L.E. as a result of the strike-off, the present case raises two questions regarding the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 relating to the nature of his share in the company.
69. Firstly, the Court finds it necessary to examine a question of a more general nature, that is whether measures relating to the company could be regarded as directly affecting the rights of the applicant as a member of the said company. In this connection, the Court has reached an affirmative conclusion, inter alia, in cases where the impugned measures had a direct bearing on the rights inherent in owning stocks or shares, as is the case with the cancelling of shares or the obligation to exchange them at a disadvantageous rate (see Olczak v. Poland (dec.), no. 30417/96, §§ 60-62, ECHR 2002-X, and Pokis v. Latvia (dec.), no. 528/02, ECHR 2006-XV). While it is true that the impugned strike-off measure was to the detriment of company L.E., it is undisputable that it also directly affected the applicant in two different ways. Not only was his share in the company cancelled, but the cancellation of his share at the same time resulted in his personal liability for the debts of the struck-off company. Therefore, the dissolution of company L.E. entailed consequences which affected the financial interests of the applicant as a former member of the company and were thus directly decisive for his individual rights.
70. Secondly, the Government raised the question of whether the applicant’s share of questionable economic value could be considered a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In view of this consideration, the Court finds that clarification of the nature of a share in a company is required in the specific circumstances of the present case.
71. There is no doubt that a company share with an economic value can be considered a possession (see Olczak, cited above, § 60, and Sovtransavto Holding, cited above, § 91). The Court has also held that the shares of a company which was placed in compulsory administration for being insolvent and unable to meet its liabilities undoubtedly had an economic value and constituted possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Vefa Holding Sh.p.k. and Alimuçaj v. Albania (dec.), no. 24096/05, § 93, 14 June 2011). Indeed, as the Court has held on many occasions, a share in a company is a complex object. The ownership of a share implies that the holder possesses a bundle of corresponding rights. These encompass the right to a share to the company’s assets in the event of its being wound up, but also other unconditioned rights, especially voting rights and the right to influence the company’s conduct (see Company S. and T. v. Sweden, no. 11189/84, Commission decision of 11 December 1986, DR 50, p. 138). Hence, the Court agrees with the applicant that, although in the four years between the cessation of company L.E.’s activities and the strike-off he could not extract any pecuniary benefits from the company, he was still entitled to exercise a number of rights which arose from his possession of a share in the company. Those rights allowed the applicant and other members of company L.E. to engage in a commercial activity, and were thus of a pecuniary nature. Therefore, accepting that the mere possession of a share created interests of a proprietary nature, the Court cannot conclude that the lack of commercial activity and assets took the applicant’s share out of the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
72. This suffices to make Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 applicable to the cancellation of the applicant’s share in L.E. as a result of the company being struck off from the court register.
B. Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
1. Applicable rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) The parties’ submissions
73. The Government maintained that the alleged interference amounted to the control of the use of property, whereas the applicant emphasised that he had not only been divested of his share in company L.E., but he had also become liable for the company’s debts. Consequently, he had been forced to surrender his possessions to the company’s creditor. Stressing that he had suffered the direct consequences of the company’s enforced dissolution, the applicant took the view that the interference with his property rights had amounted to a deprivation of property.
(b) The Court’s assessment
74. As the Court has stated on many occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers the deprivation of property and subjects it to conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules, which are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property, must be read in the light of the general principle laid down in the first rule (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 61, Series A no. 52, and Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 77, ECHR 2010).
75. The Court reiterates that the strike-off measure had two-fold consequences for the applicant’s property; on the one hand, it divested him of his share in company L.E., and on the other it gave rise to his personal liability for the debts of the struck-off company. As regards the cancellation of the applicant’s share, the Court has held, in the case of Olczak (cited above, § 71) where the applicant’s shareholding was reduced from 45% to 0.4%, that although the applicant was not technically divested of his shares, their economic value was sufficiently reduced to amount to a deprivation of property. By contrast, in the present case it was accepted by the parties that company L.E. had had no assets at the time of the strike-off. Moreover, the company had not been conducting any commercial activities for four years before the strike-off was enforced. In fact, it was precisely because of those circumstances that the strike-off was ordered. Thus, notwithstanding the finding that the possession of the share gave rise to proprietary interests and that the strike-off divested the applicant of those interests, account must be taken of the fact that the cancellation of his share did not reduce the economic value of his assets.
76. Furthermore, even assuming that the cancellation of the applicant’s share in company L.E., viewed in isolation, can be considered deprivation of property, in the Court’s opinion it should be viewed in the wider context as part of the regulation aimed at improving corporate discipline and restoring the security of legal transactions on the Slovenian commercial market. In this connection, the applicant’s consequent personal liability for the payment of the company’s debts, which falls into that same context, entailed responsibility for the repayment of losses suffered by the creditor of company L.E. The Court is of the view that this obligation may be regarded as a sanction for the applicant’s failure, in his capacity as a member with influence on the company’s business operations, to comply with the corporate obligations of the company of which he was a member. Based on the principle permitting the lifting of the corporate veil, the impugned measure should be considered as a measure of State control over the operation of the market, over corporate practices and over the management of corporate property.
77. In the light of the above circumstances, the Court finds that the strike-off had complex and diverse legal implications which cannot readily be classified in any specific category within Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Moreover, the situations envisaged in the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 as well as in its second paragraph are only particular instances of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of property as guaranteed by the general rule set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph. Accordingly, the Court considers it necessary to examine the case in the light of the general rule set out in that Article.
2. Whether the interference was justified
(a) Lawfulness of the interference
(i) The parties’ submissions
(?) The applicant
78. The applicant maintained that the circumstances in which the State had lifted the corporate veil and rendered individuals responsible for the liabilities of struck-off companies did not satisfy the requirement of legal certainty. He emphasised that before the introduction of the FOCA, individual members or shareholders of companies were personally liable for the companies’ debts only if they had caused damage to the company through inappropriate use of their corporate rights. However, the FOCA constituted a fundamental and swift overnight change of the entire system of company law.
79. The applicant claimed that he had been legitimately unaware of the strike-off proceedings until served with an enforcement order, which had originally been directed against company L.E. He emphasised that the decision to institute strike-off proceedings and the strike-off decision had only been served on the company, which had however ceased to operate four years prior to the strike-off. Thus, it could not reasonably be expected that the company should acquaint itself with decisions which infringed its rights and interests. Moreover, the applicant, relying on the Court’s judgment in the case of Bruncrona v. Finland (no. 41673/98, 16 November 2004), argued that any decisions affecting his own rights and interests should have been served on him personally, which had not been the case in the strike-off proceedings. In view of this, the applicant maintained that he had not had a reasonable opportunity to put his case before the domestic authorities with a view to effectively challenging the measures interfering with his rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The enforcement order for the Railway Company’s claim against company L.E. had not been served on him until 2004, and it was only then that he had become aware that the company had been struck off the court register and of his consequent personal liability for its outstanding obligations.
80. As regards the criteria for the personal liability of members, the applicant pointed out that at the time when company L.E. had been struck off the court register and the enforcement order issued against him, the Constitutional Court had not yet adopted its decision no. U-I-135/00. Consequently, the applicant could not have foreseen that at a later time a distinction would be made between “active” and “passive” members or shareholders. Also, the distinction was made retrospectively, since the Constitutional Court adopted the decision in question on 9 October 2002, a year after company L.E. had been struck off the court register. In the applicant’s opinion, the criteria for distinguishing between active and passive members were too vague; hence the case-by-case assessment of the status of individual members or shareholders of struck-off companies lacked sufficient legal certainty.
81. In this light, the applicant argued that his options in the enforcement proceedings had been very limited, since the courts had been bound by the decisions delivered in the strike-off proceedings. His argument that he had not been an active member of the company according to the criteria set forth by the Constitutional Court in its decision no. U-I-135/00 had been dismissed on the grounds that his 11.11% share in the company had entitled him to the rights of a minority member who could thus influence the management of the company. Moreover, as a former director of the company, he had as a matter of fact influenced the management of the company’s business operations. In the applicant’s opinion, the domestic courts’ interpretation of what constituted an “active member” was arbitrary, disproportionate and in breach of the principle of legal certainty. The domestic courts had refused to give any weight to the fact that as a member of company L.E., he had not acted in bad faith, and that the company’s debt had been incurred prior to his participation in the company.
(?) The Government
82. The Government argued that the impugned measure was lawful since it was based on the provisions of the FOCA. Relying on the Constitutional Court’s decision no. U-I-135/00, the Government emphasised that the companies to which the strike-off was applied had been economically inactive. They had not conducted any business operations, generated any income, or made payments; nor had they had any assets. However, their financial situation had not been transparent to potential creditors, who could nevertheless presume that the companies in question had at least minimum assets. Consequently, non-operating companies could be abused in order to damage their creditors. Therefore, the introduction of the FOCA had been aimed at protecting the position of creditors and reducing the risks of conducting legal transactions on the Slovenian commercial market. In this connection, the Government further emphasised that in the enforcement proceedings against the applicant, his liability had been assessed according to the criteria established by the Constitutional Court. The applicant’s objection and subsequent appeals concerning the status of an active member had been rejected by the domestic courts at all levels.
83. Furthermore, as regards the applicant’s alleged lack of access to the strike-off proceedings, the Government took the view that he had had a fair opportunity to participate in the proceedings, regardless of the fact that neither the decision to institute strike-off proceedings nor the decision on the strike-off had been served on him personally. Both documents had been duly served on company L.E. by leaving delivery slips in its mailbox, informing the company that the relevant correspondence could be collected at the post office. Since the mail had not been collected within the prescribed time-limit, both documents had been posted on the competent court’s notice board, and were thereby deemed to have been served. Additionally, the decision to institute strike-off proceedings had been published in the court register, which was an easily accessible public register, while the decision on the strike-off had been published in the Official Gazette. The notification of the strike-off had also been published in the Official Gazette. In view of this, the Government argued that, had the applicant and other members of company L.E. acted with due diligence, they could have acquainted themselves with both documents in two different manners. They also emphasised that the time-limits for lodging an objection to the institution of proceedings and an appeal against the strike-off decision had been extensive, namely two months and thirty days, respectively.
84. The Government further pointed out that, while the initial members of a limited liability company were to be entered in the court register, subsequent changes in membership were not required to be listed in the register in order to take effect. Thus in many cases – including the case of company L.E. where four members who had died prior to the strike-off had been listed as members in the court register until the strike-off – the authorities did not have information allowing them to serve the documents personally on members. Referring to Constitutional Court decision no. U-I-135/00, the Government affirmed that the personal service of documents would have been not only too time-consuming, but in many cases impossible.
85. Furthermore, despite the applicant’s active role in the operations of the company, he had failed to collect the company’s mail or to monitor the public records (the court register and the Official Gazette), even though he must have been aware that strike-off proceedings would be initiated eventually. Also, the applicant had undoubtedly been aware of the civil proceedings initiated against company L.E. by the Railway Company (see paragraph 14 above) and could have expected that the latter would attempt to enforce its claims. Lastly, the Government emphasised that, even if the applicant had objected to the strike-off in due time, the reasons which he had subsequently put forward in the enforcement proceedings to show that he was not an active member of the company would not have prevented the company from being struck off the court register. Namely, the fact that company L.E.’s prior petition for bankruptcy had been rejected for failure to make an advance payment to cover the costs of the proceedings could not be regarded as one of the grounds on which a company could successfully object to the strike-off (see paragraph 39 above).
(ii) The Court’s assessment
(?) General principles
86. The Court reiterates that its power to review compliance of impugned acts with national law is limited and it is in the first place for the domestic authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply the domestic law and to decide on issues of constitutionality (see, among many other authorities, Wittek v. Germany, no. 37290/97, § 49, ECHR 2002-X; Forrer-Niedenthal v. Germany, no. 47316/99, § 39, 20 February 2003, and The Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 82, ECHR 2000 XII). However, that does not dispense with the need for the Court to determine whether the interference in issue complied with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court further reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Capital Bank AD, cited above, §§ 132-33, with further reference to Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
87. The principle of lawfulness also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, §§ 109-10, ECHR 2000-I). Likewise, domestic law must provide a measure of legal protection against arbitrary interferences by the public authorities with the rights safeguarded by the Convention (see Hasan and Chaush v. Bulgaria [GC], no. 30985/96, § 84, ECHR 2000-XI). It is true that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements and the absence of judicial review does not amount, in itself, to a violation of that provision (see Fredin v. Sweden (no. 1), 18 February 1991, § 50, Series A no. 192, and S.C. Antares Transport S.A. and S.C. Transroby S.R.L. v. Romania, no. 27227/08, § 46, 15 December 2015). Nevertheless, it implies that any interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must be accompanied by procedural guarantees affording to the individual or entity concerned a reasonable opportunity of presenting their case to the responsible authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by that provision. In ascertaining whether that condition has been satisfied, a comprehensive view must be taken of the applicable judicial and administrative procedures (see Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002-IV with further references, and Stolyarova v. Russia, no. 15711/13, § 43, 29 January 2015).
(?) Application of those principles to the present case
88. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes, at the outset, that the impugned measure of striking off inactive companies devoid of assets from the court register was the Slovenian legislature’s response to a situation which appears to have been endemic during the political transition to a free-market economy in Slovenia. The legislature initially set out to establish an open market which was accessible to as many investors as possible (see paragraph 30 above) which, however, resulted in an ever-increasing number of companies which were not able to meet their liabilities and to stay in operation. The Companies Act of 1993 thus increased the minimum share capital and imposed on existing companies a time-limit by which they had to bring their operation in line with the new stricter legislation (see paragraph 34 above). That attempt at strengthening the legal security of the commercial market was, however, not successful. By 1998 there were more than 6,000 companies which had not been operative for a considerably long period and had no assets (see paragraph 108 below). Nevertheless, the persons in charge of the companies’ operations either did not institute any type of proceedings aimed at dissolving the inactive undertakings, or, as was the case with company L.E., did not follow them through to the end.
89. The legislature first responded to the widespread problem of inactive and insolvent companies by introducing a measure of bankruptcy initiated by the competent courts proprio motu. This, however, failed to successfully address the problem. Subsequently, on 23 July 1999 the legislature introduced the FOCA, which imposed on companies a number of measures aimed at managing their liquidity and solvency. Furthermore, if a company found itself in a situation of illiquidity or insolvency and was unable to re-establish the normal course of business operations within two months, the FOCA required it to file for bankruptcy or compulsory composition (see paragraph 37 above). Companies which failed to comply with those rules were to be struck off the court register proprio motu without a prior winding-up procedure. The measure of striking off a company from the register thus necessarily resulted in the cancellation of the company’s shares, but it had a further impact on the members or shareholders of such a company, since they became personally liable for its debts.
90. As regards the lawfulness of the impugned interference, the Court notes that the strike-off of company L.E. and its implications were based on the provisions of Chapter 3 the FOCA (see paragraphs 38 and 41 above). The FOCA was published in the Official Gazette no. 54/99 of 8 July 1999 and entered into force on 23 July 1999 (see paragraph 36 above). The Act contained the requirements under which companies were allowed to operate, as well as the conditions under which strike-off proceedings would be initiated (see paragraph 38 above) and detailed provisions on the course of the proceedings and the remedies which could be used against the strike-off decision (see paragraphs 39-40 above). The Act also included a provision that members or shareholders of struck-off companies would be held personally liable for the outstanding debts of their former companies (see paragraph 41 above).
91. Viewed as a whole, those provisions provided a clear and comprehensive framework of legislation aimed at strengthening the legal security of market participants and protecting creditors. Indeed, the Court agrees with the applicant that the changes had wide-reaching consequences; however, those consequences did not manifest themselves unexpectedly. On the contrary, the provisions of Chapter 3 of the FOCA, which contained the strike-off measure, only became applicable one year after the Act had entered into force. In the Court’s opinion, the one-year vacatio legis provided inactive and insolvent companies such as L.E. with sufficient time to institute appropriate proceedings in order to have the company dissolved and to avoid its being struck off the court register.
92. The applicant argued that he had justifiably been unaware of the strike-off proceedings until the enforcement order had been served on him almost four years later. However, in line with the principle that “ignorance of the law is no excuse”, the Court considers that the applicant was not absolved from acquainting himself with the provisions of the FOCA (see K.-H.W. v. Germany [GC], no. 37201/97, § 73, ECHR 2001 II (extracts)). At the time when the Act was passed, the applicant was still a minority member of company L.E. Moreover, as a former managing director, he must have been well aware not only of the insolvent state of the company, but also of the civil proceedings brought against it by its creditor (see paragraphs 8 and 14 above). As a result of the above, the Court is of the view that the applicant was expected to devote his attention in no small measure to the outstanding issues facing the company. It considers that the applicant was expected to be acquainted with the legislation applicable to companies, and in particular to insolvent companies. It is worth noting in this connection that a law may satisfy the requirement of foreseeability even if the person concerned has to take appropriate legal advice to assess, to a degree that is reasonable in the circumstances, the consequences which a given action may entail. The Court has emphasised that professional advice may be of particular importance to persons carrying on a professional activity, since they are expected to take special care in assessing the risks that such activity entails (see, mutatis mutandis, Cantoni v. France, 15 November 1996, § 35, Reports 1996-V). The same may be said to apply to persons engaging in commercial ventures.
93. In the light of the above findings, the Court finds that the regulation introduced by the FOCA was accessible to the applicant and that the contents of the Act were sufficiently clear to enable him to foresee that company L.E. ran the risk of being struck off the court register. In this connection, the Court would add that the principle of legal certainty, which is implicit in all the Articles of the Convention and constitutes one of the basic elements of the rule of law, does not only involve the requirement of clarity and foreseeability of the law, but requires, inter alia, a legal environment in which legal norms are consistently applied and enforced by the State.
94. Moreover, it is true, as argued by the applicant, that the legislative conception of personal liability for the debts of struck-off companies, according to which all members were liable irrespective of their roles in the companies, was mitigated by the Constitutional Court’s decision no. U-I-135/00 no sooner than two years after the entry into force of the FOCA and one year after the provisions on strike-off became applicable. However, that fact did not affect the applicant in any way, as the issue of his own personal liability for the debts of company L.E. was established in the enforcement proceedings which began in April 2002 (see paragraph 21 above) and ended in July 2007 (see paragraph 28 above). Throughout those proceedings, of which he only became aware in December 2004 (see paragraph 23 above), the applicant argued that he had not been an active member of company L.E., relying on the very decision of the Constitutional Court to support his main argument against the enforcement. Thus, the Court cannot discern that the applicant was in any way impeded in the exercise of his rights by the fact that the distinction between active and passive members was only introduced in October 2002 (see paragraphs 46 and 48 above).
95. In sum, the Court finds that the regulation introduced by the FOCA and amended by the Constitutional Court was adequately accessible and foreseeable; thus the interference complained of had a sufficient legal basis in Slovenian law to comply with the requirements of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
96. Secondly, the applicant complained that he had not had access to procedures enabling him to effectively challenge the strike-off and the ensuing personal liability for the debts of company L.E. The Court notes that the two elements of the interference complained of were subject to separate sets of proceedings. The strike-off measure was enforced in the strike-off proceedings, while the applicant’s personal liability was established in the enforcement proceedings, in which company L.E., the initial debtor, was replaced by its former members after it had been struck off the court register.
97. The main issue raised by the applicant in respect of the strike-off proceedings was the fact that the decision to institute those proceedings and the decision to strike-off the company from the register had not been personally served on him. Indeed, the Court observes that the first document was served on the company and entered in the court register (see paragraph 39 above), while the second was published in the Official Gazette in addition to being served on the company (see paragraph 40 above). The company concerned, its members and creditors could lodge an objection to the decision to institute proceedings within a two-month time-limit, while the time-limit for lodging an appeal was thirty days after service of the document on the company concerned or its publication in the Official Gazette. Therefore, contrary to the case of Bruncrona (cited above, §§ 65 69) relied on by the applicant, in the present case the information on the impending strike-off was provided prior to the measure coming into effect; it is rather the manner of the service that is disputed by the applicant.
98. The Court will assess whether the applicant had a reasonable opportunity to challenge the strike-off measure despite the lack of personal service of process, on the basis of the same considerations as those applied in establishing whether the legislation in question was accessible and foreseeable. In this connection, the Court notes that the FOCA set out the manner in which the procedural documents were to be served on the parties concerned. Both documents were served on company L.E. by means of delivery slips left in its mailbox, informing it to collect the documents at the post office. The company failed to do so, and the documents were subsequently served by being posted on the competent court’s notice board. Having regard to the Court’s view that the rules governing the formal steps to be taken and the time-limits to be complied with in lodging an appeal are aimed at ensuring a proper administration of justice and compliance, in particular, with the principle of legal certainty, the applicant was entitled to expect those rules to be applied (see Cañete de Goñi v. Spain, no. 55782/00, § 36, ECHR 2002-VIII).
99. The Government argued that it would have been too time-consuming, if not impossible, to attempt to serve the documents on individual members of the companies concerned, adding that if the applicant and other members had acted with due diligence, they could have acquainted themselves with both documents in due time. Having regard to the above considerations (see paragraphs 92-94 above), the Court agrees that the applicant’s failure to appeal against either the decision to institute strike-off proceedings or the strike-off decision was attributable to his own lack of diligence, given that he could reasonably have expected that strike-off proceedings would be brought against company L.E. and, either by himself or together with the other members of the company, he could have taken the necessary steps to collect its mail (see Hennings v. Germany, 16 December 1992, § 26, Series A no. 251-A).
100. In any event, the Court is of the view that, for as long as the members maintained the company in operation, albeit only formally, and because they failed to find a way to dissolve it, they should have ensured some basic management, especially since there was already one set of judicial proceedings pending against it.
101. Lastly, in view of the conclusion that the due diligence required of the applicant would have enabled him to participate effectively in the strike-off proceedings, the Court can accept the pragmatic approach of the domestic authorities to the service of documents in strike-off proceedings, especially since service to the companies was coupled with considerably long time-limits for appealing against the initiation of strike-off proceedings as well as the strike-off decision.
102. In the light of the foregoing, the Court finds that the measure of striking off company L.E. from the register provided sufficient procedural guarantees to the applicant and was thus lawful within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
103. As regards, however, the enforcement proceedings, the Court notes that the applicant essentially complained that the domestic courts had incorrectly applied the criteria for distinguishing between active and passive members. In the Court’s view this complaint may be regarded as an issue of substantive law, and thus more appropriately addressed in the context of the assessment of the proportionality of the interference with the applicant’s peaceful enjoyment of property caused by his personal liability for the debts of the struck-off company. Moreover, in its assessment of the proportionality of the interference the Court will refer, in so far as necessary, to the findings made above with regard to the applicant’s behaviour and the extent to which it contributed to the measures complained of.
(b) Aim of the interference
(i) The parties’ submissions
104. The applicant observed that the strike-off measure had had wide-reaching consequences, since altogether more than 17,000 companies had been struck off the court register and approximately 50,000 individuals had been affected. The applicant took the view that the strike-off measure had not been justified by any particular circumstances which could not have been appropriately addressed in bankruptcy proceedings.
105. The applicant further pointed out that the legislature had been aware of its mistake in introducing the FOCA, and had twice attempted to correct what he considered was an unconstitutional regulation governing the strike-off measure, so as to relieve former members of struck-off companies of their personal liability for the companies’ debts. In 2007 the legislature introduced an amendment to the FOCA (see paragraph 43 above) and in 2011 the Shareholders’ Liability for Corporate Obligations Act came into force (see paragraph 45 above). The applicant, relying on the reasons adduced by the legislature in support of the amendments, maintained that the disputed legislation was in contravention with the fundamental principles of corporate law in Slovenia and the European Union. However, the proposed amendments to the FOCA had not been enacted; on both occasions the Constitutional Court had annulled the amended regulation, finding that the provisions relieving former members of their personal liability had not afforded sufficient protection to the creditors of struck-off companies.
106. The Government argued that the strike-off measure was in accordance with the general interest, which was to protect creditors and ensure the security of corporate legal transactions. From 1991 to 1998, the average amount of companies’ unfulfilled obligations increased from SIT 6,319,000,000 (EUR 26,400,000) to SIT 87,573,000,000 (EUR 365,400,000); in 1998 the amount was 15 per cent higher than the year before.
107. It was estimated that at the beginning of 1998 there were more than 6,000 companies which had not been conducting any business operations for a very long period and had had no assets. Also, in that same year 8,537 legal entities had their bank accounts blocked for more than five days on account of unpaid debts; a significant proportion of those entities (6,587) had their accounts blocked for more than a year and 6,083 of them had no employees. According to the Government, those data led to the conclusion that 92% of legal entities which had had their bank accounts blocked for more than a year were no longer operating and had no assets.
108. The then applicable legislation provided that in cases of such companies, bankruptcy proceedings would be initiated proprio motu. However, the legislature decided that this was proving too costly and too difficult to manage. A landslide of bankruptcy proceedings would block the courts, given that they were required by law to give priority to those cases. It thus opted for introducing a new procedure whereby non-operating companies could be dissolved without prior winding up, since they had no assets to sell and the creditors could not be repaid from the proceeds.
(ii) The Court’s assessment
109. Any interference with the enjoyment of a right or freedom recognised by the Convention must pursue a legitimate aim. The principle of a “fair balance” inherent in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 itself presupposes the existence of a general interest of the community. Moreover, it should be reiterated that the various rules incorporated in Article 1 are not distinct in the sense of being unconnected and that the second and third rules are concerned only with particular instances (see paragraph 74 above). One of the effects of this is that the existence of a “public interest” required under the second sentence, or the “general interest” referred to in the second paragraph, are in fact corollaries of the principle set forth in the first sentence, so that an interference with the exercise of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 must also pursue an aim in the public interest (see Beyeler, cited above, § 111).
110. The Court reiterates that because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures to be applied in the sphere of the exercise of the right of property (see Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 165, ECHR 2006-VIII). The Court notes that the decision to enact laws regulating the operation of the commercial market and the management of corporate property with a view to strengthening the overall legal security on the market will commonly involve consideration of political, economic and social issues. In matters of general social and economic policy, on which opinions within a democratic society may reasonably differ widely, the domestic policy-maker should be afforded a particularly broad margin of appreciation (see Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 98, 25 October 2012, and Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 65731/01, § 52, ECHR 2006 VI).
111. In the present case, strike-off was a measure aimed at dissolving a large number of inactive and insolvent companies. The transitional legislation regulating the establishment and operation of companies had opened the commercial market to a large number of investors, many of whom proved unable to operate viable businesses. Those companies may be said to have constituted a market anomaly which necessitated legislative action to remedy the insolvent companies’ adverse effects on financial discipline in corporate legal transactions and the position of their creditors. The FOCA thus constituted an attempt to restore stability in the commercial market. The Court finds no reason to doubt that the Slovenian legislature’s approach to ensuring a better functioning of the market was “in the public interest”. It remains to be seen whether this public-interest aim was also proportionate to the interference.
(c) Proportionality of the interference
(i) The parties’ submissions
(?) The applicant
112. Referring to the Court’s judgment in the case of Agrotexim and Others v. Greece (24 October 1995, § 66, Series A no. 330 A), the applicant pointed out that according to the Court’s case law, the lifting of the corporate veil by disregarding a company’s legal personality was only justified in exceptional circumstances. Moreover, citing the Court’s decision in Olczak (cited above, § 58), the applicant asserted that the Court had already held that the cancellation of shares in a company was directly aimed at the rights of shareholders. Thus, the applicant emphasised that his rights protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had been directly affected and that any interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property should have been – but was not – fairly balanced against the general interest it sought to protect. In this connection, the applicant stressed that he had not abused company L.E. to the detriment of the creditors and that the fact that he could influence the company’s operation was not a valid reason on which to base his personal liability for its debts. He also emphasised that the debt in question had been incurred without his participation, that he had no longer been managing director of the company at the time of the strike-off, and that he had attempted to have the company dissolved by instituting bankruptcy proceedings. Those reasons, however, had been entirely disregarded by the domestic courts which, moreover, decided without a public hearing.
113. Furthermore, the applicant adduced that the lifting of the corporate veil and the imposition of personal liability on members of struck-off companies lacked a legitimate aim, as the objectives sought by the legislature, namely the protection of creditors and the security of legal transactions, would have been adequately achieved merely by dissolving inactive companies. While admitting that without the introduction of personal liability for debts, the creditors would not have been repaid, the applicant emphasised that the debts had occurred through the normal course of business operations. Any wrongful or fraudulent actions on the part of the management or members of companies, however, could be sanctioned by means of other legal instruments aimed at preventing and redressing such actions. The applicant added that also in cases of bankruptcy, creditors’ claims remained unpaid. In his opinion, there was therefore no convincing reason to adopt a different approach in cases of companies having no assets.
(?) The Government
114. The Government asserted that the measure had only been used as a last resort, that is in cases where non-operating companies had not been dissolved by their members through winding up or bankruptcy. Therefore, strike-off could be avoided if the members of a non-operating company acted in due time. Also, if the costs of initiating bankruptcy proceedings were set too high, the company could have appealed against the advance payment order. In this connection, the Government submitted a number of court decisions in which bankruptcy petitioners had succeeded in having the amount of advance payment reduced.
115. The Government added that the FOCA had provided for a long transitional period in which companies and their members had had the time to acquaint themselves with its provisions and to act accordingly. The presumption that a company had met the conditions for strike-off on account of not having any assets – which had been the case for company L.E. – could not take effect before 23 July 2000, one year after the FOCA entered into force (see paragraph 42 above). In total, more than three years had passed from when the bankruptcy petition had been rejected to when the strike-off proceedings had been initiated.
116. Secondly, with regard to the personal liability of members for the obligations of struck-off companies, the Government acknowledged that the liabilities of company members were, in principle, limited to the value of the shares held by them. However, they emphasised that the measure of lifting the corporate veil could be used in cases where the members had abused their respective companies. In addition, the rule of disregarding the legal entity had been applied to members of companies which, after the entry into force of the Companies Act (see paragraph 34 above), had failed to comply, within the prescribed time-limit, with the then newly applicable rules on company management and operations and the amount of share capital. Similarly, the sanction of strike-off was designed to protect the security of legal transactions and the position of creditors. Hence the legislature decided to follow the same principle and to disregard the corporate entity of non-operating companies. However, since members of struck-off companies were regarded as universal legal successors of the companies, they not only assumed liability for the companies’ obligations, but were also entitled to any potential assets of those companies.
117. As regards the degree of the members’ liability, the Government referred to decision no. U-I-135/00 (see paragraphs 46-49 above) in which the Constitutional Court had taken the view that those members who had influence on the operations of the company (“active members”) were legitimately held accountable for the outstanding liabilities. The decision on whether an individual member could be regarded as an active member was based on a number of criteria, in particular on whether he or she had had any influence on the management of the company, the knowledge and degree of his or her involvement in the management of the company, his or her interest in being involved in the company, and on whether the obligations had arisen during the time when the individual had been a member of the company or later. In the Government’s opinion, those considerations which distinguished between active and passive members ensured an appropriate balance between the general interest, that is the protection of creditors and the security of legal transactions, and the members’ right to peaceful enjoyment of property.
118. As regards the applicant, the Government, referring to the decisions of the domestic courts rendered in the enforcement proceedings, pointed out that he had been employed by company L.E., in addition to which he had served first as its acting director and later its managing director. Moreover, the applicant had had an 11.11% share in the company and thus had been entitled to request that a decision be taken on appointing a new manager or on further action with regard to the financial situation of the company, given that the company’s petition for bankruptcy had been rejected on procedural grounds (see paragraph 12 above).
(ii) The Court’s assessment
119. The Court reiterates that in such a sensitive economic area as the establishment and operation of a market economy, the Contracting States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 91, ECHR 2005-VI). Thus, in situations such as the deterioration of the commercial market due to a high number of inactive and insolvent companies, there may be a paramount need for the State to act in order to avoid irreparable harm to the economy and to enhance the legal security of participants in the market. Nevertheless, such margin should not exceed what is necessary to protect the essence of the individuals’ rights embodied in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
120. In that connection, a law interfering with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must achieve a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements to protect the individual’s fundamental rights. The search for this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 as a whole. In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measures applied by the State. In each case involving the alleged violation of that Article the Court must, therefore, ascertain whether by reason of the State’s action or inaction the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth, § 73, and The Former King of Greece and Others, §§ 89-90, both cited above, with further references).
121. In the present case, there may be no doubt that the strike-off measure involved extensive consequences for numerous individuals including the applicant who, as a result, became personally liable for their respective companies’ debts. In this connection, the Court observes that the applicant’s submissions were focused rather on this second aspect of the interference. However, the Court considers it appropriate to first examine the dissolution of company L.E. and the cancellation of the applicant’s share in the company. The strike-off measure constituted a type of administrative dissolution of companies imposed on them for failing to comply with the statutory requirements for the operation of companies. In fact, the measure only affected those companies which for a considerably long period had not been operating in accordance with the law or, more accurately, were no longer operating at all. It is clear that company law did not provide that insolvent companies should continue to exist (see paragraphs 34-37 above). Yet a great number of them existed formally, and although most of them had no assets, many of them were burdened by debts (see paragraphs 107 108 above). The Court agrees with the Government that such a situation could not be perpetuated indefinitely.
122. In the case of company L.E., the applicant acknowledged that it had already been insolvent at the time when it had been converted into a limited liability company (see paragraph 10 above), a corporate form which required a larger amount of minimum share capital than that required of legal entities incorporated earlier. Thus, it can only be concluded that, as a limited liability company, L.E. was not adequately capitalised from the start and acted in contravention of the applicable rules of company law. Moreover, despite the fact that the company had been unable to re-establish liquidity and solvency since 1995, it did not apply for bankruptcy until two years later, when it was evidently lacking any assets whatsoever. As a result, it failed to make an advance payment for the costs of the proceedings in the amount of EUR 626, and instead decided to wait until such proceedings were instituted proprio motu (see paragraph 35 above). However, the relevant legislation changed and removed that possibility; the FOCA introduced stricter provisions on the operation of companies. In the one-year transitional period before the provisions on strike-off came into effect, the company could have instituted another set of bankruptcy proceedings. Indeed, in such a case the members would have been required to cover the costs of the bankruptcy proceedings, but would have avoided the strike-off and personal liability for the debts of the company. In addition, the Court reiterates that from June 1997 until it was struck off in September 2001, the company existed without any management, despite the fact that civil proceedings had been pending against it since 1993 for the payment of a debt. In the Court’s opinion the lack of management, even if not in contravention of the law, was certainly not in line with good business practices.
123. In sum, although the company was not able to pay its debts or to perform the activities for which it had been established, it perpetuated its existence. In view of these considerations, the Court agrees with the position of the Constitutional Court relied on by the Government that inactive and/or insolvent companies posed a threat to the proper functioning of the market. Moreover, as argued by the Government, the strike-off proceedings were initiated as a measure of last resort, that is in the absence of any other proceedings being instituted to dissolve the company. Also, as already found, they were accompanied by sufficient procedural guarantees which, but for the applicant’s lack of due diligence, would have enabled him to effectively defend his interests (see paragraphs 99-103 above).
124. Lastly, as regards the burden that the cancellation of his share represented for the applicant, the Court has already found that as company L.E. had no assets, the cancellation of his share did not reduce the economic value of his property. Moreover, the applicant and other members had in any event intended to dissolve the company by themselves, and according to the applicant, it was only the impossibility of making the advance payment for the costs of bankruptcy proceedings that prevented them from doing so. In this light, the Court finds that the measure of striking off company L.E. from the register did not represent an excessive individual burden for the applicant.
125. It remains to be examined whether the same conclusion applies to the applicant’s consequent personal liability for the debts of company L.E. The applicant was convinced that this instance of piercing of the corporate veil was not justified in the circumstances of his case. He relied, inter alia, on the Court’s case-law developed in the judgment Agrotexim and Others (cited above), according to which only exceptional circumstances can justify the lifting of the corporate veil. However, this view was not developed in response to the question whether the interference with the right to a peaceful enjoyment of possession was justified or proportionate, but rather in response to the question whether an applicant may in any circumstances claim to be a victim of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a result of actions aimed at the property of a company, a separate legal entity (see Agrotexim and Others, cited above, § 66, and Olczak, cited above, § 57). In the present case, this question has already been answered in the affirmative (see paragraph 69 above). As regards, however, the question of whether the circumstances of the present case justified the strike-off, in the Court’s opinion the above-mentioned disregard on the part of company L.E. for company law and the principles of good corporate governance, which consisted of (a) inadequate capitalisation, (b) failure to observe the law and good business practices, (c) a prolonged state of insolvency, and (d) inactivity on the part of the company’s management, warranted a strong response by the authorities, including the imposition of personal liability on any member who was found to be responsible for the irregularities in the operation of the company.
126. The Court further observes that the effect of reducing the capital below the statutory limit and eventually exhausting it completely, coupled with prolonged failure to institute bankruptcy proceedings, had considerable adverse effects on the position of the company’s creditor. The latter was subjected to prolonged uncertainty as to whether its debt would be repaid (see paragraphs 9, 14 and 21-29 above). In the Court’s opinion, such a lengthy course of proceedings could have been avoided if company L.E. had applied for bankruptcy in due time after recognising that it was unable to re-establish sufficient basic funds to continue its operations. Had it done so, the company would probably still have had the necessary funds to cover the costs of bankruptcy proceedings.
127. Thus, while it may be true, as argued by the applicant, that the debts had occurred through the normal course of business operations, the Court finds that the effects of the company’s subsequent prolonged inactivity do not subscribe to that same context.
128. As regards the domestic courts’ assessment of the applicant’s personal liability for the debts of company L.E., the Court observes that already as a minority member, he had substantial influence on the operation of the company (see paragraph 32 above), including the possibility of lodging a judicial action requesting that the company be dissolved (see paragraph 33 above). Moreover, the applicant was employed by the company for more than four years and was involved in its management, first as its acting director and later as managing director (see paragraphs 7-8 and 10 above). Therefore, in the Court’s opinion, the above-mentioned irregularities in the operation of company L.E. were to a large extent attributable to the applicant himself. Against this background, and considering the Constitutional Court’s view on the elements of distinction between active and passive members (see paragraphs 48-49 above), the Court finds it reasonable that the applicant was found by the domestic courts to have been an active member of company L.E., and thus liable for the payment of its debts. In this connection, it is noted that the Constitutional Court confirmed that the lower courts had correctly applied its criteria for differentiating between active and passive members to the applicant’s individual situation (see paragraph 28 above). Therefore, reiterating that it is in the first place for the domestic authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply the domestic law, the Court cannot accept the applicant’s argument that the domestic courts should have given more weight to other elements adduced by him (see paragraph 114 above) and absolved him from his personal liability.
129. Also, in so far as the applicant complained that the decision on his active status had been taken without a public hearing, the Court observes that the applicant had not requested such a hearing throughout the domestic proceedings. Neither did the applicant claim that he had at any point during those proceedings lodged a request to that effect.
(d) Conclusion
130. In conclusion, given the wide margin of appreciation which the Contracting States enjoy in matters of economic policy systems, the Court finds that the measure complained of did not represent an excessive individual burden for the applicant in the particular circumstances of the present case. Accordingly, there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
131. The applicant also complained that he had been denied an effective remedy under Article 13 of the Convention with respect to the strike-off proceedings. He had been unable to obtain redress for the violation of his right to participate in the proceedings and had had no effective remedy against the decision to strike off the company from the register.
132. The Court observes that the applicant’s complaint about the unlawfulness of strike-off, viewed in the light of the accessibility and foreseeability of the legislation on which the measure was based, was not found to disclose a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Neither did the Court find his complaint about the lack of sufficient procedural guarantees for challenging strike-off to have any merit. On the basis of these and other considerations adduced by the parties, the Court found that the measure did not represent an excessive individual burden for the applicant (see paragraph 130 above). In view of the abovementioned findings, the Court considers that the applicant could not justifiably claim any redress for his inability to participate in the proceedings, which was found to be attributable to his lack of due diligence (see paragraph 104 above). For the same reason, the Court cannot accept his complaint about the lack of an effective remedy against the strike-off decision to be “arguable” for the purposes of Article 13.
133. It follows that also this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the applicant’s complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 14 February 2017, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Marialena Tsirli András Sajó
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile Nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - la Privazione di proprietà godimento Tranquillo di proprietà Proprietà)


QUARTA SEZIONE









CAUSA LEKI ?C. SLOVENIA

(Richiesta n. 36480/07)










SENTENZA



STRASBOURG


14 febbraio 2017



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Leki ?c. la Slovenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
András Sajó, Presidente
Vincenzo A. De Gaetano,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Iulia Motoc,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer, giudici
Boštjan Zalar, ad giudice di hoc,
e Marialena Tsirli, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 24 gennaio 2017,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 36480/07) contro la Repubblica della Slovenia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con OMISSIS. Lui fu rappresentato di fronte alla Corte con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Ljubljana.
2. Il Governo di sloveno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra B. Jovin Hrastnik, Avvocato Statale.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che l'impressionante via da società L.E. dal registro di corte aveva costituito un'interferenza sproporzionata col suo diritto a godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, come sé aveva voluto dire che la società nella quale lui era un azionista aveva cessato esistere. Inoltre, lui era divenuto personalmente responsabile per i debiti della società.
4. 28 novembre 2012 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo. Il Sig. Marko Bošnjak, il giudice elesse in riguardo della Slovenia, non era capace di riunirsi nella causa (Articolo 28 degli Articoli di Corte). Di conseguenza, il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di nominare il Sig. Boštjan Zalar per riunirsi come un ad giudice di hoc (l'Articolo 26 § 4 della Convenzione e Decide 29 § 1).
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1956 e vive in Ljubljana.
A. la posizione di Il richiedente in società L.E.
6. 8 ottobre 1992 il richiedente acquisì una quota in L.E., una società di limite di responsabilità basò in Ljubljana. Il suo nome fu entrato nel registro di corte di persone giuridiche (in seguito “il registro di corte”) e lui divenne uno di nove membri registrati uguali della società, ognuno che sostiene una 11.11% quota. La capitale di quota di L.E. stato di fronte a 2,995,250 tolars di sloveno (si Riunisca) (12,498.96 euros (EUR)).
7. Due dei membri fondatore ritirarono da società L.E. all'inizio di 1993. 2 febbraio 1993 il richiedente, oltre ad essendo un membro ebbe un lavoro anche con società L.E. come capo di suo Sé il reparto. In oltre, lui offrì assistenza al direttore di finanza.
8. Sul 1993 due membri di chiave di 19 febbraio e direttori di società L.E. morto in un incidente di macchina e due altri furono feriti seriamente. Di conseguenza, le operazioni di affari della società non potevano essere eseguite, e la società subì una grande perdita finanziaria. La sua gestione fu minata seriamente inoltre, e durante il corso di 1993 tutti i membri eccetto il richiedente ed un'altra persona ritirò dall'asse di gestione della società. Seguendo quegli eventi, il richiedente presunse il ruolo di direttore che agisce di società L.E prima. 29 aprile 1993, e poi il ruolo di amministratore delegato 23 febbraio 1995. In che veste che lui si è comportato come il rappresentante della società.
9. Nel frattempo, 24 agosto 1993, la Società di Binario della Slovenia (Slovenske železnice) aveva fatto domanda per un ordine di esecuzione contro L.E. basato su un documento autentico per servizi di trasporto non retribuiti. L.E. impugnato l'ordine di esecuzione e le parti furono dirette per stabilire il problema in procedimenti di contenzioso. La Società di Binario depositò un'azione civile, mentre chiedendo approssimativamente il pagamento di tre importo totale di somme Siede 5,000,000 (EUR 20,000).
10. Nel 1995, L.E. fu convertito in una società di limite di responsabilità in conformità con sezione 580 delle Società Agisca che società richieste che incorrono la sua giurisdizione per aumentare il loro capitale di quota ed allineare le loro operazioni con le disposizioni dell'Atto sotto (veda paragrafo 34 sotto). Al tempo della conversione la società era più comunque, liquida o solvibile.
11. In 6 maggio 1996 il richiedente avanzò in giù come amministratore delegato di L.E. seguendo una decisione dell'assemblea generale della società. I membri andarono a vuoto a nominare un amministratore delegato nuovo e d'ora innanzi la società esistè senza qualsiasi la gestione. La dimissione del richiedente dal posto di amministratore delegato non fu entrata nel registro di corte di persone giuridiche (in seguito “il registro di corte”).
12. 19 giugno 1997 i membri di società L.E. deciso alla sua assemblea generale per fare domanda per fallimento su conto dell'insolvenza della società. L.E. registrato un ricorso di fallimento con la corte competente, ma fu respinto come la società non era riuscito a fare il pagamento anticipato richiesto per coprire costa e spese dei procedimenti fallimentari nell'importo di Sieda 150,000 (EUR 626). I membri stabilirono che loro non potessero incorrere nei costi di fallimento e così potrebbero decidere di aspettare le corti per liquidare il motu di proprio di società, in conformità col poi legislazione applicabile, vale a dire corretto la Composizione Obbligatoria, Fallimento ed Atto Serpeggiamento-in aumento che entrarono in vigore 1 luglio 1997. L'emendamento all'Atto autorizzò le corti ad iniziare procedimenti fallimentari di loro propria istanza nelle certe circostanze specificate (veda paragrafo 34 sotto).
13. 31 luglio 1997 il richiedente fermò di lavorare per società L.E. Con la fine di 2000, un altro due membri della società erano morti inoltre.
14. Nei procedimenti civili iniziati con la Società di Binario contro L.E. il richiedente fu chiamato in causa per sembrare ad un'udienza per essere sostenuto 22 novembre 2000. Siccome lui non era capace di frequentare l'udienza, lui fece osservazioni scritte che spiegano che la società non era stata solvibile per un numero di anni. 22 novembre 2000 la Corte distrettuale di Ljubljana rese una sentenza che ordina L.E. pagare la Società di Binario le tre somme chiesero.
B. Il prevedere-via procedimenti contro società L.E.
15. 1 luglio 1999 la Composizione Obbligatoria, Fallimento e Serpeggiamento su Atto furono corretti di nuovo nel frattempo, inter alia, abrogare le disposizioni su motu di proprio di fallimento. Inoltre, 23 luglio 1999 le Operazioni Finanziarie di Società Atto (in seguito “il FOCA”) entrò in vigore. Introdusse una misura decise proprio motu da che cosa and/or insolvente che società inattive sono state previste via dal registro di corte senza lasciare senza fiato su. Così quelle società potrebbero essere scioltesi senza la procedura precedente di sbarazzandosi dei loro beni e rimborsare-alla misura possibile-i loro creditori. Comunque per assicurare che creditori di prevedere-via società fu protegguto, il FOCA previde che i membri di quelle società presumerebbero giuntura e molta responsabilità per le società precedenti i debiti di '.
16. Sulla base di una notificazione dall'AGENZIA per Documenti Legali e Pubblici e Servizi Relativi che la società L.E. non aveva compiuto qualsiasi operazioni per il suo conto bancario in un periodo di dodici mesi consecutivi, 19 gennaio 2001 la Corte distrettuale di Ljubljana, agendo nella sua veste come la corte di cancelleria procedimenti iniziati per prevedere via la società dal registro di corte.
17. Su che giorno, la decisione di iniziare prevedere-via procedimenti fu entrata nel registro di corte ed un tentativo senza successo fu reso per notificarlo sulla società alla sua sede legale. Il documento fu spedito all'indirizzo della società, ma fin da nessuno rappresentativo della società riceverlo là era, un scivolone di consegna fu lasciato nella sua cassetta della posta, mentre informando la società che la corrispondenza attinente potrebbe essere raccolta all'ufficio postale. 12 febbraio 2001 il documento fu ritornato alla corte di cancelleria con le informazioni che il destinatario non era riuscito a raccoglierlo. La corte di cancelleria lo notificò poi con affiggendolo sul suo asse di avviso, come previsto per col Corte Registro di Persone giuridiche Atto. Secondo il richiedente, società L.E. aveva cessato già operare all'indirizzo della sua sede legale nel 1997 e non era stato presente a quegli o qualsiasi gli altri locali da allora. Non c'erano inoltre, cassette della posta al palazzo degli uffici in questione ed ogni posta sarebbe stata lasciata alla scrivania di ricevimento.
18. Nessuna eccezione fu resa alla decisione di o iniziare prevedere-via procedimenti con società L.E. o coi suoi membri. In 11 maggio 2001 la corte di cancelleria emise di conseguenza, una decisione di prevedere via società L.E. dal registro di corte. La decisione fu pubblicata nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi in 30 maggio 2001. La corte di cancelleria tentò anche di notificare la decisione su società L.E. con spedendolo all'indirizzo della società, ma come il documento precedente fu ritornato 4 giugno 2001 con le informazioni che il destinatario non era riuscito a raccoglierlo. Di nuovo, la decisione fu affissa sull'asse di avviso della corte di cancelleria. Nessuna società L.E. né qualsiasi dei suoi membri che furono concessi per depositare un ricorso contro il prevedere-via decisione, fece appello contro la decisione, così 17 agosto 2001 divenne definitivo.
19. Sul 2001 società di 25 settembre L.E. fu previsto via dal registro di corte e così cessò esistere. Notificazione del prevedere-via fu pubblicato nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi 6 febbraio 2002.
20. Il richiedente affermò che lui era divenuto consapevole quel L.E. era stato previsto via dal registro di corte 22 dicembre 2004, quando un ordine di esecuzione fu notificato su lui per la confisca della sua proprietà.
Procedimenti di Esecuzione di C. contro il richiedente
21. Nel frattempo, basato sulla sentenza che ordina L.E. pagare la Società di Binario verso EUR 20,000 (veda paragrafo 9 sopra), 5 aprile 2002 il creditore depositò una richiesta per esecuzione col Ljubljana Corte Locale contro sette membri della società.
22. 5 giugno 2002 il Ljubljana Corte Locale accordò il creditore un ordine di esecuzione per prendere le proprietà personali del richiedente che furono espanse più tardi per includere il suo salario.
23. 29 dicembre 2004 il richiedente depositò un'eccezione all'ordine di esecuzione, mentre dibattendo che la corte locale era andata a vuoto a stabilire il suo ruolo effettivo in società L.E. e dare credito al suo status di un “membro inattivo” (veda divide in paragrafi 48-49 sotto) che l'avrebbe discolpato dalla responsabilità per i debiti della società. Lui sostenne che la rivendicazione del creditore contro la società era sorta prima che lui l'aveva congiunto, e che lui era stato coinvolto solamente nella gestione della società perché i due membri che prima avevano compiuto che ruolo era morto. Inoltre, il richiedente era della prospettiva che l'onere è rimasto sul creditore per stabilire che lui era stata un membro attivo della società, e che la questione dovrebbe essere esaminata in contenzioso procedimenti civili. Infine, lui fece domanda per una sospensione di esecuzione.
24. 12 marzo 2005 l'eccezione del richiedente fu respinta. La Corte Locale fondò che l'onere di provare il suo status inattivo era sul richiedente, e che lui non era riuscito a provare che lui non era stata un membro attivo di L.E. La Corte Locale stabilì che con la sua 11.11% quota nella società, il richiedente aveva goduto i diritti di un membro di minoranza, ed inoltre, lui aveva avuto un lavoro con la società ed attivamente era coinvolto nella sua gestione da aprile 1993. Nella sua veste come direttore che agisce e più tardi l'amministratore delegato, lui era stato autorizzato per agire in favore della società. Inoltre, anche dopo che il richiedente si era dimesso come amministratore delegato, lui ancora era stato attivo nelle operazioni della società ed aveva firmato anche il ricorso di fallimento. La Corte Locale respinse inoltre la richiesta del richiedente per una sospensione di esecuzione, siccome lui non era riuscito a dimostrare che l'esecuzione l'avrebbe provocato danno irreparabile o serio. Il richiedente fece appello contro che decisione, reiterando gli argomenti lui aveva sollevato nell'eccezione all'ordine di esecuzione.
25. In 6 maggio 2005 il richiedente frequentò un'udienza con riguardo ad ad un'eccezione all'ordine di esecuzione sollevato con D.P., un altro membro di società L.E.
26. 9 febbraio 2006 la Corte più Alta di Ljubljana respinse il ricorso del richiedente su essenzialmente gli stessi motivi come la corte di primo-istanza, e l'esecuzione ordina così divenne definitivo. La corte notò, inter l'alia, che la Corte Costituzionale aveva trovato la misura di “togliendo il velo aziendale” sotto le Operazioni Finanziarie ed applicabili di Società Atto per essere in conformità col principio di separazione dei beni di una società da quelli del suo membro, e così coerente con la Costituzione. La Corte più Alta lo considerò irrilevante se il richiedente era divenuto un membro di L.E. prima o dopo che la rivendicazione del creditore era sorta. Avendo congiunto la società, lui aveva presunto i suoi beni così come le sue responsabilità, ed inoltre, lui aveva avuto i diritti di un membro di minoranza. La Corte più Alta mise enfasi considerevole sul fatto che il richiedente attivamente era stato comportato nella gestione della società. Spiegò che le ragioni per togliere il velo aziendale sotto il FOCA non erano identiche a quelli previsti per nel Società Atto. Il FOCA stabilì una presunzione non-respingibile che membri di società inattive hanno inteso di avere le società si sciolta e, a quello fine, lo fece chiaro che loro presunsero giuntura e molta responsabilità per le loro pendenze debitorie (veda paragrafo 41 sotto).
27. In 5 maggio 2006 il richiedente presentò due reclami costituzionali di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, uno riguardo al prevedere-via procedimenti e gli altri i procedimenti di esecuzione.
28. 31 gennaio 2007 la Corte Costituzionale respinse l'azione di reclamo del richiedente riguardo al prevedere-via procedimenti. La decisione fu notificata sul richiedente 5 febbraio 2007. La corte osservò che il richiedente mancò interesse legale nell'impugnare la decisione della corte di cancelleria, come società L.E. già era stato previsto via dal registro di corte. Una conseguenza positiva dell'azione di reclamo costituzionale non poteva migliorare anche perciò, la posizione legale del richiedente. 9 luglio 2007 la Corte Costituzionale respinse anche l'azione di reclamo riguardo ai procedimenti di esecuzione, mentre trovando che i diritti umani del richiedente non erano stati violati manifestamente. Reiterando che membri solamente attivi di prevedere-via società potrebbe essere sostenuto responsabile per le società i debiti di ', la Corte Costituzionale fondò che le corti più basse avevano stabilito correttamente che il coinvolgimento attivo del richiedente nella gestione di società L.E. non poteva esentarlo dalla responsabilità personale per i debiti secondi.
29. Nel 2010 l'ordine di esecuzione contro il salario del richiedente fu eseguito e parte di ognuno dei salari mensili del richiedente fu sequestrata per pagare il suo debito. 23 settembre 2011 il richiedente giunse ad un accordo extragiudiziale con la Società di Binario e pagato l'importo convenuto, e la richiesta per esecuzione contro lui fu ritirata. I procedimenti contro il richiedente furono terminati 28 settembre 2011. In totale, il richiedente pagò EUR 32,795 al suo creditore.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
Legislazione di A. che precede le Operazioni Finanziarie di Società Atto
30. Nel 1988 l'Imprese Atto entrò in vigore nella Repubblica Federale Socialista e precedente dell'Iugoslavia, mentre offrendo una struttura legale per la proprietà privata di imprese (le società). L'Atto previde che società private potrebbero essere stabilite con una serie ampia di investitori con un relativamente capitale di quota basso.
31. Dopo che divenne indipendente, Slovenia decretò, nel 1993, le Società Agiscono, che sostituì le Imprese Agisca nella sua interezza. Sotto che Atto, una società di limite di responsabilità è una società il cui capitale di quota è comprised dei contributi sottoscritti dei suoi membri. Una società può avere un massimo di cinquanta membri e può stabilire con un contratto concluso coi membri nella forma di un atto notarile. Ogni membro ottiene suo o i suoi affari divide in proporzione a suo o il suo gioco nel capitale di quota totale. Membri non sono responsabili per gli obblighi della società di limite di responsabilità. Un direttore di società è costretto a digitare la società nel registro di corte. Una richiesta per entrata nel registro deve includere, inter alia, un ruolo di membri e le loro quote, il nome della società, l'attività e sede legale. Qualsiasi cambi nei dati entrati nel registro di corte devono essere notificati alla corte di cancelleria entro tre giorni.
32. Una società di limite di responsabilità ha uno o più direttori che sono responsabili per maneggiando le operazioni della società e rappresentare la società. Comunque, molte importanti decisioni riguardo alla gestione ed operazione della società (come l'appuntamento di direttori o ripartizione degli utili) è adottato ad un'assemblea generale. Membri le cui quote di affari comprendono almeno uno decimo del capitale di quota totale possono esigere la convocazione di un'assemblea generale; in questo riguardo a, loro sono costretti a specificare i problemi sui quali dovrebbe decidere l'assemblea generale, e le ragioni per chiamare un'assemblea generale. Simile membri possono richiedere anche inoltre, che un specifico problema sia incluso sull'agenda di un'assemblea generale che già è stata chiamata. Anche, un direttore di società è costretto ad immediatamente informare un membro degli affari della società a suo o la sua richiesta, e concede l'accesso di membro ai documenti della società ed archivi.
33. Con riguardo ad alla risoluzione di una società, il Società Atto prevede, che una società di limite di responsabilità deve essere scioltasi, inter l'alia, se va in bancarotta o se il capitale di quota della società è ridotto sotto il limite legale o se i membri decidono di lasciarlo senza fiato su. Qualsiasi il membro cui importi di quota di affari ad almeno uno decimo del capitale di quota totale possono depositare un'azione di fronte alla corte competente che richiede che la società si sia sciolta, se lui o lei considerano che gli scopi della società non possono essere realizzati ad un grado sufficiente, o se c'è qualsiasi gli altri motivi ragionevoli per la risoluzione della società. Inoltre, i membri di una società di limite di responsabilità possono decidere di dissolvere la società nei così definiti procedimenti riassuntivi, senza il serpeggiamento su, se tutti i membri della società richiedono la corte di cancelleria per prevedere via la società dal registro di corte. In questo evento, loro devono allegare alla richiesta una decisione su dissolvere la società con procedura riassuntiva ed una dichiarazione rese con tutti i membri nella forma di un atto di notaio all'effetto al quale tutti l'obblighi di società sono stati adempiuti, che qualsiasi controversie con gli impiegati sono state stabilite e che i membri presumono giuntura e molta responsabilità per qualsiasi obblighi insoluti e potenziali della società. Qualsiasi le rivendicazioni contro il prevedere-via società può essere eseguito contro i suoi membri entro un anno della pubblicazione del prevedere-via avviso nel registro di corte.
34. Il Società Atto introdusse gli importanti cambi nell'operazione di società e, inter l'alia, aumentò il minimo capitale di quota richiesto per l'operazione di società di limite di responsabilità. Società esistenti furono costrette ad allinearsi col nuovo, legislazione più comprimendo entro verso un anno ed una la metà dell'entrata in vigore dell'Atto. In mancanza di che, facendo seguito a sezione 580 delle società di Atto sarebbe suonato su e previde via il corte registro proprio motu, mentre i loro membri precedenti erano presumere la responsabilità personale per le società precedenti i debiti di '. Successivamente, la Corte Costituzionale annullò la disposizione in parte, mentre distinguendo fra membri che attivamente furono comportati nell'operazione di una società e così definito “membri passivi” (la decisione n. U-io-135/00). Nella conformità con la decisione della Corte Costituzionale, membri precedenti solamente attivi potrebbero essere contenuti personalmente responsabili per i debiti di una società (veda paragrafo 49 sotto).
35. Nel 1997 la legislatura rispose al problema di un numero alto di società inattive ed insolventi con correggendo il poi Composizione Obbligatoria ed applicabile, Fallimento e Serpeggiamento Su Atto. Un emendamento di 1 luglio 1997 autorizzato le corti per iniziare di loro propri procedimenti fallimentari di istanza contro società che erano andate a vuoto a pagare salari per tre mesi consecutivi, o aveva reso impraticabile conti bancari, o quale era stato non liquido (mancando le liquidità) per il precedendo dodici mesi. Società insolventi che loro registrarono per fallimento furono costrette a rendere un pagamento anticipato che copre i costi di pubblicare l'avviso di principio di procedimenti fallimentari nell'Ufficiale Pubblicare. I costi rimanenti di procedimenti fallimentari furono pagati dall'appezzamento di terreno di fallimento; se i beni che costituiscono l'appezzamento di terreno di fallimento non fossero anche sufficienti per coprire i costi dei procedimenti, il pannello di fallimento iniziò procedimenti fallimentari ed immediatamente li concluse. Le disposizioni su procedimenti fallimentari iniziati proprio motu furono abrogati con un altro emendamento all'Atto che entrò in vigore 1 luglio 1999 dopo che era stato stabilito che simile maniera di trattare con società inattive non era una soluzione fattibile data il loro grande numero (approssimativamente 6,000 società inattive all'inizio di 1998) ed i costi alti di avviare procedimenti fallimentari che erano stati incorrendo in con lo Stato.
B. Operazioni Finanziarie di Società Atto
36. Il FOCA fu decretato 24 giugno 1999 e pubblicò nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi n. 54/99 8 luglio 1999. L'Atto entrò in vigore 23 luglio 1999 ed introdusse nuovo vuole dire di distribuzione con and/or inattivo società insolventi. La legislatura osservò che un grande numero di società private non sia capace di soddisfare le loro responsabilità, mentre contribuì così a disciplina finanziaria e povera in operazioni legali e sociali e mettendo i loro creditori in una posizione precaria. Così, l'Atto costrinse società a condurre i loro affari in tale maniera che loro fossero in grado adempiere i loro obblighi in tempo dovuto sempre (sezione 5). Inoltre, loro furono costretti a mantenere capitale adeguato in proporzione al volume e tipo di operazioni e le attività loro eseguirono ed ai rischi ai quali loro furono esposti (sezione 6). In questo collegamento, la gestione della società doveva assicurare che la società condusse i suoi affari in conformità con la legge ed i principi di operazioni finanziarie (sezione 8), che esaminò i rischi incorsi in nel condurre quelle operazioni regolarmente e che prese misure appropriate per circondare con una siepe contro simile rischi (sezione 9).
37. Se una società divenisse non liquida e così incapace soddisfare le sue responsabilità che matura in tempo, la gestione doveva adottare le misure necessarie per riattivare la liquidità e, se quelle misure non portassero risultati entro i prossimi due mesi, registrare per fallimento o composizione obbligatoria (sezione 12). Similmente, se una società divenisse insolvente ed i suoi beni non erano più sufficienti per soddisfare le sue responsabilità, la gestione fu costretta a registrare per fallimento o composizione obbligatoria entro due mesi all'ultimo (sezione 13). Se la gestione andasse a vuoto ad attenersi con quegli obblighi, loro potrebbero essere trovati personalmente responsabili per qualsiasi danno causò ai creditori della società come un risultato di tale insuccesso. Inoltre, sotto le certe condizioni, il consiglio di sorveglianza ed i membri di una società potrebbe essere trovato anche personalmente responsabile per qualsiasi danno causò ai creditori.
38. Società che sono andate a vuoto a seguire le procedure prescritte per riattivare la solvibilità o terminare le loro operazioni in cause dell'insolvenza sarebbero previste via il corte registro proprio motu senza una procedura serpeggiamento-in aumento e precedente, facendo seguito alle disposizioni di Capitolo 3 del FOCA. Sotto sezione 25, prevedere-via procedimenti sarebbe iniziato se, inter l'alia, potrebbe essere presunto che la società in oggetto non aveva beni. Quel fu ritenuto per essere la causa se una società non avesse costituito operazioni per il suo conto bancario registrato dodici mesi consecutivi. Organizzazioni che effettuano operazioni di pagamento per la società furono costrette ad informare la corte responsabile per mantenere il registro di corte (la corte di cancelleria) dell'esistenza di simile circostanze entro un mese del loro assalto (sezione 26(2)).
39. La corte di cancelleria era cominciare prevedere-via procedimenti di sua propria istanza dopo avere stabilito che le condizioni per prevedere via la società dal registro era stato soddisfatto. La decisione sull'istituzione di procedimenti fu notificata sulla società riguardata ed entrò nel registro di corte (sezione 29). Un'eccezione potrebbe essere depositata all'interno di un tempo-limite di due-mese con o la società stessa, un membro della società o un creditore per motivi che (i) le condizioni per il prevedere-via era stato stabilito erroneamente o era stato stato incompleto; (l'ii) un'altra procedura per la risoluzione della società, vale a dire composizione obbligatoria, fallimento o serpeggiamento su era stato iniziato o era stato fatto domanda per; o (l'iii) un ricorso per fallimento era stato registrato in favore della società, e pagamento anticipato era stato costituito l'iniziazione di procedimenti fallimentari, o il postulante di fallimento era stato alleviato dal fare il pagamento anticipato (sezione 30).
40. Se nessuna eccezione fosse resa alla decisione di cominciare prevedere-via procedimenti o se tale eccezione fosse stata respinta, la corte di cancelleria emessa una decisione di prevedere via la società dal registro di corte che fu notificato sulla società riguardò e pubblicò nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi (le sezioni 32 e 33). Un ricorso contro tale decisione potrebbe essere depositato entro trenta giorni del suo servizio sulla società riguardata o la sua pubblicazione nell'Ufficiale Pubblica con una persona di che aveva depositato un'eccezione senza successo all'iniziazione il prevedere-via procedimenti, un membro della società o il suo creditore sugli stessi motivi come l'eccezione precedente (sezione 34). Se nessun ricorso fosse depositato contro la decisione di prevedere via la società o se tale ricorso fosse respinto, il prevedere-via decisione definitivo e la corte di cancelleria previste via la società dal registro di corte divennero; un avviso fu pubblicato al riguardo nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi (sezione 35).
41. Per assicurare che i creditori di prevedere-via società fu protegguto, il FOCA previde che soci sarebbero personalmente responsabili per pendenze debitorie. L'Atto incluse una presunzione non-respingibile che membri di and/or inattivo che società insolventi hanno inteso di avere le loro società si sciolto, ma non era riuscito ad iniziare serpeggiamento-su o procedimenti fallimentari. Sotto le disposizioni applicabili (sezione 27(4) del FOCA in concomitanza con sezione 394(1) del Società Atto), soci furono ritenuti per avere accettato giuntura presuntuosa e molta responsabilità per qualsiasi le pendenze debitorie del prevedere-via società. I creditori della società potrebbero intraprendere sulle loro rivendicazioni contro i membri per ad un anno dopo la pubblicazione del prevedere-via avviso nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi.
42. A causa delle conseguenze che ampio-raggiungono del FOCA, le disposizioni su misure per essere preso per per assicurare che una società aveva capitale adeguato ed era solvente divenne operativo sei mesi dopo che l'Atto entrò in vigore. Le disposizioni di Capitolo 3 che regola il prevedere-via procedura effetto prese addirittura più tardi. In questo riguardo a, la presunzione che la società non aveva solamente beni prese effetto quando una società era andata a vuoto a costituire pagamenti per il suo conto bancario dodici mesi consecutivi dopo che il FOCA era entrato in vigore che è 23 luglio 2000.
43. Nel 2007, la legislatura, trovando che il FOCA costituì un'interferenza con un numero di principi di legge sociale e stava avendo ampio-raggiungendo ed effetti avversi sulla posizione di membri di prevedere-via società, decise di correggere l'Atto ed alleviare soci della loro responsabilità personale per i debiti della loro società. L'Emendamento al FOCA previde che procedimenti giudiziali ed amministrativi del tutto pendenti in che i creditori di prevedere-via società le loro rivendicazioni stavano eseguendo contro membri delle società sarebbe terminato proprio motu. Un numero di creditori cui procedimenti contro membri precedenti di prevedere-via società era pendente e che era così di per perdere ogni possibilità di rimborso, presentò un reclamo costituzionale che impugna la regolamentazione nuova. La Corte Costituzionale, in decisione n. U-io-117/07, sostenne la loro azione di reclamo ed annullò le disposizioni impugnate, mentre trovando che loro non riconobbero protezione appropriata a creditori.
C. Operazioni Finanziarie, Procedura fallimentare ed Atto di Risoluzione Obbligatorio
44. 15 gennaio 2008 le Operazioni Finanziarie, Procedura fallimentare ed Atto di Risoluzione Obbligatorio furono decretati per sostituire le Operazioni Finanziarie di Società Atto. L'Atto nuovo trattenne la possibilità di prevedere via una società dal registro di corte senza una procedura serpeggiamento-in aumento e precedente, ma sotto le condizioni lievemente diverse.
45. Successivamente, l'Atto su Procedimenti per l'Esecuzione o lo Sgravio di Azionisti la Responsabilità di ' per Obblighi Sociali (in seguito “gli Azionisti la Responsabilità di ' per Obblighi Sociali Agisce”), decretò 19 ottobre 2011, di nuovo soci sollevati dalla responsabilità personale per i debiti di prevedere-via società. Poiché le soluzioni legislative previdero per nell'Atto era simile a quelli nell'Emendamento al FOCA (veda paragrafo 43 sopra), la Corte Costituzionale ancora una volta fu chiamata su per decidere se l'Atto previde un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi di membri di prevedere-via società e le società i creditori di '. La Corte Costituzionale reiterò che in cause dove le rivendicazioni di un creditore erano state riconosciute con una decisione giudiziale o dove erano pendenti i procedimenti giudiziali, così come in cause dove un creditore non aveva depositato ancora una rivendicazione contro i membri precedenti di un prevedere-via società ma aveva un'aspettativa legittima per fare così, non c'erano ragioni costituzionalmente ammissibili per interferire coi diritti acquisiti del creditore. Comunque, la corte lasciò spazio lo sgravio a membri precedenti di società che erano state previste via dal registro di corte dopo l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto.
D. la decisione di La Corte Costituzionale riguardo alla costituzione di membri azionisti di and/or di ' ' la responsabilità personale per i debiti di una società (n. U-io-135/00)
46. La regolamentazione introdotta coi 1999 FOCA era stata impugnata di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale con un numero di membri precedenti di prevedere-via società. 9 ottobre 2002, la Corte Costituzionale aveva respinto la richiesta in parte (la Decisione N.ro U-io-135/00), sostenendo che la misura di prevedere via una società inattiva che non aveva beni non era incoerente con la Costituzione. Una società economicamente inattiva non condusse qualsiasi operazioni di affari, né generò reddito o fa pagamenti. Allo stesso tempo, la sua situazione finanziaria non fu saputa ai suoi creditori che si appellarono sulla presunzione che aveva almeno un minimo importo dei beni. Per quelle ragioni, società non-conduzione posarono una minaccia alla sicurezza di operazioni legali e sociali ed alla posizione dei loro creditori.
47. I rivendicatori avevano addotto anche che loro non potessero proteggere efficacemente i loro diritti nel prevedere-via procedimenti, come i documenti sull'iniziazione di procedimenti così come sul prevedere-via non era stato notificato personalmente su loro. In risposta a quell'argomento, la Corte Costituzionale sostenne che la notificazione di documenti sulla società, insieme con una notificazione pubblica nel registro di corte di società o nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi, era adeguato. Osservò che la misura era applicabile alle varie forme di società alcuni/e dei/lle quali appartennero ad una moltitudine di azionisti. La notificazione di documenti personale sarebbe troppo lunga, e nelle certe cause impossibile.
48. Come riguardi la responsabilità personale di membri precedenti o azionisti, la Corte Costituzionale enfatizzò che, in principio loro legittimamente potrebbero aspettarsi davvero, che la loro responsabilità per gli obblighi della società non eccederebbe il valore della loro quota. Comunque, società furono costrette ad assicurare che loro stavano operando con capitale di quota adeguato, e che non incorse sotto il minimo legale. Società che operarono con capitale di quota insufficiente erano economicamente notevolmente più deboli che quelli che operarono in conformità con la legge nell'insieme la quale colpì la sicurezza di operazioni legali. Ciononostante, la Corte Costituzionale riconobbe la varietà di posizioni legali e che riguarda i fatti di azionisti di prevedere-via società e stabilito una distinzione fra così definito “azionisti attivi” che era in una posizione per influenzare l'operazione di una società e “azionisti passivi” che esercitò nessuno simile influenza. Sostenne pertanto la regolamentazione come sé fece domanda alla categoria precedente, ma l'annullò riguardo ad azionisti passivi. Nell'il suo discutere la Corte Costituzionale il criterio che le corti regolari furono costrette a considerare nel decidere sulla posizione di azionisti precedenti stabilì. Quelli criterio fu basato sulla condotta soggettiva di azionisti e la misura delle conseguenze che simile condotta potrebbe avere sull'operazione della società del quale è sulla loro conoscenza e coinvolgimento nella gestione della società.
49. Le corti che decidono sulla responsabilità personale di azionisti furono costrette perciò primariamente a stabilire se un membro individuale o azionista avevano esercitato l'influenza sulle operazioni della rispettiva società. Loro erano basare la loro valutazione su un numero di criterio, notevolmente il tipo di società (società a responsabilità limitata pubblica o una società di limite di responsabilità), lo status di azionisti individuali (individui o persone giuridiche), e le relazioni interne fra gli azionisti. Secondo la Corte Costituzionale, le corti che decidono sul problema della responsabilità personale potevano in oltre si appelli sul criterio generale col quale il Società Atto ha determinato riguardo ad all'articolo di trascurare la personalità legale di una società, vale a dire se (i) un individuo aveva abusato la società per raggiungere un obiettivo che, come un individuo, lui o lei non avrebbe dovuto chiedere, o (l'ii) un individuo aveva abusato la società e con ciò aveva provocato danno ai suoi creditori, o (l'iii) un individuo aveva usato i beni della società per suo o i suoi interessi personali in violazione della legge, o (l'iv) un individuo aveva ridotto i beni della società a suo o il suo beneficio o per il beneficio di un'altra persona, sapendo che non sarebbe capace di riunione le sue responsabilità a terze parti.
LA LEGGE
IO. LE ECCEZIONI PRELIMINARI DEL GOVERNO
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
50. Il Governo obiettò che la richiesta presente era inammissibile, mentre dibattè che, come riguardi la parte che assegna al prevedere-via procedura, il richiedente non era riuscito ad attenersi col tempo-limite di sei-mese per depositare la richiesta. Società L.E. fu previsto via dal registro di corte nel 2001 e sia la decisione di iniziare prevedere-via procedimenti (veda paragrafo 16 sopra) e la decisione di prevedere via la società dal registro di corte (veda paragrafo 18 sopra) era stato eseguito degli anni di fronte al richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale che impugna il prevedere-via. Di conseguenza, la Corte Costituzionale fondò che la posizione legale del richiedente non poteva essere migliorata con annullando le decisioni contestate e perciò concluse che il richiedente non aveva interesse legale nell'impugnarli (veda paragrafo 28 sopra). Nella prospettiva del Governo, il tempo-limite di sei-mese per depositare una richiesta di fronte alla Corte aveva avviato correre nel giorno sul quale la decisione che prevede via la società dal registro di corte era divenuta definitivo, ed il fatto che il richiedente aveva depositato alcuno anni più tardi un'azione di reclamo costituzionale non prolungò quel il tempo-limite.
51. Inoltre, il Governo osservò che nei procedimenti di esecuzione il richiedente era giunto ad un accordo extragiudiziale col creditore (veda paragrafo 29 sopra). Notando che lui aveva dato credito al debito e l'aveva pagato, il Governo dibattè che lui non fu concesso più per sollevare qualsiasi eccezione alla regolamentazione legale che impone la responsabilità personale per gli obblighi di prevedere-via società sui loro membri.
52. Nelle loro ulteriori osservazioni, comunque il Governo indicò che le azioni di reclamo riferirono ai procedimenti di esecuzione non erano parte della richiesta presente, ma sono dovute essere rivolte in un'altra richiesta assegnata a col richiedente del quale loro non erano stati dati avviso.
53. Il richiedente discusse che il tempo-limite di sei-mese per depositare una richiesta di fronte alla Corte funzionò dalla data della definitivo decisione delle autorità nazionali. Lui si convinse che lui legittimamente aveva presentato due reclami costituzionali che impugnano il prevedere-via decisione e l'esecuzione ordini, rispettivamente, al tempo quando lui era divenuto consapevole di sia espone di procedimenti. Lui enfatizzò che lui non potesse fare domanda alla Corte prima che lui aveva acquisito conoscenza del prevedere-via e la sua responsabilità personale e conseguente, sia di che era accaduto tre anni dopo il prevedere-via. Dato che una delle sue azioni di reclamo principali assegnò mancare dell'opportunità di partecipare nel prevedere-via procedimenti che devono alle autorità nazionali l'insuccesso di ' per notificare le decisioni attinenti su lui, lui fu convinto, che l'eccezione del Governo di insuccesso per osservare il tempo-limite di sei-mese potrebbe essere risolta solamente con esaminando i meriti della causa. Come per esecuzione, era una parte integrante dei procedimenti, ed era così necessario per considerare il prevedere-via ed i procedimenti di esecuzione nell'insieme.
54. Inoltre, come riguardi l'accordo extragiudiziale, il richiedente indicò che lui non faceva creare lui l'obbligo per pagare il creditore, ma era divenuto responsabile per pagamento come un risultato del prevedere-via. Avendo riguardo ad al fatto che il creditore potesse sequestrare su a due terzo del salario mensile del richiedente, il richiedente aveva preferito giungere ad un accordo di accordo da che cosa lui aveva pagato solamente una quota del debito della società proporzionata alla sua quota nella società precedente nella forma di un prezzo globale. Considerando che lui-così come tutti gli altri membri della società-era stato congiuntamente e separatamente responsabile per pagare la somma intera dovuta con società L.E. alla Società di Binario, il richiedente considerò i termini dell'accordo per essere stato favorevole a lui. In somma, l'accordo era stato soltanto un mezzi di evitare il più grande danno alla sua proprietà.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
55. Come riguardi l'ottemperanza del richiedente col tempo-limite di sei-mese per depositare la richiesta, la Corte reitera che il periodo di sei-mese comincia a correre dalla data sulla quale il richiedente ha conoscenza sufficiente della definitivo decisione nazionale (veda Baghli c. la Francia, n. 34374/97, § 31 ECHR 1999 VIII, ed A.N. c. la Lituania, n. 17280/08, § 77 31 maggio 2016). Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la decisione della Corte Costituzionale che respinge l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente fu resa 31 gennaio 2007 e notificò sul richiedente 5 febbraio 2007. Il richiedente depositò la sua richiesta con la Corte 4 agosto 2007, quel è entro sei mesi dal servizio della decisione della Corte Costituzionale.
56. Secondo il Governo, la data dalla quale dovrebbe essere calcolato il tempo-limite di sei-mese era comunque, 17 agosto 2001, il giorno sul quale la decisione che prevede via la società dal registro di corte divenne definitivo. La Corte, notando che in molta finalità di cause nel senso di res judicata non corrisponda con la definitivo decisione nazionale nel senso temporale, reitera che, come riguarda le richieste contro la Slovenia, richiedenti sono in principio richiesto per presentare un reclamo costituzionale prima di fare domanda alla Corte (veda Kuri ?ed Altri c. la Slovenia [GC], n. 26828/06, § 296 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti), ed i riferimenti citati therein). Anche, benché la Corte Costituzionale prendesse la prospettiva che anche se una decisione positiva fu resa nella causa del richiedente, la sua posizione legale non poteva essere migliorata (veda paragrafo 28 sopra), la sua azione di reclamo costituzionale non fu respinta siccome stato stato depositato fuori termini.
57. L'argomento del Governo implica che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale non dovrebbe essere considerata una via di ricorso effettiva nelle circostanze della causa presente. Comunque, considerando che, come un articolo, un'azione di reclamo costituzionale è considerata una via di ricorso effettiva che doveva essere esaurita, nell'assenza di argomenti chiari come a quale alternativa viali legali, se qualsiasi, il richiedente aveva una volta alla sua disposizione lui aveva learnt del prevedere-via, la Corte non può accettare che l'azione di reclamo costituzionale dovrebbe essere trascurata per il fine di calcolare il tempo-limite di sei-mese per depositare la richiesta. La Corte così costatazione che il richiedente ha approvato il tempo-limite di sei-mese.
58. Inoltre, come riguardi l'argomento del Governo che l'accordo extragiudiziale precluse il richiedente dal rendere qualsiasi le azioni di reclamo con riguardo ad alla sua responsabilità personale per i debiti di società L.E., la Corte osserva che il corso di azione eletto col richiedente non può essere interpretato come un riconoscimento che il debito che lui ha pagato legittimamente è stato dovuto con lui. Prima dell'accordo, il richiedente aveva usato inoltre, che che sembra essere tutti i viali legali e nazionali disponibili a lui per il fine di impugnare la sua responsabilità per il pagamento del debito in oggetto. In oltre, lui aveva depositato la richiesta presente di fronte alla Corte. Siccome spiegato col richiedente, i termini dell'accordo erano più favorevoli a lui che la responsabilità impose su lui con virtù della legge, e lui accettò solamente l'accordo per evitare incorrere nel più grande danno. I costatazione di Corte che il fatto mero che il richiedente assolse il dovere imposto su lui entro una delle decisioni impugnate non lo spoglia del suo status di vittima all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Né conduce alla conclusione che la questione è stata risolta o che non è giustificato più per continuare l'esame della richiesta all'interno del significato di Articolo 37 § 1 (b) e (il c) della Convenzione.
59. Infine, come riguardi la sfera della richiesta, la Corte osserva che, in risposta all'azione di reclamo del richiedente che riguarda la responsabilità personale per debiti, le parti furono invitate per presentare le loro osservazioni sulla questione di, se che la responsabilità aveva previsto un equilibrio equo fra i suoi diritti protegguti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e l'interesse pubblico. Si nota che nelle loro osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta, il Governo fece molti riferimenti ai procedimenti di esecuzione con riguardo ad ai fatti così come la legge. Dibattendo che il richiedente legittimamente era stato designato come un “membro attivo” della società, il Governo si riferì anche alle decisioni che le corti nazionali avevano consegnato nei procedimenti di esecuzione. La Corte considererà finora perciò, i procedimenti di esecuzione nella sua valutazione delle violazioni allegato in come la responsabilità personale del richiedente fu stabilito in quelli procedimenti.
60. Dato le considerazioni precedenti, le eccezioni preliminari del Governo devono essere respinte così.
II. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 1 DI PROTOCOLLO N. 1 A LA CONVENZIONE
61. Appellandosi su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, il richiedente si lamentò che il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà era stato violato. Lui si lamentò anche, sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che il prevedere-via dal registro di corte non era stato accompagnato con salvaguardie procedurali e che il suo diritto ad un processo equanime era stato violato con ciò.
62. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione prevede:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
63. Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, in finora come attinente, prevede:
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ognuno è concesso ad una fiera ed udienza pubblica all'interno di un termine ragionevole con un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito con legge. ...”
64. La Corte reitera che è il padrone del characterisation per essere dato in legge ai fatti della causa (veda, fra molte autorità, Guerra ed Altri c. l'Italia, 19 febbraio 1998, § 44 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-io). Prima ha contenuto che mentre Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non contiene requisiti procedurali ed espliciti, implica ciononostante che diritto nazionale deve prevedere per tutela giuridica contro interferenza arbitraria con le autorità pubbliche e che qualsiasi interferenza col godimento tranquillo di proprietà deve essere accompagnata con le certe garanzie procedurali (veda Capitale Banca Ad c. la Bulgaria, n. 49429/99, § 134 ECHR 2005-XII (gli estratti)). Nella causa presente la Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo della mancanza di una procedura giudiziale ed effettiva per impugnare il prevedere-via che fu sollevato col richiedente sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione è collegato da vicino all'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e può essere esaminato di conseguenza come parte dell'azione di reclamo seconda (veda, mutatis mutandis, Imprese di Forminster Limitò c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 38238/04, § 59 9 ottobre 2008).
L'Applicabilità di A. di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 all'annullamento della quota del richiedente in società L.E.
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
65. Le parti accettarono che la responsabilità personale del richiedente per le pendenze debitorie di società L.E. corrisposto ad un'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. La Corte prende la stessa prospettiva. Comunque, loro non furono d'accordo su se Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 era applicabile all'annullamento della quota del richiedente in società L.E., determinato che non aveva più qualsiasi valore economico.
66. Il Governo ammise che una quota in una società in principio costituito un “la proprietà” per il fine di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, poiché rappresentò un set di diritti incluso il diritto per maneggiare la società ed il diritto ad una quota nel profitto. Comunque, loro indicarono che nella causa presente la società in oggetto non aveva compiuto qualsiasi operazioni di affari e non aveva avuto nessuno beni dai quali potrebbe essere stabilita la rivendicazione del creditore. Fin dal valore economico della quota del richiedente nel prevedere-via società era così discutibile, il Governo considerò che la quota non poteva essere riguardata come un “la proprietà.” Comunque, debba la portata di Corte una conclusione diversa, il Governo prese la prospettiva che la misura da che cosa membri precedenti di prevedere-via società fu considerato come successori legali ed universali alle società e, di conseguenza, la responsabilità presunta non solo per le loro responsabilità, ma anche per qualsiasi i beni potenziali, corrisposti per controllare dell'uso di proprietà.
67. Il richiedente non fu d'accordo, mentre dibattendo che secondo la causa-legge stabilita della Corte, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 era applicabile ad una quota in una società. Lui indicò che nella causa di Sovtransavto Holding c. l'Ucraina (n. 48553/99, §§ 91-93 ECHR 2002-VII), la Corte aveva trovato che un possessore di una quota in una società non solo aveva una rivendicazione indiretta sui beni della società, ma anche gli altri diritti corrispondenti come votando diritti ed il diritto per influenzare la società. Secondo il richiedente, era così, della piccola importanza che la società L.E. non aveva avuto beni al tempo del prevedere-via. Anche in che causa i membri della società avevano trattenuto i loro diritti di votazione, il diritto per influenzare la società e gli altri diritti sociali. Inoltre, l'annullamento della quota del richiedente in L.E. aveva colpito direttamente i suoi diritti protegguti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. La valutazione della Corte
68. La Corte osserva che, in finora come il richiedente si è lamentato della perdita della sua quota in società L.E. come un risultato del prevedere-via, la causa presente pone due questioni riguardo all'applicabilità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 relativo alla natura della sua quota nella società.
69. In primo luogo, la Corte lo trova necessario esaminare una questione di una natura più generale che è se misure relativo alla società che colpiscono direttamente i diritti del richiedente come un membro della società detta potrebbero essere considerate. In questo collegamento, la Corte è giunta ad una conclusione affermativa, inter l'alia, in cause dove le misure contestate avevano un portante diretto sui diritti inerente nel possedere scorte o quote, siccome è la causa con la cancellazione di quote o l'obbligo per scambiarli ad un tasso svantaggioso (veda Olczak c. la Polonia (il dec.), n. 30417/96, §§ 60-62, ECHR 2002-X, e Pokis c. la Lettonia (il dec.), n. 528/02, ECHR 2006-XV). Mentre è vero che i contestarono prevedere-via misura eravamo al danno di società L.E., è undisputable che colpì anche direttamente il richiedente in due modi diversi. Non solo era la sua quota nella società annullata, ma l'annullamento della sua quota allo stesso tempo dato luogo alla sua responsabilità personale per i debiti del prevedere-via società. Perciò, la risoluzione di società L.E. conseguenze comportate che colpirono gli interessi finanziari del richiedente come un membro precedente della società ed erano così direttamente decisivo per i suoi diritti individuali.
70. In secondo luogo, il Governo sollevò la problema di se la quota del richiedente di valore economico e discutibile potrebbe essere considerata un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. In prospettiva di questa considerazione, i costatazione di Corte che la chiarificazione della natura di una quota in una società è richiesta nelle specifiche circostanze della causa presente.
71. C'è senza dubbio che una quota di società con un valore economico può essere considerata una proprietà (veda Olczak, citato sopra, § 60, e Sovtransavto Sostenendo, citato sopra, § 91). La Corte ha sostenuto anche che le quote di una società che fu messa in amministrazione obbligatoria per essere insolvente ed incapace per soddisfare indubbiamente le sue responsabilità avevano un valore economico e proprietà costituite all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Vefa Holding Sh.p.k. ed Alimuçaj c. l'Albania (il dec.), n. 24096/05, § 93 14 giugno 2011). Effettivamente, siccome la Corte ha sostenuto su molte occasioni, una quota in una società è un oggetto complesso. La proprietà di una quota implica che il possessore possiede un fascio di diritti corrispondenti. Questi includono il diritto ad una quota ai beni della società nell'evento del suo essere ferito su, ma anche gli altri diritti incondizionati, votando diritti ed il diritto per influenzare la condotta della società specialmente (veda Società S. e T. c. la Svezia, n. 11189/84, decisione di Commissione di 11 dicembre 1986, DR 50, p. 138). Da adesso, la Corte si confa col richiedente che, benché nei quattro anni fra la cessazione di società L.E. ' le attività di s ed il prevedere-via lui non poteva estrarre qualsiasi benefici patrimoniali dalla società, lui ancora fu concesso per esercitare un numero di diritti che sorsero dalla sua proprietà di una quota nella società. Quelli diritti concederono il richiedente e gli altri membri di società L.E. prendere parte in un'attività commerciale, ed era così di una natura patrimoniale. Perciò, accettando che la proprietà mera di una quota creò interessi di una natura di proprietà riservata, la Corte non può concludere che la mancanza dell'attività commerciale ed i beni prese la quota del richiedente dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
72. Questo basta fare Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 applicabile all'annullamento della quota del richiedente in L.E. come un risultato della società che è prevista via dal registro di corte.
Ottemperanza di B. con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
1. Articolo applicabile di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
(un) Le parti le osservazioni di '
73. Il Governo sostenne che l'interferenza allegato corrispose al controllo dell'uso di proprietà, mentre il richiedente enfatizzò che lui non solo era stato spossessato della sua quota in società L.E., ma lui era divenuto anche responsabile per i debiti della società. Di conseguenza, lui era stato costretto per cedere alle sue proprietà al creditore della società. Sottolineando che lui aveva sofferto delle conseguenze dirette della risoluzione eseguita della società, il richiedente prese la prospettiva che l'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà aveva corrisposto ad una privazione di proprietà.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
74. Siccome la Corte ha affermato su molte occasioni, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli: il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che Stati sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo e terzi articoli che concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà devono essere letti nella luce del principio generale posata in giù nel primo articolo (veda, fra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 61 la Serie Un n. 52, e Depalle c. la Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 77 ECHR 2010).
75. La Corte reitera che il prevedere-via misura conseguenze di due-piega avevano per la proprietà del richiedente; lo spossessò della sua quota in società L.E sulla mano del una., e sull'altro generò la sua responsabilità personale per i debiti del prevedere-via società. Come riguardi l'annullamento della quota del richiedente, la Corte ha sostenuto, nella causa di Olczak (citò sopra, § 71) dove il portafoglio di azioni del richiedente fu ridotto da 45% a 0.4%, che benché il richiedente non fosse spossessato tecnicamente delle sue quote, il loro valore economico sufficientemente fu ridotto per corrispondere ad una privazione di proprietà. Con contrasto, al giorno d'oggi causa che è stato accettato con le parti che società L.E. non aveva avuto beni al tempo del prevedere-via. Inoltre, la società non stava conducendo qualsiasi le attività commerciali per quattro anni di fronte al prevedere-via fu eseguito. Infatti, era precisamente a causa di quelle circostanze che il prevedere-via fu ordinato. Così, nonostante la sentenza che la proprietà della quota generò interessi di proprietà riservati e che il prevedere-via spossessò il richiedente di quegli interessi, conto deve essere preso del fatto che l'annullamento della sua quota non ridusse il valore economico dei suoi beni.
76. Inoltre, presumendo anche che l'annullamento della quota del richiedente in società L.E., vide in isolamento, può essere considerato privazione di proprietà, nell'opinione della Corte dovrebbe essere visto nel contesto più ampio come parte della regolamentazione mirata a migliorando disciplina sociale e ripristinando la sicurezza di operazioni legali sugli sloveno mercato commerciale. In questo collegamento, la responsabilità personale conseguente del richiedente per il pagamento dei debiti della società nel quale incorrono che stesso contesto, responsabilità comportata per il rimborso di perdite subito col creditore di società L.E. La Corte è della prospettiva che questo obbligo può essere considerato una sanzione per l'insuccesso del richiedente, nella sua veste come un membro con influenza sulle operazioni di affari della società, attenersi con gli obblighi sociali della società dei quali lui era un membro. Basato sul principio che permette il sollevamento del velo aziendale, la misura contestata dovrebbe essere considerata su come una misura di controllo Statale l'operazione del mercato, su pratiche sociali e sulla gestione di proprietà sociale.
77. Nella luce delle circostanze sopra, i costatazione di Corte che il prevedere-via complesso avuto ed implicazioni legali e diverse che non possono essere classificate prontamente in qualsiasi la specifica categoria all'interno di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Inoltre, le situazioni previdero nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 così come nel suo secondo paragrafo solamente particolari istanze di interferenza sono col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà come garantito con l'articolo generale esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo. Di conseguenza, la Corte lo considera necessario esaminare la causa nella luce dell'articolo generale insorga fuori quel l'Articolo.
2. Se l'interferenza fu giustificata
(un) la Legalità dell'interferenza
(i) Le parti le osservazioni di '
(?) Il richiedente
78. Il richiedente sostenne che le circostanze nelle quali lo Stato aveva tolto il velo aziendale ed aveva reso individui responsabile per le responsabilità di prevedere-via società non soddisfecero il requisito della certezza legale. Lui enfatizzò che di fronte all'introduzione dei FOCA, membri individuali o azionisti di società era solamente personalmente responsabile per le società i debiti di ' se loro avessero provocato danno alla società per uso improprio dei loro diritti sociali. Comunque, il FOCA costituì un principio e cambio la notte prima e rapido del sistema intero di diritto azionario.
79. Il richiedente affermò che lui legittimamente non aveva saputo del prevedere-via procedimenti sino a notificò con un ordine di esecuzione che era stato diretto originalmente contro società L.E. Lui enfatizzò che la decisione di avviare prevedere-via procedimenti ed il prevedere-via decisione era stato notificato solamente sulla società che aveva cessato azionare quattro anni prima di comunque il prevedere-via. Non si poteva aspettarsi ragionevolmente così, che la società dovrebbe informarsi con decisioni che infransero i suoi diritti ed interessi. Inoltre, il richiedente, appellandosi sulla sentenza della Corte nella causa di Bruncrona c. la Finlandia (n. 41673/98, 16 novembre 2004), dibattè che qualsiasi decisioni che colpiscono i suoi propri diritti ed interessi sarebbero dovute essere notificate su personalmente lui nel quale non era stato la causa il prevedere-via procedimenti. In prospettiva di questo, il richiedente sostenne, che lui non aveva avuto un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere la sua causa di fronte alle autorità nazionali con una prospettiva ad impugnando efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi suoi diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. L'ordine di esecuzione per la rivendicazione della Società di Binario contro società L.E. non era stato notificato su lui sino a 2004, ed era solamente poi che lui era divenuto consapevole che la società era stata prevista via il registro di corte e della sua responsabilità personale e conseguente per i suoi obblighi insoluti.
80. Come riguardi il criterio per la responsabilità personale di membri, il richiedente indicò che al tempo quando società L.E. era stato previsto via il registro di corte e l'esecuzione ordina emesso contro lui, la Corte Costituzionale non aveva adottato ancora la sua decisione n. U-io-135/00. Di conseguenza, il richiedente non poteva prevedere che ad un più tardi il tempo una distinzione sarebbe resa fra “attivo” e “passivo” membri o azionisti. La distinzione fu resa retrospettivamente anche, poiché la Corte Costituzionale adottò la decisione in oggetto 9 ottobre 2002, un anno dopo società L.E. era stato previsto via il registro di corte. Nell'opinione del richiedente, il criterio per distinguere fra membri attivi e passivi sia troppo vago; da adesso la valutazione di causa-con-causa dello status di membri individuali o azionisti di prevedere-via società la certezza legale e sufficiente mancò.
81. In questa luce, il richiedente dibattè, che le sue scelte nei procedimenti di esecuzione erano state molto limitate, poiché le corti erano state legate con le decisioni consegnate nel prevedere-via procedimenti. Il suo argomento che lui non era stata un membro attivo della società secondo il criterio esponga con la Corte Costituzionale nella sua decisione n. U-io-135/00 era stato respinto per motivi che la sua 11.11% quota nella società l'aveva dato un titolo ad ai diritti di un membro di minoranza che potrebbe influenzare così la gestione della società. Come un direttore precedente della società, lui aveva inoltre, come una questione di fatto influenzato la gestione delle operazioni di affari della società. Nell'opinione del richiedente, il nazionale corteggia l'interpretazione di ' di che che costituì un “membro attivo” era arbitrario, sproporzionato ed in violazione del principio della certezza legale. Le corti nazionali avevano rifiutato di dare qualsiasi peso al fatto che come un membro di società L.E., lui non aveva agito in mala fede, e che il debito della società era stato incorso in prima della sua partecipazione nella società.
(?) Il Governo
82. Il Governo dibattè che la misura contestata era legale poiché fu basato sulle disposizioni del FOCA. Appellandosi sulla decisione della Corte Costituzionale n. U-io-135/00, il Governo enfatizzò che le società a che il prevedere-via fu fatto domanda era stato economicamente inattivo. Loro non avevano condotto qualsiasi operazioni di affari, generò qualsiasi il reddito, o fece pagamenti; né loro avevano avuto qualsiasi i beni. Comunque, la loro situazione finanziaria non era stata trasparente a creditori potenziali che potrebbero presumere ciononostante che le società in oggetto aveva almeno i minimi beni. Di conseguenza, società non-conduzione potrebbero essere abusate per per danneggiare i loro creditori. Perciò, l'introduzione del FOCA era stata tirata proteggendo la posizione di creditori e riducendo i rischi di condurre operazioni legali sugli sloveno mercato commerciale. In questo collegamento, il Governo enfatizzò inoltre, che nei procedimenti di esecuzione contro il richiedente, la sua responsabilità era stata valutata secondo il criterio stabilito con la Corte Costituzionale. L'eccezione del richiedente e ricorsi susseguenti riguardo allo status di un membro attivo erano stati respinti con le corti nazionali a tutti i livelli.
83. Inoltre, come riguardi la mancanza allegato del richiedente di accesso al prevedere-via procedimenti, il Governo prese la prospettiva che lui aveva avuto un'opportunità equa di partecipare nei procedimenti, nonostante il fatto che né la decisione di avviare prevedere-via procedimenti né la decisione sul prevedere-via era stato notificato personalmente su lui. Sia documenti erano stati notificati debitamente su società L.E. con lasciando scivoloni di consegna nella sua cassetta della posta, informando la società che la corrispondenza attinente potrebbe essere raccolta all'ufficio postale. Poiché la posta non era stata raccolta all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto, sia documenti erano stati affissi sull'asse di avviso della corte competente, e fu ritenuto con ciò per essere stato notificato. Inoltre, la decisione di avviare prevedere-via procedimenti era stata pubblicata nel registro di corte che era un facilmente registro pubblico ed accessibile, mentre la decisione sul prevedere-via era stato pubblicato nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi. La notificazione del prevedere-via era stato pubblicato anche nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi. In prospettiva di questo, il Governo dibattè, che, aveva il richiedente e gli altri membri di società L.E. agito con diligenza dovuta, loro si sarebbero potuti informare con sia documenti in due manners diversi. Loro enfatizzarono anche che i tempo-limiti per depositare un'eccezione all'istituzione di procedimenti ed un ricorso contro il prevedere-via decisione era stato esteso, vale a dire due mesi e trenta giorni, rispettivamente.
84. Il Governo indicò inoltre che, mentre i membri iniziali di una società di limite di responsabilità sarebbero entrati nel registro di corte, cambi susseguenti in appartenenza non furono costretti ad essere elencati nel registro per prendere effetto. Così in molte cause-incluso la causa di società L.E. dove quattro membri prima di che erano morti il prevedere-via era stato elencato come membri nel registro di corte sino al prevedere-via-le autorità non avevano informazioni che concedono loro notificare personalmente i documenti su membri. Riferendosi a decisione di Corte Costituzionale n. U-io-135/00, il Governo affermò che la notificazione di documenti personale non solo sarebbe stata troppo lunga, ma in molte cause impossibile.
85. Nonostante il ruolo attivo del richiedente nelle operazioni della società, lui non era riuscito inoltre, a raccogliere la posta della società o esaminare i documenti pubblici (il registro di corte e l'Ufficiale Pubblica), anche se lui è dovuto essere consapevole che prevedere-via procedimenti sarebbe iniziato infine. Anche, il richiedente era stato indubbiamente consapevole dei procedimenti civili iniziati contro società L.E. con la Società di Binario (veda paragrafo 14 sopra) e si sarebbe potuto aspettare che i secondi tenterebbero di eseguire le sue rivendicazioni. Infine, il Governo enfatizzò che, anche se il richiedente aveva obiettato il prevedere-via in tempo dovuto, le ragioni che lui aveva fissato successivamente in avanti nei procedimenti di esecuzione per mostrare che lui non era un membro attivo della società non avrebbe impedito alla società di essere previsto via il registro di corte. Vale a dire, il fatto che società L.E. ' s ricorso precedente per fallimento era stato respinto per insuccesso per fare un pagamento anticipato per coprire i costi dei procedimenti non poteva essere considerato uno dei motivi sul quale una società potrebbe obiettare con successo il prevedere-via (veda paragrafo 39 sopra).
(l'ii) la valutazione di La Corte
(?) Principi Generali
86. La Corte reitera che il suo potere per fare una rassegna ottemperanza di atti contestati con legge nazionale è limitato e è nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti interpretare e fare domanda il diritto nazionale e decidere su problemi della costituzionalità (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Wittek c. la Germania, n. 37290/97, § 49 ECHR 2002-X; Forrer-Niedenthal c. la Germania, n. 47316/99, § 39, 20 febbraio 2003, ed Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 82 ECHR 2000 XII). Comunque, quel non dispensi col bisogno per la Corte per determinare se l'interferenza in problema si attenuto coi requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte reitera inoltre che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza solamente una privazione di proprietà “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso di proprietà con eseguendo “le leggi.” Inoltre, l'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (veda Capitale Banca Ad, citato sopra, §§ 132-33, con l'ulteriore riferimento ad Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
87. Il principio della legalità presuppone anche che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale sono sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro richiesta (veda Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, §§ 109-10 ECHR 2000-io). Similmente, diritto nazionale deve fornire ad una misura di tutela giuridica contro interferenze arbitrarie con le autorità pubbliche i diritti salvaguardati con la Convenzione (veda Hasan e Chaush c. la Bulgaria [GC], n. 30985/96, § 84 ECHR 2000-XI). È vero che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 contiene nessuno requisiti procedurali ed espliciti e l'assenza di controllo giurisdizionale non corrisponda, in se stesso, ad una violazione di che approvvigiona (veda Fredin c. la Svezia (n. 1), 18 febbraio 1991, § 50 la Serie Un n. 192, e S.C. Antares Transport S.A. e S.C. Transroby S.R.L. c. la Romania, n. 27227/08, § 46 15 dicembre 2015). Ciononostante, implica che qualsiasi interferenza col godimento tranquillo di proprietà deve essere accompagnata con garanzie procedurali che riconoscono all'individuo o l'entità concernè un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare la loro causa alle autorità responsabili per il fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantita con quel la disposizione. Nell'accertare se che la condizione è stata soddisfatta, una prospettiva comprensiva deve essere presa delle procedure giudiziali ed amministrative applicabili (veda Jokela c. la Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002-IV con gli ulteriori riferimenti e Stolyarova c. la Russia, n. 15711/13, § 43 29 gennaio 2015).
(?) La richiesta di quelli principi alla causa presente
88. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte nota, all'inizio, che la misura contestata di prevedere via società inattive privo dei beni dal registro di corte era la risposta della legislatura di sloveno ad una situazione che sembra essere stata indigeno durante la transizione politica ad un'economia di libero-mercato in Slovenia. La legislatura espose inizialmente fuori per stabilire un mercato aperto al quale era accessibile come molto investitori come possibile (veda paragrafo 30 sopra) quale, comunque diede luogo ad un numero mai-in aumento di società che non erano in grado soddisfare le loro responsabilità e sospendere in operazione. Le Società Agiscono così di 1993 aumentò il minimo capitale di quota ed impose su società esistenti un tempo-limite col quale loro dovevano portare la loro operazione in linea con la legislazione più severa e nuova (veda paragrafo 34 sopra). Che tentativo a fortificando la sicurezza legale del mercato commerciale era, comunque, non riuscito. Entro 1998 erano più di 6,000 società che non erano operativo dall'un periodo notevolmente lungo e non avevano avuto beni (veda paragrafo 108 sotto). Ciononostante, le persone in accusa delle società le operazioni di ' non avviarono o qualsiasi dattilografa di procedimenti mirò a dissolvendo le imprese inattive, o, siccome era la causa con società L.E., non li segua per alla fine.
89. La legislatura rispose al problema molto esteso di società inattive ed insolventi con introducendo una misura di fallimento iniziata con prima il competente corteggia proprio motu. Comunque, questo andò a vuoto a rivolgere con successo il problema. 23 luglio 1999 la legislatura introdusse successivamente, il FOCA che impose su società un numero di misure mirò a maneggiando la loro liquidità e la solvibilità. Inoltre, se una società si trovò in una situazione di illiquidity o l'insolvenza e non era capace di riattivare le operazioni di andamento degli affari normali entro due mesi, il FOCA lo costrinse a registrare per fallimento o composizione obbligatoria (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). Società che andarono a vuoto ad attenersi con quegli articoli sarebbero previste via il corte registro proprio motu senza una procedura serpeggiamento-in aumento e precedente. La misura di prevedere così via una società dal registro necessariamente diede luogo all'annullamento delle quote della società, ma aveva un ulteriore impatto sui membri o azionisti di tale società, poiché loro divennero personalmente responsabili per i suoi debiti.
90. Come riguardi la legalità dell'interferenza contestata, la Corte nota che il prevedere-via di società L.E. e le sue implicazioni furono basate sulle disposizioni di Capitolo 3 il FOCA (veda divide in paragrafi 38 e 41 sopra). Il FOCA fu pubblicato nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi n. 54/99 8 luglio 1999 ed entrò in vigore 23 luglio 1999 (veda paragrafo 36 sopra). L'Atto contenne i requisiti sotto i quali alle società fu permesso per operare, così come le condizioni sotto che prevedere-via procedimenti sarebbe iniziato (veda paragrafo 38 sopra) e particolareggiato approvvigiona sul corso dei procedimenti e le via di ricorso contro il quale potrebbero essere usate il prevedere-via decisione (veda divide in paragrafi 39-40 sopra). L'Atto incluse anche una disposizione che membri o azionisti di prevedere-via società sarebbe sostenuto personalmente responsabile per le pendenze debitorie delle loro società precedenti (veda paragrafo 41 sopra).
91. Visto nell'insieme, quelle disposizioni offrirono una struttura chiara e comprensiva di legislazione mirata a fortificando la sicurezza legale di partecipanti di mercato e creditori che proteggono. Effettivamente, la Corte si confa col richiedente che i cambi avevano ampio-raggiungendo a conseguenze; quelle conseguenze non si manifestarono all'improvviso comunque. Sul contrario, le disposizioni di Capitolo 3 del FOCA che contenne il prevedere-via misura, solamente divenne applicabile un anno dopo che l'Atto era entrato in vigore. Nell'opinione della Corte, i legis di vacatio di uno-anno offrirono società inattive ed insolventi come L.E. con tempo sufficiente avviare procedimenti appropriati per avere la società si sciolse ed evitare il suo essere previsto via il registro di corte.
92. Il richiedente dibattè che lui non aveva saputo scusabilmente del prevedere-via procedimenti finché l'ordine di esecuzione pressocché era stato notificato quattro anni più tardi su lui. Comunque, in linea col principio che “l'ignoranza della legge non è scusa”, la Corte considera che il richiedente non fu assolto dall'informarsi con le disposizioni del FOCA (veda K. - H.W. c. la Germania [GC], n. 37201/97, § 73 ECHR 2001 II (gli estratti)). Al tempo quando il Legge fu approvato, il richiedente ancora era un membro di minoranza di società L.E. Come un amministratore delegato precedente, lui è dovuto essere bene inoltre, non solo consapevole dello stato insolvente della società, ma anche dei procedimenti civili portati contro sé col suo creditore (veda divide in paragrafi 8 e 14 sopra). Come un risultato del sopra, la Corte è della prospettiva che il richiedente si è stato aspettato di dedicare la sua attenzione in nessuna piccola misura ai problemi insoluti che affrontano la società. Considera che il richiedente si fu aspettato di conoscere la legislazione applicabile a società, ed in particolare a società insolventi. Vale anche se la persona riguardata ha prendere consulenza legale appropriata per valutare, ad un grado che è ragionevole nelle circostanze le conseguenze che può comportare un'azione determinata. La Corte ha enfatizzato che consiglio professionale può essere della particolare importanza a persone che continuano un'attività professionale, poiché loro si sono aspettati di prendersi cura speciale nel valutare i rischi che simile attività comporta (veda, mutatis mutandis, Cantoni c. la Francia, 15 novembre 1996, § 35 1996-V di Relazioni). Si può dire che gli stessi facciano domanda a persone che prendono parte in azzardi commerciali.
93. Nella luce delle sentenze sopra, i costatazione di Corte che la regolamentazione ha introdotto col FOCA erano accessibili al richiedente e che i contenuti dell'Atto erano sufficientemente chiari per abilitarlo per prevedere quel la società L.E. corso il rischio di essere previsto via il registro di corte. In questo collegamento, la Corte aggiungerebbe, che il principio di certezza legale che è implicito in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione e costituisce uno degli elementi di base dell'articolo di legge, non solo comporti il requisito della chiarezza e prevedibilità della legge, ma richiede, inter alia, un ambiente legale nel quale norme legali sono fatte domanda costantemente ed eseguirono con lo Stato.
94. Inoltre, è vero, siccome dibattuto col richiedente che la concezione legislativa della responsabilità personale per i debiti di prevedere-via società secondo le quali tutti i membri erano responsabili irrispettoso dei loro ruoli nelle società, fu attenuato con la decisione della Corte Costituzionale n. U-io-135/00 nessuno più presto che due anni dopo l'entrata in vigore del FOCA ed un anno dopo le disposizioni su prevedere-via divenne applicabile. Comunque, che fatto non colpì il richiedente in qualsiasi il modo, come il problema della sua propria responsabilità personale per i debiti di società L.E. fu stabilito nei procedimenti di esecuzione che cominciarono ad aprile 2002 (veda paragrafo 21 sopra) e terminò a luglio 2007 (veda paragrafo 28 sopra). In tutto quelli procedimenti dei quali lui divenne solamente consapevole a dicembre 2004 (veda paragrafo 23 sopra), il richiedente dibattè che lui non era stata un membro attivo di società L.E., appellandosi sulla molta decisione della Corte Costituzionale di sostenere il suo argomento principale contro l'esecuzione. Così, la Corte non può discernere che il richiedente era in qualsiasi modo impedì nell'esercizio dei suoi diritti col fatto che la distinzione fra membri attivi e passivi fu introdotta solamente ad ottobre 2002 (veda divide in paragrafi 46 e 48 sopra).
95. In somma, i costatazione di Corte che la regolamentazione ha introdotto col FOCA e corresse con la Corte Costituzionale erano adeguatamente accessibili e prevedibili; così l'interferenza si lamentò di aveva una base legale e sufficiente in legge di sloveno per attenersi coi requisiti del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
96. In secondo luogo, il richiedente si lamentò che lui non aveva avuto accesso a procedure che l'abilitano per impugnare efficacemente il prevedere-via e la responsabilità personale che consegue per i debiti di società L.E. La Corte nota che i due elementi dell'interferenza si lamentarono di era soggetto a set separati di procedimenti. Il prevedere-via misura fu eseguito nel prevedere-via procedimenti, mentre la responsabilità personale del richiedente fu stabilita nei procedimenti di esecuzione in che la società L.E., il debitore iniziale, fu sostituito coi suoi membri precedenti dopo che era stato previsto via il registro di corte.
97. Il problema principale sollevato col richiedente in riguardo del prevedere-via procedimenti il fatto era che la decisione di avviare quelli procedimenti e la decisione a prevedere-via la società dal registro non era stata notificata personalmente su lui. Effettivamente, la Corte osserva che il primo documento fu notificato sulla società ed entrò nel registro di corte (veda paragrafo 39 sopra), mentre il secondo fu pubblicato nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi oltre ad essendo notificato sulla società (veda paragrafo 40 sopra). La società riguardò, i suoi membri e creditori potrebbero depositare un'eccezione alla decisione per avviare procedimenti all'interno di un tempo-limite di due-mese, mentre il tempo-limite per depositare un ricorso era trenta giorni dopo servizio del documento sulla società riguardata o la sua pubblicazione nell'Ufficiale Pubblica. Perciò, contrari alla causa di Bruncrona (citò sopra, §§ 65 69) si appellò su col richiedente, al giorno d'oggi la causa le informazioni sull'imminente prevedere-via fu previsto prima della misura che entra in vigore; è piuttosto la maniera del servizio che è contestato col richiedente.
98. La Corte valuterà se il richiedente aveva un'opportunità ragionevole di impugnare il prevedere-via misura nonostante la mancanza di notificazione personale, sulla base delle stesse considerazioni come quelli fatti domanda nello stabilire se la legislazione in oggetto era accessibile e prevedibile. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che il FOCA espose fuori la maniera nella quale i documenti procedurali sarebbero notificati sulle parti riguardata. Sia documenti furono notificati su società L.E. con vuole dire di scivoloni di consegna lasciati nella sua cassetta della posta, mentre informandolo per raccogliere i documenti all'ufficio postale. La società andò a vuoto a fare così, ed i documenti furono notificati successivamente con essendo affissi sull'asse di avviso della corte competente. Avendo riguardo ad alla prospettiva della Corte che gli articoli che governano i passi formali per essere preso ed i tempo-limiti per essere attenutosi con nel depositare un ricorso è mirato ad assicurando un'amministrazione corretta della giustizia ed ottemperanza, in particolare, col principio della certezza legale, il richiedente fu concesso per aspettarsi che quegli articoli essere fatti domanda, (veda il de di Cañete Goñi c. la Spagna, n. 55782/00, § 36 ECHR 2002-VIII).
99. Il Governo dibattè che sarebbe stato troppo lungo, se non impossibile, tentare di notificare i documenti su membri individuali delle società riguardò, mentre aggiungendo che se il richiedente e gli altri membri avessero agito con diligenza dovuta, loro si sarebbero potuti informare con sia documenti in tempo dovuto. Avendo riguardo ad alle considerazioni sopra (veda divide in paragrafi 92-94 sopra), la Corte concorda che l'insuccesso del richiedente per fare appello contro o la decisione di avviare prevedere-via procedimenti o il prevedere-via decisione era attribuibile alla sua propria mancanza di diligenza, determinato che lui si fosse potuto aspettare ragionevolmente che prevedere-via procedimenti sarebbe portato contro società L.E. e, da solo o insieme con gli altri membri della società, lui avrebbe potuto prendere i passi necessari per raccogliere la sua posta (veda Hennings c. la Germania, 16 dicembre 1992, § 26 la Serie Un n. 251-un).
100. In qualsiasi l'evento, la Corte è della prospettiva che, per come lungo come i membri mantennero la società in operazione, benché solamente formalmente, e perché loro non riuscirono a trovare un modo di dissolverlo, loro avrebbero dovuto assicurare della gestione di base, specialmente poiché c'era già uno esposto di procedimenti giudiziali pendente contro sé.
101. Infine, in prospettiva della conclusione che la diligenza dovuta ha richiesto del richiedente l'avrebbe abilitato per partecipare efficacemente nel la Corte può accettare l'approccio prammatico delle autorità nazionali alla notificazione di documenti in prevedere-via procedimenti prevedere-via procedimenti, specialmente fin da servizio alle società fu accoppiato con tempo-limiti notevolmente lunghi per fare appello contro l'iniziazione di prevedere-via procedimenti così come il prevedere-via decisione.
102. Nella luce del precedente, i costatazione di Corte che la misura di prevedere via società L.E. dal registro garanzie procedurali e sufficienti previdero al richiedente ed erano così legali all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
103. Come riguardi, comunque i procedimenti di esecuzione, la Corte nota che il richiedente essenzialmente si lamentò che le corti nazionali avevano fatto domanda erroneamente il criterio per avere distinto fra membri attivi e passivi. Nella prospettiva della Corte questa azione di reclamo può essere considerata un problema di diritto sostanziale, e così rivolse più propriamente nel contesto della valutazione della proporzionalità dell'interferenza col godimento tranquillo del richiedente di proprietà causato con la sua responsabilità personale per i debiti del prevedere-via società. Nella sua valutazione della proporzionalità dell'interferenza la Corte assegnerà inoltre, in finora come necessario, alle sentenze rese sopra di con riguardo ad al comportamento del richiedente e la misura alle quali contribuì alle misure si lamentò di.
(b) Scopo dell'interferenza
(i) Le parti le osservazioni di '
104. Il richiedente osservò che il prevedere-via misura aveva avuto ampio-raggiungendo a conseguenze, fin da complesso più che 17,000 società erano state previste via il registro di corte ed approssimativamente 50,000 individui erano stati colpiti. Il richiedente prese la prospettiva che il prevedere-via misura non era stato giustificato con qualsiasi le particolari circostanze che non potevano essere rivolte propriamente in procedimenti fallimentari.
105. Il richiedente indicò inoltre che la legislatura era stata consapevole del suo errore nell'introdurre il FOCA, ed aveva tentato due volte di correggere che che lui considerò era una regolamentazione incostituzionale che governa il prevedere-via misura, così come alleviare membri precedenti di prevedere-via società della loro responsabilità personale per le società i debiti di '. Nel 2007 la legislatura introdusse un emendamento al FOCA (veda paragrafo 43 sopra) e nel 2011 gli Azionisti la Responsabilità di ' per Obblighi Atto Sociale entrò in vigore (veda paragrafo 45 sopra). Il richiedente, appellandosi che sulle ragioni, addusse con la legislatura in appoggio degli emendamenti, sostenne che la legislazione contestata era in violazione coi principi fondamentali di legge sociale in Slovenia e l'Unione europea. Comunque, gli emendamenti proposti al FOCA non erano stati decretati; su sia le occasioni la Corte Costituzionale aveva annullato la regolamentazione corretta, mentre trovando che le disposizioni che alleviano membri precedenti della loro responsabilità personale non avevano riconosciuto protezione sufficiente ai creditori di prevedere-via società.
106. Il Governo dibattè che il prevedere-via misura era in conformità con l'interesse generale che era proteggere creditori ed assicurare la sicurezza di operazioni legali e sociali. Da 1991 a 1998, l'importo medio di società ' dal quale obblighi inadempiuti sono aumentati Siedono 6,319,000,000 (EUR 26,400,000) Sedere 87,573,000,000 (EUR 365,400,000); nel 1998 l'importo era prima 15 per cento più alto dell'anno.
107. Si valutò che all'inizio di 1998 erano più di 6,000 società che non stavano conducendo qualsiasi operazioni di affari per un periodo molto lungo e non aveva avuto beni. Anche, in che stesso anno 8,537 persone giuridiche avevano i loro conti bancari bloccati per più di cinque giorni su conto di debiti non retribuiti; una proporzione significativa di quelle entità (6,587) aveva i loro conti bloccarono per più di un anno e 6,083 di loro non avuto impiegati. Secondo il Governo, quelli dati condotti alla conclusione che 92% di persone giuridiche che avevano avuto i loro conti bancari hanno bloccato per più di un anno non stavano operando più, e non avevano beni.
108. Il poi legislazione applicabile previde che in cause di simile società, procedimenti fallimentari sarebbero iniziati proprio motu. Comunque, la legislatura decise che questo stava dimostrandosi troppo costoso e troppo difficile per maneggiare. Una frana di procedimenti fallimentari renderebbe impraticabile le corti, determinato che loro furono costretti con legge a dare priorità a quelle cause. Optò così per introdurre una procedura nuova da che cosa società non-conduzione potrebbero essere scioltesi su senza antecedente serpeggiamento, poiché loro non avevano nessuno beni per vendere ed i creditori non potevano essere rimborsati dagli incassi.
(l'ii) la valutazione di La Corte
109. Qualsiasi interferenza col godimento di un diritto o la libertà riconosciuta con la Convenzione deve perseguire un scopo legittimo. Il principio di un “equilibrio equo” inerente in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 presuppone l'esistenza di un interesse generale della comunità. Inoltre, dovrebbe essere reiterato che i vari articoli incorporarono in Articolo 1 non è distinto nel senso di essere distaccato e che il secondo e terzi articoli concernono solamente con le particolari istanze (veda paragrafo 74 sopra). Uno degli effetti di questo è che l'esistenza di un “interesse pubblico” richiese sotto la seconda frase, o il “interesse generale” assegnò a nel secondo paragrafo, è infatti corollari del principio insorsero avanti la prima frase, così che un'interferenza con l'esercizio del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà all'interno del significato della prima frase di Articolo 1 deve intraprendere anche un scopo nell'interesse pubblico (veda Beyeler, citato sopra, § 111).
110. La Corte reitera che a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure per essere fatto domanda nella sfera dell'esercizio del diritto di proprietà (veda Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, § 165 ECHR 2006-VIII). La Corte nota che la decisione di decretare leggi che regolano l'operazione del mercato commerciale e la gestione di proprietà sociale con una prospettiva a fortificando la sicurezza legale e complessiva sul mercato comporterà comunemente considerazione di problemi politici, economici e sociali. Nelle questioni di politica sociale ed economica generale sulle quali opinioni all'interno di una società democratica possono differire ragionevolmente estesamente, il politica-creatore nazionale dovrebbe essere riconosciuto un margine particolarmente largo della valutazione (veda Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 98, 25 ottobre 2012, e Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 65731/01, § 52 ECHR 2006 VI).
111. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, prevedere-via era una misura mirata a dissolvendo un gran numero di società inattive ed insolventi. La legislazione di transizione che regola la costituzione ed operazione di società aveva aperto il mercato commerciale ad un gran numero di investitori, molto di chi si dimostrò incapace per azionare società vitali. Si può dire che quelle società abbiano costituito un'anomalia di mercato che rese necessario azione legislativa per rimediare alle società insolventi ' effetti avversi sulla disciplina finanziaria in operazioni legali e sociali e la posizione dei loro creditori. Il FOCA costituì così un tentativo di ripristinare la stabilità nel mercato commerciale. La Corte non trova nessuna ragione di dubitare che l'approccio della legislatura di sloveno ad assicurando un migliore funzionando del mercato era “nell'interesse pubblico.” Rimane essere visto se questo scopo di pubblico-interesse era anche proporzionato all'interferenza.
(il c) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
(i) Le parti le osservazioni di '
(?) Il richiedente
112. Riferendosi alla sentenza della Corte nella causa di Agrotexim ed Altri c. la Grecia (24 ottobre 1995, § 66 la Serie Un n. 330 Un), il richiedente indicò che secondo il diritto giurisprudenziale della Corte, il sollevamento del velo aziendale con trascurando la personalità legale di una società fu giustificato solamente in circostanze eccezionali. Inoltre, citando la decisione della Corte in Olczak (citò sopra, § 58), il richiedente asserì che la Corte già aveva sostenuto che l'annullamento di quote in una società fu tirato direttamente i diritti di azionisti. Così, il richiedente enfatizzò che i suoi diritti proteggerono con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 era stato colpito direttamente e che qualsiasi interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà sarebbe dovuta essere-ma non era-abbastanza bilanciato contro l'interesse generale cercò di proteggere. In questo collegamento, il richiedente sottolineò, che lui non aveva abusato società L.E. al danno dei creditori e che il fatto che lui potesse influenzare l'operazione della società non era una ragione valida su che basare la sua responsabilità personale per i suoi debiti. Lui enfatizzò anche che il debito in oggetto era stato incorso in senza la sua partecipazione, che lui non era stato più amministratore delegato della società al tempo del prevedere-via, e che lui aveva tentato di avere la società si sciolto con avviando procedimenti fallimentari. Comunque, quelle ragioni erano state completamente trascurate con le corti nazionali che, inoltre, decise senza un'udienza pubblica.
113. Inoltre, il richiedente addusse che il sollevamento del velo aziendale e l'imposizione della responsabilità personale su membri di prevedere-via società un scopo legittimo mancò, siccome gli obiettivi chiesero con la legislatura, vale a dire la protezione di creditori e la sicurezza di operazioni legali sarebbe stato realizzato adeguatamente soltanto con dissolvendo società inattive. Mentre ammise che senza l'introduzione della responsabilità personale per debiti, i creditori non sarebbero stati rimborsati, il richiedente enfatizzò che i debiti erano accaduti per le operazioni di andamento degli affari normali. Con qualsiasi azioni sbagliate o fraudolente da parte della gestione o membri di società, comunque potrebbero essere sanzionate vuole dire di altri strumenti legali mirati ad ostacolando e compensando simile azioni. Il richiedente aggiunse che anche in cause di fallimento, creditori che le rivendicazioni di ' sono rimaste non retribuite. Nella sua opinione, non era perciò nessuna ragione convincente di adottare un approccio diverso in cause di società che non hanno beni.
(?) Il Governo
114. Il Governo asserì che la misura era usata solamente come un ultima istanza che è in cause dove società non-conduzione non si erano state sciolte coi loro membri per lasciando senza fiato su o fallimento. Perciò, prevedere-via potrebbe essere evitato se i membri di una società non-conduzione agissero in tempo dovuto. Anche, se i costi di iniziare procedimenti fallimentari fossero esposti troppo alti, la società sarebbe potuta piacere contro l'ordine di pagamento anticipato. In questo collegamento, il Governo presentò un numero di decisioni di corte nel quale postulanti di fallimento erano successi nell'avere l'importo di pagamento anticipato ridotto.
115. Il Governo aggiunse che il FOCA prevedeva da un periodo di transizione e lungo durante il quale società ed i loro membri avevano avuto il tempo per informarsi con le sue disposizioni ed agire di conseguenza. La presunzione che una società aveva soddisfatto le condizioni per prevedere-via su conto di non avere qualsiasi i beni-quale era stata la causa per società L.E. -non poteva prendere prima effetto 23 luglio 2000, un anno dopo che il FOCA entrò in vigore (veda paragrafo 42 sopra). In totale, più di tre anni erano passati da quando il ricorso di fallimento era stato respinto quando il prevedere-via procedimenti era stato iniziato.
116. In secondo luogo, con riguardo ad alla responsabilità personale di membri per gli obblighi di prevedere-via società, il Governo ammise, che le passività di soci erano, in principio, limitato al valore delle quote sostenuto con loro. Comunque, loro enfatizzarono che la misura di togliere il velo aziendale potrebbe essere usata in cause dove i membri avevano abusato le loro rispettive società. In oltre, l'articolo di trascurare la persona giuridica era stato fatto domanda a membri di società che, dopo l'entrata in vigore del Società Atto (veda paragrafo 34 sopra), non era riuscito ad attenersi, all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto col poi di recente articoli applicabili su gestione di società ed operazioni e l'importo di capitale di quota. Similmente, la sanzione di prevedere-via fu progettato per proteggere la sicurezza di operazioni legali e la posizione di creditori. Da adesso la legislatura decise di seguire lo stesso principio e trascurare l'entità sociale di non-azionare società. Comunque, fin da membri di prevedere-via società fu considerato successori legali ed universali delle società, loro non solo presunsero la responsabilità per le società gli obblighi di ', ma fu concesso anche a qualsiasi i beni potenziali di quelle società.
117. Come riguardi il grado dei membri la responsabilità di ', il Governo si riferì a decisione n. U-io-135/00 (veda divide in paragrafi 46-49 sopra) in che la Corte Costituzionale aveva preso la prospettiva che quelli membri che avevano l'influenza sulle operazioni della società (“membri attivi”) legittimamente fu sostenuto responsabile per le responsabilità insolute. La decisione su se un membro individuale potrebbe essere considerato un membro attivo fu basato su un numero di criterio, in particolare su se lui o lei avevano avuto qualsiasi l'influenza sulla gestione della società, la conoscenza e grado di suo o il suo coinvolgimento nella gestione della società, suo o il suo interesse nell'essere coinvolto nella società, e su se gli obblighi erano sorti durante il tempo quando l'individuo era stato un membro della società o più tardi. Nell'opinione del Governo, quelle considerazioni che distìnsero fra membri attivi e passivi assicurarono un equilibrio appropriato fra l'interesse generale che è la protezione di creditori e la sicurezza di operazioni legali ed i membri il diritto di ' a godimento tranquillo di proprietà.
118. Come riguardi il richiedente, il Governo riferendosi alle decisioni delle corti nazionali rese nei procedimenti di esecuzione, indicò che lui aveva avuto un lavoro con società L.E. oltre a che lui aveva notificato come il suo direttore di recitazione prima e più tardi il suo amministratore delegato. Inoltre, il richiedente aveva avuto una 11.11% quota nella società e così era stato concesso per richiedere che una decisione sia presa su nominare un direttore nuovo o su ulteriore azione con riguardo ad alla situazione finanziaria della società, determinato che il ricorso della società per fallimento era stato respinto su motivi procedurali (veda paragrafo 12 sopra).
(l'ii) la valutazione di La Corte
119. La Corte reitera che in tale area economica e sensibile come la costituzione ed operazione di un'economia di mercato, gli Stati Contraenti godono un margine ampio della valutazione (veda Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 91 ECHR 2005-VI). Così, in situazioni come il deterioramento del mercato commerciale dovuto ad un numero alto di società inattive ed insolventi, può essere un bisogno eminente per lo Stato per agire per evitare danno irreparabile all'economia e migliorare la sicurezza legale di partecipanti nel mercato. Ciononostante, simile margine non dovrebbe eccedere che che è necessario per proteggere l'essenza degli individui i diritti di ' incarnò in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
120. In che il collegamento, una legge che interferisce col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà deve realizzare un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti per proteggere i diritti essenziali dell'individuo. La ricerca per questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura di Articolo 1 nell'insieme. In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo chiese di essere compreso con qualsiasi misure fecero domanda con lo Stato. In ogni causa che comporta la violazione allegato di che Articolo che la Corte deve, perciò accerta se con ragione dell'azione dello Stato o inazione la persona riguardata dovuto per sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo (veda Sporrong e Lönnroth, § 73, ed Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri, §§ 89-90 sia citò sopra, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
121. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, ci può essere senza dubbio che il prevedere-via misura conseguenze estese coinvolsero per individui numerosi incluso il richiedente che, di conseguenza, divenne personalmente responsabile per le loro rispettive società i debiti di '. In questo collegamento, la Corte osserva, che le osservazioni del richiedente si furono concentrate piuttosto su questo secondo aspetto dell'interferenza. Comunque, la Corte lo considera appropriato esaminare la risoluzione di società L.E prima. e l'annullamento della quota del richiedente nella società. Il prevedere-via misura un tipo della risoluzione amministrativa di società imposto su loro per non riuscire ad attenersi coi requisiti legali per l'operazione di società costituì. Infatti, la misura colpì solamente quelle società che per un periodo notevolmente lungo non stavano operando in conformità con la legge o, più accurately, stava operando più affatto. È chiaro che diritto azionario non previde che società insolventi dovrebbero continuare ad esistere (veda divide in paragrafi 34-37 sopra). Ancora un grande numero di loro esistè formalmente, e benché la maggior parte di loro non avessero beni, molti di loro furono oppressi con debiti (veda divide in paragrafi 107 108 sopra). La Corte si confa col Governo che tale situazione non poteva essere perpetuata indefinitamente.
122. Nella causa di società L.E., il richiedente ammise che già era stato insolvente al tempo quando era stato convertito in una società di limite di responsabilità (veda paragrafo 10 sopra), una forma sociale che richiese un più grande importo di minimo capitale di quota che che richiesto di persone giuridiche incorporate più primo. Può essere concluso solamente così, che, come una società di limite di responsabilità, L.E. non fu capitalizzato adeguatamente dall'inizio ed agì in violazione degli articoli applicabili di diritto azionario. Inoltre, nonostante il fatto che la società non era stata capace di riattivare liquidità e la solvibilità fin da 1995, non fece domanda due anni più tardi per fallimento sino a, quando evidentemente stava mancandogli qualsiasi i beni qualsiasi. Di conseguenza, non riuscì a costituire un pagamento anticipato i costi dei procedimenti nell'importo di EUR 626, ed invece decise di aspettare finché simile procedimenti furono avviati proprio motu (veda paragrafo 35 sopra). Comunque, la legislazione attinente cambiò e rimosse che possibilità; il FOCA introdusse disposizioni più severe sull'operazione di società. Di uno-anno periodo di transizione prima delle disposizioni su prevedere-via entrò in vigore, la società avrebbe potuto avviare un altro set di procedimenti fallimentari. In tale causa i membri sarebbero stati costretti effettivamente, a coprire i costi dei procedimenti fallimentari, ma avrebbe evitato il prevedere-via e la responsabilità personale per i debiti della società. In oltre, la Corte reitera che da giugno 1997 finché fu previsto via a settembre 2001, la società esistè senza qualsiasi la gestione, nonostante il fatto che procedimenti civili erano stati pendenti contro sé fin da 1993 per il pagamento di un debito. Nell'opinione della Corte la mancanza di gestione, anche se non in violazione della legge, non era certamente in linea con le buone pratiche commerciali.
123. In somma, benché la società non fosse in grado pagare i suoi debiti o compiere le attività per le quali era stato stabilito, perpetuò la sua esistenza. In prospettiva di queste considerazioni, la Corte si confa con la posizione della Corte Costituzionale si appellata su col Governo che and/or inattivo società insolventi posarono una minaccia al corretto funzionando del mercato. Inoltre, siccome dibattuto col Governo, il prevedere-via procedimenti fu iniziato come una misura di ultima istanza che è nell'assenza di qualsiasi gli altri procedimenti che sono avviati per dissolvere la società. Anche, come già fondò, loro furono accompagnati con garanzie procedurali e sufficienti che, ma per la mancanza del richiedente di diligenza dovuta, l'avrebbe abilitato per difendere efficacemente i suoi interessi (veda divide in paragrafi 99-103 sopra).
124. Infine, come riguardi il carico che l'annullamento della sua quota ha rappresentato per il richiedente, la Corte già ha trovato che come società L.E. non aveva beni, l'annullamento della sua quota non ridusse il valore economico della sua proprietà. Inoltre, il richiedente e gli altri membri avevano in qualsiasi evento intese di dissolvere la società da solo, e secondo il richiedente, era solamente l'impossibilità di costituire il pagamento anticipato i costi di procedimenti fallimentari che hanno impedito loro dal fare così. In questa luce, i costatazione di Corte che la misura di prevedere via società L.E. dal registro un carico individuale ed eccessivo non rappresentò per il richiedente.
125. Rimane essere esaminato se la stessa conclusione fa domanda alla responsabilità personale conseguente del richiedente per i debiti di società L.E. Il richiedente si convinse che questa istanza di forare del velo aziendale non fu giustificata nelle circostanze della sua causa. Lui si appellò, inter l'alia, sulla causa-legge della Corte sviluppata nella sentenza Agrotexim ed Altri (citò sopra) secondo che circostanze solamente eccezionali possono giustificare il sollevamento del velo aziendale. Comunque, questa prospettiva non fu sviluppata in risposta alla questione se l'interferenza col diritto ad un godimento tranquillo di proprietà fu giustificata o proporziona, ma piuttosto in risposta alla questione se un richiedente può in qualsiasi circostanze chiedono di essere una vittima di una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 come un risultato di azioni mirato alla proprietà di una società, una persona giuridica separata (veda Agrotexim ed Altri, citato sopra, § 66, ed Olczak, citato sopra, § 57). Al giorno d'oggi la causa, a questa questione già è stata risposta nell'affermativa (veda paragrafo 69 sopra). Come riguardi, comunque la questione di se le circostanze della causa presente giustificarono il prevedere-via, nell'opinione della Corte la noncuranza summenzionata da parte di società L.E. per diritto azionario ed i principi di buon governo sociale dei quali consistè (un) capitalisation inadeguato, (b) insuccesso per osservare la legge e le buone pratiche commerciali, (il c) un stato prolungato dell'insolvenza, e (d) l'inattività da parte della gestione della società, garantì una risposta forte con le autorità, incluso l'imposizione della responsabilità personale su qualsiasi membro che fu trovato essere responsabile per le irregolarità nell'operazione della società.
126. La Corte osserva inoltre che l'effetto di riducendo il capitale sotto il limite legale ed esaurirlo completamente infine, accoppiato con insuccesso prolungato per avviare procedimenti fallimentari aveva effetti avversi e considerevoli sulla posizione del creditore della società. Il secondo fu sottoposto all'incertezza prolungata come a se il suo debito sarebbe rimborsato (veda divide in paragrafi 9, 14 e 21-29 sopra). Nell'opinione della Corte, tale lungo corso di procedimenti sarebbe potuto essere evitato se società L.E. aveva fatto domanda per fallimento in tempo dovuto dopo recognising che non era capace di riattivare finanziamenti di base e sufficienti per continuare le sue operazioni. Se avesse fatto così, la società probabilmente avrebbe avuto ancora i finanziamenti necessari per coprire i costi di procedimenti fallimentari.
127. Così, mentre può essere vero, siccome dibattuto col richiedente che i debiti erano accaduti per le operazioni di andamento degli affari normali, la Corte trova che gli effetti dell'inattività prolungata susseguente della società non sottoscrivono quel lo stesso contesto.
128. Come riguardi il nazionale corteggia valutazione di ' della responsabilità personale del richiedente per i debiti di società L.E., la Corte osserva che già come un membro di minoranza, lui aveva l'influenza sostanziale sull'operazione della società (veda paragrafo 32 sopra), incluso la possibilità di depositare un'azione giudiziale che richiede che la società si sia sciolta (veda paragrafo 33 sopra). Inoltre, il richiedente ebbe un lavoro con la società per più di quattro anni e fu coinvolto in gestione sua, prima come direttore di recitazione suo e più tardi come amministratore delegato (veda divide in paragrafi 7-8 e 10 sopra). Perciò, nell'opinione della Corte, le irregolarità summenzionate nell'operazione di società L.E. era ad una grande misura attribuibile al richiedente stesso. Contro questo sfondo, ed in considerazione della prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale sugli elementi di distinzione fra membri attivi e passivi (veda divide in paragrafi 48-49 sopra), la Corte lo trova ragionevole che il richiedente stato trovato con le corti nazionali per essere stato un membro attivo di società L.E., e così responsabile per il pagamento dei suoi debiti. In questo collegamento, è notato, che la Corte Costituzionale confermò che le corti più basse avevano fatto domanda correttamente il suo criterio per rendere differente fra membri attivi e passivi alla situazione individuale del richiedente (veda paragrafo 28 sopra). Perciò, reiterando che è nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti, interpretare e fare domanda il diritto nazionale che la Corte non può accettare l'argomento del richiedente che le corti nazionali avrebbero dovuto dare più peso agli altri elementi addusse con lui (veda paragrafo 114 sopra) e l'assolse da responsabilità personale sua.
129. Anche, in finora come il richiedente si lamentò che la decisione sul suo status attivo era stata presa senza un'udienza pubblica, la Corte osserva che il richiedente non aveva richiesto tale udienza in tutto i procedimenti nazionali. Né faceva la rivendicazione di richiedente che lui aveva a qualsiasi punto durante quelli procedimenti depositò una richiesta a quel l'effetto.
(d) la Conclusione
130. In conclusione, determinato il margine ampio di valutazione che gli Stati Contraenti godono nelle questioni di sistemi di politica economici, i costatazione di Corte di che la misura si è lamentata non rappresentarono un carico individuale ed eccessivo per il richiedente nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 13 Di La Convenzione
131. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che lui era stato negato una via di ricorso effettiva sotto Articolo 13 della Convenzione riguardo al prevedere-via procedimenti. Lui non era stato capace di ottenere compensazione per la violazione del suo diritto per partecipare nei procedimenti e non aveva avuto via di ricorso effettiva contro la decisione per prevedere via la società dal registro.
132. La Corte osserva che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente dell'illegalità di prevedere-via, vide nella luce dell'accessibilità e prevedibilità della legislazione sulle quali la misura fu basata, non fu trovato rivelare una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Né faceva il costatazione di Corte la sua azione di reclamo della mancanza di garanzie procedurali e sufficienti per impugnare prevedere-via per avere qualsiasi il merito. Sulla base di questi e le altre considerazioni addotta con le parti, la Corte trovata, che la misura non rappresentò un carico individuale ed eccessivo per il richiedente (veda paragrafo 130 sopra). In prospettiva delle sentenze di abovementioned, la Corte considera, che il richiedente non potesse chiedere scusabilmente qualsiasi compensa per la sua incapacità per partecipare nei procedimenti che furono trovati essere attribuibile alla sua mancanza di diligenza dovuta (veda paragrafo 104 sopra). Per la stessa ragione, la Corte non può accettare la sua azione di reclamo della mancanza di una via di ricorso effettiva contro il prevedere-via decisione per essere “difendibile” per i fini di Articolo 13.
133. Segue che anche questa parte della richiesta è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 14 febbraio 2017, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Marialena Tsirli András Sajó
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 02/04/2020.