Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF B.K.M. LOJISTIK TASIMACILIK TICARET LIMITED SIRKETI v. SLOVENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,35,P1-1

NUMERO: 42079/12/2017
STATO: Slovenia
DATA: 17/01/2017
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (Article 35-1 - Exhaustion of domestic remedies) Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property) Pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)



FOURTH SECTION







CASE OF B.K.M. LOJISTIK TASIMACILIK TICARET LIMITED SIRKETI v. SLOVENIA

(Application no. 42079/12)







JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

17 January 2017





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of B.K.M. Lojistik Tasimacilik Ticaret Limited Sirketi v. Slovenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
András Sajó, President,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Egidijus K?ris,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer,
Marko Bošnjak, judges,
and Marialena Tsirli, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 6 December 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 42079/12) against the Republic of Slovenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Turkish company, OMISSIS (“the applicant company”), on 12 April 2012.
2. The applicant company was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Istanbul. The Slovenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr L. Bembi?, State Attorney.
3. The applicant company alleged that the confiscation of its lorry in criminal proceedings amounted to an unlawful and disproportionate interference with its possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 30 August 2013 the application was communicated to the Government.
5. In accordance with Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 of the Rules of Court, the Turkish Government were informed of their right to submit written comments. They did not avail themselves of this right.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant company B.K.M. Lojistik Tasimacilik Ticaret Limited Sirketi has its registered office in Istanbul.
7. On 13 November 2008 customs officers stopped and checked the applicant company’s lorry, in which they found packages of unknown content. A preliminary test of the content revealed that the packages contained heroin. The customs officers informed the police accordingly.
8. On 14 November 2008 the police inspected the lorry and its trailer and found 105 kg of heroin. The driver, a Turkish citizen, was arrested and detained. The lorry was seized and the trailer and its goods became the object of a customs procedure. On an unspecified date the applicant company received documents enabling the goods contained in the trailer to be delivered to their destination. The trailer was returned to the applicant company. Subsequently, the police filed a criminal complaint against the driver with the Ptuj District State Prosecutor’s Office.
9. On 15 November 2008 the Ptuj District State Prosecutor’s Office charged the driver with the production and trafficking of illegal drugs under Section 186(1) of the Criminal Code. The District State Prosecutor further requested that the applicant company’s lorry be confiscated under Section 186(5) of the Criminal Code since it had been used for the transportation of illegal narcotic drugs.
10. On 25 November 2008 the applicant company asked the Ptuj District Court to provide it with the case-file concerning the charges against the driver. It also enquired when it would be able to retake possession of the seized lorry. On 8 December 2008 the court informed the applicant company of the charges against the driver. It further informed the applicant company that the lorry had been seized in accordance with Section 220 of the Criminal Procedure Act read in conjunction with Section 186(5) of the Criminal Code and that no decision could be made on the return or confiscation of the lorry until a decision on the merits had been issued. On 23 December 2008 the applicant company informed the court that it opposed the District State Prosecutor’s request for confiscation of the lorry.
11. On 29 December 2008 the Ptuj District Court found the driver guilty of drug trafficking and sentenced him to nine years’ imprisonment. It ordered that the lorry be returned to the applicant company. It held that confiscation was possible only if one of the conditions set out in the second paragraph of Section 73 of the Criminal Code were met, namely the existence of reasons of general security or morality. The District Court considered that that condition had not been met, taking into account the fact that there was no indication that the applicant company knew about the transportation of the illegal material.
12. Both the driver and the Higher State Prosecutor appealed. On 21 May 2009 the Maribor Higher Court modified the first-instance judgment and, relying on Sections 73(3) and 186(5) of the Criminal Code, ordered the confiscation of the lorry. It held that the legislative framework provided for mandatory confiscation in cases of drug-related criminal offences since the nature of their commission, their magnitude and the dangerous consequences thereof called for the extension of coercive measures to persons who were not the perpetrators of the criminal offence, irrespective of whether or not the owners of the vehicle knew what the perpetrator had been transporting. The Higher Court explained that in accordance with Section 73(2) of the Criminal Code, objects used in the commission of a criminal offence could be confiscated even when they did not belong to the perpetrator, in so far as the third party’s right to claim damages from the perpetrator was not thereby affected. Moreover, Section 73(3) provided for the possibility of mandatory confiscation in cases provided for by the statute. Thus, Section 186(5) of the Criminal Code implemented those two provisions by providing mandatory confiscation of the means of transport used for transportation and storage of illegal substances.
13. On 17 July 2009 the applicant company lodged a constitutional complaint against the aforementioned decision and an initiative for review of the constitutionality of Section 186(5) of the Criminal Code, alleging a violation of its property rights. It complained in particular that it had not known that the lorry was being used for illegal purposes, adding that the first-instance court had explicitly established its non-involvement in the commission of the criminal offence at issue. Claiming that it had not had an effective possibility to prevent the abuse of its property for criminal purposes, the applicant company stressed that the lorry had been subject to regular controls concerning possible vehicle modifications and hidden compartments. Thus, according to the applicant company, the measure complained of constituted a punishment and an unjustified and disproportionate interference with its property and that it had not had the opportunity to participate in the criminal proceedings.
14. On 29 September 2011 the Constitutional Court dismissed both the constitutional complaint and the initiative. In reviewing the contested legislation, the Constitutional Court confirmed the Higher Court’s view that Section 186 of the Criminal Code provided for mandatory confiscation of vehicles used for the transportation and storage of drugs or illegal substances in sport, regardless of their ownership. According to the Constitutional Court, drug-related criminal offences sanctioned under Section 186 of the Criminal Code represented a great evil and an extremely high degree of threat not only from the perspective of the individual, but also from the perspective of society as a whole; the purpose of the impugned measure was to prevent the commission of such criminal offences in the future and thus to protect important legal values in society, such as health and life – especially of young people. The Constitutional Court stressed that the nature of the criminal offences in question, the manner in which they were committed and their consequences justified the interference with the ownership rights of all owners of the means of transport used for drug-trafficking, regardless of their potential involvement in the criminal activities at issue, adding that a different regulation governing the confiscation of goods would diminish considerably the possibilities for effectively preventing the criminal offences in question.
15. Balancing the general interests in question with the property rights of the applicant company, the Constitutional Court held that the measure complained of did not amount to an excessive interference despite the fact that the applicant company had had no effective possibility for preventing the misuse of its property for criminal purposes and had not participated in the commission of the criminal offence. In this connection, the Constitutional Court pointed out that legal certainty required that every instance of legally recognised damage be adequately protected. Thus, by virtue of Section 73(2) of the Criminal Code, the confiscation did not affect the right of third parties to claim compensation from the offender. Under the general rules of tort law, the injured owner had the possibility and the right to exact compensation from the person responsible for the damage. The Constitutional Court added that it was for the regular courts to establish in each individual case whether all the elements required for recognition of the alleged damage and thus for payment of compensation were fulfilled.
16. Meanwhile, on 29 June 2009 the Ptuj District Court informed the applicant company that the lorry was to be sold at a public auction and that it could submit written comments in this respect. On 6 July 2009 the applicant company replied that it was willing to buy the confiscated lorry. On 20 October 2011 the court ordered the sale of the lorry and informed the applicant company thereof. On 30 November 2011 the lorry was sold at public auction for 12,000 euros (“EUR”). According to the Government the lorry was sold to the applicant company. In this regard, they submitted a document stating that the lorry had been sold to “B.K.M. LOJISTIK, TAS.VE TIC.LTD.STI”, a company from Istanbul. However, the applicant company contested that statement, alleging that it was another company that had purchased the lorry. The Government did not reply to this submission.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
17. Pursuant to Article 33 of the Constitution of the Republic of Slovenia (hereinafter: “the Constitution”) the right to private property and inheritance is guaranteed. Under the second paragraph of Article 15 of the Constitution, the manner in which human rights and fundamental freedoms are exercised may be regulated by law whenever the Constitution so provides or where this is necessary due to the particular nature of an individual right or freedom. According to Article 67(1) of the Constitution, the manner in which property is acquired and enjoyed is established by law so as to ensure its economic, social and environmental function.
18. The relevant provisions of the Criminal Code, as applicable at the material time, laying down the conditions under which, as a safety measure, the confiscation of items may be imposed, read as follows:

Conditions for Application of Safety Measures
Section 70
“(1) The court may apply one or more safety measures in respect of the perpetrator of a criminal offence providing the statutory conditions for the application thereof are met.
(2) The revocation of the perpetrator’s driving licence and the confiscation of objects may be ordered if a prison sentence, a suspended sentence, or a judicial warning has been imposed on him, or in case of the remission of a sentence.
...”
Confiscation of Objects
Section 73
“(1) Objects used or intended to be used, or gained through the committing of a criminal offence may be confiscated if they belong to the perpetrator.
(2) Objects under the preceding paragraph may be confiscated even when they do not belong to the perpetrator if that is required for reasons of general security or morality and if the rights of other persons to claim damages from the perpetrator are not thereby affected.
(3) Mandatory confiscation of objects may be provided for by the statute even if the objects in question do not belong to the perpetrator.
... ”
Unlawful Manufacture and Trade of Narcotic Drugs, Illegal Substances in Sport and Precursors to Manufacture Narcotic Drugs
Section 186
“...
(5) Narcotic drugs or illegal substances in sport and the means of their manufacture and means of transport used for the transportation and storage of drugs or illegal substances in sport shall be seized.”
19. Under paragraph 1 of Section 220 of the Criminal Procedure Act, items which are to be seized in accordance with the Criminal Code or which may prove to constitute evidence in criminal proceedings must be seized and delivered to the court for safekeeping or secured in some other way. Under the fourth paragraph of Section 220, police officers may seize these items during the investigation if proceeding under Sections 148 and 164 of the Criminal Procedure Act. In accordance with Section 224 of that Act, items seized during criminal proceedings must be returned to the owner or current holder if the proceedings are discontinued and there are no grounds for them to be confiscated.
20. The management of the items seized during or in connection with criminal proceedings is regulated by the Decree on the Management of Seized Items, Property and Bail (hereinafter: “the Decree”). Pursuant to Section 9 of the Decree, seized items may be returned to the owner as soon as the grounds for their seizure cease to exist. If it is not possible or permitted to return the items to the owner, the items must be sold. If it is not possible to sell the items, the court must order their destruction or donation for the public good. Prior to issuing a decision on the sale, destruction or donation of the items, the court shall obtain the opinion of the owner of those items. Under the first paragraph of Section 11 of the Decree, the sale must be conducted pursuant to the provisions of the regulations that apply to judicial enforcement proceedings.
21. Under paragraph 1 of Section 55 of the Private International Law and Procedure Act, courts in the Republic of Slovenia have jurisdiction in disputes concerning non-contractual liability for damages in cases where the harmful act was committed on the territory of the Republic of Slovenia. In such cases Slovenian law shall apply (Section 30(1) of that Act).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
22. The applicant company complained that the confiscation of its lorry amounted to an unlawful and disproportionate interference with its possessions under of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
23. The Government objected that the applicant company had failed to exhaust the domestic remedies as it had not brought an action for compensation against the driver under Section 73 of the Criminal Code and Sections 30 and 50 of the Private International Law and Procedure Act.
24. The applicant company contested that argument.
25. The Court points out that the general principles concerning the exhaustion of domestic remedies have recently been set out in Chiragov and Others v. Armenia ([GC], no. 13216/05, §§ 115-116, ECHR 2015). The Court observes in particular that it is for the applicant to select which legal remedy to pursue for the purpose of obtaining redress for the alleged breaches where there is a choice of remedies available to the applicant in respect of redress for an alleged violation of the Convention. Article 35 of the Convention must be applied in a manner corresponding to the reality of the applicant’s situation in order to guarantee the effective protection of the rights and freedoms in the Convention (see, among other authorities, Airey v. Ireland, 9 October 1979, § 23, Series A no. 32, and R.B. v. Hungary, no. 64602/12 § 60, 12 April 2016).
26. In the present case, the Court finds that the question of whether an action for compensation against the driver may be considered as relating to the alleged violation and as capable of offering an effective remedy within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is closely linked to the substance of the applicant company’s complaint. Accordingly, it should be joined to the merits.
27. The Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant company
28. The applicant company complained that the confiscation of the lorry belonging to it was unlawful, that it did not pursue any public interest and that it was disproportionate. It argued that the domestic courts had applied the domestic law arbitrarily and without taking into account its good faith and its property rights. It stressed that it had not participated in the commission of the criminal offence and that there were no bars to returning the lorry. The Criminal Code should have been interpreted as requiring confiscation only in cases where a lorry has been adapted for the commission of the relevant criminal offence. In the applicant company’s view, the confiscation of the lorry amounted to a penalty for the effective fight against drug-related criminal offences. Finally, the applicant company alleged that lorry had been sold to another company at auction.
(b) The Government
29. The Government acknowledged that the seizure and confiscation of the lorry constituted an interference with the applicant company’s possessions. During the period of seizure the applicant company had not been able to use it and, therefore, its property had been controlled. When the court’s confiscation decision became final, the applicant company had lost its title to the lorry. However, it had regained this right by purchasing the lorry at auction.
30. The Government further argued that the lorry had been confiscated pursuant to Section 186(5) of the Criminal Code as applicable at the relevant time. Under that provision, vehicles used for the transportation of narcotic drugs had to be seized irrespective of who the owner of the vehicle was or whether the owner of the vehicle had acted in good faith or whether the vehicle had contained any hidden compartments for the transportation of drugs. The applicant company’s argument that the lorry should have been confiscated only if it had had a specially adapted space for the transportation and storage of drugs was therefore not correct. Moreover, the confiscation had been carried out in accordance with the procedural rules of the Criminal Procedure Act and the applicant company had not alleged that any of the procedural rules had been violated.
31. The Government noted that criminal offences under Section 186 of the Criminal Code were punishable by one to ten years’ imprisonment. In the present case, the perpetrator was sentenced to nine years’ imprisonment, almost the maximum sentence. He had been transporting approximately 100 kg of heroin in the lorry concerned. The Government stressed that the criminal offences referred to in Section 186 of the Criminal Code constituted a great evil posing an extremely serious threat to the health and life of individuals. It was in the public interest to prevent the commission of this type of criminal offence by enacting effective measures. With the measure at issue the legislator wanted to prevent the commission of this type of criminal offence in order to reduce the threat to the most important values in society – human health and life. The perpetrators of such criminal offences were not discouraged by the fact that they did not own the means of transport that they used in order to conceal illegal drugs. An interference with the property of third persons inevitably formed part of the fight against organised crime to protect the highest values and goods of human society. The nature of such criminal offences, the manner in which they were committed and the consequences they had for people’s health and lives justified the mandatory confiscation of means of transport, regardless of the ownership of the vehicle(s) concerned. It could reasonably be expected that any regulatory arrangement (e.g. mandatory confiscation only if the means of transport was owned by the perpetrator) different from that applied would considerably have reduced the possibilities for effectively preventing these criminal offences.
32. The Government stressed that only those means of transport which were indispensable for the commission of the criminal offence could be subject to mandatory confiscation. In the present case the trailer was not subject to confiscation, and the applicant company was able to recover it some days after the event. Soon afterwards, it also received documents enabling the goods contained in the trailer to be delivered to their destination.
33. According to the Government, a third party who had suffered damage because of the measure at issue could claim compensation for such damage from the perpetrator under Section 73(2) of the Criminal Code.
34. Finally, the Government argued that in November 2011 the applicant company had bought back the confiscated lorry at auction, paying EUR 12,000. It had therefore had an opportunity to recover the lorry and made use of it.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) The applicable rule
35. The Government argued that at a preliminary stage the seizure of the lorry had constituted a control of the use of property and, later, following the confiscation decision, the applicant company had in fact been deprived of its title to the lorry. Moreover, according to the Government the applicant company had later repurchased the lorry at auction, an allegation which was contested by the applicant company.
36. The Court points out that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers the deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties. The three rules are not, however, “distinct” in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among many authorities, AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, 24 October 1986, § 48, Series A no. 108, and Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. and Di Stefano v. Italy [GC], no. 38433/09, § 185, ECHR 2012).
37. The Court has on several occasions examined issues arising from confiscation measures implemented in relation to a possession which has been used unlawfully and aimed at preventing its further unlawful use. Some of those cases involved confiscation of the proceeds of a criminal offence (productum sceleris) (see, for example, Frizen v. Russia, no. 58254/00, § 31, 24 March 2005, and the references cited therein), others concerned confiscation of the things which had been the object of the offence (objectum sceleris) (see, for example, AGOSI, cited above, § 51, and, more recently, Sulejmani v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 74681/11, § 40, 28 April 2016), and yet others confiscation of things by means of which the offence had been committed (instrumentum sceleris). The present case falls into the latter category, as it concerns legislation providing for mandatory confiscation of instrumenta sceleris for the purpose of prevention of further commission of crime.
38. As regards the question under which rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 such measures should be examined, the Court has in most cases involving instrumenta sceleris found that even though the measure in question had resulted in a deprivation of a possession, it was taken in the interest of a public policy, such as preventing drug trafficking. Therefore, it constituted an instance of control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which authorises States to enact “such laws as [they deem] necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest” (see, for example, Air Canada v. the United Kingdom, 5 May 1995, §§ 33 and 34, Series A no. 316 A, and Yildirim v. Italy ((dec.), no. 38602/02, 10 April 2003). However, it is noted that those judgments concerned temporary restrictions on the use of property (see Air Canada, cited above, § 33), or a possibility of restitution of ownership (see Yildirim, cited above). By contrast, in the present case the confiscation involved a permanent transfer of ownership and the applicant company had no realistic possibility of recovering its lorry. In this connection, the Court considers that confiscation of an instrument for the commission of criminal offences from a third party does not involve the same level of urgency as confiscation of proceeds or objects of a criminal offence, viewed from the perspective of policy responses in the general interest. Thus, it may in certain circumstances be examined under the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which covers deprivation of property. In fact, in a similar case of Andonoski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (no. 16225/08, § 12, 17 September 2015), which included the confiscation of the applicant’s car used in committing a criminal offence, the Court decided that the permanent nature of the measure which entailed a conclusive transfer of ownership, without the possibility of recovery, amounted to a deprivation of property (ibid., § 30). The Court considers that the same approach should be adopted in the present case.
(b) Compliance with the requirements of the second paragraph
39. The Court must further examine whether the interference with the applicant company’s property rights was justified under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. According to the Court’s case-law, an interference for the purposes of that paragraph must be prescribed by law and must pursue one or more legitimate aims; in addition, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim or aims sought to be realised. In other words, the Court must determine whether a balance was struck between the demands of the general interest and the interest of the individual or individuals concerned (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69 and 73, Series A no. 52, and James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 50, Series A no. 98). In doing so it leaves the State a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing the means of enforcement and to ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question (see AGOSI, cited above, § 52, and Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 109, 25 October 2012).
40. As regards the fight against illegal drug trade, the Court is acutely aware of the problems confronting Contracting States in their efforts to combat the harm caused to their societies through the supply of drugs from abroad. Therefore, recognising the need for effective strategies to reduce drug trafficking, the Court accepts that they may involve adverse consequences for the property of third persons (see Air Canada, cited above, §§ 41-42, and C.M. v. France (dec.), no. 28078/95, ECHR 2001 VII).
41. Firstly, the parties disagreed on whether the confiscation of the lorry was prescribed by law, the applicant company arguing that the interpretation of the relevant legislation given by the domestic courts was arbitrary. In this connection, the Court notes that the Higher Court and Constitutional Court both considered that the then applicable legislation, notably sections 73(3) and 186(5) of the Criminal Code provided for mandatory confiscation of the means of transport used for the transport of drugs (see paragraphs 11 and 13 above). In its decision, the Constitutional Court expressly confirmed that transporting illegal drugs resulted in mandatory confiscation of a vehicle in which the drugs were found (see paragraph 14 above), and found the measure to be consistent with the Constitution. Indeed, in the Court’s opinion, the provision of Section 186(5) of the Criminal Code, as applicable at the material time, read in conjunction with Section 73(3) which allowed for mandatory confiscation of objects used in the commission of a criminal offence (see paragraph 18 above), does not support the applicant company’s allegation that the confiscation of its lorry was tainted by arbitrariness (see, mutatis mutandis, Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 108, ECHR 2000 I). The interference was thus in accordance with the domestic law of the respondent State.
42. Moreover, the Court accepts that the interference complained of pursued the legitimate aim of preventing drug-related offences which pose a serious threat to individuals’ health and life, an aim which serves the general interest (see Air Canada, cited above, § 34; and C.M. v. France, cited above).
43. As regards, further, the striking of a fair balance between the means employed by the domestic authorities for the purpose of preventing drug trafficking and the protection of the applicant company’s property rights, the Court reiterates that such balance depends on many factors, and the behaviour of the owner of the property is one element of the entirety of circumstances which should be taken into account (see AGOSI, cited above, § 54). The Court must consider whether the applicable procedures in the present case were such as to enable reasonable account to be taken of the degree of fault or care attributable to the applicant company or, at least, of the relationship between the company’s conduct and the breach of the law which undoubtedly occurred; and also whether the procedures in question afforded the applicant company a reasonable opportunity of putting its case to the responsible authorities (ibid. § 55). In ascertaining whether these conditions were satisfied, a comprehensive view must be taken of the applicable procedures (ibid.).
44. The Court has previously examined similar cases involving seizure and/or confiscation of means of transport used for illegal purposes and in most cases found no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on the grounds that the applicants had had sufficient opportunity to put their cases to the competent national authorities and to recover the goods seized, reasonable account having been taken of their behaviour (see Air Canada, cited above, §§ 44-47, C.M. v. France, cited above, and Yildirim, cited above).
45. In the present case the applicant company sought to recover its lorry and, to this end, challenged its confiscation before the Constitutional Court after the initial decision by the first-instance court to return it was overturned pursuant to the appeal lodged by the Higher State Prosecutor. However, contrary to the above-mentioned cases, the higher instances interpreted the relevant domestic legislation as entailing mandatory confiscation of any vehicle used for drug trafficking, regardless of the diligence and good faith displayed by the owner. As a result, even though there was no indication that the applicant company had been involved in the commission of the alleged criminal offence or that it had any knowledge about the illegal activities of its driver or that it had failed to carry out regular controls of the vehicle, it did not have any effective possibility of securing the return of its lorry (see paragraphs 11-15 above). The relevant domestic legislation (Section 186(5) of the Criminal Code, read in conjunction with Section 73(3)) thus took no account of the relationship between the applicant company’s conduct and the offence (see Vasilevski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 22653/08, § 57, 28 April 2016).
46. The Government argued that the impugned strictness of the national regulation was justified by the seriousness of drug-related criminal offences. In their view the nature of such criminal offences, the manner in which they were committed and the consequences they had for people’s health and lives justified the mandatory confiscation of the means of transport, regardless of ownership, and any other regulatory arrangement would considerably diminish the possibility of effectively preventing these criminal offences.
47. In the Court’s opinion, there can be no doubt that the protection of human health and life – the grounds cited as justification for the measure – requires decisive action on the part of the Contracting States to reduce drug related criminal offences. That said, the confiscation of property used in the commission of such offences may, as in the present case, impose a significant burden on the third parties to whom the property belongs. The exercise of balancing the general interests of crime prevention and the protection of the affected individual’s rights (see paragraph 39 above and Air Canada, cited above, § 36) in these circumstances thus means that imposing such a burden on the owner of the property concerned can be justified only if his interest in having the property returned to him is outweighed by the risk that its return would facilitate drug trafficking and undermine the fight against organised crime.
48. In this connection, it does not appear that the lorry was adapted for smuggling drugs, nor were there any previous incidents caused by a failure on the part of the applicant company to prevent illegal shipments from being transported by its vehicles which would raise the question of the applicant company’s own responsibility for the commission of the criminal offence in question (see, by contrast, Air Canada, cited above, §§ 6 and 44). This, coupled with the fact that the lorry driver was convicted of drug trafficking and sentenced to nine years’ imprisonment (see paragraph 11 above), hardly allows for the conclusion that the lorry might be used again for transporting illegal substances (see, mutatis mutandis, Vasilevski, cited above, § 58). In the light of the above, the Court fails to see what adverse effects might be expected to result from the return of the lorry to its owner. This is particularly true if, as argued by the Government, the applicant company was in any event able to buy the lorry back at public auction. Also, assuming that it was indeed the applicant company that bought the lorry at the auction, the Court would point out that this cannot be considered to have remedied the damage caused to it by the confiscation because the reacquisition of the vehicle was contingent on the payment of the price attained at auction.
49. Therefore, notwithstanding the wide margin of appreciation left to the Contracting States in the choice of means aimed at combating the illegal trade in drugs, the Court cannot accept that the indiscriminate nature of the measure at issue was justified by the circumstances of the present case.
50. Moreover, relying on Section 73(2) of the Criminal Code, the Government maintained that the domestic legislation provided the applicant company with an effective opportunity to obtain compensation for its pecuniary loss by seeking it from the driver convicted of drug trafficking, who was the party responsible for the damage the company sustained. However, in a similar situation the Court has previously held that a compensation claim of this nature entailed further uncertainty for a bona fide owner of confiscated property because the offender might be found to be insolvent. The compensation claim was not held to offer bona fide owners sufficient opportunity for bringing their cases before the competent national authorities (see Bowler International Unit v. France, no. 1946/06, §§ 44-45, 23 July 2009, and, mutatis mutandis, Vasilevski, cited above, § 59). The general nature of the argument adduced by the Government does not provide a sufficient basis for the Court to depart from its above-mentioned findings.
51. Finally, as already stated, the applicant company’s overriding objective was the recovery of the vehicle. In this connection, it does not appear that at the time that the complaint was lodged, which is approximately eight months after the new Criminal Code became applicable, there was established domestic case-law on the question of whether in cases of drug trafficking, also the means of transport belonging to third parties were to be mandatorily confiscated. It rather seems that the applicant company’s constitutional complaint provided the first opportunity for the Constitutional Court to rule on the issue and clarify the scope of the third-party owners’ options with regard to confiscation of their vehicles in the criminal proceedings involving drug trafficking. The Court, reiterating that the only remedies which an applicant is required to exhaust are those that relate to the breaches alleged and which are at the same time available and sufficient (see Aquilina v. Malta [GC], no. 25642/94, § 39, ECHR 1999-III), thus takes the view that the applicant company’s choice of legal remedies was reasonable. This being so, the Court considers it excessive to require the applicant company to embark on another set of proceedings against the driver of the confiscated lorry with the aim of recovering a loss that resulted from the actions of the domestic authorities. Therefore, the Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
52. In the light of the above considerations, the Court takes the view that mandatory confiscation of the applicant company’s vehicle, coupled with the lack of a realistic opportunity to obtain compensation for its loss, did not take sufficient account of the applicant company’s interests. The Court therefore finds that in the present case a fair balance has not been struck between the demands of the general interests of the public and the applicant company’s right to peaceful enjoyment of its possessions and that the burden placed on the applicant company was excessive.
53. It follows that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
54. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
55. The applicant company claimed in respect of pecuniary damage:
(i) 7,500 Turkish liras (TRY), equivalent to EUR 2.490 for the vehicle tax paid;
(ii) TRY 131,900.50, equivalent to EUR 43,791 for the cost of the vehicle plus interest at a commercial rate;
(iii) EUR 60,000 for the loss of profit because it was unable to use the vehicle.
56. The Government contested this claim without providing any arguments.
57. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (see, for example, Brum?rescu v. Romania (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 28342/95, § 19, ECHR 2001 I, and Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 32, ECHR 2000 XI).
58. The Contracting States that are parties to a case are in principle free to choose the means whereby they will comply with a judgment in which the Court has found a breach. This discretion as to the manner of execution of a judgment reflects the freedom of choice attaching to the primary obligation of the Contracting States under the Convention to secure the rights and freedoms guaranteed (Article 1). If the nature of the breach allows for restitutio in integrum, it is for the respondent State to effect it. If, on the other hand, national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made for the consequences of the breach, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Brum?rescu, cited above, § 20).
59. The Court enjoys certain discretion in the exercise of the power conferred by Article 41, as is borne out by the adjective “just” and the phrase “if necessary” in its text (see Guzzardi v. Italy, 6 November 1980, § 114, Series A no. 39). In order to determine just satisfaction, it has regard to the particular features of each case, which may call for an award of less than the value of the actual damage sustained or the costs and expenses actually incurred, or even for no award at all.
60. Moreover, there must be a clear causal connection between the damage claimed by the applicant and the violation of the Convention (see, amongst others, Stretch v. the United Kingdom, no. 44277/98, § 47, 24 June 2003). Thus, for an award to be made in respect of pecuniary damage, the applicant must demonstrate that there is a causal link between the violation and any financial loss alleged (see, for example, Družstevní záložna Pria and Others v. the Czech Republic (just satisfaction), no. 72034/01, § 9, 21 January 2010).
61. Turning to the present case, the Court accepts that the applicant company suffered damage as a result of disproportionate interference by the authorities with its rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 52 above).
62. However, the Court does not agree with the applicant company’s approach that it should be compensated with the cost of a new lorry (see, mutatis mutandis, East West Alliance Limited v. Ukraine, no. 19336/04, § 258, 23 January 2014). The Court notes that the lorry of which the applicant company was dispossessed was not new. It was purchased in 2007 and was sold at a public auction in 2011 for the price of EUR 12,000 (see paragraph 16 above).
63. The Court further notes that the applicant company submitted the bank transfer slips concerning the payment of the vehicle tax. The Government did not contest this evidence.
64. In the light of the foregoing considerations, in particular having regard to all the evidential materials in its possession and in the absence of any specific arguments from the Government, the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicant company the sum of EUR 14,490 covering the cost of the vehicle as determined at the public auction and the vehicle tax, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
65. As regards the alleged lost profit, the Court is aware of the difficulties in calculating the loss in circumstances where such profit could fluctuate owing to a variety of unpredictable factors. In the present case, the applicant company estimated the loss at EUR 60,000, but submitted no evidence indicating how its business operations were affected by the confiscation of its lorry. In this connection, the Court observes that the applicant company continued its business after the confiscation of the lorry in question, thus it should not be too difficult to show any potential decrease in the profit achieved in the period after the confiscation of its lorry in relation to the period achieved before it. In the absence of any documents such as tax returns or precise calculations showing that the applicant company’s profit decreased as a result of the measure complained of, the Court is unable to make any award under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
66. The applicant company also claimed EUR 5,222 for costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and TRY 24,400, equivalent to EUR 8,100.80 for those incurred before the Court.
67. The Government did not provide any submissions in this respect.
68. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum.
69. With regard to the costs incurred in the domestic proceedings, the Court observes that, before applying to the Convention institutions, the applicant company had exhausted the domestic remedies available to it under domestic law, since it had participated in the criminal proceedings. The Court therefore accepts that the applicant company incurred expenses in seeking redress for the violations of the Convention through the domestic legal system (see, Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. and Di Stefano, cited above, § 224).
70. The Court further notes that the applicant company concluded an agreement with its attorney for representation before the Court according to which TLR 24,400 will be paid to the lawyer by way of fee.
71. Having regard to the material in its possession and its relevant practice, the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicant company an aggregate sum of EUR 7,000 in respect of all costs and expenses.
C. Default interest
72. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Joins to the merits, unanimously, the Government’s objection of failure to exhaust domestic remedies and rejects it;

2. Holds, by six votes to one, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds, by six votes to one,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 14,490 (fourteen thousand four hundred and ninety euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 7,000 (seven thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

4. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 17 January 2017, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Marialena Tsirli András Sajó
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge K?ris is annexed to this judgment.
A.S.
M.T.



DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE K?RIS
1. Had this case been the first one in which the Court had to examine the issue of mandatory confiscation of crime-related property belonging to a third person, it would have been quite easy to support the finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention as the logical result of an exercise in “pure” legal theory. Had it been the first one.
However, it is not.
It has to be said that the Court’s case-law on this issue calls for greater consistency and refinement. This judgment does not appear to be in line with that part of the Court’s case-law which – in my opinion quite reasonably – allows a wider margin of appreciation to be left to the member States as to the choice of means aimed at combating the most dangerous criminal activities such as drug trafficking.
2. In paragraph 50, the majority rightly point out that “a compensation claim of this nature entailed further uncertainty for a bona fide owner of confiscated property because the offender might be found to be insolvent” and that in some cases such a possibility of compensation “was not held to offer bona fide owners sufficient opportunity for bringing their cases before the competent national authorities”.
In some cases, but not in all.
Some of these cases (most notably Air Canada v. the United Kingdom (5 May 1995, Series A no. 316 A) and AGOSI v. the United Kingdom (24 October 1986, Series A no. 108)) are referred to in the judgment. But there is also other case-law which deserves greater attention than it has received in this judgment. I shall mention only a few of the much greater number of cases.
3. In Waldemar Nowakowski v. Poland (no. 55167/11, 24 July 2012), which is not referred to at all in the present judgment (indeed, there are important factual differences between that case and the instant one), a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was found because the applicant was deprived of his property, which in that case was a collection of arms “of considerable historical and presumably also financial value”, “in its entirety”. Moreover, the courts took measures to ensure that a public museum acquired the collection for free, but failed to consider “any alternative measures which could have been taken in order to alleviate the burden imposed on the applicant, including by way of seeking registration of the collection” (§§ 56 and 57).
In the present case the confiscation of the objects in the applicant’s possession that were initially seized by the authorities was by no means as indiscriminate (see paragraph 8 of the present judgment regarding the return to the applicant company of the trailer and the goods contained in it). A lorry is a lorry. It cannot be confiscated other than “in its entirety”. It may, according to the law, either be confiscated as instrumentum sceleris (to use the term employed in the judgment) or not.
4. In Sulejmani v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (no. 74681/11, § 41, 28 April 2016), to which the majority refer only in the context of the categorisation of confiscated objects as objectum sceleris (see paragraph 37 of the present judgment), the Court did not find the mandatory confiscation of the applicant’s property to have violated Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court was satisfied that the applicant had had at his disposal a judicial remedy in the form of a civil claim for compensation against the person responsible for the damage sustained. The applicant “did not explain his failure to lodge such a claim” and “did not argue that there were any impediments to him resorting to that avenue or any particulars ... which would have rendered it ineffective in the circumstances of the case”. Thus, the mandatory confiscation of the item in question, as such, was upheld by the Court. The issue as to whether the confiscated item was to be categorised as objectum sceleris or instrumentum sceleris, although given some prominence by the Chamber in the instant case (see paragraph 37 of the present judgment), did not appear to be of any relevance in Sulejmani.
What is relevant in Sulejmani, from the perspective of the instant case, is that the applicant in the instant case, like the one in Sulejmani, had the possibility of lodging a claim for compensation against the offender, in this case a (convicted) drug trafficker. But, like the applicant in Sulejmani, the applicant company did not explain its failure to lodge such a claim. I have no great difficulty in conceding and agreeing with the majority that that possibility, which would have required the applicant company to “embark on another set of proceedings”, does not (at least, not strongly) support the Government’s submissions as to the non-exhaustion of domestic remedies available to the applicant company (see paragraph 51 of the judgment; compare Sulejmani, §§ 26 and 27). But this is clearly not a sufficient basis for finding a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the present case.
Moreover, Sulejmani did not concern anything even close to drug trafficking.
5. In Andonoski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (no. 16225/08, 17 September 2015), to which the majority refer only in the context of the “applicable rule” (see paragraph 38 of the present judgment), a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was found because of the decisive circumstance (“[i]in such circumstances”, as explicitly stated in paragraph 40 of that judgment) that the domestic legislation “did not provide for the possibility to claim compensation” for the mandatory confiscation of instrumentum sceleris (again, to use the term employed in the judgment); in addition, the Court took note that the Government “did not provide any illustration of domestic practice that would demonstrate that a compensation claim ... was available, let alone effective, in similar circumstances to the applicant’s case” (§ 39).
In the present case, however, the opportunity for the applicant to claim compensation from the offender, that is, the driver convicted of drug trafficking, was obvious. In accordance with the interpretation of the Slovenian legislation by the Constitutional Court of that State, the confiscation of the lorry “did not affect” the applicant company’s right to claim such compensation. What is more, the applicant company had not only the right but also the possibility – hence the effective opportunity – to exact compensation from the person responsible for the damage sustained (see paragraph 15 of the judgment).
6. In Vasilevski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (no. 22653/08, 28 April 2016) a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was also found because of the ineffectiveness, in practice, of the claim for compensation which the applicant could have lodged against the persons whose actions had caused the damage he sustained. I am afraid that the parallel between the instant case and Vasilevski, as drawn in the judgment, is misleading. Prominence is given to the fact that, like in Vasilevski, “[t]he relevant domestic legislation ... took no account of the relationship between the applicant company’s conduct and the offence”, as well as to the fact that, like in Vasilevski, it was not likely “that the [confiscated] lorry might be used again for transporting illegal substances” had it been returned to the applicant company (see paragraphs 45 and 48 of the judgment). Also, Vasilevski is relied upon by the majority in so far as “[t]he compensation claim was not held to offer bona fide owners sufficient opportunity for bringing their cases before the competent national authorities”; the majority state that “[t]he general nature of the argument adduced by the Government does not provide a sufficient basis for the Court to depart from its above mentioned findings” (see paragraph 50).
However, what is relevant in Vasilevski for the instant case is not some ostensible parallel but the decisive factual difference between the two cases. In Vasilevski, the possibility for the applicant to claim compensation from either a physical person or a company responsible for the damage sustained was illusory. The “particular circumstances of the ... case” rendered that possibility ineffective. The physical person against whom such claims could be lodged “had died ... before the lorry was confiscated from the applicant”, “no information was available as to the whereabouts of his heirs and whether they could be held responsible under the applicable rules”, and the Government had not presented the Court with “any illustration of domestic practice that showed that a claim against heirs of a deceased seller ... had been effective in similar circumstances to the applicant’s case”. As to the company against whom the claims could be lodged, it “had ceased to exist before the [object in question] had been confiscated from [the applicant]” (§§ 59 and 60).
Nothing of this sort is apparent from the file in the instant case. In order to rebut the presumption of the availability of compensation from the actual offender and to conclude that the opportunity for the applicant company to claim compensation from the (convicted) drug trafficker was not “sufficient” (see paragraph 50), the majority should have examined whether the alleged “further uncertainty” indeed stemmed from the facts of the case. No such consideration is found in the judgment. Instead, the Chamber is satisfied with the fact-insensitive “blanket” statement that “[t]he general nature of the argument adduced by the Government does not provide a sufficient basis for the Court to depart from its above-mentioned findings” (ibid.).
7. In paragraph 43, the majority cite AGOSI (cited above, §§ 54 and 55) and reiterates that the “fair balance between the means employed by the domestic authorities for the purpose of preventing drug trafficking and the protection of the applicant company’s property rights ... depends on many factors, and the behaviour of the owner of the property is one element of the entirety of circumstances which should be taken into account”, along with consideration of “whether the applicable procedures in the present case were such as to enable reasonable account to be taken of the degree of fault or care attributable to the applicant company or, at least, of the relationship between the company’s conduct and the breach of the law which undoubtedly occurred” and “whether the procedures in question afforded the applicant company a reasonable opportunity of putting its case to the responsible authorities” (emphasis added). The majority reiterate that “[i]n ascertaining whether these conditions were satisfied, a comprehensive view must be taken of the applicable procedures”.
As a matter of principle, I could not agree more. Without speculating as to the “care” (not the “degree of fault”!) attributable to the applicant company, and confining myself to the “reasonable opportunity of putting [the case] to the responsible authorities”, I can only note that such “reasonable opportunity”, in the instant case, encompassed the avenue of lodging a civil claim for compensation against the person responsible for the damage sustained by the applicant company. It has not been established (unlike in Vasilevski, cited above, see paragraph 6 above) that this avenue was futile.
8. Mandatory confiscation of crime-related property belonging to a third person is indeed a problematic tool. When the interests of such a third person are balanced against the public interest, this tool is not uncontroversial. It is indeed somewhat borderline. Nevertheless, in previous cases the Court did not rule out the use of this tool if there were, prima facie, realistic possibilities for the third person to obtain compensation for the damage sustained. Where a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was found in such cases, that finding was (almost) always fact-specific. This stance did not obstruct member States’ efforts to combat criminal activities such as drug trafficking.
None of us judges would like the present judgment – which may be a prime example of law as contemplated in the quiet confines of a legal library – to be one more tool which, in real life, could and would effectively run counter to these efforts and, by extension, to the public good.
Will this prove to be the case?

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Eccezione preliminare congiunse a meriti e respinse (Articolo 35-1 - l'Esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali) Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - la Privazione di proprietà Articolo 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà) danno Patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)



QUARTA SEZIONE







CAUSA DI B.K.M. LOJISTIK TASIMACILIK TICARET LIMITED SIRKETI C. SLOVENIA

(Richiesta n. 42079/12)







SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

17 gennaio 2017





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di B.K.M. Lojistik Tasimacilik Ticaret Limitò Sirketi c. la Slovenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
András Sajó, Presidente
Vincenzo A. De Gaetano,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Egidijus Kris?,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer,
Marko Bošnjak, giudici
e Marialena Tsirli, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 6 dicembre 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 42079/12) contro la Repubblica della Slovenia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con una società turca, OMISSIS (“la società di richiedente”), 12 aprile 2012.
2. La società di richiedente fu rappresentata con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica ad Istanbul. Il Governo di sloveno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. L. Bembi, ?Avvocato Statale.
3. La società di richiedente addusse che il sequestro del suo autocarro in procedimenti penali corrisposti ad un'interferenza illegale e sproporzionata con le sue proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. 30 agosto 2013 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
5. Nella conformità con Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Decide 44 degli Articoli di Corte, il Governo turco fu informato del loro diritto per presentare commenti scritto. Loro non si giovarono a di questo diritto.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
6. La società di richiedente B.K.M. Lojistik Tasimacilik Ticaret Limitò Sirketi ha la sua sede legale ad Istanbul.
7. Sul 2008 doganieri di 13 novembre si fermati e controllò l'autocarro della società di richiedente nel quale loro trovarono pacchi di contenuto ignoto. Una prova preliminare del contenuto rivelò che i pacchi contennero eroina. I doganieri informarono di conseguenza la polizia.
8. 14 novembre 2008 la polizia ispezionò l'autocarro e la sua roulotte e trovò 105 kg di eroina. Il conducente, un cittadino turco fu arrestato e fu detenuto. L'autocarro fu sequestrato e la roulotte ed i suoi beni divennero l'oggetto di una procedura di dogane. Su una data non specificata la società di richiedente ricevette documenti che abilitano i beni contenuti nella roulotte per essere consegnato alla loro destinazione. La roulotte fu ritornata alla società di richiedente. Successivamente, la polizia registrò un'azione di reclamo penale contro il conducente col Distretto di Ptuj l'Ufficio di Accusatore Statale.
9. 15 novembre 2008 il Distretto di Ptuj l'Ufficio di Accusatore Statale accusò il conducente con la produzione e trafficando di droghe illegali sotto Sezione 186(1) del Codice Penale. Il Distretto che Accusatore Statale ha richiesto inoltre che l'autocarro della società di richiedente sia confiscato sotto Sezione 186(5) del Codice Penale poiché si usava per il trasporto di droghe di narcotico illegali.
10. 25 novembre 2008 la società di richiedente chiese alla Corte distrettuale di Ptuj di offrirlo con la causa-archivio riguardo alle accuse contro il conducente. Investigò anche quando sarebbe stato in grado a proprietà di ripresa dell'autocarro sequestrato. 8 dicembre 2008 la corte informò la società di richiedente delle accuse contro il conducente. Informò inoltre la società di richiedente che l'autocarro era stato sequestrato in conformità con Sezione 220 del Diritto processuale penale Agisca letto in concomitanza con Sezione 186(5) del Codice Penale e che nessuna decisione potrebbe essere presa sul ritorno o il sequestro dell'autocarro sino ad una decisione sui meriti era stato emesso. 23 dicembre 2008 la società di richiedente informò la corte che oppose il Distretto la richiesta di Accusatore Statale per il sequestro dell'autocarro.
11. 29 dicembre 2008 la Corte distrettuale di Ptuj trovò il conducente colpevole di droga che traffica e lo condannò al reclusione di ' di nove anni. Ordinò che l'autocarro sia ritornato alla società di richiedente. Contenne che il sequestro era solamente possibile se una delle condizioni esponesse fuori nel secondo paragrafo di Sezione 73 del Codice Penale fu incontrato, vale a dire l'esistenza di ragioni della sicurezza generale o la moralità. La Corte distrettuale considerò che che la condizione non era stata soddisfatta, mentre prendendo in considerazione il fatto che non c'era nessuna indicazione che la società di richiedente ha conosciuto il trasporto del materiale illegale.
12. Sia il conducente e l'Accusatore Statale e più Alto fecero appello. In 21 maggio 2009 il Maribor Corte più Alta cambiò la sentenza di primo-istanza e, appellandosi su Sezioni 73(3) e 186(5) del Codice Penale, ordinò il sequestro dell'autocarro. Contenne che la struttura legislativa previde al riguardo per il sequestro obbligatorio in cause di reati penali e droga-relativi fin dalla natura del loro perpetrazione, la loro magnitudine e le conseguenze pericolose mandata a chiamare la proroga di misure coercitive a persone che non erano i perpetratore del reato penale, irrispettoso di se o non i proprietari del veicolo seppero che che stava trasportando il perpetratore. La Corte più Alta spiegò che nella conformità con Sezione 73(2) del Codice Penale, oggetti usati nel perpetrazione di un reato penale potrebbero essere confiscati anche, quando loro non appartennero al perpetratore, in finora come il diritto della terza parte chiedere danni dal perpetratore non fu colpito con ciò. Inoltre, Sezione 73(3) purché per la possibilità del sequestro obbligatorio in cause previste per con lo statuto. Così, Sezione 186(5) del Codice Penale quelle due disposizioni implementarono con offrendo il sequestro obbligatorio dei mezzi di trasporto usato per trasporto e deposito di sostanze illegali.
13. 17 luglio 2009 la società di richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale contro la decisione summenzionata ed un'iniziativa per revisione della costituzionalità di Sezione 186(5) del Codice Penale, adducendo una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà. Si lamentò in particolare che non aveva saputo che l'autocarro era usato per fini illegali, mentre aggiunse che la corte di primo-istanza aveva stabilito esplicitamente la sua non-coinvolgimento nel perpetrazione del reato penale in questione. Chiedendo che non aveva avuto una possibilità effettiva di ostacolare l'abuso della sua proprietà per fini penali, la società di richiedente sottolineò che l'autocarro era stato soggetto a controlli regolari che concernono le possibili modifiche di veicolo e compartimenti ignoti. Secondo la società di richiedente, la misura si lamentò così, di costituì una punizione ed un'interferenza ingiustificata e sproporzionata con la sua proprietà e che non aveva avuto l'opportunità di partecipare nei procedimenti penali.
14. 29 settembre 2011 la Corte Costituzionale respinse sia l'azione di reclamo costituzionale e l'iniziativa. Nel fare una rassegna la legislazione contestata, la Corte Costituzionale confermò la prospettiva della Corte più Alta che Sezione 186 del Codice Penale ha offerto per il sequestro obbligatorio di veicoli usata per il trasporto e deposito di droghe o sostanze illegali in sport, nonostante la loro proprietà. Secondo la Corte Costituzionale, reati penali e droga-riferiti sanzionarono sotto Sezione 186 del Codice Penale rappresentata un grande cattivo ed un grado estremamente alto di minaccia non solo dalla prospettiva dell'individuo, ma anche dalla prospettiva di società nell'insieme; il fine della misura contestata era ostacolare il perpetrazione di simile reati penali nel futuro e così proteggere gli importanti valori legali in società, come salute e la vita-specialmente di giovani persone. La Corte Costituzionale sottolineò che la natura dei reati penali in oggetto, la maniera nella quale loro furono commessi e le loro conseguenze giustificarono l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà di tutti i proprietari dei mezzi di trasporto usati per droga-trafficare, nonostante il loro coinvolgimento potenziale nelle attività penali in questione, aggiungendo che una regolamentazione diversa che governa il sequestro di beni diminuirebbe notevolmente le possibilità per ostacolare efficacemente i reati penali in oggetto.
15. Bilanciando gli interessi generali in oggetto coi diritti di proprietà della società di richiedente, la Corte Costituzionale sostenne che la misura si lamentò di non corrispose ad un'interferenza eccessiva nonostante il fatto che la società di richiedente non aveva avuto possibilità effettiva per ostacolare il cattivo uso della sua proprietà per fini penali e non aveva partecipato nel perpetrazione del reato penale. In questo collegamento, la Corte Costituzionale indicò, che la certezza legale richiese che ogni istanza di danno giuridicamente riconosciuto sia protegguta adeguatamente. Così, con virtù di Sezione 73(2) del Codice Penale, il sequestro non colpì il diritto di terze parti per chiedere il risarcimento dall'offensore. Sotto gli articoli generali di legge di illecito civile, il proprietario danneggiato aveva diritto ad esigere il risarcimento dalla persona responsabile per il danno. La Corte Costituzionale aggiunse che era per le corti regolari per stabilire in ogni causa individuale se tutti gli elementi richiesero per riconoscimento del danno allegato e così per pagamento del risarcimento furono adempiuti.
16. 29 giugno 2009 la Corte distrettuale di Ptuj informò nel frattempo, la società di richiedente che l'autocarro sarebbe stato venduto ad un'asta pubblica e che potesse presentare commenti scritto in questo riguardo. 6 luglio 2009 la società di richiedente rispose che era disposto a comprare l'autocarro confiscato. 20 ottobre 2011 l'ordine della corte la vendita dell'autocarro ed informato la società di richiedente al riguardo. 30 novembre 2011 l'autocarro fu venduto ad asta pubblica per 12,000 euros (“EUR”). Secondo il Governo l'autocarro fu venduto alla società di richiedente. In questo riguardo a, loro presentarono un documento che afferma che l'autocarro era stato venduto “B.K.M. LOJISTIK, TAS.VE TIC.LTD.STI”, una società da Istanbul. Comunque, la società di richiedente contestò che dichiarazione, adducendo che era un'altra società che aveva acquistato l'autocarro. Il Governo non rispose a questa osservazione.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
17. Facendo seguito ad Articolo 33 della Costituzione della Repubblica della Slovenia (in seguito: “la Costituzione”) il diritto a proprietà privata ed eredità è garantita. Sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 15 della Costituzione, la maniera nella quale sono esercitate diritti umani e le libertà fondamentali può essere regolata ogni qualvolta con legge la Costituzione così prevede o dove è necessario a causa della particolare natura di un diritto individuale o la libertà questo. Secondo Articolo 67(1) della Costituzione, la maniera nella quale proprietà è acquisita e è goduta è stabilita con legge così come assicurare la sua funzione economica, sociale ed ambientale.
18. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice Penale, come applicabile al tempo di materiale, posando in giù le condizioni sotto che, come una misura di sicurezza, il sequestro di articoli può essere imposto, legga siccome segue:

Le condizioni per la Richiesta di Misure di Sicurezza
Sezione 70
“(1) la corte può fare domanda uno o più sicurezza misura in riguardo del perpetratore di un reato penale che offre al riguardo le condizioni legali per la richiesta è incontrato.
(2) la revoca della patente di guida del perpetratore ed il sequestro di oggetti può essere ordinata se una pena detentiva, una frase sospesa o un avvertimento giudiziale è stato imposto su lui, o in causa del rinvio di una frase.
...”
Il sequestro di Oggetti
Sezione 73
“(1) oggetti usarono o intesero di essere usati, o guadagnò per il commettere di un reato penale può essere confiscato se loro appartengono al perpetratore.
(2) obietta sotto il paragrafo precedente può essere confiscato anche quando loro non appartengono al perpetratore se quel è richiesto per ragioni della sicurezza generale o la moralità e se i diritti di altre persone per chiedere danni dal perpetratore non sono colpiti con ciò.
(3) il sequestro obbligatorio di oggetti può essere offerto per con lo statuto anche se gli oggetti in oggetto non appartenga al perpetratore.
... ”
Prodotto illegale e Mestiere di Narcotico Droghe, Sostanze Illegali in Sport e Precursori per Fabbricare Narcotico Droghe
Sezione 186
“...
(5) narcotico droga o sostanze illegali in sport ed i mezzi del loro prodotto e vuole dire di trasporto usato per il trasporto e deposito di droghe o sostanze illegali in sport sarà sequestrato.”
19. Sotto divida in paragrafi 1 di Sezione 220 del Diritto processuale penale Agisca, articoli che saranno sequestrati in conformità col Codice Penale o quale può provare costituire prova in procedimenti penali deve essere sequestrato e deve essere consegnato alla corte per custodia o garantito in dell'altro modo. Sotto il quarto paragrafo di Sezione 220, agenti di polizia possono prendere questi articoli durante l'indagine se continuando Sezioni 148 e 164 del Diritto processuale penale Agiscono sotto. Nella conformità con Sezione 224 di che Atto, articoli sequestrati durante procedimenti penali devono essere ritornati al proprietario o possessore corrente se i procedimenti sono cessati e non ci sono motivi per loro per essere confiscato.
20. La gestione degli articoli sequestrò durante o nel collegamento con procedimenti penali è regolato col Decreto sulla Gestione di Articoli Sequestrati, Proprietà e Cauzione (in seguito: “il Decreto”). Facendo seguito a Sezione 9 del Decreto, articoli sequestrati possono essere ritornati al proprietario appena i motivi per la loro cessazione di confisca per esistere. Se non è possibile o permise di restituire gli articoli al proprietario, gli articoli devono essere venduti. Se non è possibile vendere gli articoli, la corte deve ordinare la loro distruzione o donazione per il pubblico buono. Prima di emettendo una decisione sulla vendita, la distruzione o donazione degli articoli, la corte otterrà l'opinione del proprietario di quegli articoli. Sotto il primo paragrafo di Sezione 11 del Decreto, la vendita deve essere condotta, facendo seguito alle disposizioni delle regolamentazioni che fanno domanda a procedimenti di esecuzione giudiziali.
21. Sotto divida in paragrafi 1 di Sezione 55 del Diritto internazionale Privato e Procedura Atto, corti nella Repubblica della Slovenia hanno giurisdizione in controversie che concernono la responsabilità non-contrattuale per danni in cause dove l'atto dannoso fu commesso sul territorio della Repubblica della Slovenia. In simile cause la legge di sloveno farà domanda (Sezione 30(1) di che Atto).
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
22. La società di richiedente si lamentò che il sequestro del suo autocarro corrispose ad un'interferenza illegale e sproporzionata con le sue proprietà sotto di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che quale legge:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
23. Il Governo obiettò che la società di richiedente era andata a vuoto ad esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali come sé non aveva portato un'azione per il risarcimento contro il conducente sotto Sezione 73 del Codice Penale e Sezioni 30 e 50 del Diritto internazionale Privato e Procedura Atto.
24. La società di richiedente contestò quel l'argomento.
25. La Corte indica che i principi generali riguardo all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali sono stati esposti recentemente fuori in Chiragov ed Altri c. l'Armenia ([GC], n. 13216/05, §§ 115-116 ECHR 2015). La Corte osserva in particolare che è per il richiedente per selezionare quale via di ricorso legale per perseguire per il fine di ottenere compensazione per le violazioni allegato dove c'è una scelta di via di ricorso disponibile al richiedente in riguardo di compensazione per una violazione allegato della Convenzione. Articolo 35 della Convenzione deve essere fatto domanda in una maniera che corrisponde alla realtà della situazione del richiedente per garantire la protezione effettiva dei diritti e le libertà nella Convenzione (veda, fra le altre autorità, Airey c. l'Irlanda, 9 ottobre 1979, § 23 la Serie Un n. 32, e R.B. c. l'Ungheria, n. 64602/12 § 60, 12 aprile 2016).
26. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, i costatazione di Corte che la questione di se un'azione per il risarcimento contro il conducente può essere considerata come relativo alla violazione allegato e come capace di offerta una via di ricorso effettiva all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione è collegato da vicino alla sostanza dell'azione di reclamo della società di richiedente. Di conseguenza, dovrebbe essere congiunto ai meriti.
27. La Corte nota che la richiesta non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) La società di richiedente
28. La società di richiedente si lamentò che il sequestro dell'autocarro che appartiene a sé era illegale, che non perseguì qualsiasi interesse pubblico e che era sproporzionato. Dibattè che le corti nazionali avevano fatto domanda arbitrariamente il diritto nazionale e senza prendere in considerazione la sua buon fede ed i suoi diritti di proprietà. Sottolineò che non aveva partecipato nel perpetrazione del reato penale e che non c'erano sbarre a restituendo l'autocarro. Il Codice Penale sarebbe dovuto essere interpretato come richiedendo solamente il sequestro in cause dove un autocarro è stato adattato per il perpetrazione del reato penale ed attinente. Nella prospettiva della società di richiedente, il sequestro dell'autocarro corrispose ad una sanzione penale per la lotta effettiva contro reati penali e droga-relativi. Infine, la società di richiedente addusse che autocarro era stato venduto ad un'altra società a vendita all'asta.
(b) Il Governo
29. Il Governo ammise che la confisca ed il sequestro dell'autocarro costituirono un'interferenza con le proprietà della società di richiedente. Durante il periodo della confisca la società di richiedente non era stata in grado usarlo e, perciò, la sua proprietà era stata controllata. Quando la decisione di sequestro della corte divenne definitivo, la società di richiedente aveva perso il suo titolo all'autocarro. Comunque, aveva riguadagnato questo diritto con acquistando l'autocarro a vendita all'asta.
30. Il Governo dibattè inoltre che l'autocarro era stato confiscato facendo seguito a Sezione 186(5) del Codice Penale come applicabile al tempo attinente. Sotto che disposizione, veicoli usati per il trasporto di droghe di narcotico dovevano essere sequestrati irrispettoso di chi il proprietario del veicolo era o se il proprietario del veicolo aveva agito in buon fede o se il veicolo aveva contenuto qualsiasi compartimenti ignoti per il trasporto di droghe. L'argomento della società di richiedente che l'autocarro sarebbe dovuto essere confiscato solamente se avesse avuto un spazio specialmente adattato per il trasporto e deposito di droghe non aveva ragione perciò. Inoltre, il sequestro era stato eseguito in conformità con gli articoli procedurali del Diritto processuale penale Agisca e la società di richiedente non aveva addotto che qualsiasi degli articoli procedurali era stato violato.
31. Il Governo notò che reati penali sotto Sezione 186 del Codice Penale erano punibile entro uno al reclusione di ' di dieci anni. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il perpetratore fu condannato al reclusione di ' di nove anni, pressocché il massimo della pena. Lui stava trasportando approssimativamente 100 kg di eroina nell'autocarro riguardato. Il Governo sottolineò che i reati penali assegnarono ad in Sezione 186 del Codice Penale costituì un grande cattivo posando una minaccia estremamente seria alla salute e la vita di individui. Era nell'interesse pubblico per ostacolare il perpetrazione di questo tipo di reato penale con decretando misure effettive. Con la misura in questione il legislatore ostacolare il perpetrazione di questo tipo di reato penale per ridurre la minaccia ai più importanti valori in società volle-salute umana e la vita. I perpetratore di simile reati penali non furono scoraggiati col fatto che loro non possedettero i mezzi di trasporto che loro hanno usato per per celare droghe illegali. Un'interferenza con la proprietà di terza persona formò inevitabilmente parte della lotta contro malavita per proteggere i valori più alti e beni di società umana. La natura di simile reati penali, la maniera nella quale loro furono commessi e le conseguenze loro avevano per la salute di persone e le vite giustificarono il sequestro obbligatorio di vuole dire di trasporto, nonostante la proprietà del vehicle(s) interessato. Potrebbe essere aspettatosi ragionevolmente che qualsiasi disposizione regolatore (e.g. sequestro obbligatorio solamente se i mezzi di trasporto fossero posseduti col perpetratore) diverso da quel fece domanda avrebbe ridotto notevolmente le possibilità per ostacolare efficacemente questi reati penali.
32. Il Governo sottolineò che solamente quelli mezzi di trasporto che era indispensabile per il perpetrazione del reato penale potessero essere soggetto al sequestro obbligatorio. Al giorno d'oggi causa che la roulotte non era soggetto al sequestro, e la società di richiedente era in grado recuperarlo dei giorni dopo l'evento. Ricevette anche presto dopo, documenti che abilitano i beni contenuti nella roulotte per essere consegnato alla loro destinazione.
33. Una terza parte in questione che aveva sofferto di danno a causa della misura potrebbe chiedere il risarcimento per simile danno dal perpetratore sotto Sezione 73(2 secondo il Governo,) del Codice Penale.
34. Infine, il Governo dibattè che a novembre 2011 la società di richiedente aveva ricomprato l'autocarro confiscato a vendita all'asta, mentre pagò EUR 12,000. Aveva avuto perciò un'opportunità di recuperare l'autocarro e si era avvalso di sé.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) L'articolo applicabile
35. Il Governo dibattè che ad un stadio preliminare la confisca dell'autocarro aveva costituito un controllo dell'uso di proprietà e, più tardi, seguendo la decisione di sequestro, la società di richiedente aveva infatti stato privato del suo titolo all'autocarro. Secondo il Governo la società di richiedente aveva riacquistato più tardi inoltre, l'autocarro a vendita all'asta, una dichiarazione che fu contestata con la società di richiedente.
36. La Corte indica che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono “distinto” nel senso di essere distaccato. Il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò nella luce del principio generale enunciata nel primo articolo (veda, fra molte autorità, AGOSI c. il Regno Unito, 24 ottobre 1986, § 48 la Serie Un n. 108, e Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. e Di Stefano c. l'Italia [GC], n. 38433/09, § 185 ECHR 2012).
37. La Corte ha su molte occasioni esaminato problemi che sorgono da misure di sequestro implementati in relazione ad una proprietà che è usata illegalmente e è stata mirata ad ostacolando il suo ulteriore uso illegale. Alcune di quelle cause comportarono sequestro degli incassi di un reato penale (productum sceleris) (veda, per esempio, Frizen c. la Russia, n. 58254/00, § 31, 24 marzo 2005, ed i riferimenti citati therein), altri il sequestro interessato delle cose che erano state l'oggetto del reato (objectum sceleris) (veda, per esempio, AGOSI, citato sopra, § 51, e, più recentemente, Sulejmani c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia, n. 74681/11, § 40 28 aprile 2016), ed ancora altri il sequestro di cose con vuole dire di che era stato commesso il reato (instrumentum sceleris). La causa presente incorre nella categoria seconda, come sé legislazione che prevede per il sequestro obbligatorio di instrumenta sceleris per il fine di prevenzione di ulteriore perpetrazione di crimine riguarda.
38. Come riguardi la questione sotto che articolo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che simile misure dovrebbero essere esaminate, la Corte ha in più cause che comportano instrumenta sceleris trovate che anche se la misura in questione aveva dato luogo ad una privazione di una proprietà, fu preso nell'interesse di una politica pubblica, come ostacolando droga trafficando. Perciò, costituì un'istanza di controllo dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che autorizza che Stati decretino “simile leggi come [loro ritengono] necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale” (veda, per esempio, Aria il Canada c. il Regno Unito, 5 maggio 1995 §§ 33 e 34, Serie Un n. 316 Un, e Yildirim c. l'Italia ((il dec.), n. 38602/02, 10 aprile 2003). Comunque, si nota che quelle sentenze concernerono restrizioni provvisorie sull'uso di proprietà (veda Aria Canada, citato sopra, § 33), o una possibilità di restituzione di proprietà (veda Yildirim, citato sopra). Con contrasto, al giorno d'oggi la causa il sequestro comportò un trapasso di proprietà permanente e la società di richiedente non aveva nessuna possibilità realistica di recuperare il suo autocarro. In questo collegamento, la Corte considera, che il sequestro di un strumento per il perpetrazione di reati penali da una terza parte non comporta lo stesso livello di urgenza come il sequestro di incassi od oggetti di un reato penale, visto dalla prospettiva di risposte di politica nell'interesse generale. Così, può nelle certe circostanze sia esaminato sotto la seconda frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 quale copre privazione di proprietà. Infatti, in una causa simile di Andonoski c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia (n. 16225/08, § 12 17 settembre 2015) che incluso il sequestro della macchina del richiedente usò nel commettere un reato penale, la Corte decise che la natura permanente della misura che comportò un trapasso di proprietà conclusivo, senza la possibilità di ricupero corrispose ad una privazione di proprietà (l'ibid., § 30). La Corte considera che lo stesso approccio dovrebbe essere adottato nella causa presente.
(b) Ottemperanza coi requisiti del secondo paragrafo
39. La Corte deve esaminare inoltre se l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà della società di richiedente fu giustificata sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un'interferenza per i fini di che paragrafo deve essere prescritto con legge e deve intraprendere uno o scopi più legittimi; in oltre, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo o scopi cercarono di essere compresi. Nelle altre parole, la Corte deve determinare, se un equilibrio fu previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale e l'interesse dell'individuo o individui riguardate (veda Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982 §§ 69 e 73, Serie Un n. 52, e James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 50 la Serie Un n. 98). Nel fare così lascia lo Stato un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo a sia a scegliendo i mezzi di esecuzione ed ad accertando se le conseguenze di esecuzione sono giustificate nell'interesse generale per il fine di realizzare l'oggetto della legge in oggetto (veda AGOSI, citato sopra, § 52, e Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 109 25 ottobre 2012).
40. Come riguardi la lotta contro mestiere di droga illegale, la Corte è acutamente consapevole dei problemi che confrontano Stati Contraenti nei loro sforzi di combattere il danno causati all'estero alle loro società per l'approvvigionamento di droghe da. Perciò, recognising il bisogno per le strategie effettive di ridurre droga trafficando, la Corte accetta che loro possono comportare conseguenze avverse per la proprietà di terza persona (veda Aria Canada, citato sopra, §§ 41-42, e C.M. c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 28078/95, ECHR 2001 VII).
41. In primo luogo, le parti non furono d'accordo su se il sequestro dell'autocarro fu prescritto con legge, la società di richiedente che dibatte che l'interpretazione della legislazione attinente data con le corti nazionali era arbitraria. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che la Corte più Alta e Corte Costituzionale sia considerato che il poi legislazione applicabile, notevolmente sezioni 73(3) e 186(5) del Codice Penale previsto per il sequestro obbligatorio dei mezzi di trasporto usato per il trasporto di droghe (veda divide in paragrafi 11 e 13 sopra). Nella sua decisione, la Corte Costituzionale confermò espressamente, che trasportando droghe illegali date luogo al sequestro obbligatorio di un veicolo nel quale le droghe furono trovate (veda paragrafo 14 sopra), e trovò la misura per essere coerente con la Costituzione. Effettivamente, nell'opinione della Corte, la disposizione di Sezione 186(5) del Codice Penale, come applicabile al tempo di materiale, legga in concomitanza con Sezione 73(3) quale lasciò spazio al sequestro obbligatorio di oggetti usato nel perpetrazione di un reato penale (veda paragrafo 18 sopra), non sostiene la dichiarazione della società di richiedente che il sequestro del suo autocarro era contaminato con arbitrarietà (veda, mutatis mutandis, Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 108 ECHR 2000 io). L'interferenza era così in conformità col diritto nazionale dello Stato rispondente.
42. Inoltre, la Corte accetta che l'interferenza si lamentò di intraprese lo scopo legittimo di ostacolare reati droga-relativi che posano una minaccia seria ad individui la salute di ' e la vita, un scopo che notifica l'interesse generale (veda Aria Canada, citato sopra, § 34; e C.M. c. la Francia, citato sopra).
43. Come riguardi, inoltre l'impressionante di un equilibrio equo fra i mezzi assunti con le autorità nazionali per il fine di ostacolare droga che traffica e la protezione dei diritti di proprietà della società di richiedente, la Corte reitera che simile equilibrio dipende da molti fattori, ed il comportamento del proprietario della proprietà è un elemento dell'interezza di circostanze che dovrebbero essere prese in considerazione (veda AGOSI, citato sopra, § 54). La Corte deve considerare se le procedure applicabili nella causa presente erano come per abilitare conto ragionevole per essere preso del grado di colpa o cura attribuibile alla società di richiedente o, almeno, della relazione fra la condotta della società e la violazione della legge che indubbiamente accadde; ed anche se le procedure in oggetto riconobbe la società di richiedente un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere la sua causa alle autorità responsabili (l'ibid. § 55). Nell'accertare se queste condizioni furono soddisfatte, una prospettiva comprensiva deve essere presa delle procedure applicabili (l'ibid.).
44. La Corte prima ha esaminato cause simili che comportano il sequestro di and/or di confisca di vuole dire di trasporto usato per fini illegali ed in più cause nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo trovata N.ro 1 per motivi che i richiedenti avevano avuto l'opportunità sufficiente di mettere le loro cause alle autorità nazionali e competenti e recuperare i beni sequestrò, conto ragionevole stato stato preso del loro comportamento (veda Aria Canada, citato sopra, §§ 44-47, C.M. c. la Francia, citato sopra, e Yildirim, citato sopra).
45. Al giorno d'oggi la causa la società di richiedente cercò di recuperare il suo autocarro e, a questa fine, impugnò il suo sequestro di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale dopo la decisione iniziale con la corte di primo-istanza restituirlo fu rovesciato facendo seguito al ricorso depositato con l'Accusatore Statale e più Alto. Comunque, contrari alle cause summenzionate, le istanze più alte interpretarono la legislazione nazionale ed attinente siccome comportando sequestro obbligatorio di qualsiasi veicolo usò per droga trafficare, nonostante la diligenza e la buon fede espose col proprietario. Di conseguenza, anche se non c'era nessuna indicazione che la società di richiedente era stata comportata nel perpetrazione del reato penale ed allegato o che aveva qualsiasi conoscenza delle attività illegali del suo conducente o che non era riuscito ad eseguire controlli regolari del veicolo, non aveva qualsiasi possibilità effettiva di garantire il ritorno del suo autocarro (veda divide in paragrafi 11-15 sopra). La legislazione nazionale ed attinente (Sezione 186(5) del Codice Penale, legga in concomitanza con Sezione 73(3)) così non prese nessun conto della relazione fra la condotta della società di richiedente ed il reato (veda Vasilevski c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia, n. 22653/08, § 57 28 aprile 2016).
46. Il Governo dibattè che la severità contestata della regolamentazione nazionale fu giustificata con la serietà di reati penali e droga-relativi. In prospettiva loro la natura di simile reati penali, la maniera nella quale loro furono commessi e le conseguenze loro avevano per la salute di persone e le vite giustificarono il sequestro obbligatorio dei mezzi di trasporto, nonostante proprietà e qualsiasi l'altra disposizione regolatore diminuirebbe notevolmente la possibilità di ostacolare efficacemente questi reati penali.
47. Ci può essere senza dubbio nell'opinione della Corte, che la protezione di salute umana e la vita-i motivi citarono come giustificazione per la misura-costringe azione decisiva da parte degli Stati Contraenti a ridurre droga riferita reati penali. Che detto, la confisca dei beni usata nel perpetrazione di simile reati può, come nella causa presente, imponga un carico significativo sulle terze parti a chi la proprietà appartiene. L'esercizio di bilanciare gli interessi generali di prevenzione delittuosa e la protezione dei diritti dell'individuo affettato (veda paragrafo 39 sopra ed Aria il Canada, citato sopra, § 36) in queste circostanze così vuole dire che imponendo tale carico sul proprietario della proprietà riguardato può essere giustificato solamente se il suo interesse nell'avere la proprietà ritornata a lui è vinto col rischio che il suo ritorno faciliterebbe droga che traffica e minerebbe la lotta contro malavita.
48. In questo collegamento, non sembra, che l'autocarro fu adattato per contrabbandare droghe, né è là qualsiasi incidenti precedenti causati con un insuccesso da parte della società di richiedente per impedire a spedizioni illegali dell'essere trasportato coi suoi veicoli in oggetto i quali solleverebbero la problema della propria responsabilità della società di richiedente per il perpetrazione del reato penale (veda, con contrasto, Aria il Canada, citato sopra, §§ 6 e 44). Questo, accoppiò col fatto che il conducente di autocarro fu dichiarato colpevole di droga che traffica e condannò al reclusione di ' di nove anni (veda paragrafo 11 sopra), proprio non lascia spazio alla conclusione che è probabile che l'autocarro sia usato di nuovo per trasportare sostanze illegali (veda, mutatis mutandis, Vasilevski citato sopra, § 58). Nella luce del sopra, la Corte va a vuoto a vedere è probabile che che effetti avversi si siano aspettati di essere il risultato del ritorno dell'autocarro al suo proprietario. Questo è particolarmente vero se, siccome dibattuto col Governo, la società di richiedente era in qualsiasi l'evento in grado ricomprare l'autocarro ad asta pubblica. Anche, presumendo che era davvero la società di richiedente che ha comprato l'autocarro alla vendita all'asta, la Corte indicherebbe che non si può considerare che questo abbia rimediato al danno causato a sé col sequestro, perché il reacquisition del veicolo era eventuale sul pagamento del prezzo raggiunto a vendita all'asta.
49. Perciò, nonostante il margine ampio della valutazione lasciato agli Stati Contraenti nella scelta di vuole dire mirato a combating il mestiere illegale in droghe, la Corte non può accettare che la natura indiscriminata della misura in questione fu giustificato con le circostanze della causa presente.
50. Inoltre, appellandosi su Sezione 73(2) del Codice Penale, il Governo sostenne, che la legislazione nazionale fornì alla società di richiedente un'opportunità effettiva di ottenere il risarcimento per la sua perdita patrimoniale chiedendolo dal conducente condannata per droga trafficato che era la parte responsabile per il danno la società subita. In una situazione simile la Corte prima ha sostenuto comunque, che una rivendicazione di risarcimento di questa natura comportò l'ulteriore incertezza per un proprietario in buona fede di proprietà confiscata perché è probabile che l'offensore sia trovato essere insolvente. La rivendicazione di risarcimento non fu contenuta per offrire l'opportunità sufficiente proprietari in buona fede per portare le loro cause di fronte alle autorità nazionali e competenti (veda Giocatore di bocce Unità Internazionale c. la Francia, n. 1946/06, §§ 44-45, 23 luglio 2009 e, mutatis mutandis, Vasilevski citato sopra, § 59). La natura generale dell'argomento addotta col Governo non offre una base sufficiente per la Corte per abbandonare dalle sue sentenze summenzionate.
51. Infine, come già determinato, la società di richiedente sta avendo la priorità obiettivo era il ricupero del veicolo. In questo collegamento, non sembra, che al tempo che l'azione di reclamo è stata depositata che è approssimativamente otto mesi dopo che il Codice Penale e nuovo divenne applicabile, là fu stabilito causa-legge nazionale sulla questione di se in cause di droga trafficare, i mezzi di trasporto che appartiene a terze parti erano anche essere confiscati obbligatoriamente. Alquanto sembra che l'azione di reclamo costituzionale della società di richiedente offrì la prima opportunità per la Corte Costituzionale per decidere sul problema e chiarificare la sfera dei proprietari di terzo-parte le scelte di ' con riguardo ad al sequestro dei loro veicoli nei procedimenti penali che coinvolgono droga trafficando. La Corte, reiterando che le via di ricorso sole che un richiedente è costretto ad esaurire sono quelle che riferiscono alle violazioni addotte e quali sono allo stesso tempo disponibile e sufficiente (veda Aquilina c. il Malta [GC], n. 25642/94, § 39 ECHR 1999-III), così prende la prospettiva che la scelta della società di richiedente di via di ricorso legali era ragionevole. Questo essere così, la Corte lo considera eccessivo costringere la società di richiedente ad imbarcare su un altro set di procedimenti contro il conducente dell'autocarro confiscato con lo scopo di recuperare una perdita che è stata il risultato delle azioni delle autorità nazionali. Perciò, l'eccezione del Governo della non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
52. Nella luce delle considerazioni sopra, la Corte prende la prospettiva che il sequestro obbligatorio del veicolo della società di richiedente, accoppiato con la mancanza di un'opportunità realistica di ottenere il risarcimento per la sua perdita non ha preso conto sufficiente degli interessi della società di richiedente. La Corte perciò i costatazione che nella causa presente un equilibrio equo non è stato previsto fra le richieste degli interessi generali del pubblico ed il diritto della società di richiedente a godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà e che il carico mise sulla società di richiedente era eccessivo.
53. Segue che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
54. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
55. La società di richiedente chiese in riguardo di danno patrimoniale:
(i) 7,500 lire turche (Tenti), equivalente ad EUR 2.490 per la tassa di veicolo pagata;
(l'ii) Provi 131,900.50, equivalente ad EUR 43,791 per il costo del veicolo più interesse ad un tasso commerciale;
(l'iii) EUR 60,000 per la perdita di profitto perché non era capace di usare il veicolo.
56. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione senza prevedere qualsiasi gli argomenti.
57. La Corte reitera che una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione le sue conseguenze in tale modo come ripristinare il più lontano possibile la situazione che esiste di fronte alla violazione (veda, per esempio, Brumrescu ?c. la Romania (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 28342/95, § 19 ECHR 2001 io, ed Iatridis c. la Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 32 ECHR 2000 XI).
58. Gli Stati Contraenti che sono parti ad una causa sono in principio libero scegliere i mezzi da che cosa loro si atterranno con una sentenza nella quale la Corte ha trovato una violazione. Questa discrezione come alla maniera di esecuzione di una sentenza la libertà di scelta che allega all'obbligo primario degli Stati Contraenti sotto la Convenzione per garantire i diritti e le libertà garantita riflette (Articolo 1). Se la natura della violazione lascia spazio a restitutio in integrum, è per lo Stato rispondente per effettuarlo. Se, d'altra parte legge nazionale non concede-o concede solamente parziale-riparazione per essere costituito le conseguenze della violazione, Articolo 41 conferisce poteri la Corte per riconoscere la vittima simile soddisfazione siccome sembra a sé per essere appropriato (veda Brumrescu?, citato sopra, § 20).
59. La Corte gode la certa discrezione nell'esercizio del potere conferito con Articolo 41, siccome è sopportato fuori con l'aggettivo “equo” e la frase “se necessario” nel suo testo (veda Guzzardi c. l'Italia, 6 novembre 1980, § 114 la Serie Un n. 39). Per determinare la soddisfazione equa ha riguardo ad alle particolari caratteristiche di ogni causa che può mandare a chiamare un'assegnazione di meno che il valore del danno effettivo subì o i costi e spese davvero incorsero in, o anche per nessuna assegnazione affatto.
60. Ci deve essere inoltre, un collegamento causale e chiaro fra il danno chiesto col richiedente e la violazione della Convenzione (veda, fra altri, Tenda c. il Regno Unito, n. 44277/98, § 47 24 giugno 2003). Per un'assegnazione il richiedente deve dimostrare così, essere reso in riguardo di danno patrimoniale, che c'è un collegamento causale fra la violazione e qualsiasi perdita finanziaria addusse (veda, per esempio, lo záložna di Družstevní Pria ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca (soddisfazione equa), n. 72034/01, § 9 21 gennaio 2010).
61. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte accetta che la società di richiedente soffrì di danno come un risultato di interferenza sproporzionata con le autorità coi suoi diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda paragrafo 52 sopra).
62. Comunque, la Corte non si confa con l'approccio della società di richiedente che dovrebbe essere compensato col costo di un autocarro nuovo (veda, mutatis mutandis, Alleanza Dell'ovest ed Est Limitò c. l'Ucraina, n. 19336/04, § 258 23 gennaio 2014). La Corte nota che l'autocarro del quale fu spossessata la società di richiedente non era nuovo. Fu acquistato nel 2007 e fu venduto ad un'asta pubblica nel 2011 per il prezzo di EUR 12,000 (veda paragrafo 16 sopra).
63. La Corte nota inoltre che la società di richiedente presentò gli scivoloni di trasferimento bancario riguardo al pagamento della tassa di veicolo. Il Governo non contestò questa prova.
64. Nella luce delle considerazioni precedenti, nell'il particolare avere riguardo ad a tutti i materiali probatori nella sua proprietà e nell'assenza di qualsiasi gli specifici argomenti dal Governo, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 14,490 che copre il costo del veicolo come la società di richiedente determinato all'asta pubblica ed il veicolo tassato, più qualsiasi tassa sulla quale può essere addebitabile quel l'importo.
65. Come riguardi il profitto perduto ed allegato, la Corte è consapevole delle difficoltà nel calcolare la perdita in circostanze dove simile profitto potesse fluttuare dovendo ad una varietà di fattori imprevedibili. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la società di richiedente valutò la perdita ad EUR 60,000, ma non presentò nessuna prova che indica come le sue operazioni di affari furono colpite col sequestro di autocarro suo. In questo collegamento, la Corte osserva, che la società di richiedente continuò i suoi affari dopo il sequestro dell'autocarro in oggetto, così non dovrebbe essere troppo difficile da mostrare qualsiasi calo potenziale nel profitto realizzò di periodo dopo il sequestro del suo autocarro in relazione al periodo realizzato di fronte a sé. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi documenti come dichiarazione dei redditi o i calcoli precisi che mostrano che il profitto della società di richiedente decrebbe come un risultato della misura si lamentò di, la Corte non è capace di rendere qualsiasi assegna sotto questo capo.
Costi di B. e spese
66. La società di richiedente chiese anche EUR 5,222 per costi e spese incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali e Prova 24,400, equivalente ad EUR 8,100.80 per quegli incorsi in di fronte alla Corte.
67. Il Governo non previde qualsiasi osservazioni in questo riguardo.
68. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum.
69. Con riguardo ad ai costi incorsi in nei procedimenti nazionali, la Corte osserva, che, la società di richiedente aveva esaurito le via di ricorso nazionali disponibile a sé sotto diritto nazionale prima di fare domanda alle istituzioni di Convenzione, poiché aveva partecipato nei procedimenti penali. La Corte accetta perciò che la società di richiedente incorse in spese nel chiedere compensazione per le violazioni della Convenzione per l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale (veda, Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. e Di Stefano, citato sopra, § 224).
70. La Corte nota inoltre che la società di richiedente concluse un accordo col suo avvocato per rappresentanza di fronte alla Corte secondo la quale TLR 24,400 saranno pagati all'avvocato con modo di parcella.
71. Avendo riguardo ad al materiale nella sua proprietà e la sua pratica attinente, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare una somma globale di EUR 7,000 la società di richiedente in riguardo di tutti i costi e spese.
Interesse di mora di C.
72. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Congiunge ai meriti, unanimamente l'eccezione del Governo di insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali e lo respinge;

2. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

3. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno,
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 14,490 (quattordici mila quattrocento e novanta euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 7,000 (sette mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

4. Respinge, unanimamente, il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 17 gennaio 2017, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Marialena Tsirli András Sajó
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudice Kris è ?annessa a questa sentenza.
A.S.
M.T.



OPINIONE CHE DISSENTE DI GIUDICE KRIS?
1. Se questa causa fosse stata la prima nella quale la Corte doveva esaminare il problema del sequestro obbligatorio di proprietà crimine-relativa che appartiene ad un terza persona, sarebbe stato piuttosto facile sostenere la sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione come il risultato logico di un esercizio in “puro” teoria legale. Se fosse stato il primo.
Comunque, non è.
Doveva essere detto che la causa-legge della Corte su questo problema manda a chiamare la più grande consistenza e raffinatura. Questa sentenza non sembra essere in linea con che parte della causa-legge della Corte che-nella mia opinione piuttosto ragionevolmente-concede un margine più ampio della valutazione per essere lasciato al membro Stati come alla scelta di vuole dire mirato a combating le attività di criminale più pericolose come droga trafficando.
2. In paragrafo 50, la maggioranza indica esattamente, che “una rivendicazione di risarcimento di questa natura comportò l'ulteriore incertezza per un proprietario in buona fede di proprietà confiscata perché è probabile che l'offensore sia trovato essere insolvente” e che in delle cause tale possibilità del risarcimento “non fu sostenuto per offrire l'opportunità sufficiente proprietari in buona fede per portare le loro cause di fronte alle autorità nazionali e competenti.”
In delle cause, ma non in tutti.
Alcune di queste cause (più notevolmente l'Aria il Canada c. il Regno Unito (5 maggio 1995, Serie Un n. 316 Un) ed AGOSI c. il Regno Unito (24 ottobre 1986, Serie Un n. 108)) è assegnato a nella sentenza. Ma c'è anche l'altra causa-legge che merita la più grande attenzione che ha ricevuto in questa sentenza. Io menzionerò solamente alcuni del molto il più grande numero di cause.
3. In Waldemar Nowakowski c. la Polonia (n. 55167/11, 24 luglio 2012) che non è assegnato ad a tutti nella sentenza presente (ci sono davvero, importanti differenze che riguarda i fatti fra che causa ed il presente uno), una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 si trovò perché il richiedente fu privato della sua proprietà che in che causa era una raccolta di braccio “di considerevole storico e presumibilmente anche valore finanziario”, “nella sua interezza.” Inoltre, le corti presero misure per assicurare che un museo pubblico acquisì la raccolta per libero, ma non riuscì a considerare “qualsiasi misure alternative che sarebbero potute essere prese per per alleviare il carico imposero sul richiedente, incluso con modo di chiedere registrazione della raccolta” (§§ 56 e 57).
Al giorno d'oggi la causa il sequestro degli oggetti nella proprietà del richiedente che è stata sequestrata inizialmente con le autorità era con nessuno mezzi come indiscriminato (veda paragrafo 8 della sentenza presente riguardo al ritorno alla società di richiedente della roulotte ed i beni contenuta in sé). Un autocarro è un autocarro. Non può essere confiscato altro che “nella sua interezza.” Può, a norma di legge, uno sia confiscato come instrumentum sceleris (usare il termine assunto nella sentenza) o non.
4. In Sulejmani c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia (n. 74681/11, § 41 28 aprile 2016) a che la maggioranza assegna solamente nel contesto del categorisation di oggetti confiscati come objectum sceleris (veda paragrafo 37 della sentenza presente), la Corte non trovò il sequestro obbligatorio della proprietà del richiedente per avere violato Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte si soddisfece che il richiedente aveva avuto alla sua disposizione una misura giuridica nella forma di una rivendicazione civile per il risarcimento contro la persona responsabile per il danno subito. Il richiedente “non spieghi il suo insuccesso per depositare tale rivendicazione” e “non dibattè che c'era qualsiasi impedimenti a lui che ricorrono a che viale o qualsiasi i dettagli... quali l'avrebbero reso inefficace nelle circostanze della causa.” Così, il sequestro obbligatorio dell'articolo in oggetto, come così, fu sostenuto con la Corte. Il problema come a se l'articolo confiscato sarebbe categorizzato come objectum sceleris o instrumentum sceleris, benché determinato della prominenza della Camera nella causa presente (veda paragrafo 37 della sentenza presente), non sembri essere di qualsiasi attinenza in Sulejmani.
Che che è attinente in Sulejmani, dalla prospettiva della causa presente, è che il richiedente nella causa presente, come quell'in Sulejmani aveva la possibilità di depositare una rivendicazione per il risarcimento contro l'offensore, in questa causa un (condannato) trafficante di droga. Ma, come il richiedente in Sulejmani, la società di richiedente non spiegò il suo insuccesso per depositare tale rivendicazione. Io non ho grande difficoltà nel concedendo e convenire con la maggioranza che che possibilità alla quale avrebbe richiesto la società di richiedente “imbarchi su un altro set di procedimenti”, non fa (almeno, non fortemente) sostenga le osservazioni del Governo come alla non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali disponibile alla società di richiedente (veda paragrafo 51 della sentenza; compari Sulejmani, §§ 26 e 27). Ma questa non è chiaramente una base sufficiente per trovare una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nella causa presente.
Sulejmani non concernè anche inoltre, qualsiasi cosa vicino drogare trafficando.
5. In Andonoski c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia (n. 16225/08, 17 settembre 2015) a che la maggioranza assegna solamente nel contesto del “articolo applicabile” (veda paragrafo 38 della sentenza presente), una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 stato trovato a causa della circostanza decisiva (“[l'i]in simile circostanze”, come affermò esplicitamente in paragrafo 40 di che sentenza) che la legislazione nazionale “non preveda per la possibilità di chiedere il risarcimento” per il sequestro obbligatorio di instrumentum sceleris (di nuovo, usare il termine assunto nella sentenza); in oltre, la Corte prese noti che il Governo “non preveda qualsiasi illustrazione di pratica nazionale che dimostrerebbe che una rivendicazione di risarcimento... era disponibile, affitti effettivo da solo, in circostanze simili alla causa del richiedente” (§ 39).
Al giorno d'oggi causa, comunque l'opportunità per il richiedente di chiedere il risarcimento dall'offensore che è il conducente condannò per droga trafficato, era ovvio. Nella conformità con l'interpretazione della legislazione di sloveno della Corte Costituzionale di che Stato, il sequestro dell'autocarro “non colpisca” il diritto della società di richiedente per chiedere simile risarcimento. Che che è più, la società di richiedente non solo aveva il diritto ma anche la possibilità-da adesso l'opportunità effettiva-esigere il risarcimento dalla persona responsabile per il danno subì (veda paragrafo 15 della sentenza).
6. In Vasilevski c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia (n. 22653/08, 28 aprile 2016) una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 fu trovato anche a causa dell'inefficacia, in pratica della rivendicazione per risarcimento che il richiedente avrebbe potuto depositare contro le persone le cui azioni avevano provocato il danno lui subì. Io ho paura che il parallelo fra la causa presente e Vasilevski, siccome disegnato nella sentenza, sta fuorviando. Prominenza è data al fatto che, come in Vasilevski, “[il t]he legislazione nazionale ed attinente... non preso nessun conto della relazione fra la condotta della società di richiedente ed il reato”, così come al fatto che, come in Vasilevski, non era probabile “che il [confiscò] è probabile che autocarro sia usato di nuovo per trasportare sostanze illegali” l'aveva stato ritornato alla società di richiedente (veda divide in paragrafi 45 e 48 della sentenza). Vasilevski si è appellato finora anche, su con la maggioranza in come “[rivendicazione di risarcimento di t]he non fu contenuta per offrire l'opportunità sufficiente proprietari in buona fede per portare le loro cause di fronte alle autorità nazionali e competenti”; lo stato di maggioranza che “[t]he che natura generale dell'argomento ha addotto col Governo non offre una base sufficiente per la Corte per abbandonare dalle sue sentenze menzionate e sopra” (veda paragrafo 50).
Comunque che che è attinente in Vasilevski per la causa presente non è dell'apparente parallelo ma la differenza che riguarda i fatti e decisiva fra le due cause. In Vasilevski, la possibilità per il richiedente di chiedere il risarcimento da una persona fisica o una società, responsabile per il danno subita, era illusorio. Il “le particolari circostanze del... causa” rese che possibilità inefficace. La persona fisica contro chi simile rivendicazioni potrebbero essere depositate “era morto... prima che l'autocarro fu confiscato dal richiedente”, “nessuno informazioni erano disponibili come al dove dei suoi eredi e se loro potrebbero essere contenuti responsabili sotto gli articoli applicabili”, ed il Governo non aveva presentato la Corte con “qualsiasi illustrazione di pratica nazionale che ha mostrato che una rivendicazione contro eredi di un venditore deceduto... era stato effettivo in circostanze simili alla causa del richiedente.” Come alla società contro chi le rivendicazioni potrebbero essere depositate, sé “aveva cessato esistere prima il [l'oggetto in oggetto] era stato confiscato da [il richiedente]” (§§ 59 e 60).
Nulla di questo genere è evidente dall'archivio nella causa presente. Per rifiutare la presunzione della disponibilità del risarcimento dall'offensore effettivo e concludere che l'opportunità per la società di richiedente di chiedere il risarcimento dal (condannato) trafficante di droga non era “sufficiente” (veda paragrafo 50), la maggioranza avrebbe dovuto esaminare se l'allegato “l'ulteriore incertezza” davvero scaturì dai fatti della causa. Nessuno simile considerazione è trovata nella sentenza. Invece, la Camera è soddisfatta col fatto-insensibile “la coperta” la dichiarazione che “[t]he che natura generale dell'argomento ha addotto col Governo non offre una base sufficiente per la Corte per abbandonare dalle sue sentenze summenzionate” (l'ibid.).
7. In paragrafo 43, la maggioranza cita AGOSI (citò sopra, §§ 54 e 55) e reitera che il “equilibrio equo fra i mezzi assunti con le autorità nazionali per il fine di ostacolare droga che traffica e la protezione dei diritti di proprietà della società di richiedente... dipende da molti fattori, ed il comportamento del proprietario della proprietà è un elemento dell'interezza di circostanze che dovrebbero essere prese in considerazione”, insieme alla considerazione di “se le procedure applicabili nella causa presente erano come per abilitare conto ragionevole per essere preso del grado di colpa o cura attribuibile alla società di richiedente o, almeno, della relazione fra la condotta della società e la violazione della legge che indubbiamente accadde” e “se le procedure in oggetto riconobbe la società di richiedente un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere la sua causa alle autorità responsabili” (enfasi aggiunse). La maggioranza reitera che “[i]n che accerta se queste condizioni furono soddisfatte, una prospettiva comprensiva deve essere presa delle procedure applicabili.”
Come una questione di principio, io non potevo dire di sì più. Senza speculare come al “la cura” (non il “grado di colpa”!) attribuibile alla società di richiedente, e confinandosi al “l'opportunità ragionevole di fissare [la causa] alle autorità responsabili”, io posso notare solamente che simile “l'opportunità ragionevole”, nella causa presente, incluse il viale di depositare una rivendicazione civile per il risarcimento contro la persona responsabile per il danno subito con la società di richiedente. Non è stato stabilito (diversamente da in Vasilevski, citato sopra, veda paragrafo 6 sopra) che questo viale era futile.
8. Il sequestro obbligatorio di proprietà crimine-relativa che appartiene ad un terza persona è davvero un attrezzo problematico. Quando gli interessi di tale terza persona sono bilanciati contro l'interesse pubblico, questo attrezzo non è uncontroversial. È davvero piuttosto linea di demarcazione. In cause precedenti la Corte non decise ciononostante, fuori l'uso di questo attrezzo se c'era, prima facie, possibilità realistiche per il terza persona di ottenere il risarcimento per il danno subirono. Dove una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 stato trovato in simile cause che trovare era (pressocché) sempre fatto-specifico. Questa posizione non ostruì membro Stati gli sforzi di ' di combattere le attività penali come droga trafficando.
Nessuno di noi a giudici piacerebbe la sentenza presente-quale può essere un primo esempio di legge siccome contemplato nei confini quieti di una biblioteca legale-essere un più attrezzo che, nella vera vita, poteva e correrebbe efficacemente cassa a questi sforzi e, con proroga, al pubblico buono.
Questo proverà la causa per essere?




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 20/02/2020.