Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF PETAR MATAS v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,P1-1

NUMERO: 40581/12/2016
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 04/10/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property) Just satisfaction dismissed (out of time) (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)



SECOND SECTION







CASE OF PETAR MATAS v. CROATIA

(Application no. 40581/12)









JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

4 October 2016







This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Petar Matas v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
I??l Karaka?, President,
Nebojša Vu?ini?,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Gri?co,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
Georges Ravarani, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 30 August 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 40581/12) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 14 June 2012.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Split. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicant complained of an allegedly unlawful and unreasonable restriction of his property rights in respect of a commercial building by the application of measures of preventive protection relating to cultural heritage, contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 9 February 2015 the above complaint was communicated to the Government, and the remainder of the application was declared inadmissible, pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1953 and lives in Split.
6. The applicant is the owner of a commercial building in Split, which he uses as a car repair workshop. The building in issue was bought from the State in 2001. At the time of purchase, no limitation on its use was registered or apparent.
7. On 28 March 2003 the Split Department for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage (Ministarstvo kulture, Uprava za zaštitu kulturne baštine, Konzervatorski odjel u Splitu, hereafter “the Split Department”) ordered a measure of preventive protection relating to cultural heritage with regard to the applicant’s building, pending the final evaluation of its cultural value. It explained that the building, which was being used as a car repair workshop at that point, appeared to be a rare example of early industrial architecture in Split, and therefore this warranted a measure limiting its use by the applicant. Under section 10 of the Protection and Preservation of Cultural Heritage Act (Zakon o zaštiti i o?uvanju kulturnih dobara, hereafter “the Cultural Heritage Act”) the measure would remain in place for a period of three years, and, in accordance with section 11 of the same Act, would afford the same protection as a final protective measure (see paragraph 21 below).
8. The decision ordering the preventive protection was not transmitted to the applicant. It was forwarded to the land registry of the Split Municipal Court (Op?inski sud u Splitu) and duly registered in the land register.
9. On 10 January 2007, after the expiry of the three-year period, the Split Department again ordered a measure of preventive protection with regard to the applicant’s commercial building, reiterating the same grounds as those specified in its previous decision.
10. The applicant was not informed of the above decision relating to the second measure of preventive protection in respect of his building. On 3 September 2007 the measure was registered in the land register.
11. On 16 October 2007, after becoming aware of the second measure of preventive protection following an enquiry with the land registry, the applicant challenged the extended application of that measure before the Ministry of Culture (Ministarstvo culture, hereafter “the Ministry”). He contended, in particular, that he had not been informed of the decision ordering the preventive protection, and that the protection could no longer be ordered, since the maximum duration of such a measure under the Cultural Heritage Act was three years. The applicant also enquired about compensation in respect of the pecuniary damage he had sustained as a result of the measure of preventive protection.
12. On 8 January 2008 the Split Department forwarded the applicant’s appeal to the Ministry. It stressed that the decision of 10 January 2007 extending the preventive protection after the expiry of the first three-year period had been necessary, owing to the fact that it had not been possible to obtain an excerpt from the land register from the Split Municipal Court, and that the building represented an important example of early industrial architecture in Split.
13. On 31 January 2008 the Ministry dismissed the applicant’s appeal as unfounded, on the grounds that there was nothing in the law preventing the competent authority from applying the measure twice for periods of three years, and that the measure of preventive protection had not limited the applicant’s ownership rights. It also pointed out that it was necessary to extend the preventive protection in respect of the building, as the determination of its heritage value required further comprehensive assessment.
14. On 9 March 2008 the applicant lodged an administrative action in the Administrative Court (Upravni sud Republike Hrvatske), challenging the lawfulness and reasonableness of the measure of preventive protection, and emphasising the passivity of the competent authorities in finally resolving the matter. He also contended that the decisions of the lower authorities had been arbitrary. He pointed out that, contrary to what the Ministry had stated, his ownership rights had been significantly limited, as his freedom to deal with the property as he wished had been restricted. In particular, his several attempts to sell the building and set up another business cooperation had failed, owing to the existing preventive protection. The applicant also asked the Administrative Court to award him 200,000 euros (EUR) in respect of the damage he had sustained as a result of the conduct of the administrative authorities.
15. Meanwhile, the Split Department found that the applicant’s building should not be registered as an object of cultural heritage. On 15 April 2010, after the expiry of the measure of preventive protection, the Split Municipal Court ordered that the entry concerning the measure be deleted from the land register.
16. On 18 May 2011 the Administrative Court dismissed the applicant’s administrative action as unfounded, endorsing the reasoning of the lower authorities. In particular, it pointed out that there had been solid evidence suggesting that the building was an important object of cultural heritage, and that the measure of preventive protection was therefore justified given the need to carry out further assessments. Moreover, the Administrative Court considered that nothing in the relevant domestic law prevented the adoption of the second decision on preventive protection following the expiry of the first three-year time-limit.
17. On 10 September 2011 the applicant lodged a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske), complaining of a violation of his property rights under Article 48 of the Constitution with regard to the allegedly unlawful and unreasonable application of the measure of preventive protection in respect of his property.
18. On 14 December 2011 the Constitutional Court declared the applicant’s constitutional complaint inadmissible as manifestly ill-founded.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Constitution
19. The relevant provision of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette nos. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998, 113/2000, 124/2000, 28/2001, 41/2001, 55/2001, 76/2010, 85/2010 and 5/2014) reads:
Article 48
“The right of ownership shall be guaranteed ... ”
B. The Cultural Heritage Act
20. The relevant provisions of the Protection and Preservation of Cultural Heritage Act (Zakon o zaštiti i o?uvanju kulturnih dobara, Official Gazette, nos. 69/1999, 151/2003 and 157/2003) provide:
Preventive protection
Section 10
“Objects presumed capable of being of cultural benefit may be the subject of provisional decisions ordering preventive protection. ...
The period of preventive protection runs until the adoption of the [decision finally determining the status of an object of cultural heritage], but may not last longer than three years, ...
If, by the expiry of the time-limit referred to in paragraph 3 of this section, the decision determining the [heritage] status of a cultural object has not been adopted, the decision ordering preventive protection ceases to be valid. ...”
Section 11
“This Act, and all the provisions concerning the protection of objects of cultural heritage, are applicable to [matters relating to] an object which is under the preventive protection. ...”
21. The Cultural Heritage Act further provides for different obligations on the part of owners of objects of cultural heritage; in particular, the duty of care, protection and maintenance, and the duty to allow free access and the taking of further measurements in relation to the research and assessment of the objects (section 20). The owner of such an object is obliged to bear all expenses relating to the protection and preservation of the object, save for possible extraordinary expenses, which may be claimed from the Ministry (section 22). An owner who duly complies with the requirements of the Cultural Heritage Act may claim compensation for the restriction of his or her property rights, different tax and customs benefits and expert guidance concerning the use of the object of cultural heritage (sections 24-26).
22. The specific restrictions on property rights in respect of objects relevant to cultural heritage which may be imposed under the Cultural Heritage Act are enumerated in sections 27-42. These restrictions include:
(a) restrictions with regard to possession, particularly with regard to the duty to allow free access to the object for the purpose of research and assessment, where compensation may be claimed only if it can be proven that damage has been sustained;
(b) restrictions with regard to the use of objects, and in particular the obligation on the part of the owner to seek prior permission for any change in the nature of use of the object; and
(c) restrictions with regard to the transfer of property where the State has a right of pre-emption. An object of cultural heritage may also be expropriated in the interests of the State (section 41).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
23. The applicant complained of an allegedly unlawful and unreasonable restriction of his property rights in respect of a commercial building by the application of measures of preventive protection relating to cultural heritage. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ arguments
24. The Government argued that the applicant had failed to ask the Ministry to award him compensation for the restriction of his property rights by the application of the measure of preventive protection, as set out in the Cultural Heritage Act (see paragraphs 21-22 above). He had therefore failed to avail himself of an effective legal avenue whereby the question of the reasonableness of the restriction of his property rights could have been assessed.
25. The applicant maintained that he had properly exhausted the domestic remedies by pursuing his complaints before the administrative and judicial authorities concerning the application of the measure of preventive protection with regard to his building.
2. The Court’s assessment
26. The Court reiterates that the rule on exhaustion of domestic remedies under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention requires that complaints intended to be made subsequently in Strasbourg should have been made to the appropriate domestic body, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law (see Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia (preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, § 72, 25 March 2014).
27. With regard to the case in issue, the Court notes that the central tenet of the applicant’s complaint is the allegedly unlawful and unjustified interference with his property rights by the application of the measure of preventive protection with regard to his building. In respect of that complaint, the applicant duly pursued all available legal remedies before the administrative and judicial authorities, and he also lodged a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 11, 14 and 16 above). Moreover, contrary to what the Government have asserted, the applicant asked for compensation for the pecuniary damage he had sustained as a result of the application of the measure of preventive protection, before both the Ministry and the Administrative Court (see paragraphs 11 and 14 above).
28. In view of the above, the Court finds that the applicant properly exhausted the domestic remedies. The Government’s objection should therefore be rejected.
29. The Court further notes that the applicant’s complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It also notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ arguments
(a) The applicant
30. The applicant contended that, whereas he could have accepted that the first measure of preventive protection had been necessary in order to assess the value of his building with regard to cultural heritage, the second measure had been unlawful and unjustified. In particular, in his view, the second decision to apply the measure had been adopted contrary to section 10 of the Cultural Heritage Act, which clearly provided for the possibility of applying a measure of preventive protection for a period of only three years. In his case, the measure had been applied for two three-year periods, which had been contrary to the relevant domestic law, and also unnecessary and disproportionate. The applicant further contended that the application of the measure of preventive protection had imposed a number of restrictions on his property rights. It had also discouraged investors from investing in his projects concerning the reconstruction of the building. In that connection, the applicant provided outlines of the projects which had apparently been abandoned owing to the application of the measure of preventive protection.
(b) The Government
31. The Government conceded an interference with the applicant’s property rights by the application of the measure of preventive protection with regard to his building. They submitted that such an interference had been lawful, had pursued a legitimate aim of the protection of cultural heritage, and had not imposed an excessive individual burden on the applicant. This was particularly true given the need to identify and protect objects of early industrial architecture in Split, and the fact that the applicant’s building had been only one of twelve objects in respect of which substantial research and assessment had been carried out in order to determine heritage value. However, following the necessary research, it had been determined that the applicant’s building should not be registered as an object of cultural heritage. The Government further contended that, although preventive protection implied the applicability of other measures protecting cultural heritage under the Cultural Heritage Act, the only true restriction on the applicant’s property rights had been the right of pre-emption established in favour of the State. In this connection, the Government also submitted that there was arguably nothing supporting the applicant’s arguments that he had abandoned certain investment projects owing to the application of the measure of preventive protection.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether there has been interference with the applicant’s possession
32. In the present case, the Government admitted that there had been interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions (see paragraph 31 above), and the Court cannot discern any reason to hold otherwise. It notes that the application of the measure of preventive protection in respect of the applicant’s building did not deprive him of his possession, but put in place restrictions regarding the use of that possession; hence, it may be regarded as a measure to control the use of property (see, mutatis mutandis, Valette and Doherier v. France (dec.), no. 6054/10, § 17, 29 November 2011).
(b) Whether the interference was prescribed by law
33. The Court notes that the impugned second measure of preventive protection concerning the applicant’s building was based on section 10 of the Cultural Heritage Act, which provided for the possibility of applying a measure of preventive protection for a period of three years with regard to objects capable of being declared objects of cultural heritage (see paragraph 20 above). The parties’ views differ as to whether this provision limited the possibility of applying a measure of preventive protection to one period of three years, or whether such a measure could have been applied for additional three-year periods. The applicant submitted that section 10 of the Cultural Heritage Act was clear that a measure of preventive protection could only be applied for one period of three years, whereas the Government supported the views of the domestic authorities, according to which there was nothing in the relevant domestic law preventing a measure of preventive protection from being applied for multiple periods of three years.
34. The Court reiterates, as it has held on many occasions, that it is not its task to resolve problems of interpretation of domestic law; its role is confined to ascertaining whether the effects of such an interpretation are compatible with the Convention (see, for instance, Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, § 113, ECHR 2014). In these circumstances, noting that it is in the first place for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law (see Pine Valley Developments Ltd and Others v. Ireland, 29 November 1991, § 52, Series A no. 222), the Court will proceed on the assumption that the interference with the applicant’s property was lawful, and examine whether it pursued a legitimate aim and struck a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 68-69, Series A no. 52).
(c) Whether the interference pursued a legitimate aim
35. The Court has already held that the conservation of cultural heritage and, where appropriate, its sustainable use, pursue a legitimate aim of the maintenance of a certain quality of life, the preservation of the historical, cultural and artistic roots of a region and its inhabitants, and as such, they are an essential value, the protection and promotion of which are incumbent on the public authorities (see Kozac?o?lu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, § 54, 19 February 2009, and Potomska and Potomski v. Poland, no. 33949/05, § 64, 29 March 2011).
(d) Proportionality of the interference
36. The general principles regarding the assessment of the proportionality of an interference with property rights in relation to cultural heritage issues are set out in the Potomska and Potomski case (see Potomska and Potomski, cited above, § 67).
37. The Court notes that, in the instant case, there was nothing to indicate that measures of protection relating to cultural heritage could be applied in respect of the building at the time the applicant purchased it for commercial use (compare Potomska and Potomski, cited above, § 68, and, by contrast, Fürst von Thurn und Taxis v. Germany (dec.), no. 26367/10, § 24, 14 May 2013). There is also no doubt that the authorities were aware that the building had been bought by the applicant for commercial use (see paragraph 6 above).
38. The central aspect of the applicant’s complaint concerns the legal effects on the status of his property flowing from the Split Department’s decision of 10 January 2007. By that decision, the Split Department extended the application of the measure of preventive protection relating to cultural heritage concerning the applicant’s building for a further period of three years. In total, this amounted to a period of six years during which the applicant’s building was subject to preventive protection (see paragraphs 7 and 9 above).
39. The Court notes that the preventive protection under the relevant domestic law entailed a number of significant restrictions on the applicant’s use of the property, including its commercial use as he saw fit. There is no dispute between the parties that, under section 11 of the Cultural Heritage Act, the effects of preventive protection were akin to those of protection following a final determination on the status of an object’s cultural heritage (see paragraph 20 above). In particular, those effects included restrictions with regard to the use of objects, and obligations on the part of owners to seek prior permission for any change in the nature of use of objects. There were also restrictions with regard to the transfer of property where the State had a right of pre-emption. Moreover, under the Cultural Heritage Act, an object of cultural heritage could be expropriated in the interests of the State (see paragraph 22 above). The Court observes that, during the proceedings before the domestic authorities, the applicant referred to the adverse effect of these restrictions on his commercial projects concerning the building, which is consonant with his arguments and evidence put before the Court (see paragraph 14 above, and compare, by contrast, Valette and Doherier, cited above, § 20).
40. The Court considers that the restriction on the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions by the application of the measure of preventive protection is not open to criticism per se, having regard in particular to the legitimate aim pursued and the wide margin of appreciation allowed to the State where cultural heritage issues are concerned (see SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy v. France (dec.), no. 61093/00, ECHR 2005 XIII extracts). However, in its assessment of the proportionality of the measure complained of, the Court has reservations about two aspects of the domestic authorities’ conduct in the applicant’s case.
41. Firstly, although undoubtedly the assessment of the value of an object with regard to cultural heritage may require complex and lengthy assessments and studies, the Court notes that there is no indication in the case in issue that any measurements, assessments or studies in relation to the value of the applicant’s building with regard to cultural heritage – which would have justified the application of the measure of preventive protection for the period of six years – were actually taken or conducted (compare, by contrast, SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy, cited above). Indeed, the only reason cited by the Split Department during the proceedings to justify such a protracted application of the measure of preventive protection was its alleged inability to obtain an excerpt from the land register from Split Municipal Court concerning the building (see paragraph 12 above).
42. However, given that land registry data are public information – readily obtainable by other means, including via the Internet – and that there is no indication that the Split Department actually made a serious attempt to obtain that information and failed, the Court cannot accept the reason invoked as a justification for the application of the measure of preventive protection for the period of six years. In any case, the Court considers that the applicant should not have to bear any adverse consequences as a result of the alleged impossibility of the competent State bodies to coordinate their relevant actions in deciding on the matters affecting his property rights.
43. In this connection, the Court would reiterate the particular importance of the principle of “good governance”, which requires that, where an issue in the general interest is at stake, in particular when the matter affects fundamental human rights such as those involving property, the public authorities must act in good time and in an appropriate and, above all, consistent manner (see, amongst others, Bogdel v. Lithuania, no. 41248/06, § 65, 26 November 2013). In the case in issue, the Court finds that the domestic authorities failed to act in a manner consonant with the necessity to protect the applicant’s property rights and to resolve the issues pertinent to the property status of his building in a timely manner.
44. Secondly, the Court notes several procedural omissions relating to the manner in which the domestic authorities conducted the proceedings in the applicant’s case. The Court reiterates that, although Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements, the proceedings in issue must afford the individual a reasonable opportunity to put his or her case to the relevant authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision. In ascertaining whether this condition has been satisfied, the Court takes a comprehensive view (see, for instance, Zehentner v. Austria, no. 20082/02, § 73, 16 July 2009).
45. In this respect, the Court notes that, when ordering the measures of preventive protection on 28 March 2003 and 10 January 2007, the Split Department did not inform the applicant of the necessity to order those measures, nor did it transmit its decisions to the applicant. It therefore failed to take into account his views on the matter and the impact on his property rights which the application of the measures of preventive protection would have. At the same time, there is no doubt that the Split Department knew or should have known that the applicant owned the building, since in its decisions it referred to the fact that the building was used as a car repair workshop (see paragraph 7 above) at that point in time, and the applicant’s ownership was registered with the land registry.
46. Furthermore, the Court notes that, despite the applicant’s clear arguments as to the effects of the restrictions on his property rights, in particular regarding his commercial projects concerning the building (see paragraph 14 above), the Administrative Court limited its assessment to the question of the possible relevance of the building to cultural heritage, without conducting any assessment of whether the protracted application of the measures had disproportionately affected the applicant’s property rights. It also failed to address the applicant’s complaint of the competent authorities’ passivity with regard to finally resolving the matter. Those omissions of the Administrative Court were not remedied by the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 16 and 18 above).
47. Having regard to all the above factors, the Court finds that the domestic authorities’ interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions fell short of the requirements of the protection of his right of property under the Convention.
48. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
49. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
50. In his initial application, the applicant claimed EUR 15,000 in respect of damages and EUR 1,500 in respect of costs and expenses, plus the relevant statutory interest. In his further submissions to the Court, the applicant referred to his claim and stressed that he could not give any further details about the actual damage he had sustained, which had certainly been significant.
51. The Government pointed out that the applicant had failed to specify his just satisfaction claim in accordance with Rule 60 of the Rules of Court. They therefore submitted that there was no call to award him any amount in that respect.
52. The Court notes that under Rule 60 § 2 of the Rules of Court an applicant must submit itemised particulars of all claims, together with any relevant supporting documents, within the time-limit fixed for the submission of the applicant’s observations on the merits. If the applicant fails to comply with these requirements, the Court may reject the claim in whole or in part (Rules 60 § 3 and 71). In its letter dated 4 June 2015 the Court drew the applicant’s attention to the fact that these requirements applied even if he had indicated his wishes concerning just satisfaction at an earlier stage of the proceedings.
53. The Court notes in the case at issue that the applicant failed to submit and specify his just satisfaction claim, within the time-limit fixed therefor. The Court therefore, having regard to Rule 60, makes no award under Article 41 of the Convention (see, for instance, Schatschaschwili v. Germany [GC], no. 9154/10, §§ 169-170, ECHR 2015).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares, by a majority, the application admissible;

2. Holds, by five votes to two, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Dismisses, unanimously, the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 4 October 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith I??l Karaka?
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judges Lemmens and Ravarani is annexed to this judgment.
A.I.K.
S.H.N.


JOINT DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES LEMMENS AND RAVARANI
1. To our regret, we cannot agree with the majority’s finding that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in the present case. In our opinion, the complaint should have been declared inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies and is in any event unfounded.
2. First of all, we think that it is important to highlight the principal facts.
There were two consecutive measures of provisional protection of the applicant’s building, one valid from 28 March 2003 until 27 March 2006, the other from 10 January 2007 until 9 January 2010 (see paragraphs 7 and 9 of the judgment). The applicant’s building was each time protected together with eleven other buildings. The impugned measures were thus part of a quite wide-ranging operation undertaken at the time by the Split Department for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage. The Government explained that protection of the industrial heritage had only in the last two decades become a matter of concern in Croatia, and that nothing had been done in the Split area before the twelve measures of provisional protection were taken. Eventually, protection was maintained for some of these buildings, but not for the applicant’s.
The applicant undertook no action against the first measure, ordered on 28 March 2003. While paragraph 8 of the judgment could create the impression that he was not aware of it, he in fact admitted that he had known about it but had seen no reason to challenge it. He did not argue, for instance, that his property had no heritage value.
On 10 January 2007 the Split Department decided to adopt a new measure of preventive protection. It was then that the applicant challenged the measure, first before the Ministry of Culture and later before the Administrative Court. He complained in the first place that he had not been informed of that measure (a circumstance that did not, however, affect the validity of the measure itself). He further complained, and this was his main argument, that domestic law prohibited the adoption of a second measure after a first one (see paragraph 11 of the judgment). The Administrative Court dismissed his action. It held that the competent authorities had had reason to consider that his property was an important object of cultural heritage, that they had needed time to carry out further investigations, and that they had therefore been justified in taking a second measure. It also held that the fact that a first measure had previously been taken was not a legal obstacle to the adoption of a second one (see paragraph 16 of the judgment).
3. What were the practical effects of the protection measure?
In paragraphs 21-22 of the judgment a number of obligations for the owner and restrictions of his or her property rights are mentioned, provided for by the Cultural Heritage Act. This is a very general and abstract enumeration. Nothing is said about the concrete effects on the applicant. The applicant did not submit, for instance, that he had sought and been denied authorisation for any specific transaction or activity relating to his property (compare, by way of example, SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy v. France (dec.), no. 61093/00, ECHR 2005 XIII (extracts), and Fürst von Thurn und Taxis v. Germany (dec.), no. 26367/10, § 27, 14 May 2013). Neither did he submit that he had actually had to bear any expenses for the protection and preservation of the property.
We note that the Government stressed the fact that the only direct consequence following from a protection measure was that, in the event of the intended sale of the property, the State had a right of pre-emption (see paragraph 31 of the judgment); the majority does not address that argument.
It is true that the applicant alleged that the protection measure discouraged investors from investing in his projects concerning the reconstruction of the building. In response to the Government’s argument that he remained vague on this point, he submitted outlines of projects which, according to him, had been abandoned owing to the application of the measure of preventive protection (see paragraph 30 of the judgment). We note, however, that the Government dismissed the ground plans and building layouts submitted as being of no probative value since it was not clear whether they even referred to the reconstruction of the real estate in question. The majority for its part accepts the applicant’s allegation that the restrictions on his commercial projects had an adverse effect, on the mere ground that his arguments in the domestic proceedings were “consonant with his arguments and evidence put before the Court” (see paragraph 39 of the judgment). The Government’s argument as to the probative value of the documents submitted is not explicitly addressed. We find the standard of proof thus applied to be of a lightness that is not compatible with the usual standard of proof “beyond reasonable doubt”.
4. Of utmost importance, in our opinion, is the fact that the Cultural Heritage Act provides for compensation for the restriction of property rights (see paragraph 21 of the judgment). This is a type of no-fault liability on the part of the State. The system allows the owners of protected property to turn to the State if they consider that the burden imposed on them by the protection measure is out of proportion to the aim pursued in the general interest (compare Geffre v. France (dec.), no. 51307/99, ECHR 2003 I (extracts)). Compensation is thus a means by which the State is able to strike a fair balance between the owner’s individual rights and the general interest legitimately and lawfully pursued by the measure of protection of cultural heritage.
It seems to us that the applicant did not bring any such compensation claim before the competent authorities. According to the judgment, he “enquired” about the possibility of compensation to the Ministry of Culture (see paragraph 11 of the judgment). Such an enquiry is not sufficient to constitute a claim. The applicant later filed an action with the Administrative Court in which he challenged the lawfulness of the second protection measure and sought compensation for the damage suffered as a result of the conduct of the administrative authorities (see paragraph 14 of the judgment). That claim was, however, based on the allegedly unlawful conduct of the authorities. Since the Administrative Court found that the challenged act was not unlawful, it could not logically award any compensation.
We must therefore conclude that the applicant at no point brought a substantiated claim before the competent administrative authority based on the no-fault liability of the State.
5. The foregoing leads us to the issue of the admissibility of the complaint.
We have no problem accepting that the applicant exhausted domestic remedies as far as the lawfulness, under domestic law, of the impugned measure is concerned (see paragraph 27 of the judgment).
However, we disagree with the majority in so far as they state that the applicant also “asked for compensation for the pecuniary damage he had sustained as a result of the application of the measure of preventive protection, before both the Ministry and the Administrative Court” (see the same paragraph). As indicated above, we consider that the applicant did not make use of the possibility to claim compensation for any disproportionate burden he might have had to bear in the general interest. In our opinion, he did not provide the competent authorities with an opportunity to assess any burden alleged by him and, if it was found to be disproportionate, to compensate him for it. We therefore disagree with the majority that the applicant exhausted domestic remedies (see paragraph 28 of the judgment). In our opinion, the complaint should have been declared inadmissible (see, mutatis mutandis, S.A. Sobifac and S.A. Algemene Bouwonderneming en Onroerende Promotie A.B.E.B. v. Belgium, no. 17720/91, Commission decision of 9 September 1992, unreported).
6. As far as the merits of the complaint are concerned, we would like to reiterate that the applicant complained first and foremost about the unlawfulness of the second measure of protection under Croatian law. This was also the issue before the Administrative Court.
The majority rightly notes that it is not the Court’s task to resolve problems of interpretation of domestic law. But then it seems to leave open the question whether the interference complained of was lawful under domestic law (see paragraph 34 of the judgment). We do not see any reason to shy away from a firm conclusion on this point. The Administrative Court clearly and unambiguously held that the measure was lawful under domestic law. In the absence of any arbitrariness or manifest unreasonableness in that finding, it is not for the Court to call that conclusion into question (see, mutatis mutandis, Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 85, ECHR 2007 I).
7. We fully agree with the majority’s assessment that the measure complained of was in the “general interest” within the meaning of Article 1, second paragraph, of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 35 of the judgment).
8. The majority then goes on to examine the proportionality of the interference.
We would like to note, first of all, that it does not seem to us that the applicant raised this issue before the domestic authorities. One can even wonder whether he did so before our Court. True, he mentioned that the measure of preventive protection had imposed a number of restrictions on his property rights (see paragraph 30 of the judgment). But is that enough to interpret his argument as amounting to one about the disproportionate character of the burden imposed on him? It rather seems that the applicant was complaining only about the lawfulness of the measures imposed.
In any event, we regret that we are unable to agree with the majority’s assessment of the proportionality of the measure.
The majority seems to consider that the period covered by the two consecutive measures of protection, that is, six years in total, should be taken into account (see paragraph 38 of the judgment). We consider that since the applicant did not challenge the first measure, the first three years of provisional protection should be of no concern to the Court and should not be weighed in the balance. One should also bear in mind that the protective measure was not in place continuously for six years, as a period of nine months passed between the end of the validity of the first measure and the adoption of the second measure, during which the applicant could freely dispose of his property.
The majority then refers to the “significant restrictions on the applicant’s use of the property” (see paragraph 39 of the judgment). However, as indicated above, we find that it is not sufficient to refer in the abstract to the restrictions listed in the Cultural Heritage Act. What matters are the concrete effects on the applicant’s right to use his property. The only concrete effect mentioned by the majority is the effect on the applicant’s commercial projects concerning his building. We have already indicated that we do not consider that this adverse effect was substantiated. In our opinion, there is nothing in the file that suggests that the Split Department would have acted in an irresponsible way if it had been asked to authorise any change to the applicant’s property. Moreover, it appears that the applicant only became aware on 16 October 2007 of the existence of the second measure (see paragraph 11 of the judgment), having up to then, for nine months, been not in the least affected in practical terms by its existence.
In general, we find it difficult to assess the proportionality of concrete measures by way of essentially abstract reasoning. Measures that have only theoretical effects, that are not really “felt” by the subject, should in our view not be taken into account for the purposes of the proportionality test.
9. The majority states that it has “reservations about two aspects of the domestic authorities’ conduct in the applicant’s case” (see paragraph 40 of the judgment).
The first reservation is about the time it took to come to an assessment of the value of the applicant’s building from the point of view of the cultural heritage. The main reason for the majority’s criticism is that the Split Department did not act swiftly to obtain certain items of information that were allegedly publicly available (see paragraphs 41-43 of the judgment). To our regret, we find this a somewhat unfair way of treating the authorities. The applicant himself did not raise the issue of the public availability of the information in his submissions to the Court, and that issue was therefore not commented upon by the Government either. Moreover, the majority’s reasoning on this point is based entirely on a statement made by the Split Department when it had to refer the file to the Ministry of Culture (see paragraph 12 of the judgment). The Ministry did not rely on the excuse of the local authority in the further domestic proceedings. What is more, in their submissions before our Court the Government described in detail the complex nature of the process of determining cultural objects, and mentioned the specific obstacles encountered during the large-scale operation carried out in respect of the industrial heritage in Split. While that explanation seems plausible to us, the majority does not consider it worth even mentioning it when seeking to ascertain whether there was any justification for the application of the measure of preventive protection for six years.
The second reservation concerns two “procedural omissions relating to the manner in which the domestic authorities conducted the proceedings in the applicant’s case” (see paragraph 44 of the judgment).
According to the majority, the Split Department failed to take into account the applicant’s views before ordering the protective measures (see paragraph 45 of the judgment). As far as we can see, however, the applicant did not complain before the domestic authorities about a violation of his right to be heard; nor did he before our Court. We therefore do not think that this issue should be raised by the Court of its own motion. Moreover, in our opinion due attention should be paid to the fact that the measures of protection were of a provisional nature. The harm done, if any, was of a temporary nature. It is precisely in the proceedings that followed the second provisional measure that the applicant could make his views known. No attention is paid to the fact that the outcome was favourable to him since the authorities eventually abandoned the idea of protecting his property.
The majority further criticises the Administrative Court for not having assessed the proportionality of the measure (see paragraph 46 of the judgment). As indicated above, it does not seem to us that the applicant raised the proportionality issue before the domestic authorities. In his description of the domestic proceedings, he did not mention that he had done so. It is therefore questionable whether the Administrative Court can be blamed for any shortcoming in this respect. Moreover, before our Court the applicant did not complain about a lack of reasoning on this point in the Administrative Court’s judgment. We therefore find the reservation on this point to be unfounded.
10. What is conspicuously missing in the majority’s reasoning is a discussion of the compensation mechanism.
In their submissions to the Court relating to the merits of the complaint, the Government pointed to the fact that the applicant had never requested the State to compensate him for any effects on his property rights, and that he had never contacted the State regarding plans to sell his property. We consider the issue of compensation crucial for the determination of whether or not a fair balance was struck between the applicant’s individual rights and the general interest of the community (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69 and 73, Series A no. 52).
At the same time, we do not want to imply that any restriction of the applicant’s rights invariably had to be accompanied by some form of compensation (see Potomska and Potomski v. Poland, no. 33949/05, § 67, 29 March 2011; Fürst von Thurn und Taxis, cited above, § 23; and Diaconescu v. Romania (dec.), no. 38353/05, 17 September 2013). Where a measure controlling the use of property is in issue, the lack of compensation is a factor to be taken into consideration, but is not of itself sufficient to constitute a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 91, ECHR 2010, and Berger-Krall and Others v. Slovenia, no. 14717/04), § 199, 12 June 2014). The question to be answered is whether in the light of all the circumstances the applicant had to bear an individual and excessive burden and, if so, whether domestic law provided for sufficient compensation.
Where the majority does not take into consideration the possibilities offered by the compensation mechanism, we think that there can be no sufficient basis for it to conclude that the interference was disproportionate.
11. Lastly, we would like to say a word about the conclusions to be drawn from the present judgment.
Although we do not agree with what is stated in paragraphs 41-46 of the judgment, we trust that the majority consider that it is the facts mentioned in these paragraphs that tilt the balance in favour of the applicant. We therefore read the present judgment as being adopted in the light of the particular circumstances of the case.
In any event, it would be hard for us to imagine that the judgment could be interpreted in such a way as to imply that restrictions that generally follow from a measure of protection of cultural heritage (see, for instance, Article 4 of the Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe, signed in Granada on 3 October 1985) are incompatible with the right to respect for property. We do not believe that the majority wants to upset the whole philosophy behind such protection.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà Articolo 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà) la soddisfazione Equa respinse (fuori termini) (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale danno Patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)



SECONDA SEZIONE







CAUSA PETAR MATAS C. CROATIA

(Richiesta n. 40581/12)









SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

4 ottobre 2016







Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Petar Matas c. Croatia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Il ?Karaka, ?Presidente
Nebojša Vuini?,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Grico?,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
Georges Ravarani, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 30 agosto 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 40581/12) contro la Repubblica di Croatia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino croato, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 14 giugno 2012.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Divisione. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il richiedente si lamentò di un presumibilmente restrizione illegale ed irragionevole dei suoi diritti di proprietà in riguardo di un edificio commerciale con la richiesta di misure di protezione preventiva relativo ad eredità culturale, contrari ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. 9 febbraio 2015 l'azione di reclamo sopra fu comunicata al Governo, ed il resto della richiesta fu dichiarato inammissibile, facendo seguito Decidere 54 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1953 e vive in Divisione.
6. Il richiedente è il proprietario di un edificio commerciale in Divisione che lui usa come una macchina ripari officina. L'edificio in problema fu comprato dallo Stato nel 2001. Al tempo di acquisto, nessuna limitazione sul suo uso fu registrata, o evidente.
7. 28 marzo 2003 il Divisione Settore per la Conservazione di Eredità Culturale (kulture di Ministarstvo, Uprava za zaštitu kulturne baštine l'odjel di Konzervatorski u Splitu, in futuro “il Divisione Settore”) ordinò una misura di protezione preventiva relativo ad eredità culturale con riguardo ad al richiedente sta costruendo, durante la definitivo valutazione del suo valore culturale. Spiegò che l'edificio che era stato usando come una macchina ripara officina a che punto, sembrato essere un esempio raro di prima architettura industriale in Divisione e perciò questo garantì una misura che limita il suo uso col richiedente. Sotto sezione 10 della Protezione e Conservazione di Eredità Atto Culturale (Zakon o zaštiti gli ouvanju ?kulturnih dobara, in futuro “l'Eredità Atto Culturale”) la misura rimarrebbe in posto per un periodo di tre anni, e, nella conformità con sezione 11 dello stesso Atto, riconoscerebbe la stessa protezione come una definitivo misura protettiva (vedere paragrafo 21 sotto).
8. La decisione che ordina la protezione preventiva non fu trasmessa al richiedente. Fu spedito alla cancelleria di terra della Divisione Corte Municipale (?sud di Opinski u Splitu) e registrò debitamente nel registro di terra.
9. Dopo la scadenza del periodo di tre-anni, il Divisione Settore ordinò di nuovo una misura di protezione preventiva con 10 gennaio 2007, riguardo ad all'edificio commerciale del richiedente, reiterando gli stessi motivi come quelli specificò nella sua decisione precedente.
10. Il richiedente non fu informato della decisione sopra relativo alla seconda misura di protezione preventiva in riguardo del suo edificio. 3 settembre 2007 la misura fu registrata nel registro di terra.
11. Dopo essere divenuto consapevole della seconda misura di protezione preventiva che segue un enquiry con la cancelleria di terra, il richiedente impugnò la richiesta stesa di 16 ottobre 2007, che misura di fronte al Ministero della Cultura (cultura di Ministarstvo, in futuro “il Ministero”). Lui contese, in particolare, che lui non era stato informato della decisione che ordina la protezione preventiva, e che la protezione non potrebbe essere ordinata più, fin dalla durata di massimo di tale misura sotto l'Eredità Atto Culturale era tre anni. Il richiedente investigò anche del risarcimento in riguardo del danno patrimoniale che lui aveva subito come un risultato della misura di protezione preventiva.
12. 8 gennaio 2008 il Divisione Settore spedì il ricorso del richiedente al Ministero. Sottolineò che la decisione di 10 gennaio 2007 che prolunga la protezione preventiva dopo la scadenza del primo periodo di tre-anno era stata necessaria, mentre dovette al fatto che non era stato possibile ottenere un estratto dal registro di terra dalla Divisione Corte Municipale, e che l'edificio rappresentò un importante esempio di prima architettura industriale in Divisione.
13. 31 gennaio 2008 il Ministero respinse il ricorso del richiedente come infondato, per motivi che non c'era niente nella legge che impedisce all'autorità competente di fare domanda due volte la misura per periodi di tre anni, e che la misura di protezione preventiva non aveva limitato i diritti di proprietà del richiedente. Indicò anche che era necessario per prolungare la protezione preventiva in riguardo dell'edificio, come la determinazione del suo valore di eredità l'ulteriore valutazione comprensiva richiese.
14. 9 marzo 2008 il richiedente depositò un'azione amministrativa nella Corte amministrativa (sud di Upravni Republike Hrvatske), impugnando la legalità e la ragionevolezza della misura di protezione preventiva, ed emphasising la passività delle autorità competenti nell'infine chiarire la questione. Lui contese anche che le decisioni delle autorità più basse erano state arbitrarie. Lui indicò che, contrari a che che aveva affermato il Ministero, i suoi diritti di proprietà erano stati limitati significativamente, come la sua libertà per trattare con la proprietà siccome lui desiderò era stato restretto. In particolare, suo molti tentativi di vendere l'edificio ed esporre su un'altra cooperazione di affari erano andati a vuoto, mentre dovendo alla protezione preventiva ed esistente. Il richiedente chiese anche alla Corte amministrativa di assegnargli 200,000 euros (EUR) in riguardo del danno lui aveva subito come un risultato della condotta delle autorità amministrative.
15. Nel frattempo, il Divisione Settore fondò che l'edificio del richiedente non dovrebbe essere registrato come un oggetto di eredità culturale. 15 aprile 2010, dopo la scadenza della misura di protezione preventiva, la Divisione Ordine della corte Municipale che l'entrata riguardo alla misura sia cancellata dal registro di terra.
16. In 18 maggio 2011 la Corte amministrativa respinse l'azione amministrativa del richiedente come infondato, girando il ragionamento delle autorità più basse. In particolare, indicò che c'era stata prova solida che suggerisce che l'edificio era un importante oggetto di eredità culturale, e che la misura di protezione preventiva fu giustificata perciò determinata il bisogno di eseguire le ulteriori valutazioni. Inoltre, la Corte amministrativa considerò che nulla nel diritto nazionale attinente ostacolò l'adozione della seconda decisione su protezione preventiva che segue la scadenza del primo tempo-limite di tre-anno.
17. 10 settembre 2011 il richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale (sud di Ustavni Republike Hrvatske), lamentandosi di una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà sotto Articolo 48 della Costituzione con riguardo ad al presumibilmente illegale e la richiesta irragionevole della misura di protezione preventiva in riguardo della sua proprietà.
18. 14 dicembre 2011 la Corte Costituzionale dichiarata manifestamente l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente inammissibile come mal-fondò.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Costituzione
19. La disposizione attinente della Costituzione della Repubblica di Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998 113/2000, 124/2000 28/2001, 41/2001 55/2001, 76/2010 85/2010 e 5/2014) le letture:
Articolo 48
“Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito... ”
B. L'Eredità Atto Culturale
20. Le disposizioni attinenti della Protezione e Conservazione di Eredità Atto Culturale (Zakon o zaštiti gli ouvanju ?kulturnih dobara, Ufficiale Pubblica, N. 69/1999, 151/2003 e 157/2003) prevedere:
Protezione preventiva
Sezione 10
“Oggetti presunti capace di essere di beneficio culturale possono essere la materia di decisioni provvisorie che ordinano protezione preventiva. ...
Il periodo di protezione preventiva funziona sino all'adozione del [decisione che infine determina lo status di un oggetto di eredità culturale], ma non può durare più da molto di tre anni,...
Se, con la scadenza del tempo-limite assegnata ad in paragrafo 3 di questa sezione, la decisione che determina il [l'eredità] status di un oggetto culturale non è stato adottato, la decisione che ordina protezione preventiva cessa essere valida. ...”
Sezione 11
“Questo Atto, e tutte le disposizioni riguardo alla protezione di oggetti di eredità culturale, è applicabile a [le questioni relativo a] un oggetto che è sotto la protezione preventiva. ...”
21. L'Eredità Atto Culturale prevede inoltre per obblighi diversi da parte di proprietari di oggetti di eredità culturale; in particolare, l'obbligo di diligenza, protezione e mantenimento, ed il dovere per concedere accesso gratis e la presa di ulteriori misurazioni in relazione alla ricerca e valutazione degli oggetti (sezione 20). Il proprietario di tale oggetto è obbligato per sopportare tutte le spese relativo alla protezione e conservazione dell'oggetto, salvi per possibili spese straordinarie che possono essere chieste dal Ministero (sezione 22). Un proprietario che debitamente approva i requisiti dell'Eredità Atto Culturale può chiedere il risarcimento per la restrizione di suo o i suoi diritti di proprietà, tassa diversa e benefici di dogane e guida competente riguardo all'uso dell'oggetto di eredità culturale (sezioni 24-26).
22. Le specifiche restrizioni su diritti di proprietà in riguardo di oggetti attinente ad eredità culturale che può essere imposta sotto l'Eredità Atto Culturale è enumerato in sezioni 27-42. Queste restrizioni includono:
(a) le restrizioni con riguardo ad a proprietà, particolarmente con riguardo ad al dovere di lasciare spazio accesso gratis all'oggetto al fine di ricerca e valutazione, dove il risarcimento può essere chiesto solamente se può essere provato che danno è stato subito;
(b) le restrizioni con riguardo ad all'uso di oggetti, ed in particolare l'obbligo da parte del proprietario per chiedere permesso precedente per qualsiasi cambio nella natura di uso dell'oggetto; e
(c) le restrizioni con riguardo ad al trasferimento di proprietà dove lo Stato ha un diritto di pre-acquisto. Un oggetto di eredità culturale può essere espropriato anche negli interessi dello Stato (sezione 41).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
23. Il richiedente si lamentò di un presumibilmente restrizione illegale ed irragionevole dei suoi diritti di proprietà in riguardo di un edificio commerciale con la richiesta di misure di protezione preventiva relativo ad eredità culturale. Lui si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che le letture:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
24. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non era riuscito a chiedere al Ministero di assegnargli risarcimento per la restrizione dei suoi diritti di proprietà con la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva, come esponga fuori nell'Eredità Atto Culturale (vedere divide in paragrafi 21-22 sopra). Lui non era riuscito perciò a giovarsi a di un viale legale ed effettivo da che cosa la questione della ragionevolezza della restrizione dei suoi diritti di proprietà sarebbe potuta essere valutata.
25. Il richiedente sostenne che lui in modo appropriato aveva esaurito le via di ricorso nazionali con intraprendendo le sue azioni di reclamo di fronte agli amministrativi ed autorità giudiziali riguardo alla richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva con riguardo ad al suo edificio.
2. La valutazione della Corte
26. La Corte reitera che l'articolo sull'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali sotto Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione richiede che azioni di reclamo intesero di essere rese successivamente in Strasbourg sarebbe dovuto essere reso al corpo nazionale ed appropriato, almeno in sostanza ed in ottemperanza coi requisiti formali e tempo-limiti posati in giù in diritto nazionale (vedere Vukovi ?ed Altri c. Serbia (eccezione preliminare) [GC], N. 17153/11 e 29 altri, § 72 25 marzo 2014).
27. Con riguardo ad alla causa in problema, la Corte nota, che il dogma centrale dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente è il presumibilmente illegale ed interferenza ingiustificata coi suoi diritti di proprietà con la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva con riguardo ad al suo edificio. In riguardo di che azione di reclamo, il richiedente intraprese debitamente via di ricorso legali e del tutto disponibili di fronte agli amministrativi ed autorità giudiziali, e lui presentò anche un reclamo costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 11, 14 e 16 sopra). Inoltre, contrari a che che ha asserito il Governo, il richiedente chiese il risarcimento per il danno patrimoniale che lui aveva subito come un risultato della richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva, di fronte a sia il Ministero e la Corte amministrativa (vedere divide in paragrafi 11 e 14 sopra).
28. In prospettiva del sopra, i costatazione di Corte che il richiedente in modo appropriato esaurì le via di ricorso nazionali. L'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere respinta perciò.
29. La Corte nota inoltre che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota anche che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
30. Il richiedente contese che, mentre lui avesse potuto accettare che la prima misura di protezione preventiva era stata necessaria per valutare il valore del suo edificio con riguardo ad ad eredità culturale, la seconda misura era stata illegale ed ingiustificata. In particolare, nella sua prospettiva, la seconda decisione di fare domanda la misura era stata adottata contraria a sezione 10 dell'Eredità Culturale Agisca che chiaramente previde per la possibilità di fare domanda una misura di protezione preventiva per un periodo di solamente tre anni. Nella sua causa, la misura era fatta domanda da due periodi di tre-anno che erano stati contrari al diritto nazionale attinente ed anche non necessario e sproporzionato. Il richiedente contese inoltre che la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva aveva imposto un numero di restrizioni sui suoi diritti di proprietà. Aveva scoraggiato anche investitori dall'investire nei suoi progetti riguardo alla ricostruzione dell'edificio. In che il collegamento, il richiedente offrì contorni dei progetti che erano stati abbandonati apparentemente dovendo alla richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva.
(b) Il Governo
31. Il Governo ammise un'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente con la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva con riguardo ad al suo edificio. Loro presentarono che tale interferenza era stata legale, aveva intrapreso un scopo legittimo della protezione di eredità culturale, e non aveva imposto un carico individuale ed eccessivo sul richiedente. Questo era particolarmente vero determinato il bisogno di identificare e proteggere oggetti di prima architettura industriale in Divisione, ed il fatto che l'edificio del richiedente era stato solamente uno di dodici oggetti in riguardo del quale ricerca sostanziale e valutazione erano state eseguite per per determinare valore di eredità. Comunque, seguendo la ricerca necessaria, si aveva determinato che l'edificio del richiedente non dovrebbe essere registrato come un oggetto di eredità culturale. Il Governo contese inoltre che, benché protezione preventiva implicasse l'applicabilità di altre misure che proteggono eredità culturale sotto l'Eredità Atto Culturale, la vera restrizione sola sui diritti di proprietà del richiedente era stata il diritto di pre-acquisto stabilito in favore dello Stato. In questo collegamento, il Governo presentò anche, che non c'era discutibilmente nulla sostenendo gli argomenti del richiedente che lui aveva abbandonato il certo investimento proietta dovendo alla richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Se c'è stata interferenza con la proprietà del richiedente
32. Nella presente causa, il Governo ammise che c'era stata interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra), e la Corte non può discernere qualsiasi ragione di sostenere altrimenti. Nota che la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva in riguardo dell'edificio del richiedente non lo spogliò della sua proprietà, ma fissò in restrizioni di posto riguardo all'uso di che proprietà; da adesso, può essere considerato una misura per controllare l'uso di proprietà (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Valette e Doherier c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 6054/10, § 17 29 novembre 2011).
(b) Se l'interferenza fu prescritta con legge
33. La Corte nota che i contestarono seconda misura di protezione preventiva riguardo all'edificio del richiedente fu basata su sezione 10 dell'Eredità Culturale Agisca che previde per la possibilità di fare domanda una misura di protezione preventiva per un periodo di tre anni con riguardo ad ad oggetti capace di essere dichiarato oggetti di eredità culturale (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Le parti le prospettive di ' differiscono come a se questa disposizione limitò la possibilità di fare domanda una misura di protezione preventiva ad un periodo di tre anni, o se tale misura sarebbe potuta essere fatta domanda da periodi di tre-anno supplementari. Il richiedente presentò che sezione 10 dell'Eredità Atto Culturale era chiara che una misura di protezione preventiva potrebbe essere fatta domanda solamente per un periodo di tre anni, mentre il Governo sostenne le prospettive delle autorità nazionali secondo che non c'era niente nel diritto nazionale attinente che impedisce ad una misura di protezione preventiva di essere fatto domanda per periodi multipli di tre anni.
34. La Corte reitera, come sé ha sostenuto su molte occasioni, che non è il suo compito per chiarire problemi di interpretazione di diritto nazionale; il suo ruolo è confinato ad accertando se gli effetti di tale interpretazione sono compatibili con la Convenzione (vedere, per istanza, Ališi ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, § 113 ECHR 2014). In queste circostanze, notando che è nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti interpretare e fare domanda diritto nazionale (vedere Sviluppi della Valle del Pino Ltd ed Altri c. l'Irlanda, 29 novembre 1991, § 52 la Serie Un n. 222), la Corte procederà sull'assunzione che l'interferenza con la proprietà del richiedente era legale, ed esaminerà se intraprese un scopo legittimo e previde un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 68-69 la Serie Un n. 52).
(c) Se l'interferenza intraprese un scopo legittimo
35. La Corte già ha sostenuto che la conservazione di eredità culturale e, dove appropriato, il suo uso sostenibile, intraprenda un scopo legittimo del mantenimento di una certa qualità della vita, la conservazione dello storico, radici culturali ed artistiche di una regione ed i suoi abitanti e come così, loro sono un valore essenziale, la protezione e promozione di che è in carica sulle autorità pubbliche (vedere Kozacolu ?c. la Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03, § 54, 19 febbraio 2009, e Potomska e Potomski c. la Polonia, n. 33949/05, § 64 29 marzo 2011).
(d) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
36. I principi generali riguardo alla valutazione della proporzionalità di un'interferenza con diritti di proprietà in relazione a problemi di eredità culturali sono esposti fuori nel Potomska e la causa di Potomski (vedere Potomska e Potomski, citato sopra, § 67).
37. La Corte nota che, nella causa presente, non era niente da indicare che misure di protezione relativo ad eredità culturale potrebbero essere fatte domanda in riguardo dell'edificio al tempo il richiedente l'acquistò per uso commerciale (compari Potomska e Potomski, citato sopra, § 68, e, con contrasto, il von di Fürst Thurn und Tassì c. la Germania (dec.), n. 26367/10, § 24 14 maggio 2013). C'è anche senza dubbio che le autorità erano consapevoli che l'edificio era stato comprato col richiedente per uso commerciale (vedere paragrafo 6 sopra).
38. L'aspetto centrale dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente concerne gli effetti legali sullo status della sua proprietà che fluisce dalla decisione del Divisione Settore di 10 gennaio 2007. Con che decisione, il Divisione Settore prolungato la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva relativo ad eredità culturale riguardo al richiedente sta costruendo per un ulteriore periodo di tre anni. In totale, questo corrispose ad un periodo di sei anni durante il quale l'edificio del richiedente era soggetto a protezione preventiva (vedere divide in paragrafi 7 e 9 sopra).
39. La Corte nota che la protezione preventiva sotto il diritto nazionale attinente comportò un numero di restrizioni significative sull'uso del richiedente della proprietà, incluso il suo uso commerciale siccome lui vide l'adattamento. Non c'è controversia fra le parti che, sotto sezione 11 dell'Eredità Culturale Agisca, gli effetti di protezione preventiva erano simile a quelli di protezione che segue una definitivo determinazione sullo status dell'eredità culturale di un oggetto (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). In particolare, quegli effetti inclusero restrizioni con riguardo ad all'uso di oggetti, ed obblighi da parte di proprietari per chiedere permesso precedente per qualsiasi cambio nella natura di uso di oggetti. C'erano anche restrizioni con riguardo ad al trasferimento di proprietà dove lo Stato aveva un diritto di pre-acquisto. Sotto l'Eredità Atto Culturale, un oggetto di eredità culturale potrebbe essere espropriato inoltre, negli interessi dello Stato (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra). La Corte osserva che, durante i procedimenti di fronte alle autorità nazionali, il richiedente si riferì all'effetto avverso di queste restrizioni sui suoi progetti commerciali riguardo all'edificio che è conforme coi suoi argomenti e prova fissato di fronte alla Corte (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra, e compari, con contrasto, Valette e Doherier, citato sopra, § 20).
40. La Corte considera che la restrizione sul diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà con la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva non è aperta alla critica per se, avendo riguardo ad in particolare allo scopo legittimo perseguito ed il margine ampio della valutazione concedè allo Stato dove problemi di eredità culturali concernono (vedere SCEA il de di Ferme Fresnoy c. la Francia (dec.), n. 61093/00, ECHR 2005 XIII estratti). Comunque, nella sua valutazione della proporzionalità della misura si lamentò di, la Corte ha riserve approssimativamente due aspetti delle autorità nazionali che ' conduce nella causa del richiedente.
41. In primo luogo, benché indubbiamente la valutazione del valore di un oggetto con riguardo ad ad eredità culturale complesso può richiedere e lungo valutazioni e studi, la Corte nota che non c'è indicazione nella causa in problema che con qualsiasi misurazioni, valutazioni o studi in relazione al valore del richiedente stanno costruendo riguardo ad ad eredità culturale-quali giustificerebbero la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva dal periodo di sei anni-davvero fu preso o condusse (paragone, con contrasto SCEA il de di Ferme Fresnoy, citato sopra). Effettivamente, la ragione sola citata col Divisione Settore durante i procedimenti per giustificare tale richiesta prolungata della misura di protezione preventiva era la sua incapacità allegato per ottenere un estratto dal registro di terra da Divisione Corte Municipale riguardo all'edificio (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra).
42. Comunque, dato che dati di cancelleria di terra sono informazioni pubbliche -prontamente ottenibile con altro vuole dire, incluso via Internet-e che non c'è indicazione che il Divisione Settore davvero fece un tentativo serio di ottenere che informazioni e fallì, la Corte non può accettare la ragione invocata come una giustificazione per la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva per il periodo di sei anni. In qualsiasi la causa, la Corte considera che il richiedente non dovrebbe dovere nascere qualsiasi conseguenze avverse come un risultato dell'impossibilità allegato dei corpi Statali e competenti per coordinare le loro azioni attinenti nel decidere sulle questioni che colpiscono i suoi diritti di proprietà.
43. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitererebbe la particolare importanza del principio di “il buon governo” che richiede che, dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale, in particolare quando la questione colpisce diritti umani fondamentali come quelli che comportano proprietà, le autorità pubbliche devono agire nel buon tempo ed in un appropriato e, soprattutto, maniera coerente (vedere, fra altri, Bogdel c. la Lituania, n. 41248/06, § 65 26 novembre 2013). Nella causa in problema, i costatazione di Corte che le autorità nazionali sono andate a vuoto ad agire in una maniera conforme con la necessità di proteggere i diritti di proprietà del richiedente e chiarire i problemi pertinente allo status di proprietà del suo edificio in una maniera opportuna.
44. In secondo luogo, la Corte nota molte omissioni procedurali relativo alla maniera nella quale le autorità nazionali condussero i procedimenti nella causa del richiedente. La Corte reitera che, benché Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non contiene requisiti procedurali ed espliciti, i procedimenti in problema devono riconoscere l'individuo un'opportunità ragionevole di fissare suo o la sua causa alle autorità attinenti per il fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantito con questa disposizione. Nell'accertare se questa condizione è stata soddisfatta, la Corte prende una prospettiva comprensiva (vedere, per istanza, Zehentner c. l'Austria, n. 20082/02, § 73 16 luglio 2009).
45. In questo riguardo, la Corte nota, che, quando ordinando le misure di protezione preventiva il 2003 e 10 gennaio 2007 di 28 marzo, il Divisione Settore non informò il richiedente della necessità di ordinare quelle misure, né trasmise le sue decisioni al richiedente. Non riuscì perciò a prendere in considerazione le sue prospettive sulla questione e l'impatto sui suoi diritti di proprietà che avrebbe la richiesta delle misure di protezione preventiva. C'è senza dubbio allo stesso tempo, che il Divisione Settore seppe o avrebbe dovuto sapere che il richiedente possedette l'edificio, poiché nelle sue decisioni si riferì al fatto che l'edificio fu usato come una macchina ripari officina (vedere paragrafo 7 sopra) a che punto in tempo, e la proprietà del richiedente fu registrata con la cancelleria di terra.
46. Inoltre, la Corte nota che, nonostante gli argomenti chiari del richiedente come agli effetti delle restrizioni sui suoi diritti di proprietà, nell'il particolare riguardare i suoi progetti commerciali riguardo all'edificio (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra), la Corte amministrativa limitò la sua valutazione alla questione della possibile attinenza dell'edificio ad eredità culturale, senza condurre qualsiasi la valutazione di se la richiesta prolungata delle misure aveva colpito sproporzionatamente i diritti di proprietà del richiedente. Non riuscì anche a rivolgere l'azione di reclamo del richiedente delle autorità competenti la passività di ' con riguardo ad ad infine chiarendo la questione. Quelle omissioni della Corte amministrativa non furono rimediate a con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 16 e 18 sopra).
47. Avendo riguardo ad a tutti i fattori sopra, i costatazione di Corte che le autorità nazionali l'interferenza di ' col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà incorse brevemente dei requisiti della protezione del suo diritto di proprietà sotto la Convenzione.
48. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
49. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
50. Nella sua richiesta iniziale, il richiedente chiese EUR 15,000 in riguardo di danni ed EUR 1,500 in riguardo di costi e spese, più l'interesse legale ed attinente. Nelle sue ulteriori osservazioni alla Corte, il richiedente si riferì alla sua rivendicazione e sottolineò che lui non potesse dare qualsiasi gli ulteriori dettagli del danno effettivo lui aveva subito che era stato certamente significativo.
51. Il Governo indicò che il richiedente non era riuscito a specificare la sua rivendicazione di soddisfazione equa in conformità con Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte. Loro presentarono perciò che non c'era nessuna chiamata per assegnarlo qualsiasi l'importo in quel il riguardo.
52. La Corte nota che sotto Articolo 60 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte che un richiedente deve presentare dettagli particolareggiati di tutte le rivendicazioni, insieme con qualsiasi documenti che sostengono attinenti, all'interno del tempo-limite fissato per l'osservazione delle osservazioni del richiedente sui meriti. Se il richiedente non riesce ad attenersi con questi requisiti, la Corte può respingere la rivendicazione in intero o in parte (Decide 60 § 3 e 71). Nella sua lettera 4 giugno 2015 datò la Corte attrasse l'attenzione del richiedente al fatto che questi requisiti fecero domanda anche se lui aveva indicato i suoi desideri che concernono la soddisfazione equa ad un più primo stadio dei procedimenti.
53. La Corte nota nella causa in questione che il richiedente non riuscì a presentare e specificare la sua rivendicazione di soddisfazione equa, all'interno del tempo-limite therefor fissarono. La Corte perciò, avendo riguardo a Decidere 60, non fa assegnazione sotto Articolo 41 della Convenzione (vedere, per istanza, Schatschaschwili c. la Germania [GC], n. 9154/10, §§ 169-170 ECHR 2015).
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara, con una maggioranza, la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene, per cinque voti a due, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

3. Respinge, all’unanimità, la rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 4 ottobre 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Il ?Karaka?
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudici Lemmens e Ravarani è annesso a questa sentenza.
A.I.K.
S.H.N.


OPINIONE DISSIDENTE CONGIUNTA DEI GIUDICI LEMMENS E RAVARANI
1. Con nostro rammarico, noi non possiamo concordare con la maggioranza sta trovando che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nella causa presente. Nella nostra opinione, l'azione di reclamo sarebbe dovuta essere dichiarata inammissibile per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali e sarebbe dovuta essere stata in qualsiasi l'evento infondato.
2. Prima di tutti, noi pensiamo che è importante per accentuare i fatti principali.
C'erano due misure consecutive di protezione provvisoria del richiedente sta costruendo, uno valido da 28 marzo 2003 sino a 27 marzo 2006, l'altro da 10 gennaio 2007 sino a 9 gennaio 2010 (vedere divide in paragrafi 7 e 9 della sentenza). L'edificio del richiedente era ogni tempo protegguto insieme con undici altri edifici. Le misure contestate erano così parte di un'operazione completamente ampio-variando si impegnata al tempo col Divisione Settore per la Conservazione di Eredità Culturale. Il Governo spiegò che protezione dell'eredità industriale aveva solamente nelle ultime due decadi divenute una questione di preoccupazione in Croatia, e che nulla era stato fatto nell'area di Divisione di fronte alle dodici misure di protezione provvisoria fu preso. Infine, protezione fu sostenuta per alcuni di questi edifici, ma non per il richiedente.
Il richiedente non intraprese azione contro la prima misura, ordinò 28 marzo 2003. Mentre paragrafo 8 della sentenza potesse creare l'impressione che lui non ne era consapevole, lui infatti ammise che lui l'aveva conosciuto ma non aveva visto nessuna ragione di impugnarlo. Lui non dibattè, per istanza, che la sua proprietà non aveva valore di eredità.
10 gennaio 2007 il Divisione Settore decise di adottare una misura nuova di protezione preventiva. Era poi che il richiedente impugnò la misura, prima di fronte al Ministero della Cultura e più tardi di fronte alla Corte amministrativa. Lui si lamentò nel primo posto del quale gli non era stato informato che misura (una circostanza che non faceva, comunque colpisce la validità della misura stessa). Lui si lamentò inoltre, e questo era il suo argomento principale, che diritto nazionale proibì l'adozione di una seconda misura dopo un primo (vedere paragrafo 11 della sentenza). La Corte amministrativa respinse la sua azione. Contenne che le autorità competenti avevano avuto ragione di considerare che la sua proprietà era un importante oggetto di eredità culturale, che loro avevano avuto bisogno di tempo eseguire le ulteriori indagini, e che loro erano stati giustificati perciò nel prendere una seconda misura. Contenne anche che il fatto che una prima misura prima era stata presa non era un ostacolo legale all'adozione di un secondo (vedere paragrafo 16 della sentenza).
3. Quale era gli effetti pratici della misura di protezione?
In paragrafi 21-22 della sentenza un numero di obblighi per il proprietario e restrizioni di suo o i suoi diritti di proprietà sono menzionati, purché per con l'Eredità Atto Culturale. Questa è un'enumerazione molto generale ed astratta. Nulla è detto sugli effetti concreti sul richiedente. Il richiedente non presentò, per istanza che lui aveva chiesto ed aveva negato auorizzazione per qualsiasi la specifica operazione o l'attività relativo alla sua proprietà (paragone, con modo di esempio SCEA il de di Ferme Fresnoy c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 61093/00, ECHR 2005 XIII (gli estratti), ed il von di Fürst Thurn und Tassì c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 26367/10, § 27 14 maggio 2013). Neanche lui che lui aveva dovuto davvero nascere qualsiasi spese per la protezione e conservazione della proprietà.
Noi notiamo che il Governo sottolineò il fatto che la conseguenza diretta e sola che segue da una misura di protezione era che, nell'evento della vendita intenzionale della proprietà, lo Stato aveva un diritto di pre-acquisto (vedere paragrafo 31 della sentenza); la maggioranza non rivolge quel l'argomento.
È vero che il richiedente addusse che la misura di protezione scoraggiò investitori dall'investire nei suoi progetti riguardo alla ricostruzione dell'edificio. In risposta all'argomento del Governo che lui è rimasto vago su questo punto, lui presentò contorni di progetti che, secondo lui, era stato abbandonato dovendo alla richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva (vedere paragrafo 30 della sentenza). Comunque, noi notiamo che il Governo respinse i piani basi e configurazioni che costruiscono presentate come essendo di nessun valore probatorio poiché non era chiaro se loro uguagliano assegnato alla ricostruzione del beni immobili in oggetto. La maggioranza per la sua parte accetta la dichiarazione del richiedente che le restrizioni sui suoi progetti commerciali avevano un effetto avverso, sulla base mera che i suoi argomenti nei procedimenti nazionali erano “conforme coi suoi argomenti e prova fissate di fronte alla Corte” (vedere paragrafo 39 della sentenza). L'argomento del Governo come al valore probatorio dei documenti presentato non è rivolto esplicitamente. Noi troviamo così lo standard di prova fece domanda essere di una leggerezza che non è compatibile con lo standard solito di prova “oltre dubbio ragionevole.”
4. Della massima importanza, nella nostra opinione il fatto è che l'Eredità Atto Culturale prevede per il risarcimento per la restrizione di diritti di proprietà (vedere paragrafo 21 della sentenza). Questo è un tipo della responsabilità di nessuno-colpa da parte dello Stato. Il sistema permette i proprietari di proprietà protetta di rivolgersi allo Stato se loro considerano che il carico impose su loro con la misura di protezione è fuori di proporzione allo scopo perseguito nell'interesse generale (compari Geffre c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 51307/99, ECHR 2003 io (gli estratti)). Il risarcimento è così un mezzi coi quali lo Stato è in grado prevedere un equilibrio equo fra i diritti individuali del proprietario e l'interesse generale legittimamente e legalmente perseguiti con la misura di protezione di eredità culturale.
Sembra a noi che il richiedente non portò qualsiasi simile rivendicazione di risarcimento di fronte alle autorità competenti. Secondo la sentenza, lui “investigò” della possibilità del risarcimento al Ministero della Cultura (vedere paragrafo 11 della sentenza). Tale enquiry non è sufficiente per costituire una rivendicazione. Il richiedente registrò più tardi un'azione con la Corte amministrativa nella quale lui impugnò la legalità della seconda misura di protezione ed il risarcimento chiesto per il danno subita come un risultato della condotta delle autorità amministrative (vedere paragrafo 14 della sentenza). Comunque, che rivendicazione fu basata sul presumibilmente condotta illegale delle autorità. Poiché la Corte amministrativa fondò che l'atto impugnato non era illegale, non poteva assegnare logicamente qualsiasi il risarcimento.
Noi dobbiamo concludere perciò che il richiedente a nessun punto portò una rivendicazione provata di fronte all'autorità amministrativa e competente basata sulla responsabilità di nessuno-colpa dello Stato.
5. Il precedente ci conduce al problema dell'ammissibilità dell'azione di reclamo.
Noi non abbiamo nessun problema che accetta che il richiedente esaurì come lontano come la legalità via di ricorso nazionali, sotto diritto nazionale della misura contestata riguarda (vedere paragrafo 27 della sentenza).
Noi non siamo d'accordo finora comunque, con la maggioranza in siccome loro affermano che il richiedente anche “chiese il risarcimento per il danno patrimoniale che lui aveva subito come un risultato della richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva, di fronte a sia il Ministero e la Corte amministrativa” (vedere lo stesso paragrafo). Siccome indicato sopra, noi consideriamo che il richiedente non si avvalse della possibilità di chiedere il risarcimento per qualsiasi carico sproporzionato è probabile che lui avrebbe dovuto nascere nell'interesse generale. Nella nostra opinione, lui non fornì alle autorità competenti un'opportunità per valutare qualsiasi carico addusse con lui e, se fosse trovato essere sproporzionato, compensarlo per sé. Noi non siamo d'accordo perciò con la maggioranza che il richiedente esaurì via di ricorso nazionali (vedere paragrafo 28 della sentenza). Nella nostra opinione, l'azione di reclamo sarebbe dovuta essere dichiarata inammissibile (vedere, mutatis mutandis, S.A. Sobifac e S.A. Algemene l'en di Bouwonderneming Onroerende Promotie A.B.E.B. c. il Belgio, n. 17720/91, decisione di Commissione di 9 settembre 1992 non segnalato).
6. Come lontano come i meriti dell'azione di reclamo riguarda, gradiremmo reiterare che il richiedente si lamentasse dell'illegalità della seconda misura di protezione sotto legge croata prima e primo. Questo era anche il problema di fronte alla Corte amministrativa.
La maggioranza nota esattamente che non è il compito della Corte per chiarire problemi di interpretazione di diritto nazionale. Ma poi sembra lasciare aperto la questione se l'interferenza si lamentò di era legale sotto diritto nazionale (vedere paragrafo 34 della sentenza). Noi non vediamo qualsiasi la ragione a timido via da una conclusione fissa su questo punto. La Corte amministrativa chiaramente ed inequivocabilmente sostenne che la misura era legale sotto diritto nazionale. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi l'arbitrarietà o l'irragionevolezza di manifestazione in che trovando, non è per la Corte per chiamare che conclusione in questione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 85 ECHR 2007 io).
7. Noi pienamente concordiamo con la valutazione della maggioranza della quale la misura si è lamentata era nel “interesse generale” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1, secondo paragrafo, di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 35 della sentenza).
8. La maggioranza segue a poi esaminare la proporzionalità dell'interferenza.
Gradiremmo notare, prima di tutti che non sembri a noi che il richiedente sollevasse questo problema di fronte alle autorità nazionali. Uno può chiedersi anche se lui faceva così prima la nostra Corte. Vero, lui menzionò che la misura di protezione preventiva aveva imposto un numero di restrizioni sui suoi diritti di proprietà (vedere paragrafo 30 della sentenza). Ma è che abbastanza per interpretare il suo argomento siccome corrispondendo ad uno del carattere sproporzionato del carico impose su lui? Alquanto sembra che il richiedente stava lamentandosi solamente della legalità delle misure imposta.
In qualsiasi l'evento, noi pentiamo che noi non siamo capaci di concordare con la valutazione della maggioranza della proporzionalità della misura.
La maggioranza sembra considerare che il periodo coprì con le due misure consecutive di protezione che è sei anni in totale, dovrebbe essere preso in considerazione (vedere paragrafo 38 della sentenza). Noi consideriamo che poiché il richiedente non impugnò la prima misura, i primi tre anni di protezione provvisoria dovrebbero essere di nessuno interessato alla Corte e non dovrebbe essere pesato nell'equilibrio. Uno dovrebbe tenere presente anche che la misura protettiva non era a posto per sei anni continuamente, come un periodo di nove mesi passato fra la fine della validità della prima misura e l'adozione della seconda misura durante le quali il richiedente potrebbe sbarazzarsi liberamente della sua proprietà.
La maggioranza assegna poi il “restrizioni significative sull'uso del richiedente della proprietà” (vedere paragrafo 39 della sentenza). Comunque, siccome indicato sopra, noi troviamo che non è sufficiente per riferirsi nell'astratto alle restrizioni elencò nell'Eredità Atto Culturale. Che questioni sono gli effetti concreti sul diritto del richiedente per usare la sua proprietà. L'effetto concreto e solo menzionato con la maggioranza è l'effetto sui progetti commerciali del richiedente che concernono il suo edificio. Noi già abbiamo indicato che noi non consideriamo che questo effetto avverso fu provato. Nella nostra opinione, non è niente nell'archivio che suggerisce che il Divisione Settore avrebbe agito in un modo irresponsabile se si avesse chiesto ad autorizzare qualsiasi cambio alla proprietà del richiedente. Inoltre, sembra che il richiedente divenne solamente consapevole 16 ottobre 2007 dell'esistenza della seconda misura (vedere paragrafo 11 della sentenza), avere su poi a, per nove mesi non stato nel minimo affettato in termini pratici con la sua esistenza.
In generale, noi lo troviamo difficile valutare la proporzionalità di misure concrete con modo di ragionamento essenzialmente astratto. Misure che hanno effetti solamente teoretici che realmente non sono “il feltro” con la materia, debba nella nostra prospettiva non sia preso in considerazione per i fini della prova di proporzionalità.
9. Gli stati di maggioranza che ha “le riserve approssimativamente due aspetti delle autorità nazionali ' conduce nella causa del richiedente” (vedere paragrafo 40 della sentenza).
La prima riserva è del tempo prese venire ad una valutazione del valore del richiedente sta costruendo dal punto di vista dell'eredità culturale. La ragione principale per la critica della maggioranza è che il Divisione Settore non agì rapidamente ottenere i certi articoli di informazioni che erano presumibilmente pubblicamente disponibili (vedere divide in paragrafi 41-43 della sentenza). Al nostro rammarico, noi troviamo, questo un piuttosto modo ingiusto di trattare le autorità. Il richiedente stesso non sollevò il problema della disponibilità pubblica delle informazioni nelle sue osservazioni alla Corte, e che problema non fu fatto commenti perciò o su col Governo. Inoltre, la maggioranza sta ragionando su questo punto è basato completamente su una dichiarazione resa col Divisione Settore quando doveva riferirsi l'archivio al Ministero della Cultura (vedere paragrafo 12 della sentenza). Il Ministero non si appellò sulla scusa dell'autorità locale negli ulteriori procedimenti nazionali. Che che è più, nelle loro osservazioni di fronte a Corte nostra il Governo descrisse in dettaglio la natura complessa dell'elaborazione di determinare oggetti culturali, e menzionò gli specifici ostacoli incontrati durante l'operazione di grande potenza eseguita in riguardo dell'eredità industriale in Divisione. Mentre che chiarimento sembra plausibile a noi, la maggioranza non lo considera valore che lo menziona anche quando cercando di accertare se c'era qualsiasi la giustificazione per la richiesta della misura di protezione preventiva per sei anni.
La seconda riserva concerne due “omissioni procedurali relativo alla maniera nelle quali le autorità nazionali condussero i procedimenti nella causa del richiedente” (vedere paragrafo 44 della sentenza).
Secondo la maggioranza, il Divisione Settore andò a vuoto a prendere in considerazione le prospettive del richiedente prima di ordinare le misure protettive (vedere paragrafo 45 della sentenza). Come lontano siccome noi possiamo vedere, il richiedente non si lamentò prima comunque, le autorità nazionali di una violazione del suo diritto per essere ascoltato; né faceva lui di fronte alla nostra Corte. Noi non pensiamo perciò che questo problema dovrebbe essere sollevato con la Corte di sua propria istanza. Nella nostra opinione dovrebbe essere data retta inoltre, il fatto che le misure di protezione erano di una natura provvisoria. Il danno fatto, se qualsiasi, era di una natura provvisoria. È precisamente nei procedimenti che hanno fatto seguire misura provvisoria il secondo che il richiedente potesse fare le sue prospettive saputo. È data retta il fatto che la conseguenza era favorevole a lui poiché le autorità abbandonarono infine l'idea di proteggere la sua proprietà.
La maggioranza critica inoltre la Corte amministrativa per non avere valutato la proporzionalità della misura (vedere paragrafo 46 della sentenza). Siccome indicato sopra, non sembra a noi che il richiedente sollevò il problema di proporzionalità di fronte alle autorità nazionali. Nella sua descrizione dei procedimenti nazionali, lui non menzionò, che lui aveva fatto così. È perciò discutibile se la Corte amministrativa può essere biasimata per qualsiasi difetto in questo riguardo. Di fronte alla nostra Corte il richiedente non si lamentò inoltre, di una mancanza di ragionare su questo punto nella sentenza della Corte amministrativa. Noi troviamo perciò la riserva su questo punto per essere infondato.
10. Che che sta perdendo evidentemente nel ragionamento della maggioranza è una discussione del meccanismo di risarcimento.
Nelle loro osservazioni alla Corte relativo ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo, il Governo aguzzò al fatto che il richiedente non aveva richiesto mai lo Stato per compensarlo per qualsiasi effetti sui suoi diritti di proprietà, e che lui non aveva contattato mai lo Stato riguardo a piani per vendere la sua proprietà. Noi consideriamo il problema del risarcimento cruciale per la determinazione di se o non un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra i diritti individuali del richiedente e l'interesse generale della comunità (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982 §§ 69 e 73, Serie Un n. 52).
Allo stesso tempo, noi non vogliamo implicare che qualsiasi restrizione dei diritti del richiedente doveva essere accompagnata con della forma del risarcimento invariabilmente (vedere Potomska e Potomski c. la Polonia, n. 33949/05, § 67 29 marzo 2011; il von di Fürst Thurn und Tassì, citato sopra, § 23; e Diaconescu c. la Romania (il dec.), n. 38353/05, 17 settembre 2013). Dove un controllare di misura che l'uso di proprietà è in problema, la mancanza del risarcimento è un fattore per essere presa nell'esame, ma non è di sé sufficiente costituire una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Depalle c. la Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 91, ECHR 2010, e Berger-Krall ed Altri c. la Slovenia, n. 14717/04), § 199, 12 giugno 2014). La questione per essere risposto è se nella luce di tutte le circostanze il richiedente doveva sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo e, in tal caso, se diritto nazionale previde per il risarcimento sufficiente.
Dove la maggioranza non prende nell'esame le possibilità offrirono col meccanismo di risarcimento, noi pensiamo che non ci può essere nessuna base sufficiente per concludere, per sé che l'interferenza era sproporzionata.
11. Gradiremmo infine, dire una parola sulle conclusioni per essere dedotto dalla sentenza presente.
Benché noi non concordiamo con che che è affermato in paragrafi 41-46 della sentenza, noi abbiamo fiducia che la maggioranza considera che è i fatti menzionati in questi paragrafi che inclinano l'equilibrio in favore del richiedente. Noi leggemmo perciò la sentenza presente come essendo adottato nella luce delle particolari circostanze della causa.
In qualsiasi l'evento, sarebbe duro per noi per immaginare che la sentenza potrebbe essere interpretata in tale modo come implicare che restrizioni che generalmente seguono da una misura di protezione di eredità culturale (vedere, per istanza, Articolo 4 della Convenzione per la Protezione dell'Eredità Architettonica dell'Europa, firmato in Granada 3 ottobre 1985) è incompatibile col diritto per rispettare per proprietà. Noi non crediamo che la maggioranza vuole sconvolgere la filosofia intera dietro a simile protezione.





DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è domenica 09/02/2020.

Se volete sapere come funziona LA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, qui c'è uno schema:

I COSTI DELLA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, IN SINTESI

Consulenza iniziale: esame di atti e consigli

Gratuita
Per richiederla cliccate qui: Colloquio telefonico gratuito

Eventuale successiva assistenza, se richiesta

Da concordare:

  • Con accordo scritto (a garanzia dell'espropriato)
  • Con pagamento posticipato (si paga con i soldi che si ottengono dall'Amministrazione)
  • Col criterio: SE NON OTTIENI NON PAGHI

Se sei assistito da un professionista aderente all'Associazione pagherai solo a risultato raggiunto, "con i soldi" dell'Amministrazione.

Non si deve pagare se non si ottiene il risultato stabilito. Tutto ciò viene pattuito, a garanzia dell'espropriato, sempre con un contratto scritto. E' ammesso solo il rimborso spese vive: ad. es. 1.000 euro per il DAP (tutelarsi e opporsi senza contenzioso) o 2.000 euro per il contenzioso.

Per vedere l'ACCORDO TIPO per l'assistenza, cliccate qui Vademecum gratuito e andate a pag. 20

Ricordate che il principale custode dei vostri diritti siete voi stessi.
E' quindi essenziale capire ciò che accade e ciò che accadrà.

Se volete sapere come si svolge la PROCEDURA ESPROPRIATIVA e come tutelarvi nelle varie fasi, abbiamo predisposto una breve sintesi degli strumenti da utilizzare.
Potete esaminarla cliccando qui: Come Tutelarsi in tre passi