Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VUKUŠI? v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 35,P1-1

NUMERO: 69735/11/2016
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 31/05/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible
No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property
Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)



SECOND SECTION






CASE OF VUKUŠI? v. CROATIA

(Application no. 69735/11)







JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG


31 May 2016


FINAL

31/08/2016

This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Vukuši? v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
I??l Karaka?, President,
Julia Laffranque,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Gri?co,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
Georges Ravarani, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 10 May 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 69735/11) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 25 October 2011.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Sisak. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that his right to property had been violated by the annulment of his title to ownership of the flat he occupied.
4. On 4 March 2013 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1946 and lives in Zagreb.
A. Background to the case
6. In 1965 the Sisak Ironworks (Željezara Sisak), a socially-owned company, granted a specially protected tenancy to its employee S.K. and his family of a flat in Sisak. During 1991 and 1992 Serbian paramilitary forces gained control of about one third of the territory of Croatia and proclaimed the so-called “Serbian Autonomous Region of Krajina” (Srpska autonomna oblast Krajina, hereinafter “Krajina”). The town of Sisak was close to the border of Krajina. There were targeted killings of Serbian civilians by members of the Croatian police and army in the Sisak area during a prolonged period in 1991 and 1992 (see Jeli? v. Croatia, no. 57856/11, § 78, 12 June 2014). Owing to this situation, S.K. and his wife Z.K., both being of Serbian national origin, left the town of Sisak and went to live with their relatives in Rijeka. They left their belongings, such as furniture and household appliances, in the flat in Sisak.
7. In May 1991 the socially-owned company Sisak Ironworks was transformed into a joint-stock company and became Sisak Ironworks Holding (Željezara Sisak Holding). It remained State-owned and State-controlled. It owned several companies, one of them being Sisak Ironworks Flat company (Željezara Sisak “Stan”) which since May 1991 managed all the flats having been previously owned by the former Sisak Ironworks company. Another company was Sisak Ironworks Fortis, which was privatised in July 1995. From 1997 the State ceased to have any share in the ownership of Sisak Ironworks Holding.
8. On 3 June 1991 Parliament enacted the Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, hereinafter “the Sale to Occupier Act”) with regulations on the sale of socially-owned flats previously let under a specially protected tenancy. In general, the Act entitled the holder of a specially protected tenancy of a socially-owned flat to purchase it under favourable conditions.
9. The applicant and his family lived in the town of Petrinja in their house. Petrinja was occupied by Serbian paramilitary forces in September 1991. The applicant and his family moved to Sisak as displaced persons. The applicant found employment with Sisak Ironworks Fortis.
10. In 1992 the applicant and his family moved into the flat where S.K. and Z.K. had a specially protected tenancy. According to the applicant the flat was allocated to him and his family by his employer. According to the Government, during the proceedings before the domestic courts the applicant did not produce any document which showed the flat as having been allocated to him. S.K. and the applicant communicated on several occasions by telephone and S.K. agreed that the applicant and his family, as displaced persons, could temporarily occupy the flat.
B. Proceedings concerning the specially protected tenancy of S.K. and Z.K.
11. On 13 July 1992 the Sisak Ironworks Flat company brought a civil action in the Sisak Municipal Court against S.K. and Z.K., seeking the termination of their specially protected tenancy of the flat at issue. The applicant gave oral evidence as a witness in those proceedings. He stated that he did not know where S.K. was. S.K. and Z.K., having been adjudged to be persons whose whereabouts were unknown, had a special guardian ad litem appointed to represent them in the proceedings. On 20 October 1992 the Sisak Municipal Court terminated S.K. and Z.K.’s specially protected tenancy on the grounds that they had abandoned the flat in question. That judgment was upheld by the Sisak County Court on 24 March 1992 and thus became final.
12. On 23 December 1993 S.K. and Z.K. lodged an application for the reopening of civil proceedings which had been completed with final effect. A copy of that application was served on the Sisak Ironworks Flat company. The application was granted on 12 April 1994 and the proceedings were reopened. The applicant participated in the reopened proceedings as an intervener on the side of the plaintiff.
13. On the same day, Sisak Ironworks Holding and the Fortis company concluded an agreement to sell the flat at issue to the applicant, under the Sale to Occupier Act. A copy of the contract was submitted to the State Attorney’s Office for approval, which was given on 12 April 1994.
14. On 22 May 1996 the Sisak County Court dismissed the action by the Sisak Ironworks Flat company to terminate the specially protected tenancy held by S.K. and Z.K. That judgment was upheld by the Sisak County Court on 30 June 1997 and thus became final.
C. Reconstruction of the applicant’s house in Petrinja
15. After the Croatian authorities had gained control over Petrinja in 1995, the applicant and his family sought reconstruction assistance for their house in Petrinja to be repaired, under the Reconstruction Act (see paragraph 28 below).
16. On 12 December 1996 the Office for Reconstruction and Development of Sisak-Moslavina County accepted the applicant’s request and granted him and his family the sum of 29,900 Croatian kunas (HRK) to repair their house in Petrinja.
17. The applicant and his family confirmed to the administrative authorities that they had returned to Petrinja on 16 January 1998. They had their registered residence in Petrinja between 5 February 1993 and 28 December 1999.
D. Annulment of the applicant’s title to the property
18. In 2003 S.K. and Z.K. brought a civil action in the Sisak Municipal Court (Op?inski sud u Sisku) against the parties to the 1994 contract of sale, seeking the annulment of that contract. During the proceedings S.K. died. The claim was dismissed by the Sisak Municipal Court on the grounds that the contract of sale had been concluded in accordance with the law, since at that time the applicant had had a specially protected tenancy of the flat in question.
19. The Municipal Court’s judgment was reversed on 22 November 2007 by the Sisak County Court (Županijski sud u Sisku). It established that Z.K. had not lost her specially protected tenancy since it had been restored to her and therefore the contract of sale had been concluded in breach of the mandatory rules of the Sale to Occupier Act. It also held that the applicant had known the circumstances in which the former holders of the specially protected tenancy had left the flat at issue as well as that they had lodged a request for the re-opening of the proceedings in which their specially protected tenancy had been terminated. Therefore, the impugned contract of sale was contrary to morals and constitutional principles and therefore null and void under section 103(1) of the Obligations Act. The judgment was upheld by the Supreme Court (Vrhovni sud Republike Hrvatske) on 20 January 2010.
20. On 26 March 2008 the applicant lodged a constitutional complaint. He relied on Article 3 and Articles 14 § 1 and 29 § 1 of the Constitution (see paragraph 22 below). In essence he complained about the annulment of his title to the flat by the Sisak County Court. In particular, in his constitutional complaint he wrote, inter alia:
“The complainant’s right to inviolability of ownership guaranteed by Article 3 of the Croatian Constitution was violated by the decisions of the Sisak County Court and the Sisak Municipal Court because the unconstitutional decision of the Sisak County Court interferes with the complainant’s ownership ...”
21. The Constitutional Court declared the applicant’s constitutional complaint inadmissible on 9 June 2011 holding that the case did not raise any constitutional issues.
22. The applicant is still living in the flat at issue.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Constitution
23. The relevant Articles of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 56/90 with further amendments) read as follows:
Article 3
“Freedom, equality, ethnic and gender equality, peace-making, social justice, respect for human rights, inviolability of ownership, preservation of nature and the environment, the rule of law and a democratic multi-party system are the highest values of the constitutional order of the Republic of Croatia and serve as a basis for interpreting the Constitution.”
Article 14
“...
All shall be equal before the law.”
Article 29
“In the determination of his rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial court established by law.
...”
Article 34
“The home is inviolable.
...”
Article 48
“The right of ownership shall be guaranteed.
Ownership implies duties. Owners and users of property shall contribute to the general welfare.”
Article 141
“International agreements which have been concluded and ratified in accordance with the Constitution and made public shall be part of the Republic’s internal legal order and shall be [hierarchically] superior to [domestic] statutes ...”
B. Relevant legislation
1. The Constitutional Court Act
24. The relevant part of the 1999 Constitutional Act on the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Croatia (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 99/99 – “the Constitutional Court Act”), as amended by the 2002 amendments (Ustavni zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Ustavnog zakona o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 29/02), which entered into force on 15 March 2002, reads as follows:
Section 62
“1. Anyone may lodge a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court if he or she deems that a decision of a State authority, local or regional government, or a legal person invested with public authority, on his or her rights or obligations, or as regards a suspicion or accusation of a criminal offence, has violated his or her human rights or fundamental freedoms, or the right to local or regional government, guaranteed by the Constitution (‘constitutional right’)...
2. If another legal remedy is available in respect of the violation of the constitutional rights [complained of], the constitutional complaint may be lodged only after use of this remedy has been made.
3. In matters in which an administrative action or, in civil and non-contentious proceedings, an appeal on points of law [revizija] is available, remedies shall only be considered exhausted after a decision on those legal remedies has been given.”
Section 65(1)
“A constitutional complaint shall contain ... an indication of the constitutional right alleged to have been violated [together] with an indication of the relevant provision of the Constitution guaranteeing that right...”
Section 71(1)
“... [t]he Constitutional Court shall only examine the violations of constitutional rights alleged in the constitutional complaint.”
2. Sale to Occupier Act
25. The Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, Official Gazette no. 27/91 with further amendments) regulated the conditions for the sale of flats let under protected tenancies.
26. Section 1 of the Act entitled holders of protected tenancies of socially-owned flats to purchase such flats under favourable conditions, provided that each holder bought only one flat.
27. Section 21 obliged a seller to submit the contract of sale within eight days to the competent State Attorney’s Office for approval.
3. The Reconstruction Act
28. The Reconstruction Act (Zakon o obnovi, Official Gazette no. 24/96, 54/96 with further amendments) provides, inter alia, that the State, subject to certain conditions, is to grant reconstruction assistance to owners of property (flats and family houses only) which was damaged during the war. The request is to be submitted to the competent ministry. A person claiming such assistance is obliged to give a binding statement that he or she will return to live in the property at issue.
4. The Obligations Act
29. The relevant part of the Obligations Act (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia no. 29/78 with further amendments, and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia no. 53/91 with further amendments – “the 1978 Obligations Act”) provided as follows:
Nullity
Section 103
“(1) A contract that is contrary to the Constitution, mandatory rules or morals shall be null and void unless the purpose of the breached rule indicates some other penalty, or the law in a particular case provides otherwise.
(2) If only one party is prohibited from concluding a contract, the contract shall remain valid, unless the law in a particular case provides otherwise, and the party that has breached the statutory prohibition shall bear the appropriate consequences.”
Effects of nullity
Section 104(1)
“Where a contract is null and void, each contracting party is obliged to return to the other everything it has received on the basis of such a contract. If that is not possible, or if the nature of the obligation performed renders restitution impracticable, an appropriate [amount of] monetary compensation shall be given, according to the prices at the time a court decision is made, unless the law provides otherwise.”
Subsequent disappearance of the cause of nullity
Section 107
“(1) A contract that is null and void shall not become valid if the cause of nullity subsequently disappears.
(2) However, if a prohibition was of minor importance, and the contract has been performed, the issue of nullity may not be raised.”
Liability of a person responsible for the nullity of a contract
Section 108
“A contracting party responsible for the conclusion of a contract that is null and void shall be liable in damages to the other contracting party for the damage sustained on account of the nullity of the contract, if the latter did not know or, according to the circumstances, could not have known of the existence of the cause of nullity.”
Examining nullity
Section 109
“(1) A court shall examine the issue of nullity of its own motion [ex officio] and any interested party may raise it.
(2) A State attorney shall also have the right to plead nullity.”
Unlimited period for pleading nullity
Section 110
“The right to plead nullity shall not lapse.”
30. On 1 January 2006 the new Obligations Act (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Official Gazette, no. 35/05 with further amendments – “the 2006 Obligations Act”) entered into force. Sections 322, 323 and 326-328 contain the same provisions as sections 103, 104 and 107-110 of the 1978 Obligations Act.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
31. The applicant complained that his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions had been violated. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ submissions
32. The Government argued that the applicant had not properly exhausted domestic remedies because he had not complained, even in substance, of a violation of his property rights in his constitutional complaint.
33. They argued further that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was not applicable to the circumstances of the present case because the case concerned a dispute between private parties, namely S.K. and Z.K. as the claimants, and the applicant and his employer, who had concluded the impugned sale contract, as the defendants in the civil proceedings at issue. The Sisak Ironworks Flat company, even though the majority of its capital had been State-owned at the time of the impugned sale contract, had acted as a private party to a civil-law dispute. The only involvement of the State had been through the courts, which had performed their regular duty of adjudicating disputes. In support of those arguments the Government relied on the cases of S.Ö., A.K. and Ar.K. v. Turkey ((dec.), no. 31138/96, 13 September 1999) and Gladysheva v. Russia (no. 7097/10, §§ 52 and 53, 6 December 2011).
34. The applicant argued that throughout the proceedings before the national courts he had raised his property complaint in substance.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Exhaustion of domestic remedies
35. The Court notes that even though the applicant in his constitutional complaint did not rely on Article 48 of the Constitution or Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention he expressly stated that the judgment of the Sisak County Court of 22 November 2007 had been in violation of his constitutionally-guaranteed right of ownership (see paragraphs 19-20 above).
36. The Court is therefore satisfied that the applicant provided the national authorities with the opportunity which is in principle intended to be afforded to Contracting States by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, namely of putting right the violations alleged against them (see Lelas v. Croatia, no. 55555/08, §§ 45 and 47-52, 20 May 2010).
37. It follows that the Government’s objection as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies must be rejected.
(b) Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
38. According to the Convention institutions’ case-law, “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention may be either “existing possessions or assets”, including claims, under certain conditions. According to the decisions of the Croatian courts, it appears that the applicant’s title to his flat was considered void ab initio, which had the effect that he was considered never to have owned it. The Court considers that the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention even if his title was declared null and void ab initio. The Court notes that he possessed the flat in question for about twenty years and was considered its owner for all legal purposes. Moreover, it would be unreasonable to accept that a State may enact legislation which allows annulment ab initio of contracts or other titles to property and thus escape responsibility for an interference with property rights under the Convention (see Panikian v. Bulgaria, no. 29583/96, Commission decision of 10 July 1997, and Gashi v. Croatia, no. 32457/05, § 22, 13 December 2007).

39. The Government submitted that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention was not applicable to the present case because the case concerned a civil-law dispute between private parties. In this connection the Court first reiterates that while such disputes do not themselves engage the responsibility of the State under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Zagreba?ka banka d.d. v. Croatia, no. 39544/05, § 250, 12 December 2013, and case-law cited therein), this does not mean that the Article in question is inapplicable to that type of dispute. If court decisions in such disputes are arbitrary or otherwise manifestly unreasonable they would constitute a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (ibid.). If they are not, then those decisions do not amount to an interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions (ibid., § 252, and see also the case-law cited therein). In either case, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 remains applicable. Consequently, the Government’s objection as to the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has to be dismissed.
(c) Conclusion
40. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants’ submissions
41. The applicant maintained that his rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had been violated by the annulment of his title to the flat he occupied. He asserted that he had bought the flat in good faith and had been living in it for over twenty years. The situation in which he, on the one hand and Z.K. and S.K., on the other hand, had conflicting titles to the same flat had been created by the State authorities. The Sisak Municipal Court and the Sisak County Court had firstly terminated the special protected tenancy of S.K. and Z.K. by final judgments and then the same courts had annulled those judgments.
(b) The Government’s submissions
42. The Government argued that the agreement for the sale of the flat at issue between the applicant and his employer had been null and void and that the applicant could not have acquired title to the property on that basis since an agreement which was null and void could not have any legal effect.
43. Therefore, the Government argued that there had been no interference with the applicant’s property rights. Were the Court to hold otherwise, the interference had been based in law since the decision of the national courts to declare the impugned contract of sale null and void had been based on section 103 of the Obligations Act. It had also pursued the legitimate aim of protecting the legal order.
44. The Government further emphasised that the interference had also been proportionate and that the applicant had not borne any excessive individual burden. The applicant had known why S.K. and Z.K. had left Sisak and had maintained contact with them. The applicant’s employer had sold the flat at issue to the applicant, even though it had known that S.K. and Z.K. had sought the reopening of the proceedings in which they had lost their specially protected tenancy.
45. By allowing the reopening of those proceedings, the judgments of the Sisak Municipal Court and the Sisak County Court terminating the protected tenancy of S.K. and Z.K. had been set aside, with the consequence that their specially protected tenancy had prevailed. Therefore, the applicant had had no right to purchase the flat at issue and the contract of sale to that effect had been declared null and void.
46. The flat at issue had only been temporary accommodation for the applicant and his family as displaced persons during the occupation of the town of Petrinja, where they owned a house. After the liberation of Petrinja, the applicant and his family had been given reconstruction assistance for their house in Petrinja to be repaired. The very purpose of the legislation on such assistance was to enable displaced persons to return to their homes.
47. Lastly, after the impugned contract of sale had been declared null and void, the applicant could have sought reimbursement of the price he had paid for the flat at issue.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether there was an interference with the applicant’s possession
48. As to the Government’s argument that the present case concerns a civil-law dispute between private parties (see paragraphs 33 and 39 above), the Court reiterates that the mere fact that the State, through its judicial system, provided a forum for the determination of a private-law dispute does not give rise to an interference by the State with property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Zagreba?ka banka, cited above, § 250, and the case-law cited therein). However, in the Court’s view the present case is not a civil-law dispute in the traditional sense, nor was the State’s role limited to providing a judicial forum for the determination of such a dispute. In this connection the Court first notes that the contract of sale whereby the Sisak Ironworks Holding company sold the applicant the flat in question was declared null and void as being contrary to mandatory rules of the Sale to Occupier Act. The nature and rationale of that Act suggest that it is legislation which has a predominantly (if not entirely) public law character. This is best illustrated by the fact that under the legislation in question, former socially-owned companies (such as Sisak Ironworks Holding in the present case), even after they had been privatised and transformed into private companies, had to sell the flats in their ownership to those who held specially protected tenancies in respect of those flats under favourable conditions for the buyers (see paragraph 26 above). What is more, the competent State Attorney had to approve such contracts (see paragraph 27 above). It is precisely for that reason that the Court has not, in similar cases, confined itself to examining whether the judgments of domestic courts depriving applicants of the ownership of flats purchased under the Sale to Occupier Act were arbitrary or manifestly unreasonable (see Gashi, cited above, and Pavlinovi? v. Croatia (dec.), nos. 17124/05 and 17126/05, 3 September 2009). Rather, it has held that such judgments amounted to an interference with the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and examined whether the interference was provided for by law, was in the public interest and was proportionate. Moreover, at time when the flat in question was sold to the applicant, in 1994, the Sisak Ironworks Holding was still State-owned and State-controlled (compare to Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, §§ 115-117, ECHR 2014; R. Ka?apor and Others v. Serbia, nos. 2269/06 et al., §§ 97 and 98, 15 January 2008; and Zastava It Turs v. Serbia (dec.), no. 24922/12, §§ 19-23, 9 April 2013).
49. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 guarantees in substance the right of property and comprises three distinct rules. The first, which is expressed in the first sentence of the first paragraph and is of a general nature, lays down the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property. The second rule, in the second sentence of the same paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and makes it subject to certain conditions. The third rule, contained in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules, which are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of property, are to be construed in the light of the general principle laid down in the first rule (see, among other authorities, Draon v. France [GC], no. 1513/03, § 69, 6 October 2005).
50. The Court notes in this connection that the applicant purchased the flat at issue under a contract of sale concluded in 1994 with the owner of the flat, a formerly socially-owned company which at that time had already been privatised. However, until 1997 the majority of the capital of Sisak Ironworks Holding was still State-owned. The Sisak County Court’s judgment of 22 November 2007 declaring null and void the contract of sale from which the applicant derived his ownership constituted an interference with his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. As to the question whether the interference was covered by the first or second paragraph of that Article, the Court has already found that declaring title to property null and void is to be examined under the first paragraph, second sentence, as it amounts to a deprivation of possessions (see Gashi, cited above, §§ 27 28, and Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99, 48380/99, 51362/99, 53367/99, 60036/00, 73465/01 and 194/02, §§ 159-160, 15 March 2007). It considers that the same approach must be followed in the present case.
51. The Court must further examine whether the interference was justified.
(b) Justification for the interference with the peaceful enjoyment of “possessions”
(i) Whether the interference was “provided for by law”
52. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999 II).
53. In the Court’s view the decisions of the domestic courts in the present case had a legal basis in domestic law, in particular in section 103 of the Obligations Act. There is no indication that the courts applied those provisions arbitrarily or that their decisions and the resulting deprivation of property were unlawful under domestic law. The Court reiterates that its power to review compliance with domestic law is limited (see, among other authorities, Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (no. 2), 19 February 1998, § 57, Reports 1998 I). It is in the first place for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law, even in those fields where the Convention “incorporates” the rules of that law since the national authorities are, in the nature of things, particularly qualified to settle issues arising in such situations (see, mutatis mutandis, Winterwerp v. the Netherlands, 24 October 1979, § 46, Series A no. 33).
54. The Court is therefore satisfied that the interference in the present case was “provided for by law”, as required by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(ii) Whether the interference pursued an aim in the public interest
55. Any interference with a property right, irrespective of the rule it falls under, can be justified only if it serves a public (or general) interest.
56. The Court reiterates that, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than an international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. Here, as in other fields to which the safeguards of the Convention extend, the national authorities accordingly enjoy a certain margin of appreciation (see, inter alia and mutatis mutandis, Draon, cited above, § 75).
57. Furthermore, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. The Court, finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be wide, will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is “in the public interest” unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see, inter alia, Draon, cited above, § 76). The same applies necessarily, if not a fortiori, to the kind of radical social changes which occurred in central and eastern Europe after 1989 (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 91, ECHR 2005 VI).
58. In the present case the applicant’s title to the property in question was declared null and void as being contrary to the provisions of the Sale to Occupier Act, to morals and to constitutional principles since the judgment terminating the specially protected tenancy of the original holders had been set aside and therefore the applicant could not have acquired a specially protected tenancy in respect of the same flat. Consequently, he had no right to purchase the flat.
59. The Court accepts that the national courts, by declaring the contract of sale at issue null and void, were pursuing aims that were in the public interest, namely those of protecting the rule of law and of protecting the rights of others.
(iii) Proportionality of the interference
60. The Court must also examine whether an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions strikes the requisite fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, or whether it imposes a disproportionate and excessive burden on the applicant (see, among many other authorities, Jahn and Others, cited above, § 93). Thus, the balance to be maintained between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of fundamental rights is upset if the person concerned has had to bear a “disproportionate burden” (see, among many other authorities, The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 December 1994, §§ 70-71, Series A no. 301-A). Despite the margin of appreciation given to the State the Court must nevertheless, in the exercise of its power of review, determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the applicant’s right to property (see Rosinski v Poland, no. 17373/02, § 78, 17 July 2007). The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention as a whole, including therefore the first paragraph, second sentence, which is to be read in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first sentence. In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be achieved by any measure depriving a person of his possessions (see Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, 20 November 1995, § 38, Series A no. 332, and The Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 89, ECHR 2000-XII).
61. The Court notes at the outset that the national courts’ findings which led to the applicant’s title to the property at issue being declared null and void were mainly concentrated on the fact that other persons, S.K. and Z.K., had a specially protected tenancy in respect of the flat which the applicant occupied and that the judgments terminating their specially protected tenancy had been annulled. The consequence of such decisions was that S.K. and Z.K. never lost their specially protected tenancy. The national courts also placed emphasis on the fact that the applicant had been aware of the circumstances in which S.K. and Z.K. had left the flat at issue and of the fact that they had lodged a request for the re-opening of the proceedings in which their specially protected tenancy had been terminated, the applicant having even been an intervener in these proceedings.
62. However, in the meantime, the applicant had moved into the flat, allegedly with the acquiescence of the owner of the flat, the Sisak Ironworks Holding company, which subsequently sold the flat to the applicant under favourable conditions, as prescribed by the Sale to Occupier Act. The sale contract was approved by the State Attorney’s Office, a requirement under section 21 of that Act. Thus, the State authorities created a situation in which two persons had conflicting titles in respect of the same flat.
63. The Court emphasises that its task in the present case is not to call into question the right of a State to enact laws aimed at securing the rule of law by providing for the annulment of defective contracts contravening mandatory rules, but, in accordance with its supervisory powers, to review under the Convention the manner in which such laws were applied in the applicant’s case and whether the decisions taken by the relevant domestic authorities complied with the principles enshrined in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
64. In examining whether a fair balance was struck between the public interest and that of the applicant, the Court reiterates in particular the importance of the principle of “good governance”. The “good governance” principle should not, as a general rule, prevent the authorities from correcting occasional mistakes, even those resulting from their own negligence. Holding otherwise would, inter alia, amount to sanctioning an inappropriate allocation of scarce public resources, which in itself would be contrary to the public interest (see Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 73, 15 September 2009). On the other hand, the need to correct an old “wrong” should not disproportionately interfere with a new right which has been acquired by an individual relying in good faith on the legitimacy of the actions of a public authority (see, mutatis mutandis, Pincová and Pinc v. the Czech Republic, no. 36548/97, § 58, ECHR 2002 VIII). In other words, State authorities which fail to put in place or adhere to their own procedures should not be allowed to profit from their wrongdoing or to escape their obligations (see Lelas, cited above, § 74). The risk of any mistake made by the State authority must be borne by the State itself and any errors must not be remedied at the expense of the individuals concerned (see, among other authorities, mutatis mutandis, Pincová and Pinc, cited above, § 58; Gashi, cited above, § 40; and Trgo v. Croatia, no. 35298/04, § 67, 11 June 2009). In the context of the revocation of a title to property which has been granted erroneously, the “good governance” principle may not only impose on the authorities an obligation to act promptly in correcting their mistake (see Moskal, cited above, § 69), but may also necessitate the payment of adequate compensation or another type of appropriate reparation to its former good-faith holder (see Pincová and Pinc, cited above, § 53; To?cu?? and Others v. Romania, no. 36900/03, § 38, 25 November 2008; and Rysovskyy v. Ukraine, no. 29979/04, § 71, 20 October 2011).
65. The Court and the former Commission have already dealt with cases involving the annulment of contracts of sale under which applicants bought flats they occupied (see, inter alia, Panikian, cited above, pp. 109-119; Pincová and Pinc, cited above; and Velikovi and Others, cited above). In those cases, the Court and the Commission were called upon to assess particular situations which concerned legislation passed with the aim of making good injustices dating back decades and inherited from communist rule in the respective States. In particular, in the judgment of Velikovi and Others (cited above, § 190) the Court set out certain criteria for deciding whether the principle of proportionality had been complied with in such cases. It held:
“ ... [T]he proportionality issue must be decided with reference to the following factors: (i) whether or not the case falls clearly within the scope of the legitimate aims of the Restitution Law, having regard to the factual and legal basis of the applicants’ title and the findings of the national courts in their judgments declaring it null and void (abuse of power, substantive unlawfulness or minor omissions attributable to the administration) and (ii) the hardship suffered by the applicants and the adequacy of the compensation actually obtained or the compensation which could be obtained through a normal use of the procedures and possibilities available to the applicants at the relevant time, including ... the possibilities for the applicants to secure a new home for themselves.”
The Court considers that the above criteria apply, mutatis mutandis, in the present case.
66. In this connection, the Court notes that the domestic courts declared the contract of sale whereby the applicant had acquired ownership of the flat in question to be null and void because it had been concluded contrary to the mandatory rules of the Sale to Occupier Act. The applicant was aware of the circumstances in which S.K. and Z.K. had left the flat in Sisak since he had maintained contact with them. He was also aware, at the time when he bought the flat at issue, that Z.K. and S.K. had applied for the reopening of the civil proceedings in which their specially protected tenancy of that flat had been terminated. In these circumstances, the Court considers that it cannot be entirely ruled out that the applicant did not act in good faith or that the defect rendering the contract of sale null and void was partly attributable to him.
67. In the Court’s view, in such a situation the public interest pursued by the annulment of the applicant’s title, namely the rights of Z.K. and S.K. as former tenants whose specially protected tenancy had been restored, strongly prevails over any of the rights the applicant might claim in respect of the flat at issue. Thus, the first criterion under the Velikovi test has been satisfied (see paragraph 65 above).
68. As to the second criterion, in assessing whether adequate compensation was available to the applicant the Court must have regard to the particular circumstances of each case, including the availability of compensation and the practical realities in which the applicant found himself (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, § 231). A clear and foreseeable possibility of obtaining compensation was available to the applicant (see, by converse implication, Velikovi and Others, cited above, § 227). In particular, by relying on sections 104(1) and 108 of the 1978 Obligations Act (or, after 1 January 2006, section 323 of the 2006 Obligations Act), the applicant could not only have sought reimbursement of the purchase price, but also accrued statutory default interest and compensation for any further damage he might have sustained.
69. As to the situation in which the applicant found himself, the Court notes that he was granted reconstruction assistance for a house he owns in Petrinja, which had been damaged in the war, to be repaired. The purpose of the legislation concerning the allocation of resources for the reconstruction of houses damaged during the war was to enable owners to return to their homes and live there (see paragraph 28 above). The applicant, even though he had received resources from the State for that purpose, also bought a flat in Sisak under the favourable conditions prescribed by the Sale to Occupier Act. However, the actual purpose of that Act was to provide for the housing needs of those who owned no other suitable dwelling (see paragraph 25 above).
70. Against the above considerations, the Court concludes that the interference complained of did not place an excessive individual burden on the applicant. There has accordingly been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
71. The applicant complained that his right to respect for his home had been violated. He relied on Article 8 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Admissibility
1. The parties’ submissions
72. The Government argued that the applicant had not, either expressly or in substance, complained before the national courts of a violation of his right to respect for his home. In particular, he had not expressly relied on Article 34 of the Constitution in his constitutional complaint.
73. The applicant replied that he had raised this complaint in substance because throughout the proceedings before the national courts he had claimed that the flat in question constituted his home given that he had been living in it since 1991, that is, more than twenty years.
2. The Court’s assessment
74. The Court notes that the applicant in his constitutional complaint did not rely on Article 8 of the Convention or Article 34 of the Croatian Constitution, which is the provision which guarantees the right to respect for one’s home and therefore arguably corresponds to Article 8 of the Convention.
75. More importantly, the applicant did not complain of a violation of his right to respect for his home in his constitutional complaint, even in substance. In particular, his constitutional complaint does not contain a single reference to “home” or a single mention that he has been living in the flat in question for more than twenty years.
76. In this connection the Court reiterates that, in order to properly exhaust domestic remedies it is not sufficient that a violation of the Convention is “evident” from the facts of the case or applicants’ submissions. Rather, they must actually complain (expressly or in substance) about it in a manner which leaves no doubt that the same complaint that was subsequently submitted to the Court had indeed been raised at the domestic level (see Merot d.o.o. and Storitve Tir d.o.o. v. Croatia (dec.), nos. 29426/08 29737/08, § 36, 10 December 2013). Contrary to the applicant’s assertion, the Court notes that he neither expressly nor implicitly alleged a violation of his right to respect for his home in his constitutional complaint.
77. In these circumstances, the Court considers that the applicant did not properly exhaust domestic remedies and thus did not provide the national authorities with the opportunity – which is in principle intended to be afforded to Contracting States by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention – of addressing, and thereby preventing or putting right, the particular Convention violation alleged against them (see, for example, Merot d.o.o. and Storitve Tir d.o.o., cited above, § 38, and the cases cited therein).
78. It follows that this complaint is inadmissible under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies and must therefore be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 thereof.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 31 May 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith I??l Karaka?
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - la Privazione della proprietà
Godimento tranquillo della proprietà)



SECONDA SEZIONE






CAUSA VUKUŠI ? C. CROATIA

(Richiesta n. 69735/11)







SENTENZA


STRASBOURG


31 maggio 2016


DEFINITIVO

31/08/2016

Questa sentenza è divenuta definitivo sotto Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Vukuši ?c. Croatia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Il ?Karaka, ?Presidente
Julia Laffranque,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Grico?,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
Georges Ravarani, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato in 10 maggio 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 69735/11) contro la Repubblica di Croatia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino croato, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 25 ottobre 2011.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Sisak. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che il suo diritto a proprietà era stato violato con l'annullamento del suo titolo a proprietà dell'appartamento lui occupò.
4. 4 marzo 2013 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1946 e vive in Zagreb.
Sfondo di A. alla causa
6. Nel 1965 i Lavori in ferro di Sisak (Željezara Sisak), una società socialmente-posseduta, concesso un affitto specialmente protetto al suo impiegato S.K. e la sua famiglia di un appartamento in Sisak. Durante 1991 e 1992 vigori paramilitari serbi guadagnarono controllo di approssimativamente uno terzo del territorio di Croatia e proclamarono il così definito “Regione Autonoma serba di Krajina” (oblast di autonomna di Srpska Krajina, in seguito “Krajina”). La città di Sisak era vicina al confine di Krajina. Là fu designato come bersaglio uccisioni di civili serbi con membri della polizia croata ed esercito nell'area di Sisak durante un periodo prolungato nel 1991 e 1992 (veda Jeli ?c. Croatia, n. 57856/11, § 78 12 giugno 2014). Dovendo a questa situazione, S.K. ed il sua moglie Z.K., sia essere di origine di cittadino serba, sinistro la città di Sisak ed andò a vivere coi loro parenti in Rijeka. Loro lasciarono i loro belongings, come mobilia ed apparecchi di famiglia, nell'appartamento in Sisak.
7. In maggio 1991 la società socialmente-posseduta Ferriera di Sisak fu trasformata in una società di giuntura-scorta e divenne Ferriere di Sisak che Sostiene (Željezara Sisak Holding). Rimase Statale e Stato-controllato. Possedette molte società, uno di loro che è Lavori in ferro di Sisak società Piatta (Željezara Sisak “Stan”) quale poiché maggio 1991 maneggiò tutti gli appartamenti prima stato stato posseduto con la società di Ferriera di Sisak precedente. Un'altra società era Ferriera di Sisak Fortis che fu privatizzato a luglio 1995. Da 1997 lo Stato cessò avere qualsiasi quota nella proprietà di Sisak Ferriera Sostenere.
8. Sul 1991 Parlamento di 3 giugno gli Affitti Specialmente Protetti decretarono (Vendita ad Occupante) l'Atto (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, in seguito “la Vendita ad Occupante Atto”) con regolamentazioni sulla vendita di appartamenti socialmente-posseduti prima affittata sotto un affitto specialmente protetto. In generale, l'Atto diede un titolo al possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto di un appartamento socialmente-posseduto per acquistarlo sotto le condizioni favorevoli.
9. Il richiedente e la sua famiglia vissero nella città di Petrinja in alloggio loro. Petrinja fu occupato con vigori paramilitari serbi a settembre 1991. Il richiedente e la sua famiglia si trasferirono a Sisak come deportati. Il richiedente trovò lavoro con Lavori in ferro di Sisak Fortis.
10. Nel 1992 il richiedente e la sua famiglia passò all'appartamento dove S.K. e Z.K. aveva un affitto specialmente protetto. Secondo il richiedente l'appartamento fu assegnato a lui e la sua famiglia col suo datore di lavoro. Secondo il Governo, il richiedente non produsse durante i procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali qualsiasi documento che mostrò l'appartamento siccome stato stato assegnato a lui. S.K. ed il richiedente comunicò per telefono su molte occasioni e S.K. concordò che il richiedente e la sua famiglia, come deportati potessero occupare temporaneamente l'appartamento.
Procedimenti di B. riguardo all'affitto specialmente protetto di S.K. e Z.K.
11. 13 luglio 1992 i Lavori in ferro di Sisak che società Piatta ha portato un'azione civile nel Sisak Corte Municipale contro S.K. e Z.K., chiedendo la conclusione del loro affitto specialmente protetto dell'appartamento in questione. Il richiedente diede prova orale come un testimone in quelli procedimenti. Lui affermò che lui non seppe dove S.K. era. S.K. e Z.K., stato stato giudicato per essere persone cui dove erano ignote, aveva un litem dell'annuncio custode e speciale nominato per rappresentarli nei procedimenti. 20 ottobre 1992 il Sisak Corte Municipale terminò S.K. e Z.K. ' s affitto specialmente protetto per motivi che loro avevano abbandonato l'appartamento in oggetto. Che sentenza fu sostenuta con l'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak 24 marzo 1992 e così divenne definitivo.
12. Sul 1993 S.K di 23 dicembre. e Z.K. depositato una richiesta per la riapertura di procedimenti civili che erano stati completati con definitivo effetto. Una copia di che la richiesta fu notificata sui Lavori in ferro di Sisak società Piatta. La richiesta fu accordata su 12 aprile 1994 ed i procedimenti fu riaperto. Il richiedente partecipò nei procedimenti riaperti come intervenente sul lato del querelante.
13. Nello stesso giorno, Lavori in ferro di Sisak che Sostiene e la società di Fortis concluse un accordo per vendere l'appartamento in questione al richiedente, sotto la Vendita ad Occupante Atto. Una copia del contratto fu presentata all'Ufficio dell'Avvocato Statale per approvazione che fu data 12 aprile 1994.
14. In 22 maggio 1996 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak respinse l'azione coi Lavori in ferro di Sisak società Piatta terminare l'affitto specialmente protetto sostenuto con S.K. e Z.K. Che sentenza fu sostenuta con l'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak 30 giugno 1997 e così divenne definitivo.
Ricostruzione di C. dell'alloggio del richiedente in Petrinja
15. Dopo che le autorità croate avevano guadagnato su controllo Petrinja nel 1995, il richiedente e la sua famiglia cercarono assistenza di ricostruzione per alloggio loro in Petrinja di essere riparato, sotto il Ricostruzione Atto (veda paragrafo 28 sotto).
16. 12 dicembre 1996 l'Ufficio per Ricostruzione e Sviluppo di Contea di Sisak-Moslavina accettò la richiesta del richiedente ed accordò lui e la sua famiglia la somma di 29,900 kunas croati (HRK) riparare il loro alloggio in Petrinja.
17. Il richiedente e la sua famiglia confermarono alle autorità amministrative che loro erano ritornati a Petrinja 16 gennaio 1998. Loro avevano la loro residenza registrata in Petrinja fra il 1993 e 28 dicembre 1999 di 5 febbraio.
Annullamento di D. del titolo del richiedente alla proprietà
18. In 2003 S.K. e Z.K. portato un'azione civile nel Sisak Corte Municipale (?sud di Opinski u Sisku) contro le parti al contratto del 1994 di vendita, chiedendo l'annullamento di quel il contratto. Durante i procedimenti S.K. morto. La rivendicazione fu respinta col Sisak Corte Municipale per motivi che il contratto di vendita era stato concluso in conformità con la legge, poiché a che tempo il richiedente aveva avuto un affitto specialmente protetto dell'appartamento in oggetto.
19. La sentenza della Corte Municipale fu revocata 22 novembre 2007 con l'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak (sud di Županijski u Sisku). Stabilì quel Z.K. non l'aveva persa affitto specialmente protetto poiché era stato ripristinato a lei e perciò il contratto di vendita era stato concluso in violazione delle norme imperative della Vendita ad Occupante Atto. Contenne anche che il richiedente aveva conosciuto le circostanze nelle quali i possessori precedenti dell'affitto specialmente protetto avevano lasciato l'appartamento in questione così come che loro avevano depositato una richiesta per la re-apertura dei procedimenti nella quale il loro affitto specialmente protetto era stato terminato. Perciò, il contratto contestato di vendita era contrario a morale e principi costituzionali e perciò privo di valore legale sotto sezione 103(1) dell'Obblighi Atto. La sentenza fu sostenuta con la Corte Suprema (sud di Vrhovni Republike Hrvatske) 20 gennaio 2010.
20. 26 marzo 2008 il richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale. Lui si appellò su Articolo 3 ed Articoli 14 § 1 e 29 § 1 della Costituzione (veda paragrafo 22 sotto). In essenza lui si lamentò dell'annullamento del suo titolo all'appartamento con l'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak. In particolare, nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale lui scrisse, inter l'alia:
“Il diritto del reclamante all'inviolabilità di proprietà garantita con Articolo 3 della Costituzione croata fu violato con le decisioni dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak ed il Sisak Corte Municipale perché la decisione incostituzionale dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak interferisce con la proprietà del reclamante...”
21. La Corte Costituzionale dichiarò l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente inammissibile sul 2011 partecipazione azionaria di 9 giugno che la causa non ha sollevato qualsiasi problemi costituzionali.
22. Il richiedente ancora sta vivendo nell'appartamento in questione.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. La Costituzione
23. Gli Articoli attinenti della Costituzione della Repubblica di Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 56/90 con gli ulteriori emendamenti) legga siccome segue:
Articolo 3
“La libertà, uguaglianza etnico e l'uguaglianza di genere, pace-rendendo la giustizia sociale, riguardo per diritti umani l'inviolabilità di proprietà, conservazione di natura e l'ambiente l'articolo di legge ed un sistema di multi-parte democratico è i valori più alti dell'ordine costituzionale della Repubblica di Croatia e notifica come una base per interpretare la Costituzione.”
Articolo 14
“...
Tutti saranno uguali di fronte alla legge.”
Articolo 29
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti ed obblighi o di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro lui, ognuno è concesso ad un'udienza corretta all'interno di un termine ragionevole con una corte indipendente ed imparziale stabilita con legge.
...”
Articolo 34
“La casa è inviolabile.
...”
Articolo 48
“Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito.
Proprietà implica i doveri. Proprietari ed utenti di proprietà contribuiranno al welfare generale.”
Articolo 141
“Accordi internazionali che sono stati conclusi e sono stati ratificati in conformità con la Costituzione e sono stati resi pubblico saranno parte dell'ordine legale interno della Repubblica e saranno [gerarchicamente] superiore a [nazionale] gli statuti...”
B. legislazione Attinente
1. Il Corte Atto Costituzionale
24. La parte attinente del Costituzionale del 1999 Atto sulla Corte Costituzionale della Repubblica di Croatia (zakon di Ustavni o il sudu di Ustavnom Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 99/99-“il Corte Atto Costituzionale”), corretto coi 2002 emendamenti (zakon di Ustavni o izmjenama i dopunama lo zakona di Ustavnog o il sudu di Ustavnom Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 29/02) che entrò in vigore 15 marzo 2002 legge siccome segue:
Sezione 62
“1. Chiunque può presentare un reclamo costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale se lui o lei ritengono che una decisione di un'autorità Statale, governo locale o regionale, o un soggetto giuridico investì con autorità pubblica, su suo o i suoi diritti od obblighi, o come riguardi un sospetto o l'accusa di un reato penale, ha violato suo o i suoi diritti umani o le libertà fondamentali, o il diritto a governo locale o regionale, garantì con la Costituzione (diritto costituzionale di ‘')...
2. Se un'altra via di ricorso legale è disponibile in riguardo della violazione dei diritti costituzionali [si lamentò di], il reclamo costituzionale si può presentare solamente dopo che di questa via di ricorso si è stato avvalso.
3. In questioni in che un'azione amministrativa o, in civile e procedimenti di non-contenzioso, un ricorso su questioni di diritto [il revizija] è disponibile, via di ricorso saranno considerate solamente esauste dopo una decisione su quelle via di ricorso legali è stato dato.”
Sezione 65(1)
“Un'azione di reclamo costituzionale conterrà... un'indicazione del diritto costituzionale addusse essere stata violata [insieme] con un'indicazione della disposizione attinente della Costituzione che garantisce che diritto...”
Sezione 71(1)
“... [il t]he Corte Costituzionale esaminerà solamente le violazioni di diritti costituzionali addotte nell'azione di reclamo costituzionale.”
2. Vendita ad Occupante Atto
25. Gli Affitti Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante) l'Atto (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 27/91 con gli ulteriori emendamenti) regolò le condizioni per la vendita di impedimento di appartamenti sotto affitti protetti.
26. Sezione 1 dell'Atto diede un titolo a possessori di affitti protetti di appartamenti socialmente-posseduti per acquistare simile appartamenti le condizioni favorevoli sotto, purché che ogni possessore comprò appartamento solamente uno.
27. Sezione 21 obbligò un venditore a presentare il contratto di vendita entro otto giorni all'Ufficio dell'Avvocato Statale competente per approvazione.
3. Il Ricostruzione Atto
28. Il Ricostruzione Atto (Zakon od obnovi, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 24/96, 54/96 con gli ulteriori emendamenti) prevede, inter alia che lo Stato, soggetto alle certe condizioni è accordare assistenza di ricostruzione a proprietari di proprietà (appartamenti ed alloggi di famiglia solamente) quale fu danneggiato durante la guerra. La richiesta sarà presentata al ministero competente. Una persona che chiede simile assistenza è obbligata per dare una dichiarazione vincolante che lui o lei ritorneranno per vivere nella proprietà in questione.
4. Gli Obblighi Agiscono
29. La parte attinente dell'Obblighi Atto (Zakon odnosima di obveznim di o, Ufficiale Pubblica della Repubblica Federale e Socialista dell'Iugoslavia n. 29/78 con gli ulteriori emendamenti, ed Ufficiale Pubblica della Repubblica di Croatia n. 53/91 con gli ulteriori emendamenti-“i 1978 Obblighi Agiscono”) purché siccome segue:
Nullità
Sezione 103
“(1) un contratto che è contrario alla Costituzione, norme imperative o morale sarà privo di valore legale a meno che il fine dell'articolo violato indica dell'altra sanzione penale, o la legge in una particolare causa prevede altrimenti.
(2) se solamente uno che parte è proibita dal concludere un contratto, il contratto rimarrà valido, a meno che la legge in una particolare causa prevede altrimenti, e la parte che ha violato la proibizione legale sopporterà le conseguenze appropriate.”
Effetti della nullità
Sezione 104(1)
“Dove è privo di valore legale un contratto, ogni parte contraente è obbligata per ritornare all'altro tutto ha ricevuto sulla base di tale contratto. Se quel non è possibile, o se la natura dell'obbligo compiesse restituzione di prime mani d'intonaco impraticabile, un appropriato [l'importo di] il risarcimento valutario sarà dato, secondo i prezzi al tempo una decisione di corte è presa, a meno che la legge prevede altrimenti.”
Scomparsa susseguente della causa della nullità
Sezione 107
“(1) un contratto che è privo di valore legale non diverrà valido se la causa della nullità scompare successivamente.
(2) comunque, se una proibizione fosse dell'importanza minore, ed il contratto è stato compiuto, il problema della nullità non può essere sollevato.”
La responsabilità di una persona responsabile per la nullità di un contratto
Sezione 108
“Una parte contraente responsabile per la conclusione di un contratto che è privo di valore legale sarà responsabile in danni all'altra parte contraente per il danno subito su conto della nullità del contratto, se i secondi non sapessero o, secondo le circostanze, non poteva sapere dell'esistenza della causa della nullità.”
Nullità esaminatore
Sezione 109
“(1) una corte esaminerà il problema della nullità di sua propria istanza [ex l'officio] e qualsiasi parte interessata può sollevarlo.
(2) un avvocato Statale avrà diritto anche a supplicare la nullità.”
Periodo illimitato per la nullità implorante
Sezione 110
“Il diritto per supplicare la nullità non cadrà.”
30. 1 gennaio 2006 gli Obblighi nuovi Agiscono (Zakon odnosima di obveznim di o, Ufficiale Pubblica, n. 35/05 con gli ulteriori emendamenti-“i 2006 Obblighi Agiscono”) entrò in vigore. Sezioni 322, 323 e 326-328 contengono le stesse disposizioni come sezioni 103, 104 e 107-110 dell'Obblighi Atto del 1978.
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
31. Il richiedente si lamentò che il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà era stato violato. Lui si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
32. Il Governo dibattè che il richiedente non aveva esaurito in modo appropriato via di ricorso nazionali perché lui non si era lamentato, anche in sostanza, di una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale.
33. Loro dibatterono inoltre che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non era applicabile alle circostanze della causa presente perché la causa concernè una controversia fra parti private, vale a dire S.K. e Z.K. come i rivendicatori, ed il richiedente ed il suo datore di lavoro che avevano concluso il contratto di vendita contestato come gli imputati nei procedimenti civili in questione. I Lavori in ferro di Sisak società Piatta, anche se la maggioranza del suo capitale era stata Statale al tempo del contratto di vendita contestato, si era comportato come una parte privata ad una controversia di civile-legge. Il coinvolgimento solo dello Stato era stato per le corti che avevano compiuto il loro dovere regolare di aggiudicare controversie. In appoggio di quegli argomenti il Governo si appellò sulle cause di S.Ö., A.K. ed Ar.K. c. la Turchia ((il dec.), n. 31138/96, 13 settembre 1999) e Gladysheva c. la Russia (n. 7097/10, §§ 52 e 53, 6 dicembre 2011).
34. Il richiedente dibattè che in tutto i procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali lui aveva sollevato la sua azione di reclamo di proprietà in sostanza.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) l'Esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali
35. La Corte nota che anche se il richiedente nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale non si appellò su Articolo 48 della Costituzione o Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione lui affermò espressamente che la sentenza dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak di 22 novembre 2007 era stata in violazione del suo diritto di proprietà costituzionalmente-garantito (veda divide in paragrafi 19-20 sopra).
36. La Corte è soddisfatta perciò che il richiedente fornì alle autorità nazionali l'opportunità che è in principio intese di essere riconosciuto a Stati Contraenti con Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, vale a dire di mettere diritto le violazioni addusse contro loro (veda Lelas c. Croatia, n. 55555/08, §§ 45 e 47-52, 20 maggio 2010).
37. Segue che l'eccezione del Governo come all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinto.
(b) l'Applicabilità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
38. Secondo le istituzioni della la giurisprudenza della Convenzione, “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione può essere uno “proprietà esistenti o i beni”, incluso rivendicazioni, sotto le certe condizioni. Secondo le decisioni delle corti croate, sembra, che il titolo del richiedente al suo appartamento fu considerato ab initio vuoto che aveva l'effetto che non era considerato mai che lui l'avesse posseduto. La Corte considera che il richiedente aveva un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione anche se il suo titolo fu dichiarato ab initio privo di valore legale. La Corte nota che lui possedette l'appartamento in oggetto per approssimativamente venti anni e fu considerato il suo proprietario per tutti i fini legali. Inoltre, sarebbe irragionevole per accettare che un Stato può decretare legislazione che concede ab initio di annullamento di contratti o gli altri titoli a proprietà e così scappa la responsabilità per un'interferenza con diritti di proprietà sotto la Convenzione (veda Panikian c. la Bulgaria, n. 29583/96, decisione di Commissione di 10 luglio 1997 e Gashi c. Croatia, n. 32457/05, § 22 13 dicembre 2007).

39. Il Governo presentò che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non era applicabile alla causa presente perché la causa concernè una controversia di civile-legge fra parti private. In questo collegamento la Corte prima reitera che mentre simile controversie non fanno loro impegnano la responsabilità dello Stato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda il ?banka di Zagrebaka d.d. c. Croatia, n. 39544/05, § 250, 12 dicembre 2013, e causa-legge citati therein), questo non vuole dire che l'Articolo in oggetto è inapplicabile a che dattilografa di controversia. Se decisioni di corte in simile controversie sono arbitrarie o altrimenti manifestamente irragionevole loro costituirebbero una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (l'ibid.). Se loro non sono, poi quelle decisioni non corrispondono ad un'interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà (l'ibid., § 252, e vede anche la causa-legge citata therein). In ambo i casi, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 resti applicabile. Di conseguenza, l'eccezione del Governo come all'applicabilità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 doveva essere respinto.
(c) Conclusione
40. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) I richiedenti le osservazioni di '
41. Il richiedente sostenne che i suoi diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 era stato violato con l'annullamento del suo titolo all'appartamento che lui ha occupato. Lui asserì che lui aveva comprato l'appartamento in buon fede e stava vivendo in sé per più di venti anni. La situazione in che lui, sulla mano del un'e Z.K. e S.K., d'altra parte aveva titoli contraddittori allo stesso appartamento era stato creato con le autorità Statali. Il Sisak Corte Municipale e l'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak avevano terminato in primo luogo l'affitto protetto e speciale di S.K. e Z.K. con definitivo sentenze e poi le stesse corti avevano annullato quelle sentenze.
(b) osservazioni del Governo
42. Il Governo dibatté che l'accordo per la vendita dell'appartamento in questione fra il richiedente ed il suo datore di lavoro era stato privo di valore legale e che il richiedente non potesse acquisire titolo alla proprietà su che base fin da un accordo che era privo di valore legale non potesse avere qualsiasi effetto legale.
43. Perciò, il Governo dibattè che non c'era stata interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente. Era la Corte da sostenere altrimenti, l'interferenza era stata basata in legge fin dalla decisione delle corti nazionali per dichiarare il contratto contestato di vendita privo di valore legale era stato basato su sezione 103 dell'Obblighi Atto. Aveva intrapreso anche lo scopo legittimo di proteggere l'ordine legale.
44. Il Governo enfatizzò inoltre che l'interferenza era stata anche proporzionata e che il richiedente non aveva sopportato qualsiasi carico individuale ed eccessivo. Il richiedente aveva saputo perché S.K. e Z.K. aveva lasciato Sisak ed aveva mantenuto contatto con loro. Il datore di lavoro del richiedente aveva venduto l'appartamento in questione al richiedente, anche se aveva saputo quel S.K. e Z.K. aveva chiesto la riapertura dei procedimenti nella quale loro avevano perso il loro affitto specialmente protetto.
45. Con concedendo la riapertura di quelli procedimenti, le sentenze del Sisak Corte Municipale e l'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak che terminano l'affitto protetto di S.K. e Z.K. era stato accantonato, con la conseguenza che il loro affitto specialmente protetto aveva prevalso. Perciò, il richiedente aveva avuto nessuno diritto acquistare l'appartamento in questione ed il contratto di vendita a che effetto era stato dichiarato privo di valore legale.
46. L'appartamento in questione era stato alloggio solamente provvisorio per il richiedente e la sua famiglia come deportati durante l'occupazione della città di Petrinja, dove loro possedettero un alloggio. Il richiedente e la sua famiglia erano state date assistenza di ricostruzione per alloggio loro in Petrinja essere riparato dopo la liberazione di Petrinja. Il molto fine della legislazione su simile assistenza era abilitare deportati per ritornare alle loro case.
47. Infine, dopo che il contratto contestato di vendita era stato dichiarato privo di valore legale, il richiedente avrebbe potuto chiedere rimborso del prezzo in questione il quale lui aveva pagato per l'appartamento.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Se c'era un'interferenza con la proprietà del richiedente
48. Come all'argomento del Governo che la causa presente concerne una controversia di civile-legge fra parti private (veda divide in paragrafi 33 e 39 sopra), la Corte reitera che il fatto mero che lo Stato, per il suo sistema giudiziale purché un foro per la determinazione di una controversia di privato-legge non genera un'interferenza con lo Stato con diritti di proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda il ?banka di Zagrebaka, citato sopra, § 250, e la causa-legge citata therein). Nella prospettiva della Corte la causa presente non è comunque, una controversia di civile-legge nel senso tradizionale, né il ruolo dello Stato fu limitato ad offrendo un foro giudiziale per la determinazione di tale controversia. In questo collegamento la Corte prima nota che il contratto di vendita da che cosa la società finanziaria di Lavori in ferro di Sisak vendette l'appartamento il richiedente in oggetto fu dichiarato privo di valore legale come essendo contrario a norme imperative della Vendita ad Occupante Atto. La natura e base razionale di che Atto suggerisce che è legislazione che ha un prevalentemente (se non completamente) carattere di legge pubblico. Questo è illustrato meglio col fatto che sotto la legislazione in oggetto, società socialmente-possedute e precedenti (come Lavori in ferro di Sisak che Sostiene nella causa presente), anche dopo che loro era stato privatizzato ed erano stati trasformati in società private, doveva vendere gli appartamenti nella loro proprietà a quelli che contennero affitti specialmente protetti in riguardo di quegli appartamenti le condizioni favorevoli per gli acquirenti sotto (veda paragrafo 26 sopra). Che che è più, l'Avvocato Statale e competente doveva approvare simile contratti (veda paragrafo 27 sopra). È precisamente per che ragione che la Corte non ha, in cause simili si confinò ad esaminando se le sentenze di corti nazionali che spogliano richiedenti della proprietà di appartamenti acquistarono sotto la Vendita ad Occupante Atto era arbitrario o manifestamente irragionevole (veda Gashi, citato sopra, e Pavlinovi ?c. Croatia (il dec.), N. 17124/05 e 17126/05, 3 settembre 2009). Piuttosto, ha contenuto che simile sentenze corrisposero ad un'interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ed esaminò se l'interferenza fu offerta per con legge, era nell'interesse pubblico ed era proporzionato. Inoltre, a tempo quando l'appartamento in oggetto fu venduto al richiedente, nel 1994 il Sisak Lavori in ferro Sostenere ancora era Statale e Stato-controllato (compari ad Ališi ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, §§ 115-117 ECHR 2014; R. Kaapor ?ed Altri c. Serbia, N. 2269/06 et al., §§ 97 e 98, 15 gennaio 2008; e Zastava Sé Turs c. Serbia (il dec.), n. 24922/12, §§ 19-23 9 aprile 2013).
49. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 garanzie in sostanza il diritto di proprietà e comprende tre articoli distinti. Il primo che è espresso nella prima frase del primo paragrafo e è di una natura generale, posa in giù il principio di godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Il secondo articolo, nella seconda frase dello stesso paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e lo fa soggetto alle certe condizioni. Il terzo articolo, contenuto nel secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo e terzi articoli che concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà saranno costruiti nella luce del principio generale posata in giù nel primo articolo (veda, fra le altre autorità, Draon c. la Francia [GC], n. 1513/03, § 69 6 ottobre 2005).
50. La Corte nota in questo collegamento che il richiedente acquistò l'appartamento in questione sotto un contratto di vendita concluse nel 1994 col proprietario dell'appartamento, una società precedentemente socialmente-posseduta che a che tempo già era stato privatizzato. Sino a 1997 la maggioranza della capitale di Sisak Ferriera Sostenere ancora era comunque, Statale. La sentenza dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Sisak di 22 novembre 2007 dichiarando privo di valore legale il contratto di vendita dal quale il richiedente dedusse la sua proprietà costituì un'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, come garantito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Come alla questione se l'interferenza fu coperta col primo o secondo paragrafo di che Articolo, la Corte già ha trovato che dichiarando titolo a proprietà privo di valore legale sarà esaminato sotto il primo paragrafo, seconda frase come sé corrisponde ad una privazione di proprietà (veda Gashi, citato sopra, §§ 27 28, e Velikovi ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99 48380/99, 51362/99 53367/99, 60036/00 73465/01 e 194/02, §§ 159-160 15 marzo 2007). Considera che lo stesso approccio deve essere seguito nella causa presente.
51. La Corte deve esaminare inoltre se l'interferenza fu giustificata.
(b) la Giustificazione per l'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di “le proprietà”
(i) Se l'interferenza era “purché per con legge”
52. La Corte reitera che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999 II).
53. Nella prospettiva della Corte le decisioni delle corti nazionali nella causa presente avevano una base legale in diritto nazionale, in particolare in sezione 103 dell'Obblighi Atto. Non c'è indicazione che le corti fecero domanda arbitrariamente quelle disposizioni o che le loro decisioni e la privazione risultante di proprietà erano illegali sotto diritto nazionale. La Corte reitera che il suo potere per fare una rassegna ottemperanza con diritto nazionale è limitato (veda, fra le altre autorità, Allan Jacobsson c. la Svezia (n. 2), 19 febbraio 1998, § 57 Relazioni 1998 io). È nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti, interpretare e fare domanda diritto nazionale anche in quelli campi dove la Convenzione “incorpora” gli articoli di che legge poiché le autorità nazionali sono, nella natura di cose, particolarmente qualificato stabilire problemi che sorgono in simile situazioni (veda, mutatis mutandis, Winterwerp c. i Paesi Bassi, 24 ottobre 1979, § 46 la Serie Un n. 33).
54. La Corte si soddisfa perciò che l'interferenza nella causa presente era “purché per con legge”, come richiesto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(ii) Se l'interferenza intraprese un scopo nell'interesse pubblico
55. Qualsiasi interferenza con un diritto di proprietà, irrispettoso dell'articolo incorre sotto, può essere giustificato solamente se notifica un pubblico (o generale) l'interesse.
56. La Corte reitera che, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che un giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Qui, come negli altri campi ai quali prolungano le salvaguardie della Convenzione, le autorità nazionali godono di conseguenza un certo margine della valutazione (veda, inter alia e mutatis mutandis, Draon citato sopra, § 75).
57. Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è esteso. La Corte, trovandolo naturale che il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio, rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che che è “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (veda, inter alia, Draon citato sopra, § 76). Lo stesso necessariamente fa domanda, se non un fortiori, a qualche genere di cambi sociali ed integrali che accaddero in Europa centrale ed orientale dopo 1989 (veda Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 91 ECHR 2005 VI).
58. Al giorno d'oggi la causa il titolo del richiedente alla proprietà in oggetto fu dichiarato privo di valore legale come essendo contrario alle disposizioni della Vendita ad Occupante Atto, a morale ed a principi costituzionali poiché la sentenza che termina l'affitto specialmente protetto dei possessori originali era stata accantonata il richiedente non poteva acquisire un affitto specialmente protetto in riguardo dello stesso appartamento. Di conseguenza, lui aveva nessuno diritto acquistare l'appartamento.
59. La Corte accetta che le corti nazionali, con dichiarando il contratto di vendita in questione privo di valore legale stavano intraprendendo scopi che erano nell'interesse pubblico, vale a dire quelli di proteggere l'articolo di legge e di proteggere i diritti di altri.
(l'iii) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
60. La Corte deve esaminare anche se un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di scioperi di proprietà l'equilibrio equo e richiesto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, o se impone un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo sul richiedente (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Jahn ed Altri, citato sopra, § 93). Così, l'equilibrio per essere sostenuto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti di diritti essenziali si sconvolge se la persona riguardata ha dovuto nascere un “carico sproporzionato” (veda, fra molte altre autorità, I Conventi Santi c. la Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, §§ 70-71 la Serie Un n. 301-un). Nonostante il margine della valutazione dato allo Stato che la Corte deve ciononostante, nell'esercizio del suo potere di revisione determini se l'equilibrio richiesto fu sostenuto in una maniera conforme col diritto del richiedente a proprietà (veda Rosinski v Polonia, n. 17373/02, § 78 17 luglio 2007). La preoccupazione per realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nell'insieme, incluso perciò il primo paragrafo, seconda frase che sarà letta nella luce del principio generale enunciò nella prima frase. In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere realizzato con qualsiasi misura che spoglia una persona delle sue proprietà (veda Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri c. il Belgio, 20 novembre 1995, § 38 la Serie Un n. 332, ed Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 89 ECHR 2000-XII).
61. La Corte nota all'inizio che il nazionale corteggia sentenze di ' che condussero al titolo del richiedente alla proprietà in questione essendo dichiarato privo di valore legale si furono concentrate principalmente sul fatto che altre persone, S.K. e Z.K., aveva un affitto specialmente protetto in riguardo dell'appartamento che occupò il richiedente e che le sentenze che terminano il loro affitto specialmente protetto erano state annullate. La conseguenza di simile decisioni era quel S.K. e Z.K. mai non perse il loro affitto specialmente protetto. Le corti nazionali misero anche enfasi sul fatto che il richiedente era stato consapevole delle circostanze in che S.K. e Z.K. aveva lasciato l'appartamento in questione e del fatto che loro avevano depositato una richiesta per la re-apertura dei procedimenti nella quale il loro affitto specialmente protetto era stato terminato, il richiedente che è stato anche un intervenente in questi procedimenti.
62. Il richiedente era passato nel frattempo, comunque, all'appartamento, presumibilmente con l'acquiescenza del proprietario dell'appartamento la società finanziaria di Lavori in ferro di Sisak che successivamente vendè l'appartamento al richiedente sotto le condizioni favorevoli siccome prescritto con la Vendita ad Occupante Atto. Il contratto di vendita fu approvato con l'Ufficio dell'Avvocato Statale, un requisito sotto sezione 21 di quel l'Atto. Così, le autorità Statali crearono una situazione nella quale due persone avevano titoli contraddittori in riguardo dello stesso appartamento.
63. La Corte enfatizza che il suo compito nella causa presente è non chiamare in questione il diritto di un Stato per decretare leggi mirate a garantendo l'articolo di legge con prevedendo per l'annullamento di contratti difettosi che contravvengono a norme imperative, ma, nella conformità coi suoi poteri direttivi, fare una rassegna sotto la Convenzione la maniera nella quale simile leggi furono fatte domanda nella causa del richiedente e se le decisioni prese con le autorità nazionali ed attinenti si attenute coi principi custoditi in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
64. Nell'esaminare se un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra l'interesse pubblico e che la Corte reitera in particolare l'importanza del principio di del richiedente, “il buon governo.” Il “il buon governo” principio non deve, come un articolo generale, impedisca alle autorità di correggere errori occasionali, anche quelli che sono il risultato della loro propria negligenza. Sostenendo altrimenti può, inter l'alia, corrisponda a sanzionando un'allocazione impropria di risorse pubbliche e scarse che in se stesso sarebbero contrarie all'interesse pubblico (veda Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 73 15 settembre 2009). D'altra parte il bisogno di correggere un vecchio “sbagliato” non dovrebbe interferire sproporzionatamente con un diritto nuovo che è stato acquisito con un appellandosi individuale in buon fede sulla legittimità delle azioni di un'autorità pubblica (veda, mutatis mutandis, Pincová e Pinc c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 36548/97, § 58 ECHR 2002 VIII). Nelle altre parole, ad autorità Statali che vanno a vuoto a fissare in posto o aderire alle loro proprie procedure non dovrebbe essere permesso di trarre profitto dal loro male o scappare i loro obblighi (veda Lelas, citato sopra, § 74). Il rischio di qualsiasi errore rese con l'autorità Statale deve essere sopportato con lo Stato stesso e qualsiasi errori non devono essere rimediati ad alla spesa degli individui riguardò (veda, fra le altre autorità, mutatis mutandis, Pincová e Pinc, citato sopra, § 58; Gashi, citato sopra, § 40; e Trgo c. Croatia, n. 35298/04, § 67 11 giugno 2009). Nel contesto della revoca di un titolo a proprietà che è stata accordata erroneamente, il “il buon governo” principio non solo può imporre sulle autorità un obbligo per agire prontamente nel correggere il loro errore (veda Moskal, citato sopra, § 69), ma può rendere necessario anche il pagamento del risarcimento adeguato o un altro tipo di riparazione appropriata al suo possessore di buono-fede precedente (veda Pincová e Pinc, citato sopra, § 53; Tocu ?ed Altri c. la Romania, n. 36900/03, § 38 25 novembre 2008; e Rysovskyy c. l'Ucraina, n. 29979/04, § 71 20 ottobre 2011).
65. La Corte e la Commissione precedente già hanno trattato con cause che comportano l'annullamento di contratti di vendita sotto i quali richiedenti comprarono appartamenti loro occuparono (veda, inter alia, Panikian citato sopra, pp. 109-119; Pincová e Pinc, citato sopra; e Velikovi ed Altri, citato sopra). In quelle cause, la Corte e la Commissione furono chiamate su per valutare le particolari situazioni che legislazione interessata passò con lo scopo di fare le buon ingiustizie si dia l'appuntamento di nuovo decadi ed erediti da articolo di comunista nei rispettivi Stati. In particolare, nella sentenza di Velikovi ed Altri (citò sopra, § 190) la Corte espose fuori il certo criterio per decidere se il principio della proporzionalità si era stato attenuto con in simile cause. Contenne:
“... [Problema di proporzionalità di T]he deve essere deciso con riferimento ai fattori seguenti: (i) se o non la causa chiaramente incorre all'interno della sfera degli scopi legittimi della Restituzione Legge, mentre avendo riguardo ad al che riguarda i fatti e base legale dei richiedenti ' intitola e le sentenze delle corti nazionali nelle loro sentenze che lo dichiarano privo di valore legale (abuso di potere, l'illegalità effettiva od omissioni minori attribuibile all'amministrazione) e (l'ii) la fatica davvero subita coi richiedenti e l'adeguatezza del risarcimento ottenute o il risarcimento che potrebbe essere ottenuto per un uso normale delle procedure e possibilità disponibile ai richiedenti al tempo attinente, incluso... le possibilità per i richiedenti di garantire una casa nuova per loro.”
La Corte considera che il criterio sopra fa domanda, mutatis mutandis, al giorno d'oggi la causa.
66. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che le corti nazionali dichiararono il contratto di vendita da che cosa il richiedente aveva acquisito proprietà dell'appartamento in oggetto essere privo di valore legale perché era stato concluso contrario alle norme imperative della Vendita ad Occupante Atto. Il richiedente era consapevole delle circostanze in che S.K. e Z.K. aveva lasciato l'appartamento in Sisak poiché lui aveva mantenuto contatto con loro. Lui era anche consapevole, al tempo quando lui comprò l'appartamento in questione, quel Z.K. e S.K. aveva fatto domanda per la riapertura dei procedimenti civili in che il loro affitto specialmente protetto di che appartamento era stato terminato. In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che non può essere deciso completamente fuori che il richiedente non agì in buon fede o che il difetto che rende il contratto di vendita privo di valore legale era parzialmente attribuibile a lui.
67. Nella prospettiva della Corte, in tale situazione l'interesse pubblico perseguito con l'annullamento del titolo del richiedente, vale a dire i diritti di Z.K. e S.K. come inquilini precedenti il cui affitto specialmente protetto era stato ripristinato, fortemente prevale su qualsiasi dei diritti il richiedente chiederebbe in riguardo dell'appartamento in questione. Così, il primo criterio sotto la prova di Velikovi è stato soddisfatto (veda paragrafo 65 sopra).
68. Come al secondo criterio, nel valutare se il risarcimento adeguato era disponibile al richiedente la Corte deve avere riguardo ad alle particolari circostanze di ogni causa, incluso la disponibilità del risarcimento e le realtà pratiche nella quale il richiedente si trovò (veda Velikovi ed Altri, citato sopra, § 231). Una possibilità chiara e prevedibile di ottenere il risarcimento era disponibile al richiedente (veda, con implicazione contraria, Velikovi ed Altri, citato sopra, § 227). In particolare, con appellandosi su sezioni 104(1) e 108 dei 1978 Obblighi Agiscono (o, dopo 1 gennaio 2006 sezione 323 dei 2006 Obblighi Agisce,), il richiedente non solo avrebbe potuto chiedere rimborso del prezzo di acquisto, ma anche accumulò interesse di mora legale ed il risarcimento per qualsiasi l'ulteriore danno che è probabile che lui avrebbe subito.
69. Come alla situazione nella quale si trovò il richiedente, la Corte nota, che lui fu accordato assistenza di ricostruzione per un alloggio lui possiede in Petrinja che era stato danneggiato nella guerra per essere riparato. Il fine della legislazione riguardo all'allocazione di risorse per la ricostruzione di alloggi danneggiata durante la guerra era abilitare proprietari per ritornare alle loro case e vivere là (veda paragrafo 28 sopra). Il richiedente, anche se lui aveva ricevuto risorse dallo Stato per che fine, anche comprò un appartamento in Sisak sotto le condizioni favorevoli prescritte con la Vendita ad Occupante Atto. Comunque, il fine effettivo di che Atto era prevedere per le necessità di alloggio di quelli che non possedettero altra abitazione appropriata (veda paragrafo 25 sopra).
70. Contro le considerazioni sopra, la Corte conclude, che l'interferenza si lamentò di non metta un carico individuale ed eccessivo sul richiedente. Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
71. Il richiedente si lamentò che il suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa era stato violato. Lui si appellò su Articolo 8 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia, la sua casa e la sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza con un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto come è in conformità con la legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione di disturbo o incrimina, per la protezione di salute o morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
Ammissibilità
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
72. Il Governo dibattè che il richiedente non aveva, o espressamente o in sostanza, si lamentò prima le corti nazionali di una violazione del suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa. In particolare, lui non si era appellato espressamente su Articolo 34 della Costituzione nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale.
73. Il richiedente rispose che lui aveva sollevato questa azione di reclamo in sostanza perché in tutto i procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali lui aveva detto che l'appartamento in oggetto costituì la sua casa data che lui viveva in sé dal 1991, quel è, più di venti anni.
2. La valutazione della Corte
74. La Corte nota che il richiedente nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale non si appellò su Articolo 8 della Convenzione o Articolo 34 della Costituzione croata che è la disposizione che garantisce il diritto per rispettare per la casa di uno e perciò discutibilmente corrispose ad Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
75. Più importante, il richiedente non si lamentò di una violazione del suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale, anche in sostanza. In particolare, la sua azione di reclamo costituzionale non contiene un solo riferimento a “la casa” o una sola menzione che lui sta vivendo nell'appartamento in oggetto per più di venti anni.
76. In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che per in modo appropriato esaurire via di ricorso nazionali non è sufficiente che una violazione della Convenzione è “evidente” dai fatti della causa o richiedenti le osservazioni di '. Loro davvero devono lamentarsi piuttosto, (espressamente o in sostanza) di sé in una maniera che senza dubbio lascia che la stessa azione di reclamo che è stata presentata successivamente alla Corte era stata sollevata davvero al livello nazionale (veda Merot d.o.o. e Storitve Tir d.o.o. c. Croatia (il dec.), N. 29426/08 29737/08, § 36 10 dicembre 2013). Contrari all'asserzione del richiedente, la Corte nota che lui addusse né espressamente né implicitamente una violazione del suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale.
77. In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che il richiedente non esaurì in modo appropriato via di ricorso nazionali e così non fornì alle autorità nazionali l'opportunità-quale è in principio inteso di essere riconosciuto a Stati Contraenti con Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione-di indirizzamento, ed ostacolando con ciò o mettendo diritto, la particolare violazione di Convenzione addusse contro loro (veda, per esempio, Merot d.o.o. e Storitve Tir d.o.o., citato sopra, § 38, e le cause citate therein).
78. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è inammissibile sotto Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali e deve essere respinta perciò facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 4 al riguardo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNNAIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 31 maggio 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Il ?Karaka?
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.