Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VRZI? v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 06,08,P1-1

NUMERO: 43777/13/2016
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 12/07/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: No violation of Article 8 - Right to respect for private and family life (Article 8-1 - Respect for home)
No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions
Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property)



SECOND SECTION





CASE OF VRZI? v. CROATIA

(Application no. 43777/13)







JUDGMENT







STRASBOURG

12 July 2016






This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Vrzi? v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
I??l Karaka?, President,
Julia Laffranque,
Nebojša Vu?ini?,
Valeriu Gri?co,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 21 June 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 43777/13) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Croatian nationals, OMISSIS(“the applicants”), on 10 June 2013.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Ivani? Grad and Ms N. Owens, a lawyer practicing in Zagreb. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that their right to respect for their home had been violated.
4. On 24 March 2014 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants were born in 1955 and live in Pore?.
6. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
7. On 5 February 2009 the applicants and their company, M.N., entered into an agreement with M.G. and his company, E. By virtue of that agreement the applicants acknowledged their debt of 580,000 Croatian kunas (HRK) to M.G. and their company’s debt of HRK 180,000 to company E. In order to secure the overall loan, the applicants used their house as collateral, allowing M.G. to register a charge on it. It was stipulated that unless the applicants and their company paid their outstanding debts by 1 May 2009, the creditors were entitled to institute enforcement proceedings for payment of the debt through the sale of the applicants’ house.
8. On 20 October 2009 M.G. and his company E. instituted enforcement proceedings against the applicants before the Pore? Municipal Court (Op?inski sud u Pore?u), seeking the judicial sale of the house. They argued that the applicants had failed to pay their debt to M.G., while the company M.N. had managed to pay only part of its debt to the company E. The applicants’ outstanding debt amounted to HRK 703,643.05.
9. On 17 November 2009 the Pore? Municipal Court granted that request and issued an enforcement order against the applicants. The applicants did not appeal and the enforcement order became final on 17 December 2009.
10. On 11 December 2009 the Pore? Municipal Court registered the enforcement order on the applicants’ house in the land register.
11. A hearing to assess the value of the property was held before the Pore? Municipal Court on 4 May 2010. Both applicants were properly summoned, but only the first applicant appeared. He undertook to submit an expert valuation of the house within two days. The creditor asked the Municipal Court to commission an expert for that purpose. The first applicant did not comply with his undertaking.
12. On 16 June 2010 the valuation of the house was carried out on site by a civil engineer and a surveyor, in the presence of the first applicant.
13. The civil engineer submitted his report on 20 August 2010, stating that the value of the house was HRK 2,463,092.48 (approximately 323,860 euros). The applicants made no objections to the valuation.
14. On 7 October 2010 another set of enforcement proceedings against the applicants was joined to the proceedings at issue. In the former proceedings an enforcement order had been issued against the applicants at the request of the Pore? Municipality on 12 May 2010, in respect of a claim of HRK 24,352.94 (approximately 3,200 euros). Since the applicants had not lodged an appeal, the enforcement order had become final on 12 June 2010.
15. On 25 October 2010 the Municipal Court set the value of the applicants’ house at HRK 2,463,092.48.
16. On 25 January 2011 a first public auction was held. However, there were no interested buyers. The applicants, though properly summoned, did not appear.
17. A further set of enforcement proceedings against the applicants was joined to the proceedings at issue on 13 May 2011. In those proceedings, an enforcement order had been issued against the applicants at the request of Bank P. on 24 January 2011, in respect of an unpaid loan of 14 February 2006 in the amount of 159,688.87 Swiss Francs. Since the applicants had not lodged an appeal, the enforcement order had become final on 31 March 2011.
18. A second public auction for the sale of the applicants’ house was postponed several times at the request of the creditors.
19. The second public auction was eventually held on 30 March 2012 and the applicants’ house was sold to M.G. for HRK 821,040 (approximately 109,000 euros). The applicants, though properly summoned, did not appear.
20. On 2 April 2012 the Pore? Municipal Court granted M.G. title to the applicants’ house, on condition that he paid HRK 821,040 as the purchase price.
21. On 23 April 2012 the applicants lodged an appeal against that decision, arguing that the judicial sale had been disproportionate since the true value of their house had been about 700,000 euros (EUR). They also argued that the Municipal Court had failed to comply with the provisions of the Enforcement Act, which stated that courts should respect the dignity of debtors subject to enforcement and should make the enforcement process as humane as possible.
22. On 8 May 2012 the applicants submitted a statement that the value of their house was EUR 640,000.
23. On 28 December 2012 the Pula County Court (Županijski sud u Puli) dismissed the applicants’ appeal. It found that the applicants’ house had been sold at a second public auction for more than one-third of its value, that the first public auction had been unsuccessful, and that M.G. had been the only bidder. Furthermore, the value of the house had been set by the Pore? Municipal Court on 25 October 2010 and the applicants had not objected to it. In the County Court’s view, the sale of the applicants’ house was in accordance with the Enforcement Act.
24. On 31 January 2013 the Pore? Municipal Court entered M.G.’s title to the applicants’ house in the land register.
25. On 20 February 2013 the applicants lodged an appeal on points of law against the decision of the Pula County Court, relying on section 382(2) of the Civil Procedure Act. They argued that the actual value of their house was around EUR 700,000, and that their house should have been exempted from enforcement as it was “meeting their basic human needs”.
26. On the same day, the applicants applied to the Pore? Municipal Court for a stay of enforcement.
27. On 22 February 2013 the Pore? Municipal Court declared the applicants’ appeal on points of law inadmissible on the grounds that such an appeal was allowed in enforcement proceedings only if based on section 382(2) of the Civil Procedure Act, which was not the case. The applicants lodged an appeal.
28. On the same day the Pore? Municipal Court declared the applicants’ request for a stay of enforcement inadmissible, finding that they had failed to meet the statutory conditions for such a request. The applicants lodged an appeal.
29. On 8 March 2013 the Croatian Electricity Company (Hrvatska Elektroprivreda, hereinafter “HEP”) cut off the applicants’ electricity at M.G.’s request. The applicants immediately applied to the Pore? Municipal Court for an interim measure prohibiting M.G. from having the electricity and water cut off and from making alterations to the house, ordering HEP to reconnect the electricity, and authorising them to keep the house until the enforcement proceedings were complete. On the same day the Pore? Municipal Court issued the interim measure, prohibited M.G. from having the electricity and water cut off and ordered HEP to reconnect the electricity. That decision was quashed by the Pula County Court on 21 May 2013 and the applicants’ request for an interim measure was denied.
30. On 19 June 2013 the Municipal Court decided to transfer ownership of the house at issue to M.G. The applicants lodged an appeal, which was declared inadmissible by the Municipal Court on 10 July 2013.
31. On 26 July 2013 the Pore? Municipal Court held a hearing on the division of the proceeds (dioba kupovnine) from the sale of the house. The applicants, though properly summoned, did not appear.
32. On 17 September 2013 the Pore? Municipal Court ordered the eviction of the applicants. The applicants lodged an appeal, arguing that enforcement should not have been carried out by the sale of their house, which served to “satisfy their basic needs”: they lived there with their family and it also served as their business premises.
33. On 21 October 2013 the Municipal Court scheduled the eviction of the applicants for 13 December 2013, ordering the court bailiff to carry out the eviction. However, the eviction was postponed for three months.
34. On 19 November 2013 the applicants applied for an interim measure prohibiting the sale of their house and their eviction.
35. On 20 December 2013 the Pore? Municipal Court decided to conclude the enforcement proceedings for the payment of monetary debts.
36. On 20 January 2014 the Pula County Court dismissed the applicants’ appeal against the decision of 17 September 2013 (see paragraph 32 above), finding that the Municipal Court had acted in accordance with the law, namely the provisions of the Enforcement Act. The enforcement proceedings were about to be concluded since the sale of the applicants’ house had been completed.
37. On 23 January 2014 the Pula County Court accepted the applicants’ appeal against the decision of 22 February 2013 (see paragraph 27 above) and remitted the applicants’ appeal on points of law to the Municipal Court.
38. On the same day the Pula County Court, in a different decision, dismissed the applicants’ appeal against the decision of 22 February 2013 by which their request for a stay of the enforcement proceedings had been dismissed (see paragraph 28 above).
39. On 12 March 2014 the applicants withdrew their appeal on points of law referred to in paragraphs 25 and 37 above.
40. On 13 March and 28 April 2014 M.G. sought the applicants’ eviction.
41. The applicants have not yet been evicted.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Enforcement legislation
1. Enforcement Act of 1996 with subsequent amendments
42. The relevant provisions of the 1996 Enforcement Act, which was in force at the material time (Ovršni zakon, Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia, nos. 57/1996, 29/1999, 42/2000, 173/2003, 194/2003, 151/2004, 88/2005 and 67/2008), provided as follows:
Legal remedies
Section 11
“(1) Where this Act does not prescribe otherwise, an appeal is allowed against a ruling (rješenje) adopted by a first-instance court.
...
(3) Where this Act does not prescribe otherwise, an appeal is to be lodged within eight days of the service of the first-instance ruling.
(4) Where this Act does not prescribe otherwise, the lodging of an appeal does not stay the enforcement proceedings.
(5) There is no remedy against a court instruction (zaklju?ak).
...”
Section 12
“(1) In enforcement proceedings ... only an appeal on points of law under section 382(2) of the Civil Procedure Act is allowed ...”
Section 46
“(1) The debtor may lodge an appeal against the enforcement order:
...
7. if the creditor is not authorised to seek enforcement on the basis of the enforcement title or is not authorised to seek enforcement against a particular debtor.
...
9. if the claim has ceased to exist on the basis of a fact that occurred when the debtor could no longer have presented it in the proceedings in which the enforcement title was adopted, or after a court-assisted friendly settlement has been concluded or after a notary deed has been drafted, approved or authorised (ovjeren).
10. if the settling of the claim has been adjourned (even temporarily), disallowed, altered or prevented owing to a fact that occurred when the debtor could no longer have presented it in the proceedings in which the enforcement title was adopted, or after a court-assisted friendly settlement has been concluded or after a notary deed has been drafted, approved or authorised (ovjeren).
11. if the claim has become statute-barred.”
Section 48 provides that if a creditor opposes allegations in a debtor’s appeal lodged under section 46(1) subparagraphs 7 and 9 to 11, the court conducting the proceedings will instruct the debtor to bring a civil action seeking to have the enforcement declared inadmissible.
Valuation of real estate
Valuation assessment method
Section 87
“(1) A court [conducting enforcement proceedings] shall assess the value of real estate and issue a court instruction after holding a hearing at which the parties shall have an opportunity to present their arguments and submit written evidence. The court may seek information on the real-estate market from the tax authorities if necessary.
...
(3) When the parties set the value of real estate in an agreement ... by which that real estate is used as collateral ... for securing a claim which is to be enforced, that value will be relevant unless the parties agree otherwise in [enforcement] proceedings before a court ...
...”
Section 97
“(1) At the first public auction the real estate cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of its assessed value (section 87).
(2) At the second public auction the real estate cannot be sold for less than one-third of its assessed value.
...”
Section 120
“On the sale of the real estate, the enforcement debtor loses his or her title to the property and must deliver it to the buyer promptly after the service of the decision on delivering the property to the buyer, if not otherwise provided for by law or by an agreement with the buyer.”
2. Enforcement Act of 2012 with subsequent amendments
43. A new Enforcement Act entered into force on 15 October 2012.
44. Section 102 provides that real estate cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of its assessed value at a first public auction and half of its assessed value at a second public auction.
45. Section 369(1) provides that ongoing enforcement proceedings must be concluded under the previous enforcement legislation.
B. Civil Procedure Act
46. The relevant provision of the Civil Procedure Act (Zakon o parni?nom postupku, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 and 35/1991, and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia nos. 53/1991, 91/1992, 58/1993, 112/1999, 88/2001, 117/2003, 88/2005, 2/2007, 84/2008, 123/2008, 57/2011, 148/2011 and 25/2013), as in force at the material time, provided as follows:
Section 382
“(2) ... parties to proceedings may lodge an appeal on points of law against a second-instance judgment where the outcome of a dispute depends on the assessment of a substantive or procedural issue which is of importance in guaranteeing a consistent application of the law and the equality of citizens ...”
47. The relevant provisions of the Obligations Act (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Official Gazette nos. 35/2005, 41/2008, 125/2011) read as follows:
Nullity
Section 322
“(1) A contract that is contrary to the Constitution, mandatory rules or morals shall be declared null and void (ništetan) unless the purpose of the breached rule indicates some other sanction or the law in a particular case provides otherwise.
(2) If the conclusion of a contract is prohibited only to one party, the contract shall remain valid, unless the law in a particular case provides otherwise, and the party that has breached the statutory prohibition shall bear the relevant consequences.”
Voidable contracts
Section 330
“A contract is voidable (pobojan) if a party to it had no legal capacity or entered into the contract under duress (mane volje) at the time when it was concluded or where the contract is voidable under this Act or another statute.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
48. The applicants complained that their right to respect for their home had been violated. They relied on Article 8 of the Convention, which, in so far as relevant, reads:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his ... home ...
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
A. Admissibility
1. Submissions of the parties
49. The Government argued that the applicants had not exhausted all available domestic remedies. In the first place, they could have brought a civil action to declare the agreement at issue null and void. In such proceedings they could have argued that the agreement was contrary to the Constitution, which guaranteed the “inviolability of one’s home”. They could also have brought a civil action claiming that the enforcement order on their house was not admissible. In such proceedings they could have put forward all of the arguments concerning their right to respect for their home.
50. The applicants argued that a civil action could not have altered the rules for enforcement proceedings prescribed by the Enforcement Act. Also, an action seeking to have the loan agreement declared null and void would not have addressed the issue of the protection of their right to respect for their home in the enforcement proceedings.
2. The Court’s assessment
51. In accordance with Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, the Court may only deal with a matter after all domestic remedies have been exhausted. The purpose of Article 35 is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court (see, for example, Gherghina v. Romania (dec.) [GC], no. 42219/07, § 84, 9 July 2015; Hentrich v. France, 22 September 1994, § 33, Series A no. 296-A; and Remli v. France, 23 April 1996, § 33, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-II). Thus, a complaint submitted to the Court should first have been made to the appropriate national courts, at least in substance, in accordance with the formal requirements of domestic law and within the prescribed time-limits (see Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia (preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, § 72, 25 March 2014). To hold otherwise would not be compatible with the subsidiary character of the Convention system (see Gavril Yosifov v. Bulgaria, no. 74012/01, § 42, 6 November 2008). Nevertheless, the obligation to exhaust domestic remedies requires only that an applicant make normal use of remedies which are effective, sufficient and accessible in respect of his Convention grievances (see Vu?kovi? and Others, cited above, § 73; Balogh v. Hungary, no. 47940/99, § 30, 20 July 2004; and John Sammut and Visa Investments Limited v. Malta (dec.), no. 27023/03, 28 June 2005).
52. In the present case the Government argued that the applicants had at their disposal two remedies they had failed to exhaust (see paragraph 49 above).
53. As to a civil action claiming that the enforcement order on their house was not admissible, the Court notes that such an action is allowed only for the reasons specified in section 46(1) subparagraphs 7 and 9 to 11 of the Enforcement Act (see paragraph 42 above) and that the applicants have not argued that any of those circumstances applied in their case. None of the circumstances specified in those provisions concerns the applicants’ arguments under Article 8 of the Convention. Therefore, the Government’s objection, in so far as it concerns a civil action claiming that the enforcement order on the applicants’ house was not admissible, must be rejected.
54. As to a civil action seeking to have the contract at issue declared null and void, the Court considers that the arguments submitted by the parties in that respect concern the merits of the case. The Court will therefore examine them in that context.
55. The Court finds that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further finds that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Submissions of the parties
56. The applicants argued that the order for their eviction issued by the Pore? Municipal Court had amounted to an interference with their right to respect for their home, notwithstanding the fact that they had not yet been evicted. They accepted that the interference in question was in accordance with the law, but argued that it was not necessary in a democratic society. They maintained that their house should have been exempted from the enforcement proceedings since it had been satisfying their basic housing needs.
57. The applicants also argued that the procedural safeguards required under Article 8 of the Convention had not been provided, since the rules governing the enforcement proceedings did not allow the courts to carry out a proportionality test in the enforcement proceedings.
58. The Government argued that the grounds for interference with the applicants’ right to respect for their home were set out in the Enforcement Act. The interference pursued the legitimate aim of protecting the interests of others, namely, the applicants’ creditors. They maintained that, by using their house as collateral for their loan, the applicants had agreed to the sale of their house if they failed to comply with their contractual obligations.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether there has been an interference with the applicants’ right to respect for their home
59. The Court has previously held that the judicial sale of an applicant’s home and his or her eviction were to be seen as an interference with the right to respect for his or her home (see Zehentner v. Austria, no. 20082/02, § 54, 16 July 2009). In the present case, the applicants’ house was sold in enforcement proceedings and their eviction was ordered in the context of those proceedings. Even though the applicants have not yet been evicted, an eviction order has been issued and may be enforced at any time. The Court reiterates that the obligation on an applicant to vacate a house in which he or she lives amounts to an interference with his right to respect for his home (see ?osi? v. Croatia, no. 28261/06, § 18, 15 January 2009).
(b) Whether the interference was prescribed by law and pursued a legitimate aim
60. The national courts ordered the applicants to vacate their house. Under Croatian law regulating enforcement proceedings, a buyer of property at a public auction becomes the owner of that property (see section 120 of the Enforcement Act, paragraph 42 above).
61. The Court reiterates that it is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply the domestic law, even in those fields where the Convention “incorporates” the rules of that law, since the national authorities are, in the nature of things, particularly qualified to settle issues arising in this connection (see, mutatis mutandis, Winterwerp v. the Netherlands, 24 October 1979, § 46, Series A no. 33). The Court will not substitute its own interpretation for theirs in the absence of arbitrariness (see, for example, Tejedor García v. Spain, 16 December 1997, § 31, Reports 1997 VIII).
62. The decision on transferring title to the house to M.G. was issued by the national courts under Croatian laws regulating the sale of real property in enforcement proceedings. Those laws provide that when a court awards the property to the buyer, the enforcement debtor loses his title to it. The national courts’ decision to order the applicant’s eviction was based on section 120 of the Enforcement Act. The Court, noting that its power to review compliance with domestic law is limited (see, among other authorities, Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (No. 1), 25 October 1989, § 57, Series A no. 163), is thus satisfied that the national courts’ decisions ordering the applicants’ eviction were in accordance with domestic law (see ?osi?, cited above, § 19). The interference in question therefore pursued the legitimate aim of protecting the buyer’s lawful title to the applicants’ house.
(c) Whether the interference was “necessary in a democratic society”
63. The central question in this case is, therefore, whether the interference was proportionate to the aim pursued and thus “necessary in a democratic society”.
64. The Court has also held that any person at risk of interference with the right to respect for his or her home should in principle be able to have the proportionality of the measure determined by an independent tribunal in the light of the relevant principles under Article 8 of the Convention, notwithstanding that, under domestic law, his or her right of occupation has come to an end (see McCann v. the United Kingdom, no. 19009/04, § 50, ECHR 2008).
65. In several cases against Croatia the Court has found a violation of the applicants’ right to respect for their home on the grounds that the national courts had not carried out the proportionality test when eviction orders had been issued (see, for example, ?osi?, cited above; Pauli? v. Croatia, no. 3572/06, 22 October 2009; Orli? v. Croatia, no. 48833/07, 21 June 2011; Bjedov v. Croatia, no. 42150/09, 29 May 2012; and Brežec v. Croatia, no. 7177/10, 18 July 2013).
66. In all those cases, as well as in the above-cited case of McCann, the applicants were living in State-owned or socially-owned flats and an important aspect of finding a violation was the fact that there was no other private interest at stake. Furthermore, the applicants in those cases had not signed any form of agreement whereby they risked losing their home.
67. The situation in the present case is different inasmuch as the other parties in the enforcement proceedings were either a private person, namely M.G., or private enterprises, namely a bank and a company. The case-law of the Convention organs suggests that the approach in such cases is somewhat different and that a measure prescribed by law with the purpose of protecting the rights of others may be seen as necessary in a democratic society (see J.P. v. France, Commission decision, no. 26215/95, 6 September 1995, and D.P. v. the United Kingdom, no. 11949/86, 1 December 1986).
68. Unlike the situations addressed in the cases mentioned in paragraphs 64 and 65 above, the applicants in the present case complain that the payment of their debts was enforced by the sale of their home. The Court notes at the outset that the applicants voluntarily used their home as collateral for their loan. The applicants specifically agreed that if they and their company failed to pay their outstanding debts by 1 May 2009, the creditors were entitled to seek enforcement of the repayment through the sale of their house (see paragraph 1 above).
69. The debt was substantial, namely some EUR 250,320. The risk inherent in borrowing such a high sum is that the debtor might not be able to repay it. The applicants expressly agreed to take such a risk.
70. The applicants did not challenge any of the loan agreements before the national courts in appropriate proceedings. For example, they could have instituted proceedings seeking to have the contract declared null and void (ništav) or voidable (pobojan) (see sections 322 and 330 of the Obligations Act, paragraph 47 above). This implies that the applicants freely entered into those agreements and freely stipulated that the loans could be secured using their house as collateral. The applicants must therefore have been aware that their house would be sold to secure the payment of any outstanding debts after the time-limit set for the repayment of the loan had expired. When the enforcement order for the sale of their house was issued, the applicants did not challenge that order by means of an appeal, as provided for under section 11 of the Enforcement Act (see paragraph 42 above). By not objecting to the enforcement order, which specifically concerned the sale of their house, the applicants tacitly agreed to its sale in the enforcement proceedings.
71. The sale of the applicants’ house in the enforcement proceedings was a consequence of the applicants’ failure to meet their contractual obligations. Moreover, it was a consequence to which the applicants had expressly agreed.
72. It can therefore be concluded that the applicants agreed and accepted that the payment of their outstanding debts would be enforced through the sale of their house.
73. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that there has been no violation of Article 8 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
74. The applicants complained that their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions had been violated. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Submissions of the parties
75. The Government argued that the applicants had not exhausted the relevant domestic remedies. In the first place, they had not lodged an appeal against the enforcement order and had thus agreed to the sale of their house in the enforcement proceedings. Had they lodged an appeal against the enforcement order, they could have further lodged a constitutional complaint whereby they could have put forward all the complaints they had submitted before the Court.
76. Furthermore, the applicants had not objected to the valuation of their house as prescribed by the Enforcement Act. They had had until the conclusion of the first public auction to do so. Instead, they had objected to the valuation of their house for the first time in their appeal against the decision to grant M.G. title to their house. At that stage of the proceedings such an objection was no longer admissible.
77. The applicants maintained that by signing the contract with their creditors they had not agreed to the rules of the enforcement procedure, since those rules were prescribed by the Enforcement Act and a party to a contract could not agree or disagree with the provisions of an Act. Thus, a civil action concerning the contract could not have affected the application of the Enforcement Act.
78. The applicants argued that a constitutional complaint would not have been admissible in their case.
79. The applicants further stressed that they had appealed against the decision ordering the sale of their property and their eviction, but to no avail.
2. The Court’s assessment
80. The Court considers that the arguments of the parties concerning the exhaustion of domestic remedies concern the merits of the applicants’ complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and in particular its procedural aspect, and will examine them accordingly.
81. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Submissions of the parties
82. The applicants put forward the following arguments in support of their complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
83. The applicants maintained that the enforcement measures had not been accompanied by procedural safeguards. Most of their appeals in the enforcement proceedings had been declared inadmissible. The appeal against the sale of their house for a disproportionate price, namely one-third of its value, had been dismissed as unfounded.
84. The applicants also complained that their house had been sold for only a third of its value following a valuation by a court-appointed expert and that the value of their house had been much higher than the expert’s valuation.
85. The applicants submitted that the Enforcement Act, which had entered into force on 15 October 2012 when the enforcement proceedings against them had still been pending, had not been applied in their case. The application of the Act would have benefited them since it provided that real estate could not be sold at public auction for less than half of its assessed value.
86. The applicants argued that their house had been sold to one of their creditors, M.G., and that he had thus become the owner of the property, the value of which far exceeded the price for which he had bought it. In such circumstances, the applicants’ debt to M.G. should have been reduced in line with the value he had obtained, that is to say, the full value of the house at issue.
87. The Government submitted that, by entering into loan agreements, the applicants had themselves defined the details of their legal obligations in respect of their creditors. They had agreed to the sale of their house in the event that they were unable to meet their contractual obligations. The decisions adopted by the State authorities had not amounted to an interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions but had merely served as a tool for the enforcement of the will of the parties to the loan agreements.
88. The manner in which the enforcement proceedings at issue were conducted was prescribed by the Enforcement Act, as was the manner in which the applicants’ house was valued.
89. The sale of the applicants’ house in the context of the enforcement proceedings had pursued the legitimate aims of protecting the interests of the applicants’ creditors, and of ensuring legal certainty and the economic well-being of the country. The right of the applicants’ creditors to secure the repayment of the loan was of no lesser value than the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
90. The applicants had expressly agreed to the sale of their house, and that sale had been necessary to secure the payment of their outstanding debts.
91. As regards the price for which the applicants’ house had been sold, the Government submitted that the various Contracting States to the Convention had legislated in different ways in that respect. Whereas some of them had not set a minimum price, others had set the minimum at various percentages, with solutions similar to those provided for in the Croatian system. The Government conceded that some member States provided better protection for debtors, but pointed out that the differences in legislative approaches and practices among member States showed that they should enjoy a wide margin of appreciation in that connection.
92. The Government pointed out that the applicants had remained inactive as regards the valuation of their house in the context of the enforcement proceedings. They did not submit any evidence as regards the value of their house for over two years, nor did they put forward timely objections to the expert valuation.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether there has been an interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions
93. The ownership of the applicants’ home was transferred to another person in the context of enforcement proceedings brought with a view to obtaining sums of money which the domestic courts had earlier ordered to be paid to the applicants’ creditors. Even though the interference in question did not involve expropriation by the State, the contested measure resulted in depriving the applicants of their property.
94. The Court has already examined various situations of the forced sale of applicants’ homes under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and concluded that such sale amounted to interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions (see, for example, Hagman v. Finland (dec.), no. 41765/98, 14 January 2003; Zehentner, cited above, Kanala v. Slovakia, no. 57239/00, 10 July 2007; and Rousk v. Sweden, no. 27183/04, 25 July 2013). The Court sees no reason to depart from such a conclusion in the present case.
95. The Court refers to its established case-law on the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the manner in which the three rules contained in that provision are to be applied (see, among many other authorities, J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 52, ECHR 2007 III; Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 44, ECHR 2002 IV; and Zehentner, cited above, § 70).
96. In line with that case-law, the Court considers that the judicial sale of the applicants’ property falls to be considered under the so-called third rule, relating to the State’s right “to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control of the use of property in accordance with the general interest”, set out in the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for example, Zehentner, cited above, § 71).
(b) Whether the interference was prescribed by law and pursued a legitimate aim
97. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of someone’s possessions should be lawful (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999 II).
98. Any interference with a right of property, irrespective of the rule under which it falls, can be justified only if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. The Court reiterates that, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, national authorities are in principle better placed than any international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make a preliminary assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures that interfere with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 27265/95, § 85, 17 October 2002, and Elia S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 37710/97, § 77, ECHR 2001-IX).
99. The Court notes that the interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions was based on the relevant provisions of the Enforcement Act and served the legitimate aims of protecting the creditors and the purchaser of the house (see paragraph 62 above for similar considerations in respect of Article 8).
(c) Whether the interference was proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued
100. It remains to be determined whether the measures complained of were proportionate to the aim pursued. According to the Court’s well-established case-law, the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 is to be read in the light of the principle enunciated in the first sentence. Consequently, any interference must achieve a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirement of protecting the individual’s fundamental rights. The search for this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a whole, and therefore also in the second paragraph thereof: there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim pursued. In each case involving an alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must ascertain whether by reason of the State’s interference, the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 50, Series A no. 98, and Amato Gauci v. Malta, no. 47045/06, § 57, 15 September 2009). In determining whether this requirement has been met, the Court recognises that the State enjoys a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing the means of enforcement and to ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question (see Chassagnou and Others v. France [GC], nos. 25088/94, 28331/95 and 28443/95, § 75, ECHR 1999-III; Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 49, ECHR 1999 V; and Luordo v. Italy, no. 32190/96, § 69, ECHR 2003 IX;).
101. The Court is mindful of the fact that the present case concerns proceedings between private parties, namely the applicants and their creditors on the one hand and the applicants and the purchaser of their house on the other hand. However, even in cases involving private litigation, the State is under an obligation to afford the parties to the dispute judicial procedures which offer the necessary procedural guarantees and therefore enable the domestic courts and tribunals to adjudicate effectively and fairly in the light of the applicable law (see Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 83, ECHR 2007 I; J.A. Pye, cited above, § 57; and Zagreba?ka banka d.d. v. Croatia, no. 39544/05, §§ 250 and 251, 12 December 2013).
102. The Court notes that the applicants’ complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are based on two main arguments: firstly, that their house was sold at a price far below its market value and contrary to the law in force at that time (see paragraph 85 above); and, secondly, that the enforcement measures were not accompanied by procedural safeguards. They complained that the remedies they had pursued in the proceedings had been unsuccessful.
103. As regards the applicants’ conduct, the Court notes as follows. The applicants borrowed a considerable amount of money, a measure which, by its very nature, involved an element of risk. When entering into the loan agreement, the applicants could have stipulated the value of their house which they used as collateral. Under Croatian law, that would have provided them with a considerable degree of security, as under section 87(3) of the Enforcement Act a court conducting enforcement proceedings is in principle obliged to accept that value when ordering the sale of the real property concerned (see paragraph 42 above).
104. In addition, in order to avoid having their house sold at a public auction and the inherent risks, such as the possibility that the property might be sold for only a third of its assessed value, when the applicants realised that they could not comply with their contractual obligations, knowing that those obligations had been secured by their house, they could have sold the house themselves, outside the enforcement proceedings. They could thus have attempted to obtain the full market value for it.
105. In so far as the applicants complain that their house was sold for only a third of its assessed value, the Court considers that the rules providing that real property may be sold at a public auction, in the context of enforcement proceedings, for one-third of its assessed value falls within the State’s margin of appreciation and does not appear manifestly arbitrary or unreasonable. Also, it could only be sold for a third of the value after an initial auction had failed to obtain half the value.
106. Having regard to the margin of appreciation enjoyed by the national authorities under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court therefore considers that the price received by the applicants can be considered to have been reasonably related to the value of the property.
107. The Court also notes the applicants’ argument that the Enforcement Act, which entered into force on 15 October 2012 when the enforcement proceedings against them were still pending, was not applied in their case. The application of the Act would have benefited them, since it provided that real property could not be sold at public auction for less than half of its assessed value (see paragraph 44 above). The Court notes that when new legislation is introduced, the new procedural rules may apply only to future cases or to all pending proceedings. In this instance, the Croatian legislator provided that all pending enforcement proceedings would be conducted under the old rules (see paragraph 45 above). In the Court’s view, this is just one example among others of the variety of legal systems existing in Europe, and it is not the Court’s task to standardise them. A State’s choice of a particular system of procedural rules is in principle outside the scope of the supervision carried out by the Court at European level, provided that the system chosen does not contravene the principles set forth in the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Achour v. France [GC], no. 67335/01, § 51, ECHR 2006-IV; and Taxquet v. Belgium [GC], no. 926/05, § 83, ECHR 2010).
108. As to the applicants’ argument that the person who bought their house was one of their creditors, M.G. (see paragraph 86 above), the Court sees no issue in the fact that a creditor who buys real property at public auction is treated in the same manner as any other buyer.
109. In sum, and particularly in view of the risks deliberately taken by the applicants when they borrowed approximately EUR 247,000 and used their house as collateral, the applicants have not been made to bear an individual and excessive burden in this case.
110. As to the part of the applicants’ complaint relating to the procedural aspect of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court reiterates that although Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements, the proceedings at issue must afford the individual a reasonable opportunity of putting his or her case to the relevant authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision. In ascertaining whether this condition has been satisfied, the Court takes a comprehensive view (see, for instance, Jokela, cited above, § 45).
111. The Court notes that under Croatian law, a court conducting enforcement proceedings fixes the price of real property to be sold by a court instruction (zaklju?ak) which is not amenable to appeal (see sections 11(5) and 87(1) of the Enforcement Act, paragraph 42 above). However, in proceedings originating in an individual application the Court has to confine itself, as far as possible, to an examination of the concrete case before it (see J.B. v. Switzerland, no. 31827/96, § 63, ECHR 2001 III). It is therefore not called upon to review the legislation at issue in the abstract, namely the relevant provisions of the Enforcement Act on the judicial sale of property, but will examine the specific circumstances of the applicants’ case.
112. The Court notes that on 4 May 2010 the Pore? Municipal Court held a hearing to assess the value of the property at issue. Only the first applicant appeared at that hearing, even though both applicants had been properly summoned (see paragraph 11 above). The purpose of the hearing was to give the parties a possibility to advance their arguments concerning the price of the property to be sold and to submit evidence in support of their arguments (see section 87(1) of the Enforcement Act, paragraph 42 above). The first applicant, however, did not advance any arguments or submit any evidence. Even though he had promised to submit an expert valuation of the house within two days, he failed to do so. An expert commissioned by the Municipal Court submitted his valuation report on 20 August 2010. The applicants did not submit any objections to that report. Indeed, they challenged the valuation of their house for the first time in their appeal against the decision granting M.G. title to the house, at a stage of the proceedings when further arguments concerning the value of the house were no longer admissible.
113. By not using the opportunity provided to them at the hearing held to assess the value of their house, the applicants placed themselves in a disadvantageous position. The remedies the applicants sought to use at a later stage of the proceedings were not provided for by the Enforcement Act. Thus, all the consequences of the applicants’ behaviour, such as the fact that they could not challenge the valuation of the house as assessed by the court conducting the enforcement proceedings and the failure of the remedies they pursued, are attributable to the applicants themselves.
114. Given that the applicants did not actively participate in the assessment of the value of their house at the relevant stage of the enforcement proceedings, even though they had an opportunity to do so at a hearing held for exactly that purpose and by submitting timely objections to the expert’s valuation report, the Court cannot accept their arguments concerning deficiencies in the rules of the enforcement proceedings.
115. In view of the above, the Court concludes that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 8 of the Convention;

3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 12 July 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith I??l Karaka?
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 8 - Diritto al rispettare della vita privata di famiglia (Articolo 8-1 - Riguardo la dimora)
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo della proprietà
Articolo 1 par. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controllo dell'uso della proprietà)



SECONDA SEZIONE





CAUSA VRZI? C. CROATIA

(Richiesta n. 43777/13)







SENTENZA







STRASBOURG

12 luglio 2016






Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Vrzi ?c. Croatia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Il ?Karaka, ?Presidente
Julia Laffranque,
Nebojša Vuini?,
Valeriu Grico?,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 21 giugno 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 43777/13) contro la Repubblica di Croatia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con due cittadini croati, i richiedenti di OMISSIS(“the”), 10 giugno 2013.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Ivani ?Grad ed il Sig.ra N. Owens, un avvocato che pratica in Zagreb. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che il loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa era stato violato.
4. 24 marzo 2014 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti nacquero nel 1955 e vivono in Legga attentamente.?
6. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato con le parti, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
7. 5 febbraio 2009 i richiedenti e la loro società, M.N., entrò in un accordo con M.G. e la sua società, E. Con virtù di che accordo i richiedenti diedero credito al loro debito di 580,000 kunas croati (HRK) a M.G. ed il debito della loro società di HRK 180,000 a società E. Per garantire il prestito complessivo, i richiedenti usarono il loro alloggio come collaterale, concedendo M.G. registrare un'accusa su sé. Fu convenuto che a meno che i richiedenti e la loro società pagarono le loro pendenze debitorie con 1 maggio 2009, i creditori furono concessi per avviare procedimenti di esecuzione per pagamento del debito per la vendita dell’alloggio dei richiedenti
8. Sul 2009 M.G di 20 ottobre. e la sua società E. avviò procedimenti di esecuzione contro i richiedenti prima il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale (?sud di ?Opinski ?u Poreu?), chiedendo la vendita giudiziale dell'alloggio. Loro dibatterono che i richiedenti non erano riusciti a pagare il loro debito a M.G., mentre la società M.N. era riuscito a pagare solamente parte del suo debito alla società E. I richiedenti la pendenza debitoria di ' corrispose a HRK 703,643.05.
9. 17 novembre 2009 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale accordata che richiesta ed emesso un ordine di esecuzione contro i richiedenti. I richiedenti non fecero appello e l'ordine di esecuzione divenne definitivo 17 dicembre 2009.
10. 11 dicembre 2009 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale registrò l'ordine di esecuzione sui richiedenti l'alloggio di ' nel registro di terra.
11. Un'udienza per valutare il valore della proprietà fu contenuta prima il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale in 4 maggio 2010. Ambo i richiedenti in modo appropriato furono chiamati in causa, ma solamente il primo richiedente sembrò. Lui si impegnò presentare una valutazione competente dell'alloggio entro due giorni. Il creditore chiese alla Corte Municipale di commissionare un esperto per quel il fine. Il primo richiedente non approvò la sua impresa.
12. 16 giugno 2010 la valutazione dell'alloggio fu eseguita su luogo con un ingegnere civile ed un geometra, nella presenza del primo richiedente.
13. L'ingegnere civile presentò il suo rapporto 20 agosto 2010, mentre affermando che il valore dell'alloggio era HRK 2,463,092.48 (approssimativamente 323,860 euro). I richiedenti non fecero eccezioni alla valutazione.
14. 7 ottobre 2010 un altro set di procedimenti di esecuzione contro i richiedenti fu congiunto ai procedimenti in questione. Nei procedimenti precedenti un ordine di esecuzione era stato emesso contro i richiedenti alla richiesta del Legga attentamente Municipio in 12 maggio 2010, in riguardo di una rivendicazione di HRK 24,352.94 (approssimativamente 3,200 euro). Poiché i richiedenti non avevano depositato un ricorso, l'ordine di esecuzione era divenuto definitivo 12 giugno 2010.
15. 25 ottobre 2010 la Corte Municipale espose il valore dei richiedenti l'alloggio di ' a HRK 2,463,092.48.
16. 25 gennaio 2011 una prima asta pubblica fu contenuta. Non c'erano comunque, acquirenti interessati. I richiedenti, sebbene in modo appropriato chiamò in causa, non sembri.
17. Un ulteriore set di procedimenti di esecuzione contro i richiedenti fu congiunto ai procedimenti in questione in 13 maggio 2011. Un ordine di esecuzione era stato emesso contro i richiedenti alla richiesta di Banca P. 24 gennaio 2011, in riguardo di un prestito non retribuito di 14 febbraio 2006 nell'importo di 159,688.87 Franco svizzeri in quelli procedimenti. Poiché i richiedenti non avevano depositato un ricorso, l'ordine di esecuzione era divenuto definitivo 31 marzo 2011.
18. Una seconda asta pubblica per la vendita dei richiedenti l'alloggio di ' fu posticipato molte volte alla richiesta dei creditori.
19. La seconda asta pubblica fu contenuta infine su 30 marzo 2012 ed i richiedenti che l'alloggio di ' è stato venduto a M.G. per HRK 821,040 (approssimativamente 109,000 euro). I richiedenti, sebbene in modo appropriato chiamò in causa, non sembri.
20. 2 aprile 2012 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale accordò M.G. intitoli ai richiedenti l'alloggio di ', a condizione che lui pagò HRK 821,040 come il prezzo di acquisto.
21. 23 aprile 2012 i richiedenti depositarono un ricorso contro che decisione, dibattendo che la vendita giudiziale era stata sproporzionata fin dal valore reale di alloggio loro era stato approssimativamente 700,000 euro (EUR). Loro dibatterono anche che la Corte Municipale era andata a vuoto ad attenersi con le disposizioni dell'Esecuzione Agisca che affermò che corti dovrebbero rispettare la dignità di debitori soggetto ad esecuzione e dovrebbero fare l'esecuzione trattare come benigno come possibile.
22. In 8 maggio 2012 i richiedenti presentarono una dichiarazione che il valore di alloggio loro era EUR 640,000.
23. 28 dicembre 2012 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Pula (sud di Županijski u Puli) respinse i richiedenti il ricorso di '. Fondò che i richiedenti che l'alloggio di ' era venduto ad una seconda asta pubblica dal più di un terzo di valore suo, che la prima asta pubblica era stata senza successo, e quel M.G. era stato il dichiarante solo. Inoltre, il valore dell'alloggio era stato esposto col Legga attentamente Corte Municipale su 25 ottobre 2010 ed i richiedenti non aveva obiettato a sé. Nella prospettiva dell'Organo giudiziario locale, la vendita dei richiedenti che l'alloggio di ' era in conformità con l'Esecuzione Atto.
24. 31 gennaio 2013 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale digitò M.G. ' s intitolano ai richiedenti l'alloggio di ' nel registro di terra.
25. 20 febbraio 2013 i richiedenti depositarono un ricorso su questioni di diritto contro la decisione dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Pula, appellandosi su sezione 382(2) del Procedura Atto Civile. Loro dibatterono che il valore effettivo di alloggio loro era circa EUR 700,000, e che il loro alloggio sarebbe dovuto essere esentato da esecuzione come sé era “soddisfacendo le loro necessità umane e di base.”
26. Nello stesso giorno, i richiedenti fecero domanda al Legga attentamente Corte Municipale per una sospensione di esecuzione.
27. 22 febbraio 2013 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale dichiarò i richiedenti che ' piace su questioni di diritto inammissibile per motivi che a tale ricorso fu concesso solamente in procedimenti di esecuzione se basato su sezione 382(2) del Procedura Atto Civile che non era la causa. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso.
28. Nello stesso giorno il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale dichiarò i richiedenti che ' richiede per una sospensione di esecuzione inammissibile, mentre trovando che loro non erano riusciti a soddisfare le condizioni legali per tale richiesta. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso.
29. 8 marzo 2013 la Società di Elettricità croata (Hrvatska Elektroprivreda, in seguito “HEP”) taglio via i richiedenti l'elettricità di ' a M.G. ' richiesta di s. I richiedenti immediatamente fecero domanda il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale per una misura provvisoria che proibisce M.G. dall'avere l'elettricità ed acqua tagliò la strada e dal fare le modifiche all'alloggio, ordinando HEP riconnettere l'elettricità, ed authorising loro per tenere l'alloggio finché i procedimenti di esecuzione erano completi. Nello stesso giorno il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale emise la misura provvisoria, M.G proibito. dall'avere l'elettricità ed acqua tagliò la strada ed ordinò che HEP riconnettesse l'elettricità. Che decisione fu annullata con l'Organo giudiziario locale di Pula su 21 maggio 2013 ed i richiedenti ' richiede per una misura provvisoria fu negato.
30. 19 giugno 2013 la Corte Municipale decise di trasferire proprietà dell'alloggio in questione a M.G. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso che fu dichiarato inammissibile con la Corte Municipale 10 luglio 2013.
31. 26 luglio 2013 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale sostenne un'udienza sulla divisione degli incassi (dioba kupovnine) dalla vendita dell'alloggio. I richiedenti, sebbene in modo appropriato chiamò in causa, non sembri.
32. 17 settembre 2013 il Legga attentamente Ordine della corte ?Municipale lo sfratto dei richiedenti. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso, mentre dibattendo che esecuzione non sarebbe dovuta essere eseguita con la vendita del loro alloggio alla quale notificò “soddisfi le loro necessità di base”: loro vissero con la loro famiglia là e notificò anche come i loro locali di affari.
33. 21 ottobre 2013 la Corte Municipale elencò lo sfratto dei richiedenti per 13 dicembre 2013, mentre ordinando l'ufficiale giudiziario di corte eseguire lo sfratto. Comunque, lo sfratto fu posticipato per tre mesi.
34. 19 novembre 2013 i richiedenti fecero domanda per una misura provvisoria che proibisce la vendita del loro alloggio ed il loro sfratto.
35. 20 dicembre 2013 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale decise di concludere i procedimenti di esecuzione per il pagamento di debiti di valuta.
36. 20 gennaio 2014 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Pula respinse i richiedenti ' piace contro la decisione di 17 settembre 2013 (veda paragrafo 32 sopra), trovando che la Corte Municipale aveva agito in conformità con la legge, vale a dire le disposizioni dell'Esecuzione Agiscono. I procedimenti di esecuzione sarebbero conclusi circa fin dalla vendita dei richiedenti che l'alloggio di ' era stato completato.
37. 23 gennaio 2014 che l'Organo giudiziario locale di Pula ha accettato i richiedenti ' piace contro la decisione di 22 febbraio 2013 (veda paragrafo 27 sopra) e rinviò i richiedenti che ' piace su questioni di diritto alla Corte Municipale.
38. Nello stesso giorno l'Organo giudiziario locale di Pula, in una decisione diversa respinse i richiedenti ' piace contro la decisione di 22 febbraio 2013 con la quale la loro richiesta per una sospensione dei procedimenti di esecuzione era stata respinta (veda paragrafo 28 sopra).
39. 12 marzo 2014 i richiedenti ritirarono il loro ricorso su questioni di diritto assegnate ad in paragrafi 25 e 37 sopra.
40. Su 13 marzo ed il 2014 M.G di 28 aprile. chiesto i richiedenti lo sfratto di '.
41. I richiedenti non sono stati sfrattati ancora.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Legislazione di Esecuzione
1. Esecuzione Atto di 1996 con emendamenti susseguenti
42. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Esecuzione del 1996 Agiscono che era in vigore al tempo di materiale (zakon di Ovršni, Ufficiale Pubblica della Repubblica di Croatia, N. 57/1996, 29/1999 42/2000, 173/2003 194/2003, 151/2004 88/2005 e 67/2008), purché siccome segue:
Via di ricorso legali
Sezione 11
“(1) dove questo Atto non prescrive altrimenti, ad un ricorso è concesso contro una direttiva (il rješenje) adottò con una corte di primo-istanza.
...
(3) dove questo Atto non prescrive altrimenti, un ricorso sarà depositato entro otto giorni del servizio del primo-istanza decidere.
(4) dove questo Atto non prescrive altrimenti, l'alloggio di un ricorso non sospende i procedimenti di esecuzione.
(5) non c'è via di ricorso contro un'istruzione di corte (lo zakljuak?).
...”
Sezione 12
“(1) in procedimenti di esecuzione... solamente un ricorso su questioni di diritto sotto sezione 382(2) del Procedura Atto Civile è concesso...”
Sezione 46
“(1) il debitore può depositare un ricorso contro l'ordine di esecuzione:
...
7. se il creditore non è autorizzato per chiedere esecuzione sulla base del titolo di esecuzione o non è autorizzato per chiedere esecuzione contro un particolare debitore.
...
9. se la rivendicazione ha cessato esistere sulla base di un fatto che è accaduto quando il debitore non l'avesse potuto presentare più nei procedimenti nei quali fu adottato il titolo di esecuzione, o dopo che un regolamento amichevole corte-assistito è stato concluso o dopo che un atto di notaio è stato redatto, approvato o autorizzato (l'ovjeren).
10. se la sistemazione della rivendicazione è stata aggiornata (addirittura temporaneamente), respinse, alterò od ostacolò dovendo ad un fatto che è accaduto quando il debitore non l'avesse potuto presentare più nei procedimenti nei quali fu adottato il titolo di esecuzione, o dopo che un regolamento amichevole corte-assistito è stato concluso o dopo che un atto di notaio è stato redatto, approvato o autorizzato (l'ovjeren).
11. se la rivendicazione è divenuta statuto-sbarrata.”
Sezione 48 prevede che se un creditore oppone le dichiarazioni nel ricorso di un debitore depositato sotto sezione 46(1) il subparagraphs 7 e 9 a 11, la corte che conduce i procedimenti istruirà il debitore a portare un'azione civile che cerca di avere l'esecuzione dichiarata inammissibile.
Valutazione di beni immobili
Metodo di valutazione di valutazione
Sezione 87
“(1) una corte [conducendo procedimenti di esecuzione] valuterà il valore di beni immobili ed emetterà un'istruzione di corte dopo avere sostenuto un'udienza alla quale le parti avranno un'opportunità di presentare i loro argomenti e presentare prova scritto. La corte può chiedere informazioni sul mercato di vero-appezzamento di terreno dalle autorità fiscali se necessario.
...
(3) quando le parti esposero il valore di beni immobili in un accordo... con che che beni immobili è usato come garanzia collaterale... per garantire una rivendicazione che sarà eseguita, che valore sarà attinente a meno che le parti concordano altrimenti in [l'esecuzione] procedimenti di fronte ad una corte...
...”
Sezione 97
“(1) alla prima asta pubblica il beni immobili non può essere venduto meno per che due-terzo del suo valore valutato (sezione 87).
(2) alla seconda asta pubblica il beni immobili non può essere venduto meno per che un terzo del suo valore valutato.
...”
Sezione 120
“Sulla vendita del beni immobili, il debitore di esecuzione perde, suo o il suo titolo alla proprietà e deve consegnarlo prontamente all'acquirente dopo il servizio della decisione su consegnare la proprietà all'acquirente, se non altrimenti purché per con legge o con un accordo con l'acquirente.”
2. Esecuzione Atto di 2012 con emendamenti susseguenti
43. Un Esecuzione Atto nuovo entrò in vigore 15 ottobre 2012.
44. Sezione 102 prevede che beni immobili non può essere venduto meno per che due-terzo del suo valore valutato ad una prima asta pubblica e la metà del suo valore valutato ad una seconda asta pubblica.
45. Sezione 369(1) prevede che procedimenti di esecuzione in corso devono essere conclusi sotto la legislazione di esecuzione precedente.
B. Procedura Atto Civile
46. La disposizione attinente del Procedura Atto Civile (Zakon ?postupku di parninom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica della Repubblica Federale e Socialista dell'Iugoslavia N. 4/1977, 36/1977 (il corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 e 35/1991, ed Ufficiale Pubblicano della Repubblica di Croatia N. 53/1991, 91/1992, 58/1993 112/1999, 88/2001 117/2003, 88/2005 2/2007, 84/2008 123/2008, 57/2011 148/2011 e 25/2013), come in vigore al tempo di materiale, purché siccome segue:
Sezione 382
“(2)... parti a procedimenti possono depositare un ricorso su questioni di diritto contro una sentenza di secondo-istanza dove la conseguenza di una controversia dipende dalla valutazione di un problema effettivo o procedurale che è dell'importanza nel garantire una richiesta coerente della legge e l'uguaglianza di cittadini...”
47. Le disposizioni attinenti degli Obblighi Agiscono (Zakon odnosima di obveznim di o, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 35/2005, 41/2008 125/2011) legga siccome segue:
Nullità
Sezione 322
“(1) un contratto che è contrario alla Costituzione, norme imperative o morale sarà dichiarato privo di valore legale (il ništetan) a meno che il fine dell'articolo violato indica dell'altra sanzione o la legge in una particolare causa prevede altrimenti.
(2) se la conclusione di un contratto è proibita solamente ad una parte, il contratto rimarrà valido, a meno che la legge in una particolare causa prevede altrimenti, e la parte che ha violato la proibizione legale sopporterà le conseguenze attinenti.”
Contratti annullabili
Sezione 330
“Un contratto è annullabile (il pobojan) se una parte a sé non aveva qualità giuridica o entrò nel contratto sotto prigionia (volje della criniera) al tempo quando fu concluso o dove è annullabile sotto questo Atto o un altro statuto il contratto.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
48. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa era stato violato. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 8 della Convenzione che, in finora come attinente, letture:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo... casa...
2. Non ci sarà interferenza con un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto come è in conformità con la legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione di disturbo o incrimina, per la protezione di salute o morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Osservazioni delle parti
49. Il Governo dibatté che i richiedenti non avevano esaurito via di ricorso nazionali e del tutto disponibili. Nel primo posto, loro avrebbero potuto portare un'azione civile per dichiarare l'accordo in questione privo di valore legale. In simile procedimenti loro avrebbero potuto dibattere che l'accordo era contrario alla Costituzione che garantì il “l'inviolabilità della casa di uno.” Loro avrebbero potuto portare anche un'azione civile che chiede che l'ordine di esecuzione su alloggio loro non era ammissibile. In simile procedimenti loro avrebbero potuto mettere in avanti tutti gli argomenti che concernono il loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa.
50. I richiedenti dibatterono che un'azione civile non potesse alterare gli articoli per procedimenti di esecuzione prescritti con l'Esecuzione Atto. Neanche, un'azione che cerca di avere l'accordo di prestito dichiarata privo di valore legale avrebbe rivolto il problema della protezione del loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa nei procedimenti di esecuzione.
2. La valutazione della Corte
51. Nella conformità con Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, la Corte può trattare solamente con una questione dopo che tutte le via di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite. Il fine di Articolo 35 è riconoscere gli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolando o mettere violazioni corrette addotta contro loro prima che quelle dichiarazioni sono presentate alla Corte (veda, per esempio, Gherghina c. la Romania (il dec.) [GC], n. 42219/07, § 84 9 luglio 2015; Hentrich c. la Francia, 22 settembre 1994, § 33 la Serie Un n. 296-un; e Remli c. la Francia, 23 aprile 1996, § 33 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-II). Un'azione di reclamo presentata alla Corte prima sarebbe dovuta essere resa così, alle corti nazionali ed appropriate, almeno in sostanza nella conformità coi requisiti formali di diritto nazionale ed all'interno dei tempo-limiti prescritti (veda Vukovi ?ed Altri c. Serbia (eccezione preliminare) [GC], N. 17153/11 e 29 altri, § 72 25 marzo 2014). Sostenere altrimenti non sarebbe compatibile col carattere sussidiario del sistema di Convenzione (veda Gavril Yosifov c. la Bulgaria, n. 74012/01, § 42 6 novembre 2008). L'obbligo per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali richiede solamente ciononostante, che un richiedente si avvalga normale di via di ricorso che sono effettive, sufficiente ed accessibile in riguardo dei suoi danni di Convenzione (veda Vukovi ed Altri, citato sopra, § 73; Balogh c. l'Ungheria, n. 47940/99, § 30 20 luglio 2004; e John Sammut e Visto Investimenti Limitarono c. il Malta (il dec.), n. 27023/03, 28 giugno 2005).
52. Al giorno d'oggi causa che il Governo ha dibattuto che i richiedenti avevano alla loro disposizione due via di ricorso loro non erano riusciti ad esaurire (veda paragrafo 49 sopra).
53. Come ad un'azione civile che chiede che l'ordine di esecuzione su alloggio loro non era ammissibile, la Corte nota che a tale azione è lasciato spazio solamente alle ragioni specificate in sezione 46(1) il subparagraphs 7 e 9 a 11 dell'Esecuzione Agiscono (veda paragrafo 42 sopra) e che i richiedenti non hanno dibattuto che qualsiasi di quelle circostanze fatte domanda nella loro causa. Nessune delle circostanze specificò in quelle preoccupazioni di disposizioni i richiedenti gli argomenti di ' sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Perciò, l'eccezione del Governo, in finora come sé concerne un'azione civile che chiede che l'ordine di esecuzione sui richiedenti l'alloggio di ' non era ammissibile, deve essere respinto.
54. Come ad un'azione civile che cerca di avere il contratto in questione dichiarato privo di valore legale, la Corte considera, che gli argomenti presentarono con le parti in che preoccupazione di riguardo i meriti della causa. La Corte li esaminerà perciò in quel il contesto.
55. I costatazione di Corte che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Sé ulteriore trova che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Osservazioni delle parti
56. I richiedenti dibatterono che l'ordine per il loro sfratto emesso col Legga attentamente Corte Municipale aveva corrisposto ad un'interferenza col loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa, nonostante il fatto che loro non era stato sfrattato ancora. Loro accettarono che l'interferenza in oggetto era in conformità con la legge, ma dibattè che non era necessario in una società democratica. Loro sostennero che il loro alloggio sarebbe dovuto essere esentato dai procedimenti di esecuzione poiché stava soddisfacendo le loro necessità di alloggio di base.
57. I richiedenti dibatterono anche che le salvaguardie procedurali richiesero sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione non era stato previsto, poiché gli articoli che governano i procedimenti di esecuzione non permisero alle corti di eseguire una prova di proporzionalità nei procedimenti di esecuzione.
58. Il Governo dibattè che i motivi per interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' per rispettare per la loro casa fu esposto fuori nell'Esecuzione Atto. L'interferenza intraprese lo scopo legittimo di proteggere gli interessi di altri, vale a dire i richiedenti i creditori di '. Loro sostennero che, usando il loro alloggio come garanzia collaterale per il loro prestito, i richiedenti avevano accettato la vendita di alloggio loro se loro non fossero riusciti ad attenersi coi loro obblighi contrattuali.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Se c'è stata un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' rispettare per la loro casa
59. La Corte prima ha sostenuto che la vendita giudiziale della casa di un richiedente e suo o il suo sfratto sarebbe considerato un'interferenza col diritto per rispettare per suo o la sua casa (veda Zehentner c. l'Austria, n. 20082/02, § 54 16 luglio 2009). Al giorno d'oggi la causa, i richiedenti l'alloggio di ' fu venduto in procedimenti di esecuzione ed il loro sfratto fu ordinato nel contesto di quelli procedimenti. Anche se i richiedenti non sono stati sfrattati ancora, un ordine di sfratto è stato emesso e può essere eseguito a qualsiasi il tempo. La Corte reitera che l'obbligo su un richiedente per sgombrare un alloggio nel quale lui o lei vivono importi ad un'interferenza col suo diritto rispettare per la sua casa (veda ?osi ?c. Croatia, n. 28261/06, § 18 15 gennaio 2009).
(b) Se l'interferenza fu prescritta con legge ed intraprese un scopo legittimo
60. Le corti nazionali ordinarono che i richiedenti sgombrassero il loro alloggio. Sotto legge croata procedimenti di esecuzione che regola, un acquirente di proprietà ad un'asta pubblica diviene il proprietario di che proprietà (veda sezione 120 dell'Esecuzione Agire, divida in paragrafi 42 sopra).
61. La Corte reitera che è primariamente per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti, interpretare e fare domanda il diritto nazionale anche in quelli campi dove la Convenzione “incorpora” gli articoli di che legge, poiché le autorità nazionali sono, nella natura di cose, particolarmente qualificato stabilire problemi che sorgono in questo collegamento (veda, mutatis mutandis, Winterwerp c. i Paesi Bassi, 24 ottobre 1979, § 46 la Serie Un n. 33). La Corte non sostituirà la sua propria interpretazione per il loro nell'assenza dell'arbitrarietà (veda, per esempio, Tejedor García c. la Spagna, 16 dicembre 1997, § 31 le Relazioni 1997 VIII).
62. La decisione su titolo traslativo all'alloggio a M.G. fu emesso con le corti nazionali sotto leggi croate che regolano la vendita di beni immobili in procedimenti di esecuzione. Quelle leggi prevedono che quando una corte assegna la proprietà all'acquirente, il debitore di esecuzione perde il suo titolo a sé. Il nazionale corteggia la decisione di ' di ordinare lo sfratto del richiedente fu basato su sezione 120 dell'Esecuzione Agisca. La Corte, notando che il suo potere per fare una rassegna ottemperanza con diritto nazionale è limitato (veda, fra le altre autorità, Allan Jacobsson c. la Svezia (N.ro 1), 25 ottobre 1989, § 57 la Serie Un n. 163), è soddisfatto così che il nazionale corteggia decisioni di ' che ordinano i richiedenti lo sfratto di ' erano in conformità con diritto nazionale (veda ?osi?, citato sopra, § 19). L'interferenza in oggetto perciò intraprese lo scopo legittimo di proteggere il titolo legale dell'acquirente ai richiedenti l'alloggio di '.
(il c) Se l'interferenza era “necessario in una società democratica”
63. La questione centrale in questa causa è, perciò, se l'interferenza era proporzionata allo scopo perseguito e così “necessario in una società democratica.”
64. La Corte ha sostenuto anche che qualsiasi persona a rischio di interferenza col diritto per rispettare per suo o la sua casa deve in principio sia in grado avere la proporzionalità della misura determinato con un tribunale indipendente nella luce dei principi attinenti sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione, nonostante che, sotto diritto nazionale, suo o il suo diritto di occupazione ha finito (veda McCann c. il Regno Unito, n. 19009/04, § 50 ECHR 2008).
65. In molte cause contro Croatia la Corte ha trovato una violazione dei richiedenti il diritto di ' per rispettare per la loro casa per motivi che le corti nazionali non avevano eseguito la prova di proporzionalità quando ordini di sfratto erano stati emessi (veda, per esempio, ?osi?, citato sopra; Pauli c. Croatia, n. 3572/06, 22 ottobre 2009; Orli c. Croatia, n. 48833/07, 21 giugno 2011; Bjedov c. Croatia, n. 42150/09, 29 maggio 2012; e Brežec c. Croatia, n. 7177/10, 18 luglio 2013).
66. In tutte quelle cause, così come nella causa sopra-citata di McCann, i richiedenti stavano vivendo in Statale o socialmente-possedettero appartamenti ed un importante aspetto di trovare una violazione era il fatto che non c'era altro interesse privato in pericolo. Inoltre, i richiedenti in quelle cause non avevano firmato qualsiasi forma di accordo da che cosa loro rischiarono perdere la loro casa.
67. La situazione nella causa presente è diversa poiché le altre parti nei procedimenti di esecuzione o erano una persona privata, vale a dire M.G., o imprese private, vale a dire una banca ed una società. La causa-legge degli organi di Convenzione suggerisce che l'approccio in simile cause è piuttosto diverso e che una misura prescrisse con legge col fine di proteggere i diritti di altri può essere visto come necessario in una società democratica (veda J.P. c. Francia, decisione di Commissione n. 26215/95, 6 settembre 1995, e D.P. c. il Regno Unito, n. 11949/86, 1 dicembre 1986).
68. Diversamente da situazioni rivolte nelle cause menzionate in paragrafi 64 e 65 sopra, i richiedenti nella causa presente si lamentano, che il pagamento dei loro debiti fu eseguito con la vendita della loro casa. La Corte nota all'inizio che i richiedenti usarono volontariamente la loro casa come garanzia collaterale per il loro prestito. I richiedenti specificamente concordarono che se loro e la loro società andassero a vuoto a pagare le loro pendenze debitorie con 1 maggio 2009, i creditori furono concessi per chiedere esecuzione del rimborso per la vendita di alloggio loro (veda paragrafo 1 sopra).
69. Il debito era sostanziale, vale a dire dell'EUR 250,320. Il rischio inerente nel prendere in prestito tale somma alta è che è probabile che il debitore non sia in grado rimborsarlo. I richiedenti furono d'accordo espressamente a correre tale rischio.
70. I richiedenti non impugnarono qualsiasi degli accordi di prestito di fronte alle corti nazionali in procedimenti appropriati. Per esempio, loro avrebbero potuto avviare procedimenti che cercano di avere il contratto dichiarati privo di valore legale (il ništav) o annullabile (il pobojan) (veda sezioni che 322 e 330 degli Obblighi Agiscono, divida in paragrafi 47 sopra). Questo implica che i richiedenti entrarono liberamente in quegli accordi e convenne liberamente che i prestiti che usano il loro alloggio come collaterale potrebbero essere garantiti. I richiedenti sono dovuti essere perciò consapevoli che il loro alloggio sarebbe venduto per garantire il pagamento di qualsiasi le pendenze debitorie dopo che il tempo-limite espose per il rimborso del prestito era scaduto. Quando l'ordine di esecuzione per la vendita di alloggio loro fu emesso, i richiedenti non impugnarono che ordine con vuole dire di un ricorso, come previsto per sotto sezione 11 dell'Esecuzione Agisca (veda paragrafo 42 sopra). Con non obiettando all'ordine di esecuzione che specificamente concernè la vendita di alloggio loro i richiedenti accettò tacitamente la sua vendita nei procedimenti di esecuzione.
71. La vendita dei richiedenti l'alloggio di ' nei procedimenti di esecuzione era una conseguenza dei richiedenti l'insuccesso di ' per soddisfare i loro obblighi contrattuali. Inoltre, era una conseguenza che avevano accettato espressamente i richiedenti.
72. Si può concludere perciò che i richiedenti concordarono ed accettò che il pagamento delle loro pendenze debitorie sarebbe stato eseguito per la vendita di alloggio loro.
73. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per abilitare la Corte per concludere che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 1 DI PROTOCOLLO N. 1 A LA CONVENZIONE
74. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il loro diritto a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà era stato violato. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Osservazioni delle parti
75. Il Governo dibatté che i richiedenti non avevano esaurito le via di ricorso nazionali ed attinenti. Nel primo posto, loro non avevano depositato un ricorso contro l'ordine di esecuzione ed avevano accettato così la vendita di alloggio loro nei procedimenti di esecuzione. Se loro avessero depositato un ricorso contro l'ordine di esecuzione, loro avrebbero potuto presentare inoltre un reclamo costituzionale da che cosa loro avrebbero potuto mettere in avanti tutte le azioni di reclamo che loro avevano presentato di fronte alla Corte.
76. Inoltre, i richiedenti non avevano obiettato alla valutazione di alloggio loro siccome prescritto con l'Esecuzione Atto. Loro avevano avuto sino alla conclusione della prima asta pubblica per fare così. Loro avevano obiettato per la prima volta invece, alla valutazione di alloggio loro nel loro ricorso contro la decisione di accordare M.G. intitoli ad alloggio loro. A che stadio dei procedimenti tale eccezione non era più ammissibile.
77. I richiedenti sostennero che firmando il contratto coi loro creditori loro non avevano accettato gli articoli della procedura di esecuzione, poiché quegli articoli furono prescritti con l'Esecuzione Atto ed una parte ad un contratto non poteva concordare o non potrebbe essere d'accordo con le disposizioni di un Atto. Così, un'azione civile riguardo al contratto non poteva colpire la richiesta dell'Esecuzione Atto.
78. I richiedenti dibatterono che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale non sarebbe stata ammissibile nella loro causa.
79. I richiedenti sottolinearono inoltre che loro avevano fatto appello contro la decisione che ordina la vendita della loro proprietà ed il loro sfratto, ma inutilmente.
2. La valutazione della Corte
80. La Corte considera che gli argomenti delle parti riguardo all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali interessato i meriti dei richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, ed in particolare il suo aspetto procedurale, e li esaminerà di conseguenza.
81. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Osservazioni delle parti
82. I richiedenti misero in avanti gli argomenti seguenti in appoggio della loro azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
83. I richiedenti sostennero che le misure di esecuzione non erano state accompagnate con salvaguardie procedurali. La maggior parte dei loro ricorsi nei procedimenti di esecuzione erano stati dichiarati inammissibili. Il ricorso contro la vendita di alloggio loro per un prezzo sproporzionato, vale a dire un terzo del suo valore, era stato respinto come infondato.
84. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche che il loro alloggio era venduto dal solamente un terzo del suo valore seguente una valutazione con un esperto corte-nominato e che il valore di alloggio loro molto era stato più alto della valutazione dell'esperto.
85. I richiedenti presentarono che l'Esecuzione Atto che era entrato in vigore 15 ottobre 2012 quando i procedimenti di esecuzione contro loro ancora erano stati pendenti, non era stato fatto domanda nella loro causa. La richiesta dell'Atto li avrebbe tratti profitto poiché sé previde che beni immobili non poteva essere venduto meno ad asta pubblica per che la metà del suo valore valutato.
86. I richiedenti dibatterono che il loro alloggio era stato venduto ad uno dei loro creditori, M.G., e che lui era divenuto così il proprietario della proprietà, il valore di che lontano eccedè il prezzo per il quale lui l'aveva comprato. In simile circostanze, i richiedenti il debito di ' a M.G. sarebbe dovuto essere ridotto in linea col valore che lui aveva ottenuto, quel è dire, il pieno valore dell'alloggio in questione.
87. Il Governo presentò che, entrando in accordi di prestito, i richiedenti si avevano definito i dettagli dei loro obblighi legali in riguardo dei loro creditori. Loro avevano accettato la vendita di alloggio loro nell'evento che loro non erano capaci di soddisfare i loro obblighi contrattuali. Le decisioni adottate con le autorità Statali non avevano corrisposto ad un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà ma avevano notificato soltanto come un attrezzo per l'esecuzione della volontà delle parti agli accordi di prestito.
88. La maniera in che i procedimenti di esecuzione in questione fu condotto fu prescritto con l'Esecuzione Atto, siccome era la maniera in che l'alloggio dei richiedenti è stato valutato.
89. La vendita dei richiedenti l'alloggio di ' nel contesto dei procedimenti di esecuzione aveva intrapreso gli scopi legittimi di proteggere gli interessi dei creditori dei richiedenti , e di assicurare la certezza legale ed il benessere economico del paese. Il diritto dei richiedenti i creditori di ' per garantire il rimborso del prestito erano di nessun minore valore che i richiedenti il diritto di ' a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
90. I richiedenti avevano accettato espressamente la vendita di alloggio loro, e che vendita era stata necessaria per garantire il pagamento delle loro pendenze debitorie.
91. Come riguardi il prezzo per che i richiedenti che l'alloggio di ' era stato venduto, il Governo presentò che i vari Stati Contraenti alla Convenzione avevano legiferato in modi diversi in quel il riguardo. Mentre alcuni di loro non avevano esposto un minimo prezzo, altri avevano esposto il minimo alle varie percentuali, con soluzioni simile a quelli previsti per nel sistema croato. Il Governo concedette che del membro che Stati hanno offerto la migliore protezione per debitori, ma indicò che le differenze in approcci legislativi e pratica fra membro che Stati hanno mostrato che loro dovrebbero godere un margine ampio della valutazione in quel il collegamento.
92. Il Governo indicò che i richiedenti erano rimasti inattivi come riguardi la valutazione di alloggio loro nel contesto dei procedimenti di esecuzione. Loro non presentarono qualsiasi prova come riguardi il valore di alloggio loro per più di due anni, né loro misero in avanti eccezioni opportune alla valutazione competente.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Se c'è stata un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà
93. La proprietà dei richiedenti che casa ' è stata trasferita ad un'altra persona nel contesto di procedimenti di esecuzione portato con una prospettiva ad ottenendo somme di soldi che le corti nazionali avevano più prime ordinate per essere pagato ai richiedenti i creditori di '. Anche se l'interferenza in oggetto non comporti l'espropriazione con lo Stato, la misura contestata diede luogo allo spogliare i richiedenti della loro proprietà.
94. La Corte già ha esaminato le varie situazioni della forzata vendita di richiedenti case ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e concluse che simile vendita corrispose ad interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà (veda, per esempio, Hagman c. la Finlandia (il dec.), n. 41765/98, 14 gennaio 2003; Zehentner, citato sopra, Kanala c. la Slovacchia, n. 57239/00, 10 luglio 2007; e Rousk c. la Svezia, n. 27183/04, 25 luglio 2013). La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di abbandonare da tale conclusione nella causa presente.
95. La Corte si riferisce alla sua causa-legge stabilita sulla struttura di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e la maniera nelle quali i tre articoli contennero in che disposizione sarà fatta domanda (veda, fra molte altre autorità, J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) la Terra Ltd c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 52 ECHR 2007 III; Jokela c. la Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 44 ECHR 2002 IV; e Zehentner, citato sopra, § 70).
96. In linea con che causa-legge, la Corte considera che la vendita giudiziale dei richiedenti che la proprietà di ' incorre essere considerata sotto il così definito terzo articolo, relativo al diritto dello Stato “eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare dell'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale”, esponga fuori nel secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, per esempio, Zehentner, citato sopra, § 71).
(b) Se l'interferenza fu prescritta con legge ed intraprese un scopo legittimo
97. La Corte reitera che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di qualcuno proprietà dovrebbero essere legali (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999 II).
98. Qualsiasi interferenza con un diritto di proprietà, irrispettoso dell'articolo sotto il quale incorre, può essere giustificato solamente se notifica un pubblico legittimo (o generale) l'interesse. La Corte reitera che, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che qualsiasi giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare una valutazione preliminare come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (veda Terazzi S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 27265/95, § 85, 17 ottobre 2002, ed Elia S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 37710/97, § 77 ECHR 2001-IX).
99. La Corte nota che l'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà fu basato sulle disposizioni attinenti dell'Esecuzione Agisca e notificò gli scopi legittimi di proteggere i creditori e l'acquirente dell'alloggio (veda paragrafo 62 sopra per le considerazioni simili in riguardo di Articolo 8).
(il c) Se l'interferenza era proporzionata allo scopo legittimo perseguito
100. Rimane essere determinato se le misure si lamentarono di era proporzionato allo scopo perseguito. Secondo la causa-legge ben stabilita della Corte, il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1 sarà letto nella luce del principio enunciata nella prima frase. Di conseguenza qualsiasi interferenza deve realizzare un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed il requisito di proteggere i diritti essenziali dell'individuo. La ricerca per questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nell'insieme, e perciò anche nel secondo paragrafo al riguardo: ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo perseguì. In ogni causa che comporta una violazione allegato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve accertare se con ragione dell'interferenza dello Stato, la persona riguardata dovuto per sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo (veda James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 50 la Serie Un n. 98, ed Amato Gauci c. il Malta, n. 47045/06, § 57 15 settembre 2009). Nel determinare se questo requisito è stato soddisfatto, la Corte riconosce che lo Stato gode un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo a sia a scegliendo i mezzi di esecuzione ed ad accertando se le conseguenze di esecuzione sono giustificate nell'interesse generale per il fine di realizzare l'oggetto della legge in oggetto (veda Chassagnou ed Altri c. la Francia [GC], N. 25088/94, 28331/95 e 28443/95, § 75 ECHR 1999-III; Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 49 ECHR 1999 V; e Luordo c. l'Italia, n. 32190/96, § 69 ECHR 2003 IX;).
101. La Corte è attenta del fatto che la causa presente concerne procedimenti fra parti private, vale a dire i richiedenti ed i loro creditori sulla mano del un'e i richiedenti e l'acquirente di alloggio loro sull'altra mano. Lo Stato è anche in cause che comportano la causa privata, comunque, sotto un obbligo per riconoscere le parti alla controversia procedure giudiziali che offrono le garanzie procedurali e necessarie e perciò abilitano le corti nazionali e tribunali per aggiudicare efficacemente ed equamente nella luce della legge applicabile (veda Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 83 ECHR 2007 io; J.A. Pye, citato sopra, § 57; ed il ?banka di Zagrebaka d.d. c. Croatia, n. 39544/05, §§ 250 e 251, 12 dicembre 2013).
102. La Corte nota che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è basato su due argomenti principali: in primo luogo, che il loro alloggio fu venduto lontano ad un prezzo sotto il suo valore di mercato e contraria al diritto vigente a che tempo (veda paragrafo 85 sopra); e, in secondo luogo, che le misure di esecuzione non furono accompagnate con salvaguardie procedurali. Loro si lamentarono che le via di ricorso che loro avevano intrapreso nei procedimenti erano state senza successo.
103. Come riguardi i richiedenti che ' conduce, la Corte nota siccome segue. I richiedenti presero in prestito un importo considerevole di soldi, una misura che, con la sua molta natura, coinvolto un elemento di rischio. Quando entrando nell'accordo di prestito, i richiedenti avrebbero potuto stipulare il valore del loro alloggio che loro usarono come collaterale. Sotto legge croata che li avrebbe offerti con un grado considerevole della sicurezza come sotto sezione 87(3) dell'Esecuzione Atto una corte che conduce procedimenti di esecuzione è in principio obbligato ad accettare che valore quando ordinando la vendita del beni immobili riguardata (veda paragrafo 42 sopra).
104. In oltre per evitare avere il loro alloggio vendè ad un'asta pubblica ed i rischi inerenti, come la possibilità che è probabile che la proprietà sia venduta per solamente un terzo del suo valore valutato quando i richiedenti compresero che loro non potessero attenersi coi loro obblighi contrattuali, mentre sa che quegli obblighi erano stati garantiti con alloggio loro, loro avrebbero potuto vendere loro, fuori dei procedimenti di esecuzione l'alloggio. Loro avrebbero potuto tentare così di ottenere il pieno valore di mercato per sé.
105. In finora come i richiedenti si lamenti che il loro alloggio fu venduto per solamente un terzo del suo valore valutato, la Corte considera che gli articoli che prevedono che beni immobili può essere venduto ad un'asta pubblica, nel contesto di procedimenti di esecuzione per un terzo del suo valore valutato incorre all'interno del margine dello Stato della valutazione e non sembra manifestamente arbitrario o irragionevole. Potrebbe essere venduto solamente anche, per un terzo del valore dopo che una vendita all'asta iniziale era andata a vuoto ad ottenere metà il valore.
106. Avendo riguardo ad al margine della valutazione goduto con le autorità nazionali sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera perciò che il prezzo ricevette coi richiedenti si può considerare che sia stato riferito ragionevolmente al valore della proprietà.
107. La Corte nota anche i richiedenti l'argomento di ' che l'Esecuzione Atto che entrò in vigore 15 ottobre 2012 quando i procedimenti di esecuzione contro loro ancora erano pendenti, non fu fatto domanda nella loro causa. La richiesta dell'Atto li avrebbe tratti profitto, poiché sé previde che beni immobili non poteva essere venduto meno ad asta pubblica per che la metà del suo valore valutato (veda paragrafo 44 sopra). La Corte nota che quando legislazione nuova è introdotta, gli articoli procedurali e nuovi possono fare domanda solamente a cause future o a tutti i procedimenti pendenti. In questa istanza, il legislatore croato previde che tutti i procedimenti di esecuzione pendenti sarebbero condotti sotto i vecchi articoli (veda paragrafo 45 sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte, questo è solo uno esempio fra altri della varietà di ordinamenti giuridici che esistono in Europa, e non è il compito della Corte per standardizzarli. La scelta di un Stato di un particolare sistema di articoli procedurali è in principio fuori della sfera della soprintendenza eseguita con la Corte a livello europeo, purché che l'eletto di sistema non contravviene ai principi insorti avanti la Convenzione (veda, mutatis mutandis, Achour c. la Francia [GC], n. 67335/01, § 51 ECHR 2006-IV; e Taxquet c. il Belgio [GC], n. 926/05, § 83 ECHR 2010).
108. Come ai richiedenti l'argomento di ' che la persona che comprò il loro alloggio era uno dei loro creditori, M.G. (veda paragrafo 86 sopra), la Corte non vede problema nel fatto che un creditore che compra beni immobili ad asta pubblica è trattato nella stessa maniera come qualsiasi l'altro acquirente.
109. In somma, e particolarmente in prospettiva dei rischi presa intenzionalmente coi richiedenti quando loro presero in prestito verso EUR 247,000 ed usato il loro alloggio come collaterale, i richiedenti non sono stati resi per sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo in questa causa.
110. Come alla parte dei richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' relativo all'aspetto procedurale di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte reitera che benché Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non contiene requisiti procedurali ed espliciti, i procedimenti in questione deve riconoscere l'individuo un'opportunità ragionevole di fissare suo o la sua causa alle autorità attinenti per il fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantito con questa disposizione. Nell'accertare se questa condizione è stata soddisfatta, la Corte prende una prospettiva comprensiva (veda, per istanza, Jokela, citato sopra, § 45).
111. La Corte nota che sotto legge croata, una corte che conduce procedimenti di esecuzione fissa il prezzo di beni immobili per essere venduta con un'istruzione di corte (lo zakljuak?) quale non è assoggettabile per fare appello (veda sezioni 11(5) e 87(1) dell'Esecuzione Atto, divida in paragrafi 42 sopra). Comunque, in procedimenti che nascono da in una richiesta individuale la Corte ha confinarsi, il più lontano possibile ad un esame della causa concreta di fronte a sé (veda J.B. c. la Svizzera, n. 31827/96, § 63 ECHR 2001 III). Non è chiamato perciò su per fare una rassegna la legislazione in questione nell'astratto, vale a dire le disposizioni attinenti dell'Esecuzione Agiscono sulla vendita giudiziale di proprietà, ma esaminerà le specifiche circostanze dei richiedenti la causa di '.
112. La Corte nota che in 4 maggio 2010 il Legga attentamente Corte Municipale sostenne un'udienza per valutare il valore della proprietà in questione. Solamente il primo richiedente sembrò a che ascolta, anche se ambo i richiedenti in modo appropriato erano stati chiamati in causa (veda paragrafo 11 sopra). Il fine dell'udienza era dare le parti una possibilità di avanzare i loro argomenti riguardo al prezzo della proprietà per essere venduto e presentare prova in appoggio dei loro argomenti (veda sezione 87(1) dell'Esecuzione Atto, divida in paragrafi 42 sopra). Comunque, il primo richiedente non avanzò qualsiasi gli argomenti o presenta qualsiasi la prova. Anche se lui aveva promesso di presentare una valutazione competente dell'alloggio entro due giorni, lui non riuscì a fare così. Un esperto commissionato con la Corte Municipale presentò il suo rapporto di valutazione 20 agosto 2010. I richiedenti non presentarono qualsiasi le eccezioni a quel il rapporto. Loro impugnarono per la prima volta effettivamente, la valutazione di alloggio loro nel loro ricorso contro la decisione che accorda M.G. intitoli all'alloggio, ad un stadio dei procedimenti quando gli ulteriori argomenti riguardo al valore dell'alloggio non erano più ammissibili.
113. Non usando l'opportunità prevista a loro all'udienza sostenuta per valutare il valore di alloggio loro, i richiedenti si misero in una posizione svantaggiosa. Le via di ricorso i richiedenti cercarono di usare ad un più tardi stadio dei procedimenti non fu offerto per con l'Esecuzione Atto. Così, tutte le conseguenze dei richiedenti il comportamento di ', come il fatto che loro non potessero impugnare la valutazione dell'alloggio siccome valutato con la corte che conduce i procedimenti di esecuzione e l'insuccesso delle via di ricorso che loro hanno intrapreso, è attribuibile ai richiedenti stessi.
114. Dato che i richiedenti non parteciparono attivamente nella valutazione del valore di alloggio loro allo stadio attinente dei procedimenti di esecuzione, anche se loro avevano un'opportunità di fare così ad un'udienza sostenuta precisamente per che fine e presentando eccezioni opportune al rapporto di valutazione dell'esperto, la Corte non può accettare i loro argomenti riguardo alle deficienze negli articoli dei procedimenti di esecuzione.
115. In prospettiva del sopra, la Corte conclude, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 12 luglio 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Il ?Karaka?
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 11/07/2020.