Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SIA AKKA/LAA v. LATVIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,35,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 562/05/2016
STATO: Lettonia
DATA: 12/07/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible (Article 35-3 - Manifestly ill-founded) No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property) No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings Article 6-1 - Fair hearing)



FIFTH SECTION





CASE OF SIA AKKA/LAA v. LATVIA

(Application no. 562/05)















JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

12 July 2016



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of SIA AKKA/LAA v. Latvia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Angelika Nußberger, President,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Erik Møse,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Yonko Grozev,
Carlo Ranzoni,
M?rti?š Mits, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 21 June 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 562/05) against the Republic of Latvia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by OMISSIS (“the applicant organisation”), on 6 August 2004.
2. The applicant organisation was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Riga. The Latvian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms K. L?ce.
3. The applicant organisation alleged violations under Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention on the grounds that the domestic courts had restricted the copyright of authors whose musical works were collectively managed by the applicant organisation.
4. On 24 June 2013 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant organisation, OMISSIS (SIA “Autorties?bu un komunic?šan?s konsult?ciju a?ent?ra/Latvijas Autoru apvien?ba” –Copyright and Communication Consulting Agency ltd./Latvian Authors Association) is a non-profit organisation founded in Riga by a separate non profit organisation, the Latvian Authors Association, whose members are various Latvian artists.
6. At the end of the 1990s the applicant organisation, acting as a representative of approximately 2000 domestic and two million international authors who had entrusted the applicant organisation to manage the copyright of their musical works, was concluding licence agreements with several broadcasters in Latvia. From 1998 to 1999, after the expiry of the previous licence agreements, the applicant organisation and certain broadcasting organisations in Latvia could not reach an agreement on the terms of the future licence agreements, especially with regard to the remuneration to be paid for the broadcasting of music. As a result some broadcasting organisations continued to use the protected musical works without a written agreement, either without paying any remuneration or paying the amount the broadcasting organisations unilaterally considered equitable. In 2002 the applicant organisation instituted civil proceedings against several broadcasters operating in Latvia.
A. First set of proceedings – [the applicant organisation] v. Radio SWH
7. In July 2002 the applicant organisation lodged a claim against a private radio station, Radio SWH, and requested that the Riga Regional Court, acting as a first-instance court, recognise that by broadcasting protected musical works without a valid licence agreement between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 2001, the defendant had violated economic interests of the authors represented by the applicant organisation. The applicant organisation further asked that the court award compensation for unauthorised use of musical works. By relying on the authors’ exclusive rights to control the use of their musical works, the applicant organisation asked the court to apply an injunction precluding the defendant from using the authors’ works before a valid licence agreement between the parties had come into effect.
8. The defendant lodged a counterclaim arguing that the applicant organisation had abused its dominant position and had fixed an unreasonably high royalty rate, which was six times the rate which had been applicable for the period from 1995 to 1998. They asked the court to order the applicant organisation to conclude a licence agreement with the defendant organisation and to lay down an equitable royalty rate.
9. During the first-instance court’s hearing, the applicant organisation admitted that the parties had a dispute over the royalty rate in the draft licence agreement negotiated by the parties, but that the court was precluded under section 41 of the Copyright Law from setting the rate as long as there was no licence agreement concluded between the parties (see paragraph 26 below).
10. On 16 January 2003 the first-instance court partly upheld the claim and fully upheld the counterclaim. It established that between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 2001 the defendant had infringed the authors’ rights by broadcasting the protected works without authorisation, contrary to the provisions of the Copyright Law. The first-instance court ordered the defendant to pay to the applicant organisation compensation for the above period in the amount of 78,000 Latvian lats (LVL, equivalent to 111,500 euros (EUR)), which was 1.5% of the defendant’s net turnover over this period.
11. Furthermore, the first-instance court ordered the applicant organisation to conclude a licence agreement with the defendant for the next three-year period with a royalty rate set at 2% of the defendant’s monthly net turnover (ikm?neša neto apgroz?jums).
12. Lastly, by relying on the preamble of the WIPO Copyright Treaty and Articles 11 and 11bis of the Berne Convention (see paragraph 37 below), the first-instance court dismissed the applicant organisation’s application to have an injunction granted to prohibit the defendant from broadcasting works of the rightsholders represented by the applicant organisation. By referring to the testimonies of two authors represented by the applicant organisation, the first-instance court concluded that the authors themselves were interested in their musical works being publicly broadcasted. An interdiction on broadcasting of the musical works would infringe the authors’ exclusive rights to have their work reproduced, as well as it would negatively affect the interests of the society to listen to music.
13. On 23 October 2003 the Civil Cases Chamber of the Supreme Court, acting as an appellate court, upheld the part of the first-instance judgment concerning the compensation for copyright infringement and the injunction.
14. On the issue of ordering the conclusion of a licence agreement, the appellate court observed that both parties had expressed their intention to enter into a such an agreement, as attested by a draft licence agreement of 7 October 2003 in which the parties had agreed on certain terms and conditions such as the duration of the licence and the income from which royalties should be calculated. The appellate court noted that it was partly due to the applicant organisation’s inconsistent negotiating that a licence agreement could not be concluded. The appellate court accordingly recognised that the licence agreement was to be considered concluded in the wording as agreed by the parties on 7 October 2003. On the question of remuneration, the appellate court established that in the negotiation process the applicant organisation had changed the royalty rate from 6% to 4% and then to 3.5%, whereas the defendant had insisted on 1.6% of the income from which royalties should be calculated. The appellate court took note of the characteristics of the defendant’s activities and concluded that an equitable remuneration would be 2% of the income from which, as agreed by the parties, the royalties should be calculated.
15. On 11 February 2004, following an appeal on points of law, the Senate of the Supreme Court upheld the appellate court’s findings that after the expiry of the earlier licence agreement on 31 December 1998 the de facto contractual relationship between the parties had continued mainly owing to the fact that the applicant organisation had failed to reach an agreement with the defendant on the terms of the licence agreement. The Senate of the Supreme Court further observed that the parties did not contest that the authors had a right to receive equitable remuneration, but that to that day the parties had not reached an agreement on the rate of the royalty payments. Given that there was no other authority responsible to decide on this matter, the Senate of the Supreme Court concluded that pursuant to Article 11bis of the Berne Convention and section 5 of the Civil Law, it was within the court’s competence to set the royalty rate. The Senate of the Supreme Court also dismissed the allegations that the appellate court’s judgment had infringed the intellectual property rights protected under the Constitution of the Republic of Latvia.
B. Second set of proceedings – [the applicant organisation] v. Latvijas Radio
16. In their claim against Latvijas Radio, a state-owned limited liability company, the applicant organisation asked the Riga Regional Court, acting as a first-instance court, to find that by broadcasting the rightsholders’ musical works without a valid licence agreement between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2001, the defendant had violated economic interests of the authors represented by the applicant organisation. The applicant organisation further asked that the court award compensation for unauthorised use of musical works. By relying on the authors’ exclusive rights to control the use of their musical works, the applicant organisation asked the court to apply an injunction precluding the defendant from using the authors’ works before a valid licence agreement between the parties had come into effect.
17. By lodging a counterclaim the defendant in essence asked the court to recognise that in the disputed period the parties had a de facto contractual relationship.
18. On 2 April 2003 the Riga Regional Court dismissed the applicant organisation’s claim and upheld the counterclaim. The court established that even though the licence agreement concluded between the parties with the royalty rate set at 3.2% of the defendant’s annual income had expired in 1999, the applicant organisation had continued receiving royalty payments from the defendant, which continued to pay at a lower rate. Given that the applicant organisation had not referred to objections to the broadcasting of the musical works, the existence of a de facto contractual relationship between the parties had been proven. Relying on section 41 of the Copyright Law the court set the royalty rate from 2000 to 2001 at 1.57% of the defendant’s annual income.
19. On 26 November 2003 the Civil Cases Chamber of the Supreme Court, acting as an appellate court, diverted from the first-instance court’s findings and recognised that the defendant had infringed copyright by broadcasting the musical works over a prolonged period of time without a valid written licence agreement. It awarded the applicant organisation compensation in the amount of LVL 100,000 (EUR 143,000), which exceeded the amount the defendant had paid under the expired licence agreement. It considered that it would be fruitless to issue an injunction prohibiting the defendant from broadcasting the works. The appellate court observed that in principle the parties had expressed their interest in concluding a licence agreement but that before and during the court proceedings the parties had not agreed on the equitable royalty rate. It also pointed to the applicant organisation’s responsibility in failing to reach an agreement in the negotiation of a new licence. As a result, over a prolonged period of time the authors’ rights had been unprotected. As the parties had not asked the court to decide on the exact terms and conditions of a licence agreement, the appellate court decided to impose on the parties a general obligation to conclude a licence agreement by 1 March 2004. Given that the parties had been unable to agree on a royalty rate, the appellate court set the rate at 3% of the defendant’s net turnover. In reaching this conclusion the appellate court took into consideration such elements as, inter alia, the royalty rate set in other court proceedings and the existing practice in certain other EU member States.
20. The applicant organisation appealed on points of law arguing that by, inter alia, ordering the parties to conclude a licence agreement and setting its terms, the court had overstepped its powers and acted in breach of section 11bis of the Berne Convention and section 15 of the Copyright Law.
21. On 17 March 2004 the Senate partly upheld the lower court’s judgment with similar reasoning as in the first set of proceedings.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Constitution:
22. Article 113 provides that the State shall recognise the freedom of scientific research, artistic and other creative activity, and shall protect copyright and patent rights.
B. The Civil Law
23. Section 5 provides that a judge must be guided by the general principles of law and justice when a court is called upon to adjudicate on its own discretion or when exceptional circumstances have to be taken into account.
C. Copyright Law (Autorties?bu likums) (wording in force at the material time)
24. Section 7(2) provides that rightsholders may exercise copyright themselves or through a representative, such as an organisation for collective management of rightsholders’ economic rights arising from copyright (hereinafter – “the collective management of copyright”). The rights of a rightsholder are set out in section 15 and encompass, among other things, the authors’ exclusive rights to publish, reproduce and broadcast their work. Authors shall have the right to use their work in any manner, to permit or prohibit its use, to receive remuneration for permission to use it, except in cases provided for by law (section 15(4)).
25. Pursuant to section 40, permission to use a work is given in the form of a licence, which must be obtained in order to have a right to use a protected work.
26. Section 41 provides that by entering into a licence agreement the copyright holders authorise the parties to the agreement to use the protected works. The licence agreement sets out the conditions for the use of work, the remuneration and the payment procedure. Part three of the above section provides that if the licence agreement does not set out the royalty rate, the latter shall be decided by the domestic courts.
27. Under section 42(4) general licences are issued by organisations for collective management of copyright, and the licence gives a right to use the work of all the authors represented by the organisation.
28. Chapter X sets out the regulations on the collective management of copyright. Specifically, in a case where the protection of copyright cannot be ensured on an individual basis or if such protection is encumbered, copyright protection is ensured by a collective management organisation (section 63(1)). It sets out that such economic rights which arise from broadcasting of protected works shall only be administered collectively (section 63(2)). The organisation for collective management is founded by authors and it operates within the powers vested in it by the authors (section 63(3)).
29. The organisation for collective management has, inter alia, the following tasks: it sets an equitable royalty rate in cases provided for by law (see section 63(2) above); it negotiates with the users of protected works on the terms of remuneration, on procedures for payment and on conditions for the issuing of licences; the organisation issues licences to the users of works in relation to the rights administered by it; it collects royalty payments as specified in the licence, and distributes them (section 65(1)).
30. On the scope of the rights of an organisation for collective management, section 64 provides that such an organisation shall protect the rightsholders’ economic rights arising from their copyright over artistic works, and that the organisation shall represent the authors’ rights and interests in all matters with any public or private party, including in court proceedings and matters related to such proceedings.
31. Section 69 provides that in a case of copyright violation, the rightsholders’ as well as the collective management organisation have the right to ask the perpetrator to recognise the protected rights; to prohibit the use of the protected work; to request immediate termination of any unlawful activities; and to claim damages, including for lost earnings, or to claim compensation in an amount set by the court.
D. Other relevant information
32. Pursuant to part 3 of the articles of association of the applicant organisation (SIA AKKA/LAA stat?ti), the applicant organisation has its own property which consists primarily of deductions from the collected royalty payments. The income exceeding the administration expenses was put into savings to be used by the applicant organisation following the decisions of its shareholders – that is to say the authors.
33. On the basis of the standard representation agreements concluded between the applicant organisation and authors for the protection of authors’ rights, the applicant organisation has rights in its own name (sav? v?rd?) to, without obtaining additional authorisation, carry out all procedural matters in court proceedings, to bring claims, and lodge appeals, and to receive court awarded damages. The application organisation was mandated to deduct no more that 25% of the collected sums as remuneration for the services provided, whereas the authors agreed not to, inter alia, defend or carry out any activities associated with any of the rights entrusted to the applicant organisation.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL LAW
A. WIPO Copyright Treaty (adopted in Geneva on December 20, 1996), to which Latvia acceded on 22 March 2000; and which came into effect on 6 March 2002
34. In the Preamble of the WIPO Copyright Treaty the contracting States emphasised the outstanding significance of copyright protection as an incentive for literary and artistic creation, as well as recognising the need to maintain a balance between the rights of authors and the larger public interest, particularly education, research and access to information, as reflected in the Berne Convention.
35. Articles 8 and 11 of the WIPO Copyright Treaty state as follows:
Article 8
Right of Communication to the Public
“Without prejudice to the provisions of Articles 11(1)(ii), 11bis(1)(i) and (ii), 11ter(1)(ii), 14(1)(ii) and 14bis(1) of the Berne Convention, authors of literary and artistic works shall enjoy the exclusive right of authorizing any communication to the public of their works, by wire or wireless means, including the making available to the public of their works in such a way that members of the public may access these works from a place and at a time individually chosen by them.”
36. Explanatory remark to the above Article reads as follows:
“It is understood that the mere provision of physical facilities for enabling or making a communication does not in itself amount to communication within the meaning of this Treaty or the Berne Convention. It is further understood that nothing in Article 8 precludes a Contracting Party from applying Article 11bis(2).
...”
Article 11
Obligations concerning Technological Measures
“Contracting Parties shall provide adequate legal protection and effective legal remedies against the circumvention of effective technological measures that are used by authors in connection with the exercise of their rights under this Treaty or the Berne Convention and that restrict acts, in respect of their works, which are not authorized by the authors concerned or permitted by law.”
B. Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (hereinafter – “the Berne Convention” (in force with respect to Latvia from 11 August 1995)
37. Article 11bis of the Berne Convention sets out provisions in relation to broadcasting and related rights:
“(1) Authors of literary and artistic works shall enjoy the exclusive right of authorizing:
(i) the broadcasting of their works or the communication thereof to the public by any other means of wireless diffusion of signs, sounds or images;
(ii) any communication to the public by wire or by rebroadcasting of the broadcast of the work, when this communication is made by an organization other than the original one;
(iii) the public communication by loudspeaker or any other analogous instrument transmitting, by signs, sounds or images, the broadcast of the work.
(2) It shall be a matter for legislation in the countries of the Union to determine the conditions under which the rights mentioned in the preceding paragraph may be exercised, but these conditions shall apply only in the countries where they have been prescribed. They shall not in any circumstances be prejudicial to the moral rights of the author, nor to his right to obtain equitable remuneration which, in the absence of agreement, shall be fixed by competent authority.
(3) In the absence of any contrary stipulation, permission granted in accordance with paragraph (1) of this Article shall not imply permission to record, by means of instruments recording sounds or images, the work broadcast. It shall, however, be a matter for legislation in the countries of the Union to determine the regulations for ephemeral recordings made by a broadcasting organization by means of its own facilities and used for its own broadcasts. The preservation of these recordings in official archives may, on the ground of their exceptional documentary character, be authorized by such legislation.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
38. The applicant organisation complained that the domestic courts had restricted the copyright of authors whose musical works were collectively managed by the applicant organisation. They complained, in particular, that as a result of the domestic proceedings in which the domestic courts had ordered the applicant organisation to conclude licence agreements with defendant organisations and had set a royalty rate, the authors’ exclusive rights to freely conclude licence agreements for the use of their musical works had been restricted, contrary to Article 1 of protocol No. 1of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Compatibility ratione materiae
39. The Government argued in substance that the contested domestic proceedings related to the setting of royalty rates and not to property rights.
40. The applicant organisation contested the Government’s argument.
41. The Court reiterates that the protection of intellectual property rights, including the protection of copyright, falls within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 72, ECHR 2007 I, and Melnychuk v. Ukraine (dec.), no. 28743/03, 5 July 2005). The Court observes that the domestic courts in the course of the impugned civil proceedings acknowledged, among other issues, the infringement of the copyright of authors represented by the applicant organisation. The protection of musical works and the economic interests deriving from them thus fall within the scope of rights protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
42. Consequently, the Court dismisses the objection raised by the Government in this regard.
2. Compatibility ratione personae
(a) Arguments of the Parties
43. The Government contended that the applicant organisation had acted merely as an intermediary between the users of artistic works and the authors, who had transferred only the implementation of part of their pecuniary rights to the applicant organisation. The Government argued that the applicant organisation had not been directly affected by any measures and it had not by virtue of its administrative and representative function acquired any “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The recognition of the applicant organisation’s locus standi in the domestic proceedings according to the Government did not automatically envisage compliance with Article 34 of the Convention. The Government maintained that the applicant organisation could not claim to be a victim of a measure that infringed the rights guaranteed by the Convention to its members.
44. The applicant organisation argued that under domestic law and following the practice of the domestic courts they were the only entity under the national law that had the legal capacity to exercise the copyright of authors’ works and to protect and manage authors’ rights in legal relationships with users of such works, including the protection of the fundamental rights of the authors. It emphasised that the contested domestic proceedings had been brought in the name of the organisation itself as, under domestic law, the authors themselves could not enter into licence agreements with the broadcasters or bring claims. This, in the applicant organisation’s opinion, proved that they should be considered as a direct victim in the light of the Convention. In the alternative, the applicant organisation asked the Court to recognise it as an indirect victim on the ground of the applicant organisation’s very close link to the direct victims, notably, the authors. Under domestic law the latter had been obliged to establish the applicant organisation which had since been managing and protecting their artistic works.
(b) The Court’s assessment
45. The Court has held that two conditions must be met in order to comply with Article 34 of the Convention: an applicant must fall into one of the categories of petitioners mentioned in Article 34, and he or she must be able to make out a case that he or she is the victim of a violation of the Convention. In addition, in order for an applicant to be able to claim to be a victim of a violation of the Convention, there must be a sufficiently direct link between the applicant and the harm allegedly sustained on account of the alleged violation (see Gorraiz Lizarraga and Others v. Spain, no. 62543/00, § 35, ECHR 2004 III with further references). Moreover, an association cannot claim to be itself a victim of measures alleged to have interfered solely with the rights of its individual members if the contested measure did not affect the organisation as such (see Association des Amis de Saint-Raphael et de Frejus and Others v. France, no. 38192/97, Commission decision of 1 July 1998, Decisions and Reports (DR), no. 94 B, p. 124).
46. It is true that in the present case the applicant organisation’s arguments at first sight appear to concern the protection of the authors’ rights. However, given the status and role of the applicant organisation, the Court cannot share the Government’s view that the only legitimate victims vis-à-vis the Court’s proceedings were individual members of that organisation.
47. In so far as the applicant organisation raised its complaints in its function as a representative of the affiliated authors, the Court takes note of the following provisions of domestic law and documents regulating the functioning of the applicant organisation.
48. The Copyright Law provided that in relation to certain types of use of artistic work, such as the broadcasting of music, the economic rights of copyright holders were only to be administrated collectively (see paragraph 24 above). For that reason Latvian authors founded the applicant organisation and vested it with the powers to set royalty rates for the use of their works, to license broadcasters in Latvia and abroad to use those works, and to distribute to the authors the collected royalty payments (see paragraph 29 above). For the applicant organisation to be able to carry out the above functions, it had its own property which consisted primarily of deductions from the collected royalty payments (see paragraph 32 above). The Court observes in particular that the applicant organisation had broad powers in relation to the matters falling within the collective management of certain type of copyright. The authors have explicitly given up their rights to, inter alia, represent their interests in any court proceedings, and they have vested these rights in the applicant organisation (see paragraph 33 above).
49. The Court considers that once the domestic legal order attributes the protection of authors’ rights to an organisation founded by the authors for this purpose, and vests it with independent rights transferred from the authors, including the right to have its own property made up primarily of deduction from royalty payments, then that organisation must be regarded as the victim of measure affecting these rights. In the present case, as a result of the contested civil proceedings the applicant organisation was ordered to conclude written licence agreements with the defendant organisations. The domestic courts set the royalty rates in the licence agreements with broadcasters, and thus interfered with the functions and economic interests of the applicant organisation. In these circumstances the applicant organisation’s rights were directly affected by the impugned civil proceedings.
50. In the light of the above, the Court dismisses the Government’s objection as to the applicant organisation’s victim status.
3. Overall conclusion
51. This complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Whether there was an interference with the applicant organisation’s possessions
(a) Possessions
52. The Government submitted that the rights and obligations stemming from representation agreements concluded between the applicant organisation and authors had not created a separate right or asset that could be regarded as a possession for the purpose of Article 1 of Protocol No 1.
53. The applicant organisation referred to their previous arguments in relation to their victim status and contended that because the applicant organisation had collectively managed the authors’ intellectual property rights, those property rights had been deemed its possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
54. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” referred to in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning. In the case of non-physical assets, the Court has taken into consideration, in particular, whether the legal position in question gave rise to financial rights and interests and thus had an economic value (see, for example, Mullai and Others v. Albania, no. 9074/07, § 97, 23 March 2010).
55. The Court refers to its findings that the applicant organisation held the rights transferred to it by its members, that is to say the authors of musical works (see paragraphs 48-49 above). Accordingly, in the light of Article 1 Protocol No. 1 to the Convention the applicant organisation’s rights constituted “possessions” in the form of musical works and the economic interests deriving from them.
(b) Interference
56. The Government disagreed that the impugned domestic decisions amounted to an interference with the applicant organisation’s right to peaceful enjoyment of its possession. It argued that even though the domestic courts had restricted the authors’ freedom to conclude licence agreements by putting an end to the civil dispute between the parties, the domestic courts had carried out the State’s positive obligation to ensure that authors could effectively enjoy the rights guaranteed to them under the Convention.
57. The applicant organisation contended that as a result of the domestic proceedings it had been ordered to conclude compulsory licence agreements with broadcasters on terms set by the courts. The above measure constituted control of its possessions and the respondent State had failed to comply with their negative obligation not to interfere disproportionally with the peaceful enjoyment of the authors’ property rights.
58. According to the Court’s case-law determination of the conditions in which another person can use one’s property is one aspect of a property right (see R & L, s.r.o. and Others v. the Czech Republic, nos. 37926/05, 25784/09, 36002/09, 44410/09 and 65546/09, § 102, 3 July 2014), and a measure restricting the freedom to enter into contracts should be analysed in the light of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In the present case, as a result of two sets of civil proceedings the applicant organisation was ordered to conclude written licence agreements with defendant organisations. Certain terms and conditions were set by the domestic courts and thus attested to the limits imposed on the freedom to enter into contracts in relation to the broadcasting of music.
59. Accordingly, the Court considers that there has been interference with the applicant organisation’s possessions in the form of a control of the use of property which will accordingly be examined under the third sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. Whether the interference complied with the conditions set out by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
60. In order to comply with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, it must be shown that the measure constituting the interference was lawful, that it was “in accordance with the general interest”, and that there existed a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, §§ 106 and 108, 25 October 2012). The Court will examine whether each of those three conditions has been fulfilled in the present case.
(a) Whether the interference was prescribed by law
61. The Government relied on the limits of the Court’s competence pertaining to the interpretation and application of the domestic law and contended that the domestic legal instruments, specifically the Copyright Law, as interpreted by the domestic courts, had served as a valid legal basis for the alleged interference.
62. The applicant organisation argued that the fact that in the contested proceedings the domestic courts had ordered it to enter into a licence agreement either lacking any legal basis in national law (in relation to the second set of proceedings) or on the basis of insufficiently accessible and unforeseeable law (the first set of proceedings). They considered that there was no legal basis for the domestic courts to conclude that the draft licence agreement could have had the same weight as a concluded agreement, and that in both proceedings the same norms had been applied differently, thus attesting to its insufficient clarity.
63. The Court reiterates that in the context of an alleged breach by a tribunal of domestic legal provisions relating to the competence of judicial organs, the Court will not question the interpretation of the domestic courts on the matter, unless there has been a flagrant violation of domestic law (see Biagioli v. San Marino, (dec.), no. 8162/13, §§ 71-75, 8 July 2014).
64. The Court observes that according to the domestic courts’ reasoning, its competence to order the parties to enter into a licence agreement and to set an equitable royalty rate in the particular cases was determined by virtue of sections 15, 41 and 65 of the Copyright Law, interpreted in the light of Article 11bis of the Berne Convention and section 5 of the Civil Law. In the first set of proceedings the domestic courts established that both parties had agreed on a draft licence agreement, except for the terms of remuneration (see paragraph 14 above), whereas in the second set of proceedings the parties had in principle agreed to conclude a licence agreement but they had not agreed on its terms (see paragraph 19 above). The Court sees no reason to call into question the domestic courts’ interpretation of the above provisions, for it is sufficient to conclude that the domestic courts’ competence to deal with the issue had some basis in the domestic law.
65. In so far as the applicant organisation complained that the basis in the domestic law had been too vague, the Court reiterates that in the particular circumstances where the parties had expressed their intent to enter into a licence agreement, the application of the relevant provisions of Copyright Law could not be considered to have been arbitrary. The notion of “lawfulness” does not exclude judicial interpretation, for many laws are inevitably couched in terms which, to a greater or lesser extent, are vague and whose interpretation and application are questions of practice (see OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos v. Russia, no. 14902/04, § 568, 20 September 2011, and the case-law cited therein). In both sets of proceedings the domestic courts provided reasons as to the setting of royalty rates and the legal basis for conclusion of the licence agreements.
66. The Court therefore concludes that the interference was “prescribed by law”.
(b) Whether the interference pursued a legitimate aim
67. The Government contended that the adopted measure had been aimed to serve the interests of the community as end users of the musical works, as well as the interests of the rightsholders to enjoy public use of their works.
68. According to the applicant organisation, the interference with the authors’ rights to freely negotiate the use of their works served no general interest for the following reasons. Firstly, the contested measure had been aimed at solving a legal dispute between two private parties and furnishing commercial benefits for the broadcasters. Secondly, by exercising the freedom to enter into contracts granted to authors under domestic law, the applicant organisation had a right to negotiate with the users upon equitable terms for their works and even to prohibit the use of their works in order to motivate the radio stations to conclude equitable licence agreements. The domestic courts had restricted this freedom and therefore the contested measure had not been aimed at protecting the authors who had been bound by the activities of the applicant organisation as their representative.
69. On the question of a legitimate aim of the interference the Court refers to its case-law according to which it is for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures to be applied in the sphere of the exercise of the right of property. Since the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies is wide, the Court will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is “in the public interest”, unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, § 106, ECHR 2014).
70. It appears from the decisions adopted by the domestic courts that over an extended period of time protected works were being broadcast without a valid licence, and that this situation was to a certain extent due to the applicant organisation’s limited efficiency in carrying out negotiations with the defendants. These observations attest to the domestic court’s efforts to maintain a balance between the rights of the applicant organisation to obtain equitable remuneration from the use of musical work, on the one hand, and the defendants’ interest to obtain a licence allowing them to legally broadcast rights-protected work. In these circumstances the domestic courts’ judgment on the question of public interest could not be considered as manifestly without reasonable foundation.
71. In the light of the above, the Court considers that the measures complained of pursued a legitimate aim within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(c) Whether a fair balance was struck
72. The Government argued that by adopting the contested decisions the domestic courts had balanced the interests of copyright holders and the public in general. Furthermore, the Government underlined that in reaching the decision the domestic courts had done their outmost to assist the parties in reaching a settlement. After the failed attempts to reach an agreement, the domestic court had had two alternatives: ordering the conclusion of a written licence agreement and setting the amount of remuneration, even if it had been lower than what the applicant organisation had requested; or upholding the applicant organisation’s application to have the use of the musical work banned until the conclusion of a licence agreement. As the latter option would not have served the interests of the copyright holders and the general public, the domestic court had had to intervene and set an adequate royalty rate.
73. The applicant organisation maintained that by having been ordered to enter into a licence agreement with terms of remuneration which did not compensate the authors for the use of their works, the domestic courts had manifestly breached the balance between the right to receive remuneration for the use of musical works and the general interest. They also argued that the above restriction had not been justified by any public interest because the defendant in the first set of proceedings had been a commercial broadcaster and had transmitted authors’ work to gain profit. They added that in any event any public interest to have access to musical works could have been satisfied by those broadcasters in Latvia which had concluded a licence agreement with the applicant organisation. In reply to the Government’s argument that by the contested measures the domestic courts had solved a long-running dispute, the applicant organisation contended that the resolution of the case had not been in favour of the authors. In this connection they argued that before the contested proceedings the broadcasters had used the musical work without any licence and that the applicant organisation had done everything to reach an out-of-court settlement in the dispute with them.
74. The Court reiterates that whether a case is analysed in terms of the positive duty of the State or in terms of interference by a public authority which needs to be justified under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention, the criteria to be applied do not differ in substance: in both contexts regard must be had to the fair balance to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole. It also holds true that the aims mentioned in that provision may be of some relevance in assessing whether a balance between the demands of the public interest involved and the applicant’s fundamental right of property has been struck. In both contexts the State enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in determining the steps to be taken to ensure compliance with the Convention (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 144, ECHR 2004-V). The Court observes that the applicant organisation in substance considered that the State’s actions, through the decision of the domestic courts, had constituted an unjustified interference, whereas the Government contended that by adopting the contested decisions the State had carried out its positive obligations as enshrined by international and domestic copyright agreements and legislation.
75. As observed before, by virtue of the Berne Convention and the domestic law as interpreted and applied by the domestic courts, where no agreement between the parties had been reached and were no other authority had decided on this issue, it was for the courts to set an equitable royalty rate (see paragraph 64 above).
76. In order to assess whether the above mechanism in the particular case provided safeguards so as to ensure that the functioning of the copyright protection system and its impact were neither arbitrary nor unforeseeable, the Court takes into account the following elements.
77. Firstly, before laying down the royalty rate, the domestic courts endeavored to provide the parties with time to reach an agreement during the court proceedings. Since it was not possible, the domestic court relied on the fact that in the first set of proceedings the parties had already reached an agreement on the method for calculation of the royalty rate (see paragraph 14 above). In the second set of proceedings the domestic court referred to the method used in other valid licence agreements concluded between the applicant organisation and other broadcasters, and the rate set by the courts was not considerably lower than the rate negotiated by the parties in their previous licence agreement (see paragraph 18 above).
78. Secondly, observing the interests of the copyright holders, the national courts had established that in the circumstances where the parties in principle were willing to enter into an agreement, banning the broadcast of the music would not suit the best interests of copyright holders, that is to say to receive the maximum benefit from the oeuvres.
79. Thirdly, as far as the courts’ orders for the parties to enter into a licence agreement was concerned, the measure was limited in scope and time. In the first set of proceedings the royalty rate was set for a period of three years, which had already been agreed by the parties. Whereas in the second set of proceedings the domestic court took note of the scope of the claim and the counterclaim and imposed on the parties merely a general obligation to conclude a licence agreement. Accordingly, the parties were not prevented from renegotiating the rate (contrary to, for example, Anthony Aquilina v. Malta, no. 3851/12, 11 December 2014, which concerned restrictions on fixing a rent over an extended period of time). It follows that the authorities had minimally restricted the right of the applicant organisation to renegotiate terms and conditions with the defendants and other broadcasting companies.
80. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that the Latvian authorities did strike a fair balance between the demands of the general interest and the rights of the applicant organisation.
81. There has accordingly been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
82. The applicant organisation complained of a violation of a right to a fair hearing. In particular, the applicant organisation complained that the principle of equality of arms had not been respected as regards the extension of the limits of the counterclaim in the second set of proceedings. They relied on Article 6 of the Convention which, in its relevant parts, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
83. The Government contested that argument and considered that the present application fell outside the Court’s jurisdiction ratione materiae because the contested proceedings had not concerned any particular civil rights of the applicant organisation. The Government, in the alternative, argued that the domestic courts had in no way extended the limits of the defendant’s counterclaim and that in both sets of civil proceedings the domestic courts had duly assessed the arguments of both parties.
84. The applicant organisation maintained that in the second set of proceedings the Supreme Court in its judgment of 26 November 2003 had unilaterally extended the limits of the defendant’s counterclaim, and that the Senate of the Supreme Court had not addressed the applicant organisation’s arguments on this matter brought in their appeal on points of law.
85. The Court notes that this claim is closely linked to the complaint examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
86. Having regard to the Court’s finding relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that in examining the defendant organisation’s counterclaims the national courts had acted in accordance with domestic law and that they had provided sufficient reasoning in their decisions, for the reasons that is has given for finding no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, in particular, paragraphs 64-65 and 77-79 above), the Court concludes that there has been no violation of Article 6 of the Convention.
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
87. Lastly, the applicant organisation invoked other complaints under Articles 6, 13 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, in relation to other aspects of the contested civil proceedings.
88. In the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court considers that the remainder of the application does not disclose any appearance of a violation of any of the Articles of the Convention relied on. It follows that these complaints are inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 (a) as manifestly ill founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaints concerning the alleged violations of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible, and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 12 July 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Angelika Nußberger
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile (Articolo 35-3 - Manifestamente mal-fondò) Nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà Articolo 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà) Nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - l'udienza corretta)



QUINTA SEZIONE





CAUSA SIA AKKA/LAA C. LETTONIA

(Richiesta n. 562/05)















SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

12 luglio 2016



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di SIA AKKA/LAA c. la Lettonia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Angelika Nußberger, Presidente
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Erik Møse,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Yonko Grozev,
Carlo Ranzoni,
Mrtiš ?Mits, giudici
e Claudia Westerdiek, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 21 giugno 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 562/05) contro la Repubblica della Lettonia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con OMISSIS (“l'organizzazione di richiedente”), 6 agosto 2004.
2. L'organizzazione di richiedente fu rappresentata con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Riga. Il Governo lettone (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra K. Lce.?
3. L'organizzazione di richiedente addusse violazioni sotto Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione per motivi che le corti nazionali avevano restretto il diritto d'autore di autori i cui lavori musicali furono maneggiati collettivamente con l'organizzazione di richiedente.
4. 24 giugno 2013 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. L'organizzazione di richiedente, OMISSIS (SIA “Autortiesbu ?un komunicšans ?konsultciju aentra/Latvijas l'apvienba di ?Autoru?”-Diritto d'autore e Comunicazione ltd di AGENZIA Consulente. / Autori Associazione lettone) è un'organizzazione senza scopo di lucro fondata in Riga con un separato non organizzazione di profitto, l'Autori Associazione lettone i cui membri sono i vari artisti lettoni.
6. Alla fine degli anni novanta l'organizzazione di richiedente, comportandosi come un rappresentante di approssimativamente 2000 nazionale e due milioni di autori internazionali che avevano affidato l'organizzazione di richiedente per maneggiare il diritto d'autore dei loro lavori musicali, stava concludendo accordi di licenza con molti annunciatori radiofonico in Lettonia. Dopo la scadenza degli accordi di licenza precedenti, l'organizzazione di richiedente e le certe organizzazioni di radiodiffusione in Lettonia un accordo non poteva giungere ai termini degli accordi di licenza futuri da 1998 a 1999, specialmente con riguardo ad alla rimunerazione per essere pagato per la radiodiffusione di musica. Di conseguenza delle organizzazioni di radiodiffusione continuarono ad usare i lavori musicali e protetti senza un accordo scritto, o senza pagare qualsiasi la rimunerazione o pagando l'importo le organizzazioni di radiodiffusione considerò unilateralmente equo. Nel 2002 l'organizzazione di richiedente avviò procedimenti civili contro molti annunciatori radiofonico che operano in Lettonia.
A. First espose di procedimenti-[l'organizzazione di richiedente] c. la Radio SWH
7. A luglio 2002 l'organizzazione di richiedente depositò una rivendicazione contro una stazione di radio privata, Radio SWH, e richiese che il Riga Corte Regionale, mentre comportandosi come una corte di primo-istanza, riconosce che trasmettendo lavori musicali e protetti senza un accordo di licenza valido fra il 1999 e 31 dicembre 2001 di 1 gennaio, l'imputato aveva violato interessi economici degli autori rappresentati con l'organizzazione di richiedente. L'organizzazione di richiedente chiese inoltre che il risarcimento di assegnazione di corte per uso non autorizzato di lavori musicali. Appellandosi sugli autori i diritti di esclusiva di ' per controllare l'uso dei loro lavori musicali, l'organizzazione di richiedente chiesta alla corte di fare domanda un'ingiunzione che preclude l'imputato dall'usare gli autori ' funziona prima un accordo di licenza valido fra le parti era entrato in vigore.
8. L'imputato depositò un'eccezione riconvenzionale che dibatte che l'organizzazione di richiedente aveva abusato la sua posizione dominante ed aveva fissato un irragionevolmente tasso di regalità alto che era sei volte il tasso che era applicabile dall'il periodo da 1995 a 1998. Loro chiesero alla corte di ordinare l'organizzazione di richiedente per concludere un accordo di licenza con l'organizzazione di imputato ed a posi in giù un tasso di regalità equo.
9. Durante la corte di primo-istanza sta ascoltando, l'organizzazione di richiedente ammise che le parti avevano su una controversia il tasso di regalità nell'accordo di licenza di bozza negoziato con le parti, ma che la corte fu preclusa sotto sezione 41 della Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata dall'esporre il tasso come lungo come non c'era nessun accordo di licenza concluso fra le parti (veda paragrafo 26 sotto).
10. 16 gennaio 2003 la corte di primo-istanza parzialmente sostenne la rivendicazione e sostenne pienamente l'eccezione riconvenzionale. Stabilì che fra il 1999 e 31 dicembre 2001 di 1 gennaio l'imputato aveva infranto gli autori i diritti di ' con trasmettendo i lavori protetti senza auorizzazione, contrari alle disposizioni della Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata. L'ordine della corte di primo-istanza l'imputato per pagare al risarcimento di organizzazione di richiedente per il periodo sopra nell'importo di 78,000 lats lettoni (LVL, equivalente a 111,500 euros (EUR)) che era 1.5% del fatturato netto dell'imputato su questo periodo.
11. Inoltre, l'ordine della corte di primo-istanza l'organizzazione di richiedente per concludere un accordo di licenza con l'imputato per il prossimo periodo di tre-anno con un tasso di regalità espose a 2% del fatturato netto mensile dell'imputato (?apgrozjums di neto di ikmneša?).
12. Infine, appellandosi sul preambolo del WIPO Diritto d'autore Trattato ed Articoli 11 e 11bis della Convenzione di Berne (veda paragrafo 37 sotto), la corte di primo-istanza respinta la richiesta dell'organizzazione di richiedente per avere un'ingiunzione accordato per proibire l'imputato dal trasmettere lavori del rightsholders rappresentata con l'organizzazione di richiedente. Con riferendosi alle testimonianze di due autori rappresentò con l'organizzazione di richiedente, la corte di primo-istanza concluse che gli autori stessi furono interessati nel loro essere di lavori musicale trasmesso pubblicamente. Un'interdizione su trasmettere dei lavori musicali infrangerebbe gli autori i diritti di esclusiva di ' per avere il loro lavoro riprodotto, così come colpirebbe negativamente gli interessi della società per ascoltare musica.
13. 23 ottobre 2003 la Giudizi civili Camera della Corte Suprema, mentre comportandosi come una corte di appello, sostenne la parte della sentenza di primo-istanza riguardo al risarcimento per violazione dei diritti di autore e l'ingiunzione.
14. Sul problema di ordinare la conclusione di un accordo di licenza, la corte di appello osservò, che sia parti avevano espresso la loro intenzione di entrare in un tale accordo, siccome attestato con un accordo di licenza di bozza di 7 ottobre 2003 nel quale le parti avevano concordato su certi clausole e condizioni come la durata della licenza ed il reddito dalla quale le regalità dovrebbero essere calcolate. La corte di appello notò che era in parte a causa del negoziando incoerente dell'organizzazione di richiedente che un accordo di licenza non poteva essere concluso. La corte di appello riconobbe di conseguenza che l'accordo di licenza sarebbe considerato concluso nell'enunciazione come concordato con le parti 7 ottobre 2003. Sulla questione di rimunerazione, la corte di appello stabilì, che nell'elaborazione di negoziazione l'organizzazione di richiedente cambiava il tasso di regalità dal 6% a 4% e poi a 3.5%, mentre l'imputato aveva insistito 1.6% del reddito dai quali le regalità dovrebbero essere calcolate. La corte di appello prese noti delle caratteristiche delle attività dell'imputato e concluse che una rimunerazione equa sarebbe stata 2% del reddito da che, come concordato con le parti, le regalità dovrebbero essere calcolate.
15. 11 febbraio 2004, seguendo un ricorso su questioni di diritto, il Senato della Corte Suprema sostenne le sentenze della corte di appello che dopo la scadenza del più primo accordo di licenza 31 dicembre 1998 il vincolo contrattuale de facto fra le parti aveva continuato dovere principalmente al fatto che l'organizzazione di richiedente era andata a vuoto a giungere ad un accordo con l'imputato sui termini dell'accordo di licenza. Il Senato della Corte Suprema osservò inoltre che le parti non contestarono che gli autori avevano diritto a ricevere rimunerazione equa, ma che a quello giorno le parti non erano giunte ad un accordo sul tasso dei pagamenti di regalità. Dato che non c'era altra autorità responsabile decidere su questa questione, il Senato della Corte Suprema concluse che facendo seguito ad Articolo 11bis della Convenzione di Berne e sezione 5 del Diritto civile, era all'interno della competenza della corte per esporre il tasso di regalità. Il Senato della Corte Suprema respinse anche le dichiarazioni che la sentenza della corte di appello aveva infranto i diritti di proprietà intellettuali proteggè sotto la Costituzione della Repubblica della Lettonia.
B. Second espose di procedimenti-[l'organizzazione di richiedente] c. Radio di Latvijas
16. Nella loro rivendicazione contro Latvijas Radio, una società di limite di responsabilità statale, l'organizzazione di richiedente chiese al Riga Corte Regionale, mentre comportandosi come una corte di primo-istanza, trovare che trasmettendo il rightsholders ' lavori musicali senza un accordo di licenza valido fra il 2000 e 31 dicembre 2001 di 1 gennaio, l'imputato aveva violato interessi economici degli autori rappresentati con l'organizzazione di richiedente. L'organizzazione di richiedente chiese inoltre che il risarcimento di assegnazione di corte per uso non autorizzato di lavori musicali. Appellandosi sugli autori i diritti di esclusiva di ' per controllare l'uso dei loro lavori musicali, l'organizzazione di richiedente chiesta alla corte di fare domanda un'ingiunzione che preclude l'imputato dall'usare gli autori ' funziona prima un accordo di licenza valido fra le parti era entrato in vigore.
17. Depositando un'eccezione riconvenzionale l'imputato in essenza la corte chiese a riconoscere che di periodo contestato le parti avevano un vincolo contrattuale de facto.
18. 2 aprile 2003 il Riga Corte Regionale respinse la rivendicazione dell'organizzazione di richiedente e sostenne l'eccezione riconvenzionale. La corte stabilì che anche se l'accordo di licenza concluse fra le parti con la regalità tassi esposto a 3.2% del reddito annuale dell'imputato era scaduto nel 1999, l'organizzazione di richiedente aveva continuato ricevere pagamenti di regalità dall'imputato che continuò a pagare ad un tasso più basso. Dato che l'organizzazione di richiedente non si era riferita ad eccezioni alla radiodiffusione dei lavori musicali, l'esistenza di un vincolo contrattuale de facto fra le parti era stata provata. Appellandosi su sezione 41 della Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata la corte espose il tasso di regalità da 2000 a 2001 a 1.57% del reddito annuale dell'imputato.
19. 26 novembre 2003 la Giudizi civili Camera della Corte Suprema, mentre comportandosi come una corte di appello, deviò dalle sentenze della corte di primo-istanza e riconobbe che l'imputato aveva infranto diritto d'autore trasmettendo sui lavori musicali un periodo prolungato di tempo senza un accordo di licenza scritto e valido. Assegnò il risarcimento di organizzazione di richiedente nell'importo di LVL 100,000 (EUR 143,000) che eccedè l'importo l'imputato aveva pagato sotto l'accordo di licenza scaduto. Considerò che sarebbe stato infruttifero per emettere un'ingiunzione che proibisce l'imputato dal trasmettere i lavori. La corte di appello osservò che in principio le parti avevano espresso il loro interesse nel concludere un accordo di licenza ma che prima e durante gli atti le parti non avevano concordato sul tasso di regalità equo. Aguzzò anche alla responsabilità dell'organizzazione di richiedente nel non riuscire a giungere ad un accordo nella negoziazione di una licenza nuova. Di conseguenza, su un periodo prolungato di tempo gli autori i diritti di ' erano stati indifesi. Siccome le parti non avevano chiesto alla corte di decidere sui clausole e condizioni esatti di un accordo di licenza, la corte di appello decise di imporre sulle parti un obbligo generale per concludere un accordo di licenza in 1 marzo 2004. Dato che le parti non erano state capaci di concordare su un tasso di regalità, la corte di appello espose il tasso a 3% del fatturato netto dell'imputato. Nel giungere a questa conclusione la corte di appello prese nell'esame simile elementi come, inter l'alia, il tasso di regalità insorse gli altri atti e la pratica esistente nel certo altro membro di EU Stati.
20. L'organizzazione di richiedente piacque su questioni di diritto che dibattono che con, inter alia, ordinando le parti concludere un accordo di licenza ed esponendo i suoi termini la corte aveva oltrepassato i suoi poteri ed aveva agito in violazione di sezione 11bis della Convenzione di Berne e sezione 15 della Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata.
21. 17 marzo 2004 il Senato parzialmente sostenne la sentenza della corte più bassa con ragionando simile come nel primo set di procedimenti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. La Costituzione:
22. Articolo 113 prevede che lo Stato riconoscerà la libertà di ricerca scientifica, attività creativa ed artistica ed altra e proteggerà diritto d'autore e diritti patenti.
B. Il Diritto civile
23. Sezione 5 prevede che un giudice deve essere guidato coi principi generali di legge e la giustizia quando una corte è chiamata su per aggiudicare su sua propria discrezione o quando circostanze eccezionali dovevano essere prese in considerazione.
C. Copyright la Legge (?likums di Autortiesbu) (mettendo in parole in vigore al tempo di materiale)
24. Sezione 7(2) prevede che rightsholders possono esercitare diritto d'autore loro o per un rappresentante, come un'organizzazione per gestione collettiva di rightsholders ' diritti economici che sorgono da diritto d'autore (in seguito-“la gestione collettiva di diritto d'autore”). I diritti di un rightsholder sono esposti fuori in sezione 15 e sono inclusi, fra le altre cose, gli autori i diritti di esclusiva di ' per pubblicare, riproduca e trasmetta il loro lavoro. Autori avranno diritto ad usare il loro lavoro in qualsiasi la maniera, permettere o proibire il suo uso, ricevere rimunerazione per permesso per usarlo eccetto in cause previste per con legge (sezione 15(4)).
25. Facendo seguito a sezione 40, permesso per usare un lavoro è dato nella forma di una licenza che deve essere ottenuta per per avere diritto ad usare un lavoro protetto.
26. Sezione 41 prevede che entrando in un accordo di licenza i possessori proprietà letterari riservati le parti autorizzano all'accordo ad usare i lavori protetti. L'accordo di licenza espone fuori le condizioni per l'uso di lavoro, la rimunerazione e la procedura di pagamento. Parte tre della sezione sopra prevede che se l'accordo di licenza non espone fuori il tasso di regalità, i secondi saranno decisi con le corti nazionali.
27. Sotto sezione 42(4) licenze generali sono emesse con organizzazioni per gestione collettiva di diritto d'autore, e la licenza dà un diritto per usare il lavoro di tutti gli autori rappresentato con l'organizzazione.
28. Capitolo che X espone fuori le regolamentazioni sulla gestione collettiva di diritto d'autore. Specificamente, in una causa dove la protezione di diritto d'autore non può essere assicurata su una base individuale o se simile protezione è ingombrata, protezione proprietà letteraria riservata è assicurata con un'organizzazione di gestione collettiva (sezione 63(1)). Espone fuori che diritti così economici che sorgono dal trasmettere di lavori protetti saranno amministrati solamente collettivamente (sezione 63(2)). L'organizzazione per gestione collettiva è fondata con autori ed opera all'interno dei poteri assegnato legalmente in sé con gli autori (sezione 63(3)).
29. L'organizzazione per gestione collettiva ha, inter alia, i compiti seguenti: espone un tasso di regalità equo in cause previste per con legge (veda sezione 63(2) sopra); negozia con gli utenti di lavori protetti sui termini di rimunerazione, su procedure per pagamento e sulle condizioni per l'uscita di licenze; l'organizzazione emette licenze agli utenti di lavori in relazione ai diritti amministrati con sé; raccoglie pagamenti di regalità siccome specificato nella licenza, e li distribuisce (sezione 65(1)).
30. Sulla sfera dei diritti di un'organizzazione per gestione collettiva, sezione 64 prevede, che tale organizzazione proteggerà il rightsholders ' diritti economici che sorgono su dal loro diritto d'autore lavori artistici, e che l'organizzazione rappresenterà gli autori i diritti di ' ed interessi in tutte le questioni con qualsiasi parte pubblica o privata, incluso in atti e le questioni riferite a simile procedimenti.
31. Sezione 69 prevede che in una causa di violazione proprietà letteraria riservata, il rightsholders ' così come l'organizzazione di gestione collettiva ha diritto a chiedere al perpetratore di riconoscere i diritti protetti; proibire l'uso del lavoro protetto; richiedere conclusione immediata di qualsiasi le attività illegali; e chiedere danni, incluso per guadagni perduti, o chiedere il risarcimento in un importo espose con la corte.
D. le Altre informazioni attinenti
32. Facendo seguito a parte 3 degli articoli dell'associazione dell'organizzazione di richiedente (SIA lo statti di AKKA/LAA?), l'organizzazione di richiedente ha la sua propria proprietà che consiste primariamente di deduzioni dai pagamenti di regalità raccolti. Il reddito che eccede le spese di amministrazione fu fissato in risparmi per essere usato con l'organizzazione di richiedente che segue le decisioni dei suoi azionisti-quel è dire gli autori.
33. Sulla base degli accordi di rappresentanza standard conclusa fra l'organizzazione di richiedente ed autori per la protezione di autori i diritti di ', l'organizzazione di richiedente ha diritti nel suo proprio nome (sav ?vrd) a, senza ottenere auorizzazione supplementare, esegua tutte le questioni procedurali in atti, portare rivendicazioni e depositi ricorsi, e ricevere corte assegnata danni. L'organizzazione applicativa fu affidata per dedurre nessuno più che 25% delle somme raccolte come rimunerazione per i servizi previsti, mentre gli autori non concordarono, inter l'alia, difenda o porti fuori qualsiasi le attività associarono con qualsiasi dei diritti affidati all'organizzazione di richiedente.
III. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. WIPO Trattato Proprietà letterario riservato (adottò a Ginevra il 20 dicembre 1996) a che Lettonia acconsentì 22 marzo 2000; e quale entrò in vigore 6 marzo 2002
34. Nel Preambolo del WIPO Diritto d'autore Trattato gli Stati contraenti enfatizzarono il significato insoluto di protezione proprietà letteraria riservata come un incentivo per la creazione letteraria ed artistica, così come il recognising il bisogno di mantenere un equilibrio fra i diritti di autori ed il più grande interesse pubblico, particolarmente istruzione, ricerca ed accesso ad informazioni siccome riflesso nella Convenzione di Berne.
35. Articoli 8 e 11 del WIPO Copyright stato di Trattato siccome segue:
Articolo 8
Diritto di Comunicazione al Pubblico
“Senza pregiudizio alle disposizioni di Articoli 11(1)(ii), 11bis(1)(i) e (l'ii), 11ter(1)(ii), 14(1)(ii) e 14bis(1) della Convenzione di Berne, autori di lavori letterari ed artistici godranno il diritto di esclusiva di autorizzare qualsiasi comunicazione al pubblico dei loro lavori, per telegrafo o senza fili vuole dire, incluso la creazione disponibile al pubblico dei loro lavori in tale modo che membri del pubblico possono accedere questi lavori da un posto ed ad un tempo scelto individualmente con loro.”
36. Commento esplicativo alle letture di Articolo sopra siccome segue:
“Si capisce che la disposizione mera di installazioni fisici per abilitando o fare una comunicazione non corrisponde in se stesso a comunicazione all'interno del significato di questo Trattato o la Convenzione di Berne. Si capisce inoltre che nulla in Articolo 8 preclude una Parte Contraente dal fare domanda Articolo 11bis(2).
...”
Articolo 11
Obblighi che concernono Misure Tecnologiche
“Parti contraenti offriranno tutela giuridica adeguata e via di ricorso legali ed effettive contro la circonvenzione di misure tecnologiche ed effettive che sono usate con autori in collegamento con l'esercizio dei loro diritti sotto questo Trattato o la Convenzione di Berne e quel restringa atti, in riguardo dei loro lavori che non sono autorizzati con gli autori riguardato o permise con legge.”
B. Berne Convenzione per la Protezione di Lavori Letterari ed Artistici (in seguito-“la Convenzione di Berne” (in vigore riguardo a Lettonia da 11 agosto 1995)
37. Articolo 11bis della Convenzione di Berne espone fuori disposizioni in relazione a trasmettendo e diritti relativi:
“(1) autori di lavori letterari ed artistici godranno il diritto di esclusiva di autorizzare:
(i) la radiodiffusione dei loro lavori o la comunicazione al riguardo al pubblico con qualsiasi altro vuole dire di diffusione senza fili di segnali, suoni o immagini;
(l'ii) qualsiasi comunicazione al pubblico per telegrafo o con ritrasmettendo della trasmissione del lavoro, quando questa comunicazione è resa con un'organizzazione altro che l'originale;
(l'iii) la comunicazione pubblica con altoparlante o qualsiasi l'altro strumento trasmettendo analogo, con segnali, suoni o immagini la trasmissione del lavoro.
(2) sarà una questione per legislazione nei paesi dell'Unione determinare le condizioni sotto le quali i diritti menzionarono nel paragrafo precedente può essere esercitato, ma queste condizioni faranno domanda solamente nei paesi dove loro è stato prescritto. Loro non possono in qualsiasi circostanze sono pregiudizievoli ai diritti morali dell'autore, né al suo diritto per ottenere rimunerazione equa che, nell'assenza di accordo, sarà fissato con autorità competente.
(3) nell'assenza di qualsiasi stipulazione contraria, permesso accordò in conformità con paragrafo (1) di questo Articolo non implicherà permesso per registrare, con vuole dire di strumenti che registrano suoni o immagini, la trasmissione di lavoro. Comunque, sarà una questione per legislazione nei paesi dell'Unione determinare le regolamentazioni per incisioni effimere rese con un'organizzazione di radiodiffusione con vuole dire di suoi propri installazioni ed usato per sue proprie trasmissioni. La conservazione di queste incisioni in archivio ufficiale può, sulla base del loro carattere documentario ed eccezionale, sia autorizzato con simile legislazione.”
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
38. L'organizzazione di richiedente si lamentò che le corti nazionali avevano restretto il diritto d'autore di autori i cui lavori musicali furono maneggiati collettivamente con l'organizzazione di richiedente. Loro si lamentarono, in particolare, che come un risultato dei procedimenti nazionali nel quale le corti nazionali avevano ordinato l'organizzazione di richiedente per concludere accordi di licenza con organizzazioni di imputato ed avevano esposto un tasso di regalità, gli autori i diritti di esclusiva di ' per concludere liberamente accordi di licenza per l'uso dei loro lavori musicali erano stati restretti, contrari ad Articolo 1 di protocollo N.ro 1of la Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Materiae di ratione di compatibilità
39. Il Governo dibattè in sostanza che i procedimenti nazionali e contestati hanno riferito al setting di tassi di regalità e non a diritti di proprietà.
40. L'organizzazione di richiedente contestò l'argomento del Governo.
41. La Corte reitera che la protezione di diritti di proprietà intellettuali, incluso la protezione di diritto d'autore incorre all'interno della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 72 ECHR 2007 io, e Melnychuk c. l'Ucraina (il dec.), n. 28743/03, 5 luglio 2005). La Corte osserva che le corti nazionali nel corso dei procedimenti civili e contestati ammesso, fra gli altri problemi la violazione del diritto d'autore di autori rappresentata con l'organizzazione di richiedente. La protezione di lavori musicali e gli interessi economici che derivano così da loro incorre all'interno della sfera di diritti protegguta sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
42. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge l'eccezione sollevata col Governo in questo riguardo a.
2. Personae di ratione di compatibilità
(un) Argomenti delle Parti
43. Il Governo contese che l'organizzazione di richiedente si era comportata come soltanto un intermediario fra gli utenti di lavori artistici e gli autori che avevano trasferito solamente l'attuazione di parte dei loro diritti patrimoniali all'organizzazione di richiedente. Il Governo dibattè che l'organizzazione di richiedente non era stata colpita direttamente con qualsiasi misure e non avevano con virtù della sua funzione amministrativa e rappresentativa acquisì qualsiasi “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Il riconoscimento dello standi della località dell'organizzazione di richiedente nei procedimenti nazionali secondo il Governo non previde automaticamente ottemperanza con Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Il Governo sostenne che l'organizzazione di richiedente non potesse chiedere di essere una vittima di una misura che ha infranto i diritti garantita con la Convenzione ai suoi membri.
44. L'organizzazione di richiedente dibattè che sotto diritto nazionale e seguendo la pratica delle corti nazionali loro erano l'entità sola sotto la legge nazionale che aveva la qualità giuridica per esercitare il diritto d'autore di autori ' lavora e proteggere e maneggiare autori i diritti di ' in relazioni legali con utenti di simile lavori, incluso la protezione dei diritti essenziali degli autori. Enfatizzò che i procedimenti nazionali e contestati erano stati portati nel nome dell'organizzazione stessa come, sotto diritto nazionale, gli autori stessi non potevano entrare in accordi di licenza con gli annunciatori radiofonico o potrebbero portare rivendicazioni. Questo, nell'opinione dell'organizzazione di richiedente provò che loro dovrebbero essere considerati come una vittima diretta nella luce della Convenzione. Nell'alternativa, l'organizzazione di richiedente chiese alla Corte di riconoscerlo come una vittima indiretta sulla base del collegamento molto vicino dell'organizzazione di richiedente alle vittime dirette, notevolmente gli autori. Sotto il diritto nazionale i secondi erano stati obbligati per stabilire l'organizzazione di richiedente che stava maneggiando da allora ed aveva protegguto i loro lavori artistici.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
45. La Corte ha sostenuto che le due condizioni devono essere soddisfatte per per attenersi con Articolo 34 della Convenzione: un richiedente deve incorrere in una delle categorie di postulanti menzionata in Articolo 34, e lui o lei devono essere in grado estendere una causa che lui o lei sono la vittima di una violazione della Convenzione. In oltre, in ordine per un richiedente deve essere un collegamento sufficientemente diretto fra il richiedente per essere in grado chiedere di essere una vittima di una violazione della Convenzione, ed il danno subì presumibilmente su conto della violazione allegato (veda Gorraiz Lizarraga ed Altri c. la Spagna, n. 62543/00, § 35 ECHR 2004 III con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Inoltre, un'associazione non può chiedere di essersi una vittima di misure addusse avere interferito solamente coi diritti dei suoi membri individuali se la misura contestata non colpisse l'organizzazione come simile (veda des di Associazione il de di Amis Santo-Raphael de di et Frejus ed Altri c. la Francia, n. 38192/97, decisione di Commissione di 1 luglio 1998, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR), n. 94 B, p. 124).
46. È vero che nella causa presente gli argomenti dell'organizzazione di richiedente per prima avvistano sembri concernere la protezione degli autori i diritti di '. Comunque, determinato lo status e ruolo dell'organizzazione di richiedente, la Corte non può dividere la prospettiva del Governo che il vis-à-vis di vittime legittimo e solo i procedimenti della Corte erano membri individuali di quel l'organizzazione.
47. In finora come l'organizzazione di richiedente sollevò le sue azioni di reclamo nella sua funzione come un rappresentante degli autori affiliati, le prese di Corte notano delle disposizioni seguenti di diritto nazionale e documenti che regolano il funzionare dell'organizzazione di richiedente.
48. La Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata previde che in relazione ai certi tipi di uso di lavoro artistico, come la radiodiffusione di musica i diritti economici di possessori proprietà letterari riservati sarebbero amministrati solamente collettivamente (veda paragrafo 24 sopra). Per che ragione autori lettoni fondarono l'organizzazione di richiedente ed assegnato legalmente sé coi poteri per esporre tassi di regalità per l'uso dei loro lavori, ad annunciatori radiofonico di licenza in Lettonia ed all'estero usare quelli lavori, e distribuire agli autori i pagamenti di regalità raccolti (veda paragrafo 29 sopra). Essere in grado eseguire le funzioni sopra, aveva la sua propria proprietà che consistè primariamente di deduzioni dai pagamenti di regalità raccolti per l'organizzazione di richiedente (veda paragrafo 32 sopra). La Corte osserva in particolare che l'organizzazione di richiedente aveva i poteri larghi in relazione alle questioni che incorrono all'interno della gestione collettiva di certo tipo di diritto d'autore. Gli autori hanno abbandonato esplicitamente i loro diritti a, inter l'alia, rappresenti i loro interessi in qualsiasi gli atti, e loro hanno assegnati legalmente questi diritti nell'organizzazione di richiedente (veda paragrafo 33 sopra).
49. La Corte considera che una volta l'ordine legale e nazionale attribuisce la protezione di autori i diritti di ' ad un'organizzazione fondata con gli autori per questo fine, e panciotti sé con diritti indipendenti trasferiti dagli autori, incluso il diritto per avere la sua propria proprietà inventato primariamente di deduzione da pagamenti di regalità, poi che organizzazione deve essere considerata la vittima di misura che colpisce questi diritti. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, come un risultato dei procedimenti civili e contestati l'organizzazione di richiedente fu ordinata per concludere accordi di licenza scritto con le organizzazioni di imputato. Le corti nazionali esposero i tassi di regalità negli accordi di licenza con annunciatori radiofonico, e così interferì con le funzioni ed interessi economici dell'organizzazione di richiedente. In queste circostanze i diritti dell'organizzazione di richiedente furono colpiti direttamente coi procedimenti civili e contestati.
50. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo come allo status di vittima dell'organizzazione di richiedente.
3. Conclusione complessiva
51. Questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Se c'era un'interferenza con le proprietà dell'organizzazione di richiedente
(un) le Proprietà
52. Il Governo presentò che i diritti ed obblighi che scaturiscono da accordi di rappresentanza conclusero fra l'organizzazione di richiedente ed autori non avevano creato un diritto separato o il bene che potrebbero essere considerati una proprietà per il fine di Articolo 1 di Protocollo Nessuno 1.
53. L'organizzazione di richiedente si riferì ai loro argomenti precedenti in relazione al loro status di vittima e contese che perché l'organizzazione di richiedente aveva maneggiato collettivamente gli autori ' diritti di proprietà intellettuali, quelli diritti di proprietà erano stati ritenuti le sue proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
54. La Corte reitera che il concetto di “le proprietà” assegnò a nella prima parte di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo. Nella causa dei beni non-fisici, la Corte ha preso nell'esame, in particolare, se la posizione legale in oggetto generò diritti finanziari ed interessi e così aveva un valore economico (veda, per esempio, Mullai ed Altri c. l'Albania, n. 9074/07, § 97 23 marzo 2010).
55. La Corte si riferisce alle sue sentenze che l'organizzazione di richiedente contenne i diritti trasferì a sé coi suoi membri che sono dire gli autori di lavori musicali (veda divide in paragrafi 48-49 sopra). Di conseguenza, nella luce di Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione i diritti dell'organizzazione di richiedente costituirono “le proprietà” nella forma di lavori musicali e gli interessi economici che derivano da loro.
(b) l'Interferenza
56. Il Governo non fu d'accordo che le decisioni nazionali e contestate corrisposero ad un'interferenza col diritto dell'organizzazione di richiedente a godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà. Dibattè che anche se le corti nazionali avevano restretto gli autori la libertà di ' per concludere accordi di licenza con ponendo fine alla controversia civile fra le parti, le corti nazionali avevano eseguito l'obbligo positivo dello Stato per assicurare che autori potessero godere efficacemente i diritti garantiti a loro sotto la Convenzione.
57. L'organizzazione di richiedente contese che come un risultato dei procedimenti nazionali era stato ordinato per concludere accordi di licenza obbligatori con annunciatori radiofonico su termini esponga con le corti. La misura sopra costituì controllo delle sue proprietà e lo Stato rispondente era andato a vuoto ad attenersi col loro obbligo negativo per non interferire disproportionatamente col godimento tranquillo degli autori diritti di proprietà di '.
58. Secondo la determinazione di causa-legge della Corte delle condizioni nella quale un'altra persona può usare la proprietà di uno un aspetto di un diritto di proprietà è (veda R & L, s.r.o. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca, N. 37926/05, 25784/09, 36002/09 44410/09 e 65546/09, § 102 3 luglio 2014), ed una misura che restringe la libertà per entrare in contratti dovrebbe essere analizzata nella luce di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, come un risultato di due set di procedimenti civili l'organizzazione di richiedente fu ordinata per concludere accordi di licenza scritto con organizzazioni di imputato. I certi clausole e condizioni furono esposti con le corti nazionali e così attestarono ai limiti imposti sulla libertà per entrare in contratti in relazione alla radiodiffusione di musica.
59. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che c'è stata interferenza con le proprietà dell'organizzazione di richiedente nella forma di un controllo dell'uso di proprietà che sarà esaminata di conseguenza sotto la terza frase di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. Se l'interferenza si attenne con le condizioni esposte fuori con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
60. Per attenersi con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, si deve mostrare che la misura che costituisce l'interferenza era legale, che era “nella conformità con l'interesse generale”, e che là esistè una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso (veda Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, §§ 106 e 108, 25 ottobre 2012). La Corte esaminerà se ad ognuno di quelle tre condizioni è stato adempiuto nella causa presente.
(un) Se l'interferenza fu prescritta con legge
61. Il Governo si appellò sui limiti della competenza della Corte che concerne all'interpretazione e la richiesta del diritto nazionale e contese che gli strumenti legali e nazionali, specificamente la Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata siccome interpretato con le corti nazionali, aveva notificato come una base legale e valida per l'interferenza allegato.
62. L'organizzazione di richiedente dibattè che il fatto che nei procedimenti contestati le corti nazionali l'avevano ordinato per entrare in un accordo di licenza uno mancando qualsiasi base legale in legge nazionale (in relazione al secondo set di procedimenti) o sulla base di legge insufficientemente accessibile ed imprevedibile (il primo set di procedimenti). Loro considerarono che non c'era nessuna base legale per concludere, per le corti nazionali che l'accordo di licenza di bozza avesse potuto avere lo stesso peso come un accordo concluso, e che in ambo i procedimenti le stesse norme erano state fatte domanda differentemente, mentre attestando così alla sua chiarezza insufficiente.
63. La Corte reitera che nel contesto di una violazione allegato con un tribunale di disposizioni legali e nazionali relativo alla competenza di organi giudiziali, la Corte non metterà in dubbio l'interpretazione delle corti nazionali sulla questione, a meno che c'è stata una violazione flagrante di diritto nazionale (veda Biagioli c. il San Marino, (il dec.), n. 8162/13, §§ 71-75 8 luglio 2014).
64. La Corte osserva che secondo il nazionale corteggia ' ragionando, la sua competenza per ordinare le parti per entrare in un accordo di licenza ed esporre un tasso di regalità equo nelle particolari cause fu determinata con la virtù di sezioni 15, 41 e 65 della Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata, interpretati nella luce di Articolo 11bis della Convenzione di Berne e sezione 5 del Diritto civile. Nel primo set di procedimenti le corti nazionali stabilirono che sia parti avevano concordato su un accordo di licenza di bozza, a parte i termini di rimunerazione (veda paragrafo 14 sopra), mentre nel secondo set di procedimenti le parti avevano in principio convenuto concludere un accordo di licenza ma loro non avevano concordato sui suoi termini (veda paragrafo 19 sopra). La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di chiamare in questione il nazionale corteggia interpretazione di ' delle disposizioni sopra, per sé è sufficiente per concludere che il nazionale corteggia la competenza di ' per trattare col problema aveva della base nel diritto nazionale.
65. In finora come l'organizzazione di richiedente si lamentò che la base nel diritto nazionale era stata troppo vaga, la Corte reitera che nelle particolari circostanze dove le parti avevano espresso la loro intenzione per entrare in un accordo di licenza, non si poteva considerare che la richiesta delle disposizioni attinenti di Legge Proprietà letteraria riservata sia stata arbitraria. La nozione di “la legalità” non escluda interpretazione giudiziale, per molte leggi si è adagiato inevitabilmente in termini che, ad un più grande o minore misura, è vago e di chi interpretazione e la richiesta sono questioni di pratica (veda OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos c. la Russia, n. 14902/04, § 568, 20 settembre 2011, e la causa-legge citati therein). In sia espone di procedimenti che le corti nazionali hanno offerto ragioni come al setting di tassi di regalità e la base legale per conclusione degli accordi di licenza.
66. La Corte conclude perciò che l'interferenza era “prescrisse con legge.”
(b) Se l'interferenza intraprese un scopo legittimo
67. Il Governo contese che la misura adottata era stata mirata per notificare gli interessi della comunità come utenti finale dei lavori musicali, così come gli interessi del rightsholders per godere uso pubblico dei loro lavori.
68. Secondo l'organizzazione di richiedente, l'interferenza con gli autori i diritti di ' per negoziare liberamente l'uso dei loro lavori non notificato interesse generale per le ragioni seguenti. In primo luogo, la misura contestata che aveva risolto una lite giudiziaria fra due parti private e benefici commerciali che forniscono per gli annunciatori radiofonico era stata tirata. In secondo luogo, con esercitando la libertà per entrare in contratti accordò ad autori sotto diritto nazionale, l'organizzazione di richiedente aveva diritto a negoziare con gli utenti su termini equi per i loro lavori ed anche proibire l'uso dei loro lavori per motivare la radio colloca concludere accordi di licenza equi. Le corti nazionali avevano restretto questa libertà e perciò la misura contestata che aveva protegguto gli autori che erano stati legati con le attività dell'organizzazione di richiedente come il loro rappresentante non era stata tirata.
69. Sulla questione di un scopo legittimo dell'interferenza la Corte si riferisce alla sua causa-legge secondo la quale è per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure per essere fatto domanda nella sfera dell'esercizio del diritto di proprietà. Fin dal margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche è ampio, la Corte rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che che è “nell'interesse pubblico”, a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (veda Ališi ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, § 106 ECHR 2014).
70. Sembra dalle decisioni adottate con le corti nazionali che su un periodo steso di tempo hanno protegguto lavori stava essendo sparso senza una licenza valida, e che questa situazione era ad una certa misura a causa dell'efficienza limitata dell'organizzazione di richiedente nell'eseguire negoziazioni con gli imputati. Queste osservazioni attestano agli sforzi della corte nazionale di mantenere un equilibrio fra i diritti dell'organizzazione di richiedente per ottenere rimunerazione equa dall'uso di lavoro musicale, sulla mano del un'e gli imputati che ' interessa ottenere una licenza che concede loro trasmettere lavoro giuridicamente diritto-protetto. In queste circostanze il nazionale corteggia la sentenza di ' sulla questione di interesse pubblico non poteva essere considerato manifestamente come senza fondamento ragionevole.
71. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte considera, che le misure si lamentarono di intraprese un scopo legittimo all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(il c) Se un equilibrio equo fu previsto
72. Il Governo dibattè che con adottando le decisioni contestate le corti nazionali aveva bilanciato gli interessi di possessori proprietà letterari riservati ed il pubblico in generale. Inoltre, il Governo sottolineò che nel giungere alla decisione le corti nazionali i loro outmost avevano fatto assistere le parti nel giungere ad un accordo. Dopo che i tentativi falliti di giungere ad un accordo, la corte nazionale aveva avuto due alternative: ordinando la conclusione di un accordo di licenza scritto ed esponendo l'importo di rimunerazione, anche se era stato più basso che cosa l'organizzazione di richiedente aveva richiesto; o sostenendo la richiesta dell'organizzazione di richiedente per avere l'uso del lavoro musicale proibì sino alla conclusione di un accordo di licenza. Come la scelta seconda gli interessi dei possessori proprietà letterari riservati ed il pubblico generale non avrebbero notificato, la corte nazionale aveva avuto intervenire ed esporre un tasso di regalità adeguato.
73. L'organizzazione di richiedente sostenne che con stato stato ordinato per entrare in un accordo di licenza con termini di rimunerazione che non compensò gli autori per l'uso dei loro lavori, le corti nazionali avevano violato manifestamente l'equilibrio fra il diritto per ricevere rimunerazione per l'uso di lavori musicali e l'interesse generale. Loro dibatterono anche che la restrizione sopra non era stata giustificata con qualsiasi interesse pubblico perché l'imputato nel primo set di procedimenti era stato un annunciatore radiofonico commerciale ed aveva trasmesso autori ' lavora guadagnare profitto. Loro aggiunsero che in qualsiasi l'evento qualsiasi interesse pubblico per avere accesso a lavori musicali sarebbe potuto essere soddisfatto con quegli annunciatori radiofonico in Lettonia che aveva concluso un accordo di licenza con l'organizzazione di richiedente. In replica all'argomento del Governo che con le misure contestate le corti nazionali avevano risolto una controversia lungo-in marcia, l'organizzazione di richiedente contese che la decisione della causa non era stata in favore degli autori. In questo collegamento loro dibatterono che di fronte ai procedimenti contestati gli annunciatori radiofonico avevano usato il lavoro musicale senza qualsiasi la licenza e che l'organizzazione di richiedente aveva fatto tutto per giungere ad un accordo extragiudiziale nella controversia con loro.
74. La Corte reitera che se una causa è analizzata in termini del dovere positivo dello Stato o in termini di interferenza con un'autorità pubblica che ha bisogno di essere giustificata sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 della Convenzione, il criterio per essere fatto domanda non differisce in sostanza: in ambo i contesti riguardo a deve essere avuto all'equilibrio equo per essere previsto fra gli interessi che competono dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme. Contiene anche vero che gli scopi menzionarono in che disposizione può essere di alcuna attinenza nel valutare se un equilibrio fra le richieste dell'interesse pubblico coinvolte ed il diritto essenziale del richiedente di proprietà è stato previsto. In ambo i contesti lo Stato gode un certo margine della valutazione nel determinare i passi per essere preso assicurare ottemperanza con la Convenzione (veda Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 144 il 2004-V di ECHR). La Corte osserva che l'organizzazione di richiedente in sostanza considerata che le azioni dello Stato, per la decisione delle corti nazionali avevano costituito un'interferenza ingiustificata, mentre il Governo contese che con adottando le decisioni contestate lo Stato aveva eseguito i suoi obblighi positivi siccome custodito con accordi proprietà letterari riservati ed internazionali e nazionali e legislazione.
75. Siccome osservato prima, con virtù della Convenzione di Berne ed il diritto nazionale siccome interpretato e fatto domanda con le corti nazionali, dove a nessun accordo fra le parti era stato giunto e non era stato stato altra autorità aveva deciso su questo problema, era per le corti per esporre un tasso di regalità equo (veda paragrafo 64 sopra).
76. Per valutare se il meccanismo sopra nella particolare causa prevista salvaguarda così come assicurare che i funzionare del sistema di protezione proprietà letterario riservato ed il suo impatto erano né arbitrari né imprevedibili, la Corte prende in considerazione gli elementi seguenti.
77. Prima di posare in giù il tasso di regalità, le corti nazionali si sforzarono in primo luogo, di fornire alle parti tempo per giungere ad un accordo durante gli atti. Poiché non era possibile, la corte nazionale si appellò sul fatto che nel primo set di procedimenti le parti già erano giunte ad un accordo sul metodo per il calcolo del tasso di regalità (veda paragrafo 14 sopra). Nel secondo set di procedimenti la corte nazionale si riferì al metodo usato negli altri accordi di licenza validi conclusi fra l'organizzazione di richiedente e gli altri annunciatori radiofonico, ed il tasso espose con le corti non era abbassi notevolmente che il tasso negoziò con le parti nel loro accordo di licenza precedente (veda paragrafo 18 sopra).
78. In secondo luogo, osservando gli interessi dei possessori proprietà letterari riservati, le corti nazionali avevano stabilito che nelle circostanze dove erano disposte ad entrare in un accordo le parti in principio, mentre proibendo la trasmissione della musica non andrebbe bene i migliori interessi di possessori proprietà letterari riservati che sono dire di ricevere il beneficio di massimo dall'oeuvres.
79. Gli ordini di ' per le parti per entrare in un accordo di licenza concernerono come lontano siccome le corti in terzo luogo, la misura fu limitata in sfera e tempo. Nel primo set di procedimenti il tasso di regalità fu esposto per un periodo di tre anni che già erano stati concordati con le parti. Mentre nel secondo set di procedimenti la corte nazionale prese noti della sfera della rivendicazione e l'eccezione riconvenzionale ed impose soltanto sulle parti un obbligo generale per concludere un accordo di licenza. Alle parti non furono impedite di conseguenza, di rinegoziare il tasso (il contrario a, per esempio, Anthony Aquilina c. il Malta, n. 3851/12, 11 dicembre 2014 che restrizioni interessate su fissare su un affitto un periodo steso di tempo). Segue che le autorità avevano restretto minimamente il diritto dell'organizzazione di richiedente per rinegoziare clausole e condizioni con gli imputati e le altre società di radiodiffusione.
80. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per abilitare la Corte per concludere che le autorità lettoni previdero un equilibrio equo fra le richieste dell'interesse generale ed i diritti dell'organizzazione di richiedente.
81. Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 6 DI LA CONVENZIONE
82. L'organizzazione di richiedente si lamentò di una violazione di un diritto ad un'udienza corretta. In particolare, l'organizzazione di richiedente si lamentò che il principio dell'uguaglianza di braccio non era stato rispettato come riguardi la proroga dei limiti dell'eccezione riconvenzionale nel secondo set di procedimenti. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 6 della Convenzione che, nelle sue parti attinenti, legge siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...”
83. Il Governo contestò che argomento e considerato che la pelle applicativa e presente fuori del materiae di ratione di giurisdizione della Corte perché i procedimenti contestati non erano riguardati qualsiasi i particolari diritti civili dell'organizzazione di richiedente. Il Governo, nell'alternativa dibattè che le corti nazionali avevano in nessun modo prolungato i limiti dell'eccezione riconvenzionale dell'imputato e che in sia espone di procedimenti civili le corti nazionali avevano valutato debitamente gli argomenti di sia le parti.
84. L'organizzazione di richiedente sostenne che nel secondo set di procedimenti la Corte Suprema nella sua sentenza di 26 novembre 2003 aveva prolungato unilateralmente i limiti dell'eccezione riconvenzionale dell'imputato, e che il Senato della Corte Suprema non aveva rivolto gli argomenti dell'organizzazione di richiedente su questa questione tratta il loro ricorso su questioni di diritto.
85. La Corte nota che questa rivendicazione è collegata da vicino all'azione di reclamo esaminata sopra di e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile.
86. Avendo riguardo ad alla Corte sta trovando relativo ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che nell'esaminare il counterclaims dell'organizzazione di imputato le corti nazionali aveva agito in conformità con diritto nazionale e che loro avevano offerto ragionando sufficiente nelle loro decisioni, per le ragioni che sono ha dato per non trovare nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, in particolare, divide in paragrafi 64-65 e 77-79 sopra), la Corte conclude che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ALLEGATO DI LA CONVENZIONE
87. Infine, l'organizzazione di richiedente invocò le altre azioni di reclamo sotto Articoli 6, 13 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, in relazione agli altri aspetti dei procedimenti civili e contestati.
88. Nella luce di tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come le questioni si lamentò di è all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte considera che il resto della richiesta non rivela qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione di qualsiasi degli Articoli della Convenzione si appellati su. Segue che queste azioni di reclamo sono inammissibili sotto Articolo 35 § 3 (un) come manifestamente mal fondò e deve essere respinto facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo alle violazioni allegato di Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibile, ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 12 luglio 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Angelika Nußberger
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 20/02/2020.