Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF IVANOVA AND CHERKEZOV v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,08,P1-1

NUMERO: 46577/15/2016
STATO: Bulgaria
DATA: 21/04/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Violation of Article 8 - Right to respect for private and family life (Article 8-1 - Respect for home) (Conditional) No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property) (Conditional) Non-pecuniary damage - finding of violation sufficient (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)




FIFTH SECTION





CASE OF IVANOVA AND CHERKEZOV v. BULGARIA

(Application no. 46577/15)











JUDGMENT





STRASBOURG

21 April 2016



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Ivanova and Cherkezov v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Angelika Nußberger, President,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Erik Møse,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Yonko Grozev,
Carlo Ranzoni,
M?rti?š Mits, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 22 March 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 46577/15) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Bulgarian nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 15 September 2015.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Sofia and working with the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (“the BHC”). The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms R. Nikolova, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicants alleged that the enforcement of an order for the demolition of the house in which they live would be in breach of their right to respect for their home, and that they did not have an effective domestic remedy in that respect. The first applicant in addition alleged that the demolition would disproportionately interfere with her possessions.
4. On 8 October 2015 the Court decided to give priority to the application and to give the Government notice of it.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants were born in 1959 and 1947 respectively and live in the village of Sinemorets, on the southern Black Sea coast.
6. The two of them have lived as a family since 1989. At that time, they resided in the town of Burgas, where the first applicant owned a flat, which in 2013 she donated to her daughter, who had lived in it with her family for a number of years.
7. The first applicant’s father and mother owned a plot of 625 square metres in Sinemorets. Following the death of the first applicant’s father in 1986 and ensuing division-of-property proceedings between his surviving wife and seven children, the first applicant’s mother was allotted 250 out of the 625 shares in the plot. In 1999 she transferred those shares, together with the nine sixteenths of the plot to which she was otherwise entitled as a heir of her late husband, to the first applicant. Combining the shares that she obtained as a result of this transfer and the one sixteenth of the plot that she had inherited from her father, the first applicant became the owner of 484.43 shares, or 77.5%, of the plot. On the plot, there existed a dilapidated one-storey cabin.
8. In 2004 the second applicant, who had been employed as a driver, suffered a myocardial infraction and was no longer able to work. In 2005 he was recognised as a disabled person and has since then been in receipt of a disability pension. At about that time, the two applicants moved from Burgas to Sinemorets, allegedly because they were no longer able to afford living in Burgas. They submitted that they put all their savings into the reconstruction of the cabin, converting it into a solid one-storey brick house. They did not apply for a building permit. The reconstruction took place in 2004-05. Since that time, the two applicants have lived in that house. In 2006 two of the other co-owners of the plot formally notified the first applicant that they did not agree with the reconstruction. According to the Government, there was evidence that the construction had not been finalised before 2009.
9. In 2006 the other ten heirs of the first applicant’s father and mother brought a claim against the first applicant, seeking a judicial declaration that they were the owners of 140.57 of the 625 shares of the plot and of the house built on it. The Tsarevo District Court dismissed the claim. On an appeal by the claimants, on 7 June 2009 the Burgas Regional Court quashed that judgment and made a declaration in the terms sought by the claimants, finding that they were the owners of 140.57 out of the total of 625 shares of the plot and the house built in the place of the old cabin. It also held that the first applicant was the owner of the remaining 484.43 shares of the plot and the house. The first applicant attempted to appeal on points of law, but in a decision of 22 June 2009 (???. ? 566 ?? 22.06.2009 ?. ?? ??. ?. ? 1974/2009 ?., ???, I ?. ?.), the Supreme Court of Cassation refused to admit the appeal for examination. In so doing, it held, inter alia, that by including the house in the declaration, the lower court had not erred because it was settled case-law that illegal buildings could be the objects of the right to property.
10. For most of the year, the first applicant is unemployed. Her only source of income comes from servicing vacation houses in Sinemorets during the late spring and summer. The second applicant inherited shares of several plots of land in another village, which he sold for a total of 1,200 Bulgarian levs (614 euros) in 2012-14. The applicants used the money to buy a second-hand car.
11. In September 2011, prompted by some of the other co-owners of the plot, municipal officers inspected the house and found that it had been constructed illegally. They notified their findings to the first applicant in October 2011. In July 2012 the municipality brought the matter to the attention of the regional office of the National Building Control Directorate. In October 2012 that office advised the first applicant that it had opened proceedings for the demolition of the house. In November 2012 officers of the Directorate inspected it and likewise found that it was illegal as it had been constructed without a building permit.
12. On 30 September 2013 the head of the regional office of the Directorate noted that the house had been constructed in 2004-05 without a building permit, in breach of section 148(1) of the Territorial Organisation Act 2001, and was as such subject to demolition under section 225(2)(2) of that Act (see paragraphs 25 and 26 below). The first applicant had not put forward any arguments or evidence to show otherwise. The house was therefore to be demolished. Once the decision had become final, the first applicant was to be invited to comply with it voluntarily. If she failed to do so in good time, the authorities would enforce it at her expense.
13. The first applicant sought judicial review of that decision.
14. On 10 December 2014 the Burgas Administrative Court dismissed the claim. It held that the decision was lawful. The evidence clearly showed that the applicants had constructed the house in 2004-05 without obtaining a building permit, which under section 225(2)(2) of the 2001 Act (see paragraph 26 below) was grounds for its demolition. The house could not be exempted from demolition under paragraph 16 of the transitional provisions of the 2001 Act or paragraph 127 of the transitional and concluding provisions of a 2012 Act for the amendment of the 2001 Act (see paragraphs 28 and 29 below).
15. The first applicant appealed. She submitted, inter alia, that the house was her only home and that its demolition would cause her considerable difficulties as she would be unable to secure another place to live.
16. In a final judgment of 17 March 2015 (???. ? 2900 ?? 17.03.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 1381/2015 ?., ???, II ?.), the Supreme Administrative Court upheld the lower court’s judgment. It agreed that the house was illegal as it had been constructed without a building permit, that it was as such subject to demolition, and that, having been constructed in 2004-05, it could not be legalised under the transitional amnesty provisions of the 2001 Act or the 2012 Act.
17. On 15 April 2015 the regional office of the National Building Control Directorate invited the first applicant to comply with the demolition order within fourteen days of receiving notice to do so, and advised her that failure to do so would prompt it to enforce the order at her expense.
18. As the first applicant did not do so, on 6 August 2015 that office made a call for tenders from private companies willing to carry out the demolition; the deadline for submitting such offers was 15 September 2015.
19. On 18 August 2015 the Burgas Municipal Ombudsman urged the Minister of Regional Development to halt the demolition on the basis that, although formally lawful, it would have a disproportionate impact on the applicants. In response, on 25 September 2015 the Directorate’s regional office reiterated its intention to proceed with the demolition.
20. After the Government were given notice of the application (see paragraph 4 above), on 15 October 2015 the Directorate’s regional office asked the municipal authorities to explore whether, if necessary, they could provide alternative accommodation for the first applicant. Until 27 October 2015, date of the latest information from the parties on that point, the municipal authorities had not replied to that query, and the Directorate’s regional office had for that reason not proceeded with the demolition.
21. On an unspecified date in the second half of October 2015, again after notice of the application had been given to the Government, a social worker interviewed the first applicant and explained to her the possibilities to request social services. The first applicant stated that she was not interested in that because she preferred to remain in the house.
22. According to a register available on the website of the National Building Control Directorate (link), on 10 March 2016 the demolition had not yet been carried out.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Building permits for plots of land which have several co-owners
23. By sections 148(5) and 183(1) of the Territorial Organisation Act 2001, to obtain a permit to build on a plot of land which is co-owned by two or more persons, the co-owner who intends to do so must obtain the assent of the other co-owners. The administrative courts have upheld refusals to issue a building permit where such assent is lacking (see ???. ? 5170 ?? 21.04.2010 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 211/2010 ?., ???, II ?.), as well as decisions of the building control authorities to annul building permits because such assent had not been obtained (see ???. ? 13436 ?? 11.11.2009 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 13811/2008 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 3266 ?? 12.03.2010 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 13952/2009 ?., ???, II ?.; and ???. ? 1783 ?? 18.03.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 5017/2014 ?., ??-?????-????).
24. The only exception to the co-owner assent requirement is in relation to plots earmarked under the zoning regulations for low-rise or holiday housing. By section 183(4) of the 2001 Act, added in March 2009, which is similar to a rule previously set out in section 58(1) of the Territorial and Urban Planning Act 1973, in force until 2001, a co-owner may build in such a plot without having obtained the assent of the other co-owners, but only if these co-owners have themselves constructed or started to construct, or have the right to construct, their own separate buildings in the same plot.
B. Demolition of buildings constructed without a permit
25. Section 148(1) of the Territorial Organisation Act 2001 provides that buildings may only be constructed if they have been duly authorised in accordance with the Act.
26. By section 225(2)(2) of the Act, a building or a part of a building constructed without a building permit is illegal and subject to demolition. Unless falling under the amnesty provisions set out in the Act’s transitional provisions (see paragraphs 28 and 29 below), it cannot subsequently be legalised. The Supreme Administrative Court has held that this legislative solution demonstrates the heightened public interest in controlling the security, hygiene and aesthetics of construction; that the exact manner in which a building fails to conform to the building regulations is irrelevant, since all buildings put up without a permit are subject to demolition; and that this does not run counter to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see ???. ? 9768 ?? 04.07.2012 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 6382/2012 ?., ???, II ?.). On that basis, the administrative courts have held that even if a building is not in breach of the local zoning plan or other legal requirements, it must be demolished if it has been constructed without a permit (see ???. ? 4726 ?? 9.04.2009 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 14546/2008 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 1772 ?? 30.10.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 544/2014 ?., ??-??????, upheld by ???. ? 1930 ?? 23.02.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 75/2015 ?., ???, II ?.; and ???. ? 505 ?? 12.12.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 496/2015 ?., ??-?????? ???????).
27. The Supreme Administrative Court has also held that the building control authorities do not have discretion in relation to the removal of illegally constructed buildings, and that the only course of action lawfully open to them in such cases is to order their demolition (see ???. ? 13030 ?? 04.11.2009 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 7857/2009 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 3032 ?? 01.03.2011 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 15764/2010 ?., ???, II ?.; and ???. ? 942 ?? 27.01.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 7908/2014 ?., ???, II ?.); that in such cases those authorities are not bound by the general requirement of proportionality laid down in Article 6 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006, because it only applies to situations in which they enjoy discretion (see ???. ? 4035 ?? 22.03.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 632/2013 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 15733 ?? 27.11.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 9665/2013 ?., ???, II ?.; and ???. ? 1876 ?? 11.02.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 12967/2013 ?., ???, II ?.); and that under the Territorial Organisation Act 2001 it is irrelevant whether the demolition of an illegally constructed building would cause harm to those concerned (see ???. ? 13426 ?? 10.11.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 10090/ 2014 ?., ???, II ?.). Lastly, it has held that persons who are not addressees of a demolition order are not entitled to challenge it by way of judicial review (see ???. ? 9768 ?? 04.07.2012 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 6382/2012 ?., ???, II ?., and ???. ? 9877 ?? 01.07.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 7387/2013 ?., ???, II ?.).
28. By paragraph 16(1) of the transitional provisions of the 2001 Act, buildings constructed before 7 April 1987 without the requisite papers but otherwise in line with the building and zoning regulations applicable at the time of their construction are not subject to demolition. By paragraph 16(2), buildings constructed between 8 April 1987 and 30 June 1998 but not legalised before the Act’s entry into force on 31 March 2001 are likewise not subject to demolition if they were in line with the building and zoning regulations applicable at the time of their construction and were declared by their owners before the end of 1998. Paragraph 16(3) provides the same with respect to buildings whose construction has started after 30 June 1998, but only if their owners have declared them before the competent authorities within six months after the Act’s entry into force.
29. By paragraph 127(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of a 2012 Act for the amendment of the 2001 Act, buildings constructed before 31 March 2001 without the requisite papers but tolerable under the building regulations applicable at the time of their construction or under the current building regulations are not subject to demolition either.
30. In a judgment of 1 June 2015 (???. ? 6293 ?? 01.06.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 6855/2014 ?., ???, III ?.), the Supreme Administrative Court dealt with a claim for damages brought against the building control authorities by a person whose house had been demolished on their orders. The claim concerned the alleged unlawfulness of the enforcement of the demolition order, and the claimant relied on, inter alia, Article 8 of the Convention. In upholding the lower court’s decision to dismiss the claim, the Supreme Administrative Court analysed the demolition in terms of that Article, finding that it had amounted to an interference with the claimant’s right to respect for her home. It said that the enforcement authority should have taken into account that the house had been the claimant’s only home. It however went on to conclude that that interference had been proportionate because (a) the claimant had not attempted to legalise the house under the amnesty provisions of the 2001 Act (see paragraphs 28 and 29 above) as she could have, since the house fell under them; (b) the claimant had not attempted to seek judicial review of the enforcement under Article 294 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006 (see paragraph 35 below) or to obtain a declaratory judgment under Article 292 of that Code (see paragraph 33 below) on the basis that after the demolition order she had procured a certificate attesting that the house had been built in 1984 and could be tolerated; and (c) the claimant had been able to rent a dwelling after her eviction from the house, which showed that she had means to afford alternative accommodation.
C. Relevant provisions of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006
1. Postponement of the enforcement of demolition orders
31. By Article 278 § 1 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006, the enforcement of a final administrative decision may be fully or partly postponed by the competent administrative enforcement authority if it cannot be enforced immediately by reason of the financial situation of the person against whom it is directed or another objective impediment. By Article 278 § 2, enforcement may be postponed fully for fourteen days, and partly for a maximum of two months. By Article 278 § 3, the decision to postpone the enforcement or refuse to do so is not subject to legal challenge.
32. With one exception (see ???. ? 98 ?? 05.06.2012 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 147/2012 ?., ??-????? ??????, upheld by ???. ? 15346 ?? 04.12.2012 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 9645/2012 ?., ???, II ?.), the administrative courts have consistently refused to examine such challenges in relation to proceedings for the enforcement of demolition orders (see ???. ? 2989 ?? 06.03.2009 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 2480/2009 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 3298 ?? 11.03.2009 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 2921/2009 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 3768 ?? 20.03.2009 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 2481/2009 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 12660 ?? 15.10.2012 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 10151/2012 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 13269 ?? 06.11.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 13375/2014 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 14149 ?? 26.11.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 14120/2014 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 149 ?? 08.01.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 15083/2014 ?., ???, II ?.; and ???. ? 965 ?? 27.01.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 12327/2014 ?., ???, II ?.).
2. Contesting the enforcement of demolition orders by way of a claim for declaratory judgment
33. By Article 292 of the Code, it is possible to contest the enforcement by way a claim for a judicial declaration on the basis of new facts which have emerged after the decision which is due to be enforced.
34. Under the Supreme Administrative Court’ case-law, to be regarded as new, the facts must have occurred after the close of the proceedings for judicial review of the demolition order (see ???. ? 1317 ?? 02.02.2010 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 11193/2009 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 669 ?? 15.01.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 11464/2012 ?., ???, II ?.; and ???. ? 3285 ?? 10.03.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 14922/2013 ?., ???, II ?.) or, if the order has not been contested in such proceedings, the close of the administrative proceedings leading to its issuing (see ???. ? 6059 ?? 08.05.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 248/2014 ?., ???, II ?.). That court has held that the lapse of the limitation period for enforcement is a new fact (see ???. ? 9071 ?? 30.06.2010 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 5508/2010 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 2536 ?? 21.02.2012 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 13701/2011 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 3039 ?? 4.03.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 14984/2012 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 8567 ?? 14.06.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 5906/2013 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 3288 ?? 10.03.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 15163/2013 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 6291 ?? 12.05.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 507/2014 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 6973 ?? 26.05.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 859/2014 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 7224 ?? 28.05.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 342/2014 ?., ???, II ?.; ???. ? 15428 ?? 17.12.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 11539/2014 ?., ???, II ?.; and ???. ? 11888 ?? 10.11.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 6136/2015 ?., ???, II ?.), as is the legalisation of a building by the competent authorities (see ???. ? 944 ?? 27.01.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 8411/2014 ?., ???, II ?.), but that the issuing of a certificate that a building can be tolerated under the amnesty provisions of the 2001 Act (see paragraphs 28 and 29 above) is not (see ???. ? 6023 ?? 26.05.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 11540/2014 ?., ???, II ?.).
3. Judicial review of the enforcement of demolition orders
35. By Articles 294 et seq. of the Code, the decisions, actions or omissions of an administrative enforcement authority are subject to judicial review by the competent first-instance administrative court at the instance of the parties to the enforcement proceedings or any third parties whose rights, freedoms or lawful interests have been affected by them. By Article 298 § 4, the court’s judgment is not subject to appeal.
36. The Supreme Administrative Court has held that persons who are not addressees of a demolition order and whose property rights would not be affected by its enforcement are not entitled to challenge its enforcement under those provisions (see ???. ? 7946 ?? 16.06.2009 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 3935/2009 ?., ???, II ?.). However, in a more recent case the Lovech Administrative Court found, in a final judgment, that persons claiming that the enforcement of a demolition order would affect their right to respect for their home within the meaning of Article 8 § 1 of the Convention are entitled to challenge that enforcement under Article 294 et seq. of the Code (see ???. ? 7 ?? 13.01.2016 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 156/2015 ?., ??-?????).
37. In three final judgments given in March and July 2013 and February 2014 (???. ? 749 ?? 22.03.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 911/2013 ?., ??-?????; ???. 1782 ?? 04.07.2013 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 1650/2013 ?., ??-?????; and ???. ? 929 ?? 17.04.2014 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? ? 911/2013 ?., ??-?????), the Varna Administrative Court dismissed claims under Article 294 of the Code in relation to the demolition of a building which was the claimants’ only home. It examined the matter by reference to the principle of proportionality, as enshrined in Article 6 of the Code (see paragraph 27 above) and Article 8 of the Convention, but held that even though the building was the claimants’ only home, it was still subject to demolition because it was illegal and because there were no alternative means of combatting illegal construction, especially considering that the claimants had knowingly erected the building in a zone where construction was prohibited. Any arguments relating to their poor health or lack of means were irrelevant. The balance between the competing interests had been resolved at the legislative level. Holding otherwise would mean that illegal buildings inhabited by persons in poor health or persons who had no other place to live could not be demolished, which would render building regulations nugatory. The claimants then managed, on the basis of the same arguments, to obtain the discontinuance by the building control authorities of the proceedings for the enforcement of the demolition order. However, in a final judgment of 22 June 2015 (???. ? 1399 ?? 22.06.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 1230/2015 ?., ??-?????), the Varna Administrative Court, acting pursuant to a claim brought by the Sofia City Prosecutor’s Office, declared that discontinuance null and void on the basis that it had impermissibly been based on arguments already examined and rejected in a final judgment.
38. In a final judgment of 6 March 2015 (???. ? 6 ?? 06.03.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 47/2015 ?., ??-???????), the Haskovo Administrative Court dismissed a claim under Article 294 of the Code in relation to the demolition of a building which was the claimants’ only home. It held that it could not discuss the claimants’ arguments relating to the proportionality of the demolition because they did not concern the lawfulness of the enforcement but the lawfulness of the demolition order, which had already been upheld in prior judicial review proceedings.
39. In two final judgments given in January 2016 (???. ? 5 ?? 06.01.2016 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 112/2015 ?., ??-?????, and ???. ? 7 ?? 13.01.2016 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 156/2015 ?., ??-?????), the Lovech Administrative Court dismissed claims under Article 294 of the Code in relation to the demolition of buildings which were the claimants’ only home. Like the Varna Administrative Court and unlike the Haskovo Administrative Court, it examined the matter by reference to the principle of proportionality, as enshrined in Article 6 of the Code (see paragraph 27 above) and Article 8 of the Convention, but held that even though the buildings were the claimants’ only home, they were still subject to demolition because they were illegal and because there were no alternative means of combatting illegal construction.
40. In four final decisions of 15 September 2015 (???. ? 995 ?? 15.09.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 705/2015 ?., ??-?????????; ???. ? 996 ?? 15.09.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 707/2015 ?., ??-?????????; ???. ? 997 ?? 15.09.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 708/2015 ?., ??-?????????; ???. ? 1002 ?? 15.09.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 706/2015 ?., ??-?????????), the Pazardzhik Administrative Court imposed interim measures in proceedings under Article 294 of the Code relating to houses inhabited by a number of Roma families on the basis that the immediate enforcement of the orders for their demolition would render those families homeless. However, when it later examined the legal challenges under Article 294 of the Code on their merits, the court declared the steps taken to enforce the demolition orders null and void on the basis that they had not been taken by a competent authority (see ???. ? 599 ?? 13.10.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 708/2015 ?., ??-?????????; ???. ? 617 ?? 22.10.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 705/2015 ?., ??-?????????; ???. ? 624 ?? 23.10.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 707/2015 ?.; and ???. ? 728 ?? 10.12.2015 ?. ?? ???. ?. ? 706/2015 ?., ??-?????????).
D. Views expressed by the Ombudsman of the Republic
41. In his report for 2012 (link), the Ombudsman of the Republic said, at p. 98, that it was important for the building control authorities to exercise preventive control of illegal construction, and that demolition was an extreme measure that could fall foul of the principle of proportionality enshrined in Article 6 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006. This was especially important when it came to the demolition of a building which was a person’s only home.
42. In his report for 2013 (link), the Ombudsman said, at pp. 92-93, that the building control authorities did not exercise sufficient preventive control of illegal construction and thus often had to resort to the harshest measure: demolition. In his view, there were not enough guarantees that when such measures would affect the only home of the person concerned, his or her rights under Article 8 of the Convention would be respected.
43. In his report for 2014 (link), the Ombudsman said, at p. 80, that the aim of the law was more generally to deter illegal construction rather than just liquidate already existing illegal buildings. He reiterated the need to carry out preventive control and to adhere to the principle of proportionality under Article 6 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006 when measures of building control affected a person’s only home.
E. Contingency fee agreements between lawyers and clients
44. By section 36(4) of the Bar Act 2004, lawyers’ fees may be stipulated as a percentage of the pecuniary interest at issue in the proceedings depending on their outcome, except in criminal cases and cases in which the dispute does not concern pecuniary interests. Although finding that unpaid sums due under such agreements are not recoverable as costs, the Supreme Court of Cassation held that such agreements are permitted between lawyers and clients (see ????. ???. ? 6 ?? 06.11.2013 ?. ?? ????. ?. ? 6/2012 ?., ???, ?????). The courts have allowed claims by lawyers against clients for such contingency fees (see, for example, ???. ? 222 ?? 24.06.2014 ?. ?? ??. ?. ? 152/2014 ?., ??-??????, and ???. o? 14.04.2015 ?. ?? ??. ?. ? 70677/2014 ?., ??-???????, both final).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
45. The applicants complained that the demolition of the house in which they live would be in breach of their right to respect for their home. They relied on Article 8 of the Convention, which provides, in so far as relevant:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for ... his home ...
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
A. The parties’ submissions
46. The Government submitted that the decision ordering the demolition of the house in which the applicants lived was lawful. It had been judicially reviewed and upheld. It was also necessary for the protection of public safety. The national authorities had a wide margin of appreciation to tackle the problem of illegal construction. The impossibility to legalise unlawful buildings had been put in place in view of the strong public interest to ensure the safety, hygiene and aesthetics of construction. The demolition of a building because it had been erected without a permit was a proportionate measure required in all cases and not capable of being eschewed at the discretion of the building control authorities. Those authorities had acted straight away when apprised of the illegality of the house inhabited by the applicants, and had not tolerated an illegal situation for a long time: the applicants had started inhabiting the house at the earliest in 2009 and the demolition procedure had started in 2011. The applicants had constructed the house knowing full well that they had not obtained the required permit. All such buildings, unless falling under the transitional amnesty provisions of the 2001 Act, were subject to demolition; the courts had inquired into that point in the applicants’ case. The authorities had allowed the first applicant to comment on the intended demolition, and had invited her to comply with the demolition order of her own accord. In as much as she argued that she had no other place to live, it had to be noted that in June 2013, after the beginning of the demolition proceedings, she had donated a flat that she owned in Burgas and that, although the authorities did not have an obligation to provide the applicants, who did not belong to a particularly vulnerable group, with alternative accommodation, they had explored the possibility of settling them in a municipal flat. The second applicant was in receipt of a sufficiently high pension and the first applicant was able to work. They could thus afford to pay market rent in Sinemorets, and their personal circumstances were not as dire as they sought to paint them. The authorities had endeavoured to take all these matters into account when sending a social worker to interview the first applicant. It was equally possible to have the proportionality of the demolition reviewed in proceedings under Article 278 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006. The interference with the applicants’ right to respect for their home was therefore proportionate. Article 8 of the Convention could not be construed as precluding the enforcement of the building regulations in respect of those who sought to flout them, or as requiring the authorities to provide persons in the applicants’ situation with a place to live.
47. The applicants submitted that they had lived in the house undisturbed for nearly seven years, even though the local authorities were fully aware that it had been constructed without a permit, as the applicants had paid taxes in respect of the house and had their address registration there, and as Sinemorets was a small village. It was moreover widely known that many buildings in villages and small towns in Bulgaria had been constructed without a permit. The Ombudsman of the Republic had commented on that, saying that the authorities did not systematically combat illegal construction and had to do so pre-emptively rather than ex post facto. In spite of that recommendation, the only way of dealing with illegal buildings envisaged by the law was their demolition. The applicants were particularly vulnerable because the second applicant was handicapped and had a small pension, and the first applicant had been unemployed since 2003. The only illegality affecting the house was that it had been constructed without a permit; it otherwise fully complied with the applicable regulations. The public interest did not require its demolition, which would result in rendering two elderly persons with health problems homeless. The rules governing the demolition of buildings constructed without a permit, as interpreted by the Supreme Administrative Court, did not envisage any proportionality assessment or a procedure affording proper guarantees in that respect, and did not leave any discretion to the competent authorities, which were required to enforce them regardless of individual circumstances.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
48. The complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention or inadmissible on other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
49. Although only the first applicant has legal rights to the house, both applicants have in fact lived in it for a number of years (see paragraphs 8 and 11 above). It is therefore “home” for both of them (see, among other authorities, Buckley v. the United Kingdom, 25 September 1996, § 54, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV; Prokopovich v. Russia, no. 58255/00, §§ 36-39, ECHR 2004-XI (extracts); McCann v. the United Kingdom, no. 19009/04, § 46, ECHR 2008; Yordanova and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 25446/06, §§ 102-03, 24 April 2012; and Winterstein and Others v. France, no. 27013/07, § 141, 17 October 2013), and the order for its demolition amounts to an interference with their right to respect for that home (see, mutatis mutandis, ?osi? v. Croatia, no. 28261/06, § 18, 15 January 2009; Yordanova and Others, cited above, § 104; and Winterstein and Others, cited above, § 143).
50. The interference was lawful. The demolition order had a clear legal basis in section 225(2)(2) of the Territorial Organisation Act 2001 (see paragraphs 12 and 26 above). It was upheld, following fully adversarial proceedings, by two levels of court (see paragraphs 14 and 16 above), and there is nothing to suggest that it was not otherwise “in accordance with the law” within the meaning of Article 8 § 2 of the Convention.
51. The Court is satisfied that the demolition would pursue a legitimate aim. Even if its only purpose is to ensure the effective implementation of the regulatory requirement that no buildings can be constructed without permit, it may be regarded as seeking to re-establish the rule of law (see, mutatis mutandis, Saliba v. Malta, no. 4251/02, § 44, 8 November 2005), which, in the context under examination, may be regarded as falling under “prevention of disorder” and as promoting the “economic well-being of the country”. This is particularly relevant for Bulgaria, where the problem of illegal construction appears to be rife (see paragraphs 41-43 above).
52. Thus, the salient issue is whether the demolition would be “necessary in a democratic society”. On this point, the case bears considerable resemblance with cases concerning the eviction of tenants from public housing (see McCann, cited above; ?osi?, cited above; Pauli? v. Croatia, no. 3572/06, 22 October 2009; Kay and Others v. the United Kingdom, no. 37341/06, 21 September 2010; Kryvitska and Kryvitskyy v. Ukraine, no. 30856/03, 2 December 2010; Igor Vasilchenko v. Russia, no. 6571/04, 3 February 2011; and Bjedov v. Croatia, no. 42150/09, 29 May 2012), and cases concerning the eviction of occupiers from publicly owned land (see Chapman v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 27238/95, ECHR 2001-I; Connors v. the United Kingdom, no. 66746/01, 27 May 2004; Yordanova and Others, cited above; Buckland v. the United Kingdom, no. 40060/08, 18 September 2012; and Winterstein and Others v. France, no. 27013/07, 17 October 2013). An analogy may also be drawn with cases concerning evictions from properties previously owned by the applicants but lost by them as a result of civil proceedings brought by a private person, civil proceedings brought by a public body, or tax enforcement proceedings (see, respectively, Zehentner v. Austria, no. 20082/02, 16 July 2009 (proceedings brought by a creditor); Brežec v. Croatia, no. 7177/10, 18 July 2013 (proceedings brought by the true owner of the premises); Gladysheva v. Russia, no. 7097/10, 6 December 2011 (proceedings brought by a municipal body); and Rousk v. Sweden, no. 27183/04, 25 July 2013 (tax enforcement proceedings)).
53. Under the Court’s well-established case-law, as expounded in those judgments, the assessment of the necessity of the interference in cases concerning the loss of one’s home for the promotion of a public interest involves not only issues of substance but also a question of procedure: whether the decision-making process was such as to afford due respect to the interests protected under Article 8 of the Convention (see Connors, § 83; McCann, § 49; Kay and Others, § 67; Kryvitska and Kryvitskyy, § 44; and Yordanova and Others, § 118 (iii), all cited above). Since the loss of one’s home is a most extreme form of interference with the right to respect for the home, any person risking this – whether or not belonging to a vulnerable group – should in principle be able to have the proportionality of the measure determined by an independent tribunal in the light of the relevant principles under that Article (see, among other authorities, McCann, § 50; ?osi?, § 22; Zehentner, § 59; Kay and Others, § 68; Buckland, § 65; and Rousk, § 137, all cited above). The factors likely to be of prominence in this regard, when it comes to illegal construction, are whether or not the home was established unlawfully, whether or not the persons concerned did so knowingly, what is the nature and degree of the illegality at issue, what is the precise nature of the interest sought to be protected by the demolition, and whether suitable alternative accommodation is available to the persons affected by the demolition (see Chapman, cited above, §§ 102-04). Another factor could be whether there are less severe ways of dealing with the case; the list is not exhaustive. Therefore, if the person concerned contests the proportionality of the interference on the basis of such arguments, the courts must examine them carefully and give adequate reasons in relation to them (see Yordanova and Others, § 118 (iv) in fine, and Winterstein and Others, § 148 (?) in fine, both cited above); the interference cannot normally be regarded as justified simply because the case falls under a rule formulated in general and absolute terms. The mere possibility of obtaining judicial review of the administrative decision causing the loss of the home is thus not enough; the person concerned must be able to challenge that decision on the ground that it is disproportionate in view of his or her personal circumstances (see McCann, §§ 51-55; ?osi?, §§ 21-23; and Kay and Others, § 69-74, all cited above). Naturally, if in such proceedings the national courts have regard to all relevant factors and weigh the competing interests in line with the above principles – in other words, where there is no reason to doubt the procedure followed in a given case – the margin of appreciation allowed to those courts will be a wide one, in recognition of the fact that they are better placed than an international court to evaluate local needs and conditions, and the Court will be reluctant to gainsay their assessment (see Pinnock and Walker v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 31673/11, §§ 28-34, 24 September 2013).
54. The Court cannot agree with the position, expressed by some Bulgarian administrative courts, that the balance between the rights of those who stand to lose their homes and the public interest to ensure the effective implementation of the building regulations can as a rule properly be struck by way of an absolute rule permitting of no exceptions (see paragraphs 26 and 37 above). Such an approach could be sustained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which gives the national authorities considerable latitude in dealing with illegal construction (see paragraphs 73-76 below), or in other contexts (see Animal Defenders International v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 48876/08, §§ 106-09, ECHR 2013 (extracts), with further references). But given that the right to respect for one’s home under Article 8 of the Convention touches upon issues of central importance to the individual’s physical and moral integrity, maintenance of relationships with others and a settled and secure place in the community, the balancing exercise under that provision in cases where the interference consists in the loss of a person’s only home is of a different order, with particular significance attaching to the extent of the intrusion into the personal sphere of those concerned (see Connors, cited above, § 82). This can normally only be examined case by case. Moreover, there is no evidence that the Bulgarian legislature has given active consideration to this balance, or that in opting for a wholesale rather than a more narrowly tailored solution it has taken into account the interests protected under Article 8 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Vallianatos and Others v. Greece [GC], nos. 29381/09 and 32684/09, § 89, ECHR 2013 (extracts), and contrast, mutatis mutandis, Animal Defenders International, cited above, §§ 114-16). On the contrary, the Ombudsman of the Republic has repeatedly expressed concern in that regard (see paragraphs 41-43 above).
55. Nor can the Court accept the suggestion that the possibility for those concerned to challenge the demolition of their homes by reference to Article 8 of the Convention would seriously undermine the system of building control in Bulgaria (see paragraph 37 above). It is true that the relaxation of an absolute rule may entail risks of abuse, uncertainty or arbitrariness in the application of the law, expense, and delay. But it can surely be expected that the competent administrative authorities and the administrative courts, which routinely deal with various claims relating to the demolition of illegal buildings (see paragraphs 26, 27, 34 and 37-39 above), and have recently showed that they can examine such claims in the light of Article 8 of the Convention (see paragraph 30 above), will be able to tackle those risks, especially if they are assisted in this task by appropriate parameters or guidelines. Moreover, it would only be in exceptional cases that those concerned would succeed in raising an arguable claim that demolition would be disproportionate in their particular circumstances (see, mutatis mutandis, McCann, § 54; Pauli?, § 43; and Bjedov, § 67, all cited above).
56. The proceedings conducted in this case did not meet the above-mentioned procedural requirements, as set out in paragraph 53. The entire focus of those proceedings, in which the first applicant sought judicial review of the demolition order – the second applicant, not having any property rights over the house and not being an addressee of the order, would not have even had standing to take part in them (see paragraph 26 in fine above) – was whether the house had been built without a permit and whether it was nevertheless exempt from demolition because it fell within the transitional amnesty provisions of the relevant statute (see paragraphs 14 and 16 above). In her appeal, the first applicant raised, albeit briefly, the points that the applicants now put before the Court: that the house was her only home and that she would be severely affected by its demolition (see paragraph 15 above). The Supreme Administrative Court did not even mention, let alone substantively engage with this point (see, mutatis mutandis, Brežec, cited above, § 49). This is hardly surprising, as under Bulgarian law it is not relevant for the demolition order’s lawfulness. Under the applicable statutory provisions, as construed by the Supreme Administrative Court, any building constructed without a permit is subject to demolition, unless it falls under the transitional amnesty provisions of the 2001 Act, and it is not open to the administrative authorities to refrain from demolishing it on the basis that this would cause disproportionate harm to those affected by that measure (see paragraphs 25-27 above).
57. The possibility, adverted to by the Government (see paragraphs 46 above and 78 below), to seek postponement of the enforcement of the demolition order under Article 278 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006 (see paragraph 31 above) could not have remedied that (see, mutatis mutandis, Pauli?, § 44, and Bjedov, § 71, both cited above). All the applicants could have obtained in proceedings under that provision – which are conducted solely before the administrative enforcement authority rather than an independent tribunal, with no possibility for judicial review of the decisions taken in their course – would have been a temporary reprieve from the effects of the demolition order rather than a comprehensive examination of its proportionality (see paragraph 32 above).
58. Nor does it appear that, as suggested by the Supreme Administrative Court in its judgment of 1 June 2015 in a similar case (see paragraph 30 above), it would have been possible, as matters stand, to obtain a proper examination of the proportionality of the demolition by seeking judicial review of the enforcement of the demolition order under Article 294 et seq. of the 2006 Code (see paragraph 35 above). Such examination could in principle be carried out in proceedings for judicial review of enforcement (see J.L. v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 66387/10, §§ 44-46, 30 September 2014). But the case-law under these provisions shows that the Bulgarian administrative courts generally decline to examine arguments relating to the individual situation of the persons concerned by the demolition. They do so either on the basis that the proper balance between their rights under Article 8 of the Convention and the countervailing public interest to combat illegal construction has been resolved at the legislative level and that demolition is the only means of tackling illegal construction, or that such points can only be examined in proceedings for judicial review of the demolition order itself (see paragraphs 37-39 above). The only court that appears to have shown some willingness to entertain such arguments in proceedings under Article 294 et seq. of the Code is the Pazardzhik Administrative Court, which however did so when imposing interim measures in such proceedings rather than when dealing with the merits of the cases (see paragraph 40 above). It is also unclear whether persons in the position of the second applicant, who is not the addressee of the demolition order and has no property rights over the house, would have standing to bring such a challenge (see paragraph 36 above).
59. The applicants could not have obtained a proper examination of the proportionality of the demolition by bringing a claim for declaratory judgment under Article 292 of the 2006 Code either (see paragraph 33 above). The case-law under that provision, which is only intended to prevent the enforcement of administrative decisions where newly emerged facts militate against it, shows that in such proceedings the Bulgarian administrative courts just check whether facts which have come to pass after the issuing or the demolition order or its upholding by the courts – such as a lapse of the limitation period for enforcement or an intervening legalisation of the building – could preclude enforcement (see paragraph 34 above). There appears to be no case in which the courts have allowed such a claim, and thus blocked the enforcement of a demolition order, on the basis of arguments relating to the personal circumstances of those concerned. Moreover, in the applicants’ case the enforcement proceedings started less than one month after the demolition order was upheld by the courts (see paragraphs 16 and 17 above).
60. The involvement of the social services, which only occurred after notice of the application had been given to the Government (see paragraph 21 above), could not make good the lack of a proper proportionality assessment. It did not take place within the framework of a procedure capable of resulting in a comprehensive review of the proportionality of the demolition (see, mutatis mutandis, Yordanova and Others, cited above, §§ 136-37). In any event, even though the first applicant stated that she was not interested in social services, the Government emphasised that the authorities had no obligation to provide the applicants with alternative accommodation and did not clearly explain in what way those services would have provided the applicants with a satisfactory solution.
61. In sum, the applicants did not have at their disposal a procedure enabling them to obtain a proper review of the proportionality of the intended demolition of the house in which they live in the light of their personal circumstances.
62. The Court therefore finds that there would be a breach of Article 8 of the Convention if the order for the demolition of the house in which the applicants live were to be enforced without such review.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
63. The first applicant further complained that the demolition of the house, part of which belonged to her, would be a disproportionate interference with the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions. She relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which provides as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties’ submissions
64. The Government submitted that the complaint was incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of Protocol No. 1 in so far as the second applicant was concerned, because only the first applicant had title to the house. Moreover, in as much as the house had been illegally constructed without being tolerated by the authorities for a long time, it could not be regarded as a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In the alternative, the Government submitted that the interference with the first applicant’s possessions was justified. The demolition, which was a measure of control of property, was lawful and would not impose an excessive burden on the applicants as their financial situation, as evident from the property disposal transactions carried out by them, was not so dire, and as they had wilfully acted in defiance of the law. Moreover, the house did not exclusively belong to the first applicant; the other co-owners of the plot were entitled to a share of it, and some of them had objected to its construction. The legitimate aim sought to be achieved by the demolition was to enforce the building regulations, which required a permit for each newly constructed building. In constructing the house without a permit, the applicants had knowingly acted in breach of the law and had disregarded the other co-owners’ interests.
65. The applicants submitted that the complaint had only been raised by the first applicant, who had legal rights over the house even though it had been illegally constructed. It was therefore a “possession”. Nothing would be achieved by demolishing it. It would not benefit the other co-owners of the plot, who had displayed no wish to take care of the property and whose interests would be better served if they were allotted a share of the house. Nor would it advance the public interest, which could be vindicated by less invasive measures, such as a financial penalty. The applicants had built the house to have a place to live when they grew old. In 2005 the first applicant had approached one of the other co-owners to obtain his assent to the construction, but he had tried to wring a disproportionate amount of money out of her in exchange for that. That was why the applicants had proceeded with the construction without obtaining a permit.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Scope of the complaint ratione personae
66. It should be noted at the outset that this complaint was only raised by the first applicant. It is therefore not necessary to rule on the Government’s objection in relation to the second applicant.
2. Admissibility
67. The parties have diverging views on whether the first applicant has a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 and whether that provision is thus applicable. But in this case it is more appropriate to examine this question on the merits (see, mutatis mutandis, Depalle v. France (dec.), no. 34044/02, 29 April 2008, and Yordanova and Others v. Bulgaria (dec.), no. 25446/06, 14 September 2010). The complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention or inadmissible on other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
3. Merits
68. Since in Bulgaria it is settled law that illegal buildings can be the objects of the right to property, and since the Burgas Regional Court held that the first applicant is the owner of 484.43 out of the 625 shares of both the plot and the house built on it (see paragraph 9 above), there can be no doubt that she has a “possession” and that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable.
69. The intended demolition of the house will in turn amount to an interference with the first applicant’s possessions (see Allard v. Sweden, no. 35179/97, § 50, ECHR 2003-VII, and Hamer v. Belgium, no. 21861/03, § 77, ECHR 2007-V (extracts)). Being meant to ensure compliance with the general rules concerning the prohibitions on construction, this interference amounts to a “control [of] the use of property” (see Hamer, cited above, § 77, and Saliba, cited above, § 35). It therefore falls to be examined under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
70. The demolition order had a clear legal basis in section 225(2)(2) of the Territorial Organisation Act 2001 (see paragraphs 12 and 26 above). It was upheld, following fully adversarial proceedings, by two levels of court (see paragraphs 14 and 16 above). The interference is therefore lawful for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
71. It can also be accepted that the interference, which seeks to ensure compliance with the building regulations, is “in accordance with the general interest” (see Saliba, cited above, § 44). At the same time, it should be noted that the demolition order, although the product of a denunciation by the first applicant’s co-owners (see paragraph 11 above), was not premised on the first applicant’s failure to obtain their assent for the construction of the house. It cannot therefore be regarded as intended to protect their interests (contrast Allard, cited above, § 52). It follows that the weight of those interests is not a pertinent consideration in this case (contrast Allard, cited above, § 60).
72. The salient issue is whether the interference would strike a fair balance between the first applicant’s interest to keep her possessions intact and the general interest to ensure effective implementation of the prohibition against building without a permit.
73. According to the Court’s settled case-law, the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must be read in the light of the principle set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph: that an interference needs to strike a fair balance between the general interest of the community and the individual’s rights. This means that a measure must be both appropriate for achieving its aim and not disproportionate to that aim (see, among other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 50, Series A no. 98). However, the High Contracting Parties enjoy a margin of appreciation in this respect, in particular in choosing the means of enforcement and in ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement would be justified (see, as a recent authority, Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 83, ECHR 2010). When it comes to the implementation of their spatial planning and property development policies, this margin is wide (see Saliba, cited above, § 45, with further references).
74. For that reason, unlike Article 8 of the Convention, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not in such cases presuppose the availability of a procedure requiring an individualised assessment of the necessity of each measure of implementation of the relevant planning rules. It is not contrary to the latter for the legislature to lay down broad and general categories rather than provide for a scheme whereby the proportionality of a measure of implementation is to be examined in each individual case (see James and Others, cited above, § 68, and Allen and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 5591/07, § 66, 6 October 2009). There is no incongruity in this, as the intensity of the interests protected under those two Articles, and the resultant margin of appreciation enjoyed by the national authorities under each of them, are not necessarily co-extensive (see Connors, cited above, § 82). Thus, although the Court has in some cases assessed the proportionality of a measure under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the light of largely the same factors as those that it has taken into account under Article 8 of the Convention (see Zehentner, §§ 52-65 and 70-79; Gladysheva, §§ 64-83 and 90-97; and Rousk, §§ 108-27 and 134-42, all cited above, as well as Demades v. Turkey, no. 16219/90, §§ 36-37 and 44 46, 31 July 2003), this assessment is not inevitably identical in all circumstances.
75. In the first applicant’s case, the house was knowingly built without a permit (contrast N.A. and Others v. Turkey, no. 37451/97, § 39 in fine, ECHR 2005-X, and Depalle, cited above, § 85), and therefore in flagrant breach of the domestic building regulations. In this case, regardless of the explanations that the first applicant gave for this failure, this can be regarded as a crucial consideration under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The order that the house be demolished, which was issued a reasonable time after its construction (contrast Hamer, cited above, § 83), simply seeks to put things back in the position in which they would have been if the first applicant had not disregarded the requirements of the law. The order and its enforcement will also serve to deter other potential lawbreakers (see Saliba, cited above, § 46), which must not be discounted in view of the apparent pervasiveness of the problem of illegal construction in Bulgaria (see paragraphs 41-43 above). In view of the wide margin of appreciation that the Bulgarian authorities enjoy under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in choosing both the means of enforcement and in ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement would be justified, none of the above considerations can be outweighed by the first applicant’s proprietary interest in the house.
76. The implementation of the demolition order would therefore not be in breach of the first applicant’s rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
77. The applicants complained that they did not have an effective domestic remedy in respect of their complaint under Article 8 of the Convention. They relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which provides as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The parties’ submissions
78. The Government submitted that the applicants could have sought postponement of the enforcement of the demolition order under Article 278 of the Code of Administrative Procedure 2006 on the basis of arguments relating to their financial situation and the impossibility to obtain alternative accommodation. That did not of course mean that the authorities had an unconditional obligation to provide them such accommodation. That said, there was no evidence that the applicants had taken steps to be settled in a municipal flat.
79. The applicants submitted that a request under Article 278 of the 2006 Code was not an effective remedy. All it could achieve was a short postponement of the enforcement. The law did not envisage any way of dealing with unlawful construction other than its demolition, regardless of the degree or nature of the illegality, or the effects of the measure on the personal situation of those affected by it.
B. The Court’s assessment
80. The complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention or inadmissible on other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
81. However, in as much as the finding of a breach of Article 8 of the Convention was premised on the absence of a procedure in which the applicants could challenge the demolition of the house on proportionality grounds (see paragraphs 56-61 above), no separate issue arises under Article 13 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Stanková v. Slovakia, no. 7205/02, § 67, 9 October 2007, and Yordanova and Others, cited above, § 152).
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
82. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
83. The applicants jointly claimed 2,000 euros (EUR) in respect of the distress experienced by them as a result of the alleged breaches of Articles 8 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
84. The Government submitted that the claim was exorbitant.
85. In this case, the award of compensation can only be based on the breach of Article 8 of the Convention. However, that breach will only take place if the decision ordering the demolition of the house in which the applicants live were to be enforced, which has for the time being not happened (see paragraph 22 above). The finding of a violation is therefore sufficient just satisfaction for any non-pecuniary damage suffered by the applicants (see Yordanova and Others, cited above, § 171).
B. Costs and expenses
86. The applicants claimed EUR 3,280 in respect of forty-one hours of work by their legal representative on the proceedings before the Court, billed at EUR 80 per hour, plus EUR 13.73 for postage. They requested than any award made under this head be made payable to the BHC, with which their legal representative worked (see paragraph 2 above). In support of this claim, the applicants submitted two agreements between them, their legal representative and the BHC in which it was stipulated that the applicants did not have to pay any remuneration to their representative up-front but that the representative would claim her fees, plus any related expenses, in the event of a successful outcome of the case; that, in the event of a successful outcome, the fees would in fact be paid by the BHC; and that the representative agreed that any award in respect of costs and expenses could be made payable to the BHC. The applicants also submitted a time-sheet and postal receipts.
87. The Government disputed the number of hours spent by the applicants’ legal representative on the case, saying that they were excessive in view of its low complexity and the length of the submissions that she had made on the applicants’ behalf. The sum claimed in that respect was many times higher than those envisaged for similar work in domestic proceedings and out of tune with economic realities in the country. The Government also pointed out that there was no evidence, such as an invoice or a payment document, showing that the BHC had actually paid any remuneration to the applicants’ representative.
88. According to the Court’s settled case-law, costs and expenses are recoverable under Article 41 of the Convention if it is established that they were actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum.
89. The first point in dispute was whether the costs claimed by the applicants were actually incurred. The applicants made an agreement with their representative and the BHC that is comparable to a contingency fee agreement whereby a client agrees to remunerate his lawyer only in the event of a successful outcome of the case. If legally enforceable, such agreements may show that the sums claimed are payable and therefore actually incurred (see Kamasinski v. Austria, 19 December 1989, § 115, Series A no. 168). This being the case in Bulgaria (see paragraph 44 above, and compare Saghatelyan v. Armenia, no. 7984/06, § 62, 20 October 2015, and contrast Dudgeon v. the United Kingdom (Article 50), 24 February 1983, § 22, Series A no. 59, and Pshenichnyy v. Russia, no. 30422/03, § 38, 14 February 2008), the Court accepts that the costs claimed were actually incurred by the applicants, even if for the time being no payments have taken place.
90. The second disputed point was whether the costs were reasonable as to quantum. The Court is not bound by domestic scales or standards in that assessment (see Dimitrov and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 77938/11, § 190, 1 July 2014, with further references). It simply notes that the hourly rate charged by the applicants’ representative is comparable to that charged in a recent case against Bulgaria involving similar issues (see Yordanova and Others, cited above, § 172). It can thus be regarded as reasonable. However, having regard to the submissions made on behalf of the applicants, the Court finds that the number of hours claimed is excessive.
91. Taking into account all these points and the materials in its possession, the Court awards the applicants a total of EUR 2,013.73, plus any tax that may be chargeable to them.
92. As requested by the applicants, this sum is to be paid directly to the BHC, with which their representative works. The Court’s practice has been to accede to such requests (see Neshkov and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 36925/10, 21487/12, 72893/12, 73196/12, 77718/12 and 9717/13, § 309, 27 January 2015, with further references).
C. Default interest
93. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT,
1. Declares, unanimously, the application admissible;

2. Holds, by six votes to one, that there would be a violation of Article 8 of the Convention if the order for the demolition of the house in which the applicants live were to be enforced without a proper review of its proportionality in the light of the applicants’ personal circumstances;

3. Holds, unanimously, that there would be no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 if the order for the demolition of the house were to be enforced;

4. Holds, unanimously, that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention;

5. Holds, by six votes to one,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 2,013.73 (two thousand thirteen euros and seventy-three cents), to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses, to be paid to the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

6. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 21 April 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Angelika Nußberger
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Vehabovi? is annexed to this judgment.
A.N.
C.W.

PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE VEHABOVI?
I regret that I am unable to subscribe to the view of the majority that there has been a violation of Article 8 in this case.
In short, I cannot accept the approach taken by the majority that the applicants can obtain protection under Article 8 of the Convention when it appears from the facts that one of the applicants had an apartment, which was donated to her daughter only in 2013, and that the land on which the applicants had reconstructed a cabin and converted it into a solid one-storey brick house without any permission from the authorities was the subject of a property dispute between one of the applicants and other members of her family.
I disagree with the majority that the State is obliged in all circumstances to carry out a detailed review of the proportionality of each and every demolition order, even in circumstances such as these in which it is clear that the second applicant cannot prove any of his allegations and nor can he prove that either he or he and the first applicant had established a long lasting and strong connection with the premises in issue to be regarded as their home within the scope of Article 8 of the Convention. Furthermore, they could not prove that they had acted bona fide.
This area is par excellence an area in which the State enforces laws to control the use of property in the public interest (see Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 87, ECHR 2010) and in which a wide margin of appreciation applies (ibid., § 84).
It is hard to imagine the implications for the enforcement of planning regulations in other States if this judgment is to be understood as requiring a detailed proportionality review in each individual case. In this connection the Court, in the recent case of Garib v. the Netherlands (no. 43494/09, §§ 125-26, 23 February 2016, not yet final), found that the respondent party was, in principle, entitled to adopt the relevant inner-city housing legislation and policy. In finding thus, the Court appeared to cite with approval the existence of (and demonstrated reliance upon) a hardship clause.
This judgment does not sufficiently distinguish the facts of the present case from earlier cases concerning the enforcement of demolition orders for planning offences, which were examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and in which no violation was found, notably Hamer v. Belgium (no. 21861/03, ECHR 2007-V (extracts)), which concerned a building in existence for twenty-seven years before the planning offence was recorded and for a further ten years before it was demolished, and the more recent (Grand Chamber) case of Depalle (cited above), which concerned a family home near a public beach that had been in existence since 1969 on the basis of authorisations limited in time and which ceased with the enactment of specific coastal planning laws following which an order to demolish was made (no separate issue under Article 8).

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Violazione di Articolo 8 - Diritto per rispettare per privato e la vita di famiglia (Articolo 8-1 - Riguardo per casa) (Condizionale) Nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà) (Condizionale) danno Non-patrimoniale - trovando di violazione sufficiente (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)




QUINTA SEZIONE





CAUSA IVANOVA E CHERKEZOV C. BULGARIA

(Richiesta n. 46577/15)











SENTENZA





STRASBOURG

21 aprile 2016



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Ivanova e Cherkezov c. la Bulgaria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Angelika Nußberger, Presidente
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Erik Møse,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Yonko Grozev,
Carlo Ranzoni,
Mrtiš ?Mits, giudici
e Claudia Westerdiek, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 22 marzo 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 46577/15) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con due cittadini bulgari, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 15 settembre 2015.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato praticando in Sofia e lavorando col Comitato di Helsinki bulgaro (“il BHC”). Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra R. Nikolova, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. I richiedenti addussero che l'esecuzione di un ordine per la demolizione dell'alloggio nella quale loro vivono sarebbe stata in violazione del loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa, e che loro non avevano una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva in quel il riguardo. Il primo richiedente in oltre allegato che la demolizione interferirebbe sproporzionatamente con le sue proprietà.
4. 8 ottobre 2015 la Corte decise di dare priorità alla richiesta e dare l'avviso Statale di sé.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1959 e 1947 e vivono nel villaggio di Sinemorets, sulla costa di Mare Nera e meridionale.
6. I due di loro vivono come una famiglia dal 1989. A che tempo, loro risieddero nella città di Burgas, dove il primo richiedente possedette un appartamento che nel 2013 lei donò a sua figlia che aveva vissuto in sé con la sua famiglia per un numero di anni.
7. Il padre del primo richiedente e madre possedettero un'area di 625 metri di piazza in Sinemorets. Seguendo la morte del padre del primo richiedente nel 1986 e conseguendo procedimenti di divisione-di-proprietà fra la sua sopravvivente moglie e sette figli, la madre del primo richiedente fu assegnata 250 fuori del 625 quote nell'area. Nel 1999 lei trasferì quelle quote, insieme coi nove sedicesimo dell'area al quale lei fu concessa altrimenti come un erede di suo defunto marito, al primo richiedente. Combinando le quote che lei ha ottenuto come un risultato di questo trasferimento e quello sedicesimo dell'area che lei aveva ereditato da suo padre, il primo richiedente divenne il proprietario di 484.43 quote, o 77.5%, dell'area. Sull'area, là esistè la cabina di un uno-piano cadente.
8. Nel 2004 il secondo richiedente che aveva avuto un lavoro come un conducente soffrì di un'infrazione di myocardial ed era più in grado a lavoro. Nel 2005 lui fu riconosciuto come un invalido e è stato da allora poi in ricevuta di una pensione di invalidità. A di che tempo, i due richiedenti si trasferirono da Burgas a Sinemorets, presumibilmente perché loro non erano più in grado riconoscere vivendo in Burgas. Loro presentarono che loro misero tutti i loro risparmi nella ricostruzione della cabina, mentre lo convertì nell'alloggio di mattone di un uno-piano solido. Loro non fecero domanda per una licenza di edificio. La ricostruzione ebbe luogo nel 2004-05. Da allora che tempo, i due richiedenti hanno vissuto in quel l'alloggio. In 2006 due degli altri coproprietari dell'area il primo richiedente che loro non hanno concordato con la ricostruzione notificò formalmente. Secondo il Governo, era prova che la costruzione non era stata resa definitivo prima 2009.
9. Nel 2006 gli altri dieci eredi del padre del primo richiedente e madre portarono una rivendicazione contro il primo richiedente, mentre chiedendo una dichiarazione giudiziale che loro erano i proprietari di 140.57 delle 625 quote dell'area e dell'alloggio costruito su sé. La Corte distrettuale di Tsarevo respinse la rivendicazione. Su un ricorso coi rivendicatori, 7 giugno 2009 il Burgas che Corte Regionale ha annullato che sentenza e fece una dichiarazione nei termini chiesti coi rivendicatori, mentre trovando che loro erano i proprietari di 140.57 fuori del totale di 625 quote dell'area e l'alloggio integrato il posto della vecchia cabina. Contenne anche che il primo richiedente era il proprietario del rimanendo 484.43 quote dell'area e l'alloggio. Il primo richiedente tentò di fare appello su questioni di diritto, ma in una decisione di 22 giugno 2009 (.? ? 566 ?22.06.2009.? ?? ??. ?. ? 1974/2009., ?io.? ?.), la Corte Suprema di Cassazione rifiutò di ammettere il ricorso per esame. Nel fare così, contenne, inter l'alia che con incluso l'alloggio nella dichiarazione, la corte più bassa non aveva errato, perché fu stabilito causa-legge che edifici illegali potessero essere gli oggetti del diritto a proprietà.
10. Per la maggior parte dell'anno, il primo richiedente è inutilizzato. La sua fonte di reddito sola viene dal riparare alloggi di vacanza in Sinemorets durante la fine di primavera ed estate. Il secondo richiedente ereditò quote di molte aree di terra in un altro villaggio che lui vendè per un totale di 1,200 levs bulgari (614 euros) nel 2012-14. I richiedenti usarono i soldi per comprare una macchina di seconda mano.
11. A settembre 2011, incitò con alcuni degli altri coproprietari dell'area, ufficiali municipali ispezionarono l'alloggio e fondarono che era stato costruito illegalmente. Loro notificarono le loro sentenze al primo richiedente ad ottobre 2011. A luglio 2012 il municipio portò la questione all'attenzione dell'ufficio regionale della Direzione del Controllo dell'Edificio Nazionale. Ad ottobre 2012 che ufficio consigliò il primo richiedente che aveva aperto procedimenti per la demolizione dell'alloggio. A novembre 2012 ufficiali della Direzione l'ispezionarono e similmente fondarono che era illegale come sé era stato costruito senza una licenza di edificio.
12. 30 settembre 2013 il capo dell'ufficio regionale della Direzione notò che l'alloggio era stato costruito nel 2004-05 senza una licenza di edificio, in violazione di sezione 148(1) dell'Organizzazione Territoriale Atto 2001, ed era come simile soggetto alla demolizione sotto sezione 225(2)(2) di che Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 25 e 26 sotto). Il primo richiedente non aveva fissato in avanti qualsiasi gli argomenti o attesta mostrare altrimenti. L'alloggio sarebbe demolito perciò. Una volta la decisione era divenuta definitivo, il primo richiedente sarebbe invitato per attenersi volontariamente con sé. Se lei non riuscisse a fare così nel buon tempo, le autorità l'eseguirebbero alla sua spesa.
13. Il primo richiedente chiese controllo giurisdizionale di quel la decisione.
14. 10 dicembre 2014 la Corte amministrativa di Burgas respinse la rivendicazione. Contenne che la decisione era legale. La prova chiaramente mostrò che i richiedenti avevano costruito l'alloggio nel 2004-05 senza ottenere una licenza di edificio che sotto sezione 225(2)(2) dell'Atto del 2001 (veda paragrafo 26 sotto) era i motivi per la sua demolizione. L'alloggio non poteva essere esentato dalla demolizione sotto paragrafo 16 delle disposizioni di transizione dell'Atto del 2001 o potrebbe essere diviso in paragrafi 127 dei di transizione e disposizioni finali di un Atto del 2012 per l'emendamento dell'Atto del 2001 (veda divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 sotto).
15. Il primo richiedente fece appello. Lei presentò, inter l'alia, che l'alloggio era alla sua casa sola e che la sua demolizione provocherebbe le sue difficoltà considerevoli siccome lei non sarebbe capace di garantire un altro posto per vivere.
16. In una definitivo sentenza di 17 marzo 2015 (.? ? 2900 ?17.03.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 1381/2015., ?II?.), la Corte amministrativa Suprema sostenne la sentenza della corte più bassa. Concordò che l'alloggio era illegale come sé era stato costruito senza una licenza di edificio come la quale era simile soggetto alla demolizione, e che, stato stato costruito nel 2004-05, non poteva essere legalizzato sotto le disposizioni di amnistia di transizione dell'Atto del 2001 o l'Atto del 2012.
17. 15 aprile 2015 l'ufficio regionale della Direzione del Controllo dell'Edificio Nazionale invitò il primo richiedente per attenersi con l'ordine di demolizione entro quattordici giorni di ricevere avviso per fare così, e la consigliò che insuccesso per fare l'avrebbe incitato così ad eseguire l'ordine alla sua spesa.
18. Siccome non faceva il primo richiedente così, 6 agosto 2015 che ufficio costituì una chiamata navi appoggio da società private eseguirà la demolizione; il termine massimo per presentare simile offerte era 15 settembre 2015.
19. 18 agosto 2015 il Burgas Difensore civile Municipale esortò il Ministro di Sviluppo Regionale a fermare la demolizione sulla base che, benché formalmente legale, avrebbe un impatto sproporzionato sui richiedenti. 25 settembre 2015 l'ufficio regionale della Direzione reiterò la sua intenzione di procedere con la demolizione in risposta.
20. Dopo il Governo fu dato avviso della richiesta (veda paragrafo 4 sopra), 15 ottobre 2015 l'ufficio regionale della Direzione chiese alle autorità municipali di esplorare se, se necessario, loro potrebbero offrire alloggio alternativo per il primo richiedente. Fino a 27 ottobre 2015, data delle ultime informazioni dalle parti su che punto, le autorità municipali non avevano risposto che consultazione, e l'ufficio regionale della Direzione aveva per che ragione non procedè con la demolizione.
21. Su una data non specificata nel secondo la metà di ottobre 2015, di nuovo dopo avviso della richiesta era stato dato al Governo, un lavoratore sociale intervistò il primo richiedente e spiegò a lei le possibilità di richiedere servizi sociali. Il primo richiedente affermò che lei non fu interessata in che perché lei preferì rimanere nell'alloggio.
22. Secondo un registro disponibile sul website della Direzione del Controllo dell'Edificio Nazionale (il collegamento), 10 marzo 2016 fuori il quale la demolizione non era stata portata ancora.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Building licenze per aree di terra che ha molti coproprietari
23. Con sezioni 148(5) e 183(1) dell'Organizzazione Territoriale Atto 2001, ottenere una licenza per costruire su un'area di terra che è co-posseduta con due o più persone il coproprietario che intende di fare deve ottenere così l'assenso degli altri coproprietari. Le corti amministrative hanno sostenuto rifiuti per emettere una licenza di edificio dove simile assenso sta mancando (veda.? ? 5170 ?21.04.2010.? ?? ???. ?. ? 211/2010., ?II?.), così come decisioni delle autorità di controllo di edificio di annullare edificio permettono perché simile assenso non era stato ottenuto (veda.? ? 13436 ?11.11.2009.? ?? ???. ?. ? 13811/2008., ?II?.;.? ? 3266 ?12.03.2010.? ?? ???. ?. ? 13952/2009., ?II?.; e.? ? 1783 ?18.03.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 5017/2014.,?--?).
24. L'eccezione sola al requisito di assenso di coproprietario è in relazione ad aree marchiate sotto le regolamentazioni di zonizzazione per la basso-aumento o alloggio di festa. Con sezione 183(4) dell'Atto del 2001, aggiunse a marzo 2009 che prima è simile ad un articolo esponga fuori in sezione 58(1) del Territoriale e Pianificazione Urbana Atto 1973, in vigore fino a 2001 che un coproprietario può integrare tale area senza avere ottenuto l'assenso degli altri coproprietari, ma solamente se questi coproprietari si hanno costruito o avviarono costruire, o ha diritto a costruire, i loro propri edifici separati nella stessa area.
La Demolizione di B. di edifici costruì senza una licenza
25. Sezione 148(1) dell'Organizzazione Territoriale Atto 2001 prevede che edifici possono essere costruiti solamente se loro sono stati autorizzati debitamente in conformità con l'Atto.
26. Con sezione 225(2)(2) dell'Atto, un edificio o una parte di un edificio costruite senza una licenza di edificio è illegale e soggetto alla demolizione. A meno che incorrendo l'amnistia sotto approvvigiona esposto fuori nelle disposizioni di transizione dell'Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 sotto), non può essere legalizzato successivamente. La Corte amministrativa Suprema ha sostenuto che questa soluzione legislativa dimostra l'interesse pubblico ed elevato in controllare la sicurezza, igiene e l'estetica di costruzione; che la maniera esatta nella quale un edificio va a vuoto ad adattare alle regolamentazioni di edificio è irrilevante, poiché tutti gli edifici fissarono su senza una licenza è soggetto alla demolizione; e che questo non funziona cassa ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda.? ? 9768 ?04.07.2012.? ?? ???. ?. ? 6382/2012., ?II?.). Su che base, le corti amministrative hanno contenuto che anche se un edificio non è in violazione del piano di zonizzazione locale o gli altri requisiti giuridici, si deve demolire se è stato costruito senza una licenza (veda.? ? 4726 ?9.04.2009.? ?? ???. ?. ? 14546/2008., ?II?.;.? ? 1772 ?30.10.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 544/2014., ?-?, sostenne con.? ? 1930 ?23.02.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 75/2015., ?II?.; e.? ? 505 ?12.12.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 496/2015., ?-?).
27. La Corte amministrativa Suprema ha sostenuto anche che le autorità di controllo di edificio non hanno la discrezione in relazione all'allontanamento di edifici illegalmente costruiti, e che il corso solo di azione legalmente aperto a loro in simile cause è ordinare la loro demolizione (veda.? ? 13030 ?04.11.2009.? ?? ???. ?. ? 7857/2009., ?II?.;.? ? 3032 ?01.03.2011.? ?? ???. ?. ? 15764/2010., ?II?.; e.? ? 942 ?27.01.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 7908/2014., ?II?.); che in simile cause quelle autorità non sono legate col requisito generale della proporzionalità posato in giù in Articolo 6 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa, perché fa domanda solamente a situazioni nelle quali loro godono la discrezione (veda.? ? 4035 ?22.03.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 632/2013., ?II?.;.? ? 15733 ?27.11.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 9665/2013., ?II?.; e.? ? 1876 ?11.02.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 12967/2013., ?II?.); e che sotto l'Organizzazione Territoriale Atto 2001 è irrilevante se la demolizione di un edificio illegalmente costruito provocherebbe danno a quelli riguardati (veda.? ? 13426 ?10.11.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 10090 / 2014., ?II?.). Infine, ha contenuto che persone che non sono destinatari di un ordine di demolizione non sono concesse per impugnarlo con modo di controllo giurisdizionale (veda.? ? 9768 ?04.07.2012.? ?? ???. ?. ? 6382/2012., ?II?., e.? ? 9877 ?01.07.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 7387/2013., ?II?.).
28. Con paragrafo 16(1) delle disposizioni di transizione dell'Atto del 2001, edifici costruirono di fronte a 7 aprile 1987 senza le carte richieste ma altrimenti in linea con l'edificio e suddividere in zone regolamentazioni applicabile al tempo della loro costruzione non è soggetto alla demolizione. Con paragrafo 16(2), edifici costruirono fra il 1987 e 30 giugno 1998 di 8 aprile ma non legalizzarono di fronte all'entrata dell'Atto in vigore 31 marzo 2001 non è similmente soggetto alla demolizione se loro fossero in linea con l'edificio e suddividendo in zone regolamentazioni applicabile al tempo della loro costruzione e fu dichiarato coi loro proprietari di fronte alla fine di 1998. Divida in paragrafi 16(3) offre lo stesso riguardo ad edifici la cui costruzione ha cominciato dopo 30 giugno 1998, ma solamente se i loro proprietari li hanno dichiarati di fronte alle autorità competenti entro sei mesi dopo l'entrata dell'Atto in vigore.
29. Con paragrafo 127(1) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali di un Atto del 2012 per l'emendamento dell'Atto del 2001, edifici costruirono di fronte a 31 marzo 2001 senza le carte richieste ma tollerabile sotto le regolamentazioni di edificio applicabile al tempo della loro costruzione o sotto le regolamentazioni di edificio correnti non è o soggetto alla demolizione.
30. In una sentenza di 1 giugno 2015 (.? ? 6293 ?01.06.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 6855/2014., ?III?.), la Corte amministrativa Suprema trattò con una rivendicazione per danni portati contro le autorità di controllo di edificio con una persona il cui alloggio era stato demolito sui loro ordini. La rivendicazione concernè l'illegalità allegato dell'esecuzione dell'ordine di demolizione, ed il rivendicatore si appellò su, inter alia, Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Nel sostenere la decisione della corte più bassa di respingere la rivendicazione, la Corte amministrativa Suprema analizzò la demolizione in termini di che Articolo, trovando che aveva corrisposto ad un'interferenza col diritto del rivendicatore per rispettare per la sua casa. Disse che l'autorità di esecuzione avrebbe dovuto prendere in considerazione che l'alloggio era stato il rivendicatore solamente casa. Seguì a concludere comunque che che interferenza era stata proporzionata perché (un) il rivendicatore non aveva tentato di legalizzare l'alloggio sotto l'amnistia approvvigiona dell'Atto del 2001 (veda divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 sopra) siccome lei potesse avere, fin dalla pelle di alloggio sotto loro; (b) il rivendicatore non aveva tentato di chiedere controllo giurisdizionale dell'esecuzione sotto Articolo 294 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa (veda paragrafo 35 sotto) od ottenere una sentenza dichiaratoria sotto Articolo 292 di che Codice (veda paragrafo 33 sotto) sulla base che dopo che l'ordine di demolizione che lei aveva procurato un certificato che attesta che l'alloggio era stato costruito nel 1984 ed era stato tollerato; e (il c) il rivendicatore era stato in grado affittare un'abitazione dopo il suo sfratto dall'alloggio che mostrò che lei aveva vuole dire riconoscere alloggio alternativo.
C. disposizioni Attinenti del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa
1. Proroga dell'esecuzione di ordini di demolizione
31. Di Articolo 278 § 1 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa, l'esecuzione di una definitivo decisione amministrativa può essere posticipata pienamente o in parte con l'autorità di esecuzione amministrativa e competente se non può essere eseguito immediatamente con ragione della situazione finanziaria della persona contro chi è diretto o un altro impedimento obiettivo. Di Articolo 278 § 2, esecuzione può essere posticipata pienamente per quattordici giorni, ed in parte per un massimo di due mesi. Di Articolo 278 § 3, la decisione di posticipare l'esecuzione o rifiutare di fare così non è soggetto a richiesta legale.
32. Con un'eccezione (veda.? ? 98 ?05.06.2012.? ?? ???. ?. ? 147/2012., ?-?, sostenne con.? ? 15346 ?04.12.2012.? ?? ???. ?. ? 9645/2012., ?II?.), le corti amministrative hanno rifiutato costantemente di esaminare simile richieste in relazione a procedimenti per l'esecuzione di ordini di demolizione (veda.? ? 2989 ?06.03.2009.? ?? ???. ?. ? 2480/2009., ?II?.;.? ? 3298 ?11.03.2009.? ?? ???. ?. ? 2921/2009., ?II?.;.? ? 3768 ?20.03.2009.? ?? ???. ?. ? 2481/2009., ?II?.;.? ? 12660 ?15.10.2012.? ?? ???. ?. ? 10151/2012., ?II?.;.? ? 13269 ?06.11.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 13375/2014., ?II?.;.? ? 14149 ?26.11.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 14120/2014., ?II?.;.? ? 149 ?08.01.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 15083/2014., ?II?.; e.? ? 965 ?27.01.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 12327/2014., ?II?.).
2. Contestando l'esecuzione di ordini di demolizione con modo di una rivendicazione per sentenza dichiaratoria
33. Con Articolo 292 del Codice, è possibile contestare l'esecuzione con modo una rivendicazione per una dichiarazione giudiziale sulla base di fatti nuovi che sono emersi dopo la decisione che è dovuta per essere eseguito.
34. Sotto la Corte amministrativa Suprema la causa-legge di ', essere riguardato come nuovo i fatti sono dovuti accadere dopo la chiusura dei procedimenti per controllo giurisdizionale dell'ordine di demolizione (veda.? ? 1317 ?02.02.2010.? ?? ???. ?. ? 11193/2009., ?II?.;.? ? 669 ?15.01.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 11464/2012., ?II?.; e.? ? 3285 ?10.03.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 14922/2013., ?II?.) o, se l'ordine non è stato contestato in simile procedimenti, il la chiusura dei procedimenti amministrativi che conducono alla sua uscita (veda.? ? 6059 ?08.05.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 248/2014., ?II?.). Che corte ha contenuto che l'errore del termine di prescrizione per esecuzione è un fatto nuovo (veda.? ? 9071 ?30.06.2010.? ?? ???. ?. ? 5508/2010., ?II?.;.? ? 2536 ?21.02.2012.? ?? ???. ?. ? 13701/2011., ?II?.;.? ? 3039 ?4.03.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 14984/2012., ?II?.;.? ? 8567 ?14.06.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 5906/2013., ?II?.;.? ? 3288 ?10.03.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 15163/2013., ?II?.;.? ? 6291 ?12.05.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 507/2014., ?II?.;.? ? 6973 ?26.05.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 859/2014., ?II?.;.? ? 7224 ?28.05.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 342/2014., ?II?.;.? ? 15428 ?17.12.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? 11539/2014., ?II?.; e.? ? 11888 ?10.11.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 6136/2015., ?II?.), siccome è il legalisation di un edificio con le autorità competenti (veda.? ? 944 ?27.01.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 8411/2014., ?II?.), ma che l'uscita di un certificato che un edificio può essere tollerato sotto le disposizioni di amnistia dell'Atto del 2001 (veda divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 sopra) non è (veda.? ? 6023 ?26.05.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 11540/2014., ?II?.).
3. Controllo giurisdizionale dell'esecuzione di ordini di demolizione
35. Di Articoli 294 et seq. del Codice, le decisioni, azioni od omissioni di un'autorità di esecuzione amministrativa è soggetto a controllo giurisdizionale con la corte amministrativa di primo-istanza competente all'istanza delle parti ai procedimenti di esecuzione o qualsiasi terze parti i cui diritti, le libertà o interessi legali sono stati colpiti con loro. Di Articolo 298 § 4, la sentenza della corte non è soggetto a ricorso.
36. La Corte amministrativa Suprema ha sostenuto che persone che non sono destinatari di un ordine di demolizione e di chi diritti di proprietà non sarebbero colpite con la sua esecuzione non è concesso per impugnare la sua esecuzione sotto quelle disposizioni (veda.? ? 7946 ?16.06.2009.? ?? ???. ?. ? 3935/2009., ?II?.). In una più recente causa la Corte amministrativa di Lovech trovata comunque, in una definitivo sentenza che persone che chiedono che l'esecuzione di un ordine di demolizione colpirebbe il loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 § 1 della Convenzione sono concessi per impugnare che esecuzione sotto Articolo 294 et seq. del Codice (veda.? ? 7 ?13.01.2016.? ?? ???. ?. ? 156/2015., ?-?).
37. In tre definitivo sentenze date in marzo e luglio 2013 e febbraio 2014 (.? ? 749 ?22.03.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 911/2013., ?-?;.? 1782 ?04.07.2013.? ?? ???. ?. ? 1650/2013., ?-?; e.? ? 929 ?17.04.2014.? ?? ???. ?. ? ? 911/2013., ?-?), la Corte amministrativa di Varna respinse rivendicazioni sotto Articolo 294 del Codice in relazione alla demolizione di un edificio che era i rivendicatori ' solamente casa. Esaminò la questione con riferimento al principio della proporzionalità, siccome custodito in Articolo 6 del Codice (veda paragrafo 27 sopra) ed Articolo 8 della Convenzione, ma sostenne che anche se l'edificio era i rivendicatori ' solamente casa, ancora era soggetto alla demolizione perché era illegale e perché c'era nessuna alternativa vuole dire di combattere costruzione illegale, mentre specialmente considerando che i rivendicatori avevano eretto di proposito l'edificio in una zona dove costruzione fu proibita. Qualsiasi argomenti relativo alla loro salute povera o mancanza di vuole dire era irrilevante. L'equilibrio fra gli interessi che competono era stato risolto al livello legislativo. Sostenendo altrimenti vorrebbe dire che edifici illegali abitarono con persone in salute povera o persone che non avevano nessun altro posto per vivere non poteva essere demolito che renderebbe regolamentazioni di edificio vano. I rivendicatori maneggiarono poi, sulla base degli stessi argomenti, ottenere la cessazione con le autorità di controllo di edificio dei procedimenti per l'esecuzione dell'ordine di demolizione. Comunque, in una definitivo sentenza di 22 giugno 2015 (.? ? 1399 ?22.06.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 1230/2015., ?-?), la Corte amministrativa di Varna, agendo facendo seguito ad una rivendicazione portata col Sofia l'Ufficio di Accusatore Urbano, dichiarò che cessazione privo di valore legale sulla base che aveva impermissibly già stato basato su argomenti esaminati e respinse in una definitivo sentenza.
38. In una definitivo sentenza di 6 marzo 2015 (.? ? 6 ?06.03.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 47/2015., ?-?), la Corte amministrativa di Haskovo respinse una rivendicazione sotto Articolo 294 del Codice in relazione alla demolizione di un edificio che era i rivendicatori ' solamente casa. Contenne che non potesse discutere i rivendicatori gli argomenti di ' relativo alla proporzionalità della demolizione perché loro non concernerono la legalità dell'esecuzione ma la legalità dell'ordine di demolizione che già era stato sostenuto in procedimenti di controllo giurisdizionale precedenti.
39. In due definitivo sentenze date a gennaio 2016 (.? ? 5 ?06.01.2016.? ?? ???. ?. ? 112/2015., ?-?, e.? ? 7 ?13.01.2016.? ?? ???. ?. ? 156/2015., ?-?), la Corte amministrativa di Lovech respinse rivendicazioni sotto Articolo 294 del Codice in relazione alla demolizione di edifici che erano i rivendicatori ' solamente casa. Come la Corte amministrativa di Varna e diversamente da Corte amministrativa di Haskovo, esaminò la questione con riferimento al principio della proporzionalità, siccome custodito in Articolo 6 del Codice (veda paragrafo 27 sopra) ed Articolo 8 della Convenzione, ma sostenne che anche se gli edifici erano i rivendicatori ' solamente casa, loro ancora erano soggetto alla demolizione perché loro erano illegali e perché c'era nessuna alternativa vuole dire di combattere costruzione illegale.
40. In quattro definitivo decisioni di 15 settembre 2015 (.? ? 995 ?15.09.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 705/2015., ?-?;.? ? 996 ?15.09.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 707/2015., ?-?;.? ? 997 ?15.09.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 708/2015., ?-?;.? ? 1002 ?15.09.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 706/2015., ?-?), la Corte amministrativa di Pazardzhik impose misure provvisorie in procedimenti sotto Articolo 294 del Codice relativo ad alloggi abitati con un numero delle famiglie di Roma sulla base che l'esecuzione immediata degli ordini per la loro demolizione avrebbe reso quelli senzatetto di famiglie. Comunque, quando esaminò più tardi le richieste legali sotto Articolo 294 del Codice sui loro meriti, la corte dichiarò i passi presi eseguire gli ordini di demolizione privo di valore legale sulla base che loro non erano stati presi con un'autorità competente (veda.? ? 599 ?13.10.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 708/2015., ?-?;.? ? 617 ?22.10.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 705/2015., ?-?;.? ? 624 ?23.10.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 707/2015.; e.? ? 728 ?10.12.2015.? ?? ???. ?. ? 706/2015., ?-?).
Prospettive di D. espressa col Difensore civile della Repubblica
41. Nel suo rapporto per 2012 (il collegamento), disse il Difensore civile della Repubblica, a p. 98, che era importante per le autorità di controllo di edificio per esercitare controllo preventivo di costruzione illegale, e che la demolizione era una misura estrema che potrebbe incorrere urto del principio della proporzionalità custodita in Articolo 6 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa. Questo era specialmente importante quando venne alla demolizione di un edificio che era una persona solamente casa.
42. Nel suo rapporto per 2013 (il collegamento), disse il Difensore civile, a pp. 92-93, che le autorità di controllo di edificio non esercitarono controllo preventivo e sufficiente di costruzione illegale e dovevano così spesso ricorrere alla misura più aspra: demolizione. Nella sua prospettiva, non era abbastanza garanzie che quando simile misure colpirebbero la casa sola della persona riguardata, suo o i suoi diritti sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione sarebbero rispettati.
43. Nel suo rapporto per 2014 (il collegamento), disse il Difensore civile, a p. 80, che lo scopo della legge era più per impedire costruzione illegale piuttosto che equo generalmente liquidi già esistendo edifici illegali. Lui reiterò il bisogno di eseguire controllo preventivo ed aderire al principio della proporzionalità sotto Articolo 6 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa quando misure di costruire controllo colpirono una persona solamente casa.
E. Previdenza parcella accordi fra avvocati e clienti
44. Con sezione 36(4) dell'Atto 2004 Decaduto, avvocati che le parcelle di ' possono essere convenute come una percentuale dell'interesse patrimoniale in questione nei procedimenti che dipendono dalla loro conseguenza, eccetto in cause penali e cause nelle quali la controversia non concerne interessi patrimoniali. Benché trovando che somme non retribuite dovuto sotto simile accordi non è recuperabile come costi, la Corte Suprema di Cassazione sostenne che simile accordi sono permessi fra avvocati e clienti (veda.? ???. ? 6 ?06.11.2013.? ?? ????. ?. ? 6/2012.,?). Le corti hanno lasciato spazio rivendicazioni con avvocati contro clienti a simile parcelle di previdenza (veda, per esempio.? ? 222 ?24.06.2014.? ?? ??. ?. ? 152/2014., ?-?, e.? o ?14.04.2015.? ?? ??. ?. ? 70677/2014., ?-?, sia definitivo).
LA LEGGE
IO. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 8 DI LA CONVENZIONE
45. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la demolizione dell'alloggio nella quale loro vivono sarebbe stata in violazione del loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa. Loro si appellarono finora su Articolo 8 della Convenzione che prevede in come attinente:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per... la sua casa...
2. Non ci sarà interferenza con un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto come è in conformità con la legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione di disturbo o incrimina, per la protezione di salute o morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
46. Il Governo presentò che la decisione che ordina la demolizione dell'alloggio nella quale i richiedenti vissero era legale. Era stato fatto una rassegna giudizialmente ed era stato sostenuto. Era anche necessario per la protezione della sicurezza pubblica. Le autorità nazionali avevano un margine ampio della valutazione per afferrare il problema di costruzione illegale. L'impossibilità per legalizzare edifici illegali era stata fissata in posto in prospettiva dell'interesse pubblico e forte per assicurare la sicurezza, igiene e l'estetica di costruzione. La demolizione di un edificio perché era stato eretto senza una licenza era una misura proporzionata richiesta in tutte le cause e non capace di essere evitato alla discrezione delle autorità di controllo di edificio. Quelle autorità avevano agito immediatamente quando informò dell'illegalità dell'alloggio abitata coi richiedenti, e non aveva tollerato per molto tempo una situazione illegale: i richiedenti avevano cominciato ad occupare l'alloggio al più primo in 2009 e la procedura di demolizione aveva cominciato nel 2011. I richiedenti avevano costruito l'alloggio che sa bene pieno che loro non avevano ottenuto la licenza richiesta. Tutti simile edifici, a meno che incorrendo l'amnistia di transizione sotto approvvigiona dell'Atto del 2001, era soggetto alla demolizione; le corti avevano chiesto in che punto nei richiedenti la causa di '. Le autorità avevano permesso il primo richiedente per fare commenti sulla demolizione intenzionale, e l'aveva invitata ad attenersi con l'ordine di demolizione di suo proprio accordo. In tanto quanto lei dibattè che lei non aveva nessun altro posto per vivere, doveva essere notato che dopo l'inizio dei procedimenti di demolizione, lei aveva donato un appartamento che lei ha posseduto in Burgas a giugno 2013, e che, benché le autorità non avessero un obbligo per fornire ai richiedenti che non appartennero ad un gruppo particolarmente vulnerabile alloggio alternativo, loro avevano esplorato la possibilità di stabilirli in un appartamento municipale. Il secondo richiedente era in ricevuta di una pensione sufficientemente alta ed il primo richiedente era in grado a lavoro. Loro potrebbero permettersi così di pagare mercato affittato in Sinemorets, e le loro circostanze personali non erano come atroce come loro cercarono di dipingerli. Le autorità avevano endeavoured per prendere tutte queste questioni in conto quando spedendo un lavoratore sociale per intervistare il primo richiedente. Era ugualmente possibile avere la proporzionalità della demolizione fatto una rassegna in procedimenti sotto Articolo 278 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa. L'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' per rispettare per la loro casa era perciò proporzionato. Articolo 8 della Convenzione non si poteva costruire siccome precludendo l'esecuzione delle regolamentazioni di edificio in riguardo di quelli che cercarono di schernirli, o siccome costringendo le autorità a fornire a persone nei richiedenti la situazione di ' un posto vivere.
47. I richiedenti presentarono che loro avevano vissuto nell'alloggio imperturbato per quasi sette anni, anche se le autorità locali erano completamente consapevoli che era stato costruito senza una licenza, siccome i richiedenti avevano pagato tasse in riguardo dell'alloggio ed avevano avuto la loro registrazione di indirizzo là, e siccome Sinemorets era un piccolo villaggio. Si seppe inoltre estesamente che molti edifici in villaggi e le piccole città in Bulgaria erano stati costruiti senza una licenza. Il Difensore civile della Repubblica aveva fatto commenti su che, dicendo che le autorità non combatterono costruzione sistematicamente illegale e dovevano fare così pre-emptively piuttosto che ex facto del posto. Nonostante che raccomandazione, il modo solo di trattare con edifici illegali previsto con la legge era la loro demolizione. I richiedenti erano particolarmente vulnerabile perché il secondo richiedente fu handicappato ed aveva una piccola pensione, ed il primo richiedente era inutilizzato dal 2003. L'illegalità sola che colpisce l'alloggio era che era stato costruito senza una licenza; si attenne altrimenti pienamente con le regolamentazioni applicabili. L'interesse pubblico non richiese la sua demolizione che darebbe luogo al rendere due persone anziane con senzatetto di problemi di salute. Gli articoli che governano la demolizione di edifici costruirono senza una licenza, siccome interpretato con la Corte amministrativa Suprema, non preveda qualsiasi valutazione di proporzionalità o una procedura che riconoscono garanzie corrette in che riguardo, e non lasciò qualsiasi la discrezione alle autorità competenti che furono costrette ad eseguirli nonostante circostanze individuali.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Ammissibilità
48. L'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione o inammissibile su altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
49. Benché solamente il primo richiedente abbia diritti all'alloggio, ambo i richiedenti hanno infatti visse in sé per un numero di anni (veda divide in paragrafi 8 e 11 sopra). È perciò “la casa” per sia di loro (veda, fra le altre autorità, Buckley c. il Regno Unito, 25 settembre 1996, § 54 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV; Prokopovich c. la Russia, n. 58255/00, §§ 36-39 ECHR 2004-XI (gli estratti); McCann c. il Regno Unito, n. 19009/04, § 46 ECHR 2008; Yordanova ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, n. 25446/06, §§ 102-03 24 aprile 2012; e Winterstein ed Altri c. la Francia, n. 27013/07, § 141 17 ottobre 2013), e l'ordine per la sua demolizione corrisponde ad un'interferenza col loro diritto per rispettare per che casa (veda, mutatis mutandis, ?osi ?c. Croatia, n. 28261/06, § 18 15 gennaio 2009; Yordanova ed Altri, citato sopra, § 104; e Winterstein ed Altri, citato sopra, § 143).
50. L'interferenza era legale. L'ordine di demolizione aveva una base legale e chiara in sezione 225(2)(2) dell'Organizzazione Territoriale Atto 2001 (veda divide in paragrafi 12 e 26 sopra). Fu sostenuto, mentre seguendo pienamente procedimenti di adversarial, con due livelli di corte (veda divide in paragrafi 14 e 16 sopra), e non c'è niente da suggerire che non era altrimenti “nella conformità con la legge” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione.
51. La Corte si soddisfa che la demolizione intraprenderebbe un scopo legittimo. Anche se il suo fine solo è assicurare l'attuazione effettiva del requisito regolatore che nessuno edificio può essere costruito senza licenza, si può riguardare siccome cercando di riattivare l'articolo di legge (veda, mutatis mutandis, Saliba c. il Malta, n. 4251/02, § 44 8 novembre 2005) che, nel contesto sotto esame, può essere considerato incorrendo sotto “prevenzione di disturbo” e siccome promuovendo il “benessere economico del paese.” Questo è particolarmente attinente per la Bulgaria, dove il problema di costruzione illegale sembra essere comune (veda divide in paragrafi 41-43 sopra).
52. Così, il problema saliente è se la demolizione sarebbe “necessario in una società democratica.” La causa sopporta somiglianza considerevole con cause riguardo allo sfratto di inquilini da alloggio pubblico su questo punto, (veda McCann, citato sopra; l'osi?, citato sopra; Pauli c. Croatia, n. 3572/06, 22 ottobre 2009; Kay ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, n. 37341/06, 21 settembre 2010; Kryvitska e Kryvitskyy c. l'Ucraina, n. 30856/03, 2 dicembre 2010; Igor Vasilchenko c. la Russia, n. 6571/04, 3 febbraio 2011; e Bjedov c. Croatia, n. 42150/09, 29 maggio 2012), e cause riguardo allo sfratto di occupanti da terra pubblicamente posseduta (veda Chapman c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 27238/95, ECHR 2001-io; Connors c. il Regno Unito, n. 66746/01, 27 maggio 2004; Yordanova ed Altri, citato sopra; Buckland c. il Regno Unito, n. 40060/08, 18 settembre 2012; e Winterstein ed Altri c. la Francia, n. 27013/07, 17 ottobre 2013). Un'analogia può essere dedotta anche prima con cause riguardo a sfratti da proprietà possedute coi richiedenti ma può essere persa con loro come un risultato di procedimenti civili portato con una persona privata, procedimenti civili portati con un organo pubblico o procedimenti di esecuzione di tassa (veda, rispettivamente, Zehentner c. l'Austria, n. 20082/02, 16 luglio 2009 (procedimenti portati con un creditore); Brežec c. Croatia, n. 7177/10, 18 luglio 2013 (procedimenti portati col vero proprietario dei locali); Gladysheva c. la Russia, n. 7097/10, 6 dicembre 2011 (procedimenti portati con un corpo municipale); e Rousk c. la Svezia, n. 27183/04, 25 luglio 2013 (procedimenti di esecuzione di tassa)).
53. Sotto la causa-legge ben stabilita della Corte, siccome esposto in quelle sentenze, la valutazione della necessità dell'interferenza in cause riguardo alla perdita della casa di uno per la promozione di un interesse pubblico non solo comporta problemi di sostanza ma anche una questione di procedura: se l'elaborazione decisionale era come per riconoscere riguardo dovuto agli interessi proteggè sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione (veda Connors, § 83; McCann, § 49; Kay ed Altri, § 67; Kryvitska e Kryvitskyy, § 44; e Yordanova ed Altri, § 118 (l'iii), tutti citarono sopra). Fin dalla perdita della casa di uno una forma più estrema di interferenza è col diritto per rispettare per la casa qualsiasi persona che rischia questo-se o non appartenendo ad un gruppo vulnerabile-debba in principio sia in grado avere la proporzionalità della misura determinato con un tribunale indipendente nella luce dei principi attinenti sotto che Articolo (veda, fra le altre autorità, McCann, § 50; l'osi?, § 22; Zehentner, § 59; Kay ed Altri, § 68; Buckland, § 65; e Rousk, § 137 tutti citarono sopra). I fattori probabile essere di prominenza in questo riguardo a, quando viene a costruzione illegale, è se o non la casa fu stabilita illegalmente, se o non le persone riguardate facevano così di proposito che in questione che è la natura e grado dell'illegalità, la natura precisa dell'interesse è chiesta cosa per essere protegguta con la demolizione, e se alloggio alternativo ed appropriato è disponibile alle persone colpite con la demolizione (veda Chapman, citato sopra, §§ 102-04). Un altro fattore potrebbe essere se ci sono modi meno gravi di trattare con la causa; il ruolo non è esauriente. Perciò, se la persona riguardasse contesta la proporzionalità dell'interferenza sulla base di simile argomenti, le corti devono esaminarli attentamente e ragioni adeguate e determinate in relazione a loro (veda Yordanova ed Altri, § 118 (l'iv) in multa, e Winterstein ed Altri, § 148 (?) in multa, sia citò sopra); l'interferenza non può essere riguardata come normalmente giustificato semplicemente perché la causa incorre un articolo formulato in termini generali ed assoluti sotto. La possibilità mera di ottenere controllo giurisdizionale della decisione amministrativa che provoca la perdita della casa non è così abbastanza; la persona riguardata deve essere in grado a richiesta che decisione sulla base che è sproporzionato in prospettiva di suo o le sue circostanze personali (veda McCann, §§ 51-55; l'osi?, §§ 21-23; e Kay ed Altri, § 69-74 tutti citarono sopra). Naturalmente, se in simile procedimenti le corti nazionali hanno riguardo ad a tutti i fattori attinenti e pesa gli interessi che competono in linea coi principi sopra-nelle altre parole, dove c'è nessuna ragione di dubitare la procedura seguita in una causa determinata-il margine della valutazione concesso a quelle corti sarà un ampio, in riconoscimento del fatto che loro sono messi meglio che una corte internazionale per valutare necessità locali e le condizioni, e la Corte sarà riluttante a gainsay la loro valutazione (veda Pinnock e Pedone c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 31673/11, §§ 28-34 24 settembre 2013).
54. La Corte non può confarsi con la posizione, espresse con delle corti amministrative bulgare che l'equilibrio fra i diritti di quelli che sostengono perdere le loro case e l'interesse pubblico per assicurare l'attuazione effettiva delle regolamentazioni di edificio può come un articolo in modo appropriato sia previsto con modo di un articolo assoluto che permette di nessuno eccezioni (veda divide in paragrafi 26 e 37 sopra). Tale approccio potrebbe essere subito sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che dà le autorità nazionali latitudine considerevole nel trattare con costruzione illegale (veda divide in paragrafi 73-76 sotto), o negli altri contesti (veda Difensori Animali Internazionali c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 48876/08, §§ 106-09 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti), con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Ma determinato che il diritto per rispettare per la casa di uno sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione tocca su problemi dell'importanza centrale all'integrità fisica e morale dell'individuo, mantenimento di relazioni con altri ed un posto fisso e sicuro nella comunità, l'esercizio di bilanciamento sotto che approvvigiona in cause dove l'interferenza consiste nella perdita di una persona solamente casa è di un ordine diverso, col particolare significato che allega alla misura dell'intrusione nella sfera personale di quelli riguardato (veda Connors, citato sopra, § 82). Questo può essere esaminato solamente causa con causa normalmente. Non c'è inoltre, prova che la legislatura bulgara ha dato la considerazione attiva a questo equilibrio, o che nell'optare per una vendita all'ingrosso piuttosto che una soluzione attentamente fatta il sarto sé ha preso in considerazione gli interessi protegguti sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione (veda, mutatis mutandis, Vallianatos ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], N. 29381/09 e 32684/09, § 89 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti), e contrappone, mutatis mutandis, Difensori Animali Internazionale, citato sopra, §§ 114-16). Sul contrario, il Difensore civile della Repubblica ha espresso ripetutamente preoccupazione in che riguardo a (veda divide in paragrafi 41-43 sopra).
55. Né la Corte può accettare il suggerimento che la possibilità per quelli ha concernito impugnare la demolizione delle loro case con riferimento ad Articolo 8 della Convenzione minerebbe il sistema di costruire controllo in Bulgaria seriamente (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). È vero che il rilasciamento di un articolo assoluto può comportare rischi dell'abuso, l'incertezza o l'arbitrarietà nella richiesta della legge, spesa, e ritardo. Ma può essere aspettatosi certamente che le autorità amministrative e competenti e le corti amministrative che di solito trattano con le varie rivendicazioni relativo alla demolizione di edifici illegali (veda divide in paragrafi 26, 27 34 e 37-39 sopra), e ha mostrò recentemente che loro possono esaminare simile rivendicazioni nella luce di Articolo 8 della Convenzione (veda paragrafo 30 sopra), sarà in grado afferrare quelli rischi, specialmente se loro sono assistiti in questo compito con parametri appropriati od orientamenti. Sarebbe solamente inoltre, in cause eccezionali che quelli hanno concernito succederebbe nell'avanzare una rivendicazione difendibile che la demolizione sarebbe sproporzionata nelle loro particolari circostanze (veda, mutatis mutandis, McCann § 54; Pauli?, § 43; e Bjedov, § 67 tutti citarono sopra).
56. I procedimenti condotti in questa causa non soddisfecero i requisiti procedurali e summenzionati, come esponga fuori in paragrafo 53. Il fuoco intero di quelli procedimenti nel quale il primo richiedente chiese controllo giurisdizionale dell'ordine di demolizione-il secondo richiedente, non avendo qualsiasi diritti di proprietà sull'alloggio e non essendo un destinatario dell'ordine, non avrebbe avuto sostenendo anche prendere parte in loro (veda paragrafo 26 in multa sopra)-era se l'alloggio era stato costruito senza una licenza e se era ciononostante esente dalla demolizione perché incorse all'interno dell'amnistia di transizione approvvigiona dello statuto attinente (veda divide in paragrafi 14 e 16 sopra). Nel suo ricorso, il primo richiedente sollevò, benché brevemente, i punti che i richiedenti ora hanno fissato di fronte alla Corte: che l'alloggio era alla sua casa sola e che lei sarebbe colpita severamente con la sua demolizione (veda paragrafo 15 sopra). La Corte amministrativa Suprema non menzionò anche, affitti da solo effettivamente impegni con questo punto (veda, mutatis mutandis, Brežec citato sopra, § 49). Questo non è proprio sorprendente, come sotto legge bulgara non è attinente per la legalità dell'ordine di demolizione. Sotto le disposizioni legali ed applicabili, siccome costruito con la Corte amministrativa Suprema qualsiasi costruendo costruì senza una licenza è soggetto alla demolizione, a meno che incorre le disposizioni di amnistia di transizione dell'Atto del 2001 sotto, e non è aperto alle autorità amministrative per frenarsi dal demolirlo sulla base che questo provocherebbe danno sproporzionato a quelli colpì con che misura (veda divide in paragrafi 25-27 sopra).
57. La possibilità, si riferì a col Governo (veda divide in paragrafi 46 sopra e 78 sotto), chiedere proroga dell'esecuzione dell'ordine di demolizione sotto Articolo 278 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa (veda paragrafo 31 sopra) non poteva rimediare a che (veda, mutatis mutandis, Pauli?, § 44, e Bjedov, § 71, sia citò sopra). Tutti i richiedenti avrebbero potuto ottenere in procedimenti sotto che approvvigiona-quali sono condotti solamente di fronte all'autorità di esecuzione amministrativa piuttosto che un tribunale indipendente, senza possibilità per controllo giurisdizionale delle decisioni preso nel loro corso-sarebbe stato una proroga provvisoria dagli effetti della demolizione ordini piuttosto che un esame comprensivo della sua proporzionalità (veda paragrafo 32 sopra).
58. Né sembra che, siccome suggerito con la Corte amministrativa Suprema nella sua sentenza di 1 giugno 2015 in una causa simile (veda paragrafo 30 sopra), sarebbe stato possibile, siccome banco di questioni, ottenere un esame corretto della proporzionalità della demolizione con chiedendo controllo giurisdizionale dell'esecuzione dell'ordine di demolizione sotto Articolo 294 et seq. del Codice del 2006 (veda paragrafo 35 sopra). Simile esame poteva in principio sia eseguito in procedimenti per controllo giurisdizionale di esecuzione (veda J.L. c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 66387/10, §§ 44-46 30 settembre 2014). Ma la causa-legge sotto questi show di disposizioni che le corti amministrative bulgare declinano esaminare argomenti relativo alla situazione individuale delle persone generalmente riguardati con la demolizione. Loro così o fanno sulla base che l'equilibrio corretto fra i loro diritti sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed il countervailing interesse pubblico per combattere costruzione illegale è stato risolto al livello legislativo e che la demolizione è il solo vuole dire di attrezzatura costruzione illegale, o che simile punti possono essere esaminati solamente in procedimenti per controllo giurisdizionale dell'ordine di demolizione stesso (veda divide in paragrafi 37-39 sopra). La corte sola che sembra avere mostrato della buona volontà per accogliere simile argomenti in procedimenti sotto Articolo 294 et seq. del Codice la Corte amministrativa di Pazardzhik che comunque faceva è così quando imponendo misure provvisorie in simile procedimenti piuttosto che quando trattando coi meriti delle cause (veda paragrafo 40 sopra). È anche poco chiaro se persone nella posizione del secondo richiedente che non è il destinatario dell'ordine di demolizione e non ha diritti di proprietà sull'alloggio, avrebbe sostenendo portare tale richiesta (veda paragrafo 36 sopra).
59. I richiedenti non potevano ottenere un esame corretto della proporzionalità della demolizione con portando una rivendicazione per sentenza dichiaratoria sotto Articolo 292 del Codice del 2006 uno (veda paragrafo 33 sopra). La causa-legge sotto che disposizione che si intende solamente che ostacoli l'esecuzione di decisioni amministrative, dove di recente emerse fatti militano contro sé, show che in simile procedimenti le corti amministrative bulgare controllo equo se fatti che sono venuti a passare dopo l'uscita o la demolizione ordina o il suo sostenendo con le corti-come un errore del termine di prescrizione per esecuzione o un legalisation che s'interpone dell'edificio-potrebbe precludere esecuzione (veda paragrafo 34 sopra). Sembra non essere nessuna causa nella quale le corti hanno concesso tale rivendicazione, e così rese impraticabile l'esecuzione di un ordine di demolizione, sulla base di argomenti relativo alle circostanze personali di quelli riguardate. Inoltre, nei richiedenti la causa di ' i procedimenti di esecuzione cominciarono meno che un mese dopo che l'ordine di demolizione fu sostenuto con le corti (veda divide in paragrafi 16 e 17 sopra).
60. Il coinvolgimento dei servizi sociali che solamente accaddero dopo avviso della richiesta era stato dato al Governo (veda paragrafo 21 sopra), non poteva rendere buono la mancanza di una valutazione di proporzionalità corretta. Non succedè all'interno della struttura di una procedura capace di dare luogo ad una revisione comprensiva della proporzionalità della demolizione (veda, mutatis mutandis, Yordanova ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 136-37). In qualsiasi l'evento, anche se il primo richiedente affermò che lei non fu interessata in servizi sociali, il Governo enfatizzò che le autorità non avevano nessun obbligo per fornire ai richiedenti alloggio alternativo e non spiegarono chiaramente in che modo al quale quelli servizi avrebbero fornito una soluzione soddisfacente i richiedenti.
61. In somma, i richiedenti non avevano alla loro disposizione una procedura che li abilita per ottenere una revisione corretta della proporzionalità della demolizione intenzionale dell'alloggio nella quale loro vivono nella luce delle loro circostanze personali.
62. La Corte perciò costatazione che ci sarebbe una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione se l'ordine per la demolizione dell'alloggio nella quale i richiedenti vivono fosse eseguito senza simile revisione.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1
63. Il primo richiedente si lamentò inoltre che la demolizione dell'alloggio, parte di che appartenne a lei, sarebbe un'interferenza sproporzionata col godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Lei si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che prevede siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
64. Il Governo presentò che l'azione di reclamo era ratione personae incompatibile con le disposizioni di Protocollo N.ro 1 in finora come il secondo richiedente riguardò, perché solamente il primo richiedente aveva titolo all'alloggio. Inoltre, in tanto quanto l'alloggio era stato costruito illegalmente senza essere tollerato per molto tempo con le autorità, non poteva essere riguardato come un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Nell'alternativa, il Governo presentò, che l'interferenza con le proprietà del primo richiedente fu giustificata. La demolizione che era una misura di controllo di proprietà era legale e non imporrebbe un carico eccessivo sui richiedenti come la loro situazione finanziaria, come evidente dalle operazioni di disposizione di proprietà eseguite con loro, non era così atroce, e siccome loro avevano wilfully agì in sfida della legge. L'alloggio non appartenne esclusivamente inoltre, al primo richiedente; gli altri coproprietari dell'area furono concessi ad una quota di sé, ed alcuni di loro avevano obiettato alla sua costruzione. Lo scopo legittimo cercato di essere realizzato con la demolizione era eseguire le regolamentazioni di edificio che richiesero di recente una licenza per ognuno costruite edificio. Nel costruire l'alloggio senza una licenza, i richiedenti avevano agito di proposito in violazione della legge ed avevano trascurato gli altri coproprietari gli interessi di '.
65. I richiedenti presentarono che l'azione di reclamo era stata sollevata solamente col primo richiedente che aveva diritti sull'alloggio anche se era stato costruito illegalmente. Era perciò un “la proprietà.” Nulla sarebbe realizzato con demolendolo. Non trarrebbe profitto gli altri coproprietari dell'area che non aveva visualizzato nessun desiderio per prendersi cura della proprietà e di chi interessi si notificherebbero meglio se loro fossero assegnati una quota dell'alloggio. Né lo può avanzi l'interesse pubblico che potrebbe essere rivendicato con meno invasive misura, come una sanzione penale finanziaria. I richiedenti avevano costruito l'alloggio per avere un posto per vivere quando loro crebbero vecchio. Il primo richiedente si era avvicinato uno degli altri coproprietari ad ottenere il suo assenso alla costruzione nel 2005, ma lui aveva provato a stretta un importo sproporzionato di soldi di lei in cambio per quel. Quel era perché i richiedenti avevano proceduto con la costruzione senza ottenere una licenza.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Sfera del personae di ratione di azione di reclamo
66. Dovrebbe essere notato all'inizio che questa azione di reclamo è stata sollevata solamente col primo richiedente. Non è perciò necessario per decidere sull'eccezione del Governo in relazione al secondo richiedente.
2. Ammissibilità
67. Le parti hanno divergendo prospettive su se il primo richiedente ha un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1 e se che disposizione è così applicabile. Ma in questa causa è più appropriato per esaminare questa questione sui meriti (veda, mutatis mutandis, Depalle c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 34044/02, 29 aprile 2008, e Yordanova ed Altri c. la Bulgaria (il dec.), n. 25446/06, 14 settembre 2010). L'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione o inammissibile su altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
3. Meriti
68. Da allora in Bulgaria è stabilito legge che edifici illegali possono essere gli oggetti del diritto a proprietà, e fin dal Burgas Corte Regionale sostenne che il primo richiedente è il proprietario di 484.43 fuori del 625 quote di sia l'area e l'alloggio costruirono su sé (veda paragrafo 9 sopra), ci può essere senza dubbio che lei ha un “la proprietà” e che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile.
69. La demolizione intenzionale della volontà di alloggio a turno importo ad un'interferenza con le proprietà del primo richiedente (veda Allard c. la Svezia, n. 35179/97, § 50, ECHR 2003-VII, e Hamer c. il Belgio, n. 21861/03, § 77 il 2007-V di ECHR (gli estratti)). Essendo voluto dire assicurare ottemperanza con gli articoli generali riguardo alle proibizioni su costruzione, questa interferenza corrisponde un “controlli [di] l'uso di proprietà” (veda Hamer, citato sopra, § 77, e Saliba, citato sopra, § 35). Incorre perciò essere esaminato sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
70. L'ordine di demolizione aveva una base legale e chiara in sezione 225(2)(2) dell'Organizzazione Territoriale Atto 2001 (veda divide in paragrafi 12 e 26 sopra). Fu sostenuto, mentre seguendo pienamente procedimenti di adversarial, con due livelli di corte (veda divide in paragrafi 14 e 16 sopra). L'interferenza è perciò legale per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
71. Si può accettare anche che l'interferenza che cerca di assicurare ottemperanza con le regolamentazioni di edificio è “nella conformità con l'interesse generale” (veda Saliba, citato sopra, § 44). Allo stesso tempo, dovrebbe essere notato, che l'ordine di demolizione, benché il prodotto di una denunzia coi coproprietari del primo richiedente (veda paragrafo 11 sopra), non fu premesso sull'insuccesso del primo richiedente per ottenere il loro assenso per la costruzione dell'alloggio. Non può essere riguardato perciò come inteso di proteggere i loro interessi (il contrasto Allard, citato sopra, § 52). Segue che il peso di quegli interessi non è una considerazione pertinente in questa causa (il contrasto Allard, citato sopra, § 60).
72. Il problema saliente è se l'interferenza prevedrebbe un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse del primo richiedente tenere le sue proprietà intatto e l'interesse generale assicurare attuazione effettiva della proibizione contro costruendo senza una licenza.
73. Secondo la causa-legge fissa della Corte, il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere letto nella luce del principio esposta fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo: che un'interferenza ha bisogno di prevedere un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale della comunità ed i diritti dell'individuo. Questo vuole dire che una misura deve essere sia appropriato per realizzare il suo scopo e non sproporzionato a quello scopo (veda, fra le altre autorità, James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 50 la Serie Un n. 98). Comunque, le Parti Contraenti ed Alte godono un margine della valutazione in questo riguardo, in particolare nello scegliere i mezzi di esecuzione e nell'accertare se le conseguenze di esecuzione sarebbero giustificate (veda, come una recente autorità, Depalle c. la Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 83 ECHR 2010). Quando viene all'attuazione della loro pianificazione spaziale e politiche di suolo edificatorio, questo margine è ampio (veda Saliba, citato sopra, § 45, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
74. Per che ragione, diversamente da Articolo 8 della Convenzione Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non fa in simile cause presupponga la disponibilità di una procedura che richiede una valutazione individualizzata della necessità di ogni misura di attuazione degli articoli di pianificazione attinenti. Non è contrario al secondo per la legislatura a posi in giù categorie larghe e generali piuttosto che preveda per un schema da che cosa la proporzionalità di una misura di attuazione sarà esaminata in ogni causa individuale (veda James ed Altri, citato sopra, § 68, ed Allen ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 5591/07, § 66 6 ottobre 2009). Non c'è incongruenza in questo, come l'intensità degli interessi protegguta sotto quelli due Articoli ed il margine risultante della valutazione godè con le autorità nazionali sotto ognuno di loro, non è necessariamente co-esteso (veda Connors, citato sopra, § 82). Così, benché la Corte abbia in delle cause valutato la proporzionalità di una misura sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nella luce di grandemente gli stessi fattori come quelli che ha preso in considerazione sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione (veda Zehentner, §§ 52-65 e 70-79; Gladysheva, §§ 64-83 e 90-97; e Rousk, §§ 108-27 e 134-42, tutti citarono sopra, così come Demades c. la Turchia, n. 16219/90, §§ 36-37 e 44 46, 31 luglio 2003), questa valutazione non è inevitabilmente identica in tutte le circostanze.
75. Nella causa del primo richiedente, l'alloggio fu costruito di proposito senza una licenza (il contrasto N.A. ed Altri c. la Turchia, n. 37451/97, § 39 in multa, ECHR 2005-X, e Depalle citato sopra, § 85), e perciò in violazione flagrante delle regolamentazioni di edificio nazionali. In questa causa, nonostante i chiarimenti che il primo richiedente ha dato per questo insuccesso questo può essere considerato una considerazione cruciale sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. L'ordine che l'alloggio sia demolito che fu emesso un termine ragionevole dopo la sua costruzione (il contrasto Hamer, citato sopra, § 83), semplicemente cerca di mettere di nuovo cose nella posizione nella quale loro sarebbero stati se il primo richiedente non avesse trascurato i requisiti della legge. L'ordine e la sua esecuzione notificheranno anche impedire gli altri delinquenti potenziali (veda Saliba, citato sopra, § 46) che non deve essere scontato in prospettiva del pervasiveness evidente del problema di costruzione illegale in Bulgaria (veda divide in paragrafi 41-43 sopra). In prospettiva del margine ampio di valutazione che le autorità bulgare godono sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nello scegliere sia i mezzi di esecuzione e nell'accertare se le conseguenze di esecuzione sarebbero giustificate, nessune delle considerazioni sopra può essere vinto con l'interesse di proprietà riservato del primo richiedente nell'alloggio.
76. L'attuazione dell'ordine di demolizione non sarebbe perciò in violazione dei diritti del primo richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 13 Di La Convenzione
77. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro non avevano una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva in riguardo della loro azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede siccome segue:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
78. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti avessero potuto chiedere proroga dell'esecuzione dell'ordine di demolizione sotto Articolo 278 del Codice di Procedura 2006 Amministrativa sulla base di argomenti relativo alla loro situazione finanziaria e l'impossibilità ottenere alloggio alternativo. Quel non volle dire chiaramente che le autorità avevano un obbligo incondizionato per offrirloro simile alloggio. Che detto, non c'era prova che i richiedenti avevano preso passi per essere stabiliti in un appartamento municipale.
79. I richiedenti presentarono che una richiesta sotto Articolo 278 del Codice del 2006 non era una via di ricorso effettiva. Tutte che potrebbe realizzare erano una proroga breve dell'esecuzione. La legge non previde qualsiasi modo di trattare con costruzione illegale altro che la sua demolizione, nonostante il grado o natura dell'illegalità o gli effetti della misura sulla situazione personale di quelli colpita con sé.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
80. L'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione o inammissibile su altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
81. Comunque, in tanto quanto la sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione fu premesso sull'assenza di una procedura nella quale i richiedenti potrebbero impugnare la demolizione dell'alloggio su proporzionalità incaglia (veda divide in paragrafi 56-61 sopra), nessun problema separato deriva Articolo 13 della Convenzione sotto (veda, mutatis mutandis, Stanková c. la Slovacchia, n. 7205/02, § 67, 9 ottobre 2007, e Yordanova ed Altri, citato sopra, § 152).
IV. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
82. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
83. I richiedenti chiesero congiuntamente 2,000 euros (EUR) in riguardo dell'angoscia esperimentato con loro come un risultato delle violazioni allegato di Articoli 8 e 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
84. Il Governo presentò che la rivendicazione era esorbitante.
85. In questa causa, l'assegnazione del risarcimento può essere basata solamente sulla violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Comunque, che violazione avrà solamente luogo se la decisione che ordina la demolizione dell'alloggio nella quale i richiedenti vivono fosse eseguita che ha per l'essere di tempo non accadde (veda paragrafo 22 sopra). La sentenza di una violazione è perciò soddisfazione equa e sufficiente per qualsiasi danno non-patrimoniale subì coi richiedenti (veda Yordanova ed Altri, citato sopra, § 171).
Costi di B. e spese
86. I richiedenti chiesero EUR 3,280 in riguardo di quarantun ore di lavoro col loro rappresentante legale sui procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, accreditata ad EUR 80 per ora più EUR 13.73 per affrancatura. Loro richiesero che qualsiasi assegnazione resa sotto questo capo sia resa pagabile al BHC col quale lavorò il loro rappresentante legale (veda paragrafo 2 sopra). In appoggio di questa rivendicazione, i richiedenti presentarono due accordi fra loro, il loro rappresentante legale ed il BHC nei quali fu convenuto che i richiedenti non dovevano pagare qualsiasi rimunerazione alla loro su-fronte rappresentativa ma che il rappresentante chiederebbe le sue parcelle, più qualsiasi spese relative, nell'evento di una conseguenza riuscita della causa; che, nell'evento di una conseguenza riuscita, le parcelle possono, infatti sia pagato col BHC; e che il rappresentante concordò che qualsiasi assegnazione in riguardo di costi e spese potrebbe essere resa pagabile al BHC. I richiedenti presentarono anche un tempo-strato e ricevute postali.
87. Il Governo contestò il numero di ore speso coi richiedenti il rappresentante legale di ' sulla causa, dicendo che loro erano eccessivi in prospettiva della sua complessità bassa e la lunghezza delle osservazioni che lei aveva reso sui richiedenti il conto di '. La somma affermò in che riguardo era molte volte più alto che quelli previdero per lavoro simile in procedimenti nazionali e fuori del motivo con realtà economiche nel paese. Il Governo indicò anche che non c'era nessuna prova, come una fattura o un documento di pagamento mostrando che il BHC davvero aveva pagato qualsiasi rimunerazione ai richiedenti il rappresentante di '.
88. Secondo la causa-legge fissa della Corte, costi e spese sono recuperabili sotto Articolo 41 della Convenzione se è stabilito che loro davvero e necessariamente erano incorsi in e sono ragionevoli come a quantum.
89. Il primo punto in controversia era se i costi chiesero coi richiedenti davvero fu incorso in. I richiedenti fecero un accordo col loro rappresentante ed il BHC che sono comparabili ad un accordo di parcella di previdenza da che cosa un cliente è d'accordo a rimunerare solamente il suo avvocato nell'evento di una conseguenza riuscita della causa. Se giuridicamente esecutivo, simile accordi possono mostrare che le somme chieste sono pagabili e perciò davvero incorsero in (veda Kamasinski c. l'Austria, 19 dicembre 1989, § 115 la Serie Un n. 168). Questo che è la causa in Bulgaria (veda paragrafo 44 sopra, e compari Saghatelyan c. l'Armenia, n. 7984/06, § 62, 20 ottobre 2015, e contrasto Dudgeon c. il Regno Unito (Articolo 50), 24 febbraio 1983, § 22 la Serie Un n. 59, e Pshenichnyy c. la Russia, n. 30422/03, § 38 14 febbraio 2008), la Corte accetta che i costi chiesti davvero furono incorsi in coi richiedenti, anche se per l'essere di tempo nessuno pagamenti hanno avuto luogo.
90. Il secondo contestò punto era se i costi erano ragionevoli come a quantum. La Corte non è legata con scale nazionali o standard in che valutazione (veda Dimitrov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, n. 77938/11, § 190, 1 luglio 2014 con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Nota semplicemente che il tasso orario accusò coi richiedenti il rappresentante di ' è comparabile a quel accusò in una recente causa contro Bulgaria che comporta problemi simili (veda Yordanova ed Altri, citato sopra, § 172). Può essere riguardato così come ragionevole. Comunque, avendo riguardo ad alle osservazioni rese in favore dei richiedenti, i costatazione di Corte che il numero di ore ha chiesto sono eccessivi.
91. Prendendo in considerazione tutti questi punti ed i materiali nella sua proprietà, la Corte assegna un totale di EUR 2,013.73 i richiedenti, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico di loro.
92. Siccome richiesto coi richiedenti, questa somma sarà pagata direttamente al BHC con cui i loro lavori rappresentativi. La pratica della Corte è stata acconsentire a simile richieste (veda Neshkov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 36925/10, 21487/12, 72893/12 73196/12, 77718/12 e 9717/13 § 309, 27 gennaio 2015 con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
Interesse di mora di C.
93. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE,
1. Dichiara, unanimamente, la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno, che ci sarebbe una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione se l'ordine per la demolizione dell'alloggio nella quale i richiedenti vivono fosse eseguito senza una revisione corretta della sua proporzionalità nella luce dei richiedenti ' circostanze personali;

3. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non ci sarebbe nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 se l'ordine per la demolizione dell'alloggio fosse eseguito;

4. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 13 della Convenzione;

5. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno,
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 2,013.73 (due mila tredici euros e settanta-tre cento), essere convertito nella valuta dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, in riguardo di costi e spese per essere pagato al Comitato di Helsinki bulgaro;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

6. Respinge, unanimamente, il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 21 aprile 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Angelika Nußberger
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudice Vehabovi è ?annessa a questa sentenza.
A.N.
C.W.

OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENDO DI GIUDICE VEHABOVI?
Io pento che io non sono capace di sottoscrivere alla prospettiva della maggioranza che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 in questa causa.
In breve, io non posso accettare l'approccio preso con la maggioranza che i richiedenti possono ottenere protezione sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione quando sembra dai fatti che uno dei richiedenti aveva un appartamento che fu donato solamente a sua figlia nel 2013 e che la terra sulla quale i richiedenti avevano ricostruito una cabina e l'avevano convertito nell'alloggio di mattone di un uno-piano solido senza qualsiasi permesso dalle autorità era la materia di una controversia di proprietà fra uno dei richiedenti e gli altri membri della sua famiglia.
Io non sono d'accordo con la maggioranza che lo Stato è obbligato in tutte le circostanze ad eseguire una revisione particolareggiata della proporzionalità di ognuno ed ogni demolizione ordini, anche in circostanze come questi nelle quali è chiaro che il secondo richiedente non può provare qualsiasi delle sue dichiarazioni e né lui può provare che o lui o lui ed il primo richiedente, avevano stabilito un durando da molto ed il collegamento forte coi locali in problema per essere considerato la loro casa all'interno della sfera di Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Inoltre, loro non potevano provare che loro avevano agito in buona fede.
Questa area è eccellenza di parità un'area dove lo Stato esegue leggi per controllare l'uso di proprietà nell'interesse pubblico (veda Depalle c. la Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 87 ECHR 2010) ed in che fa domanda un margine ampio della valutazione (l'ibid., § 84).
È duro immaginare le implicazioni per l'esecuzione di progettare regolamentazioni negli altri Stati se questa sentenza sarà capita siccome richiedendo una revisione di proporzionalità particolareggiata in ogni causa individuale. In questo collegamento la Corte, nella recente causa di Garib c. i Paesi Bassi (n. 43494/09, §§ 125-26, 23 febbraio 2016 non ancora definitivo), fondò che la parte rispondente era, in principio, concedè adottare la legislazione di alloggio interno-urbana ed attinente e politica. Nel trovare così, la Corte sembrò citare con approvazione l'esistenza di (e dimostrò affidamento su) una clausola di fatica.
Questa sentenza sufficientemente non distingue i fatti della causa presente dalle più prime cause riguardo all'esecuzione di ordini di demolizione per progettare reati che furono esaminati sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ed in che fu trovata nessuna violazione, notevolmente Hamer c. il Belgio (n. 21861/03, il 2007-V di ECHR (gli estratti)) che interessato un edificio in esistenza per ventisetti anni prima che il reato di pianificazione fosse registrato e per un ulteriori dieci anni prima che fosse demolito, ed il più recente (la Grande Camera) causa di Depalle (citò sopra) che interessato una casa di famiglia vicino una spiaggia pubblica che era in esistenza dal 1969 sulla base di auorizzazione limitò in tempo e quale cessò con la promulgazione di specifiche leggi di pianificazione litoranee che fanno seguire un ordine per demolire quale fu reso (nessun problema separato sotto Articolo 8).



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 11/05/2020.