Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF KAREN POGHOSYAN v. ARMENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 62356/09/2016
STATO: Armenia
DATA: 31/03/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions: Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings Article 6-1 - Access to court
Fair hearing) Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) Just satisfaction reserved (Article 41 - Just satisfaction)


FIRST SECTION






CASE OF KAREN POGHOSYAN v. ARMENIA

(Application no. 62356/09)












JUDGMENT
(Merits)


STRASBOURG

31 March 2016




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Karen Poghosyan v. Armenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, President,
Ledi Bianku,
Guido Raimondi,
Kristina Pardalos,
Aleš Pejchal,
Robert Spano,
Armen Harutyunyan, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 March 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 62356/09) against the Republic of Armenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Armenian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 18 November 2009.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Yerevan. The Armenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr G. Kostanyan, Representative of the Republic of Armenia at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the quashing of the final judgment of 8 June 2001 had violated the principle of legal certainty and his right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions.
4. On 14 May 2013 the complaints concerning the alleged violation of the principle of legal certainty and the interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions were communicated to the Government, and the remainder of the application was declared inadmissible.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1969 and lives in Yerevan.
6. In 1991 the applicant, without permission, constructed a building consisting of a shop/storage and an unfinished construction and measuring in total 500 sq. m., on a 1000 sq. m. plot of land situated in a suburb of Yerevan. The applicant alleged that this land was not being used by anyone so he had cleaned it and constructed the building using his own means. It appears that the applicant used this property for the following ten years.
7. In 2001 the applicant instituted special (non-contentious) proceedings in the Shengavit District Court of Yerevan seeking recognition of his ownership right in respect of that building by virtue of acquisitive prescription under Article 187 of the Civil Code (CC), as well as his right of use in respect of the plot of land.
8. On 8 June 2001 the Shengavit District Court decided to recognise the applicant’s ownership right in respect of the building and to leave the plot of land under his use. The District Court found that the building in question had no registered owners and the applicant had openly and in good faith had it in his possession and used it without interruption for over ten years, which entitled him to become its owner under Article 187 of the CC.
9. No appeal was lodged within the prescribed 15-day time-limit, so this judgment became final.
10. On 9 April 2002 a certificate was issued by the local branch of the State Real Estate Registry on the basis of this judgment, confirming the applicant’s ownership in respect of the building. The certificate further stated that, by virtue of Article 118 § 4 of the Land Code (LC), the applicant enjoyed a right of lease in respect of the plot of land for a period of 99 years.
11. On 20 May 2003 the applicant, pursuant to Article 118 § 7 of the LC, paid the cadastral value of the plot of land which amounted to AMD 1,465,500 Armenian drams (AMD).
12. On 22 May 2003 the applicant’s right of ownership was registered in respect of the plot of land and a relevant ownership certificate was issued.
13. The applicant regularly paid property tax on both the building and the plot of land in the following years.
14. On 27 July 2008 ? topographic examination of the land was carried out by a representative of “Townplanning” State Closed Joint-Stock Company founded by, and acting on behalf of, the Yerevan Mayor’s Office. The relevant diagram mentioned the applicant as the owner of the land in question.
15. On 11 November 2008, a third person addressed a letter to the Yerevan Mayor’s Office, stating that she had bought a plot of land at an auction held on 16 June 2008. When she later applied to the local branch of the State Real Estate Registry to have her ownership right registered, she was informed that the plot of land in question overlapped with the neighbouring plot of land. She requested that the auction be cancelled in its part concerning the overlapping part of the plot, the money paid for that part be returned and a new sale contract be concluded in respect of the remaining part of her plot.
16. The Government alleged that the neighbouring plot of land was the applicant’s and that following this letter there was an exchange of correspondence between the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the local branch of the Real Estate Registry.
17. On 24 February 2009 the local branch of the State Real Estate Registry addressed a letter to the Mayor’s Office stating, in reply to an inquiry by the Mayor dated 17 February 2009, that the registration of the applicant’s ownership and lease rights had been performed on 9 April 2002 on the basis of the judgment of the Shengavit District Court of Yerevan of 8 June 2001. This letter was received by the Mayor’s Office on 18 March 2009 and attached to it was a copy of the judgment of 8 June 2001.
18. On 7 May 2009 the Deputy Prosecutor General lodged an appeal against the judgment of 8 June 2001 seeking to quash it and to dismiss the applicant’s acquisitive prescription claim, arguing that the District Court had erred in its interpretation and application of the relevant provisions of the substantive law. The land had belonged to the State and hence had not been ownerless at the material time, so the District Court should not have applied the acquisitive prescription rules to the case. As a result, the judgment had damaged the State’s pecuniary interests. The Deputy Prosecutor General further argued that the District Court had been obliged to involve, as parties to the proceedings, the local branch of the Real Estate Registry, as well as the Yerevan Mayor’s Office as the authority vested with management of land. By failing to do so, and adopting a judgment affecting their rights in their absence, the District Court had also violated the procedural law. The Deputy Prosecutor General requested the Court of Appeal to restore the expired time-limit for appeal, arguing that the Yerevan Mayor’s Office had not been aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001 and therefore had been deprived of the possibility of lodging an appeal, while the Prosecutor’s Office had been informed about that judgment by the Mayor’s letter of 24 February 2009.
19. On 18 May 2009 the Yerevan Mayor’s Office also lodged an appeal against the judgment of 8 June 2001, raising similar substantive and procedural arguments. As regards the procedural issues, it claimed that the Shengavit District Court had violated the relevant provisions by examining the case through special proceedings and not involving it as a party, despite the fact that the Mayor’s Office was the authority vested with management of public land in Yerevan and therefore the judgment affected its rights. The Mayor’s Office further claimed that it had become aware of the contested judgment by a letter from the local branch of the State Real Estate Registry dated 24 February 2009, which had been received by the Mayor’s Office on 18 March 2009. It finally added that the letter of the Judicial Department of Armenia of 6 February 2009 had been accompanied by a copy of another judgment of the Shengavit District Court, dated 26 June 2001, which was unrelated to the present case.
20. On an unspecified date, the applicant lodged a reply to the appeals. He argued, inter alia, that on 20 May 2003 he had paid the cadastral value of the plot of land and bought it through direct sale. Furthermore, the fact that the Yerevan Mayor’s Office had been aware of his becoming the new owner of the plot of land was confirmed by the compulsory payments he had to make for that property. Thus, on the one hand, by virtue of Article 61 of the LC, the Yerevan Mayor’s office had alienated the plot of land to him, received a sum of money and since then had continued to levy property tax and, on the other hand, it now claimed to be unaware of that transaction. Moreover, the Yerevan Mayor’s Office had been notified of his becoming the new owner of the plot of land by virtue of the Law on the State Registration of Rights in Respect of Property. Hence, the Mayor’s Office had been aware of the registration of his property rights on the basis of the court judgment of 8 June 2001 and of the direct sale of the plot of land, and had not – as it claimed – become aware of that judgment from a letter of 24 February 2009.
21. On 12 June 2009 the Civil Court of Appeal decided, with reference to Article 207 § 5 of the Code of Civil Procedure (CCP), to admit the appeals, stating:
“The Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the General Prosecutor have missed the time limit for appeal prescribed by law and they submitted motions seeking to find this to be valid, arguing that the Mayor’s Office found out about the judgment [of 8 June 2001] from a copy of the judgment attached to the letter of the Judicial Department of Armenia of 6 February 2009, while the General Prosecutor’s Office from the letter of the Yerevan Mayor’s Office of 24 February 2009.
...
The court finds that the motions of the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the General Prosecutor’s Office are substantiated and must be granted.”
22. On 18 July 2009 the Civil Court of Appeal decided to grant the appeals, to quash the judgment of 8 June 2001 and to dismiss the applicant’s acquisitive prescription claim. The Court of Appeal found, in particular, that the Shengavit District Court had applied Articles 178 and 187 of the CC, which were not applicable to the case, and failed to apply Articles 168 and 188 of the CC, thereby reaching incorrect findings. The building in question was an unauthorised construction built on a plot of land belonging to the State. Hence, only the State could have acquired ownership rights in respect of that building.
23. The applicant lodged an appeal on points of law.
24. On 9 September 2009 the Court of Cassation decided to return the appeal as inadmissible for lack of merit.
25. Following these decisions, the authorities instituted proceedings against the applicant seeking annulment of registration of his ownership rights in respect of the building and the plot of land, which was granted by the courts.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Civil Code
26. Article 168 prescribes that property in respect of which the State enjoys the right of ownership is public property. Land and other natural resources which do not belong to individuals, legal persons or local communities are considered public property.
27. Article 178 § 1 prescribes that property is considered ownerless if it does not have an owner or if its owner is unknown or if its owner has renounced the right of ownership in respect of it. Article 178 § 3 prescribed at the material time that the right of ownership in respect of ownerless immovable property might be acquired by virtue of acquisitive prescription (Article 187). Article 178 § 4 prescribed at the material time that the grounds and procedure for recognition of the right of ownership in respect of ownerless property were established by the CCP.
28. Article 187 prescribes that an individual or a legal person, who is not the owner of an immovable property but who has in good faith, openly and continuously used it as his own property for ten years, shall acquire ownership of that property (acquisitive prescription).
29. Article 188 prescribes that an unauthorised construction is a house, a building, other construction or other immovable property built on a plot of land not allocated for that purpose under the law, or without the requisite permission, or with substantial violations of town-planning and building norms and rules. A person who has built an unauthorised construction shall not acquire a right of ownership in its respect. He has no right to possess the construction, including selling, donating, leasing or entering into any other agreements in its respect. The court may recognise the right of ownership in respect of an unauthorised construction of a person who owns the plot of land on which the construction was built.
B. The Code of Civil Procedure
30. Article 37 prescribes that the prosecutor is entitled to, and shall, institute court proceedings for the protection of pecuniary interests of the State.
31. Articles 186-188 prescribe the procedure for instituting special proceedings seeking to recognise property as ownerless. An applicant is required to submit evidence of being in possession of the property and the court, finding that the property is ownerless or that the owner has abandoned it without the intention of maintaining his right of ownership, shall adopt a judgment recognising the property as ownerless and transferring it under the ownership of the possessor.
32. Article 207 prescribed at the material time that an appeal against a judgment of the first instance court was to be lodged within fifteen days from the date of delivery of the judgment.
33. Article 207 § 5, following amendments introduced on 1 January 2008, prescribes that persons who were not involved as a party to the proceedings but whose rights and obligations were affected by a court judgment are entitled to bring an appeal within three months from the date on which they became aware, or ought to have become aware, of the adoption of that judgment, except when twenty years have passed since that judgment entered into force. Article 207 § 7 prescribes that an appeal against a judgment of the first instance court which has entered into force may be admitted for examination in exceptional cases when, during the previous examination of the case, gross violations of substantive or procedural law have taken place as a result of which the adopted judgment impairs the very essence of administration of justice or there exist newly discovered or new circumstances.
C. The Land Code (adopted on 2 May 2001 and entered into force on 15 June 2001)
34. Article 61 prescribes that the authority entrusted with alienation of public land in Yerevan is the Mayor of Yerevan.
35. Article 118 § 4 prescribes that a person who enjoyed a right of permanent or temporary use in respect of a plot of land prior to the adoption of this Code, shall acquire a right of lease in respect of that plot of land for a period prescribed by this Code. Article 118 § 7 prescribed at the material time that in cases prescribed by, inter alia, Article 118 § 4 the lessor of a plot of land, if he so wishes, may acquire a right of ownership by paying the full cadastral value of the plot of land. The invoice certifying the payment of the cadastral value shall serve as a basis for the registration of the right of ownership.
D. The Law on the State Registration of Rights in Respect of Property
36. Article 6 prescribes that rights and limitations registered in respect of a property have legal force, while all entities are considered to be notified of such registration, regardless of whether or not they are in fact aware of it.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
37. The applicant complained that the renewal of the time-limit for appeal and the subsequent quashing of the final judgment of 8 June 2001 had violated the principle of legal certainty and the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. He relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Article 6 § 1 of the Convention
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
38. The Court notes that these complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant
39. The applicant submitted that, by admitting the out-of-time appeals lodged by the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the Deputy Prosecutor General and consequently quashing the final judgment of 8 June 2001, the Civil Court of Appeal had violated the principle of legal certainty and deprived him of his possessions, namely the building and the plot of land. Both the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the Real Estate Registry, which had registered his property rights in respect of his property on the basis of that judgment, were public authorities. During all the years when he was considered the owner of the property he had regularly paid property taxes. On at least one occasion, namely on 29 July 2008, a representative of the Yerevan Mayor’s Office had performed a rectification of the borders of his plot of land. The Government alleged that the Yerevan Mayor’s Office had become aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001 by a letter from the local branch of the Real Estate Registry dated 24 February 2009, but in reality the Mayor’s Office had been aware of the applicant’s ownership rights much earlier.
40. In any event, since the Mayor’s Office was a public authority acting on behalf of the State, the question to be answered was whether the State had been aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001, which it was, because the State was a subject of civil law and all the actions taken by various public authorities, such as adopting that judgment, registering his rights, levying taxes and measuring the land, had been performed on behalf of the State. It was therefore unreasonable to claim that the Mayor’s Office had not been, and could have not been, aware of that judgment. Furthermore, the Government’s claim that the judgment had been reversed on the ground of gross violations of substantive and procedural law was erroneous, since the Civil Court of Appeal had not applied Article 207 § 7 of the CCP but Article 207 § 5, which specifically protected the rights of third parties. In any event, their argument that a substantive violation of the law justified the reopening of the case after eight years was incompatible with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. Lastly, the quashing of the final judgment had amounted to an unjustified interference with his property rights in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. As regards the alleged procedural violation of the law, the Shengavit District Court had been free to involve the Mayor’s Office as a party of its own motion, and the fact that it had failed to do so should not have had negative consequences for him and resulted in the quashing of the judgment in his favour after eight years.
(b) The Government
41. The Government submitted that there had been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention since the Court of Appeal had had sufficient reasons to admit the out-of-time appeals lodged by the Deputy Prosecutor General and the Mayor of Yerevan. Under the domestic law, land which was not in the ownership of physical or legal persons or the local communities belonged to the State, and it was the Mayor of Yerevan who was vested with the power to allocate land in Yerevan. Thus, the Shengavit District Court had been obliged to involve the Mayor of Yerevan as a party to the proceedings since the dispute concerned State property and affected the State’s ownership rights, which it had failed to do. The Deputy Prosecutor General also had the right to appeal against this judgment since under the Constitution he was entitled to act in cases where State interests were at stake. The Court of Appeal had found their motions seeking to restore the missed time-limit to be valid, since both authorities had become aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001 from a letter of the local branch of the Real Estate Registry of 24 February 2009 and had been entitled to appeal against it within three months, by virtue of Article 207 of the CCP. Thus, by admitting their out-of-time appeals and eventually quashing the judgment of 8 June 2001, the Court of Appeal sought to correct a gross procedural error which had impaired the very essence of administration of justice.
42. Furthermore, there had also been a gross substantive error, which the Court of Appeal sought to correct, since the Shengavit District Court had erred in its interpretation and application of the relevant domestic provisions. In particular, the District Court had applied Articles 178 and 187 of the CC which were not applicable to the case because the plot of land belonged to the State and therefore was not ownerless, while it ignored the requirements of Article 188 of the CC, which precluded the recognition of the right of ownership in respect of an unauthorised construction built on a plot of land not belonging to the person who had built it. In sum, there had been no violation of the principle of legal certainty. On the same grounds, there had been no unjustified interference with the applicant’s peaceful enjoyment of possessions guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
43. As regards the applicant’s arguments that the Mayor’s Office, acting on behalf of the State, had been aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001, first of all, property taxes were collected by the local authorities and not the Yerevan Mayor’s Office. Secondly, the rectification of the borders had been performed by an employee of a State Closed Joint-Stock Company founded by the Yerevan Mayor’s Office, and not the Mayor’s Office itself. Thirdly, all judgments in Armenia were adopted on behalf of the State and this did not mean that all the public authorities acting on behalf of the State were aware of all such judgments, unless they were specifically notified. Finally, the Real Estate Registry, when registering the applicant’s ownership rights, was not obliged to verify ex officio the lawfulness of the judgment presented by him. Hence, the registration of ownership rights could not be considered as proof that the Yerevan Mayor’s Office had been aware of the judgment.
2. The Court’s assessment
44. The Court reiterates that the right to a fair hearing before a tribunal as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which declares, among other things, the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States. One of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law is the principle of legal certainty, which requires, inter alia, that where the courts have finally determined an issue, their ruling should not be called into question (see Brum?rescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999 VII). Legal certainty presupposes respect for the principle of res judicata, that is the principle of the finality of judgments. This principle underlines that no party is entitled to seek a review of a final and binding judgment merely for the purpose of obtaining a rehearing and a fresh determination of the case. Higher courts’ power of review should be exercised to correct judicial errors and miscarriages of justice, but not to carry out a fresh examination. The review should not be treated as an appeal in disguise, and the mere possibility of there being two views on the subject is not a ground for re examination. A departure from that principle is justified only when made necessary by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character (see Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003-IX).
45. In the present case, the Court notes that, in admitting the out-of-time appeals lodged by the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the General Prosecutor, the Court of Appeal relied on Article 207 § 5 of the CCP which allowed a person, who had not been involved as a party to the proceedings but whose rights had been affected by a court judgment, to lodge an out-of-time appeal against that judgment within three months from the date on which he became aware or ought to have become aware of its adoption. It decided to accept the submissions of the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the General Prosecutor, arguing that they had become aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001 only in February 2009, and to admit for examination their appeals lodged in May 2009 (see paragraph 21 above), which eventually led to a fresh examination of the case and the quashing of the final judgment in the applicant’s favour (see paragraph 22 above).
46. Thus, the present case concerns not a review of the final and binding judgment through an extraordinary appeal or in the light of newly discovered circumstances (see, for example, Tregubenko v. Ukraine, no. 61333/00, §§ 34-38, 2 November 2004, and Pravednaya v. Russia, no. 69529/01, §§ 27-34, 18 November 2004), but the reopening of proceedings after a considerable lapse of time on the ground that an affected party had not been aware of them, which in essence amounted to renewing the time limit for an ordinary appeal. The Court has previously considered it appropriate to uphold the principle of legal certainty in a number of similar cases where this fundamental principle was undermined through the use of such procedural mechanisms as the extension or the renewal of the time limit for an ordinary appeal (see Ponomaryov v. Ukraine, no. 3236/03, §§ 41-42, 3 April 2008, and Bezrukovy v. Russia, no. 34616/02, §§ 33-44, 10 May 2012). The Court acknowledged – and found it reasonable – in those cases that the legal systems of many member States provide for a possibility to renew procedural time-limits if there are valid reasons to do so. At the same time, if the time-limit for ordinary appeal procedure is renewed after a considerable lapse of time and for reasons which do not appear to be particularly persuasive, such a decision can infringe the principle of legal certainty. While the renewal or the extension of the time limit for an ordinary appeal remains primarily within the domestic courts’ discretion, such discretion is not unlimited. The courts are required in every case to indicate the reasons for their decision, as well as to verify whether the reasons for renewal of a time-limit for appeal could justify the interference with the principle of res judicata, especially when the domestic legislation does not limit the courts’ discretion either on the time or on the grounds for the renewal of the time-limits (see Ponomaryov, cited above, and Bezrukovy, cited above). When the domestic law does not contain any prohibitive limit in this respect, an allegation of abusive renewal of the time-limit for an appeal against a final judgment calls for close supervision by the Court. Its task is to assess the particular circumstances of the case at hand and the manner in which the pertinent domestic regulations were actually applied (ibid., § 35).
47. The Court notes that Armenian law, namely Article 207 § 5 of the CCP which was applied in the present case, imposes a limit of twenty years for lodging an out-of-time appeal, while the time that had actually elapsed in the present case amounted to almost eight years which, in the Court’s opinion, is a particularly long period of time requiring special scrutiny. As for the grounds for admitting the out-of-time appeals, as already noted above, the Court of Appeal was motivated by the protection of the interests of a third party, in this case the State represented by the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the General Prosecutor’s Office, whose rights had been affected by the final judgment. The Court has previously found that the protection of the rights and interests of third persons is a legitimate consideration which may justify the quashing of a final and binding judgment. In particular, it found that there had been a “fundamental defect” justifying the reopening of proceedings if the impugned judgments had affected the rights and legal interests of a person who, like in the present case, had not been a party to the proceedings in question (see Protsenko v. Russia, no. 13151/04, §§ 29 34, 31 July 2008) or who had been unable to participate in them effectively (see Tishkevich v. Russia, no. 2202/05, §§ 25-27, 4 December 2008, and Tolstobrov v. Russia, no. 11612/05, §§ 18-20, 4 March 2010). The Court has no reasons to doubt that the rights of the State, which was not represented in the proceedings in question, were affected by the final judgment in the applicant’s favour, as interpreted by the Court of Appeal and not disputed by the applicant. It accepts that the reopening of proceedings on such a ground is in principle a legitimate consideration justifying a departure from the principle of legal certainty.
48. On the other hand, the Court is not convinced about the manner in which the relevant domestic provision was actually applied in the present case. It notes that the applicant disputed, both before the domestic courts and before the Court, the arguments advanced by the opponent parties in justification of such belatedly filed appeals and the merits of their allegations that these appeals complied with the requirements of Article 207 § 5 of the CCP. He contested, in particular, the allegation that the authorities acting on behalf of the State had become aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001 and its effects only after a delay of almost eight years. The Government disputed those arguments. The Court considers that it was for the domestic courts, notably the Court of Appeal, to address such questions, to examine and assess the evidence adduced and to establish that fact. It notes, however, that the Court of Appeal appears to have failed to carry out any examination of this issue and to address any of the applicant’s arguments in that respect, despite its controversial and disputable nature and despite what was at stake. It failed to provide any reasons whatsoever for its decision to accept the Mayor’s and the Deputy Prosecutor General’s submissions and to admit their appeals lodged almost eight years after the judgment had become final, its entire reasoning amounting to the mere finding that those submissions “were substantiated” (see paragraph 21 above).
49. Furthermore, not only did the Court of Appeal fail to provide any reasons for its decision, but it appears to have overlooked a number of crucial circumstances and made obviously incorrect statements. In particular, the Court of Appeal stated that the Mayor’s Office had claimed to have found out about the judgment of 8 June 2001 by a letter from the Judicial Department of Armenia of 6 February 2009, whereas the Mayor’s Office had argued something completely different, namely that it had become aware of that judgment by a letter from the local branch of the State Real Estate Registry of 24 February 2009 and had, moreover, specified in its appeal that the letter from the Judicial Department of Armenia of 6 February 2009 had been accompanied by a copy of another judgment of the Shengavit District Court which was unrelated to the applicant’s case (see paragraph 19 above). The Court of Appeal further failed to address the Deputy General Prosecutor’s claim that it had become aware of the judgment of 8 June 2001 from the Mayor’s letter of 24 February 2009, despite its being in direct contradiction with the Mayor’s argument of having been notified of that judgment only on 18 March 2009 (see paragraphs 18 and 19 above). Lastly, it failed to address in any way the question of when the authorities in question “ought to have become aware” of the adoption of the judgment of 8 June 2001, one of the conditions contained in Article 207 § 5 of the CCP which could be seen as providing an important additional safeguard against any abusive use of the right guaranteed under that Article.
50. The Court therefore concludes that the Court of Appeal has failed to comply with its duty to verify whether there were sufficient reasons justifying the admission of the out-of-time appeals after such a significant lapse of time, to carry out a thorough examination of such a serious issue and consequently to ensure a fair balance between the interests of the applicant and the need to ensure the proper administration of justice, which includes the interests of the third party. It considers that the principle of legal certainty – one of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law – is too important to be frustrated after such a significant lapse of time on the basis of such a perfunctory examination of the opposing interests at stake.
51. In view of the foregoing, the Court concludes that, by admitting the out-of-time appeals lodged by the Yerevan Mayor’s Office and the Deputy General Prosecutor against the judgment of the Shengavit District Court of 8 June 2001, the Civil Court of Appeal failed to provide reasons of a substantial and compelling character and thereby infringed the principle of legal certainty in violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
52. Turning to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court notes that the final judgment of 8 June 2001 recognised the applicant’s ownership in respect of the building. Furthermore, it recognised the applicant’s right of use in respect of the plot of land, which later served as a basis for the recognition of his right of lease and eventually entitling the applicant to become its owner, which he did on 22 May 2003. The subsequent quashing of that judgment deprived the applicant of these possessions and amounted to an interference with his right of property as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Brum?rescu, cited above, §§ 70 and 74). As the Court has already found that the final judgment had been reviewed in violation of the principle of legal certainty and that no fair balance had been struck between the public interest and the protection of the applicant’s rights, it follows that there has also been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that respect (see, mutatis mutandis, Margushin v. Russia, no. 11989/03, § 40, 1 April 2010, and Bezrukovy, cited above, § 45).
53. In sum, there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
54. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
55. The applicant claimed 92,000 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage, this being the market value of the property of which he had been deprived as a result of the quashing. In support of this claim, he submitted a letter from a real estate valuation company, which had visited the property and carried out an approximate valuation of its market value at 21 March 2014. The applicant further claimed EUR 2,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
56. The Government submitted that there was no causal link between the pecuniary damages sought and the violation alleged. In any event, under the domestic law the legal basis for any real estate valuation was a contract signed between the client and the valuation company, whereas the applicant had failed to submit a copy of such a contract. Furthermore, the law required that the results of any real estate valuation be formulated in a written document, namely a Valuation Report. Meanwhile, it was stated at the bottom of the letter submitted by the applicant that it did not amount to a valuation report but was of an advisory nature. This was in direct contradiction with the domestic law and raised doubts about its accuracy and reliability. As regards the applicant’s claim for non-pecuniary damages, this was to be dismissed because the applicant had failed to substantiate it and because there was similarly no causal link.
57. In the circumstances of the present case, the Court considers that, as far as the award of damages is concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. That question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed, having regard to any agreement which might be reached between the Government and the applicants (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
58. The applicant did not claim any costs and expenses. Accordingly, the Court does not make any award under this head.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaints concerning the alleged violation of the principle of legal certainty and the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions admissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision as far as the award of damages is concerned and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the amount of damages to be awarded to the applicant and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.

Done in English, and notified in writing on 31 March 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni: Violazione dell’Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - Accesso ad un tribunale Udienza corretta) Violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo della proprietà) soddisfazione Equa riservata (Articolo 41 - soddisfazione Equa)


PRIMA SEZIONE






CAUSA KAREN POGHOSYAN C. ARMENIA

(Richiesta n. 62356/09)












SENTENZA
( meriti)


STRASBOURG

31 marzo 2016




Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Karen Poghosyan c. Armenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Presidente
Ledi Bianku,
Guido Raimondi,
Kristina Pardalos,
Aleš Pejchal,
Robert Spano,
Armen Harutyunyan, giudici
ed André Wampach, Cancelliere di Sezione Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato 8 marzo 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 62356/09) contro la Repubblica dell'Armenia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino Armeno, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 18 novembre 2009.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato da OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica a Yerevan. Il Governo Armeno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. G. Kostanyan, Rappresentante della Repubblica dell'Armenia alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che gli annullare della definitivo sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 avevano violato il principio della certezza legale ed il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà.
4. Il14 maggio 2013 le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla violazione addotta del principio della certezza legale e l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo di proprietà furono comunicate al Governo, ed il resto della richiesta fu dichiarato inammissibile.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1969 e vive in Yerevan.
6. Nel 1991 il richiedente, senza permesso costruì un edificio consistente di un shop/magazzino ed una costruzione non finita e misurando in totale 500 metri quadrati., su un’area di terreno di 1000 metri quadrati situata in un sobborgo di Yerevan. Il richiedente addusse che questa terra non era usata da nessuno così lui l'aveva pulito ed aveva costruito l'edificio con i propri mezzi. Sembra che il richiedente usò questa proprietà per i seguenti dieci anni.
7. Nel 2001 il richiedente avviò (non-contenzioso) procedimenti speciali presso la Corte distrettuale di Shengavit di Yerevan chiedendo il riconoscimento del suo diritto di proprietà a riguardo di quella costruzione in virtù di prescrizione acquisitiva sotto l’Articolo 187 del Codice civile (CC), così come il suo diritto di uso a riguardo dell'area di terra.
8. 8 giugno 2001 la Corte distrettuale di Shengavit decise di riconoscere il diritto di proprietà del richiedente in riguardo dell'edificio e lasciare l'area di terra sotto il suo uso. La Corte distrettuale fondò che l'edificio in oggetto non aveva nessuno proprietari registrati ed il richiedente avuti apertamente ed in buon fede l'aveva nella sua proprietà e l'usò senza interruzione per più di dieci anni che lo diedero un titolo a per divenire il suo proprietario sotto Articolo 187 del CC.
9. Nessun ricorso fu depositato all'interno del tempo-limite di 15-giorno prescritto, così questa sentenza divenne definitivo.
10. 9 aprile 2002 un certificato fu emesso col ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobiliStatale sulla base di questa sentenza, mentre confermando la proprietà del richiedente in riguardo dell'edificio. Il certificato affermò inoltre che, con virtù di Articolo 118 § 4 del Terra Codice (LC), il richiedente godè un diritto di contratto d'affitto in riguardo dell'area di terra per un periodo di 99 anni.
11. In 20 maggio 2003 il richiedente, facendo seguito ad Articolo 118 § 7 del LC, pagato il valore catastale dell'area di terra che corrispose ad AMD 1,465,500 dracme Armene (AMD).
12. In 22 maggio 2003 che il diritto di proprietà del richiedente è stato registrato in riguardo dell'area di terra ed un certificato di proprietà attinente fu emesso.
13. Il richiedente regolarmente tassa di proprietà pagata su sia l'edificio e l'area di terra di anni seguenti.
14. Sul 2008 ?esame topografico di 27 luglio della terra fu portato fuori con un rappresentante di “Townplanning” Stato Chiuse Giuntura-scorta Società fondata con, ed agendo in favore di, l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan. Il diagramma attinente menzionò il richiedente come il proprietario della terra in oggetto.
15. 11 novembre 2008, un terza persona rivolse una lettera all'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan, mentre affermando che lei aveva comprato un'area di terra ad una vendita all'asta sostenuta 16 giugno 2008. Quando lei fece domanda più tardi al ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobiliStatale per avere il suo diritto di proprietà registrato, lei fu informata che l'area di terra in oggetto ricoprì con l'area di neighbouring di terra. Lei richiese che la vendita all'asta sia annullata nella sua parte riguardo alla parte di sovrapposizione dell'area, i soldi pagò per che parte sia ritornata ed un contratto di vendita nuovo sia concluso in riguardo della parte rimanente della sua area.
16. Il Governo addusse che gli appezzamenti vicini di terra erano del richiedente e che seguendo questa lettera c'era un cambio di corrispondenza fra l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan ed il ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobili.
17. 24 febbraio 2009 il ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobili Statale rivolse una lettera all'Ufficio affermando del Sindaco, in replica ad un'indagine del Sindaco 17 febbraio 2009 datò, che la registrazione della proprietà del richiedente e diritti di contratto d'affitto era stata compiuta 9 aprile 2002 sulla base della sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Shengavit di Yerevan di 8 giugno 2001. Questa lettera fu ricevuta con l'Ufficio del Sindaco 18 marzo 2009 ed attaccato a sé una copia della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 era.
18. In 7 maggio 2009 l'Accusatore Generale Aggiunto depositato un ricorso contro la sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 che chiede di annullarlo e respingere la prescrizione avida del richiedente afferma, mentre dibattendo che la Corte distrettuale aveva errato nella sua interpretazione e la richiesta delle disposizioni attinenti del diritto sostanziale. La terra aveva appartenuto allo Stato e da adesso non era stata ownerless al materiale calcoli, così la Corte distrettuale non avrebbe dovuto fare domanda la prescrizione avida decide alla causa. Di conseguenza, la sentenza aveva danneggiato gli interessi patrimoniali dello Stato. L'Accusatore Generale Aggiunto dibattè inoltre che la Corte distrettuale era stata obbligata a coinvolgere, come parti ai procedimenti il ramo locale della Beni immobili Cancelleria, così come l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan come l'autorità assegnato legalmente con gestione di terra. Con non riuscendo a fare così, ed adottando una sentenza che colpisce i loro diritti nella loro assenza, la Corte distrettuale aveva violato anche il diritto procedurale. L'Accusatore Generale Aggiunto richiese la Corte d'appello per ripristinare il tempo-limite scaduto per ricorso, mentre dibattendo che l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan non era stato consapevole della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 e perciò era stato privato della possibilità di depositare un ricorso, mentre l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore era stato informato di che sentenza con la lettera del Sindaco di 24 febbraio 2009.
19. In 18 maggio 2009 l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan depositò anche un ricorso contro la sentenza di 8 giugno 2001, mentre sollevando argomenti effettivi e procedurali simili. Come riguardi i problemi procedurali, affermò che la Corte distrettuale di Shengavit aveva violato le disposizioni attinenti con esaminando la causa per procedimenti speciali e non coinvolgendolo come una parte, nonostante il fatto che l'Ufficio del Sindaco era l'autorità assegnato legalmente con gestione di terra pubblica in Yerevan e perciò la sentenza colpì i suoi diritti. L'Ufficio del Sindaco chiese inoltre che era divenuto consapevole della sentenza contestata con una lettera dal ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobiliStatale datò 24 febbraio 2009 che era stato ricevuto con l'Ufficio del Sindaco 18 marzo 2009. Infine aggiunse che la lettera del Settore Giudiziale di Armenia di 6 febbraio 2009 era stata accompagnata con una copia di un'altra sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Shengavit, 26 giugno 2001 datato che era non correlato alla causa presente.
20. Su una data non specificata, il richiedente depositò una replica ai ricorsi. Lui dibattè, inter l'alia che in 20 maggio 2003 lui aveva pagato il valore catastale dell'area di terra e l'aveva comprato per vendita diretta. Inoltre, il fatto che l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan era stato consapevole del suo divenire il proprietario nuovo dell'area di terra fu confermato coi pagamenti obbligatori lui doveva rendere per quel la proprietà. Sulla mano del una, con virtù di Articolo 61 del LC l'ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan aveva alienato così, l'area di terra a lui, ricevette una somma di soldi e da allora poi aveva continuato ad imporre tassa di proprietà e, d'altra parte ora chiese di non sapere di quel l'operazione. Inoltre, l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan era stato notificato del suo divenire il proprietario nuovo dell'area di terra con virtù della Legge sulla Registrazione Statale di Diritti in Riguardo di Proprietà. Da adesso, l'Ufficio del Sindaco era stato consapevole della registrazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà sulla base della sentenza di corte di 8 giugno 2001 e della vendita diretta dell'area di terra, e non aveva-come sé chiese-divenga consapevole di che sentenza da una lettera di 24 febbraio 2009.
21. 12 giugno 2009 la Corte d'appello Civile decise, con riferimento ad Articolo 207 § 5 del Codice di Procedura Civile (CCP), ammettere i ricorsi, affermando:
“L'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan ed il Generale Accusatore ha fallito il termine di decadenza per ricorso prescritto con legge e loro presentarono istanze che cercano di trovare questo per essere valido, mentre dibattendo che l'Ufficio del Sindaco fondò fuori della sentenza [di 8 giugno 2001] da una copia della sentenza allegata alla lettera del Settore Giudiziale di Armenia di 6 febbraio 2009, mentre l'Ufficio del Generale Accusatore dalla lettera dell'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan di 24 febbraio 2009.
...
La corte trova che le istanze dell'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan e l'Ufficio del Generale Accusatore sono provate e devono essere accordate.”
22. 18 luglio 2009 che la Corte d'appello Civile ha deciso di accordare i ricorsi annullare la sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 e respingere la prescrizione avida del richiedente chiedono. La Corte d'appello fondò, in particolare, che la Corte distrettuale di Shengavit aveva applicato 178 e 187 del CC che non era applicabile alla causa e non riuscì ad applicare 168 e 188 del CC Articoli Articoli, mentre giungendo con ciò a sentenze incorrette. L'edificio in oggetto era una costruzione non autorizzata costruita su un'area di terra che appartiene allo Stato. Da adesso, solamente lo Stato avrebbe potuto acquisire diritti di proprietà in riguardo di quel costruendo.
23. Il richiedente depositò un ricorso su questioni di diritto.
24. 9 settembre 2009 la Corte di Cassazione decise di restituire il ricorso come inammissibile per mancanza di merito.
25. Seguendo queste decisioni, le autorità avviarono procedimenti contro il richiedente che chiede annullamento di registrazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà in riguardo dell'edificio e l'area di terra che fu accordata con le corti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Il Codice civile
26. Articolo 168 prescrive che proprietà in riguardo della quale lo Stato gode il diritto di proprietà è proprietà pubblica. Terra e le altre risorse naturale che non appartengono ad individui, soggetti giuridici o le comunità locali sono considerate proprietà pubblica.
27. Articolo che 178 § 1 prescrive che proprietà è considerata ownerless se non ha un proprietario o se il suo proprietario è ignoto o se il suo proprietario ha ceduto il diritto di proprietà in riguardo di sé. Articolo 178 § 3 prescrisse al tempo di materiale che è probabile che il diritto di proprietà in riguardo di patrimonio immobiliare di ownerless sia acquisito con virtù di prescrizione avida (Articolo 187). Articolo 178 § 4 prescrisse al tempo di materiale che i motivi e procedura per riconoscimento del diritto di proprietà in riguardo di proprietà di ownerless furono stabilite col CCP.
28. Articolo 187 prescrive che un individuo o un soggetto giuridico che non sono il proprietario di un patrimonio immobiliare ma che hanno in buon fede, l'usò apertamente e continuamente come la sua propria proprietà per dieci anni, acquisirà proprietà di che proprietà (prescrizione avida).
29. Articolo 188 prescrive che una costruzione non autorizzata è un alloggio, un edificio, l'altra costruzione o l'altro patrimonio immobiliare costruiti su un'area di terra non assegnata per che fine sotto la legge, o senza il permesso richiesto, o con violazioni sostanziali di urbanistica e costruendo norme ed articoli. Una persona che ha costruito una costruzione non autorizzata non acquisirà un diritto di proprietà nel suo riguardo. Lui ha nessuno diritto possedere la costruzione, incluso vendendo che dona, mentre affittando o entrando in qualsiasi gli altri accordi nel suo riguardo. La corte può riconoscere il diritto di proprietà in riguardo di una costruzione non autorizzata di una persona che possiede l'area di terra sulla quale la costruzione fu costruita.
B. Il Codice di Procedura Civile
30. Articolo 37 prescrive che l'accusatore è concesso, e può, atti di istituto per la protezione di interessi patrimoniali dello Stato.
31. Articoli 186-188 prescrivono la procedura per avviare procedimenti speciali che cercano di riconoscere proprietà come senza propietario. Un richiedente è costretto a presentare prova di essere in proprietà della proprietà e la corte, mentre trovando che la proprietà sia ownerless o che il proprietario l'ha abbandonato senza l'intenzione di mantenere il suo diritto di proprietà, adotterà un riconoscimento della sentenza la proprietà come senza proprietario e trasferendolo sotto la proprietà del possessore.
32. Articolo 207 prescrisse al tempo di materiale che un ricorso contro una sentenza del primo giudice di prima istanza sarebbe stato depositato entro quindici giorni dalla data di consegna della sentenza.
33. Articolo 207 § 5, emendamenti seguenti introdussero 1 gennaio 2008, prescrive che persone che non furono comportate come una parte ai procedimenti ma i cui diritti ed obblighi furono colpiti con una sentenza di corte è concesso per portare un ricorso entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale loro divennero consapevoli, o sarebbe dovuto divenire consapevole, dell'adozione di che sentenza, eccetto quando venti anni sono passati da allora che sentenza entrò in vigore. Articolo che 207 § 7 prescrive che un ricorso contro una sentenza del primo giudice di prima istanza che è entrato in vigore può essere ammesso per esame in cause eccezionali quando, durante l'esame precedente della causa, violazioni lorde di legge effettiva o procedurale hanno avuto luogo come un risultato del quale la sentenza adottata danneggia la molta essenza di amministrazione della giustizia o esiste là di recente scoperto o circostanze nuove.
C. Il Terra Codice (adottò in 2 maggio 2001 ed entrò in vigore 15 giugno 2001)
34. Articolo 61 prescrive che l'autorità affidò con alienazione di terra pubblica in Yerevan è il Sindaco di Yerevan.
35. Articolo che 118 § 4 prescrive che una persona che godè un diritto di uso permanente o provvisorio in riguardo di un'area di terra prima dell'adozione di questo Codice, acquisirà un diritto di contratto d'affitto in riguardo di che area di terra per un periodo prescritto con questo Codice. Articolo che 118 § 7 ha prescritto al tempo di materiale che in cause ha prescritto con, inter alia, Articolo 118 § 4 il locatore di un'area di terra, se lui così desidera, può acquisire un diritto di proprietà con pagando il pieno valore catastale dell'area di terra. La fattura che certifica il pagamento del valore catastale notificherà come una base per la registrazione del diritto di proprietà.
D. La Legge sulla Registrazione Statale di Diritti in Riguardo di Proprietà
36. Articolo 6 prescrive che diritti e limitazioni registrarono in riguardo di una proprietà ha vigore legale, mentre si considera che tutte le entità siano notificate di simile registrazione, nonostante se o non loro sono infatti consapevole di sé.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
37. Il richiedente si lamentò che il rinnovamento del tempo-limite per ricorso ed il susseguente annullando della definitivo sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 aveva violato il principio della certezza legale ed il godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Lui si appellò su Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 quale, in finora come attinente, legga siccome segue:
Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”

A. Ammissibilità
38. La Corte nota che queste azioni di reclamo non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
39. Il richiedente presentò che, con ammettendo i ricorsi depositati fuori tempo dall'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan e l'Accusatore Generale Aggiunto ed annullando di conseguenza la definitivo sentenza di 8 giugno 2001, la Corte d'appello Civile aveva violato il principio della certezza legale e l'aveva spogliato delle sue proprietà, vale a dire l'edificio e l'area di terra. Sia l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan e la Cancelleria dei Beni immobili che avevano registrato i suoi diritti di proprietà in riguardo della sua proprietà sulla base di che sentenza, era autorità pubbliche. Durante tutti gli anni quando lui fu considerato il proprietario della proprietà lui aveva pagato tasse di proprietà regolarmente. 29 luglio 2008, un rappresentante dell'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan aveva compiuto vale a dire una rettifica dei confini della sua area di terra su almeno un'occasione. Il Governo addusse che l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan era divenuto consapevole della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 con una lettera dal ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobilidatò 24 febbraio 2009, ma in realtà l'Ufficio del Sindaco molto era stato consapevole dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente più primo.
40. In qualsiasi l'evento, poiché l'Ufficio del Sindaco era un'autorità pubblica che agisce in favore dello Stato, la questione per essere risposto era se lo Stato era stato consapevole della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 che era, perché lo Stato era una materia di diritto civile e tutte le azioni presa con le varie autorità pubbliche, come adottando che sentenza, registrando i suoi diritti mentre imponendo tasse e misurando la terra, era stato compiuto in favore dello Stato. Era perciò irragionevole a rivendicazione che l'Ufficio del Sindaco non era stato, e non poteva essere, consapevole di quel la sentenza. Inoltre, la rivendicazione del Governo che la sentenza era stata revocata sulla base di violazioni lorde di legge effettiva e procedurale era erronea, poiché la Corte d'appello Civile non aveva applicato 207 § 7 del CCP ma Articolo Articolo 207 § 5 che specificamente proteggerono i diritti di terze parti. In qualsiasi l'evento, il loro argomento che una violazione effettiva della legge giustificò la riapertura della causa dopo otto anni era incompatibile con Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Infine, l'annullare della definitivo sentenza aveva corrisposto ad un'interferenza ingiustificata coi suoi diritti di proprietà in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Come riguardi la violazione procedurale ed allegato della legge, la Corte distrettuale di Shengavit era stata gratis per comportare l'Ufficio del Sindaco come una parte di sua propria istanza, ed il fatto che non era riuscito a fare non avrebbe dovuto avere così conseguenze negative per lui ed avrebbe dovuto dare luogo all'il annullare della sentenza nel suo favore dopo otto anni.
(b) Il Governo
41. Il Governo presentò che non c'era stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione poiché la Corte d'appello aveva avuto ragioni sufficienti di ammettere che i ricorsi di fuori-di-tempo depositarono con l'Accusatore Generale Aggiunto ed il Sindaco di Yerevan. Sotto il diritto nazionale, terra che non era nella proprietà di persone fisiche o legali o le comunità locali appartenne allo Stato, ed era il Sindaco di Yerevan che era assegnato legalmente col potere per assegnare terra in Yerevan. Così, la Corte distrettuale di Shengavit era stata obbligata per comportare il Sindaco di Yerevan come una parte ai procedimenti poiché la controversia riguardante la proprietà Statale ed affettato i diritti di proprietà dello Stato che non era riuscito a fare. L'Accusatore Generale Aggiunto aveva diritto anche a fare appello contro questa sentenza poiché sotto la Costituzione lui fu concesso per agire in cause dove erano in pericolo interessi Statali. La Corte d'appello aveva trovato le loro istanze che cercano di ripristinare il tempo-limite perso per essere valido, poiché ambo le autorità erano divenute consapevoli della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 da una lettera del ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobilidi 24 febbraio 2009 ed erano state date un titolo a fare appello contro sé entro tre mesi, con virtù di Articolo 207 del CCP. Così, con ammettendo la loro fuori-di-tempo fa appello ed annullando infine la sentenza di 8 giugno 2001, la Corte d'appello cercò di correggere un errore procedurale e netti che aveva danneggiato la stessa essenza di amministrazione della giustizia.
42. C'era stato anche inoltre, un errore effettivo e lordo che la Corte d'appello cercò di correggere, poiché la Corte distrettuale di Shengavit aveva errato nella sua interpretazione e la richiesta delle disposizioni nazionali ed attinenti. In particolare, la Corte distrettuale aveva applicato 178 e 187 del CC che non era applicabile alla causa Articoli perché l'area di terra appartenne allo Stato e perciò non era ownerless, mentre ignorò i requisiti di Articolo 188 del CC che precluse il riconoscimento del diritto di proprietà in riguardo di una costruzione non autorizzata costruiti su un'area di terra che non appartiene alla persona che l'aveva costruito. In somma, non era stata nessuna violazione del principio della certezza legale. Sugli stessi motivi, non era stata interferenza ingiustificata col godimento tranquillo del richiedente di proprietà garantito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
43. Come riguardi gli argomenti del richiedente che l'Ufficio del Sindaco, mentre agendo in favore dello Stato, era stato consapevole della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001, prima di tutti tasse di proprietà furono raccolte con le autorità locali e non l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan. In secondo luogo, la rettifica dei confini era stata compiuta con un impiegato di una Giuntura-scorta Società Chiusa e Statale fondato con l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan, e non l'Ufficio del Sindaco stesso. In terzo luogo, tutte le sentenze in Armenia furono adottate in favore dello Stato e questo non volle dire che tutte le autorità pubbliche che agiscono in favore dello Stato erano consapevoli di tutti simile sentenze, a meno che loro specificamente furono notificati. Infine, la Beni immobili Cancelleria, quando registrando i diritti di proprietà del richiedente, non fu obbligato per verificare ex l'officio la legalità della sentenza presentata con lui. Da adesso, la registrazione di diritti di proprietà non poteva essere considerata come prova che l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan era stato consapevole della sentenza.
2. La valutazione della Corte
44. La Corte reitera che il diritto ad un'udienza corretta di fronte ad un tribunale come garantito con Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione deve essere interpretato nella luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che dichiara fra le altre cose, l'articolo di legge per essere parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti. Uno degli aspetti fondamentali dell'articolo di legge è il principio di certezza legale che richiede inter l'alia che dove le corti infine hanno determinato un problema, la loro direttiva non dovrebbe essere chiamata in questione (veda Brumrescu ?c. la Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61 ECHR 1999 VII). La certezza legale presuppone riguardo per il principio di res judicata che è il principio della finalità di sentenze. Questo principio sottolinea che nessuna parte è concessa per chiedere soltanto una revisione di un definitivo e sentenza vincolante per il fine di ottenere un riesame ed una determinazione nuova della causa. Più alto corteggia ' motorizza di revisione dovrebbe essere esercitato per correggere errori giudiziali ed errori giudiziari, ma non eseguire un esame nuovo. La revisione non dovrebbe essere trattata come un ricorso mascherato, e la possibilità mera di là che è due prospettive sulla materia non è una base per esame di re. Una partenza da che principio è giustificato solamente quando rese necessario con circostanze di un carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile (veda Ryabykh c. la Russia, n. 52854/99, § 52 ECHR 2003-IX).
45. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte nota che, nell'ammettere i ricorsi di fuori-di-tempo depositati con l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan ed il Generale Accusatore, la Corte d'appello si appellò su Articolo 207 § 5 del CCP che permise una persona che non era stata comportata come una parte ai procedimenti ma i cui diritti erano stati colpiti con una sentenza di corte, depositare un ricorso di fuori-di-tempo contro che sentenza entro tre mesi dalla data sui quali lui divenne consapevole o sarebbe dovuto divenire consapevole della sua adozione. Decise di accettare le osservazioni dell'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan ed il Generale Accusatore, mentre dibattendo che loro erano divenuti solamente consapevoli della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 a febbraio 2009, ed ammettere per esame i loro ricorsi depositarono in maggio 2009 (veda paragrafo 21 sopra) che condusse infine ad un esame nuovo della causa e l'annullare della definitivo sentenza nel favore del richiedente (veda paragrafo 22 sopra).
46. Così, la causa presente non concerne una revisione del definitivo e sentenza vincolante per un ricorso straordinario o nella luce di circostanze di recente scoperte (veda, per esempio, Tregubenko c. l'Ucraina, n. 61333/00, §§ 34-38, 2 novembre 2004, e Pravednaya c. la Russia, n. 69529/01, §§ 27-34 18 novembre 2004), ma la riapertura di procedimenti dopo un decorso del tempo considerevole sulla base che una parte affettata non era stata consapevole di loro che in essenza corrisposero a rinnovando il termine di decadenza per un ricorso ordinario. La Corte prima l'ha considerato appropriato sostenere il principio della certezza legale in un numero di cause simili dove questo principio fondamentale fu minato per l'uso di meccanismi così procedurali come la proroga o il rinnovamento del termine di decadenza per un ricorso ordinario (veda Ponomaryov c. l'Ucraina, n. 3236/03, §§ 41-42, 3 aprile 2008, e Bezrukovy c. la Russia, n. 34616/02, §§ 33-44 10 maggio 2012). La Corte ammise-e lo trovò ragionevole-in quelle cause che gli ordinamenti giuridici di molto membro Stati prevedono per una possibilità di rinnovare tempo-limiti procedurali se ci sono ragioni valide di fare così. Allo stesso tempo, se il tempo-limite per procedura di ricorso ordinaria è rinnovato dopo un decorso del tempo considerevole e per ragioni che non sembrano essere particolarmente persuasivo, tale decisione può infrangere il principio della certezza legale. Mentre il rinnovamento o la proroga del termine di decadenza per un ricorso ordinario rimane primariamente entro il nazionale corteggia la discrezione di ', simile discrezione non è illimitata. Le corti sono costrette in ogni causa ad indicare le ragioni per la loro decisione, così come verificare se le ragioni per rinnovamento di un tempo-limite per ricorso potrebbero giustificare l'interferenza col principio di res judicata, specialmente quando la legislazione nazionale non limita o le corti la discrezione di ' nel tempo o per motivi per il rinnovamento dei tempo-limiti (veda Ponomaryov, citato sopra, e Bezrukovy, citato sopra). Quando il diritto nazionale non contiene qualsiasi limite proibitivo in questo riguardo, una dichiarazione di rinnovamento abusivo del tempo-limite per un ricorso contro una definitivo sentenza manda a chiamare soprintendenza vicina con la Corte. Il suo compito è valutare le particolari circostanze della causa a mano e la maniera nelle quali davvero furono fatte domanda le regolamentazioni nazionali e pertinenti (l'ibid., § 35).
47. La Corte nota che legge Armena, vale a dire l'Articolo 207 § 5 del CCP che fu fatto domanda nella causa presente, impone un limite di venti anni per depositare un ricorso di fuori tempo, mentre il tempo che davvero era passato nella causa presente corrispose a pressoché otto anni che, nell'opinione della Corte, è un periodo particolarmente lungo di tempo che richiede scrutinio speciale. Come per i motivi per ammettere la fuori-di-tempo fa appello, come già notato sopra, la Corte d'appello fu motivata con la protezione degli interessi di una terza parte, in questa causa lo Stato rappresentato con l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan e l'Ufficio del Generale Accusatore i cui diritti erano stati colpiti con la definitivo sentenza. La Corte prima ha trovato che la protezione dei diritti ed interessi di terza persona è una considerazione legittima che può giustificare l'annullare di un definitivo e sentenza vincolante. In particolare, fondò che c'era stato un “difetto fondamentale” giustificando la riapertura di procedimenti se le sentenze contestate avessero colpito i diritti ed interessi legali di una persona che, come nella causa presente, non era stato una parte ai procedimenti in oggetto (veda Protsenko c. la Russia, n. 13151/04, §§ 29 34 31 luglio 2008) o che era stato incapace per partecipare efficacemente in loro (veda Tishkevich c. la Russia, n. 2202/05, §§ 25-27, 4 dicembre 2008, e Tolstobrov c. la Russia, n. 11612/05, §§ 18-20 4 marzo 2010). La Corte non ha nessuno ragioni di dubitare che i diritti dello Stato in oggetto i quali non fu rappresentato nei procedimenti furono colpiti con la definitivo sentenza nel favore del richiedente, siccome interpretato con la Corte d'appello e non contestato col richiedente. Accetta che la riapertura di procedimenti su tale base è in principio una considerazione legittima che giustifica una partenza dal principio della certezza legale.
48. D'altra parte la Corte non è convinta della maniera nella quale la disposizione nazionale ed attinente davvero fu fatta domanda nella causa presente. Nota che il richiedente contestò, sia di fronte alle corti nazionali e di fronte alla Corte, gli argomenti avanzati così tardamente con le parti concorrenti in giustificazione di registrarono ricorsi ed i meriti delle loro dichiarazioni che questi ricorsi si sono attenuti coi requisiti di Articolo 207 § 5 del CCP. Lui contestò, in particolare, la dichiarazione che le autorità che agiscono in favore dello Stato erano divenute solamente consapevoli della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 ed i suoi effetti dopo un ritardo di pressocché otto anni. Il Governo contestò quegli argomenti. La Corte considera che era per le corti nazionali, notevolmente la Corte d'appello, rivolgere simile questioni per esaminare e valutare la prova addusse e stabilire quel il fatto. Comunque, nota che la Corte d'appello sembra non essere riuscita a portare fuori qualsiasi esame di questo problema e rivolgere qualsiasi degli argomenti del richiedente in che riguardo, nonostante la sua natura controversa e disputabile e nonostante che che era in pericolo. Non riuscì a prevedere qualsiasi discute ciò che per la sua decisione per accettare le osservazioni del Sindaco e l'Accusatore Generale Aggiunto ed ammettere i loro ricorsi depositò pressocché otto anni dopo la sentenza era divenuto definitivo, il suo ragionamento intero che corrisponde alla sentenza mera che quelle osservazioni “fu provato” (veda paragrafo 21 sopra).
49. Inoltre, non solo faceva la Corte d'appello non riesca a prevedere qualsiasi ragioni per la sua decisione, ma sembra avere trascurato un numero di circostanze cruciali e fece evidentemente dichiarazioni incorrette. In particolare, la Corte d'appello affermò che l'Ufficio del Sindaco aveva chiesto di avere scoperto della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 con una lettera dal Settore Giudiziale di Armenia di 6 febbraio 2009, mentre l'Ufficio del Sindaco aveva dibattuto qualche cosa completamente diverso, vale a dire che era divenuto consapevole di che sentenza con una lettera dal ramo locale della Cancelleria dei Beni immobiliStatale di 24 febbraio 2009 e, inoltre, aveva specificato nel suo ricorso che la lettera dal Settore Giudiziale di Armenia di 6 febbraio 2009 era stata accompagnata con una copia di un'altra sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Shengavit che era non correlata alla causa del richiedente (veda paragrafo 19 sopra). La Corte d'appello andò a vuoto inoltre a rivolgere la rivendicazione del Generale Accusatore Aggiunto che era divenuto consapevole della sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 dalla lettera del Sindaco di 24 febbraio 2009, nonostante il suo essere in contraddizione diretta con l'argomento del Sindaco di stato stato notificato di che sentenza solamente 18 marzo 2009 (veda divide in paragrafi 18 e 19 sopra). Infine, non riuscì a rivolgere in qualsiasi il modo la questione di quando le autorità in oggetto “sarebbe dovuto divenire consapevole” dell'adozione della sentenza di 8 il 2001 giugno uno delle condizioni contenuta in Articolo 207 § 5 del CCP che potrebbe essere visto siccome offrendo un'importante salvaguardia supplementare contro qualsiasi uso abusivo del diritto garantì sotto quel l'Articolo.
50. La Corte conclude perciò che la Corte d'appello è andata a vuoto ad attenersi col suo dovere di verificare se c'erano ragioni sufficienti che giustificano l'ammissione della fuori-di-tempo fa appello dopo tale decorso del tempo significativo, eseguire un esame completo di tale problema serio e di conseguenza assicurare un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi del richiedente ed il bisogno di assicurare l'amministrazione corretta di giustizia che include gli interessi della terza parte. Considera che il principio della certezza legale-uno degli aspetti fondamentali dell'articolo di legge -è troppo importante per essere frustrato dopo tale decorso del tempo significativo sulla base di tale esame frettoloso degli interessi avversario in pericolo.
51. In prospettiva del precedente, la Corte conclude, che, ammettendo i ricorsi di fuori tempo depositati con l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan ed il Generale Accusatore Aggiunto contro la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Shengavit di 8 giugno 2001, la Corte d'appello Civile andò a vuoto ad offrire ragioni di un carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile e con ciò infranse il principio della certezza legale in violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
52. Rivolgendosi ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte nota che la definitivo sentenza di 8 giugno 2001 riconobbe la proprietà del richiedente in riguardo dell'edificio. Inoltre, riconobbe il diritto del richiedente di uso in riguardo dell'area di terra che più tardi notificò come una base per il riconoscimento del suo diritto di contratto d'affitto e dando un titolo ad infine il richiedente per divenire il suo proprietario che lui faceva in 22 maggio 2003. Il susseguente che annulla di che sentenza spogliò il richiedente di queste proprietà e corrispose ad un'interferenza col suo diritto di proprietà come garantito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Brumrescu?, citato sopra, §§ 70 e 74). Siccome già ha trovato la Corte che la definitivo sentenza era stata fatta una rassegna in violazione del principio della certezza legale e che nessun equilibrio equo era stato previsto fra l'interesse pubblico e la protezione dei diritti del richiedente, segue che c'è stata anche una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in che riguardo (veda, mutatis mutandis, Margushin c. la Russia, n. 11989/03, § 40, 1 aprile 2010, e Bezrukovy citato sopra, § 45).
53. In somma, è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
54. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
55. Il richiedente chiese 92,000 euro (EUR) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale, questo che è il valore di mercato della proprietà del quale lui era stato privato come un risultato dell'annullare. In appoggio di questa rivendicazione, lui presentò una lettera da una società di valutazione di beni immobili che aveva visitato la proprietà ed aveva eseguito una valutazione approssimata del suo valore di mercato a 21 marzo 2014. Il richiedente chiese inoltre EUR 2,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
56. Il Governo presentò che non c'era collegamento causale fra i danni patrimoniali chiesti e la violazione addusse. In qualsiasi l'evento, sotto il diritto nazionale la base legale per qualsiasi valutazione di beni immobili era un contratto firmò fra il cliente e la società di valutazione, mentre il richiedente non era riuscito a presentare una copia di tale contratto. Inoltre, la legge richiese che i risultati di qualsiasi valutazione di beni immobili sia formulata in un documento scritto, vale a dire una Relazione di Valutazione. Nel frattempo, fu affermato al fondo della lettera presentato col richiedente che non ha corrisposto ad un rapporto di valutazione ma era di una natura consultiva. Questo era in contraddizione diretta col diritto nazionale e sollevò dubita della sua accuratezza e l'affidabilità. Come riguardi la rivendicazione del richiedente per danni non-patrimoniali, questo si respingerebbe perché il richiedente non era riuscito a provarlo e perché non c'era similmente collegamento causale.
57. Nelle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte considera, che, come lontano siccome concerne il risarcimento danni, la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione. Che questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e la procedura susseguente fissò, mentre avendo riguardo ad a qualsiasi accordo che sarebbe giunto al Governo ed i richiedenti (l'Articolo 75 §§ 1 e 4 degli Articoli di Corte).
Costi di B. e spese
58. Il richiedente non chiese qualsiasi costi e spese. Di conseguenza, la Corte non rende qualsiasi assegna sotto questo capo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla violazione addotta del principio della certezza legale ed il diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

4. Sostiene che la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per decisione per quanto concerne il risarcimento dei danni e di conseguenza,
(a) riserve la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, le loro osservazioni scritte sull'importo di danni da assegnare al richiedente e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere;
(c) riserve l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.

Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 31 marzo 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
André Wampach Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è domenica 09/02/2020.

Se volete sapere come funziona LA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, qui c'è uno schema:

I COSTI DELLA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, IN SINTESI

Consulenza iniziale: esame di atti e consigli

Gratuita
Per richiederla cliccate qui: Colloquio telefonico gratuito

Eventuale successiva assistenza, se richiesta

Da concordare:

  • Con accordo scritto (a garanzia dell'espropriato)
  • Con pagamento posticipato (si paga con i soldi che si ottengono dall'Amministrazione)
  • Col criterio: SE NON OTTIENI NON PAGHI

Se sei assistito da un professionista aderente all'Associazione pagherai solo a risultato raggiunto, "con i soldi" dell'Amministrazione.

Non si deve pagare se non si ottiene il risultato stabilito. Tutto ciò viene pattuito, a garanzia dell'espropriato, sempre con un contratto scritto. E' ammesso solo il rimborso spese vive: ad. es. 1.000 euro per il DAP (tutelarsi e opporsi senza contenzioso) o 2.000 euro per il contenzioso.

Per vedere l'ACCORDO TIPO per l'assistenza, cliccate qui Vademecum gratuito e andate a pag. 20

Ricordate che il principale custode dei vostri diritti siete voi stessi.
E' quindi essenziale capire ciò che accade e ciò che accadrà.

Se volete sapere come si svolge la PROCEDURA ESPROPRIATIVA e come tutelarvi nelle varie fasi, abbiamo predisposto una breve sintesi degli strumenti da utilizzare.
Potete esaminarla cliccando qui: Come Tutelarsi in tre passi