CASO: CASE OF GUBERINA v. CROATIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GUBERINA v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,14,P1-1

NUMERO: 23682/13/20
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 22/03/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Violation of Article 14+P1-1 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property) Reopening of case (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction) Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)



SECOND SECTION






CASE OF GUBERINA v. CROATIA

(Application no. 23682/13)











JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG


22 March 2016



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Guberina v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
I??l Karaka?, President,
Nebojša Vu?ini?,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Gri?co,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro,
Georges Ravarani, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 23 February 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 23682/13) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 28 March 2013.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Zagreb, assisted by OMISSIS, a lawyer qualified in Romania and based in London. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicant complained of the unfair application of domestic tax legislation and alleged discrimination in that respect, contrary to Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, and Article 1 of Protocol No. 12.
4. On 17 July 2013 the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, and under Article 1 of Protocol No. 12, were communicated to the Government. On 25 March 214 the President of the Section to which the case was allocated decided, under Rule 54 § 2 (c) of the Rules of Court, to invite the parties to submit further observations in respect of the issues raised under Article 8 taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention.
5. In addition, third-party comments were received jointly from the Croatian Union of Associations of Persons with Disabilities (SOIH), the European Disability Forum (EDF) and the International Disability Alliance (IDA) (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 3 of the Rules of Court).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1969 and lives in Samobor.
A. Background to the case
7. The applicant owned a flat in Zagreb situated on the third floor of a residential building, where he lived with his wife and two children.
8. In 2003, three years after he had bought the flat, the applicant’s wife gave birth to their third child. The child was born with multiple physical and mental disabilities.
9. After the birth the child underwent a number of medical treatments and his condition was under the constant supervision of the competent social care services. In April 2008 an expert commission diagnosed him with incurable cerebral palsy, grave mental retardation and epilepsy. In September 2008 the social services declared the child 100 percent disabled.
10. In the meantime, in September 2006, the applicant bought a house in Samobor, and in October 2008 he sold his flat. According to the applicant, the reason for buying a house was the fact that the building in which his flat was situated had no lift and for that reason did not meet the needs of his disabled child and his family. In particular, it was very difficult to take his son out of the flat to see a doctor, or to take him for physiotherapy and to kindergarten or school, and to meet his other social needs.
B. Proceedings concerning the applicant’s request for tax exemption
11. On 19 October 2006, after he had bought the house in Samobor, the applicant submitted a tax exemption request to the tax authorities. He relied on section 11(9) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act, which provided a possibility of tax exemption for a person who was buying a flat or a house in order to solve his or her housing needs, and if he or she, or his or her family members, did not have another flat or house meeting their housing needs (see paragraph 24 below). In his request the applicant argued that the flat he owned did not meet the housing needs of his family since it was very difficult, and in fact becoming impossible, to take his disabled child out of the flat from the third floor without a lift, given that he was in a wheelchair. The applicant therefore submitted that he had bought the house in order to make arrangements for the needs of his son.
12. On 6 May 2009 the Samobor Tax Office (Ministarstvo Financija – Porezna uprava, Podru?ni ured Zagreb, Ispostava Samobor) dismissed the applicant’s request with the following statement of reasons:
“Section 11(9) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act ... provides for a tax exemption for citizens who are buying their first real property by which they are solving their housing needs under the conditions which must be cumulatively satisfied, including the requirement that the tax debtor, or his or her family members, do not have another flat or a house meeting their housing needs. During the proceedings it was established that the tax debtor Joško Guberina had owned a flat measuring 114,49 square metres, in Zagreb ..., which he had sold on 25 November 2008 to ... Given that the surface of that real property, and in view of the number of the tax debtor’s immediate family members (five), satisfied the housing needs of the tax debtor and his immediate family, within the meaning of section 11(9.3) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act, and given that it satisfied all housing needs in terms of hygiene and technical requirements as well as the basic infrastructure (electricity, water and [access to] other public utilities), under section 11(9.5) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act, the tax debtor does not meet the cumulative conditions provided under section 11(9) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act. It was therefore decided as noted in the operative part [of the decision].”
13. The Samobor Tax Office ordered the applicant to pay 83,594.25 Croatian kunas (HRK; approximately EUR 11,250) in tax.
14. The applicant appealed against the above decision to the Finance Ministry (Ministarstvo Financija, Samostalna služba za drugostupanjski upravni postupak; hereinafter: the “Ministry”), and on 6 July 2009 the Ministry dismissed his appeal as ill-founded, endorsing the reasoning of the Samobor Tax Office. The relevant part of the decision reads:
“The Real Property Transfer Tax Act (Official Gazette, nos. 69/07-153/02) provides in section 11(9) for a tax exemption for citizens who are buying their first real property by which they are solving their housing needs. It further provides conditions which the citizen must meet in order for it to be considered that he or she is buying the first real property by which he or she is solving his or her housing needs. In this connection one of the conditions, as provided under 9.5, requires that the citizen and the members of his or her immediate family do not have another real property (flat or house) meeting their housing needs; and under 9.6 it is provided that the citizen and the members of his or her immediate family must not have in their ownership a flat or a holiday house or another property of a significant value. Another property of a significant value is also a piece of land where construction is allowed or business premises where the citizen or his or her immediate family members do not perform a registered [business] activity, and the value of the real property is similar to the value of the real property (flat or house) which the citizen is buying.
Given the ratio of the cited provisions and the facts of the case undoubtedly established during the proceedings, [the Ministry] considers that the first-instance body correctly denied the appellant’s request for tax exemption ... The right to tax exemption exists if the citizen, or his or her immediate family members, at the moment of the purchase [of the real property] do not own, or did not own, another real property meeting their housing needs or a flat, a holiday house or other real property of a significant value. As this is not the case in the case at issue, given that the appellant at the moment of the purchase [of the house] owned a flat in Zagreb ... larger than the real property he was buying and in respect of which he sought tax exemption, it cannot be said that by buying the house the appellant bought the first real property by which he was solving his housing needs.”
15. On 7 September 2009 the applicant lodged an administrative action in the High Administrative Court (Visoki upravni sud Republike Hrvatske), arguing that in their decisions the lower bodies had ignored his specific family situation and in particular the disability of his child and thus the housing needs of his family. In the applicant’s view, it was necessary to recognise that in his particular case the existence of a lift in the building was the same relevant infrastructural requirement as access to water and electricity in general. He also stressed that the house was the first real property in respect of which he sought a real property transfer tax exemption.
16. On 21 March 2012 the High Administrative Court dismissed the applicant’s administrative action as ill-founded, endorsing the reasoning of the lower administrative bodies. The relevant part of the judgment reads:
“Given that the surface area of the flat [which the applicant owned] satisfied the needs of five members of the plaintiff’s family (provision 9.3) and that the flat at issue was equipped with the basic infrastructure and hygiene and technical requirements, the defendant correctly concluded that the plaintiff, in the given case, did not meet the conditions for a tax exemption set out in section 11(9) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act.
The arguments from the administrative action have no effect on a different decision in this administrative matter and therefore the court considers that the impugned decision did not breach the law to the plaintiff’s detriment.”
17. On 25 May 2012 the applicant lodged a constitutional complaint before the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) relying on Article 14 of the Constitution and contending, inter alia, that, given the specific accommodation needs of his family due to the disability of his child, he had been discriminated against by an unfair application of the relevant tax legislation. He argued in particular that the competent administrative authorities had failed to correct the factual inequality arising out of his particular situation with regard to the generally implied meaning of the term basic infrastructural requirements meeting the housing needs of his family.
18. On 26 September 2012 the Constitutional Court, endorsing the reasoning of the lower bodies, dismissed the applicant’s constitutional complaint as ill-founded on the grounds that there was no violation of his constitutional rights. In particular, after having examined his complaints from the perspective of the right to a fair trial, the Constitutional Court held that no issue arose with regard to other complaints relied upon by the applicant.
19. The decision of the Constitutional Court was served on the applicant’s representative on 11 October 2012.
C. Other relevant information
20. The Government provided a report of the Ministry of Social Policy and Youth (Ministarstvo socijalne politike i mladih) of 6 November 2013 according to which the applicant’s child had been receiving monthly monetary assistance in the amount of HRK 1,000 (approximately EUR 130) in the period between 19 January 2006 and 10 September 2012, and the amount of HRK 625 (approximately EUR 80) from 11 September 2012 onwards. In addition, he had been engaged in various therapeutic and social assistance activities, and for the period between 29 June 2010 and 2 October 2011 the applicant’s wife had been accorded a special status related to her child’s disability during which period she, inter alia, received HRK 2,500 (approximately EUR 300) monthly.
21. According to the applicant, annual expenses related to the special needs of his son amount to some HRK 80,000 (approximately EUR 10,400). This concerns HRK 28,800 for physiotherapy; HRK 4,500 for logopaedics; HRK 900 for a child neurologist; HRK 7,200 for drugs; HRK 21,175 for a wheelchair (and the State provides an additional support of HRK 8,900); HRK 7,200 for swimming therapy; and HRK 9,150 for daily transport to the day care centre for ten months.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relevant domestic law
1. Constitution
22. The relevant provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette nos. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998, 113/2000, 124/2000, 28/2001, 41/2001, 55/2001, 76/2010, 85/2010 and 5/2014) read as follows:
Article 14
“Everyone in the Republic of Croatia shall enjoy rights and freedoms regardless of their race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other belief, national or social origin, property, birth, education, social status or other characteristics.
All shall be equal before the law.”
Article 34
“The home is inviolable ... “
Article 35
“Everyone has the right to respect for and legal protection of his or her private and family life, dignity, reputation and honour.”
Article 48
“The right of ownership shall be guaranteed ...“
2. Constitutional Court Act
23. The relevant part of section 62 of the Constitutional Court Act (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 49/2002) reads as follows:
Section 62
“1. Anyone may lodge a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court if he or she deems that an individual act on the part of a State body, a body of local or regional self-government, or a legal person with public authority, concerning his or her rights and obligations or a suspicion or accusation of a criminal deed, has violated his or her human rights or fundamental freedoms or his or her right to local or regional self-government guaranteed by the Constitution (hereinafter “a constitutional right”) ...
2. If another legal remedy exists in respect of the violation of the constitutional right [complained of], a constitutional complaint may be lodged only after that remedy has been used.”
3. Real Property Transfer Tax Act
24. The relevant provision of Real Property Transfer Tax Act (Zakon o porezu na promet nekretnina, Official Gazette nos. 69/1997, 26/2000, 127/2000 and 153/2002) at the time relevant read:
Section 11
“The real property transfer tax shall not be paid by:
...
9. the citizen who is buying his or her first real property (flat or house) by which he or she is solving his or her housing needs if:
...
9.3. the surface area of the real property, depending on the number of members of the citizen’s immediate family, does not surpass:
...
- for five persons, up to 100 square metres,
...
9.5. the citizen, or members of his or her immediate family, do not have another real property (flat or a house) which meets their housing needs. The real property (flat or house) which meets the housing needs shall be considered any such accommodation which has basic infrastructure and satisfies hygiene and technical requirements. ...
9.6. the citizen and the members of his or her immediate family do not own a flat, a holiday house and other real property of a significant value. Another property of a significant value is a piece of land where construction is allowed and business premises where the citizen or his or her immediate family members do not perform a registered [business] activity, and the value of the real property is similar to the value of the real property (flat or house) which the citizen is buying.
...
15. the citizens who have already used their right to a real property transfer tax exemption under the provisions 9, 11 and 13 [of this section] do not have a right to another real property transfer tax exemption.”
4. By-law on the accessibility of buildings for persons with disabilities and reduced mobility
25. The relevant provisions of the By-law on the accessibility of buildings to persons with disabilities and reduced mobility (Pravilnik o pristupa?nosti gra?evina osobama s invaliditetom i smanjene pokretljivosti, Official Gazette nos. 151/2005 and 61/2007) provide:
Section 1
“This By-law provides conditions and the manner of securing an unobstructed access, mobility, stay and work for persons with disabilities and reduced mobility (hereinafter: accessibility) as well as [the manner of] improving the accessibility of buildings for ... residential ... purposes ...”
Section 2
“Accessibility, improvement of accessibility and the [methods for] conforming to accessibility of the buildings referred to in section 1 of this By-law shall be secured by mandatory building design and construction of the buildings so as to secure the elements of accessibility and/or to conform to the conditions of use of [mobility] devices for persons with disabilities ... as provided under this By-law.”
III Basic elements of accessibility
Section 7
“The basic elements of accessibility are:
A. the elements of accessibility for overcoming differences in height, ...”
A. The elements of accessibility for overcoming differences in height
Section 9
“In order to overcome differences in height in the premises used by persons with reduced mobility, the following elements of accessibility can be used: ... lift ...”
Section 12
Lift
“A lift shall be used as an element of accessibility for overcoming height differences and it must be used for overcoming height differences of more than 120 centimetres inside or in the outside area.
...”
5. Prevention of Discrimination Act
26. The relevant parts of the Prevention of Discrimination Act (Zakon o suzbijanju diskriminacije, Official Gazette no. 85/2008) provide:
Section 1
“(1) This Act ensures protection and promotion of equality as the highest value of the constitutional order of the Republic of Croatia; creates conditions for equal opportunities and regulates protection against discrimination on the basis of race or ethnic origin or skin colour, gender, language, religion, political or other conviction, national or social origin, state of wealth, membership of a trade union, education, social status, marital or family status, age, health, disability, genetic inheritance, gender identity, expression or sexual orientation.
(2) Discrimination within the meaning of this Act means putting any person in a disadvantageous position on any of the grounds under subsection 1 of this section, as well as his or her close relatives.
...”
Section 8
“This Act shall be applied in respect of all State bodies ... legal entities and natural persons ...”
Section 16
“Anyone who considers that, owing to discrimination, any of his or her rights has been violated may seek protection of that right in proceedings in which the determination of that right is the main issue, and may also seek protection in separate proceedings under section 17 of this Act.”
Section 17
“(1) A person who claims that he or she has been a victim of discrimination in accordance with the provisions of this Act may bring a claim and seek:
(1) a ruling that the defendant has violated the plaintiff’s right to equal treatment or that an act or omission by the defendant may lead to the violation of the plaintiff’s right to equal treatment (claim for an acknowledgment of discrimination);
(2) a ban on (the defendant’s) undertaking acts which violate or may violate the plaintiff’s right to equal treatment or an order for measures aimed at removing discrimination or its consequences to be taken (claim for a ban or for removal of discrimination);
(3) compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage caused by the violation of the rights protected by this Act (claim for damages);
(4) an order for a judgment finding a violation of the right to equal treatment to be published in the media at the defendant’s expense.”
27. In 2009 the Office for Human Rights of the Government of Croatia (Ured za ljudska prava Vlade Republike Hrvatske) published a “Manual on the Application of the Prevention of Discrimination Act” (Vodi? uz Zakon o suzbijanju diskriminacije; hereinafter: the “Manual”). The Manual explains, inter alia, that the Prevention of Discrimination Act provides two alternative avenues which an individual can pursue, as provided under section 16 of that Act. Accordingly, an individual may raise his or her discrimination complaint in the proceedings concerning the main subject matter of a dispute, or he or she may opt for separate civil proceedings, as provided under section 17 of the Act.
6. Administrative Disputes Act
28. The relevant provision of the Administrative Disputes Act (Zakon o upravnim sporovima, Official Gazette nos. 20/2010, 143/2012 and 152/2014) provides:
Section 76
“(1) The proceedings terminated by a judgment shall be reopened upon a petition of the party:
1. if, in a final judgment, the European Court of Human Rights has found a violation of fundamental rights and freedoms in a manner differing from the [Administrative Court’s] judgment, ... “
B. Relevant practice
1. Relevant practice concerning discrimination
29. On 9 November 2010, in case no. U-III-1097/2009, the Constitutional Court declared a constitutional complaint alleging discrimination by a decision of the Parliament on the basis of the political affiliation of a deputy inadmissible for non-exhaustion of legal remedies. The Constitutional Court found that the appellant had failed to pursue both the relevant administrative remedies and the remedies provided under the Prevention of Discrimination Act. However, it declined to determine what the relationship between several possible avenues in a case concerning allegations of discrimination was, on the grounds that it was primarily for the competent courts to determine that matter.
30. In its decisions no. U-III-815/2013 of 8 May 2014, concerning alleged discrimination in obtaining social benefit, and U-III-1680/2014 of 2 July 2014, concerning alleged discrimination in employment, the Constitutional Court confirmed its case-law as to the availability of remedies under the Prevention of Discrimination Act.
31. The Government referred to the judgments of the Supreme Court, no. Gž-41/11-2 of 28 February 2012, no. Gž-25/11-2 of 28 February 2012 and no. Gž-38/11-2 of 7 March 2012, by which actions under the Prevention of Discrimination Act alleging discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation had been accepted.
2. Relevant practice concerning the application of tax legislation
32. The Government also cited case-law of the Administrative Court (Upravni sud Republike Hrvatske) and the High Administrative Court by which they dismissed actions challenging the refusal of a real property transfer tax exemption on the grounds of the appellants’ failure to cumulatively meet the requirements under section 11(9.5) and (9.6) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act (judgments in the cases no. Us-4028/2009-4 of 1 June 2011, no. Us-14106/2009-4 of 16 May 2012, and no. Us 3042/2011-4 of 19 September 2013; and a judgment of the High Administrative Court, no. Usž-269/2012-4 of 23 January 2013, by which it upheld a decision on tax exemption under section 11(9.3), (9.5) and (9.6) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act).
33. In each of these cases the administrative authorities conducted a thorough assessment of the comparable values of properties when deciding whether the appellant had a real property of a significant value within the meaning of section 11(9.6) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL MATERIAL
A. United Nations
1. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
34. The relevant parts of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, A/RES/61/106, 24 January 2007 (hereinafter: the “CRPD”), ratified by Croatia on 15 August 2007, provide:
Article 2
Definitions
“For the purposes of the present Convention:
...
“Reasonable accommodation” means necessary and appropriate modification and adjustments not imposing a disproportionate or undue burden, where needed in a particular case, to ensure to persons with disabilities the enjoyment or exercise on an equal basis with others of all human rights and fundamental freedoms; ...”
Article 3
General principles
“The principles of the present Convention shall be:
...
(b) Non-discrimination;
...
(f) Accessibility; ...”
Article 4
General obligations
“1. States Parties undertake to ensure and promote the full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all persons with disabilities without discrimination of any kind on the basis of disability. To this end, States Parties undertake:
(a) To adopt all appropriate legislative, administrative and other measures for the implementation of the rights recognized in the present Convention;
(b) To take all appropriate measures, including legislation, to modify or abolish existing laws, regulations, customs and practices that constitute discrimination against persons with disabilities;
(c) To take into account the protection and promotion of the human rights of persons with disabilities in all policies and programmes:
(d) To refrain from engaging in any act or practice that is inconsistent with the present Convention and to ensure that public authorities and institutions act in conformity with the present Convention;
(e) To take all appropriate measures to eliminate discrimination on the basis of disability by any person, organization or private enterprise;
...
2. With regard to economic, social and cultural rights, each State Party undertakes to take measures to the maximum of its available resources and, where needed, within the framework of international cooperation, with a view to achieving progressively the full realization of these rights, without prejudice to those obligations contained in the present Convention that are immediately applicable according to international law.
...”
Article 5
Equality and non-discrimination
“1. States Parties recognize that all persons are equal before and under the law and are entitled without any discrimination to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law.
2. States Parties shall prohibit all discrimination on the basis of disability and guarantee to persons with disabilities equal and effective legal protection against discrimination on all grounds.
3. In order to promote equality and eliminate discrimination, States Parties shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that reasonable accommodation is provided.
4. Specific measures which are necessary to accelerate or achieve de facto equality of persons with disabilities shall not be considered discrimination under the terms of the present Convention.”
Article 7
Children with disabilities
“1. States Parties shall take all necessary measures to ensure the full enjoyment by children with disabilities of all human rights and fundamental freedoms on an equal basis with other children.
2. In all actions concerning children with disabilities, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration.
...”
Article 9
Accessibility
“1. To enable persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully in all aspects of life, States Parties shall take appropriate measures to ensure to persons with disabilities access, on an equal basis with others, to the physical environment, to transportation, to information and communications, including information and communications technologies and systems, and to other facilities and services open or provided to the public, both in urban and in rural areas. These measures, which shall include the identification and elimination of obstacles and barriers to accessibility, shall apply to, inter alia:
(a) Buildings, roads, transportation and other indoor and outdoor facilities, including schools, housing, medical facilities and workplaces;
(b) Information, communications and other services, including electronic services and emergency services.”
Article 19
Living independently and being included in the community
“States Parties to the present Convention recognize the equal right of all persons with disabilities to live in the community, with choices equal to others, and shall take effective and appropriate measures to facilitate full enjoyment by persons with disabilities of this right and their full inclusion and participation in the community, including by ensuring that:
(a) Persons with disabilities have the opportunity to choose their place of residence and where and with whom they live on an equal basis with others and are not obliged to live in a particular living arrangement;
(b) Persons with disabilities have access to a range of in-home residential and other community support services, including personal assistance necessary to support living and inclusion in the community, and to prevent isolation or segregation from the community; ...”
Article 20
Personal mobility
“States Parties shall take effective measures to ensure personal mobility with the greatest possible independence for persons with disabilities, including by:
(a) Facilitating the personal mobility of persons with disabilities in the manner and at the time of their choice, and at affordable cost;
(b) Facilitating access by persons with disabilities to quality mobility aids, devices, assistive technologies and forms of live assistance and intermediaries, including by making them available at affordable cost; ...”
Article 28
Adequate standard of living and social protection
“1. States Parties recognize the right of persons with disabilities to an adequate standard of living for themselves and their families, including adequate food, clothing and housing, and to the continuous improvement of living conditions, and shall take appropriate steps to safeguard and promote the realization of this right without discrimination on the basis of disability.
...”
2. Practice of the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
35. In its General Comment No. 2 (2014) on Article 9: Accessibility, CRPD/C/GC/2, 22 May 2014, the CRPD Committee noted:
“1. Accessibility is a precondition for persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully and equally in society. Without access to the physical environment, to transportation, to information and communication, including information and communications technologies and systems, and to other facilities and services open or provided to the public, persons with disabilities would not have equal opportunities for participation in their respective societies.
...
29. It is helpful to mainstream accessibility standards that prescribe various areas that have to be accessible, such as the physical environment in laws on construction and planning, transportation in laws on public aerial, railway, road and water transport, information and communication, and services open to the public. However, accessibility should be encompassed in general and specific laws on equal opportunities, equality and participation in the context of the prohibition of disability-based discrimination. Denial of access should be clearly defined as a prohibited act of discrimination. Persons with disabilities who have been denied access to the physical environment, transportation, information and communication, or services open to the public should have effective legal remedies at their disposal. When defining accessibility standards, States parties have to take into account the diversity of persons with disabilities and ensure that accessibility is provided to persons of any gender and of all ages and types of disability. Part of the task of encompassing the diversity of persons with disabilities in the provision of accessibility is recognizing that some persons with disabilities need human or animal assistance in order to enjoy full accessibility (such as personal assistance, sign language interpretation, tactile sign language interpretation or guide dogs). It must be stipulated, for example, that banning guide dogs from entering a particular building or open space would constitute a prohibited act of disability-based discrimination.”
3. Practice of the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
36. The United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) in its General Comment No. 5: Persons with Disabilities, E/1995/22, 9 December 1994 noted:
“3. The obligation to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of disability
15. Both de jure and de facto discrimination against persons with disabilities have a long history and take various forms. They range from invidious discrimination, such as the denial of educational opportunities, to more “subtle” forms of discrimination such as segregation and isolation achieved through the imposition of physical and social barriers. For the purposes of the Covenant, “disability-based discrimination” may be defined as including any distinction, exclusion, restriction or preference, or denial of reasonable accommodation based on disability which has the effect of nullifying or impairing the recognition, enjoyment or exercise of economic, social or cultural rights. Through neglect, ignorance, prejudice and false assumptions, as well as through exclusion, distinction or separation, persons with disabilities have very often been prevented from exercising their economic, social or cultural rights on an equal basis with persons without disabilities. The effects of disability-based discrimination have been particularly severe in the fields of education, employment, housing, transport, cultural life, and access to public places and services.”
37. The CESCR reaffirmed its General Comment No. 5 in its General Comment No. 20: Non-discrimination in economic, social and cultural rights, E/C.12/GC/20, 2 July 2009, in the following terms:
“B. Other status
27. The nature of discrimination varies according to context and evolves over time. A flexible approach to the ground of “other status” is thus needed in order to capture other forms of differential treatment that cannot be reasonably and objectively justified and are of a comparable nature to the expressly recognized grounds in article 2, paragraph 2. These additional grounds are commonly recognized when they reflect the experience of social groups that are vulnerable and have suffered and continue to suffer marginalization. ...
Disability
28. In its general comment No. 5, the Committee defined discrimination against persons with disabilities as “any distinction, exclusion, restriction or preference, or denial of reasonable accommodation based on disability which has the effect of nullifying or impairing the recognition, enjoyment or exercise of economic, social or cultural rights”. The denial of reasonable accommodation should be included in national legislation as a prohibited form of discrimination on the basis of disability. States parties should address discrimination, such as prohibitions on the right to education, and denial of reasonable accommodation in public places such as public health facilities and the workplace, as well as in private places, e.g. as long as spaces are designed and built in ways that make them inaccessible to wheelchairs, such users will be effectively denied their right to work.”
B. Council of Europe
1. The Committee of Ministers Recommendation Rec(2006)5
38. The relevant parts of the Recommendation Rec(2006)5 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the Council of Europe Action Plan to promote the rights and full participation of people with disabilities in society: improving the quality of life of people with disabilities in Europe 2006-2015, of 5 April 2006 read:
“1.2. Fundamental principles and strategic goals
1.2.1. Fundamental principles
Member states will continue to work within anti-discriminatory and human rights frameworks to enhance independence, freedom of choice and the quality of life of people with disabilities and to raise awareness of disability as a part of human diversity.
Due account is taken of relevant existing European and international instruments, treaties and plans, particularly the developments in relation to the draft United Nations international convention on the rights of persons with disabilities.
...
1.3. Key action lines
People with disabilities should be able to live as independently as possible, including being able to choose where and how to live. Opportunities for independent living and social inclusion are first and foremost created by living in the community. Enhancing community living (No. 8) requires strategic policies which support the move from institutional care to community-based settings, ranging from independent living arrangements to sheltered, supportive living in small-scale settings. It also implies a co-ordinated approach in the provision of user-driven, community-based services and person-centred support structures.
2.7. Fundamental principles
The fundamental principles which govern this Action Plan are:
– non-discrimination;
– equality of opportunities;
– full participation in society of all persons with disabilities;
...
4.3. People with disabilities in need of high level of support
4.4. Children and young people with disabilities
The needs of children with disabilities and their families must be carefully assessed by responsible authorities with a view to providing measures of support which enable children to grow up with their families, to be included in the community and local children’s life and activities. Children with disabilities need to receive education to enrich their lives and enable them to reach their maximum potential.
Quality service provision and family support structures can ensure a rich and developing childhood and lay the foundation for a participative and independent adult life. It is important therefore that policy makers take into account the needs of children with disabilities and their families when designing disability policies and mainstream policies for children and families.”
2. The Parliamentary Assembly Resolution 1642(2009) on Access to rights for people with disabilities and their full and active participation in society, reaffirmed by the Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1854 (2009) of 26 January 2009
39. The relevant part of the Parliamentary Assembly Resolution 1642(2009) on Access to rights for people with disabilities and their full and active participation in society reads:
“8. The Assembly considers that in order to enable the active participation of people with disabilities in society, it is imperative that the right to live in the community be upheld. It invites member states to:
...
8.2. provide adequate and sustained assistance to families, above all through human and material (particularly financial) means, to enable them to support their disabled family member at home; ...
12. The Assembly considers that the creation of a society for all implies equal access for all citizens to the environment in which they live. ...”
C. European Union
40. The relevant provisions of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (2000/C 364/01) read:
Article 21
Non-discrimination
“1. Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.
2. Within the scope of application of the Treaty establishing the European Community and of the Treaty on European Union, and without prejudice to the special provisions of those Treaties, any discrimination on grounds of nationality shall be prohibited.”
Article 26
Integration of persons with disabilities
“The Union recognises and respects the right of persons with disabilities to benefit from measures designed to ensure their independence, social and occupational integration and participation in the life of the community.”
41. On 17 July 2008, in the case C-303/06, S. Coleman v Attridge Law and Steve Law, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) dealt with the question whether Directive 2000/78 of 27 November 2000, establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation, must be interpreted as prohibiting direct discrimination on grounds of disability only in respect of an employee who is himself disabled, or whether the principle of equal treatment and the prohibition of direct discrimination apply equally to an employee who is not himself disabled but who is treated less favourably by reason of the disability of his child, for whom he is the primary provider of the care required by virtue of the child’s condition. In this connection the ECJ concluded:
“56. ... Directive 2000/78, and, in particular, Articles 1 and 2(1) and (2)(a) thereof, must be interpreted as meaning that the prohibition of direct discrimination laid down by those provisions is not limited only to people who are themselves disabled. Where an employer treats an employee who is not himself disabled less favourably than another employee is, has been or would be treated in a comparable situation, and it is established that the less favourable treatment of that employee is based on the disability of his child, whose care is provided primarily by that employee, such treatment is contrary to the prohibition of direct discrimination laid down by Article 2(2)(a).”
42. On 16 July 2015, in the case C?83/14, CHEZ Razpredelenie Bulgaria AD, the Grand Chamber of the ECJ dealt with the question of indirect discrimination on the grounds of ethnic origin related to the interpretation of the Directive 2000/43/EC of 29 June 2000, implementing the principle of equal treatment between persons irrespective of racial or ethnic origin, and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, in particular whether the principle of equal treatment is to benefit only persons who actually possess the racial or ethnic origin concerned or also persons who, although not being of the racial or ethnic origin in question, nevertheless suffer less favourable treatment on those grounds. The relevant part of the judgment reads:
“56. ... the Court’s case-law, already recalled in paragraph 42 of the present judgment, under which the scope of Directive 2000/43 cannot, in the light of its objective and the nature of the rights which it seeks to safeguard, be defined restrictively, is, in this instance, such as to justify the interpretation that the principle of equal treatment to which that directive refers applies not to a particular category of person[s] but by reference to the grounds mentioned in Article 1 thereof, so that that principle is intended to benefit also persons who, although not themselves a member of the race or ethnic group concerned, nevertheless suffer less favourable treatment or a particular disadvantage on one of those grounds (see, by analogy, judgment in Coleman, C?303/06, EU:C:2008:415, paragraphs 38 and 50).”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TAKEN ALONE AND IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
43. The applicant complained of alleged discrimination in connection with an unfair application of domestic tax legislation. He relied on Article 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which read as follows:
Article 14
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ arguments
44. The Government argued that the applicant had failed to raise his discrimination complaint during the proceedings before the administrative authorities concerning the adoption of the decision on his request for tax exemption. In particular, he had not relied on the provisions of the Prevention of Discrimination Act in his appeal against the first-instance decision nor had he raised the matter in his administrative action before the High Administrative Court. Moreover, he could have instituted separate civil proceedings for damages under the Prevention of Discrimination Act but he had failed to avail himself of that opportunity. Thereby, he had failed to use the effective domestic remedies concerning the allegations of discrimination. The Government conceded that the Constitutional Court had not declared the applicant’s constitutional complaint inadmissible for non-exhaustion of remedies but they considered, without elaborating further on the matter, that the provision on exhaustion of remedies under the Constitutional Court Act had a different scope and meaning from the rule of exhaustion of remedies under the Convention. The Government also pointed out that in his constitutional complaint the applicant had failed to cite the exact provision of the Constitution guaranteeing the right to property.
45. The applicant submitted that he had properly exhausted remedies before the administrative authorities and the Constitutional Court. In particular, his complaints at the domestic level concerning the alleged discrimination by unfair application of the tax legislation had not been distinguishable so as to require a separate examination of the discrimination from the property complaint. Thus, by properly exhausting the administrative remedies he had not been required to pursue another remedy under the Prevention of Discrimination Act with the same objective since it was the Court’s well-established case-law that in the case of several potentially effective remedies an applicant was required to use only one of them. In any case, the Constitutional Court had not declared his constitutional complaint inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies, which suggested that he had properly exhausted the relevant remedies before the administrative authorities. The applicant also stressed that he had properly raised his complaints before the Constitutional Court, complaining in substance of a discriminatory violation of his property rights related to an unfair application of the tax legislation.
2. The Court’s assessment
46. The Court reiterates that under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, it may only deal with an application after all domestic remedies have been exhausted. States are dispensed from answering before an international body for their acts before they have had an opportunity to put matters right through their own legal system, and those who wish to invoke the supervisory jurisdiction of the Court as concerns complaints against a State are thus obliged to use first the remedies provided by the national legal system. The obligation to exhaust domestic remedies therefore requires an applicant to make normal use of remedies which are available and sufficient in respect of his or her Convention grievances. The existence of the remedies in question must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness (see Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia (preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, §§ 70-71, 25 March 2014; and Gherghina v. Romania (dec.) [GC], no. 42219/07, § 85, 9 July 2015).
47. Article 35 § 1 also requires that the complaints intended to be made subsequently in Strasbourg should have been made to the appropriate domestic body, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law and, further, that any procedural means that might prevent a breach of the Convention should have been used (see Vu?kovi? and Others, cited above, § 72).
48. However, in the event of there being a number of domestic remedies which an individual can pursue, that person is entitled to choose a remedy which addresses his or her essential grievance. In other words, when a remedy has been pursued, use of another remedy which has essentially the same objective is not required (see T.W. v. Malta [GC], no. 25644/94, § 34, 29 April 1999; Moreira Barbosa v. Portugal (dec.), no. 65681/01, ECHR 2004-V; and Jeli?i? v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 41183/02, 15 November 2005; and Jasinskis v. Latvia, no. 45744/08, § 50, 21 December 2010).
49. The Court notes at the outset that there is no dispute between the parties that the Prevention of Discrimination Act provides two alternative avenues through which an individual can seek protection from discrimination. In particular, an individual may raise his or her discrimination complaint in the proceedings concerning the main subject matter of a dispute, or he or she may opt for separate civil proceedings, as provided under section 17 of that Act (see paragraphs 26-27 above).
50. In the case at issue the applicant contended during the administrative proceedings that the competent tax authorities had failed to treat his situation differently when determining the question of tax exemption for solving his housing needs given the disability of his child and the needs of his family. However, the High Administrative Court considered these arguments irrelevant and declined to give any ruling to that effect (see paragraphs 15-16 above). The Court finds that the applicant thereby raised in substance his discrimination complaint related to his property rights in these administrative proceedings (compare Glor v. Switzerland, no. 13444/04, § 55, ECHR 2009). He was therefore not required to pursue another remedy under the Prevention of Discrimination Act with essentially the same objective in order to meet the requirements of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (see paragraph 48 above).
51. In any case, the Court notes that the Constitutional Court did not declare the applicant’s constitutional complaint inadmissible for non-exhaustion of legal remedies, as it was its practice in other cases concerning discrimination complaints where the appellants had not properly exhausted remedies before the lower domestic authorities (see paragraphs 29-30 above). Accordingly, the Court has no reason to doubt the applicant’s proper use of remedies before the administrative and judicial authorities (see Vladimir Romanov v. Russia, no. 41461/02, § 52, 24 July 2008; Bjedov v. Croatia, no. 42150/09, § 48, 29 May 2012; and Zrili? v. Croatia, no. 46726/11, § 49, 3 October 2013).
52. As to the Government’s argument that the applicant had failed to cite the exact provision of the Constitution guaranteeing the right to property in his constitutional complaint, the Court notes that the applicant expressly relied on Article 14 of the Constitution, guaranteeing protection from discrimination, and complained of discrimination by allegedly unfair application of the relevant tax legislation (see paragraph 17 above). He thereby, by raising explicitly his discrimination complaint, which was in substance related to his property rights, provided the Constitutional Court with the opportunity which is in principle intended to be afforded to Contracting States by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, namely of putting right the violations alleged against them (see, amongst many others, Gäfgen v. Germany [GC], no. 22978/05, §§ 144-146, ECHR 2010; Lelas v. Croatia, no. 55555/08, § 51, 20 May 2010; Karapanagiotou and Others v. Greece, no. 1571/08, § 29, 28 October 2010; Bjedov, cited above, § 48; Tarbuk v. Croatia, no. 31360/10, § 32, 11 December 2012; and Ja?imovi? v. Croatia, no. 22688/09, §§ 40-41, 31 October 2013).
53. The Court therefore rejects the Government’s objection. It also notes that the applicant’s complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant
54. The applicant submitted that the domestic authorities had established his liability to pay the tax on the basis of an imprecise and unforeseeable provision and without a proper assessment of the particular circumstances of his case. Moreover, they had failed to make any assessment of proportionality of the interference with his property rights. The applicant therefore considered that the refusal to grant him the tax exemption imposed an excessive individual burden on him, contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Whereas the applicant accepted that the domestic authorities enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation in the matters of taxation, he pointed out that it was the Court’s well-established case-law that their discretion could not be exercised in a manner incompatible with Article 14 of the Convention.
55. The applicant pointed out that the reason for the refusal of his request for tax exemption was the fact that, under the domestic authorities’ understanding of section 11(9.5) of the Real Property Transfer Act, the flat he had owned had been suitable for the housing needs of his family, in view of its surface area (section 11(9.3) of the Real Property Transfer Act) and other infrastructural requirements. Further conditions, such as value of the previously owned property (section 11(9.6) of the Real Property Transfer Act), had had no bearing in the domestic authorities’ assessment of his case. This had suggested that in a case such as his, where an individual had already owned a real property, the relevant law envisaged the assessment of the suitability of the previously owned property as the central element for deciding on requests for tax exemption when buying a new real property suitable for living. However, in the applicant’s view, the domestic authorities had failed to conduct an adequate assessment of the circumstances of his case and thus obviously deprived him of adequate procedural means for the protection of his rights.
56. The applicant also pointed out that he had not sought any preferential status but had merely requested the authorities to exempt him from the obligation to pay tax due to the particular circumstances of his case. For the applicant it was obvious that he had not sought tax exemption so as to become unjustly enriched, since he had sold his old flat in order to buy a smaller real property adapted to the needs of his family related to the disability of his son.
57. The applicant further argued that accessibility, as a fundamental feature of housing, qualified as a basic infrastructure equally for all. Thus, any difference in treatment in that respect would imply discrimination. Moreover, in view of the principle of reasonable accommodation, the decisions of the domestic authorities, which failed to adapt the definitions they had used with regard to the particular needs of persons with disabilities, suggested indirect discrimination or discrimination by failure to treat differently people whose situations significantly differed.
58. In the applicant’s view the ground for his discrimination was disability by association related to the needs of his son which had been ignored by the competent domestic authorities. In particular, their assessment of the basic infrastructural requirements for adequate housing had been conducted with regard to the needs of able-bodied people ignoring the fact that the existence of a lift for a disabled person was a fundamental and indispensable feature for housing mandated by the need for an easy and unencumbered access. The authorities had thus discriminated him against by failing to interpret the term “property that satisfies a family’s housing needs” in a way taking into consideration the accessibility of the property in question. This discriminatory treatment, in the applicant’s view, had no reasonable justification, particularly given that the problem of accessibility impeded his son’s possibility to go out of the flat and thereby restricted all his other rights, such as to adequate health treatment, education and personal development. That consequently affected the entire family which had needed to cope with the problem of accessibility and also had to bear a significant financial burden related to his son’s disability.
(b) The Government
59. The Government accepted that there had been an interference with the applicant’s property rights but they considered that such interference had been lawful, that it had pursued a legitimate aim of securing public finances and that it had been proportionate. Specifically, the Government stressed that the State enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation in matters of taxation and that the domestic authorities had been best placed to assess individual cases. In the case of the applicant, the domestic authorities had sufficiently taken into account his personal situation but had considered that he could not be exempted from taxation as he had not met the requirements under the relevant domestic law.
60. In particular, the Government submitted that section 11 of the Real Property Transfer Act was clear to the effect that a tax exemption could be granted only if the conditions under that provision had been cumulatively met. In the case at issue, the applicant had failed to meet two conditions. First, the flat he had owned at the moment when he had bought the house objectively satisfied the requirements for adequate housing for him and his family. It had basic infrastructure and satisfied hygiene and technical requirements and the tax authorities had no discretion in assessing the term “housing needs”. In the Government’s view, the tax authorities were neither equipped nor competent to objectively assess numerous specific housing needs of persons who sought tax exemption. With regard to the second condition, the Government submitted that the applicant had not met the value requirement in that he had owned a flat of a significant value. Therefore, the fact that the building was not equipped with a lift had been of no relevance. It was in fact the intention of the relevant domestic law to provide tax exemption as an assistance to those individuals who were buying their first real property and in particular those who did not have any property of a significant value. In the case at issue, the domestic authorities had acted within their margin of appreciation and they had accordingly assessed that the applicant did not need any such financial assistance, which led to the dismissal of his request for tax exemption. Accordingly, in the Government’s view, the applicant had not been required to bear an excessive individual burden.
61. The Government also argued that there had been no discriminatory treatment of the applicant related to the disability of his child since the reason for the dismissal of his tax exemption request was his financial situation. This had an objective and reasonable justification in that the State had sought to protect financially disadvantaged individuals, which the applicant was not given that he had owned an adequate flat.
62. The Government further stressed that the State, as a party to the CRPD, had implemented a number of positive measures aimed at securing accessibility for disabled people and that almost seventy per cent of public buildings in Zagreb had undergone adaptation to that effect. Moreover, a recent visit by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Disability to Croatia had applauded these efforts made by the State. With regard in particular to the tax exemptions under the Real Property Transfer Act, the Government stressed that the positive measures implemented by the State were primarily aimed at financially disadvantaged individuals and they could not address the needs of all vulnerable groups. However, the State had put in place various tax advantages for disabled persons related, for instance, to income and health services taxation. Moreover, in harmonising its activities with the relevant international requirements, the State had adopted the National strategy for securing equal opportunities for the persons with disability for the period between 2007 and 2015, and is actively conducting various activities at the national and local levels for meeting the needs of disabled people.
(c) The third-party intervention
63. The third-party interveners submitted that the relevant standards of the CRPD, in particular related to the concepts of accessibility, non-discrimination and reasonable accommodation, should inform the Court in assessing the State’s compliance with its Convention obligations concerning people with disabilities. They in particular submitted that there was an intimate link between accessibility and reasonable accommodation which ultimately had the same goal of ensuring effective enjoyment and exercise of rights on an equal basis with others. There were, however, differences between the two concepts in that the measure of general accessibility should be provided in anticipation of the accessibility needs of the disabled population, whereas reasonable accommodation included specific measures directed at a particular individual with a disability, which should be provided immediately.
64. The third-party interveners further pointed out that international human rights law had developed to ensure prohibition of discrimination by association, which concerned instances where an individual was discriminated against not on the grounds of his or her own characteristic but due to his or her relationship to someone else who had such a characteristic. This principle was well-enshrined in several jurisdictions across Europe and could also be found in the Croatian Prevention of Discrimination Act. There had also been an increasing call by international human rights mechanisms for positive measures to be taken by the State to ensure access to housing by persons with disabilities. National jurisdictions, in particular within the European Union, had started to implement these actions, some of which also included tax reductions or exemptions.
65. The third-party interveners also stressed that the enjoyment of rights by persons with disabilities should be secured without any discrimination. Moreover, living in inaccessible homes hindered participation in the life of the community and led to isolation and segregation of the disabled individual and the entire family. In particular, the third-party interveners emphasised that failure to provide reasonable accommodation amounted to disability-based discrimination.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
66. The Court notes that the central tenet of the applicant’s complaint is his alleged discriminatory treatment in the application of the relevant tax legislation, contrary to Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court will therefore address his complaint in this respect on the basis of the relevant principles following from its case-law under Article 14 of the Convention.
67. The Court has consistently held that Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded thereby. Although the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of those provisions – and to this extent it is autonomous – there can be no room for its application unless the facts at issue fall within the ambit of one or more of them. The prohibition of discrimination enshrined in Article 14 thus extends beyond the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms which the Convention and the Protocols thereto require each State to guarantee. It applies also to those additional rights, falling within the general scope of any Convention Article, for which the State has voluntarily decided to provide (see, among many other authorities, E.B. v. France [GC], no. 43546/02, §§ 47-48, 22 January 2008; and Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 63, ECHR 2010).
68. The Court has established in its case-law that only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or status, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14 (see Eweida and Others v. the United Kingdom, no. 48420/10, § 86, 15 January 2013).
69. Generally, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (see X and Others v. Austria [GC], no. 19010/07, § 98, 19 February 2013). However, not every difference in treatment will amount to a violation of Article 14. A difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see Fabris v. France [GC], no. 16574/08, § 56, ECHR 2013 (extracts); Weller v. Hungary, no. 44399/05, § 27, 31 March 2009; and Top?i?-Rosenberg v. Croatia, no. 19391/11, § 36, 14 November 2013).
70. Moreover, Article 14 does not prohibit Contracting Parties from treating groups differently in order to correct “factual inequalities” between them. Indeed, the right not to be discriminated against in the enjoyment of the rights guaranteed under the Convention is also violated when States without an objective and reasonable justification fail to treat differently persons whose situations are significantly different (see Thlimmenos v. Greece [GC], no. 34369/97, § 44, ECHR 2000-IV; Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 51, ECHR 2006 VI; and Sejdi? and Finci v. Bosnia and Herzegovina [GC], nos. 27996/06 and 34836/06, § 44, ECHR 2009).
71. The Court has also accepted that a general policy or measure that has disproportionately prejudicial effects on a particular group may be considered discriminatory notwithstanding that it is not specifically aimed at that group, and that discrimination potentially contrary to the Convention may result from a de facto situation (see D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007 IV; and Kuri? and Others v. Slovenia [GC], no. 26828/06, § 388, ECHR 2012 (extracts)). This is only the case, however, if such policy or measure has no “objective and reasonable” justification, that is, if it does not pursue a “legitimate aim” or if there is not a “reasonable relationship of proportionality” between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see S.A.S. v. France [GC], no. 43835/11, § 161, ECHR 2014 (extracts)).
72. The Contracting States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment. The scope of the margin of appreciation will vary according to the circumstances, the subject matter and the background. The same is true with regard to the necessity to treat groups differently in order to correct “factual inequalities between them” (see Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 88, ECHR 2011).
73. On the one hand, wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy, for example (see Hämäläinen v. Finland [GC], no. 37359/09, § 109, ECHR 2014). This also includes measures in the area of taxation. However, any such measures must be implemented in a non-discriminatory manner and comply with the requirements of proportionality (see R.Sz. v. Hungary, no. 41838/11, § 54, 2 July 2013). On the other hand, if a restriction on fundamental rights applies to a particularly vulnerable group in society that has suffered considerable discrimination in the past, then the State’s margin of appreciation is substantially narrower and it must have very weighty reasons for the restrictions in question. The reason for this approach, which questions certain classifications per se, is that such groups were historically subject to prejudice with lasting consequences, resulting in their social exclusion. Such prejudice could entail legislative stereotyping which prohibits the individualised evaluation of their capacities and needs. The Court has already identified a number of such vulnerable groups that suffered different treatment on account of their characteristic or status, including disability (see Glor, cited above, § 84; Alajos Kiss v. Hungary, no. 38832/06, § 42, 20 May 2010; and Kiyutin v. Russia, no. 2700/10, § 63, ECHR 2011). Moreover, with regard to all actions concerning children with disabilities the best interest of the child must be a primary consideration (see paragraph 34 above; Article 7(2) CRPD). In any case, however, irrespective of the scope of the State’s margin of appreciation the final decision as to the observance of the Convention’s requirements rests with the Court (see, inter alia, Konstantin Markin v. Russia [GC], no. 30078/06, § 126, ECHR 2012 (extracts)).
74. Lastly, as to the burden of proof in relation to Article 14 of the Convention, the Court has held that once the applicant has shown a difference in treatment, it is for the Government to show that it was justified (see D.H. and Others, cited above, § 177; Kuri? and Others, cited above, § 389; Vallianatos and Others v. Greece [GC], nos. 29381/09 and 32684/09, § 85, ECHR 2013 (extracts)).
(b) Application of these principles to the present case
(i) Whether the facts underlying the complaint fall within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
75. The Court notes that it is undisputed between the parties that the circumstances of the present case, concerning matters of taxation, fall within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, rendering Article 14 of the Convention applicable. The Court sees no reason to hold otherwise (see, for example, Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 59, ECHR 2008).
(ii) Whether the disability of the applicant’s child brought the applicant’s situation within the term “other status” in Article 14 of the Convention
76. The Court has already held that a person’s health status, including disability and various health impairments fall within the term “other status” in the text of Article 14 of the Convention (see Glor, cited above, § 80; Kiyutin, cited above, § 57; and I.B. v. Greece, no. 552/10, § 73, ECHR 2013).
77. The case at hand concerns a situation in which the applicant did not allege discriminatory treatment related to his own disability but rather his alleged unfavourable treatment on the basis of the disability of his child, with whom he lives and for whom he provides care. In other words, in the present case the question arises to what extent the applicant, who does not himself belong to a disadvantaged group, nevertheless suffers less favourable treatment on the grounds related to the disability of his child (compare paragraphs 41-42 above).
78. In this connection the Court reiterates that the words “other status” have generally been given a wide meaning in its case-law (see Carson and Others, cited above, § 70) and their interpretation has not been limited to characteristics which are personal in the sense that they are innate or inherent (see Clift v. the United Kingdom, no. 7205/07, §§ 56-59, 13 July 2010). Accordingly, for instance, a question of discrimination arose in cases where the status of applicants, which served as the alleged basis for a discriminatory treatment, was determined in relation to their family situation, such as the place of residence of their children (see Efe v. Austria, no. 9134/06, § 48, 8 January 2013). It thus follows, in the light of its objective and nature of the rights which it seeks to safeguard, that Article 14 of the Convention also covers instances in which an individual is treated less favourably on the basis of another person’s status or protected characteristics.
79. The Court therefore finds that the alleged discriminatory treatment of the applicant on account of the disability of his child, with whom he has close personal links and for whom he provides care, is a form of disability based discrimination covered by Article 14 of the Convention.
(iii) Whether there was a difference of treatment between persons in relevantly similar positions or a failure to treat differently persons in relevantly different situations
80. The Court further observes that the applicant alleged discriminatory treatment in the application of the domestic real property tax legislation in comparison to other buyers of real properties, by which they were solving their housing needs in circumstances where the property they owned did not meet the housing needs of their families. In particular, the applicant contended that by selling his flat, situated on the third floor of a residential building in Zagreb, and moving to a house in Samobor, he had for the first time created housing conditions adapted to the situation which his family faced after the birth of his disabled child. This specifically relates to the fact that the residential building where the flat was located was not equipped with a lift and it was therefore, as his son grew, becoming very difficult for the applicant and his family to take him out of the flat to see a doctor, or to take him for physiotherapy, and to kindergarten or school, and to meet his other social needs (see paragraph 10 above).
81. The Court notes that there is no dispute between the parties that the applicant’s son was a person with profound and multiple disabilities and that he required full-time care and attention. This also conclusively follows from the report of the social care services which declared him 100 percent disabled (see paragraph 9 above). Accordingly, an issue arises as to whether the flat in question could be considered as accommodation meeting the housing needs of the applicant’s family after the birth of his disabled child.
82. In the Court’s view, there can be no question that the applicant’s flat in Zagreb, which he had bought three years before the birth of his son, situated on the third floor of a residential building without a lift, severely impaired his son’s mobility and consequently threatened his personal development and the ability to reach his maximum potential, making it extremely difficult for him to fully participate in the community and children’s educative, cultural and social activities. The absence of a lift must have impeded the quality of living of the applicant’s family and in particular his son to a similar extent that an able-bodied person would experience by, for example, having a flat on the third floor of a residential building without appropriate access to it or by having an impaired access to the relevant public utilities.
83. The Court therefore finds that by seeking to replace the flat in question by buying a house that was adapted to the needs of his family, the applicant was in a comparable position to any other person who was replacing a flat or a house by buying another real property equipped with, in the words of the relevant domestic tax legislation, basic infrastructure and technical accommodation requirements (see paragraph 24 above). His situation nevertheless differed with regard to the meaning of the term “basic infrastructure requirements” which, in view of his son’s disability and the relevant national and international standards on the matter (see paragraphs 25 and 34-42 above), implied the necessary accessibility facilities such as, in the concrete case, the existence of a lift.
84. However, the Court notes that the Samobor Tax Office considered that, given the surface area of the flat which the applicant had owned in Zagreb and the existence of infrastructure, such as electricity, water and access to other public utilities, it could not be said that the applicant had not had accommodation meeting the housing needs of his family. Accordingly, he was excluded from benefiting from a tax exemption for the purchase of a real property meeting the housing needs of his family, without any consideration being given to the applicant’s arguments concerning the specific needs of his family related to the disability of his child (see paragraphs 11-12 above).
85. This decision was upheld by the Ministry and the High Administrative Court holding that it could not be said that by buying the house the applicant had bought a real property solving his housing needs given that, in their view, the flat he had owned satisfied the basic infrastructure requirements. Again, as with the Samobor Tax Office, no consideration was given to the specific needs of the applicant’s family related to the disability of his child. Moreover, the High Administrative Court considered his arguments to that effect irrelevant (see paragraphs 15 16 above). The Constitutional Court also did not address the matter (see paragraph 18 above).
86. In view of the above, the Court finds that there is no doubt that the competent domestic authorities failed to recognise the factual specificity of the applicant’s situation with regard to the question of basic infrastructure and technical accommodation requirements meeting the housing needs of his family. The domestic authorities adopted an over-restrictive position with regard to the applicant’s particular case, by not taking into account the specific needs of the applicant and his family when applying the condition relating to “basic infrastructure requirements” in their case as opposed to other cases where elements such as the surface area of a flat, or access to electricity, water and other public utilities, could have suggested adequate and sufficient basic infrastructure requirements.
87. It remains to be seen whether the same treatment of the applicant as that of any other buyer of real property had an objective and reasonable justification (see paragraphs 70 and 74 above).
(iv) Whether there was objective and reasonable justification
88. In justifying the decisions of the domestic authorities, the Government advanced two arguments. First, the Government argued that the relevant domestic law provided for objective criteria for establishing the existence of basic infrastructure requirements of adequate housing, which left no discretion for an interpretation to the administrative tax authorities in a particular case; and secondly, that the applicant had not met the financial requirements for a tax exemption given his financial situation.
89. With regard to the first argument the Court cannot fail to observe that it is almost tantamount to the Government’s concession that the relevant domestic authorities were not empowered to seek a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised in the applicant’s particular case. Hence, contrary to the requirements of Article 14 of the Convention, they were unable to provide objective and reasonable justification for their failure to correct the factual inequality pertinent to the applicant’s case (see paragraph 60 above).
90. The Court nevertheless notes, being well aware that it is in the first place for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply the domestic law (see Glor, cited above, § 91), that the relevant provision of the Real Property Transfer Act is couched in rather general terms referring merely to the “basic infrastructure” and “hygiene and technical requirements” (see paragraph 24 above, section 11(9.5) of the Real Property Transfer Act).
91. The Court further observes that other relevant provisions of the domestic law provide some guidance with regard to the question of basic requirements of accessibility for persons with disabilities. Thus, for instance, the By-law on the accessibility of buildings to persons with disabilities and reduced mobility envisages the existence of a lift as one of the basic elements of accessibility for persons with disabilities (see paragraph 25 above). However, there is nothing to suggest that any of the competent domestic authorities in the case at hand gave any consideration to such enactments in the relevant domestic law capable of complementing the meaning of terms under the Real Property Transfer Act.
92. Moreover, the Court notes that by adhering to the requirements set out in the CRPD the respondent State undertook an obligation to take into consideration its relevant principles, such as reasonable accommodation, accessibility and non-discrimination against persons with disabilities with regard to their full and equal participation in all aspects of social life (see paragraph 34-37 above), and in this sphere the domestic authorities have, as asserted by the Government, undertook certain relevant measures (see paragraph 62 above). In the case in question, however, the relevant domestic authorities gave no consideration to these international obligations which the State undertook to respect.
93. It accordingly follows, contrary to what the Government asserted, that the issue in the case at hand is not the one in which the relevant domestic legislation left no room for an individual evaluation of the tax exemption requests of persons in the applicant’s situation. The issue in the instant case is rather that the manner in which the legislation was applied in practice failed to sufficiently accommodate the requirements of the specific aspects of the applicant’s case related to the disability of his child and, in particular, to the interpretation of the term “basic infrastructure requirements” for the housing of a disabled person (compare Top?i? Rosenberg, cited above, §§ 40-49).
94. Furthermore, according to the second argument advanced by the Government, the applicant was excluded from the beneficiaries of the real property transfer tax exemption on the grounds of his financial situation and in particular the value of the flat he had previously owned in Zagreb. The alleged reason for this was the fact that the tax exemption under the Real Property Transfer Act was intended to protect financially disadvantaged persons which, in the Government’s view, the applicant was not (see paragraph 61 above).
95. The Court finds that in principle the protection of financially disadvantaged persons by applying the relevant measures of tax exemption could be considered as objective justification for an alleged discriminatory treatment. Indeed, it would appear that the question of the financial situation of an individual applying for a real property transfer tax exemption was cumulatively relevant together with other factors when assessing his or her tax obligation (see paragraph 32 above and also paragraph 24 above, section 11(9.5) and (9.6) of the Real Property Transfer Tax Act).
96. However, with regard to the applicant’s particular case, the Court would note that it follows from all decisions of the competent domestic authorities that the reason for excluding the applicant from the scope of tax exemption beneficiaries was the fact that his flat in Zagreb was considered as meeting the basic infrastructure requirements for the housing needs of his family (see paragraphs 12, 14 and 16 above). The only reference to the financial element of the tax exemption provision under the Real Property Transfer Act (see paragraph 24 above, section 11(9.6) of the Real Property Transfer Act) was made by the Ministry (see paragraph 14 above). However, this was done without any concrete assessment of the relevant financial aspects of the applicant’s case, which was a well-established practice of the domestic authorities in other cases where that provision was relied upon (see paragraph 33 above).
97. Accordingly, accepting the Government’s argument to this effect would imply speculation on the part of the Court concerning the concrete relevance of the applicant’s financial situation for his tax exemption request, within the meaning of the relevant domestic law (compare, by contrast, Glor, cited above, § 90). The Court is therefore unable to accept that the protection of financially disadvantaged persons was the reason justifying the impugned discriminatory treatment of the applicant.
98. In view of the above, and in particular in the absence of the relevant evaluation of all the circumstances of the case by the competent domestic authorities, the Court does not find that they provided objective and reasonable justification for their failure to take into account the inequality pertinent to the applicant’s situation when making an assessment of his tax obligation.
99. The Court therefore finds that there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
100. This makes it unnecessary for the Court to consider separately the applicant’s complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone (see, for example, Zeman v. Austria, no. 23960/02, § 42, 29 June 2006).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLES 8 AND 14 OF THE CONVENTION
101. The applicant complained of a breach of the right to respect for his private and family life and his home related to the unfair and discriminatory application of domestic tax legislation. He relied on Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention.
102. The Government contested those allegations.
103. In the circumstances of the present case, the Court is of the view that the inequality of treatment of which the applicant claimed to be a victim has been sufficiently taken into account in the above assessment that has led to the finding of a violation of Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Accordingly, it finds that – while this complaint is also admissible – there is no cause for a separate examination of the same facts from the standpoint of Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention (see, for example, Mazurek v. France, no. 34406/97, § 56, ECHR 2000 II; and Efe, cited above, § 55).
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 12
104. The applicant further complained that he was discriminated against by the manner of application of the tax legislation which failed to distinguish his situation from the general situation falling under the relevant provisions on tax exemption. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 12.
105. The Government contested that argument.
106. The Court has already found that the manner of application of the tax legislation which failed to distinguish the applicant’s situation from the general situation falling under the relevant provisions on tax exemption amounted to discrimination in breach of Article 14 taken together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
107. Having regard to that finding, the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine separately whether, in this case, there has also been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 to the Convention (compare Sejdi? and Finci, cited above, § 51; and Savez crkava “Rije? života” and Others v. Croatia, no. 7798/08, §§ 114-115, 9 December 2010).
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
108. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
109. The applicant claimed 11,010.00 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage concerning the amount of tax he had been obliged to pay, and EUR 10,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
110. The Government considered the applicant’s claim excessive, unfounded and unsubstantiated.
111. As to the pecuniary damage claimed, the Court, having regard to its findings concerning Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 99 above), concerning the discrimination against the applicant related to the application of the domestic tax legislation, considers that it cannot speculate on the extent of the applicant’s domestic tax obligations, particularly related to the question whether his financial situation justifies a tax exemption (see paragraphs 95 97 above). Thus, being unable to assess the applicant’s claim for pecuniary damage, the Court refers to the opportunity available to the applicant to request reopening of the proceedings in accordance with section 76 of the Administrative Disputes Act (see paragraph 28 above), which would allow for a fresh examination of his claim at the domestic level.
112. On the other hand, the Court considers that the applicant must have sustained non-pecuniary damage which is not sufficiently compensated by the finding of a violation. Ruling on an equitable basis, it awards the applicant EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on this amount.
B. Costs and expenses
113. The applicant also claimed EUR 11,652.49 and 4,900 pounds sterling (GBP; approximately EUR 6,800) for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and for those incurred before the Court.
114. The Government considered the applicant’s claim unfounded and unsubstantiated.
115. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 11,500 covering costs under all heads, plus any tax that may be chargeable.
C. Default interest
116. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

3. Holds that there is no need to examine separately the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone;

4. Holds that no separate issue arises under Article 8 taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, or under Article 1 of Protocol No. 12;

5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Croatian kunas (HRK) at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 11,500 (eleven thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 March 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith I?il Karaka?
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Violazione di Articolo 14+P1-1 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - la Discriminazione) (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà) Riapertura della causa causa (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa) danno Non- patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non- patrimoniale soddisfazione Equa)



SECONDA SEZIONE






CAUSA GUBERINA C. CROATIA

(Richiesta n. 23682/13)











SENTENZA



STRASBOURG


22 marzo 2016



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte nell’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Guberina c. Croatia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Il ?Karaka, ?Presidente
Nebojša Vuini?,
Paul Lemmens,
Valeriu Grico?,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro,
Georges Ravarani, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 23 febbraio 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 23682/13) contro la Repubblica di Croatia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino croato, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 28 marzo 2013.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Zagabria, assistito con OMISSIS un avvocato qualificò in Romania e basato a Londra. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il richiedente si lamentò della richiesta ingiusta di legislazione di tassa nazionale e la discriminazione allegato in che riguardo, contrari ad Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione, ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12.
4. 17 luglio 2013 le azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione, e sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12, fu comunicato al Governo. 25 marzo 214 il Presidente della Sezione al quale la causa fu assegnata decise, sotto Decida 54 § 2 (il c) degli Articoli di Corte, invitare le parti per presentare le ulteriori osservazioni in riguardo dei problemi sollevò sotto Articolo 8 preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
5. In oltre, commenti di terzo-parte furono ricevuti congiuntamente dall'Unione croata di Associazioni di Persone con Invalidità (SOIH), il Foro di Invalidità europeo (EDF) e l'Alleanza di Invalidità Internazionale (IDA) (l'Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 44 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1969 e vive in Samobor.
Sfondo di A. alla causa
7. Il richiedente posseduto un appartamento in Zagabria situò sul terzo pavimento di un edificio residenziale, dove lui visse con sua moglie e due figli.
8. Nel 2003, tre anni dopo che lui aveva comprato l'appartamento, la moglie del richiedente partorì il loro terzo figlio. Il figlio nacque con multiplo le invalidità fisiche e mentali.
9. Dopo che la nascita che il figlio ha subito che un numero di trattamenti medici e la sua condizione era sotto la soprintendenza continua dei servizi di cura sociali e competenti. Ad aprile 2008 un perpetrazione competente lo diagnosticò con paralisi cerebrale ed incurabile, ritardo mentale e grave ed epilessia. A settembre 2008 i servizi sociali dichiararono il figlio 100 invalido di percento.
10. A settembre 2006, il richiedente comprò nel frattempo, un alloggio in Samobor, ed in ottobre 2008 che lui ha venduto il suo appartamento. Secondo il richiedente, la ragione per comprare un alloggio era il fatto che l'edificio nel quale fu situato il suo appartamento non aveva ascensore e per che ragione non soddisfece le necessità del suo figlio disabile e la sua famiglia. In particolare, era molto difficile prendere suo figlio dell'appartamento per vedere un dottore, o prenderlo per la fisioterapia ed ad asilo infantile o scuola, e soddisfare le sue altre necessità sociali.
Procedimenti di B. riguardo alla richiesta del richiedente per esenzione dalle imposte
11. 19 ottobre 2006, dopo che lui aveva comprato l'alloggio in Samobor, il richiedente presentò una richiesta di esenzione dalle imposte alle autorità fiscali. Lui si appellò su sezione 11(9) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto che offrì una possibilità di esenzione dalle imposte per una persona che stava comprando un appartamento o un alloggio per risolvere suo o il suo alloggio ha bisogno, e se lui o lei, o suo o i suoi membri di famiglia, non abbia un altro piatto o alloggio che soddisfa il loro alloggio ha bisogno (vedere paragrafo 24 sotto). Nella sua richiesta il richiedente dibattè che l'appartamento che lui ha posseduto non soddisfece le necessità di alloggio della sua famiglia poiché era molto difficile, ed infatti divenendo impossibile, prendere il suo figlio disabile dell'appartamento dal terzo pavimento senza un ascensore dato che lui era in una sedia a rotelle. Il richiedente presentò perciò che lui aveva comprato l'alloggio per costituire disposizioni le necessità di suo figlio.
12. In 6 maggio 2009 l’Ufficio Tasse di Samobor (Ministarstvo Financija-l'uprava di Porezna, l'ured di Podruni ?Zagabria, Ispostava Samobor) respinse la richiesta del richiedente con la dichiarazione seguente di ragioni:
“Sezione 11(9) dell’Atto di Trasferimento di Beni immobili... prevede per un'esenzione dalle imposte per cittadini che stanno comprando il loro primo beni immobili col quale loro stanno risolvendo le loro necessità di alloggio sotto le condizioni che devono essere soddisfatte cumulativamente, incluso il requisito che il debitore di tassa, o suo o i suoi membri di famiglia, non abbia un altro piatto o un alloggio che soddisfa le loro necessità di alloggio. Durante i procedimenti fu stabilito che il debitore di tassa Joško Guberina aveva posseduto un misurando piatto 114,49 metri di piazza, in Zagabria... a che lui aveva venduto 25 novembre 2008... Dato che la superficie di che beni immobili, ed in prospettiva del numero dei membri di famiglia immediati del debitore di tassa (cinque), soddisfatto le necessità di alloggio del debitore di tassa e la sua famiglia immediata, all'interno del significato di sezione 11(9.3) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto, e determinato che soddisfece tutte le necessità di alloggio in termini di igiene e requisiti tecnici così come l'infrastruttura di base (elettricità, acqua e [l'accesso a] le altre utilità pubbliche), sotto sezione 11(9.5) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto, il debitore di tassa non soddisfa le condizioni cumulative previste sotto sezione 11(9) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto. Fu deciso perciò come notato nella parte operativa [della decisione].”
13. L’Ufficio Tasse di Samobor ordinò che il richiedente pagasse 83,594.25 kunas croati (HRK; verso EUR 11,250) in tassa.
14. Il richiedente fece appello contro la decisione sopra al Finanza Ministero (Ministarstvo Financija, Samostalna služba za drugostupanjski upravni postupak; in seguito: il “il Ministero”), e 6 luglio 2009 il Ministero respinse il suo ricorso siccome mal-fondato, mentre girando il ragionamento del Samobor Tassa Ufficio. La parte attinente delle letture di decisione:
“Il Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto (Ufficiale Pubblica, N. 69/07-153/02) prevede in sezione 11(9) per un'esenzione dalle imposte per cittadini che stanno comprando il loro primo beni immobili col quale loro stanno risolvendo le loro necessità di alloggio. Offre inoltre condizioni che il cittadino deve soddisfare in ordine per sé per essere considerato che lui o lei stanno comprando il primo beni immobili col quale lui o lei stanno risolvendo suo o le sue necessità di alloggio. In questo collegamento uno delle condizioni, come offerto 9.5 sotto, richiede che il cittadino ed i membri di suo o la sua famiglia immediata non ha un altro beni immobili (appartamento o alloggio) soddisfacendo il loro alloggio ha bisogno; e sotto 9.6 che è offerto che il cittadino ed i membri di suo o la sua famiglia immediata non deve avere nella loro proprietà un appartamento o un alloggio di festa o un'altra proprietà di un valore significativo. Un'altra proprietà di un valore significativo è anche un appezzamento di terreno dove costruzione è permessa o affari premette dove il cittadino o suo o i suoi membri di famiglia immediati non compiono un registrato [gli affari] l'attività, ed il valore del beni immobili è simile al valore del beni immobili (appartamento o alloggio) quale il cittadino sta comprando.
Dato indubbiamente il rapporto delle disposizioni citate ed i fatti della causa stabilito durante i procedimenti, [il Ministero] considera che il corpo di primo-istanza negò correttamente la richiesta dell'appellante per esenzione dalle imposte... Il diritto ad esenzione dalle imposte esiste se il cittadino, o suo o i suoi membri di famiglia immediati, al momento dell'acquisto [del beni immobili] non possieda, o non possedette, un altro beni immobili che soddisfa il loro alloggio ha bisogno o un appartamento, un alloggio di festa o l'altro beni immobili di un valore significativo. Come questo la causa non è nella causa in questione, determinato che l'appellante al momento dell'acquisto [dell'alloggio] possedette un appartamento in Zagabria... più grande del beni immobili lui stava comprando ed in riguardo del quale lui chiese esenzione dalle imposte, non può essere detto, che con comprando l'appellante l'alloggio comprò il primo beni immobili col quale lui stava risolvendo il suo alloggio ha bisogno.”
15. 7 settembre 2009 il richiedente depositò un'azione amministrativa nella Corte amministrativa Alta (sud di upravni di Visoki Republike Hrvatske), dibattendo che nelle loro decisioni i corpi più bassi avevano ignorato la sua specifica situazione di famiglia ed in particolare l'invalidità del suo figlio e così l'alloggio ha bisogno della sua famiglia. Nella prospettiva del richiedente, era necessario per riconoscere che nella sua particolare causa l'esistenza di un ascensore nell'edificio era lo stesso requisito di infrastructural attinente come accesso per annaffiare e l'elettricità in generale. Lui sottolineò anche che l'alloggio era il primo beni immobili in riguardo del quale lui chiese un'esenzione dalle imposte di trasferimento di beni immobili.
16. 21 marzo 2012 la Corte amministrativa Alta respinse l'azione amministrativa del richiedente siccome mal-fondato, mentre girando il ragionamento dei corpi amministrativi e più bassi. La parte attinente delle letture di sentenza:
“Determinato che l'area di superficie dell'appartamento [quale il richiedente possedette] soddisfatto le necessità di cinque membri della famiglia del querelante (approvvigioni 9.3) e che l'appartamento in questione fu dotato dell'infrastruttura di base ed igiene e requisiti tecnici, l'imputato concluse correttamente che il querelante, nella causa determinata non soddisfece le condizioni per un set di esenzione dalle imposte fuori in sezione 11(9) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto.
Gli argomenti dall'azione amministrativa non hanno effetto su una decisione diversa in questa questione amministrativa e perciò la corte considera che la decisione contestata non violò la legge al danno del querelante.”
17. In 25 maggio 2012 il richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale (sud di Ustavni Republike Hrvatske) appellandosi su Articolo 14 della Costituzione e contendendo, inter l'alia che, determinato lo specifico alloggio ha bisogno della sua famiglia a causa dell'invalidità del suo figlio, lui era stato discriminato contro con una richiesta ingiusta della legislazione di tassa attinente. Lui dibattè in particolare che le autorità amministrative e competenti erano andate a vuoto a correggere l'ineguaglianza che riguarda i fatti che sorge fuori della sua particolare situazione con riguardo ad al significato generalmente implicito del termine requisiti di infrastructural di base che soddisfano le necessità di alloggio della sua famiglia.
18. 26 settembre 2012 la Corte Costituzionale, mentre girando il ragionamento dei corpi più bassi, respinse l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente siccome mal-fondato per motivi che non c'era nessuna violazione dei suoi diritti costituzionali. In particolare, dopo avere esaminato le sue azioni di reclamo dalla prospettiva del diritto ad un processo equanime, la Corte Costituzionale sostenne, che nessun problema sorse con riguardo ad alle altre azioni di reclamo si appellate su col richiedente.
19. La decisione della Corte Costituzionale fu notificata sul rappresentante del richiedente 11 ottobre 2012.
C. le Altre informazioni attinenti
20. Il Governo offrì un rapporto del Ministero di Politica Sociale e Gioventù (politike di socijalne di Ministarstvo i mladih) di 6 novembre 2013 secondo il quale il figlio del richiedente stava ricevendo assistenza valutaria e mensile nell'importo di HRK 1,000 (verso EUR 130) nel periodo fra il 2006 e 10 settembre 2012 di 19 gennaio, e l'importo di HRK 625 (verso EUR 80) dal 11 settembre 2012 in avanti. In oltre, lui era stato preso parte in varie attività di assistenza terapeutiche e sociali, e dal periodo fra il 2010 e 2 ottobre 2011 di 29 giugno la moglie del richiedente era concessa un status speciale riferito all'invalidità del suo figlio durante che periodo lei, inter l'alia, HRK 2,500 ricevuto (verso EUR 300) ogni mese.
21. Secondo il richiedente, spese annuali riferite alle necessità speciali di suo figlio corrispondono a del HRK 80,000 (verso EUR 10,400). Questo concerne HRK 28,800 per la fisioterapia; HRK 4,500 per logopaedics; HRK 900 per un neurologo di figlio; HRK 7,200 per droghe; HRK 21,175 per una sedia a rotelle (e lo Stato offre un appoggio supplementare di HRK 8,900); HRK 7,200 per la terapia da nuoto; e HRK 9,150 per trasporto quotidiano al centro di cura di giorno per dieci mesi.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. diritto nazionale Attinente
1. Costituzione
22. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione della Repubblica di Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998 113/2000, 124/2000 28/2001, 41/2001 55/2001, 76/2010 85/2010 e 5/2014) legga siccome segue:
Articolo 14
“Ognuno nella Repubblica di Croatia godrà di diritti e le libertà nonostante la loro razza, colore, sesso, lingua, religione, credenza politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, proprietà, nascita, istruzione, posizione sociale o le altre caratteristiche.
Tutti saranno uguali di fronte alla legge.”
Articolo 34
“La casa è inviolabile... “
Articolo 35
“Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per e tutela giuridica di suo o lei privato e la vita di famiglia, dignità la reputazione ed onora.”
Articolo 48
“Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito... “
2. Corte Atto costituzionale
23. La parte attinente di sezione 62 del Corte Atto Costituzionale (zakon di Ustavni o il sudu di Ustavnom Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 49/2002) legge siccome segue:
Sezione 62
“1. Chiunque può presentare un reclamo costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale se lui o lei ritengono che un atto individuale da parte di un corpo Statale, un corpo di autogoverno locale o regionale, o un soggetto giuridico con autorità pubblica, riguardando suo o i suoi diritti ed obblighi o un sospetto o l'accusa di un atto penale, ha violato suo o i suoi diritti umani o le libertà fondamentali o suo o il suo diritto ad autogoverno locale o regionale garantito con la Costituzione (in seguito “un diritto costituzionale”)...
2. Se un'altra via di ricorso legale esiste in riguardo della violazione del diritto costituzionale [si lamentò di], un reclamo costituzionale può essere presentato solamente dopo che via di ricorso è usata.”
3. Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto
24. La disposizione attinente di Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto (Zakon o porezu na promet nekretnina, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 69/1997, 26/2000 127/2000 e 153/2002) al tempo lettura attinente:
Sezione 11
“La tassa di trasferimento di beni immobili non sarà pagata con:
...
9. il cittadino che sta comprando suo o lei primo beni immobili (appartamento o alloggio) con che lui o lei stanno risolvendo suo o il suo alloggio ha bisogno se:
...
9.3. l'area di superficie del beni immobili, mentre dipendendo dal numero di membri della famiglia immediata del cittadino, non superi:
...
- per cinque persone, su a 100 metri di piazza,
...
9.5. il cittadino, o membri di suo o la sua famiglia immediata, non abbia un altro beni immobili (appartamento o un alloggio) quale soddisfa le loro necessità di alloggio. Il beni immobili (appartamento o alloggio) quale incontra le necessità di alloggio saranno considerate qualsiasi simile alloggio che ha infrastruttura di base e soddisfa igiene e requisiti tecnici. ...
9.6. il cittadino ed i membri di suo o la sua famiglia immediata non possiede un appartamento, un alloggio di festa e l'altro beni immobili di un valore significativo. Un'altra proprietà di un valore significativo è un appezzamento di terreno dove costruzione è permessa ed affari premette dove il cittadino o suo o i suoi membri di famiglia immediati non compiono un registrato [gli affari] l'attività, ed il valore del beni immobili è simile al valore del beni immobili (appartamento o alloggio) quale il cittadino sta comprando.
...
15. i cittadini che già hanno usato il loro diritto ad un'esenzione dalle imposte di trasferimento di beni immobili sotto le disposizioni 9, 11 e 13 [di questa sezione] non abbia un diritto ad un'altra esenzione dalle imposte di trasferimento di beni immobili.”
4. Con-legge sull'accessibilità di edifici per persone con invalidità e la mobilità ridotto
25. Le disposizioni attinenti della Con-legge sull'accessibilità di edifici a persone con invalidità e la mobilità ridotto (Pravilnik o pristupanosti ?graevina ?osobama s invaliditetom pokretljivosti di smanjene dei, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 151/2005 e 61/2007) prevedere:
Sezione 1
“Questa Con-legge offre le condizioni e la maniera di garantire un accesso non ostruito, la mobilità, sospensione e lavoro per persone con invalidità e la mobilità ridotto (in seguito: accessibilità) così come [la maniera di] migliorando l'accessibilità di edifici per... residenziale... fini...”
Sezione 2
“L'accessibilità, miglioramento dell'accessibilità ed il [i metodi per] adattando all'accessibilità degli edifici assegnò ad in sezione 1 di questa Con-legge sarà garantito con disegno di edificio obbligatorio e costruzione degli edifici così come garantire gli elementi di and/or di accessibilità per adattare alle condizioni di uso di [la mobilità] apparecchiature per persone con invalidità... come previsto sotto questa Con-legge.”
III elementi Di base dell'accessibilità
Sezione 7
“Gli elementi di base dell'accessibilità sono:
A. gli elementi dell'accessibilità per superare le differenze in altezza,...”
A. Gli elementi dell'accessibilità per superare le differenze in altezza
Sezione 9
“Per superare le differenze in altezza nei locali usò con persone con mobilità ridotto, gli elementi seguenti dell'accessibilità possono essere usati: ... tolga...”
Sezione 12
Ascensore
“Un ascensore sarà usato come un elemento dell'accessibilità per superare altezza differenzia e si deve usare per superare differenze di altezza di più di 120 centimetri in o nell'area di fuori.
...”
5. Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione
26. Le parti attinenti della Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione (Zakon diskriminacije di suzbijanju di o, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 85/2008) prevedere:
Sezione 1
“(1) questo Atto assicura protezione e promozione dell'uguaglianza come il valore più alto dell'ordine costituzionale della Repubblica di Croatia; crea le condizioni per le uguaglianze di opportunità e regola protezione contro la discriminazione sulla base di razza od origine etnica o colore di pelle, genere, lingua, religione, la condanna politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, stato di ricchezza, appartenenza di un sindacato istruzione, posizione sociale maritale o status di famiglia, età, salute, l'invalidità, eredità genetica, l'identità di genere, espressione od orientamento sessuale.
(2) la discriminazione all'interno del significato di questo Atto intende fissando qualsiasi persona in una posizione svantaggiosa su qualsiasi dei motivi sotto sottosezione 1 di questa sezione, così come suo o i suoi vicini parenti.
...”
Sezione 8
“Questo Atto sarà fatto domanda in riguardo di tutti i corpi in Stato... persone giuridiche e persone fisiche...”
Sezione 16
“Chiunque che considera che, dovendo alla discriminazione qualsiasi di suo o i suoi diritti sono stati violati può chiedere protezione di che diritto in procedimenti in che la determinazione di che diritto è il problema principale, e può chiedere anche protezione in procedimenti separati sotto sezione 17 di questo Atto.”
Sezione 17
“(1) una persona che chiede che lui o lei sono state una vittima della discriminazione in conformità con le disposizioni di questo Atto possono portare una rivendicazione e possono chiedere:
(1) una direttiva che l'imputato ha violato il diritto del querelante all'uguaglianza di trattamento o che un atto od omissione con l'imputato può condurre alla violazione del diritto del querelante all'uguaglianza di trattamento (rivendicazione per un riconoscimento della discriminazione);
(2) una proibizione su (l'imputato) intraprendendo atti che violano o possono violare il diritto del querelante all'uguaglianza di trattamento o un ordine per misure mirati a rimuovendo la discriminazione o le sue conseguenze per essere preso (rivendicazione per una proibizione o per l'allontanamento della discriminazione);
(3) il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale causato con la violazione dei diritti protetti da questo Atto (rivendicazione per danni);
(4) un ordine per una sentenza che trova una violazione del diritto all'uguaglianza di trattamento per essere pubblicato nei media alla spesa dell'imputato.”
27. Nel 2009 l'Ufficio per Diritti umani del Governo di Croatia (Ured za ljudska prava Vlade Republike Hrvatske) pubblicò un “Manuale sulla Richiesta della Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione” (?uz di Vodi Zakon diskriminacije di suzbijanju di o; in seguito: il “il Manuale”). Il Manuale spiega, inter l'alia, che la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione offre due viali alternativi che può intraprendere un individuo, come previsto sotto sezione 16 di quel l'Atto. Di conseguenza, un individuo può sollevare suo o la sua azione di reclamo di discriminazione nei procedimenti riguardo all'argomento principale di una controversia, o lui o lei possono optare per procedimenti civili e separati, come previsto sotto sezione 17 dell'Atto.
6. Controversie Atto amministrativo
28. La disposizione attinente del Controversie Atto Amministrativo (Zakon sporovima di upravnim di o, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 20/2010, 143/2012 e 152/2014) prevede:
Sezione 76
“(1) i procedimenti terminati con una sentenza saranno riaperti su un ricorso della parte:
1. se, in una definitivo sentenza, la Corte europea di Diritti umani ha trovato una violazione di diritti essenziali e le libertà in una maniera che differisce dal [Corte amministrativa] la sentenza,... “
B. pratica Attinente
1. Pratica attinente riguardo alla discriminazione
29. 9 novembre 2010, in causa n. U-III-1097/2009, la Corte Costituzionale dichiarò un'azione di reclamo costituzionale che adduce la discriminazione con una decisione del Parlamento sulla base dell'affiliazione politica di un sostituto inammissibile per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso legali. La Corte Costituzionale fondò che l'appellante non era riuscito a perseguire sia le via di ricorso amministrative ed attinenti e le via di ricorso previdero sotto la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione. Comunque, declinò determinare che che era la relazione fra molti possibili viali in una causa riguardo alle dichiarazioni della discriminazione, per motivi che era primariamente per le corti competenti per determinare quel la questione.
30. Nelle sue decisioni n. U-III-815/2013 di 8 maggio 2014, concernendo la discriminazione allegato nell'ottenere beneficio sociale ed U-III-1680/2014 di 2 luglio 2014, concernendo la discriminazione allegato in lavoro la Corte Costituzionale confermò la sua giurisprudenzacome alla disponibilità di via di ricorso sotto la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione.
31. Il Governo si riferì alle sentenze della Corte Suprema, n. Gž-41/11-2 di 28 febbraio 2012, n. Gž-25/11-2 di 28 febbraio 2012 e n. Gž-38/11-2 di 7 marzo 2012 con che azioni sotto la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione che adduce la discriminazione per motivi di orientamento sessuale era stato accettato.
2. Pratica attinente riguardo alla richiesta di legislazione di tassa
32. Il Governo citò anche giurisprudenzadella Corte amministrativa (sud di Upravni Republike Hrvatske) e la Corte amministrativa Alta con la quale loro respinsero azioni che impugnano il rifiuto di un'esenzione dalle imposte di trasferimento di beni immobili per motivi degli appellanti l'insuccesso di ' per soddisfare cumulativamente i requisiti sotto sezione 11(9.5) e (9.6) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto (sentenze nelle cause n. Noi-4028/2009-4 di 1 giugno 2011, n. Noi-14106/2009-4 di 16 maggio 2012, e n. Noi 3042/2011-4 19 settembre 2013; ed una sentenza della Corte amministrativa Alta, n. Usž-269/2012-4 di 23 gennaio 2013 col quale sostenne una decisione su esenzione dalle imposte sotto sezione 11(9.3), (9.5) e (9.6) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto).
33. In ognuno di queste cause le autorità amministrative condussero una valutazione completa dei valori comparabili di proprietà quando decidendo se l'appellante aveva un beni immobili di un valore significativo all'interno del significato di sezione 11(9.6) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto.
III. MATERIALE INTERNAZIONALE ED ATTINENTE
A. Nazioni Unito
1. Convenzione sui Diritti di Persone con Invalidità
34. Le parti attinenti della Nazioni Convenzione Unito sui Diritti di Persone con Invalidità, A/RES/61/106, 24 gennaio 2007 (in seguito: il “CRPD”), ratificò con Croatia 15 agosto 2007, prevedere:
Articolo 2
Definizioni
“Per i fini della Convenzione presente:
...
“Alloggio ragionevole” intende modifica necessaria ed appropriata e rettifiche non imponente un carico sproporzionato o indebito, dove ebbe bisogno in una particolare causa, assicurare a persone con invalidità il godimento o esercitare su una base uguale con altre di tutti i diritti umani e le libertà fondamentali;...”
Articolo 3
Principi Generali
“I principi della Convenzione presente saranno:
...
(b) la Non-discriminazione;
...
(f) l'Accessibilità;...”
Articolo 4
Obblighi Generali
“1. Stati Festeggia impresa per assicurare e promuovere la piena realizzazione di tutti i diritti umani e le libertà fondamentali per tutte le persone con invalidità senza la discriminazione di qualsiasi genere sulla base dell'invalidità. A questa fine, gli Stati Parties l'impresa:
(un) adottare misure legislative, amministrative ed altre e del tutto appropriate per l'attuazione dei diritti riconobbe nella Convenzione presente;
(b) prendere tutte le misure appropriate, incluso legislazione per cambiare o abolire leggi vigente, regolamentazioni, dogane e pratiche che costituiscono la discriminazione contro persone con invalidità;
(il c) prendere in considerazione la protezione e promozione dei diritti umani di persone con invalidità in tutte le politiche e programmes:
(d) frenarsi dall'impegnare in qualsiasi atto o pratica che sono incoerenti con la Convenzione presente ed assicurare che autorità pubbliche ed istituzioni agiscono in conformità alla Convenzione presente;
(e) prendere tutte le misure appropriate per eliminare la discriminazione sulla base dell'invalidità con qualsiasi persona, organizzazione o impresa privata;
...
2. Con riguardo ad a diritti economici, sociali e culturali, ciascune imprese di Parte Statali per portare misure al massimo delle sue risorse disponibili e, dove ebbe bisogno, all'interno della struttura della cooperazione internazionale, con una prospettiva a realizzando progressivamente la piena realizzazione di questi diritti, senza pregiudizio a quegli obblighi contenuti nella Convenzione presente che immediatamente è applicabile secondo diritto internazionale.
...”
Articolo 5
L'uguaglianza e la non-discriminazione
“1. Parti in Stati riconoscono che tutte le persone sono uguali prima e sotto la legge e è concesso senza qualsiasi la discriminazione alla protezione uguale e beneficio uguale della legge.
2. Parti in Stati proibiranno ogni discriminazione sulla base dell'invalidità e garantiranno a persone con invalidità uguagli e tutela giuridica effettiva contro la discriminazione su tutti i motivi.
3. Per promuovere l'uguaglianza ed eliminare la discriminazione Parti di Stati prenderà tutti i passi appropriati per assicurare che alloggio ragionevole è offerto.
4. Le specifiche misure che sono necessarie accelerare o realizzare uguaglianza de facto di persone con invalidità non saranno considerate la discriminazione sotto i termini della Convenzione presente.”
Articolo 7
Figli con invalidità
“1. Parti in Stati prenderanno tutte le misure necessarie per assicurare il pieno godimento con figli con invalidità di tutti i diritti umani e le libertà fondamentali su una base uguale con gli altri figli.
2. In tutte le azioni riguardo a figli con invalidità, i migliori interessi del figlio saranno una considerazione primaria.
...”
Articolo 9
Accessibilità
“1. Abilitare persone con invalidità per vivere indipendentemente e partecipare pienamente in tutti gli aspetti della vita, Parti di Stati prenderà misure appropriate per assicurare a persone con invalidità acceda, su una base uguale con altri, all'ambiente fisico, a trasporto ad informazioni e comunicazioni, incluso informazioni e le tecnologie di comunicazioni e sistemi ed agli altri installazioni e servizi aperto o purché al pubblico, sia in urbano ed in aree rurali. Queste misure che includeranno l'identificazione e l'eliminazione di ostacoli e barriere all'accessibilità faranno domanda, inter l'alia:
(un) Edifici, strade, trasporto e l'altro mezzi al coperto ed all'aperto, incluso scuole, alloggio, installazioni medici e posti di lavoro;
(b) Informazioni, comunicazioni e gli altri servizi incluso servizi elettronici e servizi d'emergenza.”
Articolo 19
Vivendo indipendentemente ed essendo incluso nella comunità
“Parti di Stati alla Convenzione presente riconoscono il diritto uguale di tutte le persone con invalidità per vivere nella comunità, con scelte uguagli ad altri, e prenderà misure effettive ed appropriate per facilitare il pieno godimento con persone con invalidità di questo diritto e la loro piena inclusione e partecipazione nella comunità, incluso con assicurando quel:
(un) Persone con invalidità hanno l'opportunità di scegliere la loro residenza e dove e con chi loro vivono su una base uguale con altri e non sono obbligati per vivere in una particolare disposizione vivente;
(b) Persone con invalidità hanno accesso ad una serie di in-casa servizi di appoggio di comunità residenziali ed altri, incluso assistenza personale necessario sostenere vivendo ed inclusione nella comunità, ed impedire ad isolamento o segregazione della comunità;...”
Articolo 20
Mobilità personale
“Afferma Parti prenderà misure effettive per assicurare la mobilità personale con la più grande possibile indipendenza per persone con invalidità, incluso con:
(un) Facilitando la mobilità personale di persone con invalidità nella maniera ed al tempo della loro scelta, ed a costo economico;
(b) Facilitando accesso con persone con invalidità alla mobilità di qualità aiuta, apparecchiature, le tecnologie di assistive e forme di assistenza viva ed intermediari, incluso con facendoli disponibile a costo economico;...”
Articolo 28
Standard di vita adeguato e protezione sociale
“1. Parti in Stati riconoscono il diritto di persone con invalidità ad un standard di vita adeguato per loro e le loro famiglie, incluso cibo adeguato, abbigliamento ed alloggio ed al miglioramento continuo delle condizioni viventi, e prenderà passi appropriati per salvaguardare e promuovere la realizzazione di questo diritto senza la discriminazione sulla base dell'invalidità.
...”
2. Pratichi del Nazioni Comitato Unito sui Diritti di Persone con Invalidità (CRPD)
35. Nel suo Generale Commento N.ro 2 (2014) su Articolo 9: L'accessibilità, CRPD/C/GC/2, 22 maggio 2014 che il Comitato di CRPD ha notato:
“1. L'accessibilità è un requisito indispensabile per persone con invalidità vivere indipendentemente e partecipare pienamente ed ugualmente in società. Senza accesso all'ambiente fisico, a trasporto ad informazioni e comunicazione, incluso informazioni e le tecnologie di comunicazioni e sistemi ed agli altri installazioni e servizi aperto o purché al pubblico, persone con invalidità non avrebbero le uguaglianze di opportunità per partecipazione nelle loro rispettive società.
...
29. È utile a standard di accessibilità di corrente principale che prescrivono le varie aree che devono essere accessibile, come l'ambiente fisico in leggi su costruzione e progettando, trasporto in leggi su antenna pubblica, binario, strada e trasporto di acqua, informazioni e comunicazione, e ripara aperto al pubblico. Comunque, l'accessibilità dovrebbe essere inclusa in leggi generali e specifiche sulle uguaglianze di opportunità, l'uguaglianza e partecipazione nel contesto della proibizione della discriminazione invalidità-basata. Rifiuto di accesso chiaramente dovrebbe essere definito come un atto proibito della discriminazione. Persone con invalidità che sono state negate accesso all'ambiente fisico, trasporto, informazioni e comunicazione, o ripara aperto al pubblico dovrebbe avere via di ricorso legali ed effettive alla loro disposizione. Quando importanti standard di accessibilità, le parti di Stati hanno prendere in considerazione la diversità di persone con invalidità ed assicurare che l'accessibilità è offerta a persone di qualsiasi il genere e di tutte le secoli e tipi dell'invalidità. Parte del compito di includere la diversità di persone con invalidità nella disposizione dell'accessibilità sta riconoscendo che delle persone con invalidità hanno bisogno di assistenza umana o animale per godere della piena accessibilità (come assistenza personale, interpretazione di lingua di segnale, interpretazione di lingua di segnale tattile o cani di guida). Deve essere convenuto, per esempio che proibendo cani di guida dal digitare un particolare edificio o spazio aperto costituirebbe un atto proibito della discriminazione invalidità-basata.”
3. Pratichi del Nazioni Comitato Unito su Diritti Economici, Sociali e Culturali
36. Il Nazioni Comitato Unito su Diritti Economici, Sociali e Culturali (CESCR) nel suo Generale Commento N.ro 5: Persone con Invalidità, E/1995/22, 9 dicembre 1994 celebre:
“3. L'obbligo per eliminare la discriminazione per motivi dell'invalidità
15. Jure del de e la discriminazione de facto contro persone con invalidità hanno una storia lunga e prendono le varie forme. Loro variano dalla discriminazione odiosa, come il rifiuto delle opportunità istruttive a più “sottile” forme della discriminazione come segregazione ed isolamento realizzati tramite l'imposizione di barriere fisiche e sociali. Per i fini dell'Alleanza, “la discriminazione invalidità-basata” può essere definito come incluso qualsiasi distinzione, esclusione, restrizione o preferenza, o rifiuto di alloggio ragionevole basarono su invalidità che ha l'effetto di annullando o danneggiare il riconoscimento, godimento o esercizio di diritti economici, sociali o culturali. Per la negligenza, l'ignoranza, pregiudizio ed assunzioni false, così come per esclusione, distinzione o separazione, persone con invalidità molto spesso hanno, stato ostacolato dall'esercitare i loro diritti economici, sociali o culturali su una base uguale con persone senza le invalidità. Gli effetti della discriminazione invalidità-basata sono stati particolarmente gravi nei campi di istruzione, lavoro, alloggio, trasporto, la vita culturale, ed accesso a posti pubblici e servizi.”
37. Il CESCR riaffermò il suo Generale Commento N.ro 5 nel suo Generale Fanno commenti N.ro 20: La non-discriminazione in diritti economici, sociali e culturali, E/C.12/GC/20, 2 luglio 2009, nei termini seguenti:
“B. Altro status
27. La natura della discriminazione varia secondo contesto ed evolve col tempo. Un approccio flessibile alla base di “l'altro status” è avuto bisogno così per per catturare le altre forme di trattamento differenziale che non può essere ragionevolmente ed obiettivamente giustificate e è di una natura comparabile ai motivi espressamente riconosciuti in articolo 2, divida in paragrafi 2. Questi motivi supplementari si riconoscono comunemente quando loro riflettono l'esperienza di gruppi sociali che sono vulnerabile e hanno subito e continuano a soffrire di emarginazione. ...
Invalidità
28. Nel suo commento generale N.ro 5, il Comitato definì la discriminazione contro persone con invalidità come “qualsiasi distinzione, esclusione, restrizione o preferenza, o rifiuto di alloggio ragionevole basarono su invalidità che ha l'effetto di annullando o danneggiare il riconoscimento, godimento o esercizio di diritti economici, sociali o culturali.” Il rifiuto di alloggio ragionevole dovrebbe essere incluso in legislazione nazionale come una forma proibita della discriminazione sulla base dell'invalidità. Parti in Stati dovrebbero rivolgere la discriminazione, come proibizioni sul diritto ad istruzione, e rifiuto di alloggio ragionevole in posti pubblici come installazioni di salute pubblici ed il posto di lavoro, così come in posti privati, e.g. come lungo come spazi sono disegnati ed integrarono modi che li fanno inaccessibile a sedie a rotelle, simile utenti saranno negati efficacemente il loro diritto al lavoro.”
B. Consiglio dell'Europa
1. Il Comitato di Ministri Raccomandazione Rec(2006)5
38. Le parti attinenti della Raccomandazione Rec(2006)5 del Comitato di Ministri a membro Stati sul Consiglio di Europa Azione Piano per promuovere i diritti e la piena partecipazione di persone con invalidità in società: migliorando la qualità della vita di persone con invalidità in Europa 2006-2015, del 2006 lettura di 5 aprile:
“1.2. Principi fondamentali e mete strategiche
1.2.1. Principi fondamentali
Stati membro continueranno a lavorare all'interno di strutture di diritti anti-discriminatorie ed umane per migliorare l'indipendenza, la libertà di scelta e la qualità della vita di persone con invalidità e sollevare consapevolezza dell'invalidità come una parte della diversità umana.
Conto dovuto è preso di europeo esistente ed attinente e strumenti internazionali, trattati e piani, particolarmente gli sviluppi in relazione alla bozza Nazioni Unito convenzione internazionale sui diritti di persone con invalidità.
...
1.3. Linee di azione di chiave
Persone con invalidità dovrebbero essere in grado vivere il più indipendentemente possibile, incluso essendo in grado scegliere dove e come vivere. Le opportunità per inclusione e vita sociale indipendente sono create vivendo nella comunità come prima cosa. Il miglioramento della vita (N.ro 8) richiede politiche strategiche che sostengono il passaggio da istituti di cura a setting basati sulla comunità, che variano sistemazioni indipendenti a protette, nucli abitativi con appoggio su piccola scala. Implica anche un approccio coordinato nella disposizione di servizi utente-controllati, comunità-basati e centrati sulla persona – e strutture di sostegno .
2.7. Principi fondamentali
I principi fondamentali che governano questo Azione Piano sono:
-la non-discriminazione;
-l'uguaglianza delle opportunità;
-la piena partecipazione in società di tutte le persone con invalidità;
...
4.3. Persone con invalidità in bisogno di livello alto di appoggio
4.4. Figli e le giovani persone con invalidità
Le necessità di figli con invalidità e le loro famiglie devono essere valutate attentamente con autorità responsabili con una prospettiva ad offrendo misure di appoggio che abilita figli per crescere con famiglie loro, essere incluso nella comunità e la vita di figli locali e le attività. Figli con invalidità hanno bisogno di ricevere istruzione per arricchire le loro vite ed abilitarli per giungere al loro massimo potenziale.
Disposizione di servizio di qualità e strutture di appoggio di famiglia possono assicurare un'infanzia ricca ed in sviluppo e possono posare il fondamento per un participative e la vita adulta ed indipendente. È perciò importante che creatori di politica prendono in considerazione le necessità di figli con invalidità e le loro famiglie quando politiche di invalidità che fa piani e politiche di corrente principale per figli e famiglie.”
2. La Riunione Parlamentare Decisione 1642(2009) su Accesso a diritti per persone con le invalidità e la loro piena ed attiva partecipazione in società, riaffermò con la Riunione Parlamentare Raccomandazione 1854 (2009) di 26 gennaio 2009
39. La parte attinente della Riunione Parlamentare Decisione 1642(2009) su Accesso a diritti per persone con le invalidità e la loro piena ed attiva partecipazione in letture di società:
“8. La Riunione considera che per abilitare la partecipazione attiva di persone con invalidità in società è imperativo che il diritto per vivere nella comunità sia sostenuto. Invita stati membro a:
...
8.2. offra assistenza adeguata e sostenuta a famiglie, soprattutto per creatura umana e materiale (particolarmente finanziario) vuole dire, abilitarli per sostenere il loro membro di famiglia disabile a casa;...
12. La Riunione considera che la creazione di una società per tutti implica accesso uguale per tutti i cittadini all'ambiente nel quale loro vivono. ...”
C. Unione europea
40. Le disposizioni attinenti dello Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea (2000/C 364/01) la lettura:
Articolo 21
Non- discriminazione
“1. Qualsiasi la discriminazione basò su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, origine etnica o sociale, caratteristiche genetiche, lingua, religione o credenza, politico o qualsiasi l'altra opinione, appartenenza di una minoranza nazionale che proprietà, nascita, l'invalidità, età od orientamento sessuale saranno proibite.
2. All'interno della sfera di applicazione del Trattato che stabilisce la Comunità europea e del Trattato su Unione europea, e senza pregiudizio alle disposizioni speciali di quelli Trattati qualsiasi la discriminazione sui motivi della nazionalità sarà proibita.”
Articolo 26
L'integrazione di persone con invalidità
“L'Unione riconosce e rispetta il diritto di persone con invalidità per trarre profitto da misure progettò per assicurare la loro indipendenza, l'integrazione sociale e professionale e partecipazione nella vita della comunità.”
41. 17 luglio 2008, nella causa C-303/06, S. Coleman v Attridge Legge e Steve Law, la Grande Camera della Corte di giustizia europea (ECJ) trattò con la questione se Direttiva 2000/78 di 27 novembre 2000, mentre stabilendo una struttura generale per l'uguaglianza di trattamento in lavoro ed occupazione, deve essere interpretato siccome proibendo solamente la discriminazione diretta sui motivi dell'invalidità in riguardo di un impiegato che si è invalido, o se il principio dell'uguaglianza di trattamento e la proibizione della discriminazione diretta fa domanda ugualmente ad un impiegato che non si è invalido ma che è trattato meno favourably con ragione dell'invalidità del suo figlio per che lui è il provveditore primario della cura richiesto con virtù della condizione del figlio. In questo collegamento l'ECJ concluse:
“56. ... Direttiva 2000/78, e, in particolare, Articoli 1 e 2(1) e (2)(a) al riguardo, deve essere interpretato come volendo dire che la proibizione della discriminazione diretta posò in giù con quelle disposizioni non è limitato solamente a persone che si sono invalido. Dove un feste padronali un impiegato che non si è disabilitò meno favourably che un altro impiegato è, è stato o sarebbe trattato in una situazione comparabile, e è stabilito che il trattamento meno favorevole di che impiegato è basato sull'invalidità del suo figlio con cui cura è offerta primariamente che impiegato, simile trattamento è contrario alla proibizione della discriminazione diretta posata in giù con Articolo 2(2)(a).”
42. 16 luglio 2015, nella causa C83/14?, la CHEZ Razpredelenie Bulgaria Ad, la Grande Camera dell'ECJ trattò con la questione della discriminazione indiretta per motivi di origine etnica riferita all'interpretazione del Direttiva 2000/43/EC di 29 giugno 2000, mentre implementando il principio dell'uguaglianza di trattamento fra persone irrispettoso di origine razziale o etnica, e lo Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea, in particolare se il principio dell'uguaglianza di trattamento è trarre profitto solamente persone che davvero possiedono il razziale od origine etnica riguardate o anche le persone che, benché non essendo del razziale od origine etnica in oggetto, ciononostante soffra di trattamento meno favorevole su quelli motivi. La parte attinente delle letture di sentenza:
“56. ... la giurisprudenza della Corte, già richiamò in paragrafo 42 della sentenza presente sotto il quale la sfera di Direttiva 2000/43 non può, nella luce del suo obiettivo e la natura dei diritti che cerca di salvaguardare sia definito restrittivamente, è, in questa istanza, come giustificare l'interpretazione che il principio dell'uguaglianza di trattamento a che che che indica la direzione assegna non fa domanda ad una particolare categoria di person[s] ma con riferimento ai motivi menzionati al riguardo in Articolo 1, così che che si intende che principio tragga profitto anche persone, che, benché non loro un membro della razza o gruppo etnico riguardò, ciononostante soffra di trattamento meno favorevole o un particolare svantaggio uno di quelli motivi (vedere, con analogia, sentenza in Coleman, C303/06, ?EU:C:2008:415 divide in paragrafi 38 e 50).”
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 Preso Da solo Ed In Concomitanza Con Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione
43. Il richiedente si lamentò della discriminazione allegato in collegamento con una richiesta ingiusta di legislazione di tassa nazionale. Lui si appellò su Articolo 14 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che lesse siccome segue:
Articolo 14
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Le parti gli argomenti di '
44. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non era riuscito a sollevare la sua azione di reclamo di discriminazione durante i procedimenti di fronte alle autorità amministrative riguardo all'adozione della decisione sulla sua richiesta per esenzione dalle imposte. In particolare, lui non si era appellato sulle disposizioni della Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione nel suo ricorso contro la decisione di prima -istanza né lui aveva sollevato la questione nella sua azione amministrativa di fronte alla Corte amministrativa Alta. Inoltre, lui avrebbe potuto avviare procedimenti civili e separati per danni sotto la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione ma lui non era riuscito a giovarsi a di quel l'opportunità. Con ciò, lui non era riuscito ad usare le via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive riguardo alle dichiarazioni della discriminazione. Il Governo concedè che la Corte Costituzionale non aveva dichiarato l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente inammissibile per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso ma loro considerarono, senza elaborare inoltre sulla questione che la disposizione sull'esaurimento di via di ricorso sotto il Corte Atto Costituzionale aveva una sfera diversa e volendo dire dall'articolo dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso sotto la Convenzione. Il Governo indicò anche che nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale il richiedente non era riuscito a citare la disposizione esatta della Costituzione che garantisce il diritto a proprietà.
45. Il richiedente presentò che lui in modo appropriato aveva esaurito via di ricorso di fronte alle autorità amministrative e la Corte Costituzionale. In particolare, le sue azioni di reclamo al livello nazionale riguardo alla discriminazione allegato con richiesta ingiusta della legislazione di tassa non erano state distinguibili così come richiedere un esame separato della discriminazione dall'azione di reclamo di proprietà. In modo appropriato esaurendo le via di ricorso amministrative lui non era stato costretto così, ad intraprendere un'altra via di ricorso sotto la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione con lo stesso obiettivo poiché era la giurisprudenzaben stabilita della Corte che nella causa di molte via di ricorso potenzialmente effettive un richiedente fu richiesto per usare solamente uno di loro. In qualsiasi la causa, la Corte Costituzionale non aveva dichiarato la sua azione di reclamo costituzionale inammissibile per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali che suggerirono che lui in modo appropriato aveva esaurito le via di ricorso attinenti di fronte alle autorità amministrative. Il richiedente sottolineò anche che lui in modo appropriato aveva sollevato le sue azioni di reclamo di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, mentre lamentandosi in sostanza di una violazione discriminatoria dei suoi diritti di proprietà riferì ad una richiesta ingiusta della legislazione di tassa.
2. La valutazione della Corte
46. La Corte reitera che sotto Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, può trattare solamente con una richiesta dopo che tutte le via di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite. Stati è dispensato dall'essere responsabile di fronte ad un corpo internazionale per i loro atti prima che loro hanno avuto un'opportunità di mettere diritto di questioni per il loro proprio ordinamento giuridico, e quelli che desiderano invocare la giurisdizione direttiva della Corte come concernono azioni di reclamo contro un Stato è obbligato così per usare le via di ricorso previste con l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale prima. L'obbligo per esaurire perciò via di ricorso nazionali costringe un richiedente ad avvalersi normale di via di ricorso del quale sono disponibili e sufficiente in riguardo suo o i suoi danni di Convenzione. L'esistenza delle via di ricorso in oggetto non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicuro in teoria ma in pratica, fallendo a loro mancherà quale l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia (vedere Vukovi ?ed Altri c. Serbia (eccezione preliminare) [GC], N. 17153/11 e 29 altri, §§ 70-71 25 marzo 2014; e Gherghina c. la Romania (il dec.) [GC], n. 42219/07, § 85 9 luglio 2015).
47. Articolo che 35 § 1 richiede anche che le azioni di reclamo intesero di essere rese successivamente in Strasbourg sarebbe dovuto essere reso al corpo nazionale ed appropriato, almeno in sostanza ed in ottemperanza coi requisiti formali e tempo-limiti posati in giù in diritto nazionale e, inoltre, che qualsiasi procedurale vuole dire che ostacolerebbe una violazione della Convenzione dovrebbe essere usata (vedere Vukovi ?ed Altri, citato sopra, § 72).
48. Comunque, nell'evento di là che è un numero di via di ricorso nazionali che può intraprendere un individuo, che persona è concessa per scegliere una via di ricorso che rivolge suo o il suo danno essenziale. Nelle altre parole, quando una via di ricorso è stata intrapresa, uso di un'altra via di ricorso che essenzialmente ha lo stesso obiettivo non è richiesto (vedere T.W. c. il Malta [GC], n. 25644/94, § 34 29 aprile 1999; Moreira Barbosa c. il Portogallo (il dec.), n. 65681/01, il 2004-V di ECHR; e Jelii ?c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (il dec.), n. 41183/02, 15 novembre 2005; e Jasinskis c. la Lettonia, n. 45744/08, § 50 21 dicembre 2010).
49. La Corte nota all'inizio che non c'è controversia fra le parti che la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione offre due viali alternativi per i quali un individuo può chiedere protezione dalla discriminazione. In particolare, un individuo può sollevare suo o la sua azione di reclamo di discriminazione nei procedimenti riguardo all'argomento principale di una controversia, o lui o lei possono optare per procedimenti civili e separati, come previsto sotto sezione 17 di che Atto (vedere divide in paragrafi 26-27 sopra).
50. Nella causa in questione il richiedente contesa durante i procedimenti amministrativi che le autorità fiscali competenti erano andate a vuoto a trattare differentemente la sua situazione quando determinando la questione di esenzione dalle imposte per risolvere il suo alloggio ha bisogno dato l'invalidità del suo figlio e le necessità della sua famiglia. Comunque, la Corte amministrativa Alta considerò questi argomenti irrilevante e declinò dare qualsiasi decidendo a che effetto (vedere divide in paragrafi 15-16 sopra). I costatazione di Corte che il richiedente ha sollevato con ciò in sostanza la sua azione di reclamo di discriminazione riferirono ai suoi diritti di proprietà in questi procedimenti amministrativi (compari Glor c. la Svizzera, n. 13444/04, § 55 ECHR 2009). Lui non fu costretto perciò ad intraprendere un'altra via di ricorso sotto la Prevenzione di Atto di Discriminazione con essenzialmente lo stesso obiettivo per soddisfare i requisiti di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 48 sopra).
51. In qualsiasi la causa, la Corte nota che la Corte Costituzionale non dichiarò l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente inammissibile per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso legali, come sé la sua pratica era nelle altre cause riguardo ad azioni di reclamo di discriminazione dove gli appellanti non avevano esaurito in modo appropriato rimedia a di fronte alle autorità nazionali e più basse (vedere divide in paragrafi 29-30 sopra). Di conseguenza, la Corte non ha nessuna ragione di dubitare l'uso corretto del richiedente di via di ricorso di fronte agli amministrativi ed autorità giudiziali (vedere Vladimir Romanov c. la Russia, n. 41461/02, § 52 24 luglio 2008; Bjedov c. Croatia, n. 42150/09, § 48 29 maggio 2012; e Zrili ?c. Croatia, n. 46726/11, § 49 3 ottobre 2013).
52. Come all'argomento del Governo che il richiedente non era riuscito a citare la disposizione esatta della Costituzione che garantisce il diritto a proprietà nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale, la Corte nota, che il richiedente si appellò espressamente su Articolo 14 della Costituzione, mentre garantisce protezione dalla discriminazione, e si lamentò della discriminazione con presumibilmente la richiesta ingiusta della legislazione di tassa attinente (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra). Lui con ciò, con sollevando esplicitamente la sua azione di reclamo di discriminazione che era in sostanza riferita ai suoi diritti di proprietà, purché la Corte Costituzionale con l'opportunità che è in principio intese di essere riconosciuta a Stati Contraenti con Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, vale a dire di mettere diritto le violazioni addusse contro loro (vedere, fra molti altri, Gäfgen c. la Germania [GC], n. 22978/05, §§ 144-146 ECHR 2010; Lelas c. Croatia, n. 55555/08, § 51 20 maggio 2010; Karapanagiotou ed Altri c. la Grecia, n. 1571/08, § 29 28 ottobre 2010; Bjedov, citato sopra, § 48; Tarbuk c. Croatia, n. 31360/10, § 32 11 dicembre 2012; e Jaimovi ?c. Croatia, n. 22688/09, §§ 40-41 31 ottobre 2013).
53. La Corte respinge perciò l'eccezione del Governo. Nota anche che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
54. Il richiedente presentò che le autorità nazionali avevano stabilito la sua responsabilità per pagare la tassa sulla base di una disposizione imprecisa ed imprevedibile e senza una valutazione corretta delle particolari circostanze della sua causa. Inoltre, loro non erano riusciti a rendere qualsiasi valutazione della proporzionalità dell'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà. Il richiedente considerò perciò che il rifiuto per accordarlo l'esenzione dalle imposte impose un carico individuale ed eccessivo su lui, contrari ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Mentre il richiedente accettò che le autorità nazionali goderono un margine ampio della valutazione nelle questioni di tassazione, lui indicò che era la giurisprudenzaben stabilita della Corte che la loro discrezione non poteva essere esercitata in una maniera incompatibile con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
55. Il richiedente indicò che la ragione per il rifiuto della sua richiesta per esenzione dalle imposte era il fatto che, sotto le autorità nazionali ' che capisce di sezione 11(9.5) dell'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili, l'appartamento che lui aveva posseduto era stato appropriato per le necessità di alloggio della sua famiglia, in prospettiva della sua area di superficie (sezione 11(9.3) dell'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili) e gli altri requisiti di infrastrutture. Ulteriori condizioni, come valore della proprietà prima posseduta (sezione 11(9.6) dell'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili), non aveva avuto nascendo nelle autorità nazionali la valutazione di ' della sua causa. Questo aveva suggerito che in una causa come il suo, dove un individuo già aveva posseduto un beni immobili, la legge attinente previde la valutazione dell'appropriatezza della proprietà prima posseduta come l'elemento centrale per decidere su richieste per esenzione dalle imposte quando comprando un beni immobili nuovo appropriato per vivere. Nella prospettiva del richiedente, le autorità nazionali erano andate a vuoto comunque, a condurre una valutazione adeguata delle circostanze della sua causa e così evidentemente l'avevano spogliato di adeguato procedurale vuole dire per la protezione dei suoi diritti.
56. Il richiedente indicò anche che lui non aveva chiesto qualsiasi status preferenziale ma aveva richiesto soltanto le autorità per esentarlo dall'obbligo per pagare tassa dovuto alle particolari circostanze della sua causa. Per il richiedente era ovvio che lui non aveva chiesto esenzione dalle imposte così come ingiustamente essere arricchito, poiché lui aveva venduto il suo vecchio appartamento per comprare un più piccolo beni immobili adattato alle necessità della sua famiglia riferite all'invalidità di suo figlio.
57. Il richiedente dibatté inoltre che l'accessibilità, come una caratteristica fondamentale di alloggio qualificato come un'infrastruttura di base ugualmente per tutti. Così qualsiasi la differenza in trattamento in che riguardo implicherebbe la discriminazione. Inoltre, in prospettiva del principio di alloggio ragionevole, le decisioni delle autorità nazionali che andarono a vuoto ad adattare le definizioni loro avevano usato con riguardo ad alle particolari necessità di persone con le invalidità, la discriminazione indiretta e suggerita o la discriminazione con insuccesso per trattare differentemente persone le cui situazioni differirono significativamente.
58. Nella prospettiva del richiedente la base per la sua discriminazione era l'invalidità con associazione riferita alle necessità di suo figlio che era stato ignorato con le autorità nazionali e competenti. In particolare, la loro valutazione dei requisiti di infrastructural di base per alloggio adeguato era stata condotta con riguardo ad alle necessità di persone robuste che ignorano il fatto che l'esistenza di un ascensore per un invalido era una caratteristica fondamentale ed indispensabile per alloggio affidato col bisogno per un accesso facile e sgombro. Le autorità l'avevano discriminato così contro con non riuscendo ad interpretare il termine “proprietà che soddisfa l'alloggio di una famiglia ha bisogno” in un modo che prende nell'esame l'accessibilità della proprietà in oggetto. Questo trattamento discriminatorio, nella prospettiva del richiedente non aveva giustificazione ragionevole, particolarmente dato che il problema dell'accessibilità impedì la possibilità di suo figlio di andare fuori dell'appartamento e con ciò restrinse tutti i suoi altri diritti, come a trattamento di salute adeguato, istruzione e sviluppo personale. Che di conseguenza colpì la famiglia intera che aveva avuto bisogno di affrontare il problema dell'accessibilità ed aveva dovuto anche sopportare un carico finanziario e significativo riferita all'invalidità di suo figlio.
(b) Il Governo
59. Il Governo accettò che c'era stata un'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente ma loro considerarono che simile interferenza era stata legale, che aveva intrapreso un scopo legittimo di garantire finanze pubbliche e che era stato proporzionato. Specificamente, il Governo sottolineò che lo Stato godè un margine ampio della valutazione nelle questioni di tassazione e che le autorità nazionali erano state messe meglio per valutare cause individuali. Nella causa del richiedente, le autorità nazionali sufficientemente avevano preso in considerazione la sua situazione personale ma aveva considerato che lui non poteva essere esentato da tassazione siccome lui non aveva soddisfatto i requisiti sotto il diritto nazionale attinente.
60. In particolare, il Governo presentò che sezione 11 del Beni immobili Trasferisce Atto era chiaro all'effetto che un'esenzione dalle imposte potrebbe essere accordata solamente se le condizioni sotto che disposizione era stata soddisfatta cumulativamente. Nella causa in questione, il richiedente non era riuscito a soddisfare le due condizioni. Prima, l'appartamento che lui aveva posseduto al momento quando lui aveva comprato obiettivamente l'alloggio soddisfece i requisiti per alloggio adeguato per lui e la sua famiglia. Aveva infrastruttura di base ed igiene soddisfatta e requisiti tecnici e le autorità fiscali non avuto discrezione nel valutare il termine “alloggio ha bisogno.” Nella prospettiva del Governo, le autorità fiscali né furono equipaggiate, né competente valutare obiettivamente specifico alloggio numeroso ha bisogno di persone che chiesero esenzione dalle imposte. Con riguardo ad alla seconda condizione, il Governo presentò, che il richiedente non aveva soddisfatto il requisito di valore in che lui aveva posseduto un appartamento di un valore significativo. Perciò, il fatto che l'edificio non fu dotato di un ascensore era stato di nessuna attinenza. Era infatti l'intenzione del diritto nazionale attinente di offrire esenzione dalle imposte come un'assistenza a quegli individui che stavano comprando il loro primo beni immobili ed in particolare quelli che non avevano qualsiasi proprietà di un valore significativo. Nella causa in questione, le autorità nazionali avevano agito all'interno del loro margine della valutazione e loro avevano valutato di conseguenza che il richiedente non ebbe bisogno qualsiasi simile assistenza finanziaria che condusse al proscioglimento della sua richiesta per esenzione dalle imposte. Nella prospettiva del Governo, il richiedente non era stato costretto di conseguenza, a sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo.
61. Il Governo dibatté anche che c'era stato nessun trattamento discriminatorio del richiedente riferito all'invalidità del suo figlio fin dalla ragione per il proscioglimento della sua richiesta di esenzione dalle imposte era la sua situazione finanziaria. Questo aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole in che lo Stato aveva cercato di proteggere individui finanziariamente svantaggiati che non fu dato il richiedente che lui aveva posseduto un appartamento adeguato.
62. Il Governo sottolineò inoltre che lo Stato, come una parte al CRPD aveva implementato un numero di misure positive mirato a garantendo l'accessibilità per invalidi e che pressocché settanta per cento di edifici pubblici in Zagabria avevano subito l'adattamento a quel l'effetto. Inoltre, una recente visita delle Nazioni Unito Relatore Speciale sull'Invalidità a Croatia aveva applaudito questi sforzi resi con lo Stato. Con riguardo ad in particolare alle esenzioni dalle imposte sotto l'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili, il Governo sottolineò, che le misure positive implementarono con lo Stato fu mirato primariamente ad individui finanziariamente svantaggiati e loro non potevano rivolgere le necessità di tutti i gruppi vulnerabile. Comunque, lo Stato aveva fissato in posto i vari vantaggi fiscali per invalidi riferiti, per istanza a reddito e salute ripara tassazione. Inoltre, armonizzando le sue attività coi requisiti internazionali ed attinenti, lo Stato aveva adottato la strategia Nazionale per garantire le uguaglianze di opportunità per le persone con invalidità per il periodo fra il 2007 ed il 2015, ed attivamente sta conducendo le varie attività ai livelli nazionali e locali per soddisfare le necessità di invalidi.
( c) L'intervento di una terza-parte
63. La terza parte intervenente presentò che gli standard attinenti del CRPD, in particolare relativo ai concetti dell'accessibilità, la non-discriminazione ed alloggio ragionevole, dovrebbe informare la Corte nel valutare l'ottemperanza dello Stato coi suoi obblighi di Convenzione riguardo a persone con invalidità. Loro in particolare presentò che c'era un collegamento intimo fra l'accessibilità ed alloggio ragionevole che ultimamente avevano la stessa meta di assicurare godimento effettivo ed esercizio di diritti su una base uguale con altri. C'erano comunque, differenze fra i due concetti in che la misura dell'accessibilità generale dovrebbe essere offerta nell'anticipazione dell'accessibilità ha bisogno della popolazione disabile, mentre alloggio ragionevole incluse le specifiche misure dirette ad un particolare individuo con un'invalidità che immediatamente dovrebbe essere offerta.
64. La terza parte intervenente indicò inoltre che legge di diritti umani internazionale aveva sviluppato assicurare proibizione della discriminazione con associazione che riguardava istanze dove un individuo non fu discriminato contro per motivi di suo o la sua propria caratteristica ma a causa di suo o la sua relazione a qualcuno altro chi aveva tale caratteristica. Questo principio fu bene-custodito in molte giurisdizioni attraverso l'Europa e potrebbe essere trovato anche nella Prevenzione croata di Atto di Discriminazione. C'era stata anche una chiamata in aumento con meccanismi di diritti umani internazionali per misure positive per essere preso con lo Stato per assicurare accesso ad alloggio con persone con invalidità. Giurisdizioni nazionali, in particolare all'interno dell'Unione europea, aveva avviato implementare queste azioni alcuni/e dei/lle quali anche inclusero riduzioni di tassa o esenzioni.
65. La terza parte intervenente sottolineò anche che il godimento di diritti con persone con invalidità dovrebbe essere garantito senza qualsiasi la discriminazione. Inoltre, vivendo in case inaccessibili impedì partecipazione nella vita della comunità e condusse ad isolamento e segregazione dell'individuo disabile e la famiglia intera. In particolare, La terza parte intervenente enfatizzòche insuccesso per offrire alloggio ragionevole corrispose alla discriminazione invalidità-basata.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) principi di Generale
66. La Corte nota che il dogma centrale dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente è il suo trattamento discriminatorio allegato nella richiesta della legislazione di tassa attinente, contrari ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte rivolgerà perciò la sua azione di reclamo in questo riguardo sulla base dei principi attinenti che seguono dalla sua giurisprudenza sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
67. La Corte ha sostenuto costantemente che Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con ciò. Benché la richiesta di Articolo 14 non presupponga una violazione di quelle disposizioni-ed a questa misura è autonomo- non ci può essere stanza per richiesta sua a meno che i fatti in questione incorra all'interno dell'ambito di uno o più di loro. La proibizione della discriminazione custodita così in Articolo 14 prolunga oltre il godimento dei diritti e le libertà che la Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre costringa ogni Stato a garantire. Fa domanda anche a quelli diritti supplementari, mentre incorrendo all'interno della sfera generale di qualsiasi Convenzione Articolo per il quale lo Stato ha deciso volontariamente di prevedere (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, E.B. c. la Francia [GC], n. 43546/02, §§ 47-48 22 gennaio 2008; e Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 63 ECHR 2010).
68. La Corte ha stabilito nella sua giurisprudenzache solamente differenzia in trattamento basata su una caratteristica identificabile, o status, è capace di corrispondere alla discriminazione all'interno del significato di Articolo 14 (vedere Eweida ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, n. 48420/10, § 86 15 gennaio 2013).
69. Generalmente, in ordine per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo, o pertinentemente simile, situazioni (vedere X ed Altri c. l'Austria [GC], n. 19010/07, § 98 19 febbraio 2013). Ogni differenza in trattamento non corrisponderà comunque, ad una violazione di Articolo 14. Una differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; nelle altre parole, se non intraprende un scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso (vedere Fabris c. la Francia [GC], n. 16574/08, § 56 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti); Weller c. l'Ungheria, n. 44399/05, § 27 31 marzo 2009; e Topi-Rosenberg ?c. Croatia, n. 19391/11, § 36 14 novembre 2013).
70. Inoltre, Articolo 14 non proibisce Parti Contraenti dal trattare differentemente gruppi per correggere “le ineguaglianze che riguarda i fatti” fra loro. Effettivamente, il diritto per non essere discriminato contro nel godimento dei diritti garantì sotto la Convenzione è violato anche quando Stati senza una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole vanno a vuoto a trattare differentemente persone le cui situazioni sono significativamente diverse (vedere Thlimmenos c. la Grecia [GC], n. 34369/97, § 44 ECHR 2000-IV; Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 51 ECHR 2006 VI; e Sejdi ?e Finci c. Bosnia e Herzegovina [GC], N. 27996/06 e 34836/06, § 44 ECHR 2009).
71. La Corte ha accettato anche che una politica generale o misura che hanno sproporzionatamente effetti pregiudizievoli su un particolare gruppo può essere considerata discriminatoria nonostante che non è mirato specificamente a che gruppo, e che la discriminazione potenzialmente contrario alla Convenzione può essere il risultato di una situazione de facto (vedere D.H. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 175 ECHR 2007 IV; e Kuri ?ed Altri c. la Slovenia [GC], n. 26828/06, § 388 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti)). Comunque, questa è solamente la causa se simile politica o misura ha nessuno “l'obiettivo e ragionevole” giustificazione che è se non persegue un “scopo legittimo” o se non c'è un “relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità” fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso (vedere S.A.S. c. la Francia [GC], n. 43835/11, § 161 ECHR 2014 (gli estratti)).
72. Gli Stati Contraenti godono un certo margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifici un trattamento diverso. La sfera del margine della valutazione varierà secondo le circostanze, l'argomento e lo sfondo. Lo stesso è vero con riguardo ad alla necessità di trattare raggruppa differentemente per correggere “le ineguaglianze che riguarda i fatti fra loro” (vedere Stummer c. l'Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 88 ECHR 2011).
73. Sulla mano del una, a margine ampio di solito è concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione quando viene a misure generali della strategia economica o sociale, per esempio (vedere Hämäläinen c. la Finlandia [GC], n. 37359/09, § 109 ECHR 2014). Questo include anche misure nell'area di tassazione. Comunque qualsiasi simile misure devono essere implementate in una maniera non-discriminatoria e devono essere attenutesi coi requisiti della proporzionalità (vedere R.Sz. c. l'Ungheria, n. 41838/11, § 54 2 luglio 2013). D'altra parte se una restrizione su diritti essenziali fa domanda ad un gruppo particolarmente vulnerabile in società che ha sofferto della discriminazione considerevole di passato, poi il margine dello Stato della valutazione è sostanzialmente narrower e deve avere ragioni molto pesanti per le restrizioni in oggetto. La ragione per questo approccio che mette in dubbio le certe classificazioni per se è che simile gruppi erano storicamente soggetto a pregiudizio con conseguenze durevoli, mentre dà luogo alla loro esclusione sociale. Simile pregiudizio potrebbe comportare stereotipando legislativo quale proibisce la valutazione individualizzata delle loro vesti e le necessità. La Corte già ha identificato un numero di gruppi così vulnerabile che hanno sofferto di trattamento diverso su conto della loro caratteristica o status, incluso l'invalidità (vedere Glor, citato sopra, § 84; Alajos Kiss c. l'Ungheria, n. 38832/06, § 42 20 maggio 2010; e Kiyutin c. la Russia, n. 2700/10, § 63 ECHR 2011). Inoltre, con riguardo ad a tutte le azioni riguardo a figli con invalidità il più buon interesse del figlio deve essere una considerazione primaria (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra; Articolo 7(2) CRPD). In qualsiasi causa, comunque irrispettoso della sfera del margine dello Stato della valutazione la definitivo decisione come all'osservanza dei resti di requisiti della Convenzione con la Corte (vedere, inter l'alia, Konstantin Markin c. la Russia [GC], n. 30078/06, § 126 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti)).
74. Infine, come all'onere della prova in relazione ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione, la Corte ha sostenuto, che una volta il richiedente ha mostrato una differenza in trattamento, è per il Governo per mostrare che fu giustificato (vedere D.H. ed Altri, citato sopra, § 177; Kuri ?ed Altri, citato sopra, § 389; Vallianatos ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], N. 29381/09 e 32684/09, § 85 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti)).
(b) la Richiesta di questi principi alla causa presente
(i) Se i fatti che sono posto sotto all'azione di reclamo incorrono all'interno della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
75. La Corte nota che è incontrastato fra le parti che le circostanze della causa presente, riguardo alle questioni di tassazione incorrono all'interno della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, rendendo Articolo 14 della Convenzione applicabile. La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di sostenere altrimenti (vedere, per esempio, Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 59 ECHR 2008).
(l'ii) Se l'invalidità del figlio del richiedente portò la situazione del richiedente all'interno del termine “l'altro status” in Articolo 14 della Convenzione
76. La Corte già ha sostenuto che lo status di salute di una persona, incluso l'invalidità ed i vari danneggiamenti di salute incorra all'interno del termine “l'altro status” nel testo di Articolo 14 della Convenzione (vedere Glor, citato sopra, § 80; Kiyutin, citato sopra, § 57; ed I.B. c. la Grecia, n. 552/10, § 73 ECHR 2013).
77. La causa a mano concerne una situazione nella quale il richiedente non addusse trattamento discriminatorio riferita alla sua propria invalidità ma piuttosto il suo trattamento di unfavourable allegato sulla base dell'invalidità del suo figlio, con chi lui vive e per che lui fornisce cura. Nelle altre parole, al giorno d'oggi la causa la questione sorge a che misura il richiedente che non si fa appartenga ad un gruppo svantaggiato, ciononostante soffre di trattamento meno favorevole per motivi relativo all'invalidità del suo figlio (compari divide in paragrafi 41-42 sopra).
78. In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che le parole “l'altro status” è stato dato un significato ampio nella sua giurisprudenzageneralmente (vedere Carson ed Altri, citato sopra, § 70) e la loro interpretazione non è stata limitata a caratteristiche che sono personali nel senso che loro sono innati o inerenti (vedere Clift c. il Regno Unito, n. 7205/07, §§ 56-59 13 luglio 2010). Per istanza, una questione della discriminazione sorse di conseguenza, in cause dove lo status di richiedenti che notificarono come la base allegato per un trattamento discriminatorio fu determinato in relazione alla loro situazione di famiglia, come la residenza dei loro figli (vedere Efe c. l'Austria, n. 9134/06, § 48 8 gennaio 2013). Segue così, nella luce del suo obiettivo e natura dei diritti che cerca di salvaguardare, che Articolo 14 della Convenzione copre anche istanze nelle quali un individuo è trattato meno favourably sulla base dello status di un'altra persona o caratteristiche protette.
79. La Corte perciò i costatazione che il trattamento discriminatorio allegato del richiedente su conto dell'invalidità del suo figlio, con chi lui ha chiusura collegamenti personali e per che lui fornisce cura, è una forma dell'invalidità basò discriminazione coperta con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
(l'iii) Se c'era una differenza di trattamento fra persone in pertinentemente posizioni simili o un insuccesso per trattare differentemente persone in situazioni pertinentemente diverse
80. La Corte osserva inoltre che il richiedente addusse trattamento discriminatorio nella richiesta della legislazione di tassa di beni immobili nazionale rispetto agli altri acquirenti di vere proprietà coi quali loro stavano risolvendo le loro necessità di alloggio in circostanze dove la proprietà che loro hanno posseduto non soddisfece le necessità di alloggio delle loro famiglie. In particolare, il richiedente contese che con vendendo il suo appartamento, situato sul terzo pavimento di un edificio residenziale in Zagabria, e muovendosi ad un alloggio in Samobor, lui aveva creato condizioni di alloggio adattate alla situazione che la sua famiglia affrontò dopo la nascita del suo figlio disabile per la prima volta. Questo specificamente riferisce al fatto che l'edificio residenziale dove l'appartamento fu localizzato non fu dotato di un ascensore ed era perciò, siccome crebbe suo figlio, mentre divenne molto difficile per il richiedente e la sua famiglia per prenderlo dell'appartamento per vedere un dottore, o prenderlo per la fisioterapia, ed ad asilo infantile o scuola, e soddisfare le sue altre necessità sociali (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra).
81. La Corte nota che non c'è controversia fra le parti che il figlio del richiedente era una persona con invalidità profonde e multiple e che lui richiese cura a tempo pieno ed attenzione. Questo segue anche conclusivamente dal rapporto dei servizi di cura sociali che lo dichiararono 100 percento disabilitato (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Di conseguenza, un problema sorge come a se l'appartamento in oggetto potrebbe essere considerato come alloggio che soddisfa le necessità di alloggio della famiglia del richiedente dopo la nascita del suo figlio disabile.
82. Nella prospettiva della Corte, non può essere questione che l'appartamento del richiedente in Zagabria che lui aveva comprato tre anni di fronte alla nascita di suo figlio, situato sul terzo pavimento di un edificio residenziale senza un ascensore, danneggiò severamente la mobilità di suo figlio e di conseguenza minacciò il suo sviluppo personale e la capacità di giungere al suo massimo potenziale, mentre facendolo estremamente difficile per lui partecipare pienamente nella comunità e le attività istruttive, culturali e sociali di figli. L'assenza di un ascensore ha dovuto impedire la qualità di vivere della famiglia del richiedente ed in particolare suo figlio ad una misura simile con la quale una persona robusta esperimenterebbe, per esempio che ha un appartamento sul terzo pavimento di un edificio residenziale senza accesso appropriato a sé o con avendo un accesso danneggiato alle utilità pubbliche ed attinenti.
83. La Corte perciò i costatazione che cercando di sostituire l'appartamento in oggetto con comprando un alloggio che è stato adattato alle necessità della sua famiglia, il richiedente era in una posizione comparabile a qualsiasi l'altra persona che stava sostituendo un appartamento o un alloggio con comprando un altro beni immobili equipaggiò con, nelle parole della legislazione di tassa nazionale ed attinente, infrastruttura di base e requisiti di alloggio tecnici (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). La sua situazione differì ciononostante con riguardo ad al significato del termine “requisiti di infrastruttura di base” quale, in prospettiva dell'invalidità di suo figlio ed il cittadino attinente e standard internazionali sulla questione (vedere divide in paragrafi 25 e 34-42 sopra), implicito gli installazioni di accessibilità necessari come, nella causa concreta, l'esistenza di un ascensore.
84. Comunque, la Corte nota che l’Ufficio Tasse di Samobor Tassa Ufficio considerò che, dato l'area di superficie dell'appartamento che il richiedente aveva posseduto in Zagabria e l'esistenza di infrastruttura, come elettricità, acqua ed accesso alle altre utilità pubbliche che non poteva essere detto che il richiedente non aveva avuto alloggio che soddisfa le necessità di alloggio della sua famiglia. Di conseguenza, lui fu escluso dal trarre profitto da un'esenzione dalle imposte per l'acquisto di un beni immobili che soddisfa le necessità di alloggio della sua famiglia senza qualsiasi considerazione che è data agli argomenti del richiedente riguardo alle specifiche necessità della sua famiglia riferì all'invalidità del suo figlio (vedere divide in paragrafi 11-12 sopra).
85. Questa decisione fu sostenuta col Ministero e la Corte amministrativa Alta che sostiene che non poteva essere detto che con comprando il richiedente l'alloggio aveva comprato un beni immobili che risolve il suo alloggio ha bisogno dato che, nella loro prospettiva, l'appartamento che lui aveva posseduto soddisfatto i requisiti di infrastruttura di base. Di nuovo, come dall’Ufficio Tasse di Samobor, nessuna considerazione fu data alle specifiche necessità della famiglia del richiedente riferite all'invalidità del suo figlio. Inoltre, la Corte amministrativa Alta considerò i suoi argomenti a che effetto irrilevante (vedere divide in paragrafi 15 16 sopra). La Corte Costituzionale rivolse neanche la questione (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra).
86. In prospettiva del sopra, i costatazione di Corte che ci sono senza dubbio che le autorità nazionali e competenti andarono a vuoto a riconoscere la specificità che riguarda i fatti della situazione del richiedente con riguardo ad alla questione di infrastruttura di base e requisiti di alloggio tecnici che soddisfano le necessità di alloggio della sua famiglia. Le autorità nazionali adottarono una posizione finito-restrittiva con riguardo ad alla particolare causa del richiedente, con non prendendo in considerazione le specifiche necessità del richiedente e la sua famiglia quando facendo domanda la condizione relativo a “requisiti di infrastruttura di base” nella loro causa come opposto alle altre cause dove elementi come l'area di superficie di un appartamento, o accesso all'elettricità, acqua e le altre utilità di pubblico, avrebbe potuto suggerire requisiti di infrastruttura di base ed adeguati e sufficienti.
87. Rimane essere visto se lo stesso trattamento del richiedente come che di qualsiasi l'altro acquirente di beni immobili aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole (vedere divide in paragrafi 70 e 74 sopra).
(l'iv) Se c'era giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole
88. Nel giustificare le decisioni delle autorità nazionali, il Governo avanzò due argomenti. Prima, il Governo dibattè che il diritto nazionale attinente previde per criterio obiettivo per stabilire l'esistenza di requisiti di infrastruttura di base di alloggio adeguato che non lasciò discrezione per un'interpretazione alle autorità fiscali amministrative in una particolare causa; ed in secondo luogo, che il richiedente non aveva soddisfatto i requisiti finanziari per un'esenzione dalle imposte data la sua situazione finanziaria.
89. Con riguardo ad al primo argomento la Corte non può andare a vuoto ad osservare che è quasi uguale alla concessione del Governo che le autorità nazionali ed attinenti non sono state conferite poteri per chiedere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunta e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso nella particolare causa del richiedente. Da adesso, contrari ai requisiti di Articolo 14 della Convenzione, loro non erano capaci di offrire obiettivo e la giustificazione ragionevole per il loro insuccesso per correggere l'ineguaglianza che riguarda i fatti pertinente alla causa del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 60 sopra).
90. La Corte nota ciononostante, mentre essendo bene consapevole che è nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti interpretare e fare domanda il diritto nazionale (vedere Glor, citato sopra, § 91), che la disposizione attinente dell'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili si è adagiata in piuttosto termini generali che assegnano soltanto al “infrastruttura di base” e “igiene e requisiti tecnici” (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra, sezione 11(9.5) dell'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili).
91. La Corte osserva inoltre che le altre disposizioni attinenti del diritto nazionale offrono della guida con riguardo ad alla questione di requisiti di base dell'accessibilità per persone con invalidità. Così, per istanza, la Con-legge sull'accessibilità di edifici a persone con invalidità e la mobilità ridotto prevede l'esistenza di un ascensore come uno degli elementi di base dell'accessibilità per persone con invalidità (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra). Non c'è comunque, nulla da suggerire che qualsiasi delle autorità nazionali e competenti nella causa a mano diede qualsiasi la considerazione a simile promulgazioni nel diritto nazionale attinente capace di completare il significato di termini sotto l'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili.
92. Inoltre, la Corte nota che aderendo al set di requisiti fuori nel CRPD lo Stato rispondente un obbligo si impegnò prendere nell'esame i suoi principi attinenti, come alloggio ragionevole, l'accessibilità e la non-discriminazione contro persone con invalidità con riguardo ad alla loro piena ed uguale partecipazione in tutti gli aspetti della vita sociale (vedere paragrafo 34-37 sopra), ed in questa sfera le autorità nazionali hanno, siccome asserito col Governo, intraprese le certe misure attinenti (vedere paragrafo 62 sopra). Nella causa in oggetto, comunque, le autorità nazionali ed attinenti non diedero considerazione a questi obblighi internazionali che lo Stato si impegnò rispettare.
93. Segue di conseguenza, contrari a che che asserì il Governo, che il problema nella causa a mano non è quello nel quale la legislazione nazionale ed attinente non lasciò stanza per una valutazione individuale dell'esenzione dalle imposte richiede di persone nella situazione del richiedente. Il problema nella causa presente è piuttosto che la maniera nella quale la legislazione fu fatta domanda in pratica andò a vuoto a sufficientemente accomodare i requisiti degli specifici aspetti della causa del richiedente riferiti all'invalidità del suo figlio e, in particolare, all'interpretazione del termine “requisiti di infrastruttura di base” per l'alloggio di un invalido (compari Topi ?Rosenberg, citato sopra, §§ 40-49).
94. Secondo il secondo argomento avanzato col Governo, il richiedente fu escluso inoltre, dai beneficiari del beni immobili trasferisca esenzione dalle imposte per motivi della sua situazione finanziaria ed in particolare il valore dell'appartamento che lui prima aveva posseduto in Zagabria. La ragione allegato per questo era il fatto che l'esenzione dalle imposte sotto l'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili fu intesa di proteggere persone finanziariamente svantaggiate che, nella prospettiva del Governo, il richiedente non era, (vedere paragrafo 61 sopra).
95. I costatazione di Corte che in principio la protezione di persone finanziariamente svantaggiate con facendo domanda le misure attinenti di esenzione dalle imposte potrebbe essere considerata come giustificazione obiettiva per un trattamento discriminatorio allegato. Effettivamente, sembrerebbe che la questione della situazione finanziaria di un fare domanda individuale per un'esenzione dalle imposte di trasferimento di beni immobili era cumulativamente insieme attinente con gli altri fattori quando valutando suo o il suo obbligo di tassa (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra ed anche divida in paragrafi 24 sopra, sezione 11(9.5) e (9.6) del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto).
96. Comunque, con riguardo ad alla particolare causa del richiedente, la Corte noterebbe, che segue da tutte le decisioni delle autorità nazionali e competenti che la ragione per escludere il richiedente dalla sfera di beneficiari di esenzione dalle imposte era il fatto che il suo appartamento in Zagabria fu considerato come soddisfare i requisiti di infrastruttura di base per le necessità di alloggio della sua famiglia (vedere divide in paragrafi 12, 14 e 16 sopra). Il riferimento solo all'elemento finanziario della disposizione di esenzione dalle imposte sotto l'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra, sezione 11(9.6) dell'Atto del Trasferimento del Beni immobili) fu reso col Ministero (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). Comunque, questo era fatto senza qualsiasi valutazione concreta degli aspetti finanziari ed attinenti della causa del richiedente che era una pratica ben stabilita delle autorità nazionali nelle altre cause dove che disposizione si fu appellata su (vedere paragrafo 33 sopra).
97. Di conseguenza, accettando l'argomento del Governo a questo effetto implicherebbe speculazione da parte della Corte riguardo all'attinenza concreta della situazione finanziaria del richiedente per la sua richiesta di esenzione dalle imposte, all'interno del significato del diritto nazionale attinente (paragone, con contrasto Glor, citato sopra, § 90). La Corte è perciò incapace per accettare che la protezione di persone finanziariamente svantaggiate era la ragione che giustifica il trattamento discriminatorio contestato del richiedente.
98. In prospettiva del sopra, ed in particolare nell'assenza della valutazione attinente di tutte le circostanze della causa con le autorità nazionali e competenti, la Corte non trova, che loro offrirono obiettivo e la giustificazione ragionevole per il loro insuccesso per prendere in considerazione l'ineguaglianza pertinente alla situazione del richiedente quando facendo una valutazione del suo obbligo di tassa.
99. La Corte perciò costatazione che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
100. Questo lo costituisce non necessario la Corte considerare separatamente l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo (vedere, per esempio, Zeman c. l'Austria, n. 23960/02, § 42 29 giugno 2006).
II. Violazione allegato Di Articoli 8 E 14 Di La Convenzione
101. Il richiedente si lamentò di una violazione del diritto per rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia e la sua casa riferirono all'ingiusto e la richiesta discriminatoria di legislazione di tassa nazionale. Lui si appellò su Articoli 8 e 14 della Convenzione.
102. Il Governo contestò quelle dichiarazioni.
103. Nelle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte è della prospettiva che l'ineguaglianza di trattamento della quale il richiedente chiese di essere una vittima sufficientemente è stata presa in considerazione nella valutazione sopra che ha condotto alla sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Di conseguenza, trova che-mentre questa azione di reclamo è anche ammissibile-non c'è causa per un esame separato degli stessi fatti dal posto d'osservazione di Articoli 8 e 14 della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Mazurek c. la Francia, n. 34406/97, § 56 ECHR 2000 II; ed Efe, citato sopra, § 55).
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 12
104. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre che lui fu discriminato contro con la maniera della richiesta della legislazione di tassa che andò a vuoto a distinguere la sua situazione dalla situazione generale che incorre le disposizioni attinenti su esenzione dalle imposte sotto. Lui si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12.
105. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
106. La Corte già ha trovato che la maniera della richiesta della legislazione di tassa che andò a vuoto a distinguere la situazione del richiedente dalla situazione generale che incorre le disposizioni attinenti su esenzione dalle imposte sotto corrispose alla discriminazione in violazione di Articolo 14 presa insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
107. Avendo riguardo ad a che trovando, la Corte considera che non è necessario per esaminare separatamente se, in questa causa, è stata anche una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12 alla Convenzione (compari Sejdi ?e Finci, citato sopra, § 51; ed il crkava di Savez “Rije ?života” ed Altri c. Croatia, n. 7798/08, §§ 114-115 9 dicembre 2010).
IV. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
108. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette solo una riparazione parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danni
109. Il richiedente chiese 11,010.00 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale riguardo all'importo della tassa che era stato obbligato a pagare, ed EUR 10,000 a riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
110. Il Governo considerò la rivendicazione del richiedente eccessivo, infondato e non comprovato.
111. Come al danno patrimoniale chiesto, la Corte, avendo riguardo ad alle sue sentenze riguardo ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 99 sopra), riguardo alla discriminazione contro il richiedente riferito alla richiesta della legislazione di tassa nazionale, considera che non può speculare sulla misura degli obblighi di tassa nazionali del richiedente, particolarmente riferito alla questione se la sua situazione finanziaria giustifica un'esenzione dalle imposte (vedere divide in paragrafi 95 97 sopra). Così, non essendo capace di valutare la rivendicazione del richiedente per danno patrimoniale, la Corte si riferisce all'opportunità disponibile al richiedente richiedere riapertura dei procedimenti in conformità con sezione 76 del Controversie Atto Amministrativo (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra) che concederebbe per un esame nuovo della sua rivendicazione al livello nazionale.
112. D'altra parte la Corte considera che il richiedente ha dovuto subire danno non-patrimoniale che sufficientemente non è compensato con la sentenza di una violazione. Decidendo su una base equa, assegna EUR 5,000 il richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo importo.
Costi di B. e spese
113. Il richiedente chiese anche EUR 11,652.49 e 4,900 libbre genuino (GBP; verso EUR 6,800) per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali e per quegli incorsi in di fronte alla Corte.
114. Il Governo considerò la rivendicazione del richiedente infondato e non comprovato.
115. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare 11,500 costi di copertura la somma di EUR sotto tutti i capi, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile.
C. Interesse di mora
116. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;

3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare separatamente l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo;

4. Sostiene che nessun problema separato deriva sotto l’articolo 8 preso da solo ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione, o sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12;

5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, essere convertito in kunas croato (HRK) al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(iii) EUR 11,500 (undici mila cinquecento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso di interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;

6. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 22 marzo 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Iil ?Karaka?
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 27/07/2021.