Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GARIB v. THE NETHERLANDS

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41,35,08,P4-2

NUMERO: 43494/09/2016
STATO: Olanda
DATA: 23/02/2016
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: No violation of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 - Freedom of movement-{general} (Article 2 para. 1 of Protocol No. 4 - Freedom to choose residence)



THIRD SECTION






CASE OF GARIB v. THE NETHERLANDS

(Application no. 43494/09)








JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG

23 February 2016





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Garib v. the Netherlands,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Luis López Guerra, President,
Helena Jäderblom,
George Nicolaou,
Helen Keller,
Johannes Silvis,
Branko Lubarda,
Pere Pastor Vilanova, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 7 October 2014, on 5 January 2016 and on 26 January 2016,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 43494/09) against the Kingdom of the Netherlands lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Netherlands national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 28 July 2009.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Rotterdam. The Netherlands Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr R.A.A. Böcker of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged that the restrictions to which she was subjected in choosing her place of residence were incompatible with Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention.
4. On 7 October 2014 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1971 and now lives in Vlaardingen.
6. On 25 May 2005 the applicant moved to the city of Rotterdam. She took up residence in rented property at the address A. Street 6b. This address is located in the Tarwewijk district in South Rotterdam. The applicant had previously resided outside the Rotterdam Metropolitan Region (Stadsregio Rotterdam).
7. The owner of the property asked the applicant, who by this time had two young children, to vacate the property as he wished to renovate it for his own use. He offered to let the applicant a different property at the address B. Street 72A, also in the Tarwewijk area. The applicant stated that, since it comprised three rooms and a garden, the property was far more suitable for her and her children than her A. Street dwelling which comprised a single room.
8. In the meantime, Tarwewijk had been designated under the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act (Wet bijzondere maatregelen grootstedelijke problematiek, see below) as an area in which it was not permitted to take up new residence without a housing permit (huisvestingsvergunning). Accordingly, on 8 March 2007 the applicant lodged a request for a housing permit with the Burgomaster and Aldermen (burgemeester en wethouders) of Rotterdam in order to be permitted to move to B. Street 72A.
9. On 19 March 2007 the Burgomaster and Aldermen gave a decision refusing such a permit. They found it established that the applicant had not been resident in the Rotterdam Metropolitan Region for six years immediately preceding the introduction of her request. Moreover, since she was dependent on social-security benefits under the Work and Social Assistance Act (Wet Werk en Bijstand), she did not meet the income requirement that would have qualified her for an exemption from the residence requirement.
10. The applicant lodged an objection (bezwaarschrift) with the Burgomaster and Aldermen.
11. On 15 June 2007 the Burgomaster and Aldermen gave a decision dismissing the applicant’s objection. Adopting as their own an advisory opinion by the Objections Advisory Committee (Algemene bezwaarschriftencommissie), they referred to housing permits as an instrument to ensure the balanced and equitable distribution of housing and the possibility for the applicant to move to a dwelling not situated in a “hotspot” area.
12. The applicant lodged an appeal (beroep) with the Rotterdam Regional Court (rechtbank). As relevant to the case, she argued that the hardship clause ought to have been applied. She relied on Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 of the Convention and Article 12 of the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.
13. The Regional Court gave a decision dismissing the applicant’s appeal on 4 April 2008. As relevant to the case before the Court, its reasoning was as follows:
“Section 8(1) of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act provides for the possibility of temporary restrictions on freedom of residence in areas to be indicated by the Minister [sc. the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (Minister van Volkshuisvesting, Ruimtelijke Ordening en Milieubeheer)]. The aim of these restrictions is to reverse a process of overburdening and decreasing quality of life, particularly by striving towards districts whose composition is more mixed from a socioeconomic point of view. The restrictions are also intended actively to counteract the existing segregation of incomes throughout the city through the regulation of the supply of housing in certain districts and in so doing improve quality of life for the inhabitants of those districts (Parliamentary Documents, Lower House of Parliament (Kamerstukken II) 2004/2005, 30 091, no. 3, pages 11-13). In view of the aims of the law, as set out, these temporary restrictions on the freedom to choose one’s residence cannot be found not to be justified by the general interest in a democratic society. Nor can it be found that, given the considerable extent of the problems noted in certain districts in Rotterdam, the said restrictions are not necessary for the maintenance of ordre public. The Regional Court takes the view that the legislature has sufficiently shown that in those districts the ‘limits of the capacity for absorption’ have been reached as regards care and support for the socioeconomically underprivileged and that moreover in those districts there is a concentration of underprivileged individuals in deprived districts as well as considerable dissatisfaction among the population about inappropriate behaviour, nuisance and crime.”
14. The applicant lodged a further appeal (hoger beroep) with the Administrative Jurisdiction Division (Afdeling bestuursrechtspraak) of the Council of State (Raad van State).
15. On 4 February 2009 the Administrative Jurisdiction Division gave a decision dismissing the applicant’s further appeal. As relevant to the case before the Court, its reasoning included the following:
“The Administrative Jurisdiction Division finds that, considering that the area in issue is one designated under section 5 of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act, the Burgomaster and Aldermen were entitled to take the view that the restriction [on freedom to choose one’s residence] is justified in the general interest in a democratic society within the meaning of Article 12 § 3 of the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The area in issue is a so-called ‘hotspot’, where, as has not been disputed, quality of life is under threat. The restriction resulting from section 2.6(2) of the 2003 Housing Bye-law (Huisvestingsverordening 2003) is of a temporary nature, namely for up to six years. It is not established that the supply of housing outside the areas designated by the Minister in the Rotterdam Metropolitan Region is insufficient. What [the applicant] has stated about waiting times does not lead the Administrative Jurisdiction Division to reach a different finding. The Administrative Jurisdiction Division further takes into account that pursuant to section 7(1), introductory sentence and under b of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act, the Minister is empowered to rescind the designation of the area if it turns out that persons seeking housing do not have sufficient possibility of finding suitable housing within the region in which the municipality is situated. In view of these facts and circumstances the Administrative Jurisdiction Division finds that the restriction in issue is not contrary to the requirements of a pressing social need and proportionality. The Administrative Jurisdiction Division therefore finds, as the Regional Court did, that section 2.6(2) of the 2003 Housing Bye-law does not violate Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 of the Convention or Article 12 of the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.”
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Housing Act
16. As relevant to the case before the Court, the Housing Act (Huisvestingswet) provides as follows:
Section 2
“1. If the local council finds it necessary to lay down rules concerning the taking into use, or permitting the use, of housing ..., or concerning changes to the housing supply ..., it shall adopt a housing bye-law (huisvestingsverordening).
2. For the purpose of applying the first paragraph, the local council shall investigate, in any case, the extent to which the effect can be achieved that in permitting the use of relatively low-cost housing priority is given to house-seekers who, in view of their income, are especially dependent on such housing. ...”
B. The Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act
1. Relevant provisions
17. The Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act applies to a number of named municipalities including Rotterdam. It empowers those municipalities to take measures in certain designated areas including the granting of partial tax exemptions to small business owners and the selecting of new residents based on their sources of income. It entered into force on 1 January 2006.
18. As in force at the relevant time, provisions of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act relevant to the case were the following:
Section 5
“1. The Minister [of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment] can, if so requested by the local council (gemeenteraad), designate areas in which persons seeking housing may be made subject to requirements under sections 8 and 9 of this Act.
2. The indication referred to in the first paragraph shall be for a term of up to four years. At the request of the local council, this term can be extended once only for up to four more years. [Section 7] shall apply by analogy.”
Section 6
“1. When making the request referred to in section 5(1), the local council shall satisfy the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment that the intended designation of the areas mentioned in the request:
(a) is necessary and appropriate to combat inner-city problems in the municipality; and
(b) meets requirements of subsidiarity and proportionality.
2. The designation referred to in section 5(1) shall be given only if the requirements of the first paragraph have been met, and if the local council has satisfied the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment that persons seeking housing to whom, as a result of such designation, a housing permit for taking housing in the designated areas into their use cannot be granted retain sufficient possibility to find housing suitable for them within the region in which the municipality is situated. ...”
Section 7
“1. The Minister shall rescind the designation referred to in section 5 if it is apparent to him that:
...
b. persons seeking housing to whom a housing permit allowing them to take into use housing within the designated areas cannot be granted as a result of the designation referred to in section 5 have insufficient possibility to find housing suitable for them within the region in which the municipality is situated. ...”
Section 8
“1. The local council can, if it considers [such a measure] necessary and appropriate for combating inner-city problems (grootstedelijke problematiek) within the municipality and it meets the requirements of subsidiarity and proportionality, determine in the housing bye-law that persons seeking housing who have been resident without interruption of the region within which the municipality is situated for less than six years can only be eligible for a housing permit allowing them to take into use housing belonging to categories designated in that bye-law if they dispose of:
(a) an income from work under a contract of employment;
(b) an income from an independent profession or business;
(c) an income from an early retirement pension;
(d) an old age pension within the meaning of the General Old Age Pensions Act (Algemene Ouderdomswet);
(e) an old age pension or survivor’s pension within the meaning of the Wages (Tax Deduction) Act 1964 (Wet op de loonbelasting 1964);
(f) a student grant within the meaning of the Student Grants Act 2000 (Wet op de studiefinanciering 2000).
2. The local council shall determine in the housing bye-law that the Burgomaster and Aldermen can grant a person seeking housing who does not meet the requirements set out in the first paragraph a housing permit allowing them to take into use housing as referred to in that paragraph if denying them that housing permit would lead to iniquity of an overriding nature (een onbillijkheid van overwegende aard). ...”
Section 17
“The Minister shall send a report to Parliament on the effectiveness and effects of this Act in practice to Parliament every five years after the entry into force of this Act.”
2. Legislative history of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act
(a) The advisory opinion of the Council of State and the Further Report
19. The Council of State scrutinised the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Bill and submitted an advisory opinion to the Queen. The Government forwarded the opinion to Parliament, together with their comments (Advisory Opinion of the Council of State and Further Report (Advies Raad van State en Nader Rapport), Parliamentary Documents, Lower House of Parliament, 2004/2005, 30 091, no. 5).
20. The applicant, in her observations, draws attention to several remarks made by the Council of State. As relevant to the case before the Court, these included concerns about the unwanted side effects of regulating access to housing in inner-city areas on the availability of housing for low-income groups in surrounding municipalities and about persons with income from sources other than social welfare being compelled to accept housing in depressed neighbourhoods against their wishes; concerns about compatibility with human rights treaties, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and Protocol No. 4 to the Convention; and concerns about the implicit distinction based on income, which might lead to indirect distinctions on grounds of race, colour or national or ethnic origin.
21. The Government responded to these concerns. Side effects affecting surrounding municipalities were to be expected only if the municipality concerned could not guarantee the availability of alternative housing itself; at all events, other local authorities would be consulted before the Minister gave a decision and the number and extent of the urban areas to be designated were expected to be limited. It was normally left to those seeking housing whether to react to an offer of housing or not; there was thus no compulsion. Moreover, while the effect of designation under the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act might well be to shorten waiting lists and encourage persons with income from sources other than public welfare to take up residence there, this was actually an intended effect. The measures in issue were justified in terms of Article 12 § 3 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and Article 2 § 3 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention. It could not be excluded that members of minority groups might be affected indirectly, but the aim thereby served was legitimate, the means chosen were appropriate to that aim, alternative means were not available and the requirement of proportionality had been met. In the latter connection, the Government pointed to the requirement that sufficient alternative housing be available within the region for those in need of it before an urban area could be designated under the Act; if after all this proved not to be the case, the Minister would withdraw the designation.
22. Changes were made to the Explanatory Memorandum (Memorie van Toelichting) reflecting the points raised.
(b) The Explanatory Memorandum
23. It is stated in the Explanatory Memorandum to the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Bill (Parliamentary Documents, Lower House of Parliament 2004/2005, 30 091, no. 3) that it was enacted in response to a specific wish expressed by the authorities of the municipality of Rotterdam. The emergence of concentrations of “socioeconomically underprivileged” in distressed inner-city areas had been observed, with serious effects on quality of life owing to unemployment, poverty and social exclusion. Many who could afford to move elsewhere did so, which led to the further impoverishment of the areas so affected. This, together with antisocial behaviour, the influx of illegal immigrants and crime, was said to constitute the core of Rotterdam’s problems. The need therefore existed to give impetus to economic improvement locally. Quick results were not expected, for which reason the Act was intended to remain in force indefinitely; however, its effects would be reviewed in five years’ time.
24. In addition to the local authorities of Rotterdam, those of other cities had been asked for their input. Interest in the aims and measures of the Act had been expressed by the four major cities – Amsterdam, The Hague and Utrecht, in addition to Rotterdam – and other municipalities, large towns in particular. It would, however, be left to each municipality to choose for itself the measures to adopt in response to local needs.
25. Measures available under the Act included offering tax incentives and subsidies with a view to promoting economic activity in affected areas. Other measures were aimed at regulating access to the housing market in particular areas.
26. In the longer term, measures including the sale of rental property, the demolition of substandard housing and its replacement by higher-quality, more expensive residential property were envisaged. As a short-term temporary measure, intended to offer a “breathing space” for more permanent measures to produce their effects, it was proposed on the one hand to encourage settlement by persons with an income from employment (or past employment), professional or business activity or student grants and on the other to stem the influx of socioeconomically deprived house-seekers with a view to increasing population diversity.
27. At the same time it was recognised that those denied settlement in the areas in issue should be provided with suitable housing elsewhere in the city or region concerned. If that was not secured, the areas affected would not be designated under the legislation proposed or an existing designation would have to be withdrawn as the case might be.
28. The question of compatibility with human rights treaties, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and Protocol No. 4 to the Convention, was addressed. The measures proposed were considered to serve the interests of “public order” within the meaning of Article 12 § 3 of the Covenant and ordre public within the meaning of Article 2 § 3 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention by halting the concentration in particular areas of socioeconomically deprived groups and enabling municipalities to prevent segregation on the basis of income. The influx of socioeconomically underprivileged groups, after all, led to increased reliance on social welfare, reduced what economic activity might remain and hindered the integration of immigrant communities, potentially causing social isolation of households of both native and foreign ethnic origin.
(c) Parliamentary discussions
29. The Lower House of Parliament discussed the Bill on 6, 7 and 15 September 2005. Members proposed numerous amendments. As relevant to the case before the Court, amendments adopted included a provision requiring the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment before designating an area within which the housing permit requirement would apply to ascertain that persons refused a housing permit retained adequate access to suitable housing elsewhere in the region (see section 6(2) of the Act, as adopted); and requiring municipalities introducing a housing permit system to adopt a hardship clause in every case (see section 8(2) of the Act, as adopted).
30. The Lower House of Parliament adopted the Act by 132 votes to 12 of the members present and voting.
31. In the Upper House of Parliament, concern was expressed about the compatibility of the Act with internationally guaranteed human rights, Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention and Article 12 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights in particular. In reply, the Government stressed the supervisory role of the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment and drew attention to the legal remedy constituted by proceedings before the competent administrative tribunals (Memorandum in Reply (Memorie van Antwoord), Parliamentary Documents, Upper House of Parliament (Kamerstukken I) 2005/2006, 30 091, C).
32. On 20 December 2005, after discussion, the Upper House of Parliament adopted the Act by 60 votes to 11 of the members present and voting.
B. The Housing Bye-law of the municipality of Rotterdam
1. 2003 version
33. The 2003 Housing Bye-law of the municipality of Rotterdam set rules for, among other things, the distribution of low-rent housing to low income households by empowering the Burgomaster and Aldermen to issue housing permits. In designated areas it was forbidden to take up residence without a housing permit if the rent was lower than a specified amount. The Bye-law set out criteria for the Burgomaster and Aldermen to apply in granting such housing permits; these criteria included a correlation between rent and income levels and another between the number of rooms in particular dwellings and the number of persons comprising a household.
34. On 1 October 2004 the municipality of Rotterdam introduced, on an experimental basis, a bye-law under which only households with an income between 120 per cent of the statutory minimum wage and the upper limit for compulsory public health insurance (ziekenfondsgrens; approximately double the statutory minimum wage at the time) were entitled to a housing permit allowing them to take up residence in moderate-cost rented housing.
2. 2006 version
35. In January 2006 the 2003 Housing Bye-law of the municipality of Rotterdam was amended to give detailed rules implementing the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act locally. As relevant to the present case, these rules echoed section 8 (1) and (2) of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act (section 2.6 of the 2003 Housing Bye-law).
36. The 2003 Housing Bye-law was replaced, with effect from 1 January 2008, by a new Housing Bye-law (Designated Areas (Rotterdam)) (Huisvestingsverordening aangewezen gebieden Rotterdam). This bye-law, which remains in force, includes provisions corresponding to those outlined in the preceding paragraph.
C. The designation decisions
37. On 13 June 2006 the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment designated under section 5 of the said Act four Rotterdam districts, including Tarwewijk, and several streets for an initial period of four years. These designated areas are generally referred to using the English-language expression “hotspots”.
38. In 2010 the designations were extended for a second four-year term and a first designation was made for a fifth district.
D. The opinion of the Equal Treatment Commission
39. The Equal Treatment Commission (Commissie Gelijke Behandeling) was a Government body set up under the General Equal Treatment Act (Algemene wet gelijke behandeling). Its remit was to investigate alleged direct and indirect distinctions between persons. It existed until 2012 when it was absorbed by the Netherlands Institute for Human Rights (College voor de Rechten van de Mens).
40. In December 2004 the Equal Treatment Commission was approached by Regioplatform Maaskoepel (“Maas Delta regional coordinating platform”), a federative organisation comprising social housing bodies active in the Rotterdam area, with the request to consider the experimental Rotterdam bye-law then in force (see paragraph 34 above).
41. The Equal Treatment Commission decided to include in its examination of the case the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Bill, which at that time was still pending in the Lower House of Parliament. While recognising that the Bill did not apply to certain categories of cases covered by the experimental bye-law, the Equal Treatment Commission found it relevant given that it could be applied to entire areas of the city.
42. The Equal Treatment Commission gave its opinion on 7 July 2005. It expressed the view that persons with non-Western European immigrant roots, such as persons of Turkish, Moroccan, Surinamese or Netherlands Antilles descent (afkomst) and single-parent families (i.e. working mothers and mothers on social welfare) were overrepresented among the unemployed and among those earning less than 120 per cent of the statutory minimum wage. For that reason the measures in issue constituted an indirect distinction based on race in the case of persons of non-European immigrant descent and on gender in the case of working mothers. These distinctions were unjustified given the availability of alternative policy choices, such as demanding testimonials of prospective tenants; regular checks by officials; improving the quality of housing; expropriating or purchasing low-quality housing from private landlords; suppressing illegal tenancy and sub-tenancy; and actively pursuing antisocial tenants.
43. Commenting on the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Bill, the Equal Treatment Commission added that it failed to address the said indirect distinctions and the justification given in the Explanatory Memorandum was too general.
44. The Government state that the Equal Treatment Commission wrote to the Lower House of Parliament in “more nuanced” terms on 5 September 2005. However, a copy of this document has not been submitted.
III. OTHER FACTS
A. Subsequent developments concerning the city of Rotterdam
1. The 2007 evaluation report
45. An evaluation report after the first year following the introduction of the housing permit in Rotterdam, commissioned by Rotterdam’s own City Construction and Housing Service (Dienst Stedebouw en Volkshuisvesting), was published on 6 December 2007 by the Centre for Research and Statistics (Centrum voor Onderzoek en Statistiek), a research and advice bureau collecting statistical data and carrying out research relevant to developments in Rotterdam in areas including demographics, the economy and employment (hereafter “the 2007 evaluation report”).
46. The report notes a reduction of the number of new residents dependent on social-security benefits under the Work and Social Assistance Act in “hotspot” areas, though not, of course, a complete stop because Rotterdam residents of six years’ standing are not prevented from moving there.
47. From July 2006 until the end of July 2007 there had been 2,835 requests for a housing permit. Of these, 2,240 had been granted; 184 had been refused; 16 had been rejected as incomplete; and 395 were still pending. The hardship clause (section 8(2) of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act) had been applied in 38 cases.
48. Three-quarters of the housing permits granted concerned housing let by private landlords; the remainder – 519 – had been granted through the intermediary of social housing bodies (woningcorporaties). The latter selected their tenants with due regard to the official requirements, so that refusals of housing permits with regard to social housing were unheard of.
49. Of the persons refused a housing permit, 73 (40 % of all those who met with a refusal) had managed to find housing elsewhere relatively quickly.
50. The 2007 evaluation report was presented to the local council on 15 January 2008. On 24 April 2008 the local council voted to maintain the housing permit system as was and have a new evaluation report commissioned for the end of 2009.
2. The 2009 evaluation report
51. A second evaluation report, also commissioned by Rotterdam’s City Construction and Housing Service, was published by the Centre for Research and Statistics on 27 November 2009. It covered the period from July 2006 until July 2009 (“the 2009 evaluation report”), during which the events complained of took place.
52. During this period, the social housing bodies had let 1,712 dwellings in the areas concerned. Since the social housing bodies could only accept tenants who qualified for a housing permit, no applications for such a permit had been rejected in this group.
53. Out of 6,469 applications for a housing permit relating to privately let housing, 4,980 had been accepted (77%); 342 had been refused (5%); and 296 had been pending at the beginning of July 2009. Examination of a further 851 (13%) had been discontinued without a decision being taken, generally because these applications had been withdrawn or abandoned; the assumption was that many of these applications would in any case have been rejected. It followed, therefore, that if the pending cases were not taken into account, approximately one-fifth of this category of applications had been either refused or not pursued to a conclusion.
54. The reason to reject an application for a housing permit had been related to the income requirement in 63% of cases, sometimes in combination with another ground for rejection; failure to meet the income requirement had been the sole such reason in 56% of cases.
55. Of 342 persons refused a housing permit, some two-thirds had managed to find housing elsewhere in Rotterdam (47%) or elsewhere in the Netherlands (21%).
56. The hardship clause had been applied 185 times – expressed as a percentage of applications relating to privately-let housing, 3% of the total. These had been cases of preventing squatters from taking over housing left empty (antikraak), illegal immigrants whose situation had been regularised by a general measure (generaal pardon), assisted living arrangements for vulnerable individuals (begeleid wonen), cooperative living arrangements (woongroepen), start-up enterprises, the re-housing of households forced to clear substandard housing for renovation, and foreign students. In addition, in one-third of cases the hardship clause had been applied because a decision had not been given within the prescribed time-limit.
57. The effects of the measure were considered based on four indicators: proportion of residents dependent on social-security benefits under the Work and Social Assistance Act, corrected for the supply of suitable housing; perception of safety; social quality; and potential accumulation of housing problems:
(a) It had been observed that in the areas where the housing permit requirement applied, the reduction of the number of new residents dependent on social-security benefits under the Work and Social Assistance Act had been more rapid in “hotspot” areas than in other parts of Rotterdam. In addition, the number of residents in receipt of such benefits as a proportion of the total population of those areas had also declined, although it was still greater than elsewhere.
(b) In two of the areas where the housing permit requirement had been introduced, the increase in the perception of public safety had been more rapid than the Rotterdam average. Tarwewijk had shown an increase initially, but was now back to where it had been before the measure was introduced. One other area had actually declined significantly in this respect. All of the areas where the housing permit requirement applied were perceived as considerably less safe than Rotterdam as a whole.
(c) In terms of social quality, there had been improvement in most of the parts of Rotterdam where problems existed, Tarwewijk among them. It was noted, however, that the effect of the housing permit in this respect was limited, since it only influenced the selection of new residents, not that of residents already in place.
(d) Housing problems – defined in terms of turnover, housing left unused, and house price development – had increased somewhat in the affected areas including Tarwewijk, though on the whole at a slower rate there than elsewhere. Reported reasons for the increase were an influx of immigrants of mostly non-European extraction (nieuwe Nederlanders, “new Netherlands nationals”) and new short-term residents from Central and Eastern Europe; the latter in particular tended to stay for three months or less before moving on, and their economic activity was more difficult to keep under review as many were self-employed.
58. Social housing bodies tended to view the housing permit requirement as a nuisance because it created additional paperwork. They perceived the measure rather as an appropriate instrument to tackle abuses by private landlords, provided that it be actively enforced and administrative procedures be simplified. Others with a professional involvement in the Rotterdam housing market mentioned the dissuasive effect of the measure on would-be new residents of the affected areas.
59. The report suggested that the housing permit requirement might no longer be needed for one of the existing “hotspots” (not Tarwewijk). Conversely, five other Rotterdam districts scored high for three indicators, while a sixth exceeded critical values for all four.
3. The 2011 evaluation report
60. A third evaluation report, this time commissioned by Rotterdam’s City Development Service (Housing Department), was published by the Centre for Research and Statistics in August 2012 (second revised edition). It covered the period from July 2009 until July 2011 (“the 2011 evaluation report”).
61. Based on the same indicators and methodology as the previous report, it concluded that the housing permit system should be continued in Tarwewijk and two other areas (including one in which it had been introduced in the meantime, in 2010); discontinued in two others; and introduced in one area where it was not yet in force.
4. Evaluation of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act
62. On 18 July 2012 the Minister of the Interior and Kingdom Relations (Minister van Binnenlandse Zaken en Koninkrijksrelaties) sent a separate evaluation report assessing the effectiveness of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act and its effects in practice to the Lower House of Parliament, as required by section 17 of that Act. The Minister’s missive stated the intention of the Government to introduce legislation in order to extend the validity of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act. Requests to that effect had been received from a number of affected cities. It was noted that not all of the cities concerned had made use of all of the possibilities offered by the Act; in particular, only Rotterdam used housing permits to select new residents for particular areas. Appended to the Minister’s letter was a copy of the 2009 evaluation report and a letter from the Burgomaster and Aldermen of Rotterdam in which, inter alia, the desirability was stated of extending beyond the first two four-year periods the indication of particular areas for applying the housing permit requirement: the measure was considered a success, and a twenty-year programme involving the large-scale improvement of housing and infrastructure (the “National Programme Quality Leap South Rotterdam” (Nationaal Programma Kwaliteitssprong Rotterdam Zuid, see below)) had been started in the southern parts of Rotterdam in 2011.
5. The National Programme Quality Leap South Rotterdam
63. On 19 September 2011 the Minister of the Interior and Kingdom Relations (on behalf of the Government), the Burgomaster of Rotterdam (on behalf of the municipality of Rotterdam), and the presidents of a number of South Rotterdam boroughs (deelgemeenten), social housing bodies and educational institutions signed the National Programme Quality Leap South Rotterdam. This document noted the social problems prevalent in South Rotterdam inner-city areas, which it was proposed to address by providing improved opportunities for education and economic activity and improving, or if need be replacing, housing and infrastructure. It was intended to terminate the programme by the year 2030.
64. On 31 October 2012 the Minister of the Interior and Kingdom Relations, Rotterdam’s Alderman for housing, spatial planning, real property and the city economy (wethouder Wonen, ruimtelijke ordening, vastgoed en stedelijke economie) and the presidents of three social housing bodies active in Rotterdam signed an “agreement concerning a financial impulse for the benefit of the Quality Leap South Rotterdam (2012-2015))” (Convenant betreffende een financiële impuls ten behoeve van de Kwaliteitssprong Rotterdam Zuid (2012-2015)). This agreement provided for a review of priorities in Government financing of housing and infrastructure projects in the South Rotterdam area within existing budgets and for a once-only additional investment of 122 million euros (EUR). Of the latter sum, EUR 23 million had been reserved by the municipality of Rotterdam until 2014; another EUR 10 million would be added for the period starting in 2014. These funds would be used to refurbish or replace 2,500 homes in South Rotterdam. A further EUR 30 million would be provided by the Government. The remainder would be spent by the social housing bodies on projects within their respective remit.
B. Subsequent legislative developments
1. The Inner City Problems (Special Measures) (Extension) Act
65. On 19 November 2013 the Government introduced a Bill proposing to amend the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act (Parliamentary Documents, Lower House of Parliament 2013/2014, 33 797, no. 2). The Explanatory Memorandum stated that its purpose was to empower municipalities to tackle abuses in the private rented housing sector, give municipalities broader powers of enforcement and make further temporal extension of the Act possible.
66. The Inner City Problems (Special Measures) (Extension) Act (Wet uitbreiding Wet bijzondere maatregelen grootstedelijke problematiek) entered into force on 14 April 2014, enabling the designation of particular areas under section 8 of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act to be extended the day before it was due to expire. It makes further extensions of the designation possible for successive four-year periods (section 5(2) of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act, as amended).
2. Amendment of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act in connection with the selective allotment of housing in order to limit nuisance and criminal behaviour
67. A further Bill was introduced on 8 October 2015 (Parliamentary Documents, Lower House of Parliament 2015/2016, 34 314, no. 2). It purports to grant municipalities powers to deny housing permits to individuals with a criminal record. According to its Explanatory Memorandum (Parliamentary Documents, Lower House of Parliament 2015/2016, 34 314, no. 3), the intention is to provide a legal basis for measures likely to constitute interferences with the right of freedom to choose one’s residence, as guaranteed by Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 of the Convention and Article 12 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and – since the measures in issue will of necessity entail the disclosure to local authorities of police information – with the right to private life as guaranteed by inter alia Article 8 of the Convention, Article 17 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and Article 7 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. It is currently pending in the Lower House of Parliament.
C. Subsequent events concerning the applicant
68. On 27 September 2010 the applicant moved to rented housing in the municipality of Vlaardingen. This municipality is part of the Rotterdam Metropolitan Region.
69. As of 25 May 2011 the applicant had been resident in the Rotterdam Metropolitan Region for more than six years. She therefore became entitled to reside in one of the areas designated under the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act regardless of her sources of income.
D. Other information submitted by the parties
70. The Government stated that no renovation or building permits were sought for the dwelling in A. Street inhabited by the applicant at the time of the events complained of between 2007 and 2010 and that no such permit was applied for in the period prior to 2007 either.
IV. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL LAW
71. Article 12 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights provides as follows:
“1. Everyone lawfully within the territory of a State shall, within that territory, have the right to liberty of movement and freedom to choose his residence.
2. Everyone shall be free to leave any country, including his own.
3. The above-mentioned rights shall not be subject to any restrictions except those which are provided by law, are necessary to protect national security, public order (ordre public), public health or morals or the rights and freedoms of others, and are consistent with the other rights recognized in the present Covenant.
4. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of the right to enter his own country.”
THE LAW
ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 2 OF PROTOCOL No. 4 TO THE CONVENTION
72. The applicant complained that the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act and the 2003 Housing Bye-law of the municipality of Rotterdam, and in particular section 2.6 of the latter (as in force at the time), violated her rights under Article 2 of Protocol No. 4, which provides as follows:
“1. Everyone lawfully within the territory of a State shall, within that territory, have the right to liberty of movement and freedom to choose his residence.
2. Everyone shall be free to leave any country, including his own.
3. No restrictions shall be placed on the exercise of these rights other than such as are in accordance with law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, for the maintenance of ordre public, for the prevention of crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.
4. The rights set forth in paragraph 1 may also be subject, in particular areas, to restrictions imposed in accordance with law and justified by the public interest in a democratic society.”
73. The Government disputed this.
A. Admissibility
1. The Government’s preliminary objections
(a) No longer a victim
74. The Government submitted in the first place that the applicant was no longer a victim of the alleged violation. She had moved to rented housing in Vlaardingen in 2010; she had subsequently, as a resident of more than six years’ standing of the Rotterdam Metropolitan Region, become eligible in normal circumstances for a housing permit allowing her to reside in one of the areas designated under the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act. The restrictions complained of therefore no longer applied.
75. The applicant responded that she had been forced to live in cramped and insalubrious conditions as a result of the denial of the housing permit that would have allowed her to move to housing that was both appropriate to her needs and available. She also claimed to have spent EUR 1,000 on improving the dwelling in B. Street before moving in.
76. It is the Court’s constant case-law that a decision or measure favourable to the applicant may suffice to deprive him or her of the status of “victim” for the purposes of Article 34 of the Convention provided that the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded redress for, the breach of the Convention (see, as a recent authority, O’Keeffe v. Ireland [GC], no. 35810/09, § 115, ECHR 2014 (extracts)).
77. In the instant case, although the applicant would now qualify for a housing permit that would permit her to reside in Tarwewijk, this is solely the result of her own decision to move to another municipality within the Rotterdam Metropolitan Area combined with the effluxion of time. There has been no decision or measure favourable to the applicant; no acknowledgment of any breach of the Convention; and, a fortiori, no redress offered therefor.
78. The Court therefore dismisses this objection.
(b) No significant disadvantage
79. Responding to a claim made by the applicant to the effect that she had spent EUR 1,000 improving the dwelling in B. Street, the Government argued that the applicant’s decision to incur this expenditure had resulted from a choice made by the applicant before any decision was taken by public authority. The applicant had therefore not suffered any significant disadvantage for which the respondent could be held responsible.
80. The Government noted in addition that no permits for significant construction work to be done at the applicant’s former address at A. Street had been applied for while the applicant resided there and that no major renovation work had taken place after she moved out. This, and the fact that the applicant had not sought a housing permit despite now being eligible for one regardless of her income, demonstrated that receiving such a permit was of no great significance to her. In the latter connection the Government referred to Shefer v. Russia (dec.), no. 45175/04, 13 March 2012.
81. In response to the Government’s argument, the applicant again submitted that she had been forced to live in uncongenial conditions for a protracted period. She also argued that the outlay of EUR 1,000, all of which she lost, was considerable in comparison with her income. She had thus suffered significant damage, both pecuniary and non-pecuniary.
82. In the Court’s view, the issue raised by the case before it is whether or not the applicant was entitled to expect to move into the B. Street dwelling at all; her disadvantage arose from the refusal by public authority to allow her to do so as and when she wished. Considered in this light, the question of damage, whether pecuniary or non-pecuniary, has no independent significance; it can only arise if the Court finds a violation of the applicant’s substantive rights.
83. The Court understands the Government’s argument that there was no major renovation work done to the dwelling on A. Street at any relevant time to be that the applicant in reality did not need to move from there for reasons connected with its state of repair. However, the information available to the Court is insufficient for it to draw such an inference. At all events, the Court does not consider it necessary to establish the facts on this point.
84. Nor is it immediately apparent from the applicant’s decision to take up residence in Vlaardingen and her subsequent failure to lodge a new request for a Rotterdam housing permit that the applicant had no real interest in obtaining such a permit at the time of the events complained of. After all, by the time the applicant moved out of Rotterdam she had exhausted the domestic remedies and lodged an application with the Court. The comparison with the case of Shefer v. Russia, which concerned the non-enforcement of a domestic judgment with a relatively minor financial interest and was characterised by that applicant’s inaction for seven years before she took any serious further steps, is inapposite.
85. Since therefore it does not appear that the applicant has suffered “no significant disadvantage”, the Court dismisses this objection also.
(c) Actio popularis
86. The Government submitted that the application was intended to oblige the respondent to provide a “structural solution to a perceived problem”. It was therefore in the nature of an actio popularis, to be declared inadmissible on that ground.
87. The applicant recognised that she considered the problem raised in the application a structural one. However, she had had a personal interest at the time when she applied to the Court, having not yet moved to Vlaardingen.
88. The Court reiterates that, in order to be able to lodge a petition in pursuance of Article 34, a person, non-governmental organisation or group of individuals must be able to claim “to be the victim of a violation ... of the rights set forth in the Convention ...” In order to claim to be a victim of a violation, a person must be directly affected by the impugned measure. The Convention does not, therefore, envisage the bringing of an actio popularis for the interpretation of the rights set out therein or permit individuals to complain about a provision of national law simply because they consider, without having been directly affected by it, that it may contravene the Convention (see, among other authorities, Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 33, ECHR 2008, and Centre for Legal Resources on behalf of Valentin Câmpeanu v. Romania [GC], no. 47848/08, § 101, ECHR 2014).
89. It may well be that the applicant’s wish is to address a structural phenomenon. Even so, provided that the applicant can herself claim to be, or to have been, a “victim” of the violation alleged, that is not enough to deny her standing before the Court. It should be remembered that the Court does not exist merely to protect rights of individuals, important though that be. The Court’s task, as set by Article 19 of the Convention, is to ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the High Contracting Parties in the Convention and the Protocols thereto. This it does by giving judgments and decisions interpreting the provisions of the Convention in specific cases on the basis of applications submitted under Articles 33 and 34 of the Convention by High Contracting Parties and persons, non-governmental organisations or groups of individuals claiming to be victims of violations of their rights, respectively, and by giving advisory opinions on questions within its competence under Article 47 of the Convention at the request of the Committee of Ministers (see, in particular, Salah v. the Netherlands, no. 8196/02, § 69, ECHR 2006 IX (extracts); see also Loizidou v. Turkey (preliminary objections), 23 March 1995, § 70, Series A no. 310).
90. In the present case there can be no doubt that the applicant was directly and personally affected by the denial of a housing permit that would have enabled her to take up residence in what, at the time, was the dwelling of her choice. It follows that the applicant can claim to be a “victim” of the violation alleged and has standing to bring her case before the Court, and that this objection must likewise be dismissed.
2. Conclusion as to admissibility
91. The Court considers that the application raises questions of fact and law which are sufficiently serious that its determination should depend on an examination of the merits. No other grounds for declaring it inadmissible have been established. The Court therefore declares it admissible.
B. Merits
1. Argument before the Court
(a) The Government
92. The Government accepted that there had been a restriction of the applicant’s right freely to choose her residence.
93. The restriction in issue was “in accordance with the law” in that it had a basis in statute and duly published delegated legislation. The submission by the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment to Parliament of an order to designate an area as falling under the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act was in the form of a parliamentary paper and thus also accessible to the public. Moreover, not only the debates in Parliament that had led to the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act but also its implementation in Rotterdam had been given regular media attention. The requirements of accessibility and foreseeability were therefore amply satisfied.
94. The legitimate aim pursued by the measure was the maintenance of ordre public. This was served by regulating access to the housing market so as to prevent an increase in the concentration of socioeconomically disadvantaged groups – or, in the Government’s words, “income-based segregation” – in particular areas as a result of selective migration. The inflow of underprivileged groups placed a correspondingly greater demand on social security structures, reduced support for economic activities and services, hampered integration, threatened public safety and security, and led to increased crime. Temporary restrictions on such inflow were indicated to allow other measures that had already been implemented to make sustainable improvements to bear fruit.
95. The other measures referred to included tackling illegal overcrowding and rogue property owners, joint initiatives between youth workers and the police, additional schooling and care for school-aged children involving integrated community police teams, additional investment to improve substandard housing, and a personalised approach to addicts, the homeless and those who partook of antisocial behaviour.
96. The local authorities of the municipality of Rotterdam were required to satisfy the Minister that the areas listed in their application presented an accumulation of problems to the point where designation was necessary. In the event, the Minister had been satisfied that the municipality was doing all it could to tackle the problems before it, but that despite this, additional measures were needed that were tailored to the particular neighbourhoods.
97. The impugned measures were temporary, since they were ordered for a maximum of four years at a time. While they might be extended for further four-year periods, this implied that the situation and the continued necessity of the measures were assessed, in detail, every four years.
98. Finally, it needed to be established that there was still enough housing in the region to satisfy the needs of those seeking housing to whom a housing permit could not be granted for a particular area as a result of an area designation under the Act.
99. With regard to the particular circumstances of the applicant, the Government observed that the applicant had not qualified for a housing permit allowing her to take up residence in B. Street at the relevant time because she had no income from employment and had not yet lived in the Rotterdam region for at least six years. She had not put forward sufficiently compelling circumstances to receive a housing permit on the basis of the hardship clause, such as a medical urgency or a situation involving violence for example. Nor had it been shown that the applicant’s dwelling in A. Street was in especially poor condition, since no planning permission for major renovation work had been requested at any relevant time.
100. Finally, the mere fact that the applicant had been already resident in Tarwewijk when the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act and implementing measures entered into force did not per se entitle her to a housing permit to move to a different dwelling within Tarwewijk. Persons already residing in the designated areas who wished to move and did not fulfil the requirements were free to move to what the Government termed “one of the many suitable dwellings available outside these areas”; this would contribute to achieving the aims of the Act.
(b) The applicant
101. The applicant submitted that the measures complained of were not appropriate to the problems which they were supposed to solve. The aim was to improve quality of life in certain parts of Rotterdam by preventing the socioeconomically deprived from taking up residence there. However, it was reflected in the 2007 evaluation report that between July 2006 and the end of July 2007 only 184 requests for housing permits had been refused, out of a total of 2,835 (see paragraph 47 above); this suggested that there was no causal link between any reduction in quality of life in the areas concerned and any increase in the number of socioeconomically underprivileged residents. Similarly, according to the 2009 evaluation report, which covered the time of the events complained of, out of “nearly 6,000” applications for a housing permit only 342 had been turned down, 215 of them based on the income requirement. Of the persons concerned, fewer than half had found other accommodation elsewhere in Rotterdam.
102. Responding to the suggestion implicit in the Government’s argument that the legislative process had been painstaking and democratically legitimised, the applicant countered that disapproval had in fact been expressed by two authoritative Government bodies. She pointed to the criticism contained in the report of the Equal Treatment Commission (see paragraph 43 above) and the opinion of the Council of State (see paragraph 20 above).
103. More generally, the applicant questioned the connection between low income and disorder. In her submission, the small proportion of rejected applications for a housing permit, if taken together with the deterioration of the quality of life noted by the evaluation reports in Tarwewijk, suggested that such a link did not exist. Moreover, persons with a low income from sources other than social-security benefits related to unemployment, for example some old-age pensioners, were not refused residence in the areas concerned. Finally, other reasons for the decrease in the quality of life in the areas in issue suggested by the evaluation reports included the influx of new residents from Central and Eastern Europe and of non-European extraction.
104. With regard to her own situation, the applicant argued that she had no criminal record and no history of misbehaviour. Moreover, she had already been living in Tarwewijk when she applied for a housing permit, so that her taking up residence at a new address in the same area would not have added to the social problems there.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Applicability of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4
105. The Court notes at the outset that the applicant – who, as a Netherlands national, was lawfully within the territory of the State – was refused a housing permit that would have allowed her to take up residence with her family in a property of her choice. It is implicit that this property was actually available to her on conditions she was willing and able to meet. There has therefore undoubtedly been a “restriction” on her “freedom to choose her residence”, within the meaning of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4. That provision will accordingly have been violated unless the “restriction” in issue is justified under its third or fourth paragraph.
106. The restriction complained of affects only the applicant’s right to choose her residence, not her right to liberty of movement or her right to leave the country. It does not target any particular individual or individuals but is of general application in discrete areas (namely, circumscribed areas within the city of Rotterdam). The Court will therefore consider it under the fourth paragraph of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4, which relates directly to the first paragraph, rather than the third.
107. To comply with Article 2 § 4 of Protocol No. 4, the restriction in issue must have been imposed “in accordance with law” and “justified by the public interest in a democratic society”.
(b) Whether the restriction in issue was “in accordance with law”
108. There is no doubt that the imposition of a housing permit requirement in the areas concerned was in accordance with domestic law, to wit, the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act and the 2003 Housing Bye-law of the municipality of Rotterdam (2006 version, as in force at the time).
(c) Whether the restriction in issue was “justified by the public interest in a democratic society”
109. It remains to be decided whether the restriction in issue was “justified by the public interest in a democratic society”. For this to be the case, it must pursue a “legitimate aim” and there must be a “reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised”.
i. Legitimate aim
110. The restriction here in issue was intended to reverse the decline of impoverished inner-city areas and to improve quality of life generally. There can be no doubt that this is an aim which it is legitimate for legislatures and city planners to pursue. Indeed, the applicant does not suggest otherwise.
ii. Proportionality
? Applicable principles
111. The present case requires the Court to weigh the individual’s right to choose his or her residence against the implementation of a public policy that purposely overrides it.
112. It is recalled that a State can, consistently with the Convention, adopt general measures which apply to pre-defined situations regardless of the individual facts of each case even if this might result in individual hard cases (see Ždanoka v. Latvia [GC], no. 58278/00, §§ 112-115, ECHR 2006?IV, and Animal Defenders International v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 48876/08, § 106, ECHR 2013 (extracts)).
113. In order to determine the proportionality of a general measure, the Court must primarily assess the legislative choices underlying it. The quality of the parliamentary and judicial review of the necessity of the measure is of particular importance in this respect, including to the operation of the relevant margin of appreciation. It is also relevant to take into account the risk of abuse if a general measure were to be relaxed, that being a risk which is primarily for the State to assess. The application of the general measure to the facts of the case remains, however, illustrative of its impact in practice and is thus material to its proportionality (see Animal Defenders, cited above, § 108, with further references). It follows that the more convincing the general justifications for the general measure are, the less importance the Court will attach to its impact in the particular case (Animal Defenders, § 109).
114. Turning now to Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 in particular, the Court first notes the obvious interplay between the freedom to choose one’s residence and the right to respect for one’s home (Article 8 of the Convention). Indeed, the Court has on a previous occasion directly applied reasoning concerning the right to respect for one’s home to a complaint under Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 (see Noack and Others v. Germany (dec.), ECHR 2000-VI). The Court will therefore primarily have regard to its case-law under that Article.
115. It should be pointed out, however, that it is not possible to apply the same test under Article 2 § 4 of Protocol No. 4 as under Article 8 § 2, the interrelation between the two provisions notwithstanding. The Court has held that Article 8 cannot be construed as conferring a right to live in a particular location (see Ward v. the United Kingdom, (dec.) no. 31888/03, 9 November 2004, and Codona v. United Kingdom (dec.), no. 485/05, 7 February 2006). In contrast, freedom to choose one’s residence is at the heart of Article 2 § 1 of Protocol No. 4, which provision would be voided of all significance if it did not in principle require Contracting States to accommodate individual preferences in the matter. Accordingly, any exceptions to this principle must be dictated by the public interest in a democratic society.
116. The applicable principles are to be found in the Court’s case-law; although developed under Articles 8 of the Convention and 1 of Protocol No. 1 respectively, they transcend those particular Articles. These principles are the following:
(a) The Court has held in the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that spheres such as housing, which modern societies consider a prime social need and which plays a central role in the welfare and economic policies of Contracting States, may often call for some form of regulation by the State. In that sphere decisions as to whether, and if so when, it may fully be left to the play of free market forces or whether it should be subject to State control, as well as the choice of measures for securing the housing needs of the community and of the timing for their implementation, necessarily involve consideration of complex social, economic and political issues. Finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, the Court has on many occasions declared that it will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is in the “public” or “general” interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 166, ECHR 2006 VIII, with further references). More specifically, the Court has recognised that in an area as complex and difficult as that of the development of large cities, the State enjoys a wide margin of appreciation in order to implement their town-planning policy (see Ayangil and Others v. Turkey, no. 33294/03, § 50, 6 December 2011).
(b) Where general social and economic policy considerations have arisen in the context of Article 8, which concerns rights of central importance to the individual’s identity, self-determination, physical and moral integrity, maintenance of relationships with others and a settled and secure place in the community, the scope of the margin of appreciation has depended on the context of the case, with particular significance attaching to the extent of the intrusion into the personal sphere of the applicant (see Connors v. the United Kingdom, no. 66746/01, § 82, 27 May 2004; McCann v. the United Kingdom, no. 19009/04, § 49, ECHR 2008; and Zehentner v. Austria, no. 20082/02, § 57, 16 July 2009).
(c) Whenever discretion capable of interfering with the enjoyment of a Convention right such as the one in issue in the present case is conferred on national authorities, the procedural safeguards available to the individual will be especially material in determining whether the respondent State has, when fixing the regulatory framework, remained within its margin of appreciation. Indeed it is settled case-law that, whilst Article 8 contains no explicit procedural requirements, the decision-making process leading to measures of interference must be fair and such as to afford due respect to the interests safeguarded to the individual by Article 8 (see, among other authorities, Buckley v. the United Kingdom, 25 September 1996, § 76, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 IV; Chapman, cited above, § 92; Connors, cited above, § 83; and Zehentner, cited above, § 58).
(d) It is also appropriate, in order to assess the proportionality of the interference, to examine the possibilities of alternative housing that exist (see Winterstein and Others v. France, no. 27013/07, § 159, 17 October 2013).
117. It is within the lines thus drawn that the Court will consider the facts of the present case.
?. Application of the above principles in the present case
118. In cases arising from individual applications the Court’s task is not to review the relevant legislation or practice in the abstract; it must as far as possible confine itself, without overlooking the general context, to examining the issues raised by the case before it (see, among other authorities, Guincho v. Portugal, 10 July 1984, § 39, Series A no. 81; Pisano v. Italy (striking out) [GC], no. 36732/97, § 48, 24 October 2002; Van Anraat v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 65389/09, § 75, 6 July 2010; and S.H. and Others v. Austria [GC], no. 57813/00, § 92, ECHR 2011). Consequently, the Court’s task is not to substitute itself for the competent national authorities in determining the most appropriate policy for regulating access to housing.
119. It is also important to emphasise the fundamentally subsidiary role of the Convention mechanism. The national authorities have direct democratic legitimation and are, as the Court has held on many occasions, in principle better placed than an international court to evaluate local needs and conditions. In matters of general policy, on which opinions within a democratic society may reasonably differ widely, the role of the domestic policy-maker should be given special weight (see, for example, Maurice v. France [GC], no. 11810/03, § 117, ECHR 2005?IX, and S.A.S. v. France [GC], no. 43835/11, § 129, ECHR 2014 (extracts)).
120. The State’s margin in principle extends both to its decision to intervene in the subject area and, once having intervened, to the detailed rules it lays down in order to achieve a balance between the competing public and private interests. However, this does not mean that the solutions reached by the legislature are beyond the scrutiny of the Court. It falls to the Court to examine carefully the arguments taken into consideration during the legislative process and leading to the choices that have been made by the legislature and to determine whether a fair balance has been struck between the competing interests of the State and those directly affected by those legislative choices (see, mutatis mutandis, S.H. and Others v. Austria, cited above, § 97, and Parrillo v. Italy [GC], no. 46470/11, § 170, 27 August 2015).
121. As to the legislative and policy background of the case, the Court first observes that the domestic authorities found themselves called upon to address increasing social problems in particular inner-city areas of Rotterdam resulting from impoverishment caused by unemployment and a tendency for gainful economic activity to be transferred elsewhere. They sought to reverse these trends by favouring new residents whose income was related to gainful economic activity of their own, past or present (see paragraphs 21 and 23 above). It is for this purpose that the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act was called into existence.
122. The competent Minister is required by section 17 of that Act to report to Parliament every five years on the effectiveness of the Act and its effects in practice, as was in fact done on 18 July 2012 (see paragraph 62 above).
123. Considering the measures adopted to have brought success, the domestic authorities have since extended them, later actually linking them to a twenty-year programme which involves considerable public investment (see paragraphs 63-64 above).
124. The restriction in issue remains subject to temporal as well as geographical limitation, the designation of particular areas being valid for no more than four years at a time (see section 5(2) of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act; paragraph 18 above).
125. At the same time, the entitlement of individuals unable to find suitable housing has been recognised by safeguard clauses enshrined in the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act itself: firstly, section 5(1), which requires the Local Council to satisfy the Minister that sufficient housing remains available locally for those who do not qualify for a housing permit; secondly, section 7(2), which provides that the designation of an area under that Act shall be revoked if insufficient alternative housing is available locally for those affected; and thirdly, the individual hardship clause prescribed by section 8(2) (see paragraph 18 above).
126. It is in the nature of things that the legislative process involves criticism of legislative proposals. The applicant drew the Court’s attention to criticism by the Equal Treatment Commission of an earlier version of the Rotterdam Housing Bye-law (which, the Court observes, is not in issue in the present case) and by the Council of State of the first version of the Government’s legislative proposal. Perusal of the legislative history of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act shows that the objections raised were addressed by the Government, and that Parliament itself was concerned to limit any detrimental effects. In fact, the safeguard clauses alluded to in the preceding paragraph owe much to direct Parliamentary intervention.
127. In these circumstances, the Court cannot find that the policy decisions taken by the domestic authorities are manifestly without reasonable foundation. Certainly the differences between the numbers of housing permits granted and refused (see paragraphs 47 and 53 above), which in the applicant’s submission showed up the measure in issue as ineffective, could not of itself justify such a finding, if only because her interpretation of these would appear to ignore the role of the social housing bodies in the allocation of housing (see paragraphs 48 and 52 above) and the number of applications for a housing permit that were not pursued to their conclusion (see paragraph 53 above).
128. The availability of alternative solutions does not in itself render the measure in issue unjustified; it constitutes one factor, among others, that is relevant for determining whether the means chosen may be regarded as reasonable and suited to achieving the legitimate aim being pursued. Provided the interference remained within these bounds – which the Court, in view of its above considerations, is satisfied it did – it is not for the Court to say whether the measure complained of represented the best solution for dealing with the problem or whether the State’s discretion should have been exercised in another way (see, mutatis mutandis, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 51, Series A no. 98; Mellacher and Others v. Austria, 19 December 1989, § 53, Series A no. 169; Ble?i? v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 67, ECHR 2006 III; and Animal Defenders, cited above, § 110).
129. Having thus concluded that the respondent Party was, in principle, entitled to adopt the legislation and policy here in issue, the Court now turns to their application in the case in hand.
130. The applicant moved to Rotterdam in May 2005; she had therefore not completed six years’ residence in the Rotterdam Metropolitan Area by the time of the decisions complained of. Her income consisted exclusively of social welfare benefits. She failed to satisfy the Burgomaster and Aldermen of Rotterdam and the administrative tribunals that her personal situation was such as to trigger the application of the hardship clause. The refusal of a housing permit that would have allowed her to move to the dwelling in B. Street was therefore consonant with the applicable law and policy.
131. The applicant’s stated reason for seeking to move to the dwelling in B. Street offered her by her landlord was that it was better suited to her housing needs than her dwelling in A. Street: it was more spacious, had a garden and apparently was in a better state of repair. The applicant was at no time prevented from taking up residence in areas of Rotterdam not covered by the legislation here in issue. She has however stated no reason, cogent or otherwise, for wishing to live in Tarwewijk rather than in other areas of the city of Rotterdam or the Rotterdam Metropolitan Area where suitable housing might have been available.
132. It is significant that the applicant has qualified for a housing permit under the legislation here under discussion since May 2011, having completed six years’ uninterrupted residence in the Metropolitan Region of Rotterdam (see paragraphs 68 and 69 above). Nonetheless, she has remained in her present dwelling in Vlaardingen.
133. The Court has no reason to doubt that the applicant was of good behaviour and constituted no threat to public order; indeed the Government do not contradict the applicant on this point. That, however, cannot by itself suffice to outweigh the public interest which is served by the consistent application of legitimate public policy.
134. In the circumstances, therefore, the Court cannot find that the Burgomaster and Aldermen were under an obligation to accommodate the applicant’s preferences.
135. Finally, the Court notes that the applicant does not allege any lack of adequate safeguards in the decision-making process in her case.
136. There has accordingly been no violation of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares, unanimously, the application admissible;

2. Holds, by five votes to two, that there has been no violation of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 23 February 2016, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Luis López Guerra
Registrar President

In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judges López Guerra and Keller is annexed to this judgment.
L.L.G.
J.S.P.


JOINT DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES
LÓPEZ GUERRA AND KELLER
1. To our regret, we cannot agree with the majority’s finding that there has been no violation of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention in the present case, which is one of very few applications raising fundamental issues concerning the right of nationals to choose their residence freely to have come before the Court to date. We consider that the question of which paragraph of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 – paragraph 3 or paragraph 4 – applies to the present case deserves a more elaborate answer than the one given by the majority (I.). Furthermore, the case raises a fundamental question, namely that of which level of scrutiny the Court should apply in examining an individual restriction on the right to choose one’s residence freely (II.). On both accounts, we are unable to follow the majority’s reasoning and therefore conclude that the applicant’s right under Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 has been violated (III.).
2. The facts of the present case are particularly striking. The applicant – a Netherlands national who is a single mother with two minor children – lived from 2005 in a one-room apartment in Tarwewijk, a designated “hotspot” area according to the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act. She has no criminal record, is not known for any sort of disruptive behaviour and never caused any housing problems. However, she is poor and living on social welfare benefits. She belongs to the socioeconomically underprivileged – a “flaw” in and of itself that, according to section 8 of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act, is seen as sufficient to restrict her right freely to choose her residence as long as she has not yet been living in the Rotterdam Metropolitan Region for six years.
3. It goes without saying that the fact that the applicant lived in a single room with her two children was a cause of distress with tangible consequences for both the applicant and her children; for this reason, she sought to move to a more suitable three-room apartment with a garden in Tarwewijk. Her request for a housing permit was, however, refused in March 2007 for the reasons mentioned above. A restriction of the applicant’s freedom to choose her residence was thus considered necessary by the State because the applicant, or more specifically the applicant’s poverty, constituted a threat to ordre public or to another “public interest in a democratic society” within the meaning of paragraphs 3 and 4 respectively of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4.
4. Before we go on to examine whether the measure at issue in the case in hand was necessary in a democratic society, we would first like to address the distinction between paragraphs 3 and 4 of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4, taking into account both the travaux préparatoires in respect of that Article and the interpretation of its sister Article in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights of the United Nations (Article 12 ICCPR – see paragraph 71 of the judgment).
I. The distinction between paragraphs 3 and 4 of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4
5. In paragraph 106 of the judgment, the Court argues that the fourth paragraph of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 is applicable to the case in hand. This argument is premised on the fact that the restriction in section 8 of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act does not target individuals, but is of general application “in discrete areas”. Therefore, the majority consider that the facts of the present case are to be analysed under the “public interest” criterion enshrined in paragraph 4 of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4. The applicability of either paragraphs 3 or 4 is, however, not triggered by such a distinction. The restrictions in paragraph 4 concern particular areas where “it might be necessary, for legitimate reasons, and solely in the public interest in a democratic society, to impose restrictions which it might not always be possible to bring within the concept of ‘ordre public’” (see the Explanatory Report on Article 2 of Protocol No. 4, § 18).
6. The inclusion of paragraph 4 in Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 came about because the Council of Europe Committee of Experts on Human Rights refused to include a clause in the provision permitting restrictions on the grounds of economic welfare out of concern that such a clause would allow abuse by States (ibid., § 15 (a) and 18). Members of the Committee considered it a retrograde step to permit restrictions based purely on economic grounds (ibid., § 15 (f)), which means that a restriction on the right to choose one’s residence based solely on income cannot be justified in any case under this provision (contrast the wording of paragraph 2 of Article 8 of the Convention, where the “economic well-being of the country” is explicitly mentioned; see also paragraph 22 below).
7. In order to understand the meaning of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4, one must also take into account the changes made during the drafting process by the Committee of Experts. The provision was drafted with the intention of using “words in their widest possible sense when laying down regulations equivalent to broad general principles of law”, such as the freedom to choose one’s residence (ibid., § 9). This means that, in order to prevent abuse by States, the freedoms guaranteed in paragraph 1 of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 should have the widest possible meaning and should only rarely be the subject of restrictions.
8. Paragraph 4 of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 is thus solely applicable if a restriction concerns particular areas. However, since interferences should be applied restrictively, it is questionable whether this criterion is sufficient on its own. One could argue, on the basis of the Article’s drafting history and the fact that nationals of States Parties have a de facto absolute right of residence in the territory of their State under Article 12 ICCPR, that a restriction under paragraph 4 is only possible in particular areas during emergency situations, by analogy with restrictions to the liberty of movement (see Landvreugd v. the Netherlands, no. 37331/97, § 71, 4 June 2002, and Olivieira v. the Netherlands, no. 33129/96, § 56, ECHR 2002 IV).
9. For these reasons, we have doubts as to the applicability of paragraph 4 to the case in hand and consider the reasoning of the Court insufficiently justified in this regard. The distinction is a relevant one given that paragraph 4 covers restrictions, in certain areas, aimed at the “public interest in a democratic society”, whereas paragraph 3 allows only for restrictions for the maintenance of ordre public. The latter notion is narrower than the former. However, even if one should come to the conclusion that paragraph 4 is applicable, it is necessary to answer a second question regarding the test to be applied by the Court.
II. The necessity test
10. The central question raised by the present case concerns the proportionality of the interference with the applicant’s rights under Article 2 of Protocol No. 4, that is, the justification of this measure by the public interest in a democratic society. The restriction of the applicant’s freedom to choose her residence in the case in hand strikes at the very heart of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4. This fact alone means that strict scrutiny by the Court is required.
11. Nonetheless, in paragraph 113 of the judgment, the majority find that the more convincing the general justification for a measure is, the less importance the Court will attach to its impact in a particular case, thus granting the State a wider margin of appreciation. We respectfully disagree with this reasoning. Why should a restriction be more “justified” or “necessary” solely because the restrictive measure is of a general nature? In our opinion, the decisive question should rather be whether the individual application of the restriction – be it based on a general or an individual measure – conflicts with the core of the rights guaranteed by the Convention. It is important to bear in mind that even where States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation, “the final evaluation of whether the interference is necessary remains subject to review by the Court for conformity with the requirements of the Convention” (see Winterstein and Others v. France, no. 27013/07, §§ 147-148, 17 October 2013) and that States must be able to put forward “relevant and sufficient reasons” justifying the restriction (see S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 30562/04 and 30566/04, §§ 101-102, ECHR 2008).
12. The majority go on to state in paragraphs 114–117 of the judgment that the principles developed in the pertinent case-law under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are applicable to the right to choose one’s residence. However, the applicant never raised an issue concerning housing or social welfare. This fact renders it dogmatically inappropriate to apply the aforementioned case-law to the case in hand by way of analogy.
13. On the basis of the case-law cited, the majority afford the domestic legislature a wide margin of appreciation in implementing social and economic policies and determining what is in the “public” or “general” interest (see paragraphs 116, 118 and 120 of the judgment). However, the State’s scope of action to adopt policy decisions and implement them is not at stake here; nor are the various policy measures under the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act being questioned in general. Rather, the Court is called upon to clarify whether the individual measure regarding the applicant was in conformity with Article 2 of Protocol No. 4.
14. In order to determine whether a measure was necessary in a democratic society, it is important to bear in mind that restricting the free choice of residence of persons who present a threat to the public can only be justified in the interests of the rights of others when such a restriction is necessary, proportionate and not discriminatory. We are of the opinion that, since the measure is linked to source of income and is thus implicitly connected to the social origin and gender of the persons concerned, the applicable test is the necessity test provided for under Article 14 of the Convention. If the Court wishes to borrow some inspiration from existing case-law in order to decide the present case, the applicable principles concerning discrimination should have been considered relevant. As stated in Vrountou v. Cyprus (no. 33631/06, § 75, 13 October 2015), “advancement of gender equality is today a major goal in the member States of the Council of Europe and very weighty reasons would have to be put forward before such a difference in treatment could be regarded as compatible with the Convention”. In general, it can also be argued that the poor are a vulnerable group in and of themselves, and that restrictions applied to this group must ensure a “reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised” (see I.B. v. Greece, § 78, no. 552/10, ECHR 2014); the State’s margin of appreciation must accordingly also be narrower in this context (Kiyutin v. Russia, no. 2700/10, § 63, ECHR 2011).
15. We therefore conclude that “the principle of proportionality does not merely require the measure chosen to be suitable in principle for achievement of the aim sought. It must also be shown that it was necessary, in order to achieve that aim, to exclude certain categories of people ... from the scope of application of the provisions in issue” (see Vallianatos and Others v. Greece, nos. 29381/09 and 32684/09, § 85, ECHR 2013).
III. Application to the case in hand
16. The only question raised in the case in hand is whether the refusal of a residence permit based on the grounds that the applicant had not lived in Tarwewijk for a minimum of six years and depends on social welfare was necessary in a democratic society.
17. Making the freedom to choose one’s residence dependent on how many years one has previously lived in a designated area has a very harsh impact on the person concerned. Being prevented from moving within a familiar area because one has not yet lived there for six years is particularly difficult for families. The majority omitted even to address this question. In our view, residents already living in a “hotspot” area should therefore not be forced to move out, especially since the aim pursued – preventing an increase in the number of poor people needing care and social support in a “hotspot” area – can certainly be achieved by other means (see paragraph 23 below). In addition, there seems to be no convincing justification for the six-year requirement. Especially for young children, this time span is very long. It is equally debatable why such a requirement should apply to anyone who is not a new resident of the area.
18. Of much greater concern, however, is the income-based restriction. It not only leads to stigmatisation of the poor, but it indirectly creates discrimination based on race and gender, since the people most gravely affected by unemployment are immigrants and single mothers. In our opinion, therefore, the contested measure does not qualify as necessary in a democratic society. The poor do not per se pose a threat to public security, nor are they systematically the cause of crime, and the legitimate aim of the Inner City Problems (Special Measures) Act – the need to reverse the decline of impoverished inner-city areas – can be achieved through other policy measures not tied to personal characteristics.
19. In the case in hand, the restriction has even had the paradoxical consequence of preventing the applicant from improving her personal living conditions. The majority’s argument in paragraph 131 of the judgment that the applicant failed to put forward reasons other than her desire to move to a more spacious apartment is misplaced – the applicant has the right to choose her residence, and she is not obliged to justify this choice. Contrary to the majority, we consider it comprehensible that the applicant did not move back to Tarwewijk after having moved to Vlaardingen (see paragraph 132 of the judgment). It is not even known to the Court whether the apartment in Tarwewijk would still have been available, and it is also clear that moving generates costs and is stressful, especially for children.
20. It is equally incomprehensible why the Court refused to take into consideration the fact that the applicant, the mother of two young children, did not represent a threat to public order (see paragraph 133 of the judgment). This is central in determining the proportionality of the measure at issue. We thus come to the conclusion that it was disproportionate to refuse the applicant her housing permit, and that in her case the hardship clause should have been applied.
21. Moreover, the United Nations Human Rights Committee’s General Comment No. 27 on Article 12 of the ICCPR explicitly states that “the Committee has criticised provisions requiring individuals to apply for permission to change their residence or to seek the approval of the local authorities of the place of destination”. We therefore consider that a restriction on choosing one’s residence based on income does not fulfil the test of necessity and the requirements of proportionality. This line of argument is also supported by the fact that the Council of Europe Committee of Experts on Human Rights removed the express provision for restrictions that were necessary for the economic welfare of the country (see paragraph 7 above), which clearly distinguishes Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 from Article 8 § 2 of the Convention (for the strict conditions in relation to the latter Article, see Hasanbasic v. Switzerland, no. 52166/09, § 59, 11 June 2013).
IV. Conclusion
22. In our opinion, for the reasons mentioned above, the applicant’s right to choose her residence has been violated in the present case.
23. However, our opinion should not be misunderstood. We accept that the problems facing impoverished areas are real and serious. It is unquestionably legitimate to strive to improve those areas, and it is of primary importance to avoid ghettoisation. However, such policies should not be linked to personal characteristics. The aforementioned aims can also be achieved through measures such as tax reductions for small businesses, urban planning favouring more luxurious apartments, renovation of abandoned housing, eliminating illegal tenancies, purchasing low-quality housing, and providing for more teachers and care in schools.
24. Any stereotyping legislation, especially where it involves stigmatisation of the poor, is per se problematic. Equally dangerous are restrictions based on such grounds as criminal records (see paragraph 67 of the judgment), illness or race. The present judgment fails to recognise that the exclusion of vulnerable groups on the basis of personal characteristics that individuals cannot easily amend is most problematic, given its stigmatising effect.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 2 del Protocollo N.ro 4 - Libertà di movimento-generale (l'Articolo 2 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 4 - Libertà d scegliere laresidenza)



TERZA SEZIONE






CAUSA GARIB C. PAESI BASSI

(Richiesta n. 43494/09)








SENTENZA



STRASBOURG

23 febbraio 2016





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Garib c. i Paesi Bassi,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Luis López Guerra, Presidente
Helena Jäderblom,
Giorgio Nicolaou,
Helen Keller,
Johannes Silvis,
Branko Lubarda,
Pari Pastore Vilanova, giudici
e Stefano Phillips, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 7 ottobre 2014, 5 gennaio 2016 e 26 gennaio 2016,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 43494/09) contro il Regno dei Paesi Bassi depositato con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino di Paesi Bassi, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 28 luglio 2009.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Rotterdam. Il Governo di Paesi Bassi (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. R.A.A. Böcker del Ministero di Affari Esteri.
3. Il richiedente addusse che le restrizioni alle quali lei fu sottoposta nello scegliere la sua residenza erano incompatibili con Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione.
4. 7 ottobre 2014 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1971 ed ora vive in Vlaardingen.
6. Il 25 maggio 2005 il richiedente si trasferì nella città di Rotterdam. Lei prese su residenza in proprietà affittata all'indirizzo A. Strada 6b. Questo indirizzo è localizzato nel distretto di Tarwewijk in Rotterdam Meridionale. Il richiedente prima aveva risieduto fuori del Rotterdam Regione Metropolitana (Stadsregio Rotterdam).
7. Il proprietario della proprietà chiese al richiedente che con questa volta aveva due giovani figli, sgombrare la proprietà siccome lui desiderò rinnovarlo per suo proprio uso. Lui offrì di affittare il richiedente una proprietà diversa all'indirizzo B. Strada 72A, anche nell'area di Tarwewijk. Il richiedente affermò che, poiché sé il comprised tre stanze ed un giardino, la proprietà era lontano più appropriata per lei ed i suoi figli che il suo A. abitazione Stradale che il comprised una sola stanza.
8. Nel frattempo, Tarwewijk era stato designato sotto i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto (bijzondere maatregelen grootstedelijke problematiek Bagnato, vedere sotto) come un'area dove non fu permesso di prendere su residenza nuova senza una licenza di alloggio (il huisvestingsvergunning). 8 marzo 2007 il richiedente depositò di conseguenza, una richiesta per una licenza di alloggio col Borgomastro ed Assessori (wethouders di en di burgemeester) di Rotterdam per essere permesso di trasferirsi a B. Strada 72A.
9. 19 marzo 2007 il Borgomastro ed Assessori diede una decisione che rifiuta tale licenza. Loro fondarono stabilì che il richiedente non era stato residente nel Rotterdam Regione Metropolitana per sei anni che immediatamente precedono l'introduzione della sua richiesta. Inoltre, poiché lei era dipendente su benefici di sociale-sicurezza sotto l’Atto del lavoro e di assistenza sociale (Werk en Bagnato Bijstand), lei non soddisfece il requisito di reddito che l'avrebbe qualificata per un'esenzione dal requisito di residenza.
10. Il richiedente depositò un'eccezione (il bezwaarschrift) col Borgomastro ed Assessori.
11. 15 giugno 2007 il Borgomastro ed Assessori diede una decisione che respinge l'eccezione del richiedente. Adottando come loro proprio un'opinione consultiva delle Eccezioni Comitato Consultivo (bezwaarschriftencommissie di Algemene), loro si riferirono a licenze di alloggio come un strumento per assicurare l'equilibrato e la distribuzione equa di alloggio e la possibilità per il richiedente muoversi ad un'abitazione non situò in un “il hotspot” l'area.
12. Il richiedente depositò un ricorso (il beroep) col Rotterdam Corte Regionale (il rechtbank). Come attinente alla causa, lei dibattè, che la clausola di fatica sarebbe dovuta essere fatta domanda. Lei si appellò su Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 della Convenzione ed Articolo 12 dell'Internazionale del 1966 Alleanza su Diritti Civili e Politici.
13. La Corte Regionale diede una decisione che respinge il ricorso del richiedente 4 aprile 2008. Come attinente alla causa di fronte alla Corte, il suo ragionamento era, siccome segue:
“Sezione 8(1) dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto prevede per la possibilità di restrizioni provvisorie sulla libertà di residenza in aree per essere indicato col Ministro [lo sc. il Ministro di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente (furgone di Ministro Volkshuisvesting, Ruimtelijke l'en di Ordening Milieubeheer)]. Lo scopo di queste restrizioni è invertire un'elaborazione di sovraccaricare e qualità decrescente della vita, particolarmente sforzandosi verso distretti la cui composizione è mescolata più da un punto di vista socioeconomico. Si intende anche attivamente che le restrizioni contrattacchino la segregazione esistente di redditi in tutta la città per la regolamentazione dell'approvvigionamento di alloggio nei certi distretti, ed in così migliori qualità della vita per gli abitanti di quelli distretti (Documenti Parlamentari, Casa più Bassa di Parlamento (Kamerstukken II) 2004/2005, 30 091 n. 3, pagine 11-13). In prospettiva degli scopi della legge, come esponga fuori, queste restrizioni provvisorie sulla libertà per scegliere la residenza di uno non possono essere trovate non essere giustificate con l'interesse generale in una società democratica. Né può essere trovato che, determinato la misura considerevole dei problemi notò nei certi distretti in Rotterdam, le restrizioni dette non sono necessarie per il mantenimento di ordine pubblico. La Corte Regionale prende la prospettiva che la legislatura sufficientemente ha mostrato che in quelli distretti il ‘limita della veste per l'assorbimento ' è stato giunto a cura di riguardi e è stato sostenuto per il socioeconomicamente bisognoso e che c'è inoltre in quelli distretti una concentrazione di individui bisognosi in distretti deprivati così come l'insoddisfazione considerevole fra la popolazione di comportamento improprio, fastidio e crimine.”
14. Il richiedente depositò un ulteriore ricorso (hoger beroep) con la Giurisdizione Divisione Amministrativa (bestuursrechtspraak di Afdeling) del Consiglio di Stato (Raad trasporta con furgone Stato).
15. 4 febbraio 2009 la Giurisdizione Divisione Amministrativa diede una decisione che respinge l'ulteriore ricorso del richiedente. Come attinente alla causa di fronte alla Corte, il suo ragionamento incluse il seguente:
“I costatazione di Divisione di Giurisdizione Amministrativi che, considerando che l'area in problema è una designata sotto sezione 5 dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto, il Borgomastro ed Assessori furono concessi per prendere la prospettiva che la restrizione [su libertà per scegliere la residenza di uno] è giustificato nell'interesse generale in una società democratica all'interno del significato di Articolo 12 § 3 dell'Internazionale del 1966 Alleanza su Diritti Civili e Politici. L'area in problema è un così definito ‘hotspot ', dove, siccome non è stato contestato, qualità della vita è sotto minaccia. La restrizione che è il risultato di sezione 2.6(2) dell'Alloggio Ciao-legge del 2003 (Huisvestingsverordening 2003) è di una natura provvisoria, vale a dire per su a sei anni. Non è stabilito che l'approvvigionamento di alloggio fuori delle aree designate col Ministro nel Rotterdam Regione Metropolitana è insufficiente. Che che [il richiedente] ha affermato di aspettando tempi non conduca la Giurisdizione Divisione Amministrativa a giungere ad una sentenza diversa. La Giurisdizione Divisione Amministrativa le ulteriori prese in conto che facendo seguito a sezione 7(1), frase introduttiva e sotto b dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto, il Ministro è conferito poteri per rescindere la designazione dell'area se risulta che persone che chiedono alloggio non hanno possibilità sufficiente di trovare alloggio appropriato all'interno della regione nella quale è situato il municipio. In prospettiva di questi fatti e circostanze i costatazione di Divisione di Giurisdizione Amministrativi che la restrizione in problema non è contraria ai requisiti di un bisogno sociale ed incalzante e la proporzionalità. La Giurisdizione Divisione Amministrativa perciò i costatazione, siccome faceva la Corte Regionale, che sezione 2.6(2) dell'Alloggio Ciao-legge del 2003 Articolo 2 di Protocollo non viola N.ro 4 della Convenzione o Articolo 12 dell'Internazionale del 1966 Alleanza su Diritti Civili e Politici.”
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. L'Alloggio Atto
16. Come attinente alla causa di fronte alla Corte, l'Alloggio Atto (Huisvestingswet) prevede siccome segue:
Sezione 2
“1. Se la giunta comunale lo trova necessario a posi in giù articoli riguardo alla presa in uso, o permettendo l'uso, di alloggio..., o riguardo a cambi all'alloggio approvvigioni..., adotterà una ciao-legge di alloggio (il huisvestingsverordening).
2. Per il fine di fare domanda il primo paragrafo, la giunta comunale investigherà, in qualsiasi la causa, la misura alla quale può essere realizzato l'effetto che nel permettere l'uso di relativamente priorità di edilizia a buon mercato è dato ad alloggio-cercatori che, in prospettiva del loro reddito, è specialmente dipendente su simile alloggio. ...”
B. I Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto
1. Disposizioni attinenti
17. I Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto fa domanda ad un numero di municipi chiamati incluso Rotterdam. Conferisce poteri quelli municipi per prendere misure nelle certe aree designate incluso l'accordando di esenzioni dalle imposte parziali ai piccoli proprietari di affari ed i selezionare di residenti nuovi basarono sulle loro fonti di reddito. Entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2006.
18. Come in vigore al tempo attinente, approvvigiona dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto attinente alla causa il seguente sia:
Sezione 5
“1. Il Ministro [di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente], in tal caso richiese con la giunta comunale (il gemeenteraad), aree designate nelle quali persone che chiedono alloggio possono essere rese soggetto a requisiti sotto sezioni 8 e 9 di questo Atto.
2. L'indicazione assegnata a nel primo paragrafo dipenderà per un termine di da quattro anni. Alla richiesta della giunta comunale, questo termine può essere prolungato una volta solamente su per all'anni di più di quattro. [Sezione 7] farà domanda con analogia.”
Sezione 6
“1. Quando facendo la richiesta assegnata ad in sezione 5(1), la giunta comunale soddisferà il Ministro di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente che la designazione intenzionale delle aree ha menzionato nella richiesta:
(un) è necessario ed appropria combattere problemi di interno-città nel municipio; e
(b) soddisfa requisiti di sussidiarietà e la proporzionalità.
2. La designazione assegnò ad in sezione 5(1) sarà dato solamente se i requisiti del primo paragrafo sono stati soddisfatti, e se la giunta comunale ha soddisfatto il Ministro di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente che persone che chiedono alloggio a chi, come un risultato di simile designazione una licenza di alloggio per prendere alloggio nelle aree designate nel loro uso non può essere accordata trattenga possibilità sufficiente di trovare alloggio appropriato per loro all'interno della regione nella quale è situato il municipio. ...”
Sezione 7
“1. Il Ministro rescinderà la designazione assegnata ad in sezione 5 se è evidente a lui quel:
...
b. persone che chiedono alloggio a chi una licenza di alloggio che concede loro prendere in alloggio di uso all'interno delle aree designate non possono essere accordate come un risultato della designazione assegnato ad in sezione 5 abbia possibilità insufficiente di trovare alloggio appropriato per loro all'interno della regione nella quale è situato il municipio. ...”
Sezione 8
“1. La giunta comunale può, se considera [tale misura] necessario ed appropria per problemi di interno-città di combating (grootstedelijke problematiek) all'interno del municipio e soddisfa i requisiti di sussidiarietà e la proporzionalità, determini nella ciao-legge di alloggio che persone che chiedono alloggio che è stato residente senza interruzione della regione entro la quale il municipio è situato meno per che sei anni possono essere solamente eleggibili per una licenza di alloggio che concede loro prendere in alloggio di uso che appartiene a categorie designata in che ciao-legge se loro dispongono di:
(un) un reddito da lavoro sotto un contratto di lavoro;
(b) un reddito da una professione indipendente o affari;
(il c) un reddito da una prima pensione di pensionamento;
(d) una pensione della maturità all'interno del significato del Generale La maturità Pensioni Atto (Algemene Ouderdomswet);
(e) una pensione della maturità o la pensione di superstite all'interno del significato dei Salarii (Tassa Deduzione) Atto 1964 (de di op Bagnato loonbelasting 1964);
(f) una concessione studentesca all'interno del significato delle Concessioni Studentesche Atto 2000 (de di op Bagnato studiefinanciering 2000).
2. La giunta comunale determinerà nella ciao-legge di alloggio che il Borgomastro ed Assessori può accordare una persona che chiede alloggio che non soddisfa il set di requisiti fuori nel primo paragrafo una licenza di alloggio che concede loro prendere in alloggio di uso siccome assegnato ad in che paragrafo se negandoli che licenza di alloggio condurrebbe all'iniquità di una natura che ha la priorità (een onbillijkheid trasportano con furgone overwegende aard). ...”
Sezione 17
“Il Ministro spedirà un rapporto a Parlamento sull'efficacia ed effetti di questo Atto in pratica a Parlamento ogni cinque anni dopo l'entrata in vigore di questo Atto.”
2. Storia legislativa dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto
(un) L'opinione consultiva del Consiglio di Stato e l'Ulteriore Relazione
19. Il Consiglio di Stato scrutò i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Bill e presentò un'opinione consultiva alla Regina. Il Governo spedì l'opinione a Parlamento, insieme coi loro commenti (Opinione Consultiva del Consiglio di Stato e l'Ulteriore Relazione (Advies Raad trasporta con furgone en Statale Relazione di Nader), Documenti Parlamentari, Casa più Bassa di Parlamento 2004/2005, 30 091 n. 5).
20. Il richiedente, nelle sue osservazioni attrae attenzione a molti commenti resi col Consiglio di Stato. Come attinente alla causa di fronte alla Corte, queste preoccupazioni incluse degli effetti laterali non desiderati di accesso che regola ad alloggio in aree di interno-città sulla disponibilità di alloggio per gruppi a basso reddito in municipi circostanti e di persone con reddito da fonti altro che benessere sociale che è obbligato per accettare alloggio in neighbourhoods depresso contro i loro desideri; si preoccupa della compatibilità di trattati di diritti umani, incluso l'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici e Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione; e riguarda della distinzione implicita basata su reddito che condurrebbe a distinzioni indirette sui motivi di razza, colore o cittadino od origine etnica.
21. Il Governo rispose a queste preoccupazioni. Effetti laterali municipi circostanti e toccanti si si aspetterebbero solamente se il municipio riguardato non potesse garantire la disponibilità di alloggio alternativo stesso; a tutti gli eventi, le altre autorità locali sarebbero consultate di fronte al Ministro diede una decisione ed il numero e misura delle aree urbane per essere designato si fu aspettato di essere limitato. Che chiese alloggio fu lasciato a quelli normalmente se reagire ad un'offerta di alloggio o non; non c'era così coercizione. Inoltre, mentre l'effetto di designazione sotto i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) è probabile che Atto sia bene accorciare liste d'attesa ed incoraggiare persone con reddito da fonti altro che welfare pubblico per prendere su residenza là, questo davvero era un effetto intenzionale. Le misure in problema furono giustificate in termini di Articolo 12 § 3 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici ed Articolo 2 § 3 di Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione. Non si poteva escludere che è probabile che membri di gruppi di minoranza siano colpiti indirettamente, ma con ciò lo scopo notificò era legittimo, l'eletto di mezzi sia appropriato a che scopo, alternativa vuole dire non era disponibile ed il requisito della proporzionalità era stato soddisfatto. Nel collegamento secondo, il Governo aguzzò al requisito che alloggio alternativo e sufficiente è disponibile all'interno della regione per quegli in bisogno di sé prima che un'area urbana potrebbe essere designata sotto l'Atto; se dopo tutti questo provò non essere la causa, il Ministro ritirerebbe la designazione.
22. Cambi furono resi al Memorandum Esplicativo (Memorie trasporta con furgone Toelichting) riflettendo i punti sollevati.
(b) Il Memorandum Esplicativo
23. È affermato nel Memorandum Esplicativo ai Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Bill (Documenti Parlamentari, Casa più Bassa di Parlamento 2004/2005, 30 091 n. 3) che fu decretato in risposta ad un specifico desiderio espresso con le autorità del municipio di Rotterdam. La comparsa delle concentrazioni di “socioeconomicamente bisognoso” in aree di interno-città angosciate era stato osservato, con effetti seri su qualità di vita che deve a disoccupazione, povertà ed esclusione sociale. Molti che potrebbero permettersi di muoversi altrove faceva così che condusse all'ulteriore impoverimento delle aree così colpito. Questo, insieme con comportamento antisociale l'afflusso di immigranti illegali ed incrimina, fu detto per costituire il centro dei problemi di Rotterdam. Il bisogno esistè perciò dare localmente impeto a miglioramento economico. Risultati rapidi non si furono aspettati per che la ragione l'Atto fu inteso di rimanere indefinitamente in vigore; comunque, i suoi effetti sarebbero fatti una rassegna nel tempo di ' di cinque anni.
24. Oltre alle autorità locali di Rotterdam, quelli di altre città si avevano chiesto il loro contributo. Interesse negli scopi e misure dell'Atto era stato espresso con le quattro città di maggiore-Amsterdam, Il Hague ed Utrecht oltre a Rotterdam-e gli altri municipi, le grandi città in particolare. Comunque, sarebbe lasciato ad ogni municipio per scegliere per sé le misure per adottare in risposta alle necessità locali.
25. Misure disponibile sotto l'Atto incentivi fiscali di offerta e sussidi inclusero con una prospettiva a promuovendo l'attività economica in aree affettate. Le altre misure furono tirate accesso che regola al mercato di alloggio nelle particolari aree.
26. Nel termine più lungo, misure incluso la vendita di proprietà di noleggio, la demolizione di alloggio sotto la norma e la sua sostituzione con alto-qualità, proprietà residenziale e più costosa fu prevista. Come una misura provvisoria ed a breve termine, intese di offrire un “respirando spazio” produrre i loro effetti, fu proposto sulla mano del una per incoraggiare accordo con persone con un reddito da lavoro per misure più permanenti (o lavoro passato), professionale o esercizio d'impresa o concessioni di studente e sull'altro per arginare l'afflusso di alloggio-cercatori socioeconomicamente deprivati con una prospettiva alla diversità di popolazione in aumento.
27. Allo stesso tempo fu riconosciuto che quelli negarono accordo nelle aree in problema dovrebbe essere previsto altrove con alloggio appropriato nella città o regione riguardò. Se quel non fu garantito, le aree colpite non sarebbero designate sotto la legislazione proposta o una designazione esistente dovrebbe essere ritirata come la causa sarebbe.
28. La questione della compatibilità con trattati di diritti umani, incluso l'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici e Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione, fu rivolto. Era considerato che le misure proposte notificassero gli interessi di “l'ordine pubblico” all'interno del significato di Articolo 12 § 3 dell'Alleanza ed ordine pubblico all'interno del significato di Articolo 2 § 3 di Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione con fermando la concentrazione nelle particolari aree di gruppi socioeconomicamente privati e municipi abilitanti per ostacolare segregazione sulla base di reddito. L'afflusso di gruppi socioeconomicamente bisognosi, dopo tutto condusse ad affidamento aumentato su benessere sociale, ridotto è probabile che che attività economica rimanga ed impedì l'integrazione delle comunità di immigrante, mentre provocando potenzialmente isolamento sociale di famiglie di sia origine etnica e natia ed estera.
(il c) discussioni Parlamentari
29. La Casa più Bassa di Parlamento discusse il Bill 6, 7 e 15 settembre 2005. Membri proposero emendamenti numerosi. Come attinente alla causa di fronte alla Corte, emendamenti adottarono inclusi una disposizione che richiede il Ministro di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente prima di designare un'area entro la quale il requisito di licenza di alloggio farebbe domanda accertare che persone rifiutarono una licenza di alloggio trattenne altrove accesso adeguato ad alloggio appropriato nella regione (vedere sezione 6(2) dell'Atto, siccome adottato); e richiedendo municipi che introducono un sistema di licenza di alloggio per adottare una clausola di fatica in ogni causa (vedere sezione 8(2) dell'Atto, siccome adottato).
30. La Casa più Bassa di Parlamento adottata l'Atto con 132 voti a 12 dei membri presenta e votando.
31. Nella Casa Superiore di Parlamento, si fu preoccupata della compatibilità dell'Atto con internazionalmente garantì diritti umani, Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione ed Articolo 12 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici in particolare. In replica, il Governo sottolineò il ruolo direttivo del Ministro di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente ed attrasse attenzione alla via di ricorso legale costituita con procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali amministrativi e competenti (Memorandum in Replica (Memorie trasporta con furgone Antwoord), Documenti Parlamentari, Casa Superiore di Parlamento (Kamerstukken io) 2005/2006, 30 091 il C).
32. 20 dicembre 2005, la Casa Superiore di Parlamento adottata l'Atto con 60 voti a 11 dei membri presenta dopo discussione, e votando.
B. L'Alloggio Ciao-legge del municipio di Rotterdam
1. 2003 versione
33. L'Alloggio Ciao-legge del 2003 del municipio di Rotterdam articoli fissi per, fra le altre cose, la distribuzione di alloggio di basso-affitto a famiglie di reddito basso con conferendo poteri il Borgomastro ed Assessori per emettere licenze di alloggio. In aree designate fu impedito per prendere su residenza senza una licenza di alloggio se l'affitto fosse più basso di un importo specificato. La Ciao-legge esposta fuori criterio per il Borgomastro ed Assessori per fare domanda nell'accordare simile alloggio permette; questi criterio incluse una correlazione fra affitto e reddito livella ed un altro fra il numero di stanze nelle particolari abitazioni ed il numero di persone che comprendono una famiglia.
34. 1 ottobre 2004 il municipio di Rotterdam introdusse, su una base sperimentale, una ciao-legge sotto che solamente famiglie con un reddito fra 120 per cento del salario minimo legale ed il limite superiore per assicurazione contro le malattie pubblica ed obbligatoria (lo ziekenfondsgrens; verso sosia il salario minimo legale al tempo) fu concesso ad una licenza di alloggio che concede loro prendere su residenza in moderato-costo affittò alloggio.
2. 2006 versione
35. A gennaio 2006 l'Alloggio Ciao-legge del 2003 del municipio di Rotterdam fu corretta per dare articoli particolareggiati che implementano i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Agisca localmente. Come attinente alla causa presente, questi articoli risuonarono sezione 8 (1) e (2) dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto (sezione 2.6 dell'Alloggio Ciao-legge del 2003).
36. L'Alloggio Ciao-legge del 2003 fu sostituita, con effetto da 1 gennaio 2008, con una Alloggio Ciao-legge nuova (Designò Aree (Rotterdam)) (gebieden di aangewezen di Huisvestingsverordening Rotterdam). Questa ciao-legge che rimane in vigore include disposizioni che corrispondono a quelli delineate nel paragrafo precedente.
C. Le decisioni di designazione
37. 13 giugno 2006 il Ministro di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente designarono sotto sezione 5 dell'Atto detto quattro distretti di Rotterdam, incluso Tarwewijk e molte strade per un periodo iniziale di quattro anni. Queste aree designate si sono riferite ad usando l'espressione di Inglese-lingua generalmente “il hotspots.”
38. Nel 2010 le designazioni furono prolungate per un secondo termine di quattro anni ed una prima designazione fu costituito un quinto distretto.
D. L'opinione della Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento
39. La Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento (Commissie Gelijke Behandeling) era un corpo Statale esposto su sotto l'Atto dell'Uguaglianza di trattamento del Generale (Algemene gelijke behandeling bagnato). Suo rinvii investigherebbe distinzioni dirette ed indirette addotte fra persone. Esistè fino a 2012 quando fu assorbito con l'Istituto di Paesi Bassi per Diritti umani (de di voor di Università Rechten trasporta con furgone de Mens).
40. A dicembre 2004 alla Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento si fu avvicinata con Regioplatform Maaskoepel (“Delta di Maas piattaforma che coordina regionale”), un'organizzazione federativa che comprende corpi di alloggio sociali attivi nell'area di Rotterdam, con la richiesta per considerare poi la ciao-legge di Rotterdam sperimentale in vigore (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra).
41. La Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento decise di includere nel suo esame della causa i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Bill che a che tempo ancora era pendente nella Casa più Bassa di Parlamento. Mentre recognising che il Bill non ha fatto domanda alle certe categorie di cause coprirono con la ciao-legge sperimentale, la Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento lo trovò attinente determinato che potrebbe essere fatto domanda ad aree intere della città.
42. La Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento diede la sua opinione 7 luglio 2005. Espresse la prospettiva che persone con radici di immigrante europee e non-occidentali, come persone di turco, Marocchino, Surinamese o i Paesi Bassi discesa di Antille (l'afkomst) e famiglie di singolo-genitore (cioé. madri che lavorano e madri su benessere sociale) era sovrarappresentatofra l'inutilizzato e fra quelli guadagnando meno che 120 per cento del salario minimo legale. Per che ragione le misure in problema costituirono una distinzione indiretta basata su razza nella causa di persone di discesa di immigrante non-europea e su genere nella causa di lavorare madri. Queste distinzioni erano ingiustificate determinato la disponibilità di scelte di politica alternative, come benserviti esigenti di inquilini eventuali; controlli regolari con ufficiali; migliorando la qualità di alloggio; espropriando o acquistando alloggio di scarsa qualità da padroni di casa privati; sopprimendo affitto illegale e supplire-affitto; ed attivamente perseguendo inquilini antisociali.
43. Facendo commenti sui Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Bill, la Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento aggiunse che non riuscì a rivolgere le distinzioni indirette e dette e la giustificazione date nel Memorandum Esplicativo era troppo generale.
44. Lo stato Statale nel quale la Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento ha scritto alla Casa più Bassa di Parlamento “più nuanced” termini 5 settembre 2005. Comunque, una copia di questo documento non è stata presentata.
III. ALTRI FATTI
A. sviluppi Susseguenti riguardo alla città di Rotterdam
1. Il rapporto di valutazione del 2007
45. Un rapporto di valutazione dopo il primo anno che segue l'introduzione della licenza di alloggio in Rotterdam, commissionò con la propria Costruzione Urbana di Rotterdam ed Alloggio Servizio (Dienst l'en di Stedebouw Volkshuisvesting), fu pubblicato 6 dicembre 2007 col Centre per Ricerca e Statistica (voor di Centrum l'en di Onderzoek Statistiek), una ricerca e scrivania di consiglio raccogliendo dati statistici ed eseguendo ricerca attinente a sviluppi in Rotterdam in aree incluso demographics, l'economia e lavoro (in futuro “il rapporto di valutazione del 2007”).
46. Il rapporto nota una riduzione del numero di residenti nuovi dipendente su benefici di PREVIDENZAsociale- sotto l’Atto del lavoro e di assistenza sociale nelle “ aree hotspot”, sebbene non, chiaramente, una fermata completa perché ai residenti di Rotterdam del ' stare in piedi di sei anni non sono impediti di muoversi là.
47. Da luglio 2006 sino alla fine di luglio 2007 erano state 2,835 richieste per una licenza di alloggio. Di questi, 2,240 erano stati accordati,; 184 erano stati rifiutati; 16 erano stati respinti come incompleto; e 395 ancora erano pendenti. La clausola di fatica (sezione 8(2) dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto) era stato fatto domanda in 38 cause.
48. Tre-quartieri delle licenze di alloggio accordarono impedimento di alloggio interessato con padroni di casa privati; il resto-519-era stato accordato per l'intermediario di corpi di alloggio sociali (il woningcorporaties). I secondi selezionarono i loro inquilini con dovuto riguardo ad ai requisiti ufficiali, così che rifiuti di licenze di alloggio con riguardo ad ad alloggio sociale era non udito di.
49. Delle persone una licenza di alloggio rifiutò, 73 (40% di tutti quelli che si incontrarono con un rifiuto) era riuscito a trovare altrove relativamente rapidamente alloggio.
50. Il rapporto di valutazione del 2007 fu presentato alla giunta comunale 15 gennaio 2008. 24 aprile 2008 la giunta comunale votò mantenere il sistema di licenza di alloggio siccome era e ha un rapporto di valutazione nuovo commissionato per la fine di 2009.
2. Il rapporto di valutazione del 2009
51. Un secondo rapporto di valutazione, anche commissionato con la Costruzione in Città di Rotterdam ed Alloggio Servizio fu pubblicato col Centro per la Ricerca e la Statistica 27 novembre 2009. Coprì il periodo da luglio 2006 sino a luglio 2009 (“il rapporto di valutazione del 2009”) durante il quale gli eventi di cui ci si lamenta successero.
52. Durante questo periodo, i corpi di alloggio sociali avevano affittato 1,712 abitazioni nelle aree riguardate. Poiché i corpi di alloggio sociali potrebbero accettare solamente inquilini che qualificarono per una licenza di alloggio, nessuno richieste per tale licenza erano state respinte in questo gruppo.
53. Fuori delle 6,469 richieste per una licenza di alloggio relativo ad alloggio privatamente affittato, 4,980 erano stati accettati, (77%); 342 erano stati rifiutati (5%); e 296 erano stati pendenti all'inizio di luglio 2009. Esame di un ulteriore 851 (13%) era stato cessato senza una decisione che è presa, generalmente perché queste richieste erano state ritirate o abbandonato; l'assunzione era che molte di queste richieste possono in qualsiasi causa è stata respinta. Seguì, perciò, che se le cause pendenti non fossero prese in considerazione, approssimativamente uno-quinto di questa categoria delle richieste o erano stati rifiutati o non erano stati perseguiti ad una conclusione.
54. La ragione di respingere una richiesta per una licenza di alloggio era stata riferita al requisito di reddito in 63% di cause, qualche volta in combinazione con un altro base per rifiuto; insuccesso per soddisfare il requisito di reddito era stato il risuoli simile ragione in 56% di cause.
55. Di 342 persone rifiutarono una licenza di alloggio, del due - terzi era riuscito a trovare altrove alloggio in Rotterdam (47%) o altrove nei Paesi Bassi (21%).
56. La clausola di fatica era stata fatta domanda 185 volte-espresse come una percentuale delle richieste relativo ad alloggio privatamente-affittato, 3% del totale. Queste erano state cause di impedire ad uomini accosciati del prendere sinistra di alloggio vuota (l'antikraak), immigranti illegali la cui situazione era stata resa regolare con una misura generale (generaal perdonano), disposizioni viventi ed assistite per individui vulnerabile (begeleid wonen), disposizioni viventi e cooperative (il woongroepen), cominciare-su imprese, il re-alloggio di famiglie costrinse ad alloggio sotto la norma e chiaro per rinnovamento, e studenti esteri. In oltre, in un terzo di cause la clausola di fatica era stata fatta domanda perché una decisione non era stata data all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto.
57. Gli effetti della misura furono considerati basati su quattro indicatori: proporzione di residenti dipendente su benefici di previdenza sociale sotto l’Atto del lavoro e di assistenza sociale, corresse per l'approvvigionamento di alloggio appropriato; percezione della sicurezza; qualità sociale; e l'accumulazione potenziale di problemi di alloggio:
(un) era stato osservato che nelle aree dove il requisito di licenza di alloggio fece domanda, la riduzione del numero di residenti nuovi dipendente su benefici di sociale-sicurezza sotto l’Atto del lavoro e di assistenza sociale era stato più rapido in “il hotspot” le aree che nelle altre parti di Rotterdam. In oltre, il numero di residenti in ricevuta di simile benefici come una proporzione della popolazione totale di quelle aree aveva declinato anche, benché ancora era più grande che altrove.
(b) In due delle aree dove il requisito di licenza di alloggio era stato introdotto, l'aumento nella percezione della sicurezza pubblica era stato più rapido della media di Rotterdam. Tarwewijk aveva mostrato inizialmente un aumento, ma ora ritornava a dove era stato prima che la misura fosse introdotta. Un'altra area davvero aveva declinato significativamente in questo riguardo. Tutte le aree dove il requisito di licenza di alloggio fece domanda fu percepito come notevolmente meno sicuro di Rotterdam nell'insieme.
(il c) In termini di qualità sociale, era stato miglioramento nella maggior parte delle parti di Rotterdam dove problemi esisterono, Tarwewijk fra loro. Comunque, si notò che l'effetto della licenza di alloggio in questo riguardo fu limitato, poiché influenzò solamente la selezione di residenti nuovi, non che di residenti già in posto.
(d) problemi di Alloggio-definito in termini di fatturato, alloggio lasciò non usato, e sviluppo di prezzo di alloggio-aveva aumentato piuttosto nelle aree affettate incluso Tarwewijk, sebbene sull'intero ad un tasso più lento là che altrove. Ragioni riportate per l'aumento erano un afflusso di immigranti dell'estrazione quasi sempre non-europea (il nieuwe Nederlanders, “cittadini di Paesi Bassi nuovi”) e residenti a breve termine e nuovi dall'Europa Centrale ed Orientale; il secondo in particolare tese a sospendere per tre mesi o meno prima di muoversi su, e la loro attività economica era più difficile tenere sotto revisione come molti era autonomo.
58. Corpi di alloggio sociali tesero a vedere il requisito di licenza di alloggio come un fastidio perché creò lavoro supplementare. Loro percepirono piuttosto la misura come un strumento appropriato per afferrare gli abusi con padroni di casa privati, purché che attivamente sia eseguito e procedure amministrative siano semplificate. Altri con un coinvolgimento professionale nel mercato di alloggio di Rotterdam menzionarono l'effetto dissuasivo della misura su residenti nuovi e così chiamati delle aree affettate.
59. Il rapporto suggerì che era probabile che del requisito di licenza di alloggio non fosse avuto bisogno più per uno dell'esistente “il hotspots” (non Tarwewijk). Al contrario., cinque altri distretti di Rotterdam segnarono alti per tre indicatori, mentre un sesto valori critici ecceduti per tutti i quattro.
3. Il rapporto di valutazione del 2011
60. Un terzo rapporto di valutazione, questa volta commissionata con lo Sviluppo Urbano di Rotterdam Ripara (Alloggio Settore), fu pubblicato col Centre per Ricerca e Statistica ad agosto 2012 (seconda edizione revisionata). Coprì il periodo da luglio 2009 sino a luglio 2011 (“il rapporto di valutazione del 2011”).
61. Basato sugli stessi indicatori e la metodologia come il rapporto precedente, concluse che il sistema di licenza di alloggio dovrebbe essere continuato in Tarwewijk e due altre aree (incluso uno nel quale era stato introdotto nel frattempo, nel 2010); cessò in due altri; ed introdusse in un'area dove non era ancora in vigore.
4. Valutazione dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto
62. 18 luglio 2012 il Ministro degli Interni e Regno Relazioni (furgone di Ministro Binnenlandse l'en di Zaken Koninkrijksrelaties) spedì un rapporto di valutazione separato che valuta l'efficacia dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto ed i suoi effetti in pratica alla Casa più Bassa di Parlamento, come richiesto con sezione 17 di quel l'Atto. La lettera del Ministro affermò l'intenzione del Governo di introdurre legislazione per prolungare la validità dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto. Richieste a che effetto era stato ricevuto da un numero di città affettate. Si notò che non tutte le città riguardate si erano avvalse di tutte le possibilità offerto con l'Atto; in particolare, solamente Rotterdam usò alloggio permette di selezionare residenti nuovi per particolari aree. Appeso alla lettera del Ministro era una copia del rapporto di valutazione del 2009 ed una lettera del Borgomastro ed Assessori di Rotterdam in che, inter l'alia, la desiderabilità fu affermata di prolungare oltre i primi due periodi di quattro anni l'indicazione di particolari aree per fare domanda il requisito di licenza di alloggio: la misura fu considerata un successo, ed un programme del venti-anno che comporta il miglioramento di grande potenza di alloggio ed infrastruttura (il “Programme Qualità Salto Nazionale Rotterdam Meridionale” (Nationaal Programma Kwaliteitssprong Rotterdam Zuid, vedere sotto)) era stato cominciato nelle parti meridionali di Rotterdam nel 2011.
5. Il Programma Qualità Salto Nazionale Rotterdam Meridionale
63. 19 settembre 2011 il Ministro degli Interni e Regno Relazioni (in favore del Governo), il Borgomastro di Rotterdam (in favore del municipio di Rotterdam), ed i presidenti di un numero di distretti amministrativi di Rotterdam Meridionali (il deelgemeenten), corpi di alloggio sociali ed istituzioni istruttive firmarono il Programme Qualità Salto Nazionale Rotterdam Meridionale. Questo documento notò i problemi sociali comune in aree di interno-città di Rotterdam Meridionali che fu proposto di rivolgere con offrendo le opportunità migliorate per istruzione e l'attività economica e migliorando, o se bisogno sta sostituendo, alloggio ed infrastruttura. Fu inteso di terminare il programme con l'anno 2030.
64. 31 ottobre 2012 il Ministro degli Interni e Regno Relazioni, l'Assessore di Rotterdam per alloggio, pianificazione spaziale, beni immobili e l'economia urbana (il wethouder Wonen, ruimtelijke ordening vastgoed en stedelijke economie) ed i presidenti di tre corpi di alloggio sociali attivo in Rotterdam firmò un “accordo riguardo ad un impulso finanziario per il beneficio del Qualità Salto Rotterdam Meridionale (2012-2015))” (Convenant betreffende een financiële impuls dieci behoeve trasportano con furgone de Kwaliteitssprong Rotterdam Zuid (2012-2015)). Questo accordo previsto per una revisione di priorità in finanziamento di Governo di alloggio ed infrastruttura proietta nell'area di Rotterdam Meridionale all'interno di bilanci esistenti e per un investimento supplementare ed una volta-solo di 122 milioni di euros (EUR). Della somma seconda, EUR 23 milione era stato riservato col municipio di Rotterdam fino a 2014; un altro EUR 10 milione sarebbero aggiunti per il periodo che comincia nel 2014. Questi finanziamenti sarebbero usati mettere a nuovo o sostituire 2,500 case in Rotterdam Meridionale. Un ulteriore EUR 30 milione sarebbe offerto col Governo. Il resto sarebbe speso coi corpi di alloggio sociali su progetti entro loro rispettivo rinvii.
B. sviluppi legislativi e Susseguenti
1. I Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) (la Proroga) l'Atto
65. 19 novembre 2013 il Governo introdusse un Bill che propone di correggere i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto (Documenti Parlamentari, Casa più Bassa di Parlamento 2013/2014, 33 797 n. 2). Il Memorandum Esplicativo affermò che il suo fine era conferire poteri municipi per afferrare gli abusi nel privato affittò settore di alloggio, municipi determinati i poteri più larghi di esecuzione e rende possibile l'ulteriore proroga temporale dell'Atto.
66. I Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) (la Proroga) l'Atto (uitbreiding Bagnato bijzondere maatregelen grootstedelijke problematiek Bagnato) entrò in vigore 14 aprile 2014, mentre abilitando la designazione di particolari aree sotto sezione 8 dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto per essere prolungato il giorno prima che era dovuto per scadere. Rende possibile le ulteriori proroghe della designazione periodi di quattro anni e successivi (sezione 5(2) dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto, corretto).
2. Emendamento dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto nel collegamento con l'assegnazione selettiva di alloggio per limitare fastidio e comportamento penale
67. Un ulteriore Bill fu introdotto 8 ottobre 2015 (Documenti Parlamentari, Casa più Bassa di Parlamento 2015/2016, 34 314 n. 2). Stabilisce accordare i poteri di municipi per negare licenze di alloggio ad individui con un casellario giudiziale. Secondo Memorandum Esplicativo suo (Documenti Parlamentari, Casa più Bassa di Parlamento 2015/2016, 34 314 n. 3), l'intenzione è offrire probabilmente una base legale per misure per costituire interferenze col diritto della libertà per scegliere la residenza di uno, come garantito con Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 della Convenzione ed Articolo 12 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici, e-fin dalle misure nella volontà di problema della necessità comporti la rivelazione ad autorità locali di informazioni di polizia-col diritto alla vita privata come garantito con inter l'alia Articolo 8 della Convenzione, Articolo 17 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici ed Articolo 7 dello Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea. È attualmente pendente nella Casa più Bassa di Parlamento.
C. eventi Susseguenti riguardo al richiedente
68. 27 settembre 2010 il richiedente si mosse ad alloggio affittato nel municipio di Vlaardingen. Questo municipio è parte del Rotterdam Regione Metropolitana.
69. Come di 25 maggio 2011 il richiedente era stato residente nel Rotterdam Regione Metropolitana per più di sei anni. Lei fu concessa perciò per risiedere in una delle aree designò sotto i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto nonostante le sue fonti di reddito.
D. le Altre informazioni presentate con le parti
70. Il Governo affermò che nessun rinnovamento o costruendo licenze fu chiesto per l'abitazione in Strada di A. abitata col richiedente al tempo degli eventi si lamentò di fra il 2007 ed il 2010 e che nessuno per simile licenza o fu fatta domanda di periodo prima di 2007.
IV. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE
71. Articolo 12 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici prevede siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno può legalmente all'interno del territorio di un Stato, entro che territorio, abbia diritto alla libertà di movimento e la libertà a scegliere la sua residenza.
2. Ognuno sarà gratis per lasciare qualsiasi il paese, incluso suo proprio.
3. I diritti summenzionati non saranno soggetto a qualsiasi restrizioni omettono quelli che sono offerti con legge, è necessario per proteggere la sicurezza nazionale, ordine pubblico (l'ordine pubblico), salute pubblica o morale o i diritti e le libertà di altri, e è coerente con gli altri diritti riconosciuti nell'Alleanza presente.
4. Nessuno sarà privato arbitrariamente del diritto per digitare il suo proprio paese.”
LA LEGGE
VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 2 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 4 ALLA CONVENZIONE
72. Il richiedente si lamentò che i Problemi Urbani Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto e la legge Housing Bye-law del 2003 del municipio di Rotterdam, e nella particolare sezione 2.6 del secondo (come in vigore al tempo), violò i suoi diritti sotto Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 che prevedono siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno può legalmente all'interno del territorio di un Stato, entro che territorio, abbia diritto alla libertà di movimento e la libertà a scegliere la sua residenza.
2. Ognuno sarà gratis per lasciare qualsiasi il paese, incluso suo proprio.
3. Nessuno restrizioni saranno messe sull'esercizio di questi diritti altro che come è in conformità con legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale o la sicurezza di pubblico, per il mantenimento di ordine pubblico, per la prevenzione di crimine, per la protezione di salute o morale o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.
4. I diritti insorti avanti paragrafo 1 possono essere anche soggetti, nelle particolari aree, a restrizioni imposte in conformità con legge e giustificò con l'interesse pubblico in una società democratica.”
73. Il Governo contestò questo.
A. Ammissibilità.
1. Le eccezioni preliminari del Governo
(a) più una vittima
74. Il Governo presentò nel primo posto che il richiedente non era più una vittima della violazione allegato. Lei si era mossa ad alloggio affittato in Vlaardingen nel 2010; lei aveva successivamente, come un residente di più del ' di sei anni che sta in piedi del Rotterdam Regione Metropolitana, divenga eleggibile in circostanze normali per una licenza di alloggio che le concede risiedere in una delle aree designata sotto i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto. Le restrizioni si lamentarono perciò più di fece domanda.
75. Il richiedente rispose che lei era stata costretta per vivere in ristretto ed insalubrious condiziona come un risultato del rifiuto della licenza di alloggio che le avrebbe concesso muoversi ad alloggio che era sia appropriato alle sue necessità e disponibile. Lei disse anche di avere speso EUR 1,000 su migliorare l'abitazione in Strada di B. prima di muoversi in.
76. È la giurisprudenza continua della Corte che una decisione o misura favorevole al richiedente spogliarli lui o dello status di può bastare “la vittima” per i fini di Articolo 34 della Convenzione previde che le autorità nazionali hanno ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, e poi riconobbe compensazione per, la violazione della Convenzione (vedere, come una recente autorità, O'Keeffe c. l'Irlanda [GC], n. 35810/09, § 115 ECHR 2014 (gli estratti)).
77. Nella causa presente, benché il richiedente ora qualificasse per una licenza di alloggio che la permetterebbe per risiedere in Tarwewijk, questo è solamente il risultato di sua propria decisione per muoversi ad un altro municipio all'interno del Rotterdam Area Metropolitana combinata con il passare del tempo. Non ci sono state nessuna decisione o misura favorevoli al richiedente; nessun riconoscimento di qualsiasi violazione della Convenzione; e, un fortiori, nessuna compensazione fu perciò offerta.
78. La Corte respinge perciò questa eccezione.
(b) Nessun svantaggio significativo
79. Rispondendo ad una rivendicazione rese col richiedente all'effetto che lei aveva speso EUR 1,000 che migliora l'abitazione in Strada di B., il Governo dibattè che la decisione del richiedente di incorrere in questa spesa era stata il risultato di una scelta resa col richiedente di fronte a qualsiasi decisione fu presa con autorità pubblica. Il richiedente non aveva subito perciò qualsiasi svantaggio significativo per il quale il convenuto potrebbe essere contenuto responsabile.
80. Il Governo notò in oltre che per nessuno licenze per lavoro di costruzione significativo per essere fatto all'indirizzo precedente del richiedente a Strada di A. erano state fatte domanda mentre il richiedente risiedde là e che nessun lavoro di rinnovamento notevole aveva avuto luogo dopo che lei si mosse fuori. Questo, ed il fatto che il richiedente non aveva chiesto una licenza di alloggio nonostante ora essendo eleggibile per uno nonostante il suo reddito, dimostrò che ricevere tale licenza era di nessun grande significato a lei. Nel collegamento secondo il Governo si riferì a Shefer c. la Russia (il dec.), n. 45175/04, 13 marzo 2012.
81. In risposta all'argomento del Governo, il richiedente presentò di nuovo, che lei era stata costretta per vivere in condizioni non congeniali per un periodo prolungato. Lei dibattè anche che la spesa di EUR 1,000 tutti di che lei perse, era considerevole rispetto col suo reddito. Lei aveva sofferto così di danno significativo, sia patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale.
82. Nella prospettiva della Corte, il problema sollevato con la causa prima che è se o non il richiedente fu concesso per aspettarsi di passare al B. abitazione Stradale a tutti; il suo svantaggio sorse dal rifiuto con autorità pubblica per concederle fare così come e quando lei desiderò. Considerato in questa luce, la questione di danno se patrimoniale o non-patrimoniale, non ha significato indipendente; può sorgere solamente se la Corte trova una violazione dei diritti effettivi del richiedente.
83. La Corte capisce l'argomento del Governo che non c'era lavoro di rinnovamento notevole fatto all'abitazione su Strada di A. a qualsiasi tempo attinente per essere che il richiedente in realtà non ebbe bisogno di muoversi da là per ragioni connesse col suo stato di ripari. Comunque, le informazioni disponibile alla Corte è insufficiente per sé per disegnare tale inferenza. A tutti gli eventi, la Corte non lo considera necessario stabilire i fatti su questo punto.
84. Né immediatamente è sé evidente dalla decisione del richiedente di prendere su residenza in Vlaardingen ed il suo insuccesso susseguente per depositare una richiesta nuova per una licenza di alloggio di Rotterdam che il richiedente non aveva vero interesse nell'ottenere tale licenza al tempo degli eventi si lamentò di. Col tempo il richiedente si mosse dopo tutto, fuori di Rotterdam lei aveva esaurito le via di ricorso nazionali ed aveva depositato una richiesta con la Corte. Il paragone con la causa di Shefer c. Russia con la quale concernè la non-esecuzione di una sentenza nazionale un relativamente interesse finanziario e minore e fu caratterizzato con che l'inazione di richiedente per sette anni prima che lei prese qualsiasi ulteriori passi seri, è inappropriato.
85. Da allora perciò non sembra che il richiedente ha subito “nessun svantaggio significativo”, la Corte respinge anche questa eccezione.
(c) L’Actio popularis
la richiesta fu intesa di obbligare il convenuto a prevedere un “soluzione strutturale ad un problema percepito.” Era perciò nella natura di un actio popularis, essere dichiarato inammissibile su quel la base.
87. Il richiedente riconobbe che lei considerò il problema sollevato nella richiesta un strutturale. Comunque, lei aveva avuto un interesse personale al tempo quando lei fece domanda alla Corte, dopo non si essendo trasferito ancora a Vlaardingen.
88. La Corte reitera che per essere in grado depositare un ricorso nell'adempimento di Articolo 34, una persona, organizzazione non-governativa o gruppo di individui deve essere in grado chiedere “essere la vittima di una violazione... del set di diritti avanti nella Convenzione...” Per chiedere di essere una vittima di una violazione una persona deve essere colpita direttamente con la misura contestata. La Convenzione non fa, perciò, prevedere il portare di un actio popularis per l'interpretazione dei diritti espose fuori therein o individui di licenza per lamentarsi semplicemente di una disposizione di legge nazionale perché loro considerano, senza ne stato stato colpito direttamente, che può contravvenire alla Convenzione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 33, ECHR 2008, e Centre per Risorse Legali in favore di Valentin Câmpeanu c. la Romania [GC], n. 47848/08, § 101 ECHR 2014).
89. Può essere bene che il desiderio del richiedente è rivolgere un fenomeno strutturale. Anche così, purché che il richiedente si inscatola rivendicazione per essere, o essere stato, un “la vittima” della violazione addotta, quel non è abbastanza per negarla stando in piedi di fronte alla Corte. Si dovrebbe ricordare che la Corte non esiste soltanto proteggere diritti di individui, importante sebbene quel sia. Il compito della Corte, come esponga con Articolo 19 della Convenzione, è assicurare l'osservanza degli appuntamenti si impegnata con le Parti Contraenti ed Alte nella Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre. Questo fa con dando sentenze e decisioni che interpretano le disposizioni della Convenzione nelle specifiche cause sulla base delle richieste presentate sotto Articoli 33 e 34 della Convenzione con Parti Contraenti ed Alte e persone, organizzazioni non-governative o gruppi di individui che chiedono di essere vittime di violazioni dei loro diritti, rispettivamente e con dando opinioni consultive su questioni all'interno della sua competenza sotto Articolo 47 della Convenzione alla richiesta del Comitato di Ministri (vedere, in particolare, Salah c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 8196/02, § 69 ECHR 2006 IX (gli estratti); vedere anche Loizidou c. la Turchia (eccezioni preliminari), 23 marzo 1995, § 70 la Serie Un n. 310).
90. Al giorno d'oggi la causa ci può essere senza dubbio che il richiedente era colpito direttamente e personalmente col rifiuto di una licenza di alloggio che l'avrebbe abilitata per prendere su residenza in quanto, al tempo, era l'abitazione della sua scelta. Segue che il richiedente può chiedere di essere un “la vittima” della violazione addotta e ha sostenendo portare la sua causa di fronte alla Corte, e che questa eccezione deve essere respinta similmente.
2. Conclusione come all'ammissibilità
91. La Corte considera che le questioni di aumenti applicative di fatto e diritto che è sufficientemente serio che la sua determinazione dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei meriti. Nessuno altri motivi per dichiararlo inammissibile sono stati stabiliti. La Corte lo dichiara perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Argomento di fronte alla Corte
(un) Il Governo
92. Il Governo accettò che c'era stata liberamente una restrizione del diritto del richiedente per scegliere la sua residenza.
93. La restrizione in problema era “nella conformità con la legge” in che aveva una base in statuto e pubblicò debitamente legislazione delegata. L'osservazione del Ministro di Alloggio, Pianificazione Spaziale e l'Ambiente a Parlamento di un ordine per designare un'area come incorrendo i Problemi Urbani ed Interni sotto (Misure Speciali) Atto era nella forma di una carta parlamentare e così anche accessibile al pubblico. Inoltre, non solo i dibattiti in Parlamento che aveva condotto ai Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto ma anche la sua attuazione in Rotterdam era stata data attenzione di media regolare. I requisiti dell'accessibilità e prevedibilità furono soddisfatti perciò ampiamente.
94. Lo scopo legittimo perseguito con la misura era il mantenimento di ordine pubblico. Questo fu notificato con regolando accesso al mercato di alloggio così come ostacolare un aumento nella concentrazione di gruppi socioeconomicamente svantaggiati-o, nelle parole del Governo, “segregazione reddito-basata”-nelle particolari aree come un risultato di migrazione selettiva. L'afflusso di gruppi bisognosi mise un corrispondentemente la più grande richiesta su previdenza sociale struttura, ridotto sostenga per le attività economiche e servizi, l'integrazione impedita, la sicurezza pubblica e minacciata e la sicurezza, e condusse a crimine aumentato. Restrizioni provvisorie su simile afflusso furono indicate per concedere le altre misure che già erano state implementate per fare miglioramenti sostenibili per sopportare frutta.
95. Le altre misure si riferirono ad attrezzatura inclusa sovraffollamento illegale e proprietari di proprietà di vagabondo, iniziative unite fra lavoratori di gioventù e la polizia istruzione supplementare e si preoccupa di figli scuola-anziani che comportano polizia di comunità integrata attacca, investimento supplementare per migliorare alloggio sotto la norma, ed un approccio personalizzato a tossicodipendenti, il senzatetto e quelli che parteciparono di comportamento antisociale.
96. Le autorità locali del municipio di Rotterdam furono costrette a soddisfare il Ministro che le aree hanno elencato nella loro richiesta presentato un'accumulazione di problemi al punto dove era necessaria designazione. Nell'evento, il Ministro era stato soddisfatto, che il municipio stava facendo tutti poteva afferrare i problemi di fronte a sé, ma che di misure supplementari furono avute bisogno nonostante questo, che fu fatto il sarto al particolare neighbourhoods.
97. Le misure contestate erano provvisorie, poiché loro furono ordinati per un massimo di quattro anni ad un tempo. Mentre è probabile che loro siano prolungati per ulteriori periodi di quattro anni, questo implicò che la situazione e la necessità continuata delle misure furono valutate, in dettaglio, ogni quattro anni.
98. Ebbe bisogno di infine, essere stabilito che c'era ancora abbastanza alloggio nella regione per soddisfare le necessità di quelli che chiedono alloggio a chi una licenza di alloggio non poteva essere accordato per una particolare area come un risultato di una designazione di area sotto l'Atto.
99. Con riguardo ad alle particolari circostanze del richiedente, il Governo osservò, che il richiedente non aveva qualificato per una licenza di alloggio che le concede prendere su residenza in Strada di B. al tempo attinente perché lei non aveva reddito da lavoro e non viveva ancora nella regione di Rotterdam da almeno sei anni. Lei non aveva fissato spedisca circostanze sufficientemente irresistibili per ricevere una licenza di alloggio sulla base della clausola di fatica, come un'urgenza medica o una situazione che comporta la violenza per esempio. Né era stato mostrato che il richiedente sta indulgendo in Strada di A. era in condizione specialmente povera, fin da nessun permesso di pianificazione per lavoro di rinnovamento notevole era stato richiesto a qualsiasi tempo attinente.
100. Infine, il fatto mero che il richiedente era stato già residente in Tarwewijk quando i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto ed implementando misure entrate in vigore non faceva per se la dia un titolo ad ad un alloggio permetta di muoversi ad un'abitazione diversa all'interno di Tarwewijk. Persone che già risiedono nelle aree designate che desiderarono muoversi e non adempierono i requisiti erano libere per muoversi a che che chiamò il Governo “una delle molte abitazioni appropriate disponibile fuori di queste aree”; questo contribuirebbe a realizzando gli scopi dell'Atto.
(b) Il richiedente
101. Il richiedente presentò che le misure si lamentarono di non era appropriato ai problemi che loro furono supposti per risolvere. Lo scopo era migliorare qualità della vita nelle certe parti di Rotterdam ostacolando il socioeconomicamente deprivato dal prendere su residenza là. Comunque, fu riflesso nel rapporto di valutazione del 2007 che fra luglio 2006 e la fine di luglio 2007 solamente 184 richieste per licenze di alloggio erano state rifiutate, fuori di un totale di 2,835 (vedere paragrafo 47 sopra); questo suggerì che non c'era collegamento causale fra qualsiasi riduzione in qualità della vita nelle aree riguardate e qualsiasi aumento nel numero di residenti socioeconomicamente bisognosi. Similmente, secondo il rapporto di valutazione del 2009 che coprì il tempo degli eventi si lamentò di, fuori di “quasi 6,000” le richieste per una licenza di alloggio solamente 342 erano stati rifiutati, 215 di loro basato sul requisito di reddito. Delle persone riguardate, meno che la metà aveva trovato altrove l'altro alloggio in Rotterdam.
102. Rispondendo al suggerimento implicito nell'argomento del Governo che l'elaborazione legislativa era stata accurata e democraticamente legittimata, il richiedente opporsi a che disapprovazione aveva infatti stato espresso con due corpi Statali autorevoli. Lei aguzzò alla critica contenuta nel rapporto della Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento (vedere paragrafo 43 sopra) e l'opinione del Consiglio di Stato (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra).
103. Più generalmente, il richiedente mise in dubbio il collegamento fra reddito basso e disturbo. In osservazione sua, la piccola proporzione delle richieste respinte per una licenza di alloggio, se è preso insieme col deterioramento della qualità della vita notato coi rapporti di valutazione in Tarwewijk, suggerì che tale collegamento non esistè. Inoltre, persone con un reddito basso da fonti altro che benefici di sociale-sicurezza riferirono a disoccupazione, per esempio dei pensionati di vecchio-età, non fu rifiutato residenza nelle aree riguardate. Infine, le altre ragioni per il calo nella qualità della vita nelle aree in problema suggerito coi rapporti di valutazione inclusero l'afflusso di residenti nuovi dall'Europa Centrale ed Orientale e dell'estrazione non-europea.
104. Con riguardo ad alla sua propria situazione, il richiedente dibattè, che lei aveva nessun casellario giudiziale e nessuna storia di misbehaviour. Lei già stava vivendo inoltre, in Tarwewijk quando lei fece domanda per una licenza di alloggio, così che la sua presa su residenza ad un indirizzo nuovo nella stessa area non avrebbe aggiunto ai problemi sociali là.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) l'Applicabilità di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4
105. La Corte nota all'inizio che il richiedente-chi, come un cittadino di Paesi Bassi era legalmente all'interno del territorio dello Stato-fu rifiutato una licenza di alloggio che le avrebbe concesso prendere su residenza con la sua famiglia in una proprietà della sua scelta. È implicito che questa proprietà era davvero disponibile a lei su condizioni lei era disposta ed in grado a riunione. C'è stato perciò indubbiamente un “la restrizione” su lei “la libertà per scegliere la sua residenza”, all'interno del significato di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4. Che approvvigiona sarà stato violato di conseguenza a meno che il “la restrizione” in problema il suo terzo o quarto paragrafo è giustificato sotto.
106. La restrizione si lamentò di colpisce il diritto di scelta di solamente il richiedente la sua residenza, non il suo diritto alla libertà di movimento o il suo diritto per lasciare il paese. Non designa come bersaglio qualsiasi il particolare individuo o individui ma è della richiesta generale in aree distinte (vale a dire, aree circoscritte all'interno della città di Rotterdam). La Corte lo considererà perciò sotto il quarto paragrafo di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 che riferiscono direttamente al primo paragrafo piuttosto che il terzo.
107. Attenersi con Articolo 2 § 4 di Protocollo N.ro 4, la restrizione in problema è dovuta essere imposta “nella conformità con legge” e “giustificò con l'interesse pubblico in una società democratica.”
(b) Se la restrizione in problema era “nella conformità con legge”
108. C'è senza dubbio che l'imposizione di un requisito di licenza di alloggio nelle aree riguardate era in conformità con diritto nazionale, all'intelligenza i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto e la legge Housing Bye-law del 2003 del municipio di Rotterdam (2006 versione, come in vigore al tempo).
(il c) Se la restrizione in problema era “giustificò con l'interesse pubblico in una società democratica”
109. Rimane essere deciso se la restrizione in problema era “giustificò con l'interesse pubblico in una società democratica.” Per questo deve perseguire essere la causa, un “scopo legittimo” e ci deve essere un “relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso.”
i. Scopo legittimo
110. La restrizione qui in problema fu intesa di invertire il ribasso di aree di interno-città impoverite e migliorare qualità della vita generalmente. Ci può essere senza dubbio che questo è un scopo che è legittimo per legislature e progettisti di città per perseguire. Il richiedente non suggerisce altrimenti effettivamente.
ii. Proporzionalità
? Principi applicabili
111. La causa presente costringe la Corte a pesare il diritto di scelta dell'individuo suo o la sua residenza contro l'attuazione di una politica pubblica che intenzionalmente l'ha la priorità.
112. Si ricorda che un Stato può, costantemente con la Convenzione, adotta misure generali che fanno domanda a situazioni pre-definito nonostante i fatti individuali di ogni causa anche se è probabile che questo dia luogo a cause dure ed individuali (vedere Ždanoka c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 58278/00, §§ 112-115, ECHR 2006IV?, e Difensori Animali Internazionale c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 48876/08, § 106 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti)).
113. Per determinare la proporzionalità di una misura generale la Corte deve valutare primariamente le scelte legislative che lo sono posto sotto a. La qualità del parlamentare e revisione giudiziale della necessità della misura è della particolare importanza in questo riguardo, incluso all'operazione del margine attinente della valutazione. È anche attinente per prendere in considerazione il rischio dell'abuso se una misura generale fosse sbloccata, che essendo un rischio che è primariamente per lo Stato per valutare. La richiesta della misura generale ai fatti dei resti di causa, comunque illustrativo del suo impatto in pratica e è così materiale alla sua proporzionalità (vedere Difensori Animali, citato sopra, § 108, con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Segue che il più convincente i justifications generali per la misura generale sono, la meno importanza la Corte allegherà ad impatto suo nella particolare causa (Difensori Animali, § 109).
114. Ora rivolgendosi ad Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 in particolare, la Corte nota l'interazione ovvia fra la libertà per scegliere la residenza di uno ed il diritto per rispettare per la casa di uno prima (Articolo 8 della Convenzione). Effettivamente, la Corte ha su un'occasione precedente fatto domanda ragionando direttamente riguardo al diritto per rispettare per la casa di uno ad un'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 (vedere Noack ed Altri c. la Germania (il dec.), ECHR 2000-VI). La Corte avrà perciò primariamente riguardo ad alla sua giurisprudenzasotto quel l'Articolo.
115. Comunque, si dovrebbe indicare che non è possibile fare domanda la stessa prova sotto Articolo 2 § 4 di Protocollo N.ro 4 come sotto Articolo 8 § 2, l'interrelazione fra le due disposizioni ciononostante. La Corte ha sostenuto che Articolo 8 non può essere costruito siccome conferendo un diritto per vivere in una particolare ubicazione (vedere Custodia c. il Regno Unito, (il dec.) n. 31888/03, 9 novembre 2004, e Codona c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 485/05, 7 febbraio 2006). In contrasto, la libertà per scegliere la residenza di uno è al cuore di Articolo 2 § 1 di Protocollo N.ro 4 che approvvigionano sarebbero evacuati di ogni significato se non facesse in principio costringa Stati Contraenti ad accomodare preferenze individuali nella questione. Di conseguenza qualsiasi eccezioni a questo principio devono essere dettate con l'interesse pubblico in una società democratica.
116. I principi applicabili saranno trovati nella giurisprudenzadella Corte; benché sviluppò sotto Articoli 8 della Convenzione e 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 rispettivamente, loro trascendono quelli particolari Articoli. Questi principi sono il seguente:
(un) La Corte ha sostenuto nel contesto di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che sfere come alloggio che società moderne considerano un primo bisogno sociale e quale ha un ruolo centrale nel welfare e politiche economiche degli Stati Contraenti, può mandare a chiamare della forma di regolamentazione con lo Stato spesso. In che decisioni di sfera come a se, ed in tal caso quando, può essere lasciato pienamente il giochi di vigori di mercato gratis o se dovrebbe essere soggetto a controllo di Stato, così come la scelta di misure per garantire le necessità di alloggio della comunità e del tempismo per la loro attuazione, necessariamente comporti considerazione di complesso problemi sociali, economici e politici. Trovandolo naturale che il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere un ampio, la Corte ha su molte occasioni dichiarate che rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che in che è il “pubblico” o “generale” interessi a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, § 166 ECHR 2006 VIII, con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Più specificamente, la Corte ha riconosciuto che in un'area come complesso e difficile come che dello sviluppo di grandi città, lo Stato gode un margine ampio della valutazione per implementare la loro politica di urbanistica (vedere Ayangil ed Altri c. la Turchia, n. 33294/03, § 50 6 dicembre 2011).
(b) Dove le considerazioni di politica sociali ed economiche generali sono sorte nel contesto di Articolo 8 che concerne diritti dell'importanza centrale all'identità dell'individuo autodeterminazione, integrità fisica e morale mantenimento di relazioni con altri ed un posto fisso e sicuro nella comunità, la sfera del margine della valutazione è dipesa dal contesto della causa, col particolare significato che allega alla misura dell'intrusione nella sfera personale del richiedente (vedere Connors c. il Regno Unito, n. 66746/01, § 82 27 maggio 2004; McCann c. il Regno Unito, n. 19009/04, § 49 ECHR 2008; e Zehentner c. l'Austria, n. 20082/02, § 57 16 luglio 2009).
(il c) Ogni qualvolta la discrezione capace di interferire col godimento di un diritto di Convenzione come quell'in problema nella causa presente è conferito su autorità nazionali, le salvaguardie procedurali disponibile all'individuo sarà materiale nel determinare specialmente se lo Stato rispondente ha, quando fissando la struttura regolatore, rimasto all'interno del suo margine della valutazione. Effettivamente è stabilito giurisprudenzache, mentre Articolo 8 non contiene requisiti procedurali ed espliciti, l'elaborazione decisionale che conduce a misure di interferenza deve essere equa e come riconoscere riguardo dovuto agli interessi salvaguardò all'individuo con Articolo 8 (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Buckley c. il Regno Unito, 25 settembre 1996, § 76 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996 IV; Chapman, citato sopra, § 92; Connors, citato sopra, § 83; e Zehentner, citato sopra, § 58).
(d) È anche appropriato per valutare la proporzionalità dell'interferenza, esaminare le possibilità di alloggio alternativo che esiste (vedere Winterstein ed Altri c. la Francia, n. 27013/07, § 159 17 ottobre 2013).
117. È così all'interno delle linee disegnate che la Corte considererà i fatti della causa presente.
?. La richiesta dei principi sopra nella causa presente
118. In cause che sorgono dalle richieste individuali il compito della Corte è non fare una rassegna la legislazione attinente o praticare nell'astratto; deve come lontano come il possibile confine stesso, senza trascurare il contesto generale, ad esaminando i problemi sollevati con la causa di fronte a sé (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Guincho c. il Portogallo, 10 luglio 1984, § 39 la Serie Un n. 81; Pisano c. l'Italia (colpendo) [GC], n. 36732/97, § 48 24 ottobre 2002; Van Anraat c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 65389/09, § 75 6 luglio 2010; e S.H. ed Altri c. l'Austria [GC], n. 57813/00, § 92 ECHR 2011). Di conseguenza, il compito della Corte deve sostituire sé per le autorità nazionali e competenti nel determinare la politica più appropriata per accesso che regola ad alloggio.
119. È anche importante per enfatizzare il ruolo fondamentalmente sussidiario del meccanismo di Convenzione. Le autorità nazionali hanno legittimazione democratica e diretta e è, siccome la Corte ha sostenuto su molte occasioni, in principio meglio messo che una corte internazionale per valutare necessità locali e le condizioni. Nelle questioni di politica generale sulle quali opinioni all'interno di una società democratica possono differire ragionevolmente estesamente, il ruolo del politica-creatore nazionale dovrebbe essere dato peso speciale (vedere, per esempio, Maurizio c. la Francia [GC], n. 11810/03, § 117, ECHR 2005IX?, e S.A.S. c. la Francia [GC], n. 43835/11, § 129 ECHR 2014 (gli estratti)).
120. Il margine dello Stato in principio prolunga sia alla sua decisione per intervenire nell'area soggetta e, essendo intervenuto una volta, agli articoli particolareggiati posa in giù per realizzare un equilibrio fra il pubblico che compete ed interessi privati. Comunque, questo non vuole dire che le soluzioni giunsero alla legislatura è oltre lo scrutinio della Corte. Incorre alla Corte per esaminare attentamente gli argomenti presi nell'esame durante l'elaborazione legislativa e conducendo alle scelte che sono state rese con la legislatura e determinare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra gli interessi che competono dello Stato e quelli colpiti direttamente con quelle scelte legislative (vedere, mutatis mutandis, S.H. ed Altri c. l'Austria, citato sopra, § 97, e Parrillo c. l'Italia [GC], n. 46470/11, § 170 27 agosto 2015).
121. Come al legislativo e politica di fondo della causa, la Corte prima osserva, che le autorità nazionali si trovarono chiamato su rivolgere aumentando problemi sociali nelle particolari aree interno-urbane di Rotterdam che è il risultato di impoverimento causò con disoccupazione ed una tendenza per l'attività economica lucrativa per essere trasferito altrove. Loro cercarono di invertire questi trend con favouring residenti nuovi di cui reddito fu riferito all'attività economica lucrativa loro proprio, passato o presente (vedere divide in paragrafi 21 e 23 sopra). È per questo fine che i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto stato chiamato in esistenza.
122. Il Ministro competente è richiesto con sezione 17 di che Atto per riportare a Parlamento ogni cinque anni sull'efficacia dell'Atto ed i suoi effetti in pratica, siccome era infatti fatto 18 luglio 2012 (vedere paragrafo 62 sopra).
123. Considerato che le misure adottarono avere portato il successo, le autorità nazionali li hanno prolungati da allora, mentre davvero collegandoli più tardi ad un programme del venti-anno che comporta investimento pubblico e considerevole (vedere divide in paragrafi 63-64 sopra).
124. La restrizione in resti di problema soggetto a temporale così come limitazione geografica, la designazione di particolari aree che sono valido per non più di quattro anni ad un tempo (vedere sezione 5(2) dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto; paragrafo 18 sopra).
125. Allo stesso tempo, il diritto di individui incapace trovare alloggio appropriato è stato riconosciuto con clausole di salvaguardia custodite nei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto stesso: in primo luogo, sezione 5(1) che costringe il Consiglio Locale a soddisfare il Ministro che alloggio sufficiente rimanga localmente disponibile per quelli che non qualificano per una licenza di alloggio; in secondo luogo, sezione 7(2) che prevede che la designazione di un'area sotto che Atto sarà revocato se alloggio alternativo ed insufficiente è localmente disponibile per quelli colpiti; ed in terzo luogo, la clausola di fatica individuale prescritta con sezione 8(2) (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra).
126. È nella natura di cose che l'elaborazione legislativa comporta critica di proposte legislative. Il richiedente attrasse l'attenzione della Corte alla critica con la Commissione di Uguaglianza di trattamento di una più prima versione della Rotterdam Alloggio Ciao-legge (quale, la Corte osserva, non è in problema nella causa presente) e col Consiglio di Stato della prima versione della proposta legislativa del Governo. Perusal della storia legislativa dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) show di Atto che le eccezioni sollevate furono rivolti col Governo, e che Parlamento stesso concernè per limitare qualsiasi effetti dannosi. Infatti, le clausole di salvaguardia allusero a nel paragrafo precedente debba molto per dirigere intervento Parlamentare.
127. In queste circostanze, la Corte non può trovare, che le decisioni di politica prese con le autorità nazionali sono manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole. Certamente le differenze fra i numeri di licenze di alloggio accordati e rifiutò (vedere divide in paragrafi 47 e 53 sopra) che nell'osservazione del richiedente mostrò sulla misura in problema come inefficace, non poteva di sé giustifici tale sentenza, se solamente perché la sua interpretazione di questi sembrerebbe ignorare il ruolo dei corpi di alloggio sociali nell'allocazione di alloggio (vedere divide in paragrafi 48 e 52 sopra) ed il numero delle richieste per una licenza di alloggio che non è stata intrapresa alla loro conclusione (vedere paragrafo 53 sopra).
128. La disponibilità di soluzioni alternative non rende in se stesso la misura in problema ingiustificato; costituisce un fattore, fra altri che sono attinenti per determinare se l'eletto di mezzi può essere riguardato come ragionevole e può essere andato bene a realizzando l'essere di scopo legittimo perseguito. Purché l'interferenza rimase all'interno di questi confini-quale la Corte, in prospettiva delle sue considerazioni sopra è soddisfatta faceva-non è per la Corte per dire se la misura si lamentò di rappresentò la migliore soluzione per trattare col problema o se la discrezione dello Stato sarebbe dovuta essere esercitata in un altro modo (vedere, mutatis mutandis, James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 51 la Serie Un n. 98; Mellacher ed Altri c. l'Austria, 19 dicembre 1989, § 53 la Serie Un n. 169; Blei ?c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 67 ECHR 2006 III; e Difensori Animali, citato sopra, § 110).
129. Avendo concluso così che la Parte rispondente era, in principio, concedè adottare la legislazione e politica qui in problema, la Corte ora si rivolge alla loro richiesta nella causa disponibile.
130. Il richiedente si trasferì a Rotterdam in maggio 2005; lei non aveva completato perciò il residenza di ' di sei anni nel Rotterdam Area Metropolitana col tempo delle decisioni si lamentò di. Il suo reddito consistè esclusivamente di benefici di benessere sociale. Lei non riuscì a soddisfare il Borgomastro ed Assessori di Rotterdam ed i tribunali amministrativi che la sua situazione personale era come per provocare la richiesta della clausola di fatica. Il rifiuto di una licenza di alloggio che le avrebbe concesso muoversi all'abitazione in Strada di B. era perciò conforme con la legge applicabile e politica.
131. La ragione determinata del richiedente per cercare di muoversi all'abitazione in Strada di B. l'offrì con suo padrone di casa era che sé fu andato bene meglio alle sue necessità di alloggio che la sua abitazione in Strada di A.: era più spazioso, aveva un giardino ed apparentemente era in un migliore stato di ripari. Il richiedente era a nessun tempo ostacolato dal prendere su residenza in aree di Rotterdam non coperto con la legislazione qui in problema. Lei non ha affermato ragione comunque, convincente o altrimenti, per desiderare vivere in Tarwewijk piuttosto che nelle altre aree della città di Rotterdam o il Rotterdam Area Metropolitana dove è probabile che alloggio appropriato sarebbe stato disponibile.
132. È significativo che il richiedente ha qualificato per una licenza di alloggio sotto la legislazione qui sotto discussione fin da maggio 2011, avendo completato il ' di sei anni residenza ininterrotta nella Regione Metropolitana di Rotterdam (vedere divide in paragrafi 68 e 69 sopra). Nondimeno, lei è rimasta nella sua abitazione presente in Vlaardingen.
133. La Corte non ha nessuna ragione di dubitare che il richiedente era di buon comportamento e non costituì minaccia ad ordine pubblico; davvero il Governo non contraddice il richiedente su questo punto. Comunque, quel non può bastare vincere l'interesse pubblico che è notificato con la richiesta coerente di politica pubblica e legittima da solo.
134. Nelle circostanze, perciò la Corte non può trovare che il Borgomastro ed Assessori erano sotto un obbligo per accomodare le preferenze del richiedente.
135. Infine, la Corte nota che il richiedente non adduce qualsiasi mancanza delle salvaguardie adeguate nell'elaborazione decisionale nella sua causa.
136. Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara, all’unanimità, la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene, per cinque voti a due, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 23 febbraio 2016, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stefano Phillips Luis López Guerra
Cancelliere Presidente

In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudici López Guerra e Keller è annessa a questa sentenza.
L.L.G.
J.S.P.


OPINIONE CONGIUNTA DISSIDENTE DEI GIUDICI
LÓPEZ GUERRA E KELLER
1. Al nostro rammarico, noi non possiamo concordare con la maggioranza sta trovando che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione nella causa presente che è una di richieste molto poche che sollevano problemi fondamentali riguardo al diritto di cittadini per scegliere la loro residenza per essere venuto liberamente prima la Corte a datare. Noi consideriamo che la questione di che paragrafo di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4-paragrafo 3 o divide in paragrafi 4-fa domanda alla causa presente merita una risposta più elaborata che quello dato con la maggioranza (io.). Inoltre, la causa solleva una problema fondamentale, vale a dire che di che livello di scrutinio la Corte dovrebbe fare domanda nell'esaminare liberamente una restrizione individuale sul diritto di scelta la residenza di uno (II.). Su ambo i conti, noi non siamo capaci di seguire la maggioranza sta ragionando e perciò conclude che il diritto del richiedente sotto Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 sono stati violati (III.).
2. I fatti della causa presente stanno prevedendo particolarmente. Il richiedente-un cittadino di Paesi Bassi che è una ragazza madre con due figli minori-visse da 2005 in un appartamento di uno-stanza in Tarwewijk, un designò “il hotspot” area secondo i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto. Lei non ha casellario giudiziale, non è conosciuto per qualsiasi genere di comportamento dirompente e mai non causò qualsiasi problemi di alloggio. Comunque, lei dipende povera e vivente dall'assistenza pubblica di benessere sociale. Lei appartiene al socioeconomicamente bisognosa-un “il difetto” in e di sé che, secondo sezione 8 dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto, è visto come sufficiente restringere liberamente il suo diritto per scegliere la sua residenza come lungo come lei non sta vivendo ancora nel Rotterdam Regione Metropolitana per sei anni.
3. Va senza dire che il fatto che il richiedente visse in una sola stanza coi suoi due figli era una causa dell'angoscia con conseguenze tangibili per sia il richiedente ed i suoi figli; per questa ragione, lei cercò di muoversi ad un appartamento di tre-stanza più appropriato con un giardino in Tarwewijk. La sua richiesta per una licenza di alloggio, comunque fu rifiutata a marzo 2007 per le ragioni menzionate sopra di. Una restrizione della libertà del richiedente per scegliere la sua residenza fu considerata così necessaria con lo Stato perché il richiedente, o più specificamente la povertà del richiedente, costituì una minaccia per ordinare pubblico o ad un altro “interesse pubblico in una società democratica” all'interno del significato di paragrafi 3 e 4 rispettivamente di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4.
4. Prima che noi seguiamo ad esaminare se la misura in questione nella causa disponibile era necessario in una società democratica, gradiremmo rivolgere la distinzione fra paragrafi 3 e 4 di Articolo 2 di Protocollo prima N.ro 4, prendendo in considerazione sia il travaux préparatoires in riguardo di che Articolo e l'interpretazione del suo suora Article nell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici delle Nazioni Unito (l'Articolo 12 ICCPR-vedere paragrafo 71 della sentenza).
IO. La distinzione fra paragrafi 3 e 4 di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4
5. In paragrafo 106 della sentenza, la Corte dibatte, che il quarto paragrafo di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 sono applicabili alla causa disponibile. Questo argomento è premesso sul fatto che la restrizione in sezione 8 dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto non designa come bersaglio individui, ma è della richiesta generale “in aree distinte.” Perciò, la maggioranza considera che i fatti della causa presente saranno analizzati sotto il “interesse pubblico” criterio custodì in paragrafo 4 di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4. L'applicabilità di o divide in paragrafi 3 o 4 è, comunque, non provocò con tale distinzione. Le restrizioni in paragrafo 4 preoccupazione le particolari aree dove “è probabile che sia necessario, per ragioni legittime, e solamente nell'interesse pubblico in una società democratica, imporre restrizioni che è probabile che non sia sempre possibile portare all'interno del concetto dell'ordine di ‘' pubblico” (vedere la Relazione Esplicativa su Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4, § 18).
6. L'inclusione di paragrafo 4 in Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 occorsero perché il Consiglio di Comitato di Europa di Esperti su Diritti umani rifiutò di includere una clausola nella disposizione che permette restrizioni per motivi di welfare economico fuori di preoccupazione che tale clausola concederebbe l'abuso con gli Stati (l'ibid., § 15 (un) e 18). Membri del Comitato lo considerarono un passo retrogrado per permettere restrizioni basate puramente su motivi economici (l'ibid., § 15 (f)) che vuole dire che una restrizione sul diritto di scelta la residenza di uno basata solamente sul reddito non può essere giustificata in qualsiasi causa sotto questa disposizione (il contrasto l'enunciazione di paragrafo 2 di Articolo 8 della Convenzione, dove il “benessere economico del paese” è menzionato esplicitamente; vedere anche paragrafo 22 sotto).
7. Per capire il significato di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4, uno deve prendere anche in considerazione che i cambi hanno reso durante l'elaborazione che redige col Comitato di Esperti. La disposizione fu redatta con l'intenzione di usare “parole nel loro possibile senso più ampio quando posando in giù regolamentazioni equivalente a principi generali e larghi di legge”, come la libertà per scegliere la residenza di uno (l'ibid., § 9). Questo vuole dire che per ostacolare l'abuso con gli Stati le libertà garantirono in paragrafo 1 di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 dovrebbero avere il possibile significato più ampio e dovrebbero essere solamente raramente la materia di restrizioni.
8. Divida in paragrafi 4 di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 sono così solamente applicabili se una restrizione concerne le particolari aree. Comunque, poiché interferenze dovrebbero essere fatte domanda restrittivamente, è discutibile se questo criterio è sufficiente da solo. Uno potrebbe dibattere, sulla base dell'Articolo sta redigendo storia ed il fatto che cittadini di Parti di Stati hanno un diritto assoluto e de facto di residenza nel territorio del loro Stato sotto Articolo 12 ICCPR, che una restrizione sotto paragrafo 4 è solamente possibile nelle particolari aree durante situazioni emergenza, con analogia con restrizioni alla libertà di movimento (vedere Landvreugd c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 37331/97, § 71, 4 giugno 2002, ed Olivieira c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 33129/96, § 56 ECHR 2002 IV).
9. Noi abbiamo dubbi come all'applicabilità di paragrafo 4 alla causa per queste ragioni, disponibile e considera il ragionamento della Corte giustificato insufficientemente in questo riguardo a. La distinzione è un attinente determinato che paragrafo 4 copre restrizioni, nelle certe aree mirate al “interesse pubblico in una società democratica”, mentre paragrafo 3 lascia spazio solamente a restrizioni per il mantenimento di ordine pubblico. La nozione seconda è narrower che il precedente. Comunque, anche se uno dovrebbe venire alla conclusione che paragrafo 4 è applicabile, è necessario per rispondere ad una seconda questione riguardo alla prova per essere fatto domanda con la Corte.
II. La prova di necessità
10. La questione centrale sollevata con le preoccupazioni di causa presenti la proporzionalità dell'interferenza coi diritti del richiedente sotto Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4, quel è, la giustificazione di questa misura con l'interesse pubblico in una società democratica. La restrizione della libertà del richiedente per scegliere la sua residenza nella causa scioperi disponibili al molto cuore di Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4. Questo fatto vuole dire da solo che scrutinio severo della Corte è richiesto.
11. Nondimeno, in paragrafo 113 della sentenza, il costatazione di maggioranza che il più convincente la giustificazione generale per una misura è, la meno importanza la Corte allegherà ad impatto suo in una particolare causa, mentre accordando così lo Stato un margine più ampio della valutazione. Noi non siamo d'accordo rispettosamente con questo ragionamento. Perché una restrizione dovrebbe essere più “allineato” o “necessario” solamente perché la misura restrittiva è di una natura generale? Nella nostra opinione, la questione decisiva dovrebbe essere piuttosto, se la richiesta individuale della restrizione-sia basò su un generale o una misura individuale-conflitti col centro dei diritti garantito con la Convenzione. È importante per tenere presente che anche dove Stati godono un margine ampio della valutazione, “la definitivo valutazione di se l'interferenza è resti necessari soggetto a revisione con la Corte per la conformità coi requisiti della Convenzione” (vedere Winterstein ed Altri c. la Francia, n. 27013/07, §§ 147-148 17 ottobre 2013) e che Stati devono essere in grado fissare in avanti “ragioni attinenti e sufficienti” giustificando la restrizione (vedere S. e Marper c. il Regno Unito [GC], N. 30562/04 e 30566/04, §§ 101-102 ECHR 2008).
12. La maggioranza segue ad affermare in paragrafi 114–117 della sentenza che i principi hanno sviluppato nella giurisprudenzapertinente sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile al diritto di scelta la residenza di uno. Il richiedente non sollevò mai comunque, un problema riguardo ad alloggio o benessere sociale. Questo fatto lo rende dogmaticamente improprio fare domanda la giurisprudenzasummenzionata alla causa disponibile con modo di analogia.
13. Sulla base della giurisprudenzacitata, la maggioranza riconosce la legislatura nazionale un margine ampio della valutazione nell'implementando politiche sociali ed economiche e determinare che in che è il “pubblico” o “generale” interessi (vedere divide in paragrafi 116, 118 e 120 della sentenza). Comunque, la sfera dello Stato di azione per adottare decisioni di politica ed implementarli non è in pericolo qui; né è la varia politica misura sotto i Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) Atto che è interrogato in generale. Piuttosto, la Corte è chiamata su per chiarificare se la misura individuale riguardo al richiedente era in conformità ad Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4.
14. Per determinare se una misura era necessaria in una società democratica, è importante per tenere presente quando tale restrizione è necessaria, proporzionata e non discriminatorio. Noi siamo dell'opinione che, poiché la misura ha collegato a fonte di reddito e ha connesso così implicitamente all'origine sociale e genere delle persone riguardati, la prova applicabile è la prova di necessità prevista per sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Se la Corte desidera prendere in prestito dell'inspirazione da giurisprudenzaesistente per decidere la causa presente, i principi applicabili riguardo alla discriminazione sarebbero dovuti essere considerati attinenti. Come affermato in Vrountou c. la Cipro (n. 33631/06, § 75 13 ottobre 2015), “avanzamento dell'uguaglianza di genere è oggi una meta notevole nel membro Stati del Consiglio di Europa e ragioni molto pesanti dovrebbe essere fissato spedisce di fronte a tale differenza in trattamento potrebbe essere riguardato come compatibile con la Convenzione.” In generale, si può dibattere anche che i poveri sono un gruppo vulnerabile in e di loro, e che restrizioni fecero domanda a questo gruppo deve assicurare un “relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso” (vedere I.B. c. Grecia, § 78 n. 552/10, ECHR 2014); il margine dello Stato della valutazione deve essere di conseguenza anche narrower in questo contesto (Kiyutin c. la Russia, n. 2700/10, § 63 ECHR 2011).
15. Noi concludiamo perciò che “il principio della proporzionalità non richiede soltanto la misura scelta di essere appropriato in principio per conseguimento dello scopo chiesta. Si deve mostrare anche che era necessario per realizzare che scopo, escludere le certe categorie di persone... dalla sfera di applicazione delle disposizioni in problema” (vedere Vallianatos ed Altri c. la Grecia, N. 29381/09 e 32684/09, § 85 ECHR 2013).
III. La richiesta alla causa disponibile
16. La questione sola sollevata nella causa disponibile è se il rifiuto di un permesso di soggiorno basò per motivi che il richiedente non aveva vissuto in Tarwewijk per un minimo di sei anni ed era dipeso da benessere sociale era necessario in una società democratica.
17. Facendo la libertà per scegliere la residenza di uno dipendente su quanti anni uno prima ha vissuto in un'area designata ha un impatto molto aspro sulla persona riguardata. Essendo ostacolato dal muoversi all'interno di un'area familiare perché uno non vive ancora là da sei anni è particolarmente difficile per famiglie. La maggioranza omise anche rivolgere questa questione. Nella nostra prospettiva, residenti che già vivono in un “il hotspot” area non dovrebbe essere costretta perciò per muoversi fuori, specialmente poiché lo scopo perseguì-ostacolando un aumento nel numero di persone povere che hanno bisogno di cura ed appoggio sociale in un “il hotspot” l'area-certamente può essere realizzato con altro vuole dire (vedere paragrafo 23 sotto). In oltre, là sembra non essere giustificazione convincente per il requisito di sei-anno. Specialmente per giovani figli, questa spanna di tempo è molto lunga. È ugualmente discutibile perché tale requisito dovrebbe fare domanda a chiunque che non è un residente nuovo dell'area.
18. Di molta più grande preoccupazione, comunque la restrizione reddito-basata è. Non solo conduce a stigmatizzazione del povero, ma crea indirettamente discriminazione basata su razza e genera, fin dalle persone più seriamente colpite con disoccupazione immigranti e ragazze madri sono. Nella nostra opinione, perciò la misura contestata non qualifica come necessario in una società democratica. I poveri non fanno per se posi una minaccia alla sicurezza pubblica, né è loro sistematicamente la causa di crimine, e lo scopo legittimo dei Problemi Urbani ed Interni (Misure Speciali) l'Atto-il bisogno di invertire il ribasso di aree di interno-città impoverite-può essere realizzato per le altre misure di politica non allacciate a caratteristiche personali.
19. Nella causa disponibile, la restrizione ha avuto anche la conseguenza paradossale di impedire al richiedente di migliorarla le condizioni viventi e personali. L'argomento della maggioranza in paragrafo 131 della sentenza che il richiedente non è riuscito a mettere ragioni dirette altre che suo desideri muoversi ad un appartamento più spazioso è riposto male-il richiedente ha il diritto di scelta la sua residenza, e lei non è obbligata per giustificare questa scelta. Contrari alla maggioranza, noi lo consideriamo comprensibile che il richiedente non si ritrasferì a Tarwewijk dopo essersi trasferito a Vlaardingen (vedere paragrafo 132 della sentenza). Non è conosciuto anche alla Corte se l'appartamento in Tarwewijk ancora sarebbe stato disponibile, e è anche chiaro che muovendosi genera costi e è stressante, specialmente per figli.
20. È ugualmente incomprensibile perché la Corte rifiutò di prendere nell'esame il fatto che il richiedente, la madre di due giovani figli non rappresentò una minaccia ad ordine pubblico (vedere paragrafo 133 della sentenza). Questo è centrale nel determinare la proporzionalità della misura in questione. Noi veniamo così alla conclusione che era sproporzionato per rifiutare il richiedente la sua licenza di alloggio, e che nella sua causa la clausola di fatica sarebbe dovuta essere fatta domanda.
21. Inoltre, il Generale Commento del Comitato dei Diritti umani delle Nazioni Unito N.ro 27 su Articolo 12 dell'ICCPR esplicitamente gli stati che “il Comitato ha criticato disposizioni che costringono individui a fare domanda per permesso per cambiare la loro residenza o chiedere l'approvazione delle autorità locali del posto di destinazione.” Noi consideriamo perciò che una restrizione su scegliere la residenza di uno basata sul reddito non adempie la prova della necessità ed i requisiti della proporzionalità. Questa linea di argomento è sostenuta anche col fatto che il Consiglio di Comitato di Europa di Esperti su Diritti umani rimosse la disposizione espressa per restrizioni che erano necessarie per il welfare economico del paese (vedere paragrafo 7 sopra) che chiaramente distingue Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 da Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione (per le condizioni severe in relazione all'Articolo secondo, vedere Hasanbasic c. la Svizzera, n. 52166/09, § 59 11 giugno 2013).
IV. Conclusione
22. Nella nostra opinione, per le ragioni menzionate sopra di, il diritto di scelta del richiedente che la sua residenza è stata violata nella causa presente.
23. Comunque, la nostra opinione non dovrebbe essere mal interpretata. Noi accettiamo che i problemi che affrontano aree impoverite sono veri e seri. È indiscutibilmente legittimo per sforzarsi di migliorare quelle aree, e è dell'importanza primaria per evitare la ghettizzazione. Comunque, simile politiche non dovrebbero essere collegate a caratteristiche personali. Gli scopi summenzionati possono essere realizzati anche per misure come riduzioni di tassa per piccole società, favouring della pianificazione urbano appartamenti più lussuosi, rinnovamento di alloggio abbandonato eliminando affitti illegali, acquistando alloggio di scarsa qualità, e prevedendo per più insegnanti e cura in scuole.
24. Qualsiasi stereotipando legislazione, specialmente dove comporta stigmatizzazione del povero, è per se problematico. Ugualmente pericoloso è restrizioni basate su simile motivi come casellari giudiziali (vedere paragrafo 67 della sentenza), malattia o razza. La sentenza presente va a vuoto a riconoscere che l'esclusione di gruppi vulnerabile sulla base di caratteristiche personali che individui non possono correggere facilmente è molto problematica, dato il suo effetto di stigmatizzante.





DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.