Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF AMIRKHANYAN v. ARMENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,35,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 22343/08/2015
STATO: Armenia
DATA: 03/12/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions: Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings Article 6-1 - Fair hearing)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)


FIRST SECTION






CASE OF AMIRKHANYAN v. ARMENIA

(Application no. 22343/08)














JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

3 December 2015




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Amirkhanyan v. Armenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, President,
Ledi Bianku,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Paul Mahoney,
Aleš Pejchal,
Robert Spano,
Armen Harutyunyan, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 10 November 2015,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 22343/08) against the Republic of Armenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Armenian national, Mr OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 12 May 2008.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Yerevan. The Armenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr G. Kostanyan, Representative of the Republic of Armenia at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the decision of the Court of Cassation of 12 December 2007 to quash the judgment of the Civil Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007 had infringed the principle of res judicata and his right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions.
4. On 14 June 2010 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1941 and lives in Yerevan.
6. A third person, G., owned a plot of land, a part of which, with her consent, was separated by a fence and used by another person, J.
7. On 21 April 1998 G. concluded an agreement with J., according to which she gave a part of her plot of land, measuring 285 sq. m., to him. It appears that the plot of land actually used by J., as separated by the fence, was 38.75 sq. m. bigger than the 285 sq. m. plot given by G. The 38.75 sq. m. also belonged to G. In this connection, another agreement was reached between G. and J., according to which G. gave her consent for J. to become the owner of the whole plot of land used by him. However, it appears that J.’s ownership rights were officially registered only in respect of the plot of land measuring 285 sq. m.
8. On 28 April 1998 the applicant bought the larger plot of land from J. and, since the fence was still in place, continued to use also the 38.75 sq. m. strip of land.
9. In 2004 G. instituted proceedings against the applicant, seeking to take the 38.75 sq. m. strip of land used by the applicant, claiming her ownership rights.
10. On 14 December 2006 the Erebuni and Nubarashen District Court of Yerevan granted the claim, ordering the applicant to release the strip of land to G.
11. On an unspecified date the applicant lodged an appeal.
12. On 9 March 2007 the Civil Court of Appeal granted the appeal and dismissed G.’s claim. In particular, the Court of Appeal found that since G. had agreed that J. become the owner of the plot of land used by him, as separated by the fence, she had relinquished her rights in respect of the strip of land in favour of J. and, consequently, in favour of the applicant.
13. This judgment was subject to appeal on points of law within six months from the date of its delivery.
14. On 26 March 2007 G. lodged an appeal on points of law against the judgment of 9 March 2007 with the Court of Cassation, claiming that it had been adopted in violation of substantive and procedural law. As a ground for admitting her appeal on points of law, G. submitted, pursuant to Article 231.2 § 1 (3) of the Code of Civil Procedure (the CCP), that the violations of the substantive and procedural law might have grave consequences, such as deprivation of her ownership rights in respect of the plot of land.
15. On 7 April 2007 amendments were introduced to the CCP which stipulated that there was no right to bring an appeal on points of law more than once, unless the Court of Cassation – when returning an appeal – fixed a time-limit to correct and re-submit it (see paragraph 26 below).
16. On 12 April 2007 the Court of Cassation decided to return G.’s appeal as inadmissible for lack of merit. The reasons provided were as follows:
“The Civil Chamber of the Court of Cassation ... having examined the question of admitting [G.’s appeal lodged against the judgment of the Civil Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007], found that it must be returned for the following reasons:
Pursuant to Article 230 § 1 (4.1) of [the CCP] an appeal on points of law must contain any of the grounds [required by] Article 231.2 § 1 of [the CCP].
The Court of Cassation finds that the admissibility grounds raised in the appeal on points of law[, as required by] Article 231.2 § 1 of [the CCP], are absent. In particular, the Court of Cassation considers the arguments raised in the appeal on points of law concerning a possible judicial error and its consequences, in the circumstances of the case, to be unfounded.
...
At the same time, the Court of Cassation does not find it appropriate to fix a time limit for correcting the shortcomings and lodging the appeal anew.”
17. This decision entered into force from the moment of its delivery and was not subject to appeal.
18. On 7 September 2007 G. lodged another appeal on points of law with the Court of Cassation against the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007, alleging violations of substantive and procedural law. As a ground for admitting her appeal G. indicated, in addition to the ground mentioned in her appeal of 26 March 2007, that the judicial act to be adopted by the Court of Cassation on her case might have a significant impact on the uniform application of the law, and that the contested judgment of the Court of Appeal contradicted a judicial act previously adopted by the Court of Cassation.
19. On 1 October 2007 the Court of Cassation decided to admit the appeal for examination. The reasons provided were as follows:
“[The appeal] must be admitted for examination since it satisfies the requirements of Articles 230 and 231.2 § 1 of [the CCP].”
20. On 8 October 2007 the applicant lodged a reply to G.’s appeal with the Court of Cassation where, inter alia, he stated that the admission of G.’s second appeal by the Court of Cassation was in violation of the principle of res judicata and his property rights. When the Court of Cassation, by its decision of 12 April 2007, had returned G.’s appeal without fixing a time limit to correct any shortcomings and to re-submit the appeal, the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007 became final and binding.
21. On 12 December 2007 the Court of Cassation examined G.’s appeal on the merits and decided to grant it partially by quashing the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007 in its part related to G.’s property claim in respect of the plot of land and remitting the case for a fresh examination. The Court of Cassation found that the Civil Court of Appeal, when reaching its conclusions, had failed to take into account an expert opinion which was among the materials of the case file, as well as to indicate the provisions of the domestic law on which its judgment had been based.
22. On 1 April 2008 the General Jurisdiction Court of Erebuni and Nubarashen Districts of Yerevan conducted a fresh examination of G.’s claim and granted it by recognising G.’s ownership rights in respect of the strip of land in question.
23. On an unspecified date the applicant lodged an appeal.
24. On 10 July 2008 the Civil Court of Appeal dismissed the applicant’s appeal and upheld the judgment of the District Court.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Code of Civil Procedure
25. The relevant provisions of the CCP, as in force prior to the amendments of 7 April 2007, read as follows:
Article 1: Civil procedure legislation
“3. Proceedings in civil cases are conducted in accordance with laws in force during the examination of the case.”
Article 219: Entry into force of judgments of the Court of Appeal
“Judgments of the Court of Appeal enter into force from the moment of their delivery.”
Article 222: Review of judicial acts through cassation proceedings
“1. Judgments of ... the Court of Appeal which have entered into force ... can be reviewed through cassation proceedings ... .”
Article 224: The court that examines appeals on points of law
and the objective of its activity
“1. Appeals on points of law lodged against judgments of ... the Court of Appeal which have entered into force ... are examined by the Civil Chamber of the Court of Cassation (hereafter, Court of Cassation).
2. The objective of the Court of Cassation’s activity is to ensure the uniform application of the law and its correct interpretation of the law and to facilitate the development of the law.”
Article 225: Grounds for lodging an appeal on points of law
“An appeal on points of law can be lodged on the ground of ... a substantive or a procedural violation of the parties’ rights ...”
Article 228.1: Time-limits for lodging an appeal on points of law
“1. An appeal on points of law can be lodged within six months from the date of entry into force of the judgment of the lower court deciding on the merits of the case.”
Article 230: The content of an appeal on points of law
“1. An appeal on points of law must contain ... (4) the appellant’s claim, with reference to the laws and other legal acts and specifying which provisions of substantive or procedural law have been violated or wrongly applied ...; (4.1) arguments required by any of the subparagraphs of the first paragraph of Article 231.2 of this Code ... .”
Article 231.1: Returning an appeal on points of law
“1. An appeal on points of law shall be returned if it does not comply with the requirements of Article 230 and the first paragraph of Article 231.2 of this Code ...
2. The Court of Cassation shall adopt a decision to return an appeal on points of law within ten days after the receipt of the appeal.
3. In its decision to return an appeal on points of law the Court of Cassation may fix a time-limit for correcting the shortcoming and lodging the appeal anew.”
Article 231.2: Admitting an appeal on points of law
“1. The Court of Cassation shall admit an appeal on points of law, if (1) the judicial act to be adopted on the given case by the Court of Cassation may have a significant impact on the uniform application of the law, or (2) the contested judicial act contradicts a judicial act previously adopted by the Court of Cassation, or (3) a violation of the procedural or the substantive law by the lower court may cause grave consequences, or (4) there are newly discovered circumstances.”
Article 236: The powers of the Court of Cassation
“1. Having examined a case, the Court of Cassation has the right: (1) to uphold the court judgment and to dismiss the appeal...; (2) to quash the whole or part of the judgment and to remit the case for a new examination...”
Article 239: Entry into force of a decision of the Court of Cassation
“A decision of the Court of Cassation enters into force from the moment of its delivery and is not subject to appeal.”
26. The provisions of the CCP, which were modified by the amendments of 7 April 2007 (in italics), read as follows:
Article 228.1: Time-limits for lodging an appeal on points of law
“1. An appeal on points of law can be lodged within six months from the date of entry into force of the judgment of the lower court deciding on the merits of the case. The same person may lodge an appeal on points of law only once, except cases envisaged by the third paragraph of Article 231.1.”
Article 231.1: Returning an appeal on points of law
“1. An appeal on points of law shall be returned if it does not comply with the requirements of Article 230 and paragraph 1 of Article 231.2 of this Code ... or there are grounds envisaged by the fourth paragraph of this Article.
2. The Court of Cassation shall adopt a decision to return an appeal on points of law within ten days after the receipt of the appeal.
3. In its decision to return an appeal on points of law the Court of Cassation may fix a time-limit for correcting the shortcoming and lodging the appeal anew.
4. If a decision is taken to return the appeal without fixing a time-limit, the appellant may not bring another appeal.”
The amendments in question did not contain transitional provisions.
B. The Constitution
27. Article 42 provides, inter alia, that laws and other legal acts worsening a person’s legal situation shall not have a retroactive force.
C. The Law on Legal Acts
28. Article 78 provides that legal acts restricting the rights and freedoms of legal entities or physical persons, as well as worsening their legal situation in some other way, may not have a retroactive force.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
29. The applicant complained that the decision to quash the judgment of 9 March 2007 had been taken in violation of the principle of res judicata. He relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
A. Admissibility
30. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
31. The Government submitted that there had been no violation of the principle of finality of judgments. They alleged that, by virtue of Article 228.1 of the CCP prior to its amendments of 7 April 2007, an unlimited number of appeals could be lodged with the Court of Cassation within the prescribed six months as long as they were based on different grounds. The parties obtained a right to lodge an appeal on points of law on 9 March 2007, when the Court of Appeal adopted its judgment and prior to the above-mentioned amendments. Therefore, the Court of Cassation had to apply the law which was in force at that time. Moreover, the amendments of 7 April 2007 could not be applied to the present case, since Article 42 of the Constitution and Article 78 of the Law on Legal Acts prohibited the retroactive application of laws worsening a person’s legal situation. There was a difference in grounds and scope between the first and second appeals submitted to the Court of Cassation since G. relied on different domestic legal provisions.
32. The applicant submitted that, by admitting G.’s second appeal on points of law and then quashing the final and binding judgment of the Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007, the Court of Cassation had violated the principle of res judicata. With effect from 7 April 2007, Articles 228.1 § 1 and 231.1 § 4 of the CCP explicitly prohibited appeals on points of law to be lodged more than once in the same case if no time-limit was fixed by the Court of Cassation to correct possible shortcomings. The Court of Cassation returned G.’s first appeal on points of law on 12 April 2007, when these amendments were already in force, and stated explicitly in its decision that it did not find it appropriate to fix a time-limit for correcting the shortcomings and lodging the appeal anew. From that moment the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007 became final and binding and G. had no right to lodge another appeal on points of law nor the Court of Cassation to admit such an appeal, regardless of its content. In any event, the two appeals lodged by G. were basically the same. The fact that she relied on other domestic provisions in her new appeal did not mean that the very essence of her arguments was different. Both appeals made reference to the same expert opinion. Lastly, as regards the alleged prohibition of retroactive application of the law, Article 1 § 3 of the CCP stipulated a general rule of civil procedure, pursuant to which civil cases were to be examined in accordance with laws in force at the material time.
2. The Court’s assessment
33. The Court reiterates that the right to a fair hearing before a tribunal as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which declares, among other things, the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States. One of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law is the principle of legal certainty, which requires, inter alia, that where the courts have finally determined an issue, their ruling should not be called into question (see Brum?rescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999 VII). Legal certainty presupposes respect for the principle of res judicata, that is the principle of the finality of judgments. This principle underlines that no party is entitled to seek a review of a final and binding judgment merely for the purpose of obtaining a rehearing and a fresh determination of the case. Higher courts’ power of review should be exercised to correct judicial errors and miscarriages of justice, but not to carry out a fresh examination. The review should not be treated as an appeal in disguise, and the mere possibility of there being two views on the subject is not a ground for re examination. A departure from that principle is justified only when made necessary by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character (see Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003-IX).
34. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that on 9 March 2007 the Civil Court of Appeal ruled in favour of the applicant in a property dispute. Appeal lay against this judgment to the Court of Cassation, which is the final instance, within six months by virtue of Article 228.1 § 1 of the CCP. On 26 March 2007 the applicant’s opponent lodged an appeal on points of law. In the meantime, on 7 April 2007 amendments were introduced in the CCP which explicitly prohibited lodging appeals on points of law more than once unless, when returning an appeal, the Court of Cassation fixed a time-limit for its correction and re submission. On 12 April 2007 the Court of Cassation decided to return the appeal of 26 March 2007, specifying in its decision that it did not find it appropriate to fix such a time-limit. In spite of this, the applicant’s opponent lodged another appeal on points of law on 7 September 2007, which the Court of Cassation decided to admit for examination on 1 October 2007, subsequently quashing the judgment of 9 March 2007.
35. The Government alleged that, even if at the time when the first appeal was returned the law prohibited lodging appeals on points of law more than once, in deciding to admit the second appeal the Court of Cassation was guided by the law prior to the amendments of 7 April 2007. They alleged that, before those amendments were introduced, an unlimited number of appeals on points of law could be lodged with the Court of Cassation within the prescribed six months. The Court of Cassation was guided by those rules since they were in force at the time when the Court of Appeal adopted its judgment, whereas the amendments of 7 April 2007 worsened the applicant’s opponent’s situation and were therefore not applied as was required by law. The Court, however, is not convinced by these allegations for the following reasons.
36. The Court notes firstly that, prior to 7 April 2007, there was no explicit provision in the Armenian civil procedure law allowing a party to civil proceedings to lodge an appeal on points of law twice, let alone an unlimited number of times. None of the provisions of the CCP stipulated such a right. To the contrary, Article 239 of the CCP provided that the decisions of the Court of Cassation were final and not subject to appeal. Furthermore, the Government have not demonstrated that such a right derived from any well-established practice either. The procedure of returning appeals for their failure to comply with admissibility requirements was introduced in November 2005 (see Borisenko and Yerevanyan Bazalt Ltd v. Armenia (dec.), no. 18297/08, 14 April 2009), but there is no material before the Court to indicate that the new rules were authoritatively interpreted by the Court of Cassation in such a way as to allow parties to lodge appeals repeatedly until the expiry of the time-limit for appeal. The Government have also failed to submit any examples of domestic decisions dating from that period to show that what happened in the present case was part of normal practice rather than the result of some sort of omission.
37. Secondly, the Court notes that on 7 April 2007 there were amendments introduced in the civil procedure law which explicitly prohibited the lodging of more than one appeal on points of law, which suggests that there was lack of clarity in the rules prior to those amendments regarding the right of bringing an appeal on points of law.
38. It is true that at the material time there was one exception to the general rule stipulated by Article 231.1 § 3 of the CCP, allowing a party to the proceedings to re-lodge an appeal if the Court of Cassation considered that it contained shortcomings which could be corrected, in which case it fixed a time-limit for doing so and re-submitting the appeal. However, this exception did not apply to the present case, since the Court of Cassation explicitly stated in its decision of 12 April 2007 that it did not consider it appropriate to fix such a time-limit (see paragraph 16 above).
39. In the light of the above, the Court concludes that the judgment of the Civil Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007 could no longer be appealed against and became final and binding after the Court of Cassation decided on 12 April 2007 to return the appeal on points of law lodged by the applicant’s opponent on 26 March 2007. Thus, by admitting another appeal lodged by the same party and subsequently granting it the Court of Cassation overturned a final judgment. The Court accepts that in certain circumstances legal certainty can be disturbed in order to correct a “fundamental defect” or a “miscarriage of justice” (see, among other authorities, Ryabykh, cited above, § 52; Ro?ca v. Moldova, no. 6267/02, § 52, 22 March 2005; and Sutyazhnik v. Russia, no. 8269/02, § 35, 23 July 2009). However, the Government did not suggest that this had happened in the present case. Nor does it follow from the materials of the case that this was the aim pursued. To the contrary, it appears that the Court of Cassation simply rendered a fresh decision in the case, moreover without having any legal basis for doing so. Thereby it breached the principle of res judicata enshrined in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
40. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
41. The applicant complained that the decision to quash the judgment of 9 March 2007 had infringed his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions as provided in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
42. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
43. The Government, relying on their submissions under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, argued that there had been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They further claimed as to the merits of the applicant’s property dispute that he had no “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
44. The applicant submitted that the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was not connected to the merits of his property dispute but to the fact that a final judgment, which had determined that the plot of land belonged to him, had been unlawfully quashed. As a result, he was deprived of his property.
2. The Court’s assessment
45. The Court reiterates that “possessions” can be “existing possessions” or assets, including, in certain well-defined situations, claims. A final court judgment which recognises one’s title to property may be regarded as a “possession” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Brum?rescu, cited above, § 70, and Vrioni and Others v. Albania, no. 2141/03, § 71, 24 March 2009). Furthermore, quashing such a judgment after it has become final and no longer subject to appeal will constitute an interference with the judgment beneficiary’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of that possession (see Brum?rescu, cited above, § 74, and Ryabykh, cited above, § 61).
46. In the present case, the Court notes that when dismissing the applicant’s opponent’s claim, the Civil Court of Appeal found that she had relinquished her ownership rights to the strip of land in favour of the applicant, thereby confirming the applicant’s ownership in respect of that strip of land. That judgment became final on 12 April 2007 and can be considered as a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Brum?rescu, cited above, § 70). Its subsequent quashing by the Court of Cassation therefore amounted to an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of the applicant’s possessions as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
47. In this regard, the Court points out that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that the States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws” (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999 II). As already indicated above, there was no right under the Armenian civil procedure law to lodge a second appeal on points of law against the same judgment of the lower court. Therefore, by granting the second appeal on points of law and quashing the final judgment of the Civil Court of Appeal of 9 March 2007, the Court of Cassation did not act pursuant to “conditions provided for by law”. It follows that the interference with the applicant’s possessions was not lawful for the purpose of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
48. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
49. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
50. The applicant claimed 10,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non pecuniary damage.
51. The Government contested this claim, arguing that there was no causal link between the alleged violations and the compensation sought.
52. The Court considers that the applicant has suffered non-pecuniary damage as a result of the violations found and awards him EUR 3,000 in respect of such damage.
B. Costs and expenses
53. The applicant did not claim any costs and expenses.
C. Default interest
54. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 3 December 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni: Violazione di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - l'udienza corretta)
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)


PRIMA LA SEZIONE






CAUSA AMIRKHANYAN C. ARMENIA

(Richiesta n. 22343/08)














SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

3 dicembre 2015




Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Amirkhanyan c. l'Armenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Presidente
Ledi Bianku,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Paul Mahoney,
Aleš Pejchal,
Robert Spano,
Armen Harutyunyan, giudici
ed André Wampach, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato 10 novembre 2015,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 22343/08) contro la Repubblica dell'Armenia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) ds un cittadino Armeno, il Sig. OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), in 12 maggio 2008.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato col Sig. OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Yerevan. Il Governo Armeno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. G. Kostanyan, Rappresentante della Repubblica dell'Armenia alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che la decisione della Corte di Cassazione di 12 dicembre 2007 di annullare la sentenza della Corte d'appello Civile di 9 marzo 2007 aveva infranto il principio di res judicata ed il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà.
4. 14 giugno 2010 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1941 e vive in Yerevan.
6. Un terza persona, G. possedeva un'area di terreno, una parte del quale, col suo beneplacito, fu separata con un recinto ed usata da un'altra persona, J.
7. Il 21 aprile 1998 G. un accordo concluse con J. secondo il quale lei dava una parte della sua area di terreno, che misurava 285 metri quadrati., a lui. Sembra che davvero l'area di terreno usata con J., come separato dal recinto, era 38.75 metri quadrati. più grande dei 285 metri quadrati. area data da G. I 38.75 metri quadrati. anche faceva parte a G. Di questo collegamento, un altro accordo fu giunto a G. e J. secondo i quali G. diede il suo beneplacito per J. per divenire il proprietario dell'area intera di terreno usò con lui. Comunque, sembra che J. ' che diritti di proprietà di s sono stati registrati ufficialmente solamente in riguardo dell'area di terreno che misura 285 metri quadrati.
8. 28 aprile 1998 il richiedente comprò la più grande area di terreno da J. e, poiché il recinto era ancora in posto, continuò ad usare anche i 38.75 metri quadrati. si spogli di terreno.
9. Nel 2004 G. avviò procedimenti contro il richiedente, mentre cercando di prendere i 38.75 metri quadrati. si spogli di terreno usata col richiedente, mentre chiedendo i suoi diritti di proprietà.
10. 14 dicembre 2006 l'Erebuni e Corte distrettuale di Nubarashen di Yerevan ammisero il ricorso, mentre ordinando il richiedente rilasciare la striscia di terreno a G.
11. Su una data non specificata il richiedente depositò un ricorso.
12. 9 marzo 2007 la Corte d'appello Civile accordò il ricorso e respinse la rivendicazione di G. In particolare, la Corte d'appello fondò che poiché G. aveva concordato che J. diviene il proprietario dell'area di terreno usato con lui, siccome separato col recinto, lei aveva abbandonato i suoi diritti in riguardo della striscia di terreno in favore di J. e, di conseguenza, in favore del richiedente.
13. Questa sentenza era soggetto a ricorso su questioni di diritto entro sei mesi dalla data della sua consegna.
14. Sul 2007 G. di 26 marzo un ricorso depositò su questioni di diritto contro la sentenza di 9 marzo 2007 con la Corte di Cassazione, chiedendo che era stato adottato in violazione di legge effettiva e procedurale. Come una base per ammettere il suo ricorso su questioni di diritto, G. presentò, facendo seguito ad Articolo 231.2 § 1 (3) del Codice di Procedura Civile (il CCP), che è probabile che le violazioni dell'effettivo e legge procedurale abbiano conseguenze gravi, come privazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà in riguardo dell'area di terreno.
15. Sul 2007 emendamenti di 7 aprile fu introdotto al CCP che convenne che c'era nessuno diritto portare un ricorso su questioni di diritto più che una volta, a meno che la Corte di Cassazione -quando restituendo un ricorso-fisso un tempo-limite per correggere e re-presentarlo (veda paragrafo 26 sotto).
16. 12 aprile 2007 che la Corte di Cassazione ha deciso di restituire G. ' s piacciono come inammissibile per mancanza di merito. Le ragioni previste erano siccome segue:
“La Camera Civile della Corte di Cassazione... avendo esaminato la questione di ammettere [G. ' ricorso di s depositò contro la sentenza della Corte d'appello Civile di 9 marzo 2007], fondò che deve essere ritornato per le ragioni seguenti:
Facendo seguito ad Articolo 230 § 1 (4.1) di [il CCP] un ricorso su questioni di diritto deve contenere qualsiasi dei motivi [richiese con] l'Articolo 231.2 § 1 di [il CCP].
La Corte di costatazione di Cassazione che i motivi di ammissibilità hanno sollevato nel ricorso su questioni di diritto [, come richiesto con] l'Articolo 231.2 § 1 di [il CCP], è assente. In particolare, la Corte di Cassazione considera gli argomenti sollevati nel ricorso su questioni di diritto riguardo ad un possibile errore giudiziale e le sue conseguenze, nelle circostanze della causa essere infondato.
...
Allo stesso tempo, la Corte di Cassazione non lo trova appropriato fissare un termine di decadenza per correggendo i difetti e depositare di nuovo il ricorso.”
17. Questa decisione entrò in vigore dal momento della sua consegna e non era soggetto a ricorso.
18. Sul 2007 G. di 7 settembre un altro ricorso depositò su questioni di diritto con la Corte di Cassazione contro la sentenza della Corte d'appello di 9 marzo 2007, adducendo violazioni di legge effettiva e procedurale. Come una base per ammettere il suo ricorso G. indicò, oltre alla base menzionata nel suo ricorso di 26 marzo 2007 che è probabile che l'atto giudiziale per essere adottato con la Corte di Cassazione sulla sua causa abbia un impatto significativo sulla richiesta di uniforme della legge, e che la sentenza contestata della Corte d'appello prima contraddisse un atto giudiziale adottato con la Corte di Cassazione.
19. 1 ottobre 2007 la Corte di Cassazione decise di ammettere il ricorso per esame. Le ragioni previste erano siccome segue:
“[Il ricorso] deve essere ammesso per esame poiché soddisfa i requisiti di Articoli 230 e 231.2 § 1 di [il CCP].”
20. 8 ottobre 2007 il richiedente depositò una replica a G. che ' s piacciono con la Corte di Cassazione dove, inter alia, lui affermò che l'ammissione di G. ' s appoggiano ricorso con la Corte di Cassazione era in violazione del principio di res judicata ed i suoi diritti di proprietà. Quando la Corte di Cassazione, con la sua decisione di 12 aprile 2007 aveva restituito G. ' s piacciono senza fissare un termine di decadenza per correggere qualsiasi i difetti e la sentenza della Corte d'appello di 9 marzo 2007 divenne definitivo a re-presentare il ricorso, e legando.
21. 12 dicembre 2007 la Corte di Cassazione esaminò G. ' s piacciono sui meriti e decisero di accordarlo parzialmente con annullando la sentenza della Corte d'appello di 9 marzo 2007 nella sua parte riferì a G. ' rivendicazione di proprietà di s in riguardo dell'area di terreno e rinviando la causa per un esame nuovo. La Corte di Cassazione fondò che la Corte d'appello Civile, quando giungendo alle sue conclusioni, non era riuscito a prendere in considerazione un'opinione competente che era fra i materiali della causa registri, così come indicare le disposizioni del diritto nazionale sulle quali la sua sentenza era stata basata.
22. 1 aprile 2008 la Corte della Giurisdizione del Generale di Erebuni e Distretti di Nubarashen di Yerevan condusse un esame nuovo di G. ' s chiedono e l'accordarono con recognising G. ' diritti di proprietà di s in riguardo della striscia di terreno in oggetto.
23. Su una data non specificata il richiedente depositò un ricorso.
24. 10 luglio 2008 la Corte d'appello Civile respinse il ricorso del richiedente e sostenne la sentenza della Corte distrettuale.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Il Codice di Procedura Civile
25. Le disposizioni attinenti del CCP, come in vigore prima degli emendamenti di 7 aprile 2007, legga siccome segue:
Articolo 1: Legislazione di procedura civile
“3. Procedimenti in giudizi civili sono condotti in conformità con leggi in vigore durante l'esame della causa.”
Articolo 219: Entrata in vigore di sentenze della Corte d'appello
“Sentenze della Corte d'appello entrano in vigore dal momento della loro consegna.”
Articolo 222: Faccia una rassegna di atti giudiziali per procedimenti di cassazione
“1. Sentenze di... la Corte d'appello che è entrata in vigore... può essere fatto una rassegna per procedimenti di cassazione... .”
Articolo 224: La corte che esamina ricorsi su questioni di diritto
e l'obiettivo della sua attività
“1. Ricorsi su questioni di diritto depositate contro sentenze di... la Corte d'appello che è entrata in vigore... è esaminato con la Camera Civile della Corte di Cassazione (in futuro, Corte di Cassazione).
2. L'obiettivo della Corte dell'attività della Cassazione è assicurare la richiesta di uniforme della legge e la sua interpretazione corretta della legge e facilitare lo sviluppo della legge.”
Articolo 225: I motivi per depositare un ricorso su questioni di diritto
“Un ricorso su questioni di diritto può essere depositato sulla base di... un effettivo o una violazione procedurale delle parti i diritti di '...”
Articolo 228.1: Time-limiti per depositare un ricorso su questioni di diritto
“1. Un ricorso su questioni di diritto può essere depositato entro sei mesi dalla data di entrata in vigore della sentenza della corte più bassa che decide sui meriti della causa.”
Articolo 230: Il contenuto di un ricorso su questioni di diritto
“1. Un ricorso su questioni di diritto deve contenere... (4) la rivendicazione dell'appellante, con riferimento alle leggi e gli altri atti legali e specificando quale approvvigiona di legge effettiva o procedurale è stato violato o è stato fatto domanda erroneamente...; (4.1) argomenti richiesero con qualsiasi del subparagraphs del primo paragrafo di Articolo 231.2 di questo Codice... .”
Articolo 231.1: Restituendo un ricorso su questioni di diritto
“1. Un ricorso su questioni di diritto si ritornerà se non si attiene coi requisiti di Articolo 230 ed il primo paragrafo di Articolo 231.2 di questo Codice...
2. La Corte di Cassazione adotterà una decisione di restituire un ricorso su questioni di diritto entro dieci giorni dopo la ricevuta del ricorso.
3. Nella sua decisione per restituire un ricorso su questioni di diritto la Corte di Cassazione può fissare un tempo-limite per correggendo il difetto e depositare di nuovo il ricorso.”
Articolo 231.2: Ammettendo un ricorso su questioni di diritto
“1. La Corte di Cassazione ammetterà un ricorso su questioni di diritto, se (1) l'atto giudiziale per essere adottato sulla causa determinata con la Corte di Cassazione può avere un impatto significativo sulla richiesta di uniforme della legge, o (2) l'atto giudiziale e contestato prima contraddice un atto giudiziale adottato con la Corte di Cassazione, o (3) una violazione del procedurale o il diritto sostanziale con la corte più bassa può provocare conseguenze gravi, o (4) là è scoperto di recente circostanze.”
Articolo 236: I poteri della Corte di Cassazione
“1. Avendo esaminato una causa, la Corte di Cassazione ha il diritto: (1) sostenere la sentenza di corte e respingere il ricorso...; (2) annullare l'intero o parte della sentenza e rinviare la causa per un esame nuovo...”
Articolo 239: Entrata in vigore di una decisione della Corte di Cassazione
“Una decisione della Corte di Cassazione entra in vigore dal momento della sua consegna e non è soggetto a ricorso.”
26. Le disposizioni del CCP che fu cambiato con gli emendamenti di 7 aprile 2007 (in italics), legga siccome segue:
Articolo 228.1: Time-limiti per depositare un ricorso su questioni di diritto
“1. Un ricorso su questioni di diritto può essere depositato entro sei mesi dalla data di entrata in vigore della sentenza della corte più bassa che decide sui meriti della causa. La stessa persona può depositare solamente una volta un ricorso su questioni di diritto, eccetto cause previste col terzo paragrafo di Articolo 231.1.”
Articolo 231.1: Restituendo un ricorso su questioni di diritto
“1. Un ricorso su questioni di diritto si ritornerà se non si attiene coi requisiti di Articolo 230 e divide in paragrafi 1 di Articolo 231.2 di questo Codice... o ci sono motivi previsti col quarto paragrafo di questo Articolo.
2. La Corte di Cassazione adotterà una decisione di restituire un ricorso su questioni di diritto entro dieci giorni dopo la ricevuta del ricorso.
3. Nella sua decisione per restituire un ricorso su questioni di diritto la Corte di Cassazione può fissare un tempo-limite per correggendo il difetto e depositare di nuovo il ricorso.
4. Se una decisione è presa restituire il ricorso senza fissare un tempo-limite, l'appellante non può portare un altro ricorso.”
Gli emendamenti in oggetto non contenga disposizioni di transizione.
B. La Costituzione
27. Articolo 42 prevede, inter l'alia, che leggi e gli altri atti legali che peggiorano la situazione legale di una persona non avranno un vigore retroattivo.
C. La Legge su Atti Legali
28. Articolo 78 prevede che atti legali che restringono i diritti e le libertà di persone giuridiche o persone fisiche, così come peggiorando la loro situazione legale in dell'altro modo, non può avere un vigore retroattivo.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
29. Il richiedente si lamentò che la decisione di annullare la sentenza di 9 marzo 2007 era stata presa in violazione del principio di res judicata. Lui si appellò su Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge.”

A. Ammissibilità
30. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti 31. Il Governo presentò che non c'era stata nessuna violazione del principio della finalità di sentenze. Loro addussero che, con la virtù di Articolo 228.1 del CCP prima dei suoi emendamenti di 7 aprile 2007, un numero illimitato di ricorsi potrebbe essere depositato con la Corte di Cassazione all'interno dei prescrissero sei mesi come lungo come loro furono basati su motivi diversi. Le parti ottennero un diritto per depositare un ricorso su questioni di diritto 9 marzo 2007, quando la Corte d'appello adottò la sua sentenza e prima degli emendamenti summenzionati. La Corte di Cassazione doveva perciò, fare domanda la legge alla quale era in vigore quel il tempo. Inoltre, gli emendamenti di 7 aprile 2007 non potevano essere fatti domanda alla causa presente, fin da Articolo 42 della Costituzione ed Articolo 78 della Legge su Atti Legali la richiesta retroattiva di leggi che peggiorano la situazione legale di una persona proibì. C'era una differenza in motivi e sfera fra i primo e secondo ricorsi presentati alla Corte di Cassazione poiché G. si appellò su disposizioni legali nazionali e diverse.
32. Il richiedente presentò che, con ammettendo ' s G. appoggi ricorso su questioni di diritto ed annullando poi il definitivo e sentenza vincolante della Corte d'appello di 9 marzo 2007, la Corte di Cassazione aveva violato il principio di res judicata. Con effetto da 7 aprile 2007, Articoli 228.1 § 1 e 231.1 § 4 del CCP proibì esplicitamente ricorsi su questioni di diritto per essere depositato più che una volta nella stessa causa se nessun tempo-limite fosse fissato con la Corte di Cassazione per correggere i possibili difetti. La Corte di Cassazione restituì G. che ' s piacciono su questioni di diritto 12 aprile 2007 prima, quando questi emendamenti già erano in vigore, ed affermò esplicitamente nella sua decisione che non lo trovò appropriato fissare un tempo-limite per correggendo i difetti e depositare di nuovo il ricorso. Da che momento la sentenza della Corte d'appello di 9 marzo 2007 divenne definitivo e legando e G. aveva nessuno diritto depositare un altro ricorso su questioni di diritto né la Corte di Cassazione per ammettere tale ricorso, nonostante il suo contenuto. In qualsiasi l'evento, i due ricorsi depositati con G. erano fondamentalmente gli stessi. Il fatto che lei si appellò su altre disposizioni nazionali nel suo ricorso nuovo non volle dire che la molta essenza dei suoi argomenti era diversa. Sia ricorsi fecero riferimento alla stessa opinione competente. Infine, come riguardi la proibizione allegato della richiesta retroattiva della legge, Articolo che 1 § 3 del CCP è convenuto un articolo generale di procedura civile facendo seguito a che giudizi civili sarebbero esaminati in conformità con leggi in vigore al tempo di materiale.
2. La valutazione della Corte
33. La Corte reitera che il diritto ad un'udienza corretta di fronte ad un tribunale come garantito con Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione deve essere interpretato nella luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che dichiara fra le altre cose, l'articolo di legge per essere parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti. Uno degli aspetti fondamentali dell'articolo di legge è il principio di certezza legale che richiede inter l'alia che dove le corti infine hanno determinato un problema, la loro direttiva non dovrebbe essere chiamata in questione (veda Brumrescu ?c. la Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61 ECHR 1999 VII). La certezza legale presuppone riguardo per il principio di res judicata che è il principio della finalità di sentenze. Questo principio sottolinea che nessuna parte è concessa per chiedere soltanto una revisione di un definitivo e sentenza vincolante per il fine di ottenere un riesame ed una determinazione nuova della causa. Più alto corteggia ' motorizza di revisione dovrebbe essere esercitato per correggere errori giudiziali ed errori giudiziari, ma non eseguire un esame nuovo. La revisione non dovrebbe essere trattata come un ricorso mascherato, e la possibilità mera di là che è due prospettive sulla materia non è una base per esame di re. Una partenza da che principio è giustificato solamente quando rese necessario con circostanze di un carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile (veda Ryabykh c. la Russia, n. 52854/99, § 52 ECHR 2003-IX).
34. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte nota che 9 marzo 2007 la Corte d'appello Civile decise in favore del richiedente in una controversia di proprietà. Disposizione di ricorso contro questa sentenza alla Corte di Cassazione che è la definitivo istanza entro sei mesi con virtù di Articolo 228.1 § 1 del CCP. 26 marzo 2007 l'oppositore del richiedente depositò un ricorso su questioni di diritto. Nel frattempo, sul 2007 emendamenti di 7 aprile fu introdotto nel CCP che proibì esplicitamente alloggio fa appello su questioni di diritto più che una volta a meno che, quando restituendo un ricorso, la Corte di Cassazione fissò un tempo-limite per la sua correzione ed osservazione di re. 12 aprile 2007 la Corte di Cassazione decise di restituire il ricorso di 26 marzo 2007, mentre specificando nella sua decisione che non lo trovò appropriato fissare tale tempo-limite. L'oppositore del richiedente depositò un altro ricorso su 7 settembre 2007 questioni di diritto che la Corte di Cassazione decise di ammettere per esame 1 ottobre 2007 nonostante questo, mentre annullando successivamente la sentenza di 9 marzo 2007.
35. Il Governo addusse che, anche se al tempo quando il primo ricorso fu restituito la legge proibita alloggio piace su questioni di diritto più che una volta, nel decidere di ammettere il secondo ricorso la Corte di Cassazione fu guidato con la legge prima degli emendamenti di 7 aprile 2007. Loro addussero che, prima che quegli emendamenti fossero introdotti, un numero illimitato di ricorsi su questioni di diritto potrebbe essere depositato con la Corte di Cassazione all'interno dei prescrissero sei mesi. La Corte di Cassazione fu guidata con quegli articoli poiché loro erano in vigore al tempo quando la Corte d'appello adottò la sua sentenza, mentre gli emendamenti di 7 aprile 2007 peggiorarono la situazione dell'oppositore del richiedente e non furono fatti domanda perciò siccome fu richiesto con legge. Comunque, la Corte non è convinta con queste dichiarazioni per le ragioni seguenti.
36. La Corte nota in primo luogo che, prima di 7 aprile 2007, non era disposizione esplicita nella legge di procedura civile ed Armena che permette una parte a procedimenti civili per depositare due volte un ricorso su questioni di diritto, affitti un numero illimitato di tempi da solo. Nessuna delle disposizioni del CCP stipulò tale diritto. Al contrario, Articolo 239 del CCP previde che le decisioni della Corte di Cassazione erano definitivo e non soggetto a ricorso. Inoltre, il Governo non ha dimostrato che tale diritto derivò da qualsiasi pratica ben stabilita uno. La procedura di restituire ricorsi per la loro inosservanza con requisiti di ammissibilità fu introdotta a novembre 2005 (veda Borisenko e Yerevanyan Bazalt Ltd c. l'Armenia (il dec.), n. 18297/08, 14 aprile 2009), ma non c'è materiale di fronte alla Corte per indicare che gli articoli nuovi furono interpretati autorevolmente con la Corte di Cassazione in tale modo come permettere parti di depositare ripetutamente ricorsi sino alla scadenza del tempo-limite per ricorso. Il Governo è andato a vuoto anche a presentare da qualsiasi esempi di decisioni nazionali si danno l'appuntamento che periodo per mostrare che che che accadde nella causa presente era parte di pratica normale piuttosto che il risultato di del genere di omissione.
37. In secondo luogo, la Corte nota che 7 aprile 2007 erano emendamenti introdotti nella legge di procedura civile che proibì esplicitamente l'alloggio di più di un ricorso su questioni di diritto che suggeriscono che c'era mancanza della chiarezza negli articoli prima di quegli emendamenti riguardo al diritto di portare un ricorso su questioni di diritto.
38. È vero che al tempo di materiale era un'eccezione all'articolo generale convenuto con Articolo 231.1 § 3 del CCP, mentre permette una parte ai procedimenti per re-depositare un ricorso se la Corte di Cassazione considerasse che contenne difetti che potrebbero essere corretti in che la causa fissò un tempo-limite per fare così e re-presentando il ricorso. Comunque, questa eccezione non fece domanda alla causa presente, fin dalla Corte di Cassazione affermata esplicitamente nella sua decisione di 12 aprile 2007 che non lo considerò appropriato fissare tale tempo-limite (veda paragrafo 16 sopra).
39. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte conclude, che la sentenza della Corte d'appello Civile di 9 marzo 2007 non potrebbe essere piaciuta più contro e potrebbe essere divenuta definitivo e legando dopo che la Corte di Cassazione decise 12 aprile 2007 per restituire il ricorso su questioni di diritto depositò con l'oppositore del richiedente 26 marzo 2007. Così, con ammettendo un altro ricorso depositato con la stessa parte ed accordandolo successivamente la Corte di Cassazione rovesciò una definitivo sentenza. La Corte accetta che nelle certe circostanze la certezza legale può essere disturbata per per correggere un “difetto fondamentale” o un “l'errore giudiziario” (veda, fra le altre autorità, Ryabykh, citato sopra, § 52; Roca ?c. la Moldavia, n. 6267/02, § 52 22 marzo 2005; e Sutyazhnik c. la Russia, n. 8269/02, § 35 23 luglio 2009). Comunque, il Governo non suggerì che questo era accaduto nella causa presente. Né segue dai materiali della causa che questo era lo scopo perseguì. Al contrario, sembra, che la Corte di Cassazione rese semplicemente una decisione nuova nella causa, inoltre senza avere qualsiasi base legale per fare così. Con ciò violò il principio di res judicata custodito in Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
40. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
41. Il richiedente si lamentò che la decisione di annullare la sentenza di 9 marzo 2007 aveva infranto il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà come previsto in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
42. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti 43. Il Governo, mentre appellandosi sulle loro osservazioni sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, dibattè che non c'era stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro dissero inoltre come ai meriti della controversia di proprietà del richiedente che lui aveva nessuno “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
44. Il richiedente presentò che la violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non fu connesso ai meriti della sua proprietà contesti ma al fatto che una definitivo sentenza che aveva determinato che l'area di terreno appartenne a lui, era stato annullato illegalmente. Di conseguenza, lui fu privato della sua proprietà.
2. La valutazione della Corte
45. La Corte reitera che “le proprietà” può essere “proprietà esistenti” o i beni, incluso, nelle certe situazioni ben definite, rivendicazioni. Una definitivo sentenza di corte che riconosce il titolo di uno a proprietà può essere riguardata come un “la proprietà” per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Brumrescu?, citato sopra, § 70, e Vrioni ed Altri c. l'Albania, n. 2141/03, § 71 24 marzo 2009). Inoltre, annullando tale sentenza dopo che è divenuto definitivo e più soggetto a ricorso costituirà un'interferenza col diritto del beneficiario di sentenza al godimento tranquillo di che proprietà (veda Brumrescu, citato sopra, § 74, e Ryabykh, citato sopra, § 61).
46. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte nota che quando respingendo il richiedente concorrente chieda, la Corte d'appello Civile fondò che lei aveva abbandonato i suoi diritti di proprietà alla striscia di terreno in favore del richiedente, confermando con ciò la proprietà del richiedente in riguardo di che si spoglia di terreno. Che sentenza divenne definitivo 12 aprile 2007 e può essere considerata come un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, mutatis mutandis, Brumrescu ?citato sopra, § 70). Il suo annullando susseguente della Corte di Cassazione perciò corrisposta ad un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle proprietà del richiedente come garantita con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
47. In questo riguardo, la Corte indica, che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza solamente una privazione di proprietà “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso di proprietà con eseguendo “le leggi” (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999 II). Come già indicato sopra, c'era nessuno diritto sotto la legge di procedura civile ed Armena per depositare un secondo ricorso su questioni di diritto contro la stessa sentenza della corte più bassa. Accordando il secondo ricorso su questioni di diritto ed annullando la definitivo sentenza della Corte d'appello Civile di 9 marzo 2007, la Corte di Cassazione non agì perciò, facendo seguito a “le condizioni previdero per con legge.” Segue che l'interferenza con le proprietà del richiedente non era legale per il fine di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
48. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
49. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
50. Il richiedente chiese 10,000 euros (EUR) in riguardo di non danno patrimoniale.
51. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione, mentre dibattendo che non c'era collegamento causale fra le violazioni allegato ed il risarcimento chiesti.
52. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha sofferto di danno non-patrimoniale come un risultato delle violazioni trovato e gli ha assegnato EUR 3,000 in riguardo di simile danno.
Costi di B. e spese
53. Il richiedente non chiese qualsiasi costi e spese.
Interesse di mora di C.
54. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 3,000 (tre mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale da convertire nella valuta dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;

5. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 3 dicembre 2015, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento di Corte.
André Wampach Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.