Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VROUNTOU v. CYPRUS

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,13,14,P1-1

NUMERO: 33631/06/2015
STATO: Cipro
DATA: 13/10/2015
ORGANO: Sezioni


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Violation of Article 14+P1-1-1 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Possessions)
Violation of Article 13 - Right to an effective remedy (Article 13 - Effective remedy) Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)



FOURTH SECTION






CASE OF VROUNTOU v. CYPRUS

(Application no. 33631/06)







JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG

13 October 2015





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Vrountou v. Cyprus,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Guido Raimondi, President,
Päivi Hirvelä,
George Nicolaou,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paul Mahoney,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Faris Vehabovi?, judges,
and Françoise Elens-Passos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 6 October 2015,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 33631/06) against the Republic of Cyprus lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Cypriot national, Ms Maria Vrountou (“the applicant”), on 25 July 2006.
2. Ms Vrountou was born in 1980 and lives in Kokkinotrimithia. She was represented by Mr C. Christophi, a lawyer practising in Nicosia. The Cypriot Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, the Attorney-General, Mr P. Clerides.
3. The applicant principally alleged that the failure to grant her a refugee card, and thus to deny her the range of benefits, including housing assistance, to which the holder of such card was entitled, amounted to discrimination on grounds of sex and was thus in violation of Article 14 of the Convention when taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 10 January 2008 the application was communicated to the Government. They and the applicant filed written observations. Further observations were requested from the parties on 17 January 2013 and subsequently filed by them.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Introduction
5. On 19 September 1974 the Council of Ministers of the Republic of Cyprus approved the introduction of a scheme of aid for displaced persons and war victims. Under the scheme, displaced persons were entitled to refugee cards. The holders of such cards were (and still are) eligible for a range of benefits including housing assistance. For the purposes of the scheme the term “displaced” was determined as being any person whose permanent home was in the areas occupied by the Turkish armed forces, in an inaccessible area, or in an area which had been evacuated to meet the needs of the National Guard.
6. To implement the scheme, the Director of the Care and Rehabilitation of Displaced Persons Service (“SCRDP”) issued a circular on 10 September 1975. The circular provided that non-displaced women whose husbands were displaced could be registered on the refugee card of their husbands. It also provided that children whose fathers were displaced could be registered on the refugee card of their fathers (see paragraph 20 below). No provision was made for the children of displaced women to be registered on the refugee cards of their mothers.
7. Although the term “displaced” was extended by the Council of Ministers on 19 April 1995 (see paragraphs 23 and 24 below), at the time of the facts giving rise to the present application it had not been extended to allow children whose mothers were displaced but whose fathers were not, to qualify for refugee cards.
B. The applicant’s application for a refugee card
8. The applicant’s mother has been a refugee since 1974. Her mother is the holder of a refugee card.
9. In September 2002, the applicant married and began looking for a house for her family in Kokkynotrimithia. She wished to obtain housing assistance and so, on 27 February 2003, applied to the Civil Registry and Migration Department of the Ministry of the Interior for a refugee card with occupied Skylloura, the place from which her mother was displaced, as her place of displacement.
10. By letter dated 6 March 2003 the request was rejected on the basis that the applicant was not a displaced person because, while her mother was a displaced person, her father was not.
C. First instance proceedings before the Supreme Court (revisional jurisdiction): recourse no. 436/03
11. The applicant filed a recourse before the Supreme Court challenging the above decision. She claimed, inter alia, that the decision was in violation of the principle of equality safeguarded by Article 28 of the Constitution and in breach of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. She claimed that it also breached Article 13 of the Convention.
12. A single judge of the Supreme Court dismissed the recourse on 12 May 2004, finding that, on the basis of the relevant case-law, the extension of the applicable criteria so as to cover the children of displaced women was not possible. The question of extending the term “displaced” to cover the children whose mothers were displaced but whose fathers were not had been repeatedly discussed before the House of Representatives’ Committee for Refugees. A proposal to change the law to that effect had been placed before the Committee but was never approved. Furthermore, because of the consequences which would ensue from such an extension of the term “displaced”, the Minister of the Interior had referred the question to the Council of Ministers for its consideration and, on 19 April 1995, the Council of Ministers had decided not to extend the term in this manner (see the relevant domestic law and practice set out at paragraphs 23 and 24 below).
D. Appeal proceedings before the Supreme Court: appeal no. 3830
13. On 23 June 2004 the applicant filed an appeal before the Supreme Court.
14. By judgment of 3 March 2006 a five-judge panel of the Supreme Court dismissed the appeal and upheld the findings of the first instance court.
15. The Supreme Court held as follows:
“[In the present appeal] an attempt was made to demonstrate that we must depart from the above [first instance] decision, since the Supreme Court can, in the present case, proceed to the so-called “extended interpretation” and, by invoking the principle of equality, widen the application of the criterion to the children of displaced mothers as well.
...
The proposed extension of the plan was placed before the Council of Ministers in Proposal no. 1852/92, which was submitted by the Ministry of the Interior to amend the criteria for providing assistance to displaced persons. However the decision taken refers only to amendments which do not concern the present case. Despite the fact that, on 19 April 1995, by decision no. 42.465 of the Council of Ministers, further amendments were made by which the term ‘displaced’ was extended and now includes other categories of those entitled, the point which concerns us in this case remains unchanged.
...
In accordance with the case-law (Dias United Publishing Co Ltd v. The Republic, [1996] 3 A.A.D. 550), the non-existence of a legislative provision cannot be remedied by judicial decision because, in such a case, the constitutional control which the Supreme Court exercises would be turned into a means of reshaping or supplementing the legislation.
...
We have given this matter very serious consideration in view also of the position that, in the case of an arrangement favouring one sex only, the extended application of the provision also finds support in European Community Law ...
However this may be, we cannot depart from the prevailing case-law. Dias United Publishing Co Ltd v. The Republic, cited above, fixed the framework of the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court has, in accordance with Article 146(4) of the Constitution, the power to uphold in full or in part the decision appealed against or to declare the act or omission invalid. It does not have jurisdiction to legislate by extending legislative arrangements which did not meet with the approval of parliament. This would conflict with the principle of the separation of powers. We note that the House of Representatives cannot of its own accord enact legislation which would incur expenditure. If the House of Representatives, the constitutionally appointed legislative organ, does not have such a right, the Supreme Court has even less of a right.
In agreement with the principles set out above, we conclude that the Supreme Court does not have the competence to proceed to an extended application of a legislative arrangement.”
16. The same issue of the non-extension of refugee cards to the children of displaced women was also considered by the Supreme Court in Anna Giagkozi v. the Republic (case no. 291/2001). That challenge was rejected at first instance on 30 April 2002 ((2002) 4 A.A.D. 405), the court finding that, while it was difficult to understand why there should not be uniform treatment between the children of displaced men and displaced women, on the basis of Dias United, cited above, it was unable to grant the relief sought. This was because Ms Giagkozi was, in effect, asking the court to extend the relevant legal framework so that the benefits provided to children of displaced fathers would be provided to children of displaced mothers. An appeal against that judgment was dismissed on 3 March 2006 by the same bench which dismissed the present applicant’s appeal (the appeal judgment in Giagkozi is reported at (2006) 3 ?.?.D. 85).
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Constitution of Cyprus
17. The right to equality before the law, administration and justice is set out in Article 28 of the Constitution which provides as follows, in so far as relevant:
“1. All persons are equal before the law, the administration and justice, and are entitled to equal protection thereof and treatment thereby.
2. Every person shall enjoy all the rights and liberties provided for in this Constitution without any direct or indirect discrimination against any person on the ground of his community, race, religion, language, sex, political or other convictions, national or social descent, birth, colour, wealth, social class, or on any ground whatsoever, unless there is express provision to the contrary in this Constitution.
...”
18. This provision has independent existence and therefore can be raised alone or in conjunction with another right protected by the Constitution.
B. Relevant decisions, circulars and provisions concerning “displaced” persons and refugee cards
19. The scheme of aid for displaced and other affected persons referred to in paragraph 5 above was introduced by the Council of Ministers on 19 September 1974 by decision no. 13.503. For the purposes of the scheme the term “displaced person” was defined by the Council of Ministers as meaning any person whose permanent residence was in the occupied areas, or in an inaccessible area or in an area which had been evacuated to meet the needs of the National Guard.
20. The circular which was issued by the Director of Care and Rehabilitation of Displaced Persons Service (“SCRDP”) on 10 September 1975 reads in relevant part:
“(a) When a displaced woman marries a non-displaced man, the husband and children cannot be registered or considered as displaced persons;
(b) When a displaced man marries a non-displaced woman, the non-displaced wife will be registered on the refugee card of the husband. The children will be considered as refugees and will be registered on the refugee card of their father.”
21. On 3 May 1979, by decision no. 17.918, the Council of Ministers decided that families who had lost privately-owned residences in the occupied areas and did not own any other property in the free areas until the 16 August 1974, would be provided with a “special certification”. Based on that special certification the family would be allowed a one-off payment of housing assistance (i.e. the payment would be made to the family but the children of such families would not be entitled themselves to apply for such housing assistance).
22. On 3 May 1994, the Council of Ministers decided that families whose home or property was in the occupied areas but who, at the time of the invasion, were resident in the free areas for professional reasons would have the same treatment as persons with refugee cards. The same year, the Council of Ministers also decided that assistance for this category of families would be limited to original displaced persons and not their children. On the other hand, those who had only been given “special confirmation” that they owned a house in the occupied areas but had no other links with the area would continue to be treated in accordance with the Council of Minister’s decision of 3 May 1979 (see paragraph 21 above). By contrast, those given such special confirmation who: (i) owned a house in the occupied areas and (ii) did in fact have other links with those areas would be given the same treatment as the holders of refugee cards, meaning the extension of refugee rights to their children.
23. On 19 April 1995, the Council of Ministers decided to extend the term “displaced” to those persons who, before the Turkish invasion, had their ordinary residence in the free areas and/or had been resident abroad because of their work or other obligations but whose principal residence and property were in the occupied areas (decision of the Council of Ministers, no. 42.465).
24. However, on the same date the Council of Ministers, decided that the term “displaced” should not be extended to children whose mother was displaced but whose father was not. The reasons given by the Council of Ministers were:
“(a) The actual percentages of displaced persons will be altered.
(b) According to a relevant estimate by the Statistical and Research Department, the percentage of displaced persons, in such a case, would gradually rise to 80% of the total population of Cyprus.
(c) The number of electors in the occupied Electoral Districts would increase disproportionately, with a corresponding increase-decrease in parliamentary seats by Electoral District.”
25. At the time of the applicant’s request for a refugee card, section 119 of the Census Bureau Law (? ???? ??????? ????????? ????? ??? 2002 N. 141(I)/2002) provided that children whose father was displaced were considered to have their permanent residence in the occupied areas and thus, for the purposes of the law, were considered displaced from the same place as their father.
C. The criteria for housing assistance for the holders of refugee cards at the time of the applicant’s request for a refugee card
26. At the time of the present applicant’s request for a refugee card (February 2003), there were four categories of housing assistance available to the holders of refugee cards: (i) being allocated housing in one of the settlements built by the State for refugees; (ii) a grant towards the cost of building a residence on State-owned land; (iii) a similar grant for building a residence on privately-owned land; and (iv) a grant for buying a flat or residence.
27. In 2003, persons seeking assistance under (iii) or (iv) were not subject to a means test based on their income (Council of Minister’s decision 50.669 of 24 November 1999). They were, however, required not to have previously obtained a loan with subsidised interest by the State on the basis of other housing schemes (decision 16.296 of 27 October 1977).
28. According to information provided by the Government, in 2003 the basic amount of housing assistance that could be granted under (iii) or (iv) ranged from CYP 8,520 (EUR 14,557) to CYP 11,540 (EUR 19,717), with appropriate uplifts when larger accommodation was necessary for larger families. It is to be noted that, at the time of her application for a refugee card, the applicant had recently married and did not appear to have any children.
D. Relevant changes to the law after the lodging of the present application
29. The Census Bureau (Amendment) (No. 2) Law of 2013 (N. 174(I)/2013) amended section 119 of the Census Bureau Law to include children whose mother was displaced within the definition of displaced persons. The relevant part of section 119 now reads:
“Children whose father is a displaced person are considered to have their permanent residence in the occupied areas and consequently, for the purposes of the present Law, they are considered to be displaced persons from the same place from which their father comes.
Children of only a displaced mother are considered to have their permanent residence in the occupied areas and are displaced persons from the same place from which their mother comes, exclusively for the purposes of any state aid or other benefit which is provided for displaced persons, without their place of origin being connected with any voting rights or electoral process.”
30. Changes have also been made to eligibility criteria for housing assistance. Those criteria, which had previously been contained in decisions of the Council of Ministers (see for instance paragraph 27 above), were placed on a statutory footing by the Granting of Housing Assistance to Displaced Persons, Affected and Other Persons Law 2005 (“the 2005 Law”). Section 2 of the Law defined “displaced person” as the holder of a refugee card issued by the Civil Registry and Migration Department of the Ministry of Interior. Under section 7 displaced persons were eligible for housing assistance.
31. In 2011, the Granting of Housing Assistance to Displaced Persons, Affected and Other Persons (Amendment) Law 2011 amended sections 2 and 7 of the 2005 Law to allow the granting of housing assistance to persons whose mother was displaced. However, this was limited to the first two categories of housing assistance set out at paragraph 26 above (being allocated housing in one of the settlements built by the State for refugees or being given a grant towards the cost of building a residence on State-owned land).
32. The children of displaced women became eligible for the remaining two categories of housing assistance in 2013 when further amendments to the 2005 Law were made by the Granting of Housing Aid to Displaced Persons, Affected and Other Persons (Amendment) Law of 2013.
33. Since 2013, applicants wishing either to buy a flat or residence or to build a residence on privately-owned land have been subject to a means test based on their family’s annual income. After allowing for deductions of EUR 1,500 for each dependent child, this should not exceed EUR 45,000 (EUR 20,000 for single persons). An applicant whose income falls above these thresholds is not entitled to housing assistance. If the applicant’s income falls below these thresholds, the precise amount of housing assistance he or she is entitled to receive is calculated with reference to both the size of the person’s family and the family’s annual income.
E. Relevant commentary on the refugee assistance scheme
34. On 18 May 2006, further to a series of complaints, the Commissioner for Administration (hereinafter “the Ombudsman”) published a report on the inability of the children of displaced women to obtain refugee cards and thus access to the refugee assistance scheme. The Ombudsman considered that allowing children of male displaced persons to acquire the status of displaced persons, while excluding children of female displaced persons merely on grounds of gender, was both contrary to the principle of equality and discriminatory. The Ombudsman recommended that the relevant authorities should consider applying the same rules to both sexes.
35. The pre-2013 scheme also attracted critical comment from the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW: Concluding Comments on Cyprus, 30 May 2006, at paragraph 32); the Committee on Migration, Refugees and Population of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (“Europe’s forgotten people: protecting the human rights of long-term displaced persons”, report of 8 June 2009, at paragraph 70); and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (report to the United Nations Human Rights Council on the question of human rights in Cyprus, 2 March 2010, at paragraphs 19 and 20).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION WHEN TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
36. The applicant complained first that the refusal of the authorities to grant her a refugee card breached her property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. She maintained that having a refugee card provided the holder with a number of benefits such as financial aid, scholarships, free education, medical treatment, housing assistance, and help in the form of clothing and footwear. She had applied for a refugee card with a view to seeking housing assistance.
37. Second, she complained that denying her a refugee card on the basis that she was the child of a displaced woman rather than a displaced man was discriminatory on the grounds of sex and thus in breach of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No.1.
38. These Articles provide:
Article 14 (prohibition of discrimination)
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (protection of property)
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
39. The Government contested those arguments.
40. Since the alleged discriminatory treatment of the applicant lies at the heart of her application, the Court considers it appropriate to examine first the complaint made under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Ponomaryovi v. Bulgaria, no. 5335/05, § 45, ECHR 2011 with further references therein).
B. Admissibility
41. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
C. Merits
1. The parties’ observations
(a) The Government
(i) The background to, and extension of, the scheme
42. The Government submitted that the reasons for restricting the refugee assistance scheme to children whose fathers were displaced, were to be found in the socio-economic situation and social concepts of 1975 when the male was the family breadwinner. The economic effects of displacement were far more acute for the children of male displaced persons who would bear the responsibility for their children’s upbringing and education, and for providing them with financial assistance in their adult lives. On the other hand, the children of female displaced persons would not be financially dependent on their mothers: when those women married, their children would be provided for by their non-displaced father who had not suffered the financial effects of displacement. Moreover, it had been necessary for the State to give priority to persons most in need, taking into account the availability of funds for catering for the variety of needs of those affected by the Turkish invasion.
43. The refugee assistance scheme had been reviewed and extended since its introduction. This had always been done subject to the availability of funds. In 1979, the Council of Ministers decided that refugee families would be eligible for housing aid (see paragraph 21 above). In 1994 it decided that families whose home or property was in the occupied areas but who, at the time of the invasion, were resident in the free areas for professional reasons would have the same treatment as persons with refugee cards (see paragraph 22 above). The same year, the Council of Ministers also decided that state assistance for this category of families would be limited to original displaced persons and not their children (ibid.). Those decisions had been the result of prior consultation with the relevant Ministry, the Pancyprian Committee of Refugees (????????? ???????? ?????????) and members of the House of Representatives representing all political parties.
44. There had been further, extensive debate on the issue in the House of Representatives, which culminated in two legislative proposals for amending the scheme. The first of the two proposals had two limbs: (i) extending the scheme to include those who, while living in the free areas, had the greater part of their immovable property in the occupied area; and (ii) extending it to children whose mother was displaced. The second of the two proposals was to extend the scheme to cover all persons from the occupied areas who had their permanent home in the free areas for professional reasons. At the time the Government considered that both of these proposals would have had considerable financial consequences. On a basis of estimates prepared in 1994, extending eligibility for refugee cards to children whose displaced parent was the mother would mean that the percentage of the population eligible would rise to 40.7% of the total population by the end of 1992, 51.2% by 2007 and 80% by 2047.
45. In light of the above, an agreement was reached between the Government and the relevant Committee of the House of Representatives to extend eligibility for refugee cards to those who had only been given “special confirmations” and not refugee cards in 1994 (see paragraph 22 above). This was enacted via the Council of Minister’s decision of 19 April 1995 (see paragraph 23 above).
46. The scheme was again reviewed in 2007 in light of further proposals in the House of Representatives: one to extend eligibility for a refugee card to children whose mother was displaced, until such children reached eighteen years of age; another to extend the right to apply for housing assistance to children whose only displaced parent was their mother. On this occasion, the Government brought forward legislation which amended the Census Bureau Law of 2002 to allow children whose father or mother was a displaced person the right to apply and obtain a certificate recognising them as “displaced persons by descent”. The holder of such certificate was not rendered eligible for any grant or other benefit.
47. At the time of the submission of the Government’s initial observations (June 2008), the scheme was under further review, involving various ministries and also consultations with members of the House of Representatives and civil society. According to Government estimates prepared in 2008 in course of that review, there were approximately 51,000 people in the same category as the applicant: affording them the same housing assistance as persons whose father was displaced, would cost an extra EUR 30,000,000 a year.
(ii) Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No.1
48. The Government submitted that the applicant did not have an interest falling in the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 because holders of refugee cards were not provided with housing assistance as of right. The granting of such assistance was subject to various criteria, for instance a requirement not to have property of a considerable value already and a means test based on the total gross income of the person’s family. Consequently, the applicant could not assert a right to state assistance under domestic law. As such, there was no pecuniary interest, nor legitimate expectation of such an interest, for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
49. When the Republic decided to provide assistance to those adversely affected by the invasion, it created a scheme which assisted those most in need of help. The scheme did not include people in the applicant’s situation: her case was therefore distinguishable from those cases decided by the Court where the applicant belonged to a class of individuals who were covered by a social benefits scheme and complained that the scheme was applied in a discriminatory manner (Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 54, ECHR 2005 X; Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004-IX). To hold that the applicant in the present case had a pecuniary interest falling within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 would be tantamount to holding that, when a State made a decision to assist disadvantaged sections of the population, it was not free to prioritise needs or choose the class of persons eligible for assistance.
50. There was, moreover, no difference in treatment: in 1975, owing to the socio-economic differences at the time, the children of displaced women were not in an analogous position to the children of displaced men. According to Ministry of Interior statistics, in 1973, 25% of women were in employment as against 75% of men; the equivalent percentages for 2001 were 42% of women and 58% of men.
51. Finally, even if there had been a difference in treatment, it had an objective and reasonable justification. It served the legitimate aim of affording state assistance to those most in need, taking into account social conditions, budgetary considerations and financial resources. As stated above (paragraphs 43 et seq. above), it had been progressively extended, subject to availability of financial resources. It was not the Government’s contention that the socio-economic differences of 1975 had not gradually changed as more women entered the labour market, but rather that the difference in treatment remained objectively and reasonably justified until such a time as those changes removed the need for the difference in treatment entirely. Having regard to the fact that measures of economic and social strategy fell within the State’s margin of appreciation, the State’s decisions as to the precise timing and means for bringing to an end the difference in treatment were not “manifestly without reasonable foundation”: Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, §§ 52 and 64, ECHR 2006 VI.
(iii) Further submissions on the amendments to the scheme enacted after the lodging of the present application
52. The Government reiterated their initial submission that measures of economic and social strategy fell within the state’s margin of appreciation, as did the precise timing and means of phasing out the distinction between the children of displaced men and displaced women introduced in 1975. As with the amendments made between 1975 and 1995, the timing and means of the subsequent amendments made between 2007 and 2013 were not so manifestly unreasonable as to exceed the state’s wide margin of appreciation.
(b) The applicant
(i) Initial submissions
53. The applicant submitted that, notwithstanding the difficulties the Government faced in 1974 in providing assistance to displaced persons from the northern part of the Republic of Cyprus, the decisions taken had to be rational and lawful. They had not been: the decision to exclude the children of displaced women from receiving refugee cards had been arbitrary and unjustified.
54. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 applied to the benefits to which holders of refugee cards were entitled. In particular, had the applicant possessed such a card she would have applied for, and had a legitimate expectation of being granted, housing assistance to the value of CYP 11,540 (EUR 19,717). She satisfied all of the other criteria for that assistance (see, mutatis mutandis, Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004 IX).
55. There was a clear difference in treatment, a point which appeared to be accepted by the domestic authorities (see for instance the report of the Ombudsman at paragraph 34 above) and implicitly by the Government in their submissions.
56. There was no objective and reasonable justification for that difference in treatment. She relied on the Court’s finding in Wessels Bergervoet v. the Netherlands, no. 34462/97, § 51, ECHR 2002 IV, that the traditional role of men as breadwinners did not provide objective and reasonable justification for differences in treatment based on gender. In any case, women had played just as important a role in the rural economic life of the island before the invasion as men had. Nor was it correct to suggest, as the Government had done, that the economic effects of displacement would be more acute and longer-lasting for the children of displaced men. On the contrary, the children of displaced women were in a much worse position given the historic absence of equal pay for men and women and the more limited opportunities for women to balance work and family commitments.
57. With reference to the Government’s submission as to the economic consequences of broadening the class of refugees eligible for assistance, the applicant responded that there had been no such budgetary concerns in 1975. Therefore, these concerns could not be relied on as justification more than twenty years later.
58. Finally, the legislative changes introduced in 2007, whereby children of all refugees were granted a certificate of “displaced person by descent”, changed nothing: the certificate did not confer any housing or other benefits on the holder.
(ii) Further submissions on the amendments to the scheme enacted after the lodging of the present application
59. The applicant submitted that the amendments were introduced after she had been refused a refugee card and after she had lodged the present application. As such, they did nothing to negate the sex discrimination she had suffered; if anything those amendments showed that the previous system was discriminatory. Whatever those changes, the original difference in treatment remained without reasonable and objective justification.
2. The Court’s assessment
60. Before examining the merits of this complaint, the Court notes that the scheme under which the applicant was denied a refugee card was amended after she lodged her application such that, as of 2013, children of displaced women are now eligible for housing assistance on the same terms as the children of displaced men (see the summary of those changes set out at paragraphs 29–33 above). It was for this reason that the parties were asked to submit further observations on the admissibility and merits of the case in 2013 (see the summaries of those observations set out at paragraphs 52 and 59 above). However, in those observations neither party has sought to argue that the 2013 changes made any material difference to the applicant’s case, or the decision to refuse her a refugee card in 2003. In particular, the Government have not argued that this in any way affected the applicant’s victim status: their submission is instead that the changes were demonstrative of their earlier submission that Cyprus had not exceeded the margin of appreciation it enjoyed under the Convention. This is a submission on the merits of the case which the Court will consider in due course.
61. Turning therefore to the merits of this complaint, the Court begins by noting that, as in any case concerning a complaint based on Article 14 taken in conjunction with a substantive article of the Convention or its Protocols, the four questions the Court must consider are:
(1) whether the facts of the case fall within the ambit of the substantive article (here, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1);
(2) whether there has been a difference in treatment between the applicant and others;
(3) whether that difference in treatment has been on the basis of one of the protected grounds set out in Article 14 of the Convention; and
(4) whether there was a reasonable and objective justification for that difference in treatment; if there was not, the difference in treatment will be discriminatory and in violation of Article 14.
(a) Whether the facts of the case fall within the ambit Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
62. The prohibition of discrimination enshrined in Article 14 extends beyond the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms which the Convention and the Protocols thereto require each State to guarantee. It applies also to those additional rights, falling within the general scope of any Convention Article, for which the State has voluntarily decided to provide (Konstantin Markin v. Russia [GC], no. 30078/06, § 124, ECHR 2012 (extracts) and E.B. v. France [GC], no. 43546/02, § 48, 22 January 2008).
63. These principles apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and are equally relevant when it comes to welfare benefits. In particular, this Article does not create a right to acquire property. It places no restriction on the Contracting State’s freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security scheme, or to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under any such scheme. If, however, a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit – whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 82, ECHR 2011).
64. The relevant test is whether, but for the condition of entitlement about which the applicant complains, he or she would have had a right, enforceable under domestic law, to receive the benefit in question (Stummer at § 83 and Fabris v. France [GC], no. 16574/08, § 52, ECHR 2013 (extracts)).
65. In applying that test to the present case, the Court considers that, while a range of benefits appear to have been available to the holders of refugee cards, it is only necessary to consider the particular benefit of housing assistance: this, rather than the other benefits apparently available, was the reason the applicant applied for a refugee card in the first place.
66. That housing assistance was clearly a “benefit” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In 2003, the material date for the purposes of the present case, the primary condition of entitlement to housing assistance was that the person applying for it had to be the holder of a refugee card. At that time, there was no means test (see paragraph 27 above). Finally, the only other relevant condition for obtaining this assistance in 2003 was that the person applying for the assistance had not previously obtained a loan from the State: it has not been suggested that the present applicant did not meet that condition. Therefore, but for the need to have a refugee card, the applicant would have had a right, enforceable under Cypriot law, to receive housing assistance.
67. In seeking to persuade the Court that the facts of this case do not fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Government have sought, on the basis of three submissions, to distinguish the refugee assistance scheme from other similar benefit schemes which have been considered by the Court to fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. First, it is said that the scheme was designed to help those most in need. Second, they submit that this case is different from those cases where an applicant belongs to a class of individuals covered by a social benefits scheme but the scheme is applied in a discriminatory manner. This is because, in the present case, the refugee assistance scheme simply did not include people in the applicant’s situation. Third, in the Government’s submission, any contrary conclusion would be tantamount to holding that a State is not free to prioritise needs or choose the class of persons eligible for assistance.
68. These submissions are unpersuasive. The first and third submissions are, in essence, submissions as to whether difference in treatment in entitlement to a refugee card (and thus to the benefits which refugees are entitled) had an objective and reasonable justification rather than whether the benefits to which refugees are entitled fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No 1. As to the Government’s second submission, there is no support in the Court’s case-law for distinguishing between a scheme which applied in a discriminatory manner and a scheme from which a person has been excluded in a discriminatory manner: in both cases, the person has not received a benefit to which members of the scheme are entitled. In short, there is nothing in the Government’s three submissions which could cast doubt on the correctness of the conclusion that the Court has reached in paragraph 66 above.
69. For these reasons, the Court finds that the facts of this case fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) Whether there has been a difference in treatment
70. There will be a difference in treatment if it can be established that other persons in an analogous or relevantly similar situation enjoy preferential treatment (see Konstantin Markin, cited above, § 125).
71. Relying on the different proportions of women and men in the workplace when the scheme was first enacted, the Government have submitted that the applicant, as the daughter of a displaced woman, is not in an analogous position to the child of a displaced man. However, it is not clear to the Court why these proportions should have any bearing on whether the children of displaced women and the children of displaced men were in an analogous situation, either in 1975 when the scheme was enacted or in 2003 when the applicant applied for a refugee card. The fact that more men happened to be in the workplace (and by implication that more displaced men worked than displaced women) does not mean that the children of displaced men are in any different situation from the children of displaced women. The only difference between them is the sex of their displaced parent. The children of displaced men and the children of displaced women have similar needs and are therefore in an entirely analogous situation.
72. In being entitled to a refugee card (and thus housing assistance) the children of displaced men clearly enjoy preferential treatment over the children of displaced women. A difference in treatment has thus been established in this case.
(c) Whether this difference in treatment has been on the basis of one of the protected grounds set out in Article 14 of the Convention
73. It does not appear to be in dispute that this difference in treatment was on the basis of sex, one of the protected grounds set out in Article 14.
(d) Whether there was a reasonable and objective justification for this difference in treatment
74. A difference of treatment is discriminatory and thus in violation of Article 14, if it has no objective and reasonable justification; that is, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see Fabris, cited above, § 56; and Konstantin Markin at §125).
75. In cases where the difference in treatment is on grounds of sex, the general principles which apply in determining this question of justification, were restated by the Grand Chamber in Konstantin Markin at §§ 126 and 127. Where relevant to the present case, these provide as follows (internal references omitted):
- The Contracting States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a difference in treatment. The scope of the margin of appreciation will vary according to the circumstances, the subject matter and its background, but the final decision as to the observance of the Convention’s requirements rests with the Court. Since the Convention is first and foremost a system for the protection of human rights, the Court must however have regard to the changing conditions in Contracting States and respond, for example, to any emerging consensus as to the standards to be achieved.
- The advancement of gender equality is today a major goal in the member States of the Council of Europe and very weighty reasons would have to be put forward before such a difference in treatment could be regarded as compatible with the Convention. In particular, references to traditions, general assumptions or prevailing social attitudes in a particular country are insufficient justification for a difference in treatment on grounds of sex. For example, States are prevented from imposing traditions that derive from the man’s primordial role and the woman’s secondary role in the family.
76. Applying these principles to the present case, the Court begins by observing that the principal justification the Government have advanced for the difference in treatment is the socio-economic differences which were said to exist in Cyprus in 1974, notably that men were the traditional breadwinners at that time (see their observations summarised at paragraph 42 above). However, this is precisely the kind of reference to “traditions, general assumptions or prevailing social attitudes” which provides insufficient justification for a difference in treatment on grounds of sex because it derives entirely from the man’s primordial role and woman’s secondary role in the family (see Konstantin Markin at paragraph 127, quoted at paragraph 74 above).
77. Moreover, even if that reflected the general nature of economic life in rural Cyprus in 1974 (a matter disputed by the parties: compare the Government’s submissions at paragraph 42 above with those of the applicant at paragraph 56 above), it did not justify regarding all displaced men as breadwinners and all displaced women as incapable of fulfilling that role once displaced from the northern to the southern part of the Republic. Nor could it justify subsequently depriving the children of displaced women of the benefits to which the children of displaced men were entitled. This is particularly so when many of the benefits that the children of displaced men were entitled, including housing assistance, were without any reference to a means test. This would have meant, for instance, that the child of a displaced woman earning a lower income would not have been entitled to that assistance whereas the child of a displaced man earning a higher income would have been entitled to it. This difference in treatment towards the children of displaced persons cannot be justified simply by reference to the need to prioritise resources in the immediate aftermath of the 1974 invasion.
78. The Government, drawing firstly on the progressive expansion of the scheme since 1974 and secondly on the budgetary implications that ending the difference in treatment would have had, have submitted that, even if the difference in treatment could no longer be justified, the State should nonetheless enjoy a margin of appreciation in choosing the timing and means for extending the refugee assistance scheme to the children of displaced women.
79. Neither of these considerations suffices to remedy the otherwise discriminatory nature of the scheme. First, whatever the attempts to expand the scheme from 1974 to 2003, none of the changes introduced during that period cured the clear difference in treatment between the children of displaced men and the children of displaced women. Nor can it be said that these changes were introduced to reflect the gradual entry of women into the labour market (see the Government’s submissions at paragraph 51 above). From 1974-2013 the scheme at all times excluded the children of displaced women. Budgetary considerations alone cannot serve to justify a clear difference in treatment based exclusively on gender, particularly when the successive expansions of the scheme between 1974 and 2013 would themselves have had financial consequences.
80. Finally, it is particularly striking that the scheme continued on the basis of this difference in treatment until 2013, nearly forty years after it was first introduced. The fact the scheme persisted for so long, and yet continued to be based solely on traditional family roles as understood in 1974, means that the State must be taken to have exceeded any margin of appreciation it enjoyed in this field. Very weighty reasons would have been required to justify such a long-lasting difference in treatment. None have been shown to exist. There is accordingly no objective and reasonable justification for this difference in treatment.
81. For these reasons, the Court concludes that the difference in treatment between the children of displaced women and the children of displaced men was discriminatory and thus finds a violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
82. In view of that conclusion, the Court considers it unnecessary to examine separately the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone (see Ponomaryovi, cited above, § 64).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 12
83. In the alternative, the applicant complained that the refusal to grant her an identity card was in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 12, which provides:
“1. The enjoyment of any right set forth by law shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.
2. No one shall be discriminated against by any public authority on any ground such as those mentioned in paragraph 1.”
84. The Government contested that argument.
85. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible. However, having regard to the finding relating to Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 81 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine this complaint.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
86. The applicant further complained that there had been a violation of Article 13 as no authority in Cyprus, including the courts, had examined her complaint and, as a result, given her relief. Article 13 provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
87. The Government submitted that Article 13 does not guarantee a remedy allowing a Contracting State’s primary legislation to be challenged on grounds that it is contrary to the Convention (P.M. v. the United Kingdom, no. 6638/03, § 34, 19 July 2005 and further references therein).
A. Admissibility
88. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
89. The Court considers that the domestic proceedings which the applicant brought did not attempt to challenge primary legislation: at the time she was refused a refugee card all of the relevant provisions were contained in decisions of the Council of Ministers (see paragraphs 19–24 above). They were thus administrative-executive decisions, and the Government have not relied on any legislative act relevant to the scheme and in force at the time in question. Thus, contrary to the Government’s submission, this is not a case where the impugned measure was contained in primary legislation and where, therefore, there was no need to have an effective remedy in place. Accordingly, the ordinary rule on the need to provide an effective remedy applies.
90. In applying that rule, the Court recalls that the “effectiveness” of a “remedy” within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant (see, as a recent authority, Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, § 131, ECHR 2014). Nonetheless, there must be a domestic remedy allowing the competent national authority both to deal with the substance of the relevant Convention complaint and to grant appropriate relief (see Nada v. Switzerland [GC], no. 10593/08, § 207, ECHR 2012; see also Ališi? and Others, ibid.).
91. In the present case, the reason the Supreme Court was unable to consider whether the applicant was entitled to the remedy she sought (the quashing of the decision to refuse her a refugee card) was that it considered that it did not have jurisdiction to extend the refugee card scheme without infringing the constitutional principle of the separation of powers (see the final two paragraphs of the Supreme Court’s judgment, quoted at paragraph 15 above). In other words, the Supreme Court, applying that principle, found itself unable to consider the merits of the applicant’s discrimination claim and thus unable to grant her appropriate relief. The Court readily understands the Supreme Court’s concern to ensure proper respect for the separation of powers under the Constitution of Cyprus and it is not the Court’s place to question the Supreme Court’s interpretation and application of that principle. However, the consequence of the Supreme Court’s approach was that, in so far as the applicant’s Convention complaints were concerned, recourse to the Supreme Court was not an effective remedy for her. Since the Government have not submitted that any other effective remedy existed in Cyprus at the material time to allow the applicant to challenge the discriminatory nature of the refugee card scheme, it follows that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
92. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
93. The applicant submitted that she is entitled to an amount of EUR 112,225 reflecting the loss in the value of the property she could have acquired had she been granted a refugee card in 2003. In support of her claim, the applicant submitted a valuation report conducted on the basis of randomly selected properties in Kokkynotrimithia where she lived. The report compared the prices between properties there for the years 2003, when the applicant applied for a refugee card, and 2008, the date the applicant submitted her just satisfaction claims. According to the report, the average price of a building plot in 2003 was CYP 15,700 (approximately EUR 26,825) in contrast to EUR 153,774 in 2008. The applicant submitted that the housing assistance of CYP 11,540 which she could have received in 2003 amounted to 73% of the purchase price of a building plot in 2003. With this in mind the applicant submitted that, taking into account 2008 prices, she had suffered a loss of EUR 112,225 (EUR 153,774 x 73%). Alternatively, the applicant submitted that she was entitled to a sum equal to the housing assistance granted to displaced persons wishing to construct a three-bedroom residence in 2008 meaning EUR 68,350.
94. The Government contested both of the applicant’s claims submitting that the sums claimed were speculative and not causally linked to the alleged violation of the Convention.
95. The Court reiterates that the indispensable condition for making an award in respect of pecuniary damage is the existence of a causal link between the damage alleged and the violation found (see, for instance, Nikolova v. Bulgaria [GC], no. 31195/96, § 73, ECHR 1999?III). The Court cannot therefore accept the applicant’s claim based on the 2008 value of property she could have bought in 2003, nor her claim for CYP 68,350 (the value of housing assistance in 2008): neither of these claims are causally linked to the violation found.
96. Nonetheless, the Court reiterates that on the basis of Article 41 the applicant should so far as possible be put in the position she would have enjoyed had the violation found by the Court not occurred: see Wessels Bergervoet, cited above, § 60. It is therefore appropriate to award the applicant the grant of housing assistance she would have received but for the difference in treatment she suffered. However, since the applicant has not provided sufficient details as to why she claimed she would have been entitled to receive CYP 11,540, the Court considers it appropriate to basis its award on the minimum amount available in 2003, CYP 8,520 (see paragraph 28 above). Adjusting that sum to reflect interest and inflation since 2003, and ruling on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant EUR 21,500.
B. Non-pecuniary damage
97. The applicant submitted that she is also entitled to non-pecuniary damages on the grounds that the discrimination was solely on the basis of gender and that the Government continuously failed to take any corrective measures to alleviate the discriminatory treatment.
98. The Government submitted that, in the event the Court found a violation of the Convention, such finding should constitute sufficient just satisfaction.
99. The Court accepts that the applicant has suffered non-pecuniary damage resulting from the nature of the discrimination. Ruling on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant EUR 4,000 under this head.
C. Costs and expenses
100. The applicant claimed CYP 4,086 (EUR 6,981) for the costs and expenses she had incurred before the Supreme Court, plus interest. She further claimed EUR 10,000 for the costs and expenses she had incurred in proceedings before the Court. Finally, the applicant claimed EUR 575 for the preparation of the valuation report on property prices in Kokkynotrimithia (see paragraph 93 above).
101. The Government accepted that the costs and expenses suffered by the applicant in the domestic proceedings and in proceedings before the Court were recoverable by way of just satisfaction provided that they had been actually and necessarily incurred.
102. For costs and expenses incurred by the applicant before the Supreme Court, the Court considers that these were necessarily and reasonably incurred in the applicant’s attempt to seek redress for the violation of the Convention it has found. Thus, they are in principle recoverable (see, for instance, Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen (ASLEF) v. the United Kingdom, no. 11002/05, § 58, ECHR 2007 ...). The sums claimed are also reasonable as to quantum. The Court considers, therefore, that these claims should be met in full and accordingly awards the applicant EUR 6,981 under this head.
103. As regards the costs incurred in the proceedings before it, the Court notes that the applicant has not provided an itemised bill of costs sufficiently substantiating her claims (Efstathiou and Michailidis & Co. Motel Amerika v. Greece, no. 55794/00, § 40, ECHR 2003 IX). For this reason, the Court finds that this part of the applicant’s claim must be dismissed.
104. Finally, as regards the EUR 575 incurred for valuation report, given that pecuniary damage has been calculated on the basis of the amount of housing assistance available to the applicant in 2003 and not property prices in 2008, the Court finds that this expense was not necessarily incurred (Michael Theodossiou Ltd. v. Cyprus (just satisfaction), no. 31811/04, § 30, 14 April 2015). This part of the applicant’s claim must also be dismissed.
D. Default interest
105. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

3. Holds that there is no need to examine the merits of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone;

4. Holds that there is no need to examine the merits of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 12;

5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention;

6. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 21,500 (twenty-one thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 4,000 (four thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 6,981 (six thousand, nine hundred and eighty-one euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

7. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 13 October 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Françoise Elens-Passos Guido Raimondi
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Violazione di Articolo 14+P1-1-1 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - la Discriminazione) (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - le Proprietà)
Violazione di Articolo 13 - Diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva (Articolo 13 - via di ricorso Effettiva) danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale danno Patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)



QUARTA SEZIONE






CAUSA VROUNTOU C. CIPRO

(Richiesta n. 33631/06)







SENTENZA



STRASBOURG

13 ottobre 2015





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Vrountou c. la Cipro,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Guido Raimondi, Presidente
Päivi Hirvelä,
Giorgio Nicolaou,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paul Mahoney,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Faris Vehabovi, ?giudici
e Françoise Elens-Passos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 6 ottobre 2015,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 33631/06) contro la Repubblica della Cipro depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino cipriota, il Sig.ra Maria Vrountou (“il richiedente”), 25 luglio 2006.
2. Il Sig.ra Vrountou nacque nel 1980 e vive in Kokkinotrimithia. Lei fu rappresentata col Sig. C. Christophi, un avvocato che pratica in Nicosia. Il Governo cipriota (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, l'Avvocato-generale, il Sig. P. Clerides.
3. Il richiedente addusse principalmente che l'insuccesso per accordarla una scheda di rifugiato, e così negarla la serie di benefici, incluso assistenza di alloggio alla quale fu concesso il possessore di simile scheda corrispose alla discriminazione sui motivi di sesso ed era così in violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione quando preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. 10 gennaio 2008 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo. Loro ed il richiedente registrarono osservazioni scritto. Inoltre osservazioni furono richieste dalle parti 17 gennaio 2013 e successivamente registrarono con loro.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
Introduzione di A.
5. 19 settembre 1974 il Consiglio di Ministri della Repubblica della Cipro approvò l'introduzione di un schema di aiuto per deportati e vittime di guerra. Sotto lo schema, deportati furono concessi a schede di rifugiato. I possessori di simile schede erano (ed ancora è) eleggibile per una serie di benefici incluso assistenza di alloggio. Per i fini dello schema il termine “spostò” fu determinato come essere qualsiasi persona la cui casa permanente era nelle aree occupò con le forze armate turche, in un'area inaccessibile o in un'area che era stata evacuata per soddisfare le necessità della Guardia Nazionale.
6. Implementare lo schema, il Direttore della Cura e Riabilitazione di Deportati Servizio (“SCRDP”) emesso una circolare 10 settembre 1975. La circolare previde quel non-spostò donne i cui mariti furono spostati potrebbero essere registrate sulla scheda di rifugiato dei loro mariti. Sé anche previde che figli i cui padri furono spostati potrebbero essere registrati sulla scheda di rifugiato dei loro padri (veda paragrafo 20 sotto). Nessuna disposizione fu costituita i figli di donne spostate per essere registrata sulle schede di rifugiato delle loro madri.
7. Benché il termine “spostò” fu prolungato col Consiglio di Ministri 19 aprile 1995 (veda divide in paragrafi 23 e 24 sotto), al tempo dei fatti che generano la richiesta presente sé permettere figli le cui madri furono spostate non era stato prolungato ma i cui padri non erano, qualificare per schede di rifugiato.
B. la richiesta di Il richiedente per una scheda di rifugiato
8. La madre del richiedente è una rifugiata dal 1974. Sua madre è il possessore di una scheda di rifugiato.
9. A settembre 2002 il richiedente si sposò, e cominciò a cercare un alloggio per la sua famiglia in Kokkynotrimithia. Lei desiderò ottenere assistenza di alloggio e così, 27 febbraio 2003, fatto domanda alla Cancelleria Civile e Migrazione Settore del Ministero dell'Interno per una scheda di rifugiato con Skylloura occupato, il posto dal quale fu spostata sua madre, come il suo posto di dislocamento.
10. Con lettera 6 marzo 2003 che la richiesta è stata respinta sulla base datò che il richiedente non era un deportato perché, mentre sua madre era una deportata, suo padre non era.
C. First citano un esempio procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Suprema (giurisdizione di revisional): ricorso n. 436/03
11. Il richiedente registrò un ricorso di fronte alla Corte Suprema che impugna la decisione sopra. Lei disse, inter l'alia, che la decisione era in violazione del principio dell'uguaglianza salvaguardò con Articolo 28 della Costituzione ed in violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Lei disse che violò anche Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
12. Un solo giudice della Corte Suprema respinse il ricorso in 12 maggio 2004, mentre trovando che, sulla base della causa-legge attinente, la proroga del criterio applicabile così come coprire i figli di donne spostate non era possibile. La questione di prolungare il termine “spostò” coprire i figli le cui madri furono spostate ma i cui padri avuto stato discusso ripetutamente di fronte alla Casa di Rappresentanti Comitato di ' per Rifugiati. Una proposta per cambiare la legge a che effetto era stato messo di fronte al Comitato ma non era stato approvato mai. Inoltre, a causa delle conseguenze che conseguirebbero da tale proroga del termine “spostò”, il Ministro dell'Interno si era riferito la questione al Consiglio di Ministri per la sua considerazione e, 19 aprile 1995, il Consiglio di Ministri aveva deciso di non prolungare il termine in questa maniera (veda il diritto nazionale attinente e pratica espose fuori a paragrafi 23 e 24 sotto).
D. Appeal procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Suprema: ricorso n. 3830
13. 23 giugno 2004 il richiedente registrò un ricorso di fronte alla Corte Suprema.
14. Con sentenza di 3 marzo 2006 un pannello di cinque-giudice della Corte Suprema respinse il ricorso e sostenne le sentenze del primo giudice di prima istanza.
15. La Corte Suprema sostenne siccome segue:
“[Nel ricorso presente] un tentativo fu reso per dimostrare che noi dobbiamo abbandonare dal sopra [prima l'istanza] la decisione, poiché la Corte Suprema può, al giorno d'oggi la causa, proceda al così definito “interpretazione stesa” e, invocando il principio dell'uguaglianza, allargi come bene la richiesta del criterio ai figli di madri spostate.
...
La proroga proposta del piano fu messa di fronte al Consiglio di Ministri in Proposta n. 1852/92 che furono presentati col Ministero dell'Interno per correggere il criterio per offrire assistenza a deportati. Comunque la decisione presa si riferisce solamente ad emendamenti che non concernono la causa presente. Nonostante il fatto che, 19 aprile 1995, con decisione n. 42.465 del Consiglio di Ministri, gli ulteriori emendamenti furono resi con che il termine che ‘ha spostato ' fu prolungato ed ora include le altre categorie di quelli concesse, il punto che ci concerne in questa causa rimane immutato.
...
Nella conformità con la causa-legge (Dias Editoria Unito Co Ltd c. La Repubblica, [1996] 3 A.A.D. 550), la non-esistenza di una disposizione legislativa non può essere rimediata a con decisione giudiziale perché, in tale causa, il controllo costituzionale che gli esercizi di Corte Supremi sarebbero trasformati in un mezzi di rifoggiando o completare la legislazione.
...
Noi abbiamo dato anche questa questione la considerazione molto seria in prospettiva della posizione che, nella causa di un favouring della disposizione un sesso la richiesta stesa della disposizione trova anche solamente, sostenga in Legge di Comunità europea...
Comunque questo può essere, noi non possiamo abbandonare dalla causa-legge prevalente. Dias Editoria Unito Co Ltd c. La Repubblica, citato sopra, fisso la struttura della giurisdizione della Corte Suprema. La Corte Suprema ha, nella conformità con Articolo 146(4) della Costituzione, il potere per sostenere in pieno o in parte la decisione piacque contro o dichiarare l'atto od omissione nulle. Non ha giurisdizione per legiferare con prolungando disposizioni legislative che non si incontrarono con l'approvazione di parlamento. Questo contrasterebbe col principio della separazione dei poteri. Noi notiamo che la Casa di Rappresentanti non può di suo proprio accordo decreti legislazione che incorrerebbe in spesa. Se la Casa di Rappresentanti, l'organo legislativo e costituzionalmente nominato non ha tale diritto, la Corte Suprema ha anche meno di un diritto.
In conformità col set di principi fuori sopra, noi concludiamo che la Corte Suprema non ha la competenza per procedere ad una richiesta stesa di una disposizione legislativa.”
16. Lo stesso problema della non-proroga di schede di rifugiato ai figli di donne spostate fu considerato anche con la Corte Suprema in Anna Giagkozi c. la Repubblica (la causa n. 291/2001). Che richiesta fu respinta istanza 30 aprile 2002 per prima ((2002) 4 A.A.D. 405), la sentenza di corte che, mentre era difficile capire perché non ci dovrebbe essere trattamento di uniforme fra i figli di uomini spostati e spostò donne, sulla base di Dias Unito, citato sopra, non era capace di accordare il sollievo chiesto. Questo era perché il Sig.ra Giagkozi era, in effetto, chiedendo alla corte di prolungare la struttura legale ed attinente così che i benefici previdero a figli di padri spostati sarebbe previsto a figli di madri spostate. Un ricorso contro che sentenza fu respinta 3 marzo 2006 con la stessa panca che respinse il ricorso del richiedente presente (la sentenza di ricorso in Giagkozi è riportata a (2006) 3.??. D. 85).
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. La Costituzione della Cipro
17. Il diritto all'uguaglianza di fronte alla legge, amministrazione e la giustizia è esposta fuori in Articolo 28 della Costituzione che prevede siccome segue, in finora come attinente:
“1. Tutte le persone sono uguali di fronte alla legge, l'amministrazione e la giustizia, e è concesso per uguagliare al riguardo protezione e trattamento con ciò.
2. Ogni persona godrà di tutti i diritti e le libertà previste per in questa Costituzione senza qualsiasi la discriminazione diretta o indiretta contro qualsiasi persona sulla base della sua comunità, razza, religione, lingua, sesso, le condanne politiche o altre, cittadino o discesa sociale, nascita, colore ricchezza, classe sociale o su qualsiasi incaglia ciò che, a meno che c'è disposizione espressa al contrario in questa Costituzione.
...”
18. Questa disposizione ha esistenza indipendente e perciò può essere sollevata da solo o in concomitanza con un altro diritto protegguto con la Costituzione.
B. decisioni Attinenti, circolari e disposizioni che riguardano “spostò” persone e schede di rifugiato
19. Lo schema di aiuto per spostò e le altre persone affettate assegnarono ad in paragrafo 5 sopra fu introdotto col Consiglio di Ministri 19 settembre 1974 con decisione n. 13.503. Per i fini dello schema il termine “il deportato” fu definito col Consiglio di Ministri come volendo dire qualsiasi persona la cui residenza permanente era nelle aree occupate, o in un'area inaccessibile o in un'area che era stata evacuata per soddisfare le necessità della Guardia Nazionale.
20. La circolare che fu emessa col Direttore di Cura e Riabilitazione di Deportati Servizio (“SCRDP”) sul 1975 letture di 10 settembre in parte attinente:
“(un) Quando una donna spostata si sposa un uomo non-spostato, il marito e figli non possono essere registrati o considerato come deportati;
(b) Quando un uomo spostato si sposa una donna non-spostata, la moglie non-spostata sarà registrata sulla scheda di rifugiato del marito. I figli saranno considerati come rifugiati e saranno registrati sulla scheda di rifugiato di loro padre.”
21. In 3 maggio 1979, con decisione n. 17.918, il Consiglio di Ministri decise che famiglie che avevano perso residenze privatamente-possedute nelle aree occupate e non possedettero qualsiasi l'altra proprietà nelle aree gratis sino al 16 agosto 1974, sarebbe previsto con un “la certificazione speciale.” Basato su che la certificazione speciale la famiglia sarebbe concessa un uno-via pagamento di assistenza di alloggio (cioé. il pagamento sarebbe reso alla famiglia ma i figli di simile famiglie non li sarebbe dati un titolo a per fare domanda per simile assistenza di alloggio).
22. In 3 maggio 1994 il Consiglio di Ministri decise, che famiglie le cui casa o proprietà erano nelle aree occupate ma che, al tempo dell'invasione, era residente nelle aree gratis per ragioni professionali avrebbe lo stesso trattamento come persone con schede di rifugiato. Lo stesso anno, il Consiglio di Ministri decise anche che assistenza per questa categoria di famiglie sarebbe stata limitata a deportati originali e non i loro figli. D'altra parte quelli che erano stati dati solamente “conferma speciale” che loro possedettero un alloggio nelle aree occupate ma non avevano altri collegamenti con l'area continuerebbe ad essere trattato in conformità col Consiglio della decisione di Ministro di 3 maggio 1979 (veda paragrafo 21 sopra). Con contrasto, quelle conferma così speciale e determinata che: (i) possedette un alloggio nelle aree occupate e (l'ii) faceva infatti abbia gli altri collegamenti con quelle aree sarebbe dato lo stesso trattamento come i possessori di schede di rifugiato, mentre intendendo la proroga di diritti di rifugiato ai loro figli.
23. 19 aprile 1995, il Consiglio di Ministri decise di prolungare il termine “spostò” a quelle persone che, di fronte all'invasione turca, aveva la loro residenza ordinaria nell'and/or di aree gratis era stato all'estero residente a causa del loro lavoro o gli altri obblighi ma le cui residenza principale e proprietà erano nelle aree occupate (decisione del Consiglio di Ministri, n. 42.465).
24. Comunque, sulla stessa data il Consiglio di Ministri, decise che il termine “spostò” non dovrebbe essere prolungato a figli la cui madre fu spostata ma il cui padre non era. Le ragioni date col Consiglio di Ministri erano:
“(un) Le percentuali effettive di deportati saranno alterate.
(b) secondo una stima attinente dello Statistico e Ricerca Settore, la percentuale di deportati, in tale causa gradualmente sorgerebbe a 80% della popolazione totale della Cipro.
(il c) Il numero di elettori nei Distretti Elettorali ed occupati aumenterebbe sproporzionatamente, con un'aumento-calo corrispondente in seggi parlamentari di Distretto Elettorale.”
25. Al tempo della richiesta del richiedente per una scheda di rifugiato, sezione 119 della Legge della Scrivania del Censimento (?2002 N. 141(I)/2002) purché che era considerato che figli il cui padre fu spostato avessero la loro residenza permanente nelle aree occupate e così, per i fini della legge, fu considerato spostato dallo stesso posto come loro padre.
C. Il criterio per assistenza di alloggio per i possessori di schede di rifugiato al tempo della richiesta del richiedente per una scheda di rifugiato
26. Al tempo della richiesta del richiedente presente per una scheda di rifugiato (febbraio 2003), c'erano quattro categorie di assistenza di alloggio disponibili ai possessori di schede di rifugiato: (i) essendo assegnati alloggio in uno degli accordi costruì con lo Stato per rifugiati; (l'ii) una concessione verso il costo di costruire una residenza su terra Statale; (l'iii) una concessione simile per costruire una residenza su terra privatamente-posseduta; e (l'iv) una concessione per comprare un appartamento o residenza.
27. Nel 2003, persone che chiedono assistenza sotto (l'iii) o (l'iv) non era soggetto ad una prova di mezzi basata sul loro reddito (Consiglio della decisione 50.669 di Ministro di 24 novembre 1999). Comunque, loro furono costretti a prima non avere ottenuto un prestito con sovvenzionato interessi con lo Stato sulla base di altri schemi di alloggio (decisione 16.296 di 27 ottobre 1977).
28. Secondo informazioni previste col Governo, nel 2003 l'importo di base di assistenza di alloggio che potrebbe essere accordata sotto (l'iii) o (l'iv) variò da CYP 8,520 (EUR 14,557) a CYP 11,540 (EUR 19,717), con sollevamenti appropriati quando il più grande alloggio era necessario per più grandi famiglie. Sarà notato che, al tempo della sua richiesta per una scheda di rifugiato, il richiedente si era sposato recentemente, e non sembrò avere qualsiasi i figli.
D. cambi Attinenti alla legge dopo l'alloggio della richiesta presente
29. La Censimento Scrivania (l'Emendamento) (N.ro 2) Legge di 2013 (N. 174(I)/2013) corresse sezione 119 della Legge della Scrivania del Censimento per includere figli la cui madre fu spostata all'interno della definizione di deportati. La parte attinente di sezione 119 ora le letture:
“Si considera che figli il cui padre è un deportato abbiano la loro residenza permanente nelle aree occupate, e di conseguenza, si considera che loro siano deportati dallo stesso posto del quale è loro padre, per i fini della Legge presente.
Si considera che figli di solamente una madre spostata abbiano la loro residenza permanente nelle aree occupate, e sono deportati dallo stesso posto dal quale viene loro madre, esclusivamente per i fini di qualsiasi sovvenzione statale o l'altro beneficio che sono offerti per deportati, senza il loro posto di origine che è connessa con qualsiasi votando diritti o elaborazione elettorale.”
30. Cambi sono stati costituiti anche a criterio di eleggibilità assistenza di alloggio. Quelli criterio che prima era stato contenuto in decisioni del Consiglio di Ministri (veda per istanza divide in paragrafi 27 sopra), fu messo su un appiglio legale con l'Accordare di Alloggio Assistenza a Deportati, Persone Affettate ed Altre Legge 2005 (“la Legge del 2005”). Sezione 2 della Legge definì “il deportato” come il possessore di una scheda di rifugiato emesso con la Cancelleria Civile e Migrazione Settore del Ministero di Interno. Sotto la sezione 7 deportati erano eleggibili per assistenza di alloggio.
31. Nel 2011, l'Accordare di Alloggio Assistenza a Deportati, Persone Affettate ed Altre (l'Emendamento) la Legge 2011 sezioni corrette 2 e 7 della Legge del 2005 per concedere l'accordare di assistenza di alloggio a persone la cui madre fu spostata. Comunque, questo fu limitato alle prime due categorie di assistenza di alloggio esposte fuori a paragrafo 26 sopra (essendo assegnati alloggio in uno degli accordi costruì con lo Stato per rifugiati o essendo dato una concessione verso il costo di costruire una residenza su terra Statale).
32. I figli di donne spostate divennero eleggibili per il rimanendo due categorie di assistenza di alloggio nel 2013 quando gli ulteriori emendamenti alla Legge del 2005 furono resi con l'Accordare di Alloggio Assistenza a Deportati, Persone Affettate ed Altre (l'Emendamento) Legge di 2013.
33. Dal 2013, richiedenti che augurano o comprare un appartamento o residenza o costruire una residenza su terra privatamente-posseduta, sono soggetto ad una prova di mezzi basata sul reddito annuale della loro famiglia. Dopo avere lasciato spazio a deduzioni di EUR 1,500 per ogni figlio dipendente, questo non dovrebbe eccedere EUR 45,000 (EUR 20,000 per sole persone). Un richiedente il cui reddito incorre sopra queste soglie non è concesso ad assistenza di alloggio. Se il reddito del richiedente incorre sotto queste soglie, l'importo preciso di assistenza di alloggio lui o lei sono concesse per ricevere è calcolato con riferimento a sia la taglia della famiglia della persona ed il reddito annuale della famiglia.
E. commentario Attinente sullo schema di assistenza di rifugiato
34. In 18 maggio 2006, inoltre ad una serie di azioni di reclamo, il Commissario per Amministrazione (in seguito “il Difensore civile”) pubblicò un rapporto sull'incapacità dei figli di donne spostate per ottenere rifugiato carda e così accesso allo schema di assistenza di rifugiato. Il Difensore civile considerò che permettendo figli di deportati maschi di acquisire lo status di deportati, mentre escludendo soltanto figli di deportati femmina sui motivi di genere, era sia contrario al principio dell'uguaglianza e discriminatorio. Il Difensore civile raccomandò che le autorità attinenti dovrebbero considerare fare domanda gli stessi articoli ad ambo i sessi.
35. Lo schema di pre-2013 attirò anche commento critico dal Comitato sull'Eliminazione della Discriminazione contro Donne (CEDAW: Commenti finali sulla Cipro, 30 maggio 2006, a paragrafo 32); il Comitato su Migrazione, Rifugiati e Popolazione della Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa (“le persone dimenticate di Europa: proteggendo i diritti umani di deportati a lungo termine”, rapporto di 8 giugno 2009, a paragrafo 70); e le Nazioni Unito Commissario Alto per Diritti umani (rapporto al Consiglio dei Diritti umani delle Nazioni Unito sulla questione di diritti umani in Cipro, 2 marzo 2010, a paragrafi 19 e 20).
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione Quando Preso In Concomitanza Con Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N. 1
36. Il richiedente prima si lamentò che il rifiuto delle autorità per accordarla una scheda di rifugiato violò i suoi diritti di proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Lei sostenne che avendo una scheda di rifugiato fornito al possessore un numero di benefici come assistenza finanziaria, borse di studio, istruzione gratis trattamento medico, assistenza di alloggio ed aiuta nella forma di vestire e calzatura. Lei aveva fatto domanda per una scheda di rifugiato con una prospettiva a chiedendo assistenza di alloggio.
37. Secondo, lei si lamentò che negandola una scheda di rifugiato sulla base che lei era il figlio di una donna spostata piuttosto che un uomo spostato era discriminatorio per motivi di sesso e così in violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1.
38. Questi Articoli prevedono:
Articolo 14 (proibizione della discriminazione)
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (protezione di proprietà)
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
39. Il Governo contestò quegli argomenti.
40. Fin dal trattamento discriminatorio allegato del richiedente giace al cuore della sua richiesta, la Corte lo considera appropriato esaminare l'azione di reclamo resa sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo prima N.ro 1 (veda, mutatis mutandis, Ponomaryovi c. la Bulgaria, n. 5335/05, § 45 ECHR 2011 con ulteriore cita therein).
Ammissibilità di B.
41. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
C. Merits
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) Il Governo
(i) Lo sfondo a, e proroga di, lo schema
42. Il Governo presentò che le ragioni per restringere lo schema di assistenza di rifugiato a figli i cui padri furono spostati, sarebbe trovato nella situazione socio-economica e concetti sociali di 1975 quando il maschio era il provveditore di famiglia. Gli effetti economici di dislocamento erano lontano più acuti per i figli di deportati maschi che sopporterebbero la responsabilità per l'educazione dei loro figli ed istruzione, e per offrirli con assistenza finanziaria in vite adulte loro. D'altra parte i figli di deportati femmina non sarebbero finanziariamente dipendenti sulle loro madri: quando quelle donne si sposarono, i loro figli sarebbero offerti per col loro non-spostato padre che non aveva sofferto degli effetti finanziari di dislocamento. Inoltre, era stato necessario per lo Stato per dare priorità a persone la maggior parte in bisogno, prendendo che in considerazione la disponibilità di finanziamenti per approvvigionare per la varietà delle necessità di quelli, colpì con l'invasione turca.
43. Lo schema di assistenza di rifugiato era stato fatto una rassegna ed era stato prolungato fin dalla sua introduzione. Questo era stato fatto soggetto alla disponibilità di finanziamenti sempre. Nel 1979, il Consiglio di Ministri decise, che famiglie di rifugiato sarebbero state eleggibili per aiuto di alloggio (veda paragrafo 21 sopra). Nel 1994 decise che famiglie le cui casa o proprietà erano nelle aree occupate ma che, al tempo dell'invasione, era residente nelle aree gratis per ragioni professionali avrebbe lo stesso trattamento come persone con schede di rifugiato (veda paragrafo 22 sopra). Lo stesso anno, il Consiglio di Ministri decise anche che assistenza statale per questa categoria di famiglie sarebbe stata limitata a deportati originali e non i loro figli (l'ibid.). Quelle decisioni erano state il risultato della consultazione precedente col Ministero attinente, il Comitato di Pancyprian di Rifugiati (?) e membri della Casa di Rappresentanti che rappresenta tutti i partiti politici.
44. C'era stato l'ulteriore, esteso dibattito sul problema nella Casa di Rappresentanti che terminò in due proposte legislative per correggere lo schema. La prima delle due proposte avevano due margini: (i) prolungando lo schema per includere quelli che, mentre vivendo nelle aree gratis, aveva la più grande parte del loro patrimonio immobiliare nell'area occupata; e (l'ii) prolungandolo a figli la cui madre fu spostata. Il secondo delle due proposte era prolungare lo schema per coprire tutte le persone dalle aree occupate che avevano la loro casa permanente nelle aree gratis per ragioni professionali. Al tempo il Governo considerò che sia di queste proposte conseguenze finanziarie e considerevoli avrebbero avuto. Su una base di stime preparata nel 1994, mentre prolungando l'eleggibilità per rifugiato carda a figli cui spostarono genitore era la madre vorrebbe dire che la percentuale della popolazione eleggibile sorgerebbe a 40.7% della popolazione totale con la fine di 1992, 51.2% entro 2007 e 80% entro 2047.
45. In luce del sopra, un accordo fu giunto al Governo ed il Comitato attinente della Casa di Rappresentanti per prolungare l'eleggibilità per rifugiato carda a quelli che erano stati dati solamente “conferme speciali” e non rifugiato carda nel 1994 (veda paragrafo 22 sopra). Questo fu decretato via il Consiglio della decisione di Ministro di 19 aprile 1995 (veda paragrafo 23 sopra).
46. Lo schema fu fatto una rassegna di nuovo nel 2007 in luce di ulteriori proposte nella Casa di Rappresentanti: uno per prolungare l'eleggibilità per una scheda di rifugiato a figli la cui madre fu spostata, finché simile figli giunsero a diciotto anni maggiorenne; un altro per prolungare il diritto per fare domanda per assistenza di alloggio a figli cui solamente spostarono genitore era loro madre. Su questa occasione, il Governo portò legislazione diretta che corresse la Legge della Scrivania del Censimento di 2002 per permettere figli cui generano o madre era una deportata il diritto per fare domanda ed ottenere un recognising del certificato loro come “deportati con discesa.” Il possessore di simile certificato non fu reso eleggibile per qualsiasi concessione o l'altro beneficio.
47. Al tempo dell'osservazione delle osservazioni iniziali del Governo (giugno 2008), lo schema era l'ulteriore revisione sotto, mentre comportando i vari ministeri ed anche le consultazioni con membri della Casa di Rappresentanti e società civile. Secondo stime di Governo preparate nel 2008 in corso di che revisione, c'erano approssimativamente 51,000 persone nella stessa categoria come il richiedente: riconoscendoli la stessa assistenza di alloggio come persone il cui padre fu spostato, costerebbe un EUR 30,000,000 addizionale per anno.
(l'ii) Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1
48. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non aveva un interesse che incorre nell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 perché a possessori di schede di rifugiato non furono forniti di pieno diritto assistenza di alloggio. L'accordare di simile assistenza era soggetto al vario criterio, per istanza un requisito per già non avere proprietà di un valore considerevole ed una prova di mezzi basò sul reddito lordo totale della famiglia della persona. Di conseguenza, il richiedente non poteva asserire un diritto per affermare assistenza sotto diritto nazionale. Come così, non c'era interesse patrimoniale, né l'aspettativa legittima di tale interesse, per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
49. Quando la Repubblica decise di offrire assistenza a quelli colpì avversamente con l'invasione, creò un schema che assistè quelli la maggior parte in bisogno di aiuto. Lo schema non incluse persone nella situazione del richiedente: la sua causa era perciò distinguibile da quelle cause decise con la Corte dove il richiedente appartenne ad una classe di individui che furono coperti con un schema di benefici sociale e si lamentarono che lo schema fu fatto domanda in una maniera discriminatoria (Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 54 ECHR 2005 X; Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 ECHR 2004-IX). Sostenere che il richiedente nella causa presente aveva un interesse patrimoniale che incorre all'interno della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 sarebbe uguale a sostenendo che, quando un Stato prese una decisione di assistere sezioni svantaggiate della popolazione, non era gratis priorizzare le necessità o scegliere la classe di persone eleggibile per assistenza.
50. C'era, inoltre, nessuna differenza in trattamento: nel 1975, dovendo alle differenze socio-economiche al tempo, i figli di donne spostate non erano in una posizione analoga ai figli di uomini spostati. Secondo Ministero di statistiche Interne, nel 1973 25% di donne erano in lavoro come contro 75% di uomini; le percentuali equivalenti per 2001 erano 42% di donne e 58% di uomini.
51. Infine, anche se c'era stata una differenza in trattamento, aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole. Notificò lo scopo legittimo di riconoscere assistenza statale a quelli la maggior parte in bisogno, prendendo in considerazione le condizioni sociali, le considerazioni budgetarie e risorse finanziarie. Come affermato sopra (divide in paragrafi 43 et seq. sopra), era stato prolungato progressivamente, soggetto alla disponibilità di risorse finanziarie. Non era la contesa del Governo che le differenze socio-economiche di 1975 gradualmente non avevano cambiato come più donne entrata l'operi mercato, ma piuttosto che la differenza in trattamento rimasto obiettivamente e ragionevolmente giustificato sino a tale tempo come quelli cambi rimosse completamente il bisogno per la differenza in trattamento. Avendo riguardo ad al fatto che misure della strategia economica e sociale incorsero all'interno del margine dello Stato della valutazione, le decisioni dello Stato come al tempismo preciso e vuole dire per portare ad una fine la differenza in trattamento non era “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole”: Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, §§ 52 e 64, ECHR 2006 VI.
(l'iii) le Ulteriori osservazioni sugli emendamenti allo schema decretato dopo l'alloggio della richiesta presente
52. Il Governo reiterò la loro osservazione iniziale che misura della strategia economica e sociale incorse all'interno del margine dello stato della valutazione, siccome faceva il tempismo preciso e vuole dire di mettere in fase fuori la distinzione fra i figli di uomini spostati e spostò donne introdotte nel 1975. Come con gli emendamenti resi fra il 1975 ed il 1995, il tempismo e vuole dire degli emendamenti susseguenti resi fra il 2007 ed il 2013 non era così manifestamente irragionevole come eccedere il margine ampio dello stato della valutazione.
(b) Il richiedente
(i) osservazioni Iniziali
53. Il richiedente presentò che, nonostante le difficoltà il Governo affrontò nel 1974 nell'offrire assistenza a deportati dalla parte settentrionale della Repubblica della Cipro, le decisioni prese dovuto per essere razionale e legale. Loro non erano stati: la decisione di escludere i figli di donne spostate da schede di rifugiato riceventi era stata arbitraria ed ingiustificata.
54. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 fece domanda ai benefici ai quali furono concessi possessori di schede di rifugiato. In particolare, aveva il richiedente posseduto tale scheda lei avrebbe fatto domanda per, ed aveva un'aspettativa legittima di essere accordato, assistenza di alloggio al valore di CYP 11,540 (EUR 19,717). Lei soddisfece tutto l'altro criterio per che assistenza (veda, mutatis mutandis, Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 ECHR 2004 IX).
55. C'era una differenza chiara in trattamento, un punto che sembrò essere accettato con le autorità nazionali (veda per istanza il rapporto del Difensore civile a paragrafo 34 sopra) ed implicitamente col Governo nelle loro osservazioni.
56. Non c'era giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole per che la differenza in trattamento. Lei si appellò sulla Corte sta trovando in Wessels Bergervoet c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 34462/97, § 51 ECHR 2002 IV, che il ruolo tradizionale di uomini come provveditori non offrì obiettivo e la giustificazione ragionevole per le differenze in trattamento basò su genere. In qualsiasi la causa, donne avevano giocato nel momento in cui importante un ruolo nella vita economica rurale dell'isola di fronte all'invasione come uomini avuti. Né aveva ragione sé, siccome aveva fatto il Governo, che gli effetti economici di dislocamento sarebbero stati più acuti e lungo-durevoli per i figli di uomini spostati. Sul contrario, i figli di donne spostate erano in una posizione molto peggiore data l'assenza storica di uguale paghi per uomini e donne e le opportunità più limitate per donne per bilanciare lavoro ed impegni di famiglia.
57. Con riferimento all'osservazione del Governo come alle conseguenze economiche di ampliare la classe di rifugiati eleggibile per assistenza, il richiedente rispose, che non c'erano state preoccupazioni così budgetarie nel 1975. Perciò, queste preoccupazioni non potevano essere appellatesi su come giustificazione più che venti anni più tardi.
58. Infine, i cambi legislativi introdussero nel 2007, da che cosa figli di tutti i rifugiati furono accordati un certificato di “deportato con discesa”, non cambiò niente: il certificato non conferì qualsiasi alloggio o gli altri benefici sul possessore.
(l'ii) le Ulteriori osservazioni sugli emendamenti allo schema decretato dopo l'alloggio della richiesta presente
59. Il richiedente presentò che gli emendamenti furono introdotti dopo che lei era stata rifiutata una scheda di rifugiato e dopo che lei aveva depositato la richiesta presente. Come così, loro non facevano niente per negare la discriminazione di sesso lei aveva subito; se qualsiasi cosa che quegli emendamenti hanno mostrato che il sistema precedente era discriminatorio. Qualunque cosa quelli cambi, la differenza originale in trattamento rimasto senza la giustificazione ragionevole ed obiettiva.
2. La valutazione della Corte
60. Prima di esaminare i meriti di questa azione di reclamo, la Corte nota, che lo schema sotto il quale il richiedente fu negato una scheda di rifugiato fu corretto dopo che lei depositò la sua richiesta simile che, come figli di donne spostate ora sono eleggibili per assistenza di alloggio sugli stessi termini come i figli di uomini spostati di 2013, (veda il riassunto di quelli cambi esposto fuori a paragrafi 29–33 sopra). Era per questa ragione che le parti si hanno chiesto a presentare le ulteriori osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e meriti della causa nel 2013 (veda i riassunti di quelle osservazioni esposti fuori a paragrafi 52 e 59 sopra). In quelle osservazioni nessuna parte ha cercato comunque, di dibattere che i 2013 cambi fecero qualsiasi materiale differenzia alla causa del richiedente, o la decisione di rifiutarla una scheda di rifugiato nel 2003. In particolare, il Governo non ha dibattuto che questo in qualsiasi modo colpì lo status di vittima del richiedente: la loro osservazione è invece che i cambi erano dimostrativi della loro più prima osservazione che Cipro non aveva ecceduto il margine della valutazione sé godè sotto la Convenzione. Questa è un'osservazione sui meriti della causa che la Corte considererà in corso dovuto.
61. Rivolgendosi perciò ai meriti di questa azione di reclamo, la Corte comincia con notare che come in qualsiasi causa riguardo ad un'azione di reclamo basata su Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con un articolo effettivo della Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli, le quattro questioni che la Corte deve considerare sono:
(1) se i fatti della causa incorrono all'interno dell'ambito dell'articolo effettivo (qui, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1);
(2) se c'è stata una differenza in trattamento fra il richiedente ed altri;
(3) se che la differenza in trattamento è stata sulla base di uno dei motivi protetti esposta fuori in Articolo 14 della Convenzione; e
(4) se c'era una giustificazione ragionevole ed obiettiva per che la differenza in trattamento; se non c'era, la differenza in trattamento sarà discriminatoria ed in violazione di Articolo 14.
(un) Se i fatti della causa incorrono all'interno dell'ambito Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
62. La proibizione della discriminazione custodita in Articolo 14 prolunga oltre il godimento dei diritti e le libertà che la Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre costringa ogni Stato a garantire. Fa domanda anche a quelli diritti supplementari, mentre incorrendo all'interno della sfera generale di qualsiasi Convenzione Articolo per il quale lo Stato ha deciso volontariamente di prevedere (Konstantin Markin c. la Russia [GC], n. 30078/06, § 124 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti) ed E.B. c. la Francia [GC], n. 43546/02, § 48 22 gennaio 2008).
63. Questi principi fanno domanda in cause sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo generalmente N.ro 1 e è ugualmente attinente quando viene a benefici di welfare. In particolare, questo Articolo non crea un diritto per acquisire proprietà. Non mette restrizione sulla libertà dello Stato Contraente per decidere se avere in posto o no qualsiasi forma di schema di previdenza sociale, o scegliere il tipo o importo di benefici per prevedere sotto qualsiasi simile schema. Comunque, se un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di un beneficio di welfare-se condizionale o non sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione che genera un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo deve essere considerata N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (Stummer c. l'Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 82 ECHR 2011).
64. La prova attinente è se, ma per la condizione di diritto della quale il richiedente si lamenta, lui o lei avrebbe avuto un diritto, esecutivo sotto diritto nazionale, ricevere il beneficio in oggetto (Stummer a § 83 e Fabris c. la Francia [GC], n. 16574/08, § 52 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti)).
65. Nel fare domanda che prova alla causa presente, la Corte considera che, mentre una serie di benefici sembra essere stata disponibile ai possessori di schede di rifugiato, è solamente necessario per considerare il particolare beneficio di assistenza di alloggio: questo, piuttosto che gli altri benefici evidentemente disponibile, era la ragione per la quale il richiedente ha fatto domanda una scheda di rifugiato nel primo posto.
66. Che assistenza di alloggio chiaramente era un “il beneficio” per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Nel 2003, la data di materiale per i fini della causa presente, la condizione primaria di diritto ad assistenza di alloggio era che la persona che fa domanda per sé doveva essere il possessore di una scheda di rifugiato. A che tempo, c'era nessuno mezzi esaminano (veda paragrafo 27 sopra). Infine, l'altra condizione attinente sola per ottenere questa assistenza nel 2003 era che la persona che fa domanda per l'assistenza prima non aveva ottenuto un prestito dallo Stato: non si ha suggerito che il richiedente presente non incontrò quel la condizione. Perciò, ma per il bisogno di avere una scheda di rifugiato, il richiedente avrebbe avuto un diritto, esecutivo sotto legge cipriota, ricevere assistenza di alloggio.
67. Nel cercare di persuadere la Corte che i fatti di questa causa non incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il Governo ha chiesto, sulla base di tre osservazioni, distinguere lo schema di assistenza di rifugiato dagli altri schemi di beneficio simili che sono stati considerati che con la Corte incorra all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Prima, si dice che lo schema fu progettato per aiutare quelli la maggior parte in bisogno. Secondo, loro presentano che questa causa è diversa da quelle cause dove un richiedente appartiene ad una classe di individui coperta con un schema di benefici sociale ma lo schema è fatto domanda in una maniera discriminatoria. Questo è perché, al giorno d'oggi la causa, lo schema di assistenza di rifugiato non incluse semplicemente persone nella situazione del richiedente. Terzo, nell'osservazione del Governo qualsiasi conclusione contraria sarebbe uguale a sostenendo che un Stato non è gratis priorizzare le necessità o scegliere la classe di persone eleggibile per assistenza.
68. Queste osservazioni sono unpersuasive. Le primo e terze osservazioni sono, in essenza, osservazioni come a se la differenza in trattamento in diritto ad una scheda di rifugiato (e così ai benefici che sono concessi rifugiati) aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole piuttosto che se i benefici ai quali sono concessi rifugiati incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo Nessuno 1. Come alla seconda osservazione del Governo, non è appoggio nella causa-legge della Corte per distinguere fra un schema che fece domanda in una maniera discriminatoria ed un schema dai quali una persona è stata esclusa in una maniera discriminatoria: in ambo le cause, la persona non ha ricevuto un beneficio al quale sono concessi membri dello schema. In breve, non c'è niente nelle tre osservazioni del Governo che potrebbero gettare dubbio sulla correttezza della conclusione al quale la Corte è giunta in paragrafo 66 sopra.
69. Per queste ragioni, la Corte trova, che i fatti di questa causa incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) Se c'è stata una differenza in trattamento
70. Ci sarà una differenza in trattamento se può essere stabilito che altre persone in un analogo o pertinentemente situazione simile gode trattamento preferenziale (veda Konstantin Markin, citato sopra, § 125).
71. Appellandosi sulle proporzioni diverse di donne ed uomini nel posto di lavoro quando lo schema prima fu decretato, il Governo ha presentato che il richiedente, come la figlia di una donna spostata non è in una posizione analoga al figlio di un uomo spostato. Comunque, non è chiaro alla Corte perché queste proporzioni dovrebbero avere qualsiasi nascendo su se i figli di donne spostate ed i figli di uomini spostati erano in una situazione analoga, o nel 1975 quando lo schema fu decretato o nel 2003 quando il richiedente fece domanda per una scheda di rifugiato. Il fatto che a più uomini accadde di essere nel posto di lavoro (e con implicazione che uomini più spostati hanno lavorato che spostò donne) non vuole dire che i figli di uomini spostati sono in qualsiasi situazione diversa dai figli di donne spostate. La differenza sola fra loro è il sesso del loro spostato genitore. I figli di uomini spostati ed i figli di donne spostate hanno le necessità simili e sono perciò in una situazione completamente analoga.
72. Nell'essere concesso ad una scheda di rifugiato (e così assistenza di alloggio) i figli di uomini spostati chiaramente godono trattamento preferenziale sui figli di donne spostate. Una differenza in trattamento è stata stabilita così in questa causa.
(il c) Se questa differenza in trattamento è stata sulla base di uno dei motivi protetti esposta fuori in Articolo 14 della Convenzione
73. Non sembra essere in controversia che questa differenza in trattamento era sulla base di sesso, uno dei motivi protetti espose fuori in Articolo 14.
(d) Se c'era una giustificazione ragionevole ed obiettiva per questa differenza in trattamento
74. Una differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria e così in violazione di Articolo 14, se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; quel è, se non intraprende un scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso (veda Fabris, citato sopra, § 56; e Konstantin Markin a §125).
75. In cause dove è sui motivi di sesso, i principi generali che fanno domanda nel determinare questa questione della giustificazione la differenza in trattamento fu riaffermato con la Grande Camera in Konstantin Markin a §§ 126 e 127. Dove attinente alla causa presente, questi prevedono, siccome segue (riferimenti interni omisero):
- Gli Stati Contraenti godono un certo margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifici una differenza in trattamento. La sfera del margine della valutazione varierà secondo le circostanze, l'argomento ed il suo sfondo, ma la definitivo decisione come all'osservanza dei resti di requisiti della Convenzione con la Corte. Poiché la Convenzione è un sistema per la protezione di diritti umani prima e primo, la Corte deve avere comunque riguardo ad al cambio condiziona in Stati Contraenti e risponde, per esempio a qualsiasi emergendo consentimento come agli standard per essere realizzato.
- L'avanzamento dell'uguaglianza di genere è oggi una meta notevole nel membro Stati del Consiglio di Europa e ragioni molto pesanti dovrebbe essere fissato spedisce di fronte a tale differenza in trattamento potrebbe essere riguardato come compatibile con la Convenzione. In particolare, riferimenti a tradizioni, assunzioni generali o atteggiamenti sociali che prevalgono in un particolare paese sono la giustificazione insufficiente per una differenza in trattamento sui motivi di sesso. Per esempio, a Stati sono impediti di tradizioni imponenti che derivano dal ruolo primordiale dell'uomo ed il ruolo secondario della donna nella famiglia.
76. Facendo domanda questi principi alla causa presente, la Corte comincia con osservare che la giustificazione principale il Governo ha avanzato per la differenza in trattamento è le differenze socio-economiche che furono dette per esistere in Cipro nel 1974, notevolmente che uomini erano i provveditori tradizionali a che tempo (veda le loro osservazioni riassunte a paragrafo 42 sopra). Questo è precisamente comunque, qualche genere di riferimento a “tradizioni, assunzioni generali o atteggiamenti sociali che prevalgono” quale offre la giustificazione insufficiente per una differenza in trattamento sui motivi di sesso perché deriva completamente dal ruolo primordiale dell'uomo ed il ruolo secondario di donna nella famiglia (veda Konstantin Markin a paragrafo 127, citò a paragrafo 74 sopra).
77. Inoltre, anche se quel riflettè la natura generale della vita economica in Cipro rurale nel 1974 (una questione contestata con le parti: compari le osservazioni del Governo a paragrafo 42 sopra con quelli del richiedente a paragrafo 56 sopra), non giustificò riguardando tutti spostati uomini come provveditori e tutti spostarono donne come incapace di adempiere che ruolo spostò una volta dal settentrionale alla parte meridionale della Repubblica. Né potrebbe giustificare spogliando successivamente i figli di donne spostate dei benefici alle quali i figli di uomini spostati furono concessi. Questo è particolarmente così quando molti dei benefici che i figli di uomini spostati sono stati concessi, incluso assistenza di alloggio era senza qualsiasi riferimento ad una prova di mezzi. Questo avrebbe voluto dire, per istanza alla quale il figlio di una donna spostata che guadagna un reddito più basso non sarebbe stato concesso che assistenza mentre il figlio di un guadagno di uomo spostato un reddito più alto sarebbe stato concesso a sé. Questa differenza in trattamento verso i figli di deportati non può essere giustificata semplicemente con riferimento al bisogno di priorizzare risorse nella conseguenza immediata dell'invasione del 1974.
78. Il Governo, disegnando in primo luogo sull'espansione progressiva dello schema fin da 1974 ed in secondo luogo sulle implicazioni budgetarie che terminando la differenza in trattamento avrebbe avuto, ha presentato che, anche se la differenza in trattamento non potrebbe essere giustificata più, lo Stato dovrebbe godere nondimeno un margine della valutazione nello scegliere il tempismo e dovrebbe volere dire per prolungare lo schema di assistenza di rifugiato ai figli di donne spostate.
79. Nessune di queste considerazioni basta rimediare all'altrimenti natura discriminatoria dello schema. Prima, purchessia i tentativi di espandere lo schema da 1974 a 2003, nessuni dei cambi introdusse durante che periodo guarì la differenza chiara in trattamento fra i figli di uomini spostati ed i figli di donne spostate. Né si può dire che questi cambi furono introdotti per riflettere l'entrata graduale di donne nell'operi mercato (veda le osservazioni del Governo a paragrafo 51 sopra). Da 1974-2013 lo schema sempre escluse i figli di donne spostate. Le considerazioni budgetarie non possono notificare giustificare una differenza chiara in trattamento da sole basò esclusivamente su genere, particolarmente quando le espansioni successive dello schema fra il 1974 ed il 2013 possono loro hanno avuto conseguenze finanziarie.
80. Sta prevedendo particolarmente infine, che lo schema continuò sulla base di questa differenza in trattamento sino a 2013, quasi quaranta anni dopo che prima fu introdotto. Il fatto che lo schema ha persistito per così lungo, ed ancora continuò ad essere basato solamente su ruoli di famiglia tradizionali siccome capito nel 1974, vuole dire che lo Stato deve essere preso avere ecceduto qualsiasi margine della valutazione che ha goduto in questo campo. Ragioni molto pesanti sarebbero state costrette a giustificare tale differenza lungo-durevole in trattamento. Nessuno è stato mostrato per esistere. Non c'è di conseguenza giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole per questa differenza in trattamento.
81. Per queste ragioni, la Corte conclude, che la differenza in trattamento fra i figli di donne spostate ed i figli di uomini spostati era discriminatoria e così i costatazione una violazione di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
82. In prospettiva di che conclusione, la Corte lo considera non necessario esaminare separatamente l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo (veda Ponomaryovi, citato sopra, § 64).
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N. 12
83. Nell'alternativa, il richiedente si lamentò, che il rifiuto per accordarla una scheda di identità era in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12 che prevedono:
“1. Il godimento di qualsiasi set destro sarà garantito avanti con legge senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.
2. Nessuno sarà discriminato contro con qualsiasi autorità pubblica su qualsiasi base come quelli menzionò in paragrafo 1.”
84. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
85. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo ha collegato all'esaminato sopra e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile. Comunque, avendo riguardo ad alla sentenza relativo ad Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda paragrafo 81 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario per esaminare questa azione di reclamo.
III. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 13 Di La Convenzione
86. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre che c'era stata una violazione di Articolo 13 come nessuna autorità in Cipro, incluso le corti aveva esaminato la sua azione di reclamo e, di conseguenza, determinato il suo sollievo. Articolo 13 prevede:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
87. Il Governo presentò che Articolo 13 non garantisce una via di ricorso che permette alla legislazione primaria di un Stato Contraente di essere impugnata su motivi che è contrario alla Convenzione (P.m c. il Regno Unito, n. 6638/03, § 34 19 luglio 2005 ed ulteriore cita therein).
Ammissibilità di A.
88. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
89. La Corte considera che i procedimenti nazionali che portato il richiedente non tentarono di impugnare legislazione primaria: al tempo lei fu rifiutata una scheda di rifugiato tutte le disposizioni attinenti furono contenute in decisioni del Consiglio di Ministri (veda divide in paragrafi 19–24 sopra). Loro erano così decisioni amministrativo-esecutive, ed il Governo non si è appellato su qualsiasi atto legislativo attinente allo schema ed in vigore alla questione di momento di entrata. Così, contrari all'osservazione del Governo, questa non è una causa dove la misura contestata fu contenuta in legislazione primaria e dove, non c'era perciò, nessun bisogno di avere una via di ricorso effettiva in posto. Di conseguenza, l'articolo ordinario sul bisogno di offrire una via di ricorso effettiva fa domanda.
90. Nel fare domanda che articolo, i richiami di Corte che il “l'efficacia” di un “la via di ricorso” all'interno del significato di Articolo 13 non dipenda dalla certezza di una conseguenza favorevole per il richiedente (veda, come una recente autorità, Ališi ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, § 131 ECHR 2014). Ci deve essere nondimeno, una via di ricorso nazionale che concede l'autorità nazionale e competente sia trattare con la sostanza dell'azione di reclamo di Convenzione attinente ed accordare il sollievo appropriato (veda Nada c. la Svizzera [GC], n. 10593/08, § 207 ECHR 2012; veda anche Ališi ed Altri, ibid.).
91. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la ragione la Corte Suprema era incapace per considerare se il richiedente fu concesso alla via di ricorso lei chiese (l'annullare della decisione di rifiutarla una scheda di rifugiato) era che considerò che non aveva giurisdizione per prolungare lo schema di scheda di rifugiato senza infrangere il principio costituzionale della separazione dei poteri (veda i definitivo due paragrafi della sentenza della Corte Suprema, citò a paragrafo 15 sopra). Nelle altre parole, la Corte Suprema, facendo domanda che principio, si trovi incapace considerare i meriti della rivendicazione di discriminazione del richiedente e così incapace accordare il suo sollievo appropriato. La Corte capisce prontamente la preoccupazione della Corte Suprema per assicurare riguardo corretto per la separazione dei poteri sotto la Costituzione della Cipro e non è il posto della Corte per mettere in dubbio l'interpretazione della Corte Suprema e la richiesta di quel il principio. Comunque, la conseguenza dell'approccio della Corte Suprema era che, in finora come le azioni di reclamo di Convenzione del richiedente riguardò, ricorso alla Corte Suprema non era una via di ricorso effettiva per lei. Poiché il Governo non ha presentato che qualsiasi l'altra via di ricorso effettiva esistè in Cipro al tempo di materiale per permettere il richiedente di impugnare la natura discriminatoria dello schema di scheda di rifugiato, segue che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
IV. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
92. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. danno Patrimoniale
93. Il richiedente presentò che lei è concessa ad un importo di EUR 112,225 che riflette la perdita nel valore della proprietà lei avrebbe potuto acquisire l'avuta stato accordato una scheda di rifugiato nel 2003. In appoggio della sua rivendicazione, il richiedente presentò un rapporto di valutazione condotto sulla base di proprietà casualmente selezionate in Kokkynotrimithia dove lei visse. Il rapporto comparò i prezzi fra proprietà per gli anni 2003 là, quando il richiedente fece domanda per una scheda di rifugiato, e 2008, la data che il richiedente ha presentato le sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione eque. Secondo il rapporto, il prezzo medio di un'area di edificio nel 2003 era CYP 15,700 (verso EUR 26,825) in contrasto ad EUR 153,774 nel 2008. Il richiedente presentò che l'assistenza di alloggio di CYP 11,540 quale lei avrebbe potuto ricevere in 2003 corrisposti a 73% del prezzo di acquisto di un'area di edificio nel 2003. Con questo in mente il richiedente presentò che, prendendo in considerazione 2008 prezzi, lei aveva sofferto di una perdita di EUR 112,225 (EUR 153,774 x 73%). Alternativamente, il richiedente presentò che lei fu concessa ad una somma uguale all'assistenza di alloggio accordata a deportati che desiderano costruire una residenza di tre-camera da letto in 2008 significato EUR 68,350.
94. Il Governo contestò sia delle rivendicazioni del richiedente che presentano che le somme chieste erano speculative e non causalmente collegarono alla violazione allegato della Convenzione.
95. La Corte reitera che la condizione indispensabile per fare un'assegnazione in riguardo di danno patrimoniale è l'esistenza di un collegamento causale fra il danno addotto e la violazione fondò (veda, per istanza, Nikolova c. la Bulgaria [GC], n. 31195/96, § 73 ECHR 1999III?). La Corte non può accettare perciò la rivendicazione del richiedente basata sul valore del 2008 di proprietà che lei avrebbe potuto comprare nel 2003, né la sua rivendicazione per CYP 68,350 (il valore di assistenza di alloggio nel 2008): nessune di queste rivendicazioni è collegato causalmente alla violazione trovata.
96. Nondimeno, la Corte reitera che sulla base di Articolo 41 il richiedente deve finora come possibile sia fissato nella posizione lei avrebbe goduto avuto la violazione trovata con la Corte non accaduta: veda Wessels Bergervoet, citato sopra, § 60. È perciò appropriato per assegnare la concessione di assistenza di alloggio il richiedente lei avrebbe ricevuto ma per la differenza in trattamento lei subì. Comunque, poiché il richiedente non ha offerto dettagli sufficienti come a perché lei disse lei sarebbe stata concessa per ricevere CYP 11,540, la Corte lo considera appropriato a base la sua assegnazione sul minimo importo disponibile nel 2003, CYP 8,520 (veda paragrafo 28 sopra). Aggiustando che somma per riflettere interesse e l'inflazione fin da 2003, e decidendo su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 21,500 il richiedente.
B. danno Non-patrimoniale
97. Il richiedente presentò che lei è concessa anche a danni non-patrimoniali per motivi che la discriminazione era solamente sulla base di genere e che il Governo andò a vuoto continuamente a prendere qualsiasi misure correttive per alleviare il trattamento discriminatorio.
98. Il Governo presentò che, nell'evento la Corte trovò una violazione della Convenzione, simile sentenza dovrebbe costituire la soddisfazione equa e sufficiente.
99. La Corte accetta che il richiedente ha sofferto di danno non-patrimoniale che è il risultato della natura della discriminazione. Decidendo su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 4,000 il richiedente sotto questo capo.
Costi di C. e spese
100. Il richiedente chiese CYP 4,086 (EUR 6,981) per i costi e spese lei era incorsa in di fronte alla Corte Suprema, più l'interesse. Lei disse inoltre EUR 10,000 per i costi e spese che lei era incorsa in in procedimenti di fronte alla Corte. Infine, il richiedente chiesto EUR 575 per la preparazione del rapporto di valutazione su proprietà fissa il prezzo di in Kokkynotrimithia (veda paragrafo 93 sopra).
101. Il Governo accettò che i costi e spese subirono col richiedente nei procedimenti nazionali ed in procedimenti di fronte alla Corte era recuperabile con modo della soddisfazione equa previde che loro davvero e necessariamente erano stati incorsi in.
102. Per costi e spese incorse in col richiedente di fronte alla Corte Suprema, la Corte considera, che questi erano necessariamente e ragionevolmente incorsi in nel tentativo del richiedente di chiedere compensazione per la violazione della Convenzione che ha trovato. Così, loro sono in principio recuperabile (veda, per istanza, Società Associata di Ingegneri Locomotivi e Pompieri (ASLEF) c. il Regno Unito, n. 11002/05, § 58 ECHR 2007...). Le somme chieste sono anche ragionevoli come a quantum. La Corte considera, perciò, che queste rivendicazioni dovrebbero essere soddisfatte in pieno e di conseguenza le assegnazioni il richiedente EUR 6,981 sotto questo capo.
103. Come riguardi i costi incorsero in nei procedimenti di fronte a sé, la Corte nota che il richiedente non ha offerto una nota spese particolareggiata che sufficientemente prova le sue rivendicazioni (Efstathiou e Michailidis & Co. Motel Amerika c. la Grecia, n. 55794/00, § 40 ECHR 2003 IX). Per questa ragione, i costatazione di Corte che questa parte della rivendicazione del richiedente deve essere respinta.
104. Come riguardi l'EUR 575 infine incorse in, per rapporto di valutazione, determinato che danno patrimoniale è stato calcolato sulla base dell'importo di assistenza di alloggio disponibile al richiedente nel 2003 e non proprietà fissa il prezzo di nel 2008, i costatazione di Corte che questa spesa non è stata incorsa in necessariamente (Michael Theodossiou Ltd. c. la Cipro (soddisfazione equa), n. 31811/04, § 30 14 aprile 2015). Questa parte della rivendicazione del richiedente deve essere respinta anche.
Interesse di mora di D.
105. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare i meriti dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo;

4. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare i meriti dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12;

5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione;

6. Sostiene
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 21,500 (ventuno mila cinquecento euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 4,000 (quattro mila euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'iii) EUR 6,981 (sei mila, novecento ed ottantuno euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

7. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 13 ottobre 2015, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Françoise Elens-Passos Guido Raimondi
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.