Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF OLIARI AND OTHERS v. ITALY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41

NUMERO: 18766/11/2015
STATO: Italia
DATA: 21/07/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 8 - Right to respect for private and family life (Article 8 - Positive obligations Article 8-1 - Respect for family life
Respect for private life) Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)
Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)



FOURTH SECTION





CASE OF OLIARI AND OTHERS v. ITALY

(Applications nos. 18766/11 and 36030/11)













JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

21 July 2015



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Oliari and Others v. Italy,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Päivi Hirvelä, President,
Guido Raimondi,
Ledi Bianku,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paul Mahoney,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Yonko Grozev, judges,
and Françoise Elens-Passos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 30 June 2015,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in two applications (nos. 18766/11 and 36030/11) against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by six Italian nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 21 March and 10 June 2011 respectively.
2. The first two applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Trent. The remaining applicants were represented by OMISSIS, lawyers practising in Milan. The Italian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Ersiliagrazia Spatafora.
3. The applicants complained that the Italian legislation did not allow them to get married or enter into any other type of civil union and thus they were being discriminated against as a result of their sexual orientation. They cited Articles 8, 12 and 14 of the Convention.
4. On 3 December 2013 the Chamber to which the case was allocated decided that the complaints concerning Article 8 alone and in conjunction with Article 14 were to be communicated to the Government. It further decided that the applications should be joined.
5. On 7 January 2013 the Vice-President of the Section to which the case had been allocated decided to grant anonymity to one of the applicants under Rule 47 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
6. Written observations were also received from FIDH, AIRE Centre, ILGA-Europe, ECSOL, UFTDU and UDU jointly, Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti, and ECLJ (European Centre for Law and Justice), which had been given leave to intervene by the Vice-President of the Chamber (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention). Mr Pavel Parfentev on behalf of seven Russian NGOS (Family and Demography Foundation, For Family Rights, Moscow City Parents Committee, Saint-Petersburg City Parents Committee, Parents Committee of Volgodonsk City, the regional charity “Svetlitsa” Parents’ Culture Centre, and the “Peterburgskie mnogodetki” social organisation), and three Ukrainian NGOS (the Parental Committee of Ukraine, the Orthodox Parental Committee, and the Health Nation social organisation), had also been given leave to intervene by the Vice-President of the Chamber. However, no submissions have been received by the Court.
7. The Government objected to the observations submitted by FIDH, AIRE Centre, ILGA-Europe, ECSOL, UFTDU and UDU jointly, as they had reached the Court after the set deadline, namely on 27 March 2014 instead of 26 March 2014. The Court notes that at the relevant time the Vice-President of the Chamber did not take a decision to reject the submissions presented, which were in fact sent to the parties for comment. The Court, having considered that the observations were anticipated by e mail and received by the Court at 2.00 a.m. on 27 March 2014, and that the hard copy received by fax later that day contained an apology as well as an explanation for the delay, rejects the Government’s objection.
8. The applicants in application no. 18766/11 requested that an oral hearing be held in the case. On 30 June 2015 the Court considered this request. It decided that having regard to the materials before it an oral hearing was not necessary.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
9. The details concerning the applicants may be found in the Annex.
The background to the case
1. Mr OMISSIS and Mr A.

10. In July 2008 these two applicants, who were in a committed stable relationship with each other, declared their intention to marry, and requested the Civil Status Office of the Trent Commune to issue the relevant marriage banns.
11. On 25 July 2008 their request was rejected.
12. The two applicants challenged the decision before the Trent Tribunal (in accordance with Article 98 of the Civil Code). They argued that Italian law did not explicitly prohibit marriage between persons of the same sex, and that, even if that were the case, such a position would be unconstitutional.
13. By a decision of 24 February 2009 the Trent Tribunal rejected their claim. It noted that the Constitution did not establish the requirements to contract marriage, but the Civil Code did and it precisely provided that one such requirement was that spouses be of the opposite sex. Thus, a marriage between persons of the same sex lacked one of the most essential requirements to render it a valid legal act, namely a difference in sex between the parties. In any event there was no fundamental right to marry, neither could the limited law provisions constitute discrimination, since the limitations suffered by the applicants were the same as those applied to everyone. Furthermore, it noted that European Union (“EU”) law left such rights to be regulated within the national order.
14. The applicants appealed to the Trent Court of Appeal. While the court reiterated the unanimous interpretation given to Italian law in the field, namely to the effect that ordinary law, particularly the Civil Code, did not allow marriage between people of the same sex, it considered it relevant to make a referral to the Constitutional Court in connection with the claims of unconstitutionality of the law in force.
15. The Italian Constitutional Court in judgment no. 138 of 15 April 2010 declared inadmissible the applicants’ constitutional challenge to Articles 93, 96, 98, 107, 108, 143, 143 bis and 231 of the Italian Civil Code, as it was directed to the obtainment of additional norms not provided for by the Constitution (diretta ad ottenere una pronunzia additiva non costituzionalmente obbligata).
16. The Constitutional Court considered Article 2 of the Italian Constitution, which provided that the Republic recognises and guarantees the inviolable rights of the person, as an individual and in social groups where personality is expressed, as well as the duties of political, economic and social solidarity against which there was no derogation. It noted that by social group one had to understand any form of community, simple or complex, intended to enable and encourage the free development of any individual by means of relationships. Such a notion included homosexual unions, understood as a stable cohabitation of two people of the same sex, who have a fundamental right to freely express their personality in a couple, obtaining – in time and by the means and limits to be set by law – juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties. However, this recognition, which necessarily requires general legal regulation aimed at setting out the rights and duties of the partners in a couple, could be achieved in other ways apart from the institution of marriage between homosexuals. As shown by the different systems in Europe, the question of the type of recognition was left to regulation by Parliament, in the exercise of its full discretion. Nevertheless, the Constitutional Court clarified that without prejudice to Parliament’s discretion, it could however intervene according to the principle of equality in specific situations related to a homosexual couple’s fundamental rights, where the same treatment of married couples and homosexual couples was called for. The court would in such cases assess the reasonableness of the measures.
17. It went on to consider that it was true that the concepts of family and marriage could not be considered “crystallised” in reference to the moment when the Constitution came into effect, given that constitutional principles must be interpreted bearing in mind changes in the legal order and the evolution of society and its customs. Nevertheless, such an interpretation could not be extended to the point where it affected the very essence of legal norms, modifying them in such a way as to include phenomena and problems which had not been considered in any way when it was enacted. In fact it appeared from the preparatory work to the Constitution that the question of homosexual unions had not been debated by the assembly, despite the fact that homosexuality was not unknown. In drafting Article 29 of the Constitution, the assembly had discussed an institution with a precise form and an articulate discipline provided for by the Civil Code. Thus, in the absence of any such reference, it was inevitable to conclude that what had been considered was the notion of marriage as defined in the Civil Code, which came into effect in 1942 and which at the time, and still today, established that spouses had to be of the opposite sex. Therefore, the meaning of this constitutional precept could not be altered by a creative interpretation. In consequence, the constitutional norm did not extend to homosexual unions, and was intended to refer to marriage in its traditional sense.
18. Lastly, the court considered that, in respect of Article 3 of the Constitution regarding the principle of equality, the relevant legislation did not create unreasonable discrimination, given that homosexual unions could not be considered equivalent to marriage. Even Article 12 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 9 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights did not require full equality between homosexual unions and marriages between a man and a woman, as this was a matter of Parliamentary discretion to be regulated by national law, as evidenced by the different approaches existing in Europe.
19. In consequence of the above judgment, by a decision (ordinanza) lodged in the relevant registry on 21 September 2010 the Court of Appeal rejected the applicants’ claims in full.
2. Mr OMISSIS and Mr OMISSIS
20. In 2003 these two applicants met and entered into a relationship with each other. In 2004 Mr OMISSIS decided to undertake further studies (and thus stopped earning any income), a possibility open to him thanks to the financial support of Mr OMISSIS.
21. On 1 July 2005 the couple moved in together. In 2005 and 2007 the applicants wrote to the President of the Republic highlighting difficulties encountered by same-sex couples and soliciting the enactment of legislation in favour of civil unions.
22. In 2008 the applicants’ physical cohabitation was registered in the authorities’ records. In 2009 they designated each other as guardians in the event of incapacitation (amministratori di sostegno).
23. On 19 February 2011 they requested their marriage banns to be issued. On 9 April 2011 their request was rejected on the basis of the law and jurisprudence pertaining to the subject matter (see Relevant domestic law below).
24. The two applicants did not pursue the remedy provided for under Article 98 of the Civil Code, in so far as it could not be considered effective following the Constitutional Court pronouncement mentioned above.
3. Mr OMISSIS and Mr OMISSIS
25. In 2002 these two applicants met and entered into a relationship with each other. In the same year they started cohabiting and since then they have been in a committed relationship.
26. In 2006 they opened a joint bank account.
27. In 2007 the applicants’ physical cohabitation was registered in the authorities’ records.
28. On 3 November 2009 they requested that their marriage banns be issued. The person in charge at the office did not request them to fill in the relevant application, simply attaching their request to a number of analogous requests made by other couples.
29. On 5 November 2009 their request was rejected on the basis of the law and jurisprudence pertaining to the subject matter (see Relevant domestic law below).
30. OMISSIS challenged the decision before the Milan Tribunal.
31. By a decision (decreto) of 9 June 2010 lodged in the relevant registry on 1 July 2010 the Milan Tribunal rejected their claim, considering that it was legitimate for the Civil Status Office to refuse a request to have marriage banns issued for the purposes of a marriage between persons of the same sex, in line with the finding of the Constitutional Court judgment no. 138 of 15 April 2010.
32. The applicants did not lodge a further challenge (reclamo) under Article 739 of the Code of Civil Procedure, in so far as it could not be considered effective following the Constitutional Court pronouncement.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND INTERNATIONAL LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relevant domestic law and practice
1. The Italian Constitution
33. Articles 2, 3 and 29 of the Italian Constitution read as follows:
Article 2
“The Republic recognises and guarantees inviolable human rights, both as an individual and in social groups where personality is developed, and requires the fulfilment of obligations of political, economic, social solidarity, against which there is no derogation.”
Article 3
“All citizens have equal social dignity and are equal before the law, without distinction of sex, race, language, religion, political opinion, personal and social conditions. It is the duty of the Republic to remove those obstacles of an economic or social nature which constrain the freedom and equality of citizens, thereby impeding the full development of the human person and the effective participation of all workers in the political, economic and social organization of the country.”
Article 29
“The Republic recognises the rights of the family as a natural society founded on marriage. Marriage is based on the moral and legal equality of the spouses within the limits laid down by law to guarantee the unity of the family.”
2. Marriage
34. Under Italian domestic law, same-sex couples are not allowed to contract marriage, as affirmed in the Constitutional Court judgment no. 138 (mentioned above).
35. The same has been affirmed by the Italian Court of Cassation in its judgment no. 4184 of 15 March 2012 concerning two Italian citizens of the same sex who got married in the Netherlands and who had challenged the refusal of Italian authorities to register their marriage in the civil status record on the ground of the “non-configurability as a marriage”. The Court of Cassation concluded that the claimants had no right to register their marriage, not because it did not exist or was invalid, but because of its inability to produce any legal effect in the Italian order. It further held that persons of the same sex living together in a stable relationship had the right to respect for their private and family life under Article 8 of the European Convention; therefore, in the exercise of the right to freely live their inviolable status as a couple they may bring an action before a court to claim, in specific situations related to their fundamental rights, the same treatment as that afforded by law to married couples.
36. Furthermore, the Constitutional Court in its judgment no. 170/2014 concerning “forced divorce” following gender reassignment of one of the spouses, found that it was for the legislator to ensure that an alternative to marriage was provided, allowing such a couple to avoid the transformation in their situation, from one of maximum legal protection to an absolutely uncertain one. The Constitutional Court went on to state that the legislator had to act promptly to resolve the legal vacuum causing a lack of protection for the couple.
3. Other relevant case-law in the context of same-sex couples
37. In a case before the Tribunal of Reggio Emilia, the claimants (a same-sex couple) had not requested the tribunal to recognise their marriage entered into in Spain, but to recognise their right to family life in Italy, on the basis that they were related. The Tribunal of Reggio Emilia, by means of an ordinance of 13 February 2012, in the light of the EU directives and their transposition into Italian law, as well as the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, considered that such a marriage was valid for the purposes of obtaining a residence permit in Italy.
38. In the judgment of the Tribunal of Grosseto of 3 April 2014, delivered by a court of first instance, it was held that the refusal to register a foreign marriage was unlawful. The court thus ordered the competent public authority to proceed with registration of the marriage. While the order was being executed, the case was appealed against by the State. By a judgment of 19 September 2014 the Court of Appeal of Florence, having detected a procedural error, quashed the first-instance decision and remitted the case to the tribunal of Grosseto.
4. Cohabitation agreements
39. Cohabitation agreements are not specifically provided for in Italian law.
40. Protection of cohabiting couples more uxorio has always been derived from Article 2 of the Italian Constitution, as interpreted in various court judgments over the years (post 1988). In more recent years (2012 onwards) domestic judgments have also considered cohabiting same sex couples as deserving such protection.
41. In order to fill the lacuna in the written law, with effect from 2 December 2013 it has been possible to enter into “cohabitation agreements”, namely a private deed, which does not have a specified form provided by law, and which may be entered into by cohabiting persons, be they in a parental relationship, partners, friends, simple flatmates or carers, but not by married couples. Such contracts mainly regulate the financial aspects of living together, cessation of the cohabitation, and assistance in the event of illness or incapacity .
5. Civil unions
42. Italian domestic law does not provide for any alternative union to marriage, either for homosexual couples or for heterosexual ones. The former have thus no means of recognition.
43. In a report of 2013 prepared by Professor F. Gallo (then President of the Constitutional Court) addressed to the highest Italian constitutional authorities, the latter stated:
“Dialogue is sometimes more difficult with the [Constitutional] Court’s natural interlocutor. This is particularly so in cases where it solicits the legislature to modify a legal norm which it considered to be in contrast with the Constitution. Such requests are not to be underestimated. They constitute, in fact, the only means available to the [Constitutional] Court to oblige the legislative organs to eliminate any situation which is not compatible with the Constitution, and which, albeit identified by the [Constitutional] Court, does not lead to a pronouncement of anti-constitutionality. ... A request of this type which remained unheeded was that made in judgment no. 138/10, which, while finding the fact that a marriage could only be contracted by persons of a different sex to be constitutional compliant, also affirmed that same-sex couples had a fundamental right to obtain legal recognition, with the relevant rights and duties, of their union. It left it to Parliament to provide for such regulation, by the means and within the limits deemed appropriate.”
44. Nevertheless, some cities have established registers of “civil unions” between unmarried persons of the same sex or of different sexes: among others are the cities of Empoli, Pisa, Milan, Florence and Naples. However, the registration of “civil unions” of unmarried couples in such registers has a merely symbolic value.
6. Subsequent domestic case-law
45. Similarly, the Italian Constitutional Court, in its judgments nos. 276/2010 of 7 July 2010 lodged in the registry on 22 July 2010, and 4/2011 of 16 December 2010 lodged in the registry on 5 January 2011, declared manifestly ill-founded claims that the above-mentioned articles of the Civil Code (in so far as they did not allow marriage between persons of the same sex) were not in conformity with Article 2 of the Constitution. The Constitutional Court reiterated that juridical recognition of homosexual unions did not require a union equal to marriage, as shown by the different approaches undertaken in different countries, and that under Article 2 of the Constitution it was for the Parliament, in the exercise of its discretion, to regulate and supply guarantees and recognition to such unions.
More recently, in a case concerning the refusal to issue marriage banns to a same-sex couple who had so requested, the Court of Cassation, in its judgment no. 2400/15 of 9 February 2015, rejected the claimants’ request. Having considered recent domestic and international case-law, it concluded that – while same-sex couples had to be protected under Article 2 of the Italian Constitution and that it was for the legislature to take action to ensure recognition of the union between such couples – the absence of same-sex marriage was not incompatible with the applicable domestic and international system of human rights. Accordingly, the lack of same-sex marriage could not amount to discriminatory treatment: the problem in the current legal system revolved around the fact that there was no other available union, apart from marriage, be it for heterosexual or homosexual couples. However, it noted that the court could not establish through jurisprudence matters which went beyond its competence.
7. Recent and current legislation
46. The House of Deputies has recently examined Bill no. 242 named “Amendments to the Civil Code and other provisions on equality in access to marriage and filiation by same-sex couples” and Bill no. 15 “Norms against discrimination in matrimony”. The Senate in 2014 examined Bill no. 14 on civil unions and Bill no. 197 concerning amendments to the Civil Code in relation to cohabitation, as well as Bill no. 239 on the introduction into the Civil Code of an agreement on cohabitation and solidarity.
47. A unified bill concerning all the relevant legal proposals was presented to the Senate in 2015 and was adopted by the Senate on 26 March 2015 as a basic text to enable further discussions by the Justice Commission. Amendments were to be submitted by May 2015, and a text presented to the two Chambers constituting Parliament by summer 2015. On 10 June 2015 the Lower House adopted a motion to favour the approval of a law on civil unions, taking particular account of the situation of persons of the same sex.
8. Remedies in the domestic system
48. A decision of the Civil Status Office may be challenged (within thirty days) before the ordinary tribunal, in accordance with Article 98 of the Civil Code.
49. A decree of the ordinary tribunal may in turn be challenged before the Court of Appeal (within ten days) by virtue of Article 739 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
50. According to its paragraph (3) no further appeal lay against the decision of the Court of Appeal. However, according to Article 111 (7) of the Constitution as interpreted by consolidated case-law, as well as Article 360 (4) of the Code of Civil Procedure (as modified by legislative decree no. 40/06) if the appeal decree affects subjective rights, is of a decisive nature, and constitutes a determination of a potentially irreversible matter (thus having the value of a judgment), the appeal decision may be challenged before the Court of Cassation within sixty days, in the circumstances and form established by Article 360 of the Code of Civil Procedure. According to Article 742 of the Code of Civil Procedure a decree which does not fall under the above-mentioned definition remains revocable and modifiable, at any future date subject to a change in the factual circumstances or underlying law (presupposti di diritto).
51. According to Articles 325 to 327 of the Code of Civil Procedure, an appeal to the Court of Cassation must be lodged within sixty days of the date on which the appeal decision is served on the party. In any event, in the absence of notification such an appeal may not be lodged later than six months from the date it was lodged in the registry (pubblicazione).
52. According to Article 324 of the Code of Civil Procedure, a decision becomes final, inter alia, when it is no longer subject to an appeal, to the Court of Appeal or Cassation, unless otherwise provided for by law.
B. Comparative and European law and practice
1. Comparative-law material
53. The comparative-law material available to the Court on the introduction of official forms of non-marital partnership within the legal systems of Council of Europe (CoE) member States shows that eleven countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Iceland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) recognise same-sex marriage .
54. Eighteen member States (Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) authorise some form of civil partnership for same-sex couples. In certain cases such union may confer the full set of rights and duties applicable to the institute of marriage, and thus, is equal to marriage in everything but name, as for example in Malta. In addition, on 9 October 2014 Estonia also legally recognised same-sex unions by enacting the Registered Partnership Act, which will enter into force on 1 January 2016. Portugal does not have an official form of civil union. Nevertheless, the law recognises de facto civil unions , which have automatic effect and do not require the couple to take any formal steps for recognition. Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Iceland used to provide for registered partnership in the case of same-sex unions, but was abolished in favour of same-sex marriage.
55. It follows that to date twenty-four countries out of the forty-seven CoE member States have already enacted legislation permitting same-sex couples to have their relationship recognised as a legal marriage or as a form of civil union or registered partnership.
2. Relevant Council of Europe materials
56. In its Recommendation 924 (1981) on discrimination against homosexuals, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) criticised the various forms of discrimination against homosexuals in certain member States of the Council of Europe.
57. In Recommendation 1474 (2000) on the situation of lesbians and gays in Council of Europe member States, the PACE recommended that the Committee of Ministers call upon member States, among other things, “to adopt legislation making provision for registered partnerships”. Furthermore, in Recommendation 1470 (2000) on the more specific subject of the situation of gays and lesbians and their partners in respect of asylum and immigration in the member States of the Council of Europe, it recommended to the Committee of Ministers that it urge member States, inter alia, “to review their policies in the field of social rights and protection of migrants in order to ensure that homosexual partnerships and families are treated on the same basis as heterosexual partnerships and families ...”.
58. PACE Resolution 1547 (2007) of 18 April 2007 entitled “State of human rights and democracy in Europe” called upon all member States of the CoE, and in particular their respective parliamentary bodies, to address all the issues raised in the reports and opinions underlying this resolution and in particular, to, inter alia, combat effectively all forms of discrimination based on gender or sexual orientation, introduce anti discrimination legislation, partnership rights and awareness-raising programmes where these are not already in place;” (point 34.14.).
59. Resolution 1728 (2010) of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, adopted on 29 April 2010 and entitled “Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity”, calls on member States to “ensure legal recognition of same-sex partnerships when national legislation envisages such recognition, as already recommended by the Assembly in 2000”, by providing, inter alia, for:
“16.9.1. the same pecuniary rights and obligations as those pertaining to different sex couples;
16.9.2. ‘next of kin’ status;
16.9.3. measures to ensure that, where one partner in a same-sex relationship is foreign, this partner is accorded the same residence rights as would apply if she or he were in a heterosexual relationship;
16.9.4. recognition of provisions with similar effects adopted by other member states;”
60. In Recommendation CM/Rec(2010)5 on measures to combat discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity, the Committee of Ministers recommended that member States:
“1. Examine existing legislative and other measures, keep them under review, and collect and analyse relevant data, in order to monitor and redress any direct or indirect discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity;
2. Ensure that legislative and other measures are adopted and effectively implemented to combat discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity, to ensure respect for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons and to promote tolerance towards them ...”
61. The Recommendation also observed as follows:
“23. Where national legislation confers rights and obligations on unmarried couples, member states should ensure that it applies in a non-discriminatory way to both same sex and different-sex couples, including with respect to survivor’s pension benefits and tenancy rights.
24. Where national legislation recognises registered same-sex partnerships, member states should seek to ensure that their legal status and their rights and obligations are equivalent to those of heterosexual couples in a comparable situation.
25. Where national legislation does not recognise nor confer rights or obligations on registered same-sex partnerships and unmarried couples, member states are invited to consider the possibility of providing, without discrimination of any kind, including against different-sex couples, same-sex couples with legal or other means to address the practical problems related to the social reality in which they live.”
3. European Union law
62. Articles 7, 9 and 21 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, which was signed on 7 December 2000 and entered into force on 1 December 2009, read as follows:
Article 7
“Everyone has the right to respect for his or her private and family life, home and communications.”
Article 9
“The right to marry and to found a family shall be guaranteed in accordance with the national laws governing the exercise of these rights.”
Article 21
“1. Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.
2. Within the scope of application of the Treaty establishing the European Community and of the Treaty on European Union, and without prejudice to the special provisions of those Treaties, any discrimination on grounds of nationality shall be prohibited.”
63. The Commentary of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, prepared in 2006 by the EU Network of Independent Experts on Fundamental Rights, states as follows with regard to Article 9 of the Charter:
“Modern trends and developments in the domestic laws in a number of countries toward greater openness and acceptance of same-sex couples notwithstanding, a few states still have public policies and/or regulations that explicitly forbid the notion that same-sex couples have the right to marry. At present there is very limited legal recognition of same-sex relationships in the sense that marriage is not available to same-sex couples. The domestic laws of the majority of states presuppose, in other words, that the intending spouses are of different sexes. Nevertheless, in a few countries, e.g., in the Netherlands and in Belgium, marriage between people of the same sex is legally recognized. Others, like the Nordic countries, have endorsed a registered partnership legislation, which implies, among other things, that most provisions concerning marriage, i.e. its legal consequences such as property distribution, rights of inheritance, etc., are also applicable to these unions. At the same time it is important to point out that the name ‘registered partnership’ has intentionally been chosen not to confuse it with marriage and it has been established as an alternative method of recognizing personal relationships. This new institution is, consequently, as a rule only accessible to couples who cannot marry, and the same sex partnership does not have the same status and the same benefits as marriage ...
In order to take into account the diversity of domestic regulations on marriage, Article 9 of the Charter refers to domestic legislation. As it appears from its formulation, the provision is broader in its scope than the corresponding articles in other international instruments. Since there is no explicit reference to ‘men and women’ as the case is in other human rights instruments, it may be argued that there is no obstacle to recognize same-sex relationships in the context of marriage. There is, however, no explicit requirement that domestic laws should facilitate such marriages. International courts and committees have so far hesitated to extend the application of the right to marry to same-sex couples ...”
64. A number of other Directives may also be of interest in the present case: they can be found in Vallianatos and Others v. Greece ([GC], nos. 29381/09 and 32684/09, §§ 33-34, ECHR 2013 (extracts)).
4. The United States
65. On 26 June 2015, in the case of Obergefell et al. v. Hodges, Director, Ohio Department of Health et al, the Supreme Court of the United States held that same-sex couples may exercise the fundamental right to marry in all States, and that there was no lawful basis for a State to refuse to recognise a lawful same-sex marriage performed in another State on the ground of its same-sex character.
The petitioners had claimed that the respondent state officials violated the Fourteenth Amendment by denying them the right to marry or to have marriages lawfully performed in another State given full recognition.
The Supreme Court held that that the challenged laws burdened the liberty of same-sex couples, and abridged central precepts of equality. It considered that the marriage laws enforced by the respondents were unequal as same-sex couples were denied all the benefits afforded to opposite-sex couples and were barred from exercising a fundamental right. This denial to same-sex couples of the right to marry worked a grave and continuing harm and the imposition of this disability on gays and lesbians served to disrespect and subordinate them. Indeed, the Equal Protection Clause, like the Due Process Clause, prohibited this unjustified infringement of the fundamental right to marry. These considerations led to the conclusion that the right to marry was a fundamental right inherent in the liberty of the person, and under the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment couples of the same-sex may not be deprived of that right and that liberty. The Supreme Court thus held that same-sex couples may exercise the fundamental right to marry.
Having noted that substantial attention had been devoted to the question by various actors in society, and that according to their constitutional system individuals need not await legislative action before asserting a fundamental right, it considered that were the Supreme Court to stay its hand and allow slower, case-by-case determination of the required availability of specific public benefits to same sex couples, it still would deny gays and lesbians many rights and responsibilities intertwined with marriage.
Lastly, noting that many States already allowed same-sex marriage – and hundreds of thousands of these marriages had already occurred – it opined that the disruption caused by the recognition bans was significant and ever growing. Thus, the Supreme Court also found that there was no lawful basis for a State to refuse to recognise a lawful same-sex marriage performed in another State.
THE LAW
I. PRELIMINARY OBJECTIONS
A. Rule 47
66. The Government cited Article 47 of the Rules of Court. They highlighted that according to the recent revision of Article 47 of the Rules issued by the Plenary Court, the rules on what an application must contain must be applied in a stricter way. Thus, failure to comply with the requirements set out in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this rule may result in the application not being examined by the Court.
67. The applicants in application no. 18766/11 submitted that on the basis of the principle of tempus regit actum, the new Rule 47 adopted in 2013 could not apply to an application lodged in 2011.
68. The Court notes that, quite apart from the failure of the Government to indicate in what way the applicants failed to fulfil the requirements of Rule 47, it is only from 1 January 2014 that the amended Rule 47 applied stricter conditions for the introduction of an application with the Court. In the present case, the Court notes that all the applicants lodged their applications in 2011, and there is no reason to consider that they have not fulfilled the requirements of Rule 47 as applicable at the time.
69. It follows that any Government objection in this respect must be dismissed.
B. Victim status
70. Although not explicitly raised as an objection to the applications’ admissibility, the Government submitted that the applicants had not indicated in what way they had suffered any actual damage, and the reference to the injury of the applicants was only abstract (inheritance rights, assistance to the partner, sub-entry into economic relationships acts). They pointed out that the Court could only judge upon specific circumstances of a case and not make evaluations going beyond the scope of the applications.
71. The Court considers it appropriate to deal with the argument at this stage. It notes that the applicants are individuals past the age of majority, who, according to the information submitted, are in same-sex relationships and in some cases are cohabiting. To the extent that the Italian Constitution as interpreted by the domestic courts excludes same-sex couples from the scope of marriage law, and that because of the absence of any legal framework to that effect the applicants cannot enter into a civil union and organise their relationship accordingly, the Court considers that they are directly concerned by the situation and have a legitimate personal interest in seeing it brought to an end (see, mutatis mutandis, Vallianatos and Others v. Greece [GC], nos. 29381/09 and 32684/09, § 49, ECHR 2013 (extracts), and by implication, Schalk and Kopf v. Austria, no. 30141/04, ECHR 2010).
72. Accordingly, the Court concludes that the individuals in the present applications should be considered “victims” of the alleged violations within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention.
C. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
1. The Government
73. The Government submitted that the applicants had failed to exhaust domestic remedies. They noted that in cases such as the present one it is possible to appeal against refusal to publish wedding banns before the relevant tribunal. The first-instance decision could then be challenged before the Court of Appeal and the Court of Cassation. However, OMISSIS and Mr A. had failed to lodge a further appeal to the Court of Cassation, OMISSIS had not made any challenge to the administrative refusal to publish their banns, and OMISSIS had failed to appeal against the first-instance judgment handed down in their case.
74. The Government referred to the principle of subsidiarity, and considered that the domestic courts could have given the applicants adequate redress for the damage suffered and offered them the legal and judicial means to obtain a statement at least recognising their union as a social formation like a life partnership as traditionally understood [sic]. In support of this the Government made reference to the Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184 delivered in 2012 concerning the registration of same sex marriage contracted abroad, which according to their translation reads as follows:
“[T]he case law of this Court (of Cassation) – according to which the difference in sex of the engaged couple is, together with the manifestation of the will expressed by the same in the presence of the civil state officer celebrant, indispensable minimum requirement for the ‘existence of civil marriage’ as legally relevant act – is no more suitable to the current legal reality, having been radically overcome the idea that the difference in sex couples preparing for marriage is a prerequisite, as to say ‘natural’ of the same ‘existence’ of marriage. For all the above reasons, the no-transcription of homosexual unions depends – not from their ‘non-existence’, nor by their ‘invalidity’ but – by their inability to produce, as marriage records precisely, legal effects in the Italian system.”
In that light, the Government considered that if the applicants had brought their case before the domestic judges they would at least have had a legal recognition of their union. However, they had deliberately chosen not to do so.
75. Furthermore, they noted that the claims lodged before the domestic courts solely concerned their inability to obtain same-sex marriage and not the inability to obtain an alternative form of recognition for such couples.
2. The applicants
76. The applicants submitted that while the Constitutional Court in its judgment of no. 138/10 had found that Article 2 of the Constitution required legal protection of same-sex unions, it had no other option but to declare the complaint inadmissible, given the legislature’s competence in the matter. A similar situation obtained in judgment no. 170/14 (see paragraph 36 above). Furthermore, the applicants submitted that the Government had not proved, by means of examples, that the domestic courts could provide any legal recognition of their unions. Indeed, given that the flaw related to the law (or lack thereof), ordinary domestic courts were prevented from taking any remedial action: even the court with competence to review the laws was unable to do this. Within the domestic system the appropriate remedy would have been a challenge before the Constitutional Court, which the Court had already stated was not a remedy to be used, it not being directly accessible to individuals (see Scoppola v. Italy (no. 2) [GC], no. 10249/03, § 70, 17 September 2009). Moreover, in the present case such a challenge would not have been successful, given the precedent which lay in judgment no. 138/10, subsequently confirmed by other decisions.
3. The Court’s assessment
77. The Court reiterates that Article 35 § 1 of the Convention requires that complaints intended to be made subsequently at Strasbourg should have been made to the appropriate domestic body, at least in substance (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 66, Reports 1996 IV, and Gäfgen v. Germany [GC], no. 22978/05 §§ 144 and 146, ECHR 2010). The purpose of the exhaustion rule is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to it (see, among many other authorities, Selmouni v. France [GC], no. 25803/94, § 74, ECHR 1999-V). That rule is based on the assumption, reflected in Article 13 of the Convention, with which it has close affinity, that there is an effective remedy available in respect of the alleged breach in the domestic system (ibid.). To be effective, a remedy must be capable of remedying directly the impugned state of affairs, and must offer reasonable prospects of success (see Sejdovic v. Italy [GC], no. 56581/00, § 46, ECHR 2006 II).
78. The scope of the Contracting States’ obligations under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant’s complaint; however, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law (see, for example, ?lhan v. Turkey [GC], no. 22277/93, § 97, ECHR 2000-VII). It is for the Court to determine whether the means available to an applicant for raising a complaint are “effective” in the sense either of preventing the alleged violation or its continuation, or of providing adequate redress for any violation that had already occurred (see Kud?a v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, §§ 157-158, ECHR 2000 XI). Whether the redress given is effective will depend, among other things, on the nature of the right alleged to have been breached, the reasons given for the decision and the persistence of the unfavourable consequences for the person concerned after that decision (see, for example, Freimanis and L?dums v. Latvia, nos. 73443/01 and 74860/01, § 68, 9 February 2006). In certain cases a violation cannot be made good through the mere payment of compensation (see, for example, Petkov and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 77568/01, 178/02 and 505/02, § 80, 11 June 2009 in connection with Article 3 of Protocol No. 1) and the inability to render a binding decision granting redress may also raise issues (see Silver and Others v. the United Kingdom, 25 March 1983, § 115, Series A no. 61; Leander v. Sweden, 26 March 1987, § 82, Series A no. 116; and Segerstedt-Wiberg and Others v. Sweden, no. 62332/00, § 118, ECHR 2006 VII).
79. The only remedies which Article 35 of the Convention requires to be exhausted are those that relate to the breaches alleged and at the same time are available and sufficient. The existence of such remedies must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but also in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness (see Akdivar and Others, cited above, § 66, and Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia [GC], no. 17153/11, § 71, 25 March 2014).
80. In addition, according to the “generally recognised principles of international law”, there may be special circumstances which absolve the applicant from the obligation to exhaust the domestic remedies at his disposal (see Selmouni, cited above, § 75). However, the Court points out that the existence of mere doubts as to the prospects of success of a particular remedy which is not obviously futile is not a valid reason for failing to exhaust domestic remedies (see Vu?kovi? and Others, cited above, § 74, and Brusco v. Italy (dec.), no. 69789/01, ECHR 2001 IX). The issue of whether domestic remedies have been exhausted shall normally be determined by reference to the date when the application was lodged with the Court. This rule is however subject to exceptions which might be justified by the specific circumstances of each case (see, for example, Baumann v. France, no. 33592/96, § 47, 22 May 2001; Nogolica v. Croatia (dec.), no. 77784/01, ECHR 2002-VIII; and Mariën v. Belgium (dec.), no. 46046/99, 24 June 2004).
81. As regards the Government’s main argument that none of the applicants availed themselves of the full range of remedies available (up to the Court of Cassation), the Court observes that at the time when all the applicants introduced their applications before the Court (March and June 2011) the Constitutional Court had already given judgment on the merits of the first two applicants’ claim (15 April 2010), as a result of which the Court of Appeal dismissed their claims on 21 September 2010. The Constitutional Court subsequently reiterated those findings in two further judgments (lodged in the relevant registry on 22 July 2010 and 5 January 2011, see paragraph 45 above) also delivered before the applicants introduced their applications with the Court. Thus, at the time when the applicants wished to complain about the alleged violations there was consolidated jurisprudence of the highest court of the land indicating that their claims had no prospect of success.
82. The Government have not shown, nor does the Court imagine, that the ordinary jurisdictions could have ignored the Constitutional Court’s findings and delivered different conclusions accompanied by the relevant redress. Further, the Court observes that the Constitutional Court itself could not but invite the legislature to take action, and it has not been demonstrated that the ordinary courts could have acted more effectively in redressing the situations in the present cases. In this connection, and in the light of the Government’s argument that they could have obtained a statement at least on the recognition of their union based on the Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184/12, the Court notes as follows: firstly, the Government failed to give even one example of such a formal recognition by the domestic courts; secondly, it is questionable whether such recognition, if at all possible, would have had any legal effect on the practical situation of the applicants in the absence of a legal framework – indeed the Government have not explained what this ad hoc statement of recognition would entail; and thirdly, judgment no. 4184, referred to by the Government (which only makes certain references en passant), was delivered after the applicants had introduced their application with the Court.
83. Bearing in mind the above, the Court considers that there is no evidence enabling it to hold that on the date when the applications were lodged with the Court the remedies available in the Italian domestic system would have had any prospects of success. It follows that the applicants cannot be blamed for not having pursued an ineffective remedy, either at all or until the end of the judicial process. Thus, the Court accepts that there were special circumstances which absolved the applicants from their normal obligation to exhaust domestic remedies (see Vilnes and Others v. Norway, nos. 52806/09 and 22703/10, § 178, 5 December 2013).
84. Without prejudice to the above, in reply to the Government’s last argument the Court observes that the domestic proceedings (undertaken by four of the applicants in the present case) related to the authorities’ refusal to permit the applicants to marry. As the opportunity to enter into a registered partnership did not exist in Italy, it is difficult to see how the applicants could have raised the question of legal recognition of their partnership except by seeking to marry, especially given that they had no direct access to the Constitutional Court. Consequently, their domestic complaint focused on their lack of access to marriage. Indeed, the Court considers that the issue of alternative legal recognition is so closely connected to the issue of lack of access to marriage that it has to be considered as inherent in the present application (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, § 76). Thus, the Court accepts that such a complaint, at least in substance, included the lack of any other means to have their relationship recognised by law (ibid., § 75). It follows that the domestic courts, particularly the Constitutional Court hearing the case concerning the first two applicants, was in a position to deal with the issue and, indeed, addressed it briefly, albeit only to conclude that it was for the legislature to take action on the matter. In these circumstances, the Court is satisfied that national jurisdictions were given the opportunity to redress the alleged violations being complained of in Strasbourg, as also characterised by the Court (see, mutatis mutandis, Gatt v. Malta, no. 28221/08, § 24, ECHR 2010).
85. It follows that in these circumstances the Government’s objection must be dismissed.

D. Six months
1. The Government
86. The Government submitted that the complete application no. 18766/11 of 4 August 2011 was received by the Court on 9 August 2011, one year after the judgment of the Court of Appeal of Trent dated 23 September 2010, and that the complete application no. 36030/11 of 10 June 2011 was received by the Court on 17 June 2011, one year after the judgment of the Milan Tribunal of 9 June 2010, lodged in the relevant registry on 1 July 2010 in respect of Mr Perelli Cippo and Mr Zaccheo and in the absence of any judgment in respect of Mr Felicetti and Mr Zappa. Any material submitted to the Court before those dates had not contained all the characteristics of the application.
2. The applicants
87. The applicants in application no. 18766/11 submitted that under Italian law the decision of the Trent Court of Appeal served on the applicants on 23 September 2010 became final after six months. It followed that the application introduced on 21 March 2011 complied with the six month rule provided in the Convention.
88. The applicants in application no. 36030/11 considered that the alleged violations had a continuous character, as long as same-sex unions were not recognised under Italian law.
3. The Court’s assessment
(a) Dates of introduction of the applications
89. The Court reiterates that the six-month period is interrupted on the date of introduction of an application. In accordance with its established practice and Rule 47 § 5 of the Rules of Court, as in force at the relevant time, it normally considered the date of the introduction of an application to be the date of the first communication indicating an intention to lodge an application and giving some indication of the nature of the application. Such first communication, which at the time could take the form of a letter sent by fax, would in principle interrupt the running of the six-month period (see Yartsev v. Russia (dec.) no. 1376/11, § 21, 26 March 2013; Abdulrahman v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 66994/12, 5 February 2013; and Biblical Centre of the Chuvash Republic v. Russia, no. 33203/08, § 45, 12 June 2014).
90. In the instant case, concerning application no. 18766/11, the first communication indicating the wish to lodge a case with the Court as well as the object of the application (in the instant case in the form of an incomplete application), was deposited by hand at the Court Registry on 21 March 2011: a completed application followed in accordance with the instructions of the Registry. There is thus no doubt that the date of introduction in respect of application no. 18766/11 was 21 March 2011. Similarly, concerning application no. 36030/11 a complete application was received by the Court by fax on 10 June 2011, it was followed by the original received by the Court on 17 June 2011. There is therefore also no doubt that the introduction date in respect of application no. 36030/11 must be considered to be 10 June 2011. It follows that in these circumstances the date of “receipt” by the Court of the original or the completed application forms is irrelevant for determining the date of introduction; the Government’s argument to that effect is therefore misconceived.
91. It remains to be determined whether the applications introduced on those days complied with the six-month rule.
(b) Compliance with the six-month time-limit
(i) General principles
92. As a rule, the six-month period runs from the date of the final decision in the process of exhaustion of domestic remedies. Where it is clear from the outset, however, that no effective remedy is available to the applicant, the period runs from the date of the acts or measures complained of, or from the date of knowledge of that act or its effect on or prejudice to the applicant (see Mocanu and Others v. Romania [GC], nos. 10865/09, 45886/07 and 32431/08, § 259, ECHR 2014 (extracts)). Where an applicant avails himself of an apparently existing remedy and only subsequently becomes aware of circumstances which render the remedy ineffective, it may be appropriate for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 to take the start of the six-month period as the date when the applicant first became or ought to have become aware of those circumstances (ibid., § 260; see also El-Masri v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 39630/09, § 136, ECHR 2012, and Paul and Audrey Edwards v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 46477/99, 4 June 2001).
93. In cases where there is a continuing situation, the period starts to run afresh each day, and it is in general only when that situation ends that the six month period actually starts to run (see Varnava and Others v. Turkey [GC], nos. 16064/90, 16065/90, 16066/90, 16068/90, 16069/90, 16070/90, 16071/90, 16072/90 and 16073/90, § 159, ECHR 2009).
94. The concept of a “continuing situation” refers to a state of affairs which operates by continuous activities by or on the part of the State which render the applicants victims (see Ananyev and Others v. Russia, nos. 42525/07 and 60800/08, § 75, 10 January 2012; see also, conversely, McDaid and Others v. the United Kingdom, no. 25681/94, Commission decision of 9 April 1996, Decisions and Reports (DR) 85-A, p. 134, and Posti and Rahko v. Finland, no. 27824/95, § 39, ECHR 2002 VII). The Court has however also established that omissions on the part of the authorities may also constitute “continuous activities by or on the part of the State” (see, for example, Vasilescu v. Romania, 22 May 1998, § 49, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998 III concerning a judgment preventing the applicant from regaining possession of her property; Sabin Popescu v. Romania, no. 48102/99, § 51, 2 March 2004 concerning a parent’s inability to regain parental rights; Iordache v. Romania, no. 6817/02, § 66, 14 October 2008; and Hadzhigeorgievi v. Bulgaria, no. 41064/05, §§ 56-57, 16 July 2013, both concerning non-enforcement of judgments, as well as, by implication, Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. and Di Stefano v. Italy [GC], no. 38433/09, § 104, ECHR 2012, concerning the inability to broadcast television programmes).
95. In its case-law the Court has considered that there were “continuing situations” bringing the case within its competence with regard to Article 35 § 1, where a legal provision gave rise to a permanent state of affairs, in the form of a permanent limitation on an individual Convention protected right, such as the right to vote or to stand for election (see Paksas v. Lithuania [GC], no. 34932/04, § 83, 6 January 2011, and Anchugov and Gladkov v. Russia, nos. 11157/04 and 15162/05, § 77, 4 July 2013) or the right of access to court (see Nataliya Mikhaylenko v. Ukraine, no. 49069/11, § 25, 30 May 2013), or in the form of a legislative provision which intrudes continuously on an individual’s private life (see Dudgeon v. the United Kingdom, 22 October 1981, § 41, Series A no. 45, and Daróczy v. Hungary, no. 44378/05, § 19, 1 July 2008)
(ii) Application to the present case
96. Turning to the particular features of the present case, the Court notes that in so far as the rights under Articles 8, 12 and 14 concerning the inability to marry or enter into a civil union are at issue the applicants’ complaints do not concern an act occurring at a given point in time or even the enduring effects of such an act, but rather concern provisions (or in this case the lack thereof) giving rise to a continuing state of affairs, namely a lack of recognition of their union, with all its practical consequences on a daily basis, against which no effective domestic remedy was in fact available. The Convention organs have previously held that when they receive an application concerning a legal provision which gives rise to a permanent state of affairs for which there is no domestic remedy, the question of the six-month period arises only after this state of affairs has ceased to exist: “... in the circumstances, it is exactly as though the alleged violation was being repeated daily, thus preventing the running of the six month period” (see De Becker v. Belgium, (dec.) 9 June 1958, no. 214/56, Yearbook 2, and Paksas, cited above, § 83).
97. In the instant case, in the absence of an effective domestic remedy given the state of domestic case-law, and the fact that the state of affairs complained of has clearly not ceased, the situation must be considered as a continuing one (see, for example, Anchugov and Gladkov v. Russia, nos. 11157/04 and 15162/05, § 77, 4 July 2013, albeit a different line had been taken previously in British cases concerning similar circumstances, see Toner v. The United Kingdom (dec.), § 29, no. 8195/08, 15 February 2011, and Mclean and Cole v. The United Kingdom (dec.), § 25, 11 June 2013). It cannot therefore be maintained that the applications are out of time.
98. Accordingly, the Government’s objection is dismissed.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 14 IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 8
99. The applicants in application no. 18766/11 complained that they had no means of legally safeguarding their relationship, in that it was impossible to enter into any type of civil union in Italy. They invoked Article 8 alone. The applicants in application nos. 18766/11 and 36030/11 complained that they were being discriminated against in breach of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8. Those provisions read as follows:
Article 8
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Article 14
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
100. The Court reiterates that it is the master of the characterisation to be given in law to the facts of the case (see, for example, Gatt, cited above, § 19). In the present case the Court considers that the complaints raised by the applicants in application no. 36030/11, also fall to be examined under Article 8 alone.
A. Admissibility
1. Applicability
101. The Government, referring to Schalk and Kopf (§§ 93-95), did not dispute the applicability of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8.
102. As the Court has consistently held, Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. It has no independent existence, since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. Although the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of those provisions – and to this extent it is autonomous – there can be no room for its application unless the facts at issue fall within the ambit of one or more of the latter (see, for instance, E.B. v. France [GC], no. 43546/02, § 47, 22 January 2008; Karner v. Austria, no. 40016/98, § 32, ECHR 2003 IX; and Petrovic v. Austria, 27 March 1998, § 22, Reports 1998 II).
103. It is undisputed that the relationship of a same-sex couple, such as those of the applicants, falls within the notion of “private life” within the meaning of Article 8. Similarly, the Court has already held that the relationship of a cohabiting same-sex couple living in a stable de facto partnership falls within the notion of “family life” (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, § 94). It follows that the facts of the present applications fall within the notion of “private life” as well as “family life” within the meaning of Article 8. Consequently, both Article 8 alone and Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention apply.
2. Conclusion
104. The Court notes that the complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants in application no. 18766/11
105. The applicants referred to the evolution which had taken place, as a result of which many countries had legislated in favour of some type of institution for same-sex couples, the most recent additions being Gibraltar and Malta, whose legislation enacted in 2014 gave same-sex couples grosso modo the same rights and duties applicable to married couples; registered partnership for same-sex couples had also been instituted in Croatia. They considered that there was no reason why those unions should not be provided for in Italy. They noted in particular that the Italian Constitutional Court itself had considered that the state had an obligation to introduce in its legal system some form of civil union for same-sex couples. They referred to the Court’s jurisprudence concerning the positive obligations inherent in an effective respect for private and family life, and reiterated that according to the Court, where a particular facet of an individual’s existence or identity was at stake, or where the activities at stake involved a most intimate aspect of private life, the margin allowed to a State was correspondingly narrow (Söderman v. Sweden [GC], no. 5786/08, § 79, ECHR 2013).
106. The applicants noted that the Government had given no justification for the failure to legislate to this effect. On the contrary, they had tried to convince the Court that same-sex couples were already protected, despite the lack of a specific legal framework. This in itself was contradictory, because if the Government recognised the need to protect, then there was no other way of doing so than by providing a stable legal framework, such as marriage or a similar institution of registered partnership, or the like. Further, the applicants failed to understand the connection between the protection of family in its traditional sense and the legal recognition of a stable relationship of a same-sex couple.
107. The applicants considered that the recognition in law of one’s family life and status was crucial for the existence and well-being of an individual and for his or her dignity. In the absence of marriage the State should, at least, give access to a recognised union by means of a solemn juridical institution, based on a public commitment and capable of offering them legal certainty. Currently they were denied such protection in law, and same-sex couples suffered a state of uncertainty, as shown by the domestic cases cited by the Government, which left people in the applicants’ situation at the mercy of judicial discretion. The applicants noted that despite the fact that Italy had transposed EU directive 78/2000, the administration continued to deny certain benefits to same-sex couples, and did not consider them equal to heterosexual couples.
108. The applicants considered that the Government was misleading the Court by a wrong interpretation of the decision of the municipality of Milan concerning registration (see paragraph 130 below). The registration referred to did not provide for the issuance of a document certifying a “civil union” based on a bond of affection, but of a “union for record purposes (unione anagrafica)” based on a bond of affection. It solely concerned registration for the purposes of statistical records of the existing population, which was not to be confused with the notion of an individual’s civil status. While noting that certain municipalities had embraced this system, very few couples had actually registered, since it had no effect on a person’s civil status, and could only be produced as proof of cohabitation. Indeed it had no effects vis-à-vis third parties, nor did it deal with matters such as succession, parental matters, adoption, and the right to create a family business (impresa famigliare). Similarly, the judgment of the tribunal of Grosseto concerning the registration of the marriage of a homosexual couple (see paragraph 38 above) had been a unique judgment and was, at the time of the submission of observations, pending appeal at the request of the Government. They further noted that the remarks made by the Court of Cassation in its judgment no. 4184/12, to the effect that a same-sex marriage contracted abroad was no longer contrary to the Italian public order, had been said in passing (obiter dictum), were not binding and the administration had not followed suit. Indeed the Court of Cassation had clearly decided the matter, in the sense that no such marriage was possible.
109. In connection with Article 14, the applicants reiterated that the State’s margin of appreciation was narrow when the justification for evading such an obligation was based on the sexual orientation of individuals (they referred to X and Others v. Austria [GC], no. 19010/07, ECHR 2013, and X v. Turkey, no. 24626/09, 9 October 2012), and very weighty reasons were necessary to justify a difference of treatment based on such grounds. They relied on the dissenting opinions in the judgment of Schalk and Kopf. They further considered that in the present case there was no point in arguing that it was not open for heterosexual couples to enter into some sort of registered union, given that heterosexual couples had the opportunity to marry, while homosexual couples had no protection of this kind whatsoever.
(b) The applicants in application no. 36030/11
110. The applicants submitted that in view of the positive trend registered in Europe, the Court should now impose on States a positive obligation to ensure that same sex-couples have access to an institution, of whatever name, which was more or less equivalent to marriage. This was particularly so given that in Italy the Constitutional Court had upheld the need for homosexual unions to be recognised in law with the relevant rights and duties; despite this the legislator had remained inert.
111. The applicants noted that the Government had failed to demonstrate how recognition of same-sex unions would adversely affect actual and existing “traditional families”. Neither had the Government explained that prevention of any adverse effects could not be attained through less restrictive means. The applicants also noted that a finding of a violation in the present case would only oblige Italy to take legislative measures in this regard, leaving to the State the space to address any legitimate aim by tailoring the relevant legislation. It followed that the margin of appreciation, which was particularly narrow in respect of a total denial of legal recognition to same-sex couples, was, conversely, existent in relation to the form and content of such recognition, which however was not the subject of this application. They further noted that the present case did not raise moral and ethical issues of acute sensitivity (such as the issue of abortion) nor did it involve a balance with the rights of others, in particular children (such as adoption by homosexuals): the present case simply related to the rights and duties of partners towards each other (irrespective of the recognition of rights such as parental rights, adoption or access to medically assisted procreation).
112. The applicants submitted that in Schalk and Kopf one of the Chambers of the Court had found no violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8, by a tight majority (4-3), considering that States enjoyed a margin of appreciation as to the timing of such recognition, and that at the time there was not yet a majority of States providing for such recognition. The applicants noted that until June 2014 (date of observations) 22 of 47 States recognised some form of same-sex union. These included all the Council of Europe (CoE) founding States except Italy, as well as countries sharing, like Italy, a deep attachment to the Catholic religion (such as Ireland and Malta). In addition Greece was also under an obligation to introduce such recognition following the judgment in Vallianatos. This meant that, at the time they submitted their observations, 49% of States had recognised same-sex unions. However, the applicants noted, with respect, that in Schalk and Kopf the Chamber had taken as a decisive factor “the majority of member States”, while in earlier case-law (namely Christine Goodwin v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 28957/95, § 84, ECHR 2002 VI), notwithstanding the little common ground that existed between States, and the fact that a European common approach was still lacking, the Grand Chamber chose to give less importance to those criteria and to give more importance to the clear and uncontested evidence of a continuing international trend. Further, the applicants noted that in the present case it could not be said that there was a consensus on the practice followed by Italy.
113. The applicants contended that the Court could not be reduced to being an “accountant” of majoritarian domestic views. On the contrary, it had to be the guardian of the Convention and its underlying values, which include the protection of minorities (they referred in this connection to L. and V. v. Austria, nos. 39392/98 and 39829/98, § 52, ECHR 2003 I, and Smith and Grady v. the United Kingdom, nos. 33985/96 and 33986/96, § 97, ECHR 1999 VI). The applicants noted that bias was still present throughout Europe, and could be stronger in certain countries where prejudice against homosexuals was rooted in traditional, if not archaic, convictions and where democratic ideals and practices had only established themselves in recent times. The applicants noted that empirical evidence (submitted to the Court) showed that lack of recognition of same-sex couples in a given state corresponded to a lower degree of social acceptance of homosexuality. It followed that by simply deferring normative choices to the national authorities, the Court would fail to take account of the fact that certain national choices were in fact based on prevailing discriminatory attitudes against homosexuals, rather than the outcome of a genuine democratic process guided by the consideration of what is strictly necessary in a democratic society.
114. In the applicants’ view, even accepting a certain margin of appreciation it was not appropriate for the Italian Government to rely on it for the specific reason that the domestic courts had upheld the existence in domestic constitutional law of an obligation to recognise same-sex unions. The applicants contended that under the Court’s jurisprudence once a State provided for a right in domestic law it was then obliged to provide effective and non-discriminatory protection of such a right (they referred to A, B and C v. Ireland [GC], no. 25579/05, § 249, ECHR 2010). The applicants noted that Constitutional Court judgment no. 138/10 had the effect of affirming the existence of a constitutional fundamental right for same-sex partners to obtain recognition of their union and, to this effect, of a constitutional duty upon the legislature to enact an appropriate general regulation on the recognition of same-sex unions, with consequent rights and duties for partners. The recognition by the domestic courts that the concept of family was not limited to the traditional notion based on marriage had gone even beyond judgment no. 138/10. Other judgments in the field of fundamental rights held that as a matter of domestic constitutional law the notion of traditional family played a minor role in justifying restrictions: examples pertained to medically assisted procreation (nos. 162/14 and 151/09); rules on the transmission of the family name to children (no. 61/06); a partner’s right to succeed in a lease contract (no. 404/88); and a partner’s right to refrain from giving testimony in judicial proceedings (no. 7/97).
115. The lack of recognition of their union affected and disadvantaged the applicants in many specific and concrete ways. The applicants noted that even if the law recognised some specific and limited rights for non-married (heterosexual or same-sex) couples, these were not dependent on status, but on a de facto situation of cohabitation more uxorio. In fact, in the domestic cases concerning reparation in the case of a partner’s death, the Court of Cassation (judgment no. 23725/08) had held that for such purposes the existence of a stable relationship providing mutual, moral and material assistance would have to be proved, and that declarations made by the interested individuals (affidavit) or indications given to the administration for the purposes of statistics would not suffice. Thus, the applicants submitted that to exercise or claim their rights they could not rely on status resulting from an act of common will, but had to resort to proving the existence of a factual situation. In addition, only a limited number of rights had been recognised in respect of de facto partners, and in most cases they remained without legal protection. They submitted the following as a non exhaustive list of examples of the latter (on the basis of legal provisions, and in certain cases confirmed by case-law): the law failed to regulate the respective rights and duties of partners (as also noted by the Constitutional Court) in spheres such as material and moral assistance between partners, the responsibilities in contributing to the needs of the family, or their choices concerning family life; there was a lack of inheritance rights in the case of intestate succession; de facto partners were not entitled to a reserved portion (legitim) and a surviving partner did not enjoy a right in rem to live in the family home owned by the deceased partner (Constitutional Court judgment no. 310/89); there existed no right to a survivor’s pension (Constitutional Court judgment no. 461/2000); de facto partners had limited rights concerning assistance to a hospitalised partner when the latter was not able to express his or her will; in principle a de facto partner had no right to access his or her companion’s medical file (although the Garante della Privacy in its decision of 17 September 2009, found otherwise, in the event of proof of written consent); de facto partners did not have maintenance rights and duties; de facto partners were not entitled to special leave from work to assist a partner affected by a serious disability; de facto partners did not benefit from most taxation or social policies relating to family: for example, they could not benefit from tax deductions applicable to dependent spouses; and de facto partners had no access to adoption or to medically assisted procreation.
116. The applicants noted that while a certain limited degree of protection could have been obtained by means of private agreements, this was irrelevant, and the Court’s Grand Chamber had already rejected such an argument in Vallianatos (§ 81). Furthermore, such arrangements were time consuming and costly, as well as stressful, and again it was a burden only to be carried by the applicants and not by heterosexual couples, who could opt for marriage, or by couples who were not interested in having any legal recognition. The lack of legal recognition of the union, besides causing legal and practical problems, also prevented the applicants from having a ritualised public ceremony through which they could, under the protection of the law, solemnly undertake the relevant duties towards each other. They considered that such ceremonies brought social legitimacy and acceptance, and particularly in the case of homosexuals, they went to show that they also have the right to live freely and to live their relationships on an equal basis, both in private and in public. They noted that the absence of such recognition brought about in them a sense of belonging to an inferior class of persons, despite their needs in the sphere of love being the same.
117. The applicants submitted that the fact that 155 of the existing 8,000 municipalities had recently instituted what are known as “registers of civil unions” had not corrected the situation. Accepting their political and symbolic importance, the applicants submitted that such registers, available only on a small portion of the territory, were merely administrative acts which were unable to confer a status on the applicants or bestow any legal rights. Such initiatives only testified to the willingness of certain authorities to include unions outside marriage when taking measures concerning families, within their sphere of competence.
118. The applicants submitted that the alleged violation was a direct consequence of the vacuum in the legal system in force. The applicants’ were in a relevantly similar situation to that of a different-sex couple as regards their need for legal recognition and protection of their relationship. They further claimed that they were also in a position which was significantly different from that of opposite-sex couples who, though eligible for marriage, did not wish to obtain legal recognition of their union. They noted that the only basis for the difference in treatment suffered by the applicants was their sexual orientation, and that the Government had failed to give weighty reasons justifying such treatment, which constituted direct discrimination. Neither was any justification submitted as to why they were subject to indirect discrimination, in that they were treated in the same way as persons who were in a significantly different situation (they referred to Thlimmenos v. Greece [GC], no. 34369/97, ECHR 2000 IV), namely that of heterosexual couples who were not willing to marry.
119. The Government, relying solely on their margin of appreciation, gave no reasons at all, let alone weighty ones, to justify such a situation. In the applicants’ view this stance was already sufficient to find a violation of the cited provisions.
120. Nevertheless, even assuming that the difference in treatment may be considered to be aiming at “the protection of the family in the traditional sense”, given the Court’s evolving case-law they considered that it would be unacceptable to frame restrictions on the basis of sexual orientation as aimed at protecting public morals. This, in their view, would be in radical contrast with the demands of pluralism, tolerance and broadmindedness without which there was no democratic society (they referred to Handyside v. the United Kingdom, 7 December 1976, § 50, Series A no. 24). In connection with the notion of the traditional family the applicants referred to the Court’s findings in Vallianatos (cited above, § 84) and Konstantin Markin (cited above, § 127).
121. Lastly, they noted that in Vallianatos the Court stressed that “the principle of proportionality does not merely require the measure chosen to be suitable in principle for achievement of the aim sought. It must also be shown that it was necessary, in order to achieve that aim, to exclude certain categories of people – in this instance persons living in a homosexual relationship – from the scope of application of the provisions at issue ... the burden of proof in this regard is on the respondent Government.” Moreover, the need for any restriction was to be assessed in relation to the principles which normally prevail in a democratic society (they referred to Konstantin Markin, cited above).
(c) The Government
122. The Government noted that the Court recognised the Convention right of same-sex couples to see their union legally acknowledged, but considered that the relevant provisions (Articles 8, 12 and 14) did not give rise to a legal obligation on the Contracting States, as the latter enjoyed a wider margin of appreciation in the adoption of legislative changes able to meet the changed “common sense” of the community. Indeed, in that light, in Schalk and Kopf, although lacking legislation on marriage or other forms of recognition of homosexual unions, the Austrian State was not held responsible for violations of the Convention. In the Government’s view, as in Gas and Dubois v. France, (no. 25951/07, ECHR 2012), the Court had acknowledged that the State had no obligation to provide for same-sex marriage, so it also had no obligation to provide for other same-sex unions.
123. Referring to the principles laid down by the Court, the Government observed that the social and cultural sensitivities of the issue of legal recognition of homosexual couples gave each Contracting State a wide margin of appreciation in the choice of the times and modes of a specific legal framework. They further relied on the provisions of Protocol No. 15. They noted that the same margin had been provided for in EU law, particularly Article 9 of the Bill of Rights. This matter had thus to be left to the individual State (in this case Italy), which was the only entity capable of having cognisance of the “common sense” of its own community, particularly concerning a delicate matter which affected the sensitivity of individuals and their cultural identities, and where time was necessarily required to achieve a gradual maturation of a common sense of national community on the recognition of this new form of family in the Convention sense.
124. In the Government’s view the Court had no power to impose such an obligation. Nor could such an obligation be dictated by other States which, in the meantime – most of them only recently (see for example, Malta, 2014) – had adopted a rule as a result of an internal process of social maturation. The Government noted that, at the time of the submission of their observations, less than half the European Contracting States had provided legal forms of protection for unmarried couples, including homosexuals, and many had done so only recently (for example, Austria in 2010, Ireland in 2011, and Finland in 2012), and in the other half it was not provided for at all. They further considered that the fact that at the end of a gradual evolution a State was in an isolated position with regard to an aspect of its legislation did not necessarily mean that that aspect was in conflict with the Convention (they referred to Vallianatos, § 92). The Government thus considered that no positive obligation to legislate in the matter of homosexual couples descended from any article of the Convention. It was solely for the State to decide whether to prohibit or allow same-sex unions, and currently there was no trend to this effect (this process and result could also be seen in the United States of America, where each state was allowed to regulate the matter).
125. Turning to the situation pertaining to Italy, the Government referred to judgment no. 138/10 (see paragraph 16 above), in which the Constitutional Court had recognised the importance for same-sex couples of being able to see their union legally acknowledged, but had left it to Parliament to identify the timing, methods and limits of such a regulatory framework. Thus, contrary to the applicants’ argument, there was no immediate obligation, and the Constitutional Court had not enshrined such a constitutional obligation. Reference to this finding had also been made in the recent Constitutional Court judgment no. 170/14 concerning “forced divorce” following gender reassignment. However, unlike in the present case, in the latter case the Constitutional Court had invited the legislator to act promptly because the individuals concerned had already established a marital relationship productive of effects and consequences which were suddenly brought to a halt. In the instant case, the Constitutional Court acknowledged the existence of a fundamental right, with a consequent need to ensure the legal protection of same-sex unions whenever unequal treatment arose. However, it had delegated to the ordinary national courts the role of controlling, on a case-by-case basis, whether in each specific case the rules provided for different gender unions were extendable to same sex ones. If, in the courts’ view, there was unequal treatment to the detriment of same-sex couples, they could refer the question to the Constitutional Court claiming the rule examined to be discriminatory and calling for corrective intervention by the judge.
126. The Government further submitted that the Italian State had been engaged in developing legal status for same-sex unions since 1986, by means of intense debate and a variety of bills on the recognition of civil unions (also between same-sex couples). The issue had always been considered timely and relevant, and recent bills to this effect, introduced by various political parties, were in the process of undergoing parliamentary scrutiny (see paragraphs 46-47 above). Thus, while noting the widespread social and legal ferment on the issue, the Government highlighted that the matter had continued to be debated in recent times. They referred particularly to the President of the Italian Council of Ministers, who had publicly claimed to have assigned top priority to the legal recognition of same-sex unions and to the imminent discussion and examination in the Senate of Bill no. 14 on civil unions for same-sex couples, which, in terms of obligations, specifically corresponded to the institution of marriage and the rights therein, including adoption, inheritance rights, the status of a couple’s children, health care and penitentiary care, residence and working benefits. Thus, Italy was perfectly in line with the pace of maturation which would lead to a European consensus, and could not be blamed for not having yet legislated on the matter. This intense activity in the past thirty years showed an intention on the part of the State to find a solution which would meet with public approval, as well as corresponding to the needs of the protection of a part of the community. It also showed, however, that despite the attention paid to the issue by various political forces, it was difficult to reach a balance between the different sensitivities on such a delicate and deeply felt social issue. They noted that the delicate choices involved in social and legislative policy had to achieve the unanimous consent of different currents of thought and feeling, as well as religious sentiment, which were present in society. It followed that the Italian State could not be held responsible for the tortuous course towards recognition of same-sex unions.
127. The Government, however, contended that they had still, in many ways, demonstrated that they recognised homosexual unions as legally existing and relevant, and that they had offered them specific and concrete forms of legal protection, through judicial and non-judicial means. Domestic jurisprudence had in most circumstances recognised same-sex unions as a reality, with legal and social importance. Indeed, the Italian supreme courts recognised that, in some specific circumstances, same-sex couples may have the same rights as heterosexual married couples: they referred to the Constitutional Court judgments nos. 138/10; 276/2010 and 4/2011 (all mentioned above) and particularly the Court of Cassation judgment no. 4184/12, as well as the Reggio Emilia ordinance of 13 February 2012 and the decision of the Tribunal of Grosseto (see paragraph 37 above): according to the Government, subsequent to the latter decision registration of such marriages became the common practice (an example was the decision of the Municipality of Milan of 7 May 2013).
128. The Government pointed out that the protection of same-sex couples was not limited to the recognition of the union and the family relationship itself. It was actually ensured with specific reference to concrete aspects of their common life. The Government referred to a number of judgments of the ordinary courts: the Rome Tribunal judgment no. 13445/82 of 20 November 1982 which, in a case concerning the lease of an apartment, considered cohabitation by a homosexual couple to be on an equal footing with that of a heterosexual couple; the Milan Tribunal ordinance of 13 February 2011, in which the surviving partner, who had had a long-standing relationship with the victim, was awarded non-pecuniary damages for the loss of the same-sex partner; the Milan Tribunal ordinance of 13 November 2009 [sic] admitting the application as a civil party of the homosexual partner of a victim for the purposes of compensation for the loss suffered; Judgment no. 7176/12 of the Milan Court of Appeal, Labour Section of 29 March 2012, lodged in the relevant registry on 31 August 2012, which granted to the same-sex partner the welfare benefits payable by the employer to the family living with the employee; Judgment of the Rome Court of Minors no. 299/14 of 30 June 2014 which granted “the right to adopt to a homosexual couple” [sic], recte: the right of a non-biological “mother” to adopt her lesbian partner’s child (conceived through medically assisted procreation, abroad, in pursuance of their wish for joint parenthood) given the best interests of the child.
129. The Government further stressed that same-sex couples wishing to give a legal framework to various aspects of their community life could enter into cohabitation agreements (contratti di convivenza). Such agreements enabled same-sex couples to regulate aspects related to; i) the manner of sharing common expenses, ii) the criteria for the allocation of ownership of assets acquired during the cohabitation; iii) the manner of use of the common residence (whether owned by one or both partners); iv) the procedure for the distribution of assets in the event of termination of cohabitation; v) provisions relating to rights in cases of physical or mental illness or incapacity; and vi) acts of testamentary disposition in favour of the cohabiting partner. Such agreements had recently been publicised by the National Council of Notaries, in the light of the growing phenomenon of de facto unions. The Government explained that in order to give cohabitation agreements the organic nature of a legal framework for de facto unions, whether between couples of the same or different sex, a proposal had been made for the Civil Code to be amended, which introduced a regulatory body dedicated to these situations (Civil Code Chapter XXVI, Article 1986 bis et sequi).
130. The Government further noted that since 1993 a growing number of municipalities (to date 155) had established a Register of Civil Unions, which allowed homosexual couples to register themselves to enable their recognition as families for the purposes of administrative, political, social and welfare policy of the city. This was in place in both small and larger towns, and was an unequivocal sign of a progressive and growing social consensus in favour of the recognition of such families. Concerning the content and effects of this form of protection, the Government referred by way of example to the regulations of the register of civil unions issued by the city of Milan (resolution no. 30 of 26 July 2012) according to which the city was committed to protecting and supporting civil unions, in order to overcome situations of discrimination and to promote integration into the social, cultural and economic development of the territory. The thematic areas within which priority action was required were housing, health and social services, policies for youth, parents and seniors, sports and leisure, education, school and educational services, rights, participation, and transportation. The acts of the administration were to provide non discriminatory access to these areas and to prevent conditions of social and economic disadvantage. Within the city of Milan, a person enrolled in the register was equivalent to “the next of kin of the person with whom he or she is registered” for the purposes of assistance. The City Council shall, at the request of interested parties, grant a certificate of civil union based on an affective bond of mutual, moral and material assistance.
131. The Government further submitted that since 2003 Italian legislation had been in place for equal treatment in employment and occupation under Directive 2000/78/EC. They noted that the protection of civil unions received more acceptance in certain branches of the State than in others. As an example, they referred to a decision of the Garante della Privacy (a collegial body made of four elected parliamentarians that deals with the protection of personal data) of 17 September 2009, which recognised a surviving partner’s right to request a copy of the deceased partner’s medical records, despite the heirs’ opposition.
132. In their observations in reply, the Government denied categorically that the aim of the contested measure, or rather the absence of such a measure, was to protect the traditional family or the morals of society (as had been claimed by the applicants).
133. In particular, in connection with Article 14, the Government distinguished the present case from that of Vallianatos. They noted that it was not possible yet to state that there existed a European common view on the matter and most states were, in fact, still deprived of this kind of regulatory framework. They further relied on the Court’s findings in Shalk and Kopf. The Government submitted that while the Italian State had engaged in the development of a number of bills concerning de facto couples, they had not given rise to unequal treatment or discrimination. Similarly, given the concrete recognition and legal judicial, legislative, and administrative protection awarded to same-sex couples (as described above), the conduct of the Italian State could not be considered discriminatory. Furthermore, the applicants had not given specific details of the suffering they alleged, and any abstract or generic damage could not be considered discriminatory. Had it been so, it could also be considered discriminatory against heterosexual unmarried couples, as no difference of treatment existed between the two mentioned types of couples.
(d) Third-party interveners
(i) Prof Robert Wintemute, on behalf of the non-governmental organisations FIDH (Fédération Internationale des ligues de Droit de l’Homme), AIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe), ILGA-Europe (European Region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association), ECSOL (European Commission on Sexual Orientation Law), UFTDU (Unione forense per la tutela dei diritti umani) and LIDU (Lega Italiana dei Diritti dell’Uomo).
(?) positive obligation to provide some means of recognition
134. Those intervening submitted that there existed an emerging consensus, in European and other democratic societies, that a government may not limit a particular right, benefit or obligation to married couples, to the exclusion of same-sex couples who were legally prevented from getting married. They referred to the situation in March 2014, where at the time 44.7% of CoE member States had legislated in favour of same-sex relationships (see above for the current situation) and where Greece was yet to amend its legislation following the judgment in Vallianatos, as well as the Italian Constitutional Court’s invitation to the legislature to legislate accordingly. They noted that up until March 2014, outside Europe legislation had been adopted in Argentina, Australia , Canada , Mexico , New Zealand, South Africa and Uruguay. In the United States, 21 of 50 states (42%) and the District of Columbia had granted legal recognition to same-sex couples, through access to marriage, civil union or domestic partnership, as the result of legislation or a judicial decision. The interveners opined that there was a growing consensus in European and other democratic societies that same-sex couples must be provided with some means of qualifying for particular rights, benefits and obligations attached to legal marriage, and as noted in Smith and Grady v. the United Kingdom (nos. 33985/96 and 33986/96, § 104, ECHR 1999 VI), even if relatively recent, the Court cannot overlook the widespread and consistently developing views and associated legal changes to the domestic laws of Contracting States on this issue. The Court had therefore to take account of this evolution and any further development until the date of its judgment. They considered that the Court’s approach in Goodwin (§ 85; see also §§ 91, 93, 103) to give more weight to “a continuing international trend” applied, mutatis mutandis, in the present case.
135. They submitted that judicial reasoning in a growing number of decisions required at least an alternative to legal marriage, if not access to legal marriage for same-sex couples. They noted that although many of the courts (mentioned below) found direct discrimination based on sexual orientation, and required equal access to legal marriage for same-sex couples, their reasoning supported a fortiori (at least) a finding of indirect discrimination based on sexual orientation, and (at least) a requirement that governments provide alternative means of legal recognition to same-sex couples. They noted the following:
The first court to require equal access for same-sex couples to the rights, benefits and obligations of legal marriage, while leaving it to the legislature to decide whether this access would be through legal marriage or an alternative registration system, was the Vermont Supreme Court in Baker v. State, 744 A.2d 864 (1999):
“We hold only that plaintiffs are entitled under ... the Vermont Constitution to obtain the same benefits and protections afforded ... to married opposite-sex couples. We do not purport to infringe upon the prerogatives of the Legislature ... other than to note ... [the existence of] ‘registered partnership’ acts, which ... establish an alternative legal status to marriage for same-sex couples, ... create a parallel ... registration scheme, and extend all or most of the same rights and obligations ... [T]he current statutory scheme shall remain in effect for a reasonable period of time to enable the Legislature to ... enact implementing legislation in an orderly and expeditious fashion.”
A law on same-sex civil unions was passed in 2000.
The British Columbia Court of Appeal went further in EGALE Canada (1 May 2003), 225 D.L.R. (4th) 472, holding that the exclusion of same-sex couples from legal marriage amounted to discrimination violating the Canadian Charter. It could not see (§ 127):
“... how according same-sex couples the benefits flowing to opposite-sex couples in any way inhibits, dissuades or impedes the formation of heterosexual unions ...”
The Ontario Court of Appeal agreed with the above in Halpern (10 June 2003), 65 O.R. (3d) 161 (§ 107):
“... [S]ame-sex couples are excluded from ... the benefits that are available only to married persons ... Exclusion perpetuates the view that same-sex relationships are less worthy of recognition than opposite-sex relationships ... [and] offends the dignity of persons in same-sex relationships.”
The Ontario Court ordered the issuance of marriage licences to same-sex couples that day.
The British Columbia Court followed on 8 July 2003 (228 D.L.R. (4th) 416). A federal law (approved by the Supreme Court of Canada) extended these appellate decisions to all ten provinces and three territories from 20 July 2005.
On 18 November 2003 the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court reached the same conclusion as the Canadian courts in Goodridge, 798 N.E.2d 941:
“The question before us is whether, consistent with the Massachusetts Constitution, the [State] may deny the protections, benefits, and obligations conferred by civil marriage to two individuals of the same sex ... We conclude that it may not.”
On 30 November 2004, South Africa’s Supreme Court of Appeal agreed with the Canadian and Massachusetts courts, and restated the common-law definition of marriage as: “the union between two persons to the exclusion of all others for life.” On 1 December 2005, South Africa’s Constitutional Court concluded that the remaining statutory obstacle to marriage for same sex couples was discriminatory (§ 71):
“ ... The exclusion of same-sex couples from ... marriage ... represents a harsh if oblique statement by the law that same-sex couples are outsiders ... that their need for affirmation and protection of their intimate relations as human beings is somehow less than that of heterosexual couples ... that their capacity for love, commitment and accepting responsibility is by definition less worthy of regard than that of heterosexual couples ...”
South Africa’s Parliament responded by enacting the Civil Union Act (No. 17 of 2006, in force on 30 November 2006), allowing any couple, different-sex or same-sex, to contract a “civil union” and choose whether it should be known as a ‘marriage’ or a ‘civil partnership’.
On 25 October 2006, in Lewis v. Harris, 908 A.2d 196 (2006), the New Jersey Supreme Court adopted the same approach as the Vermont Supreme Court:
“Although we cannot find that a fundamental right to same-sex marriage exists in this State [cf. Schalk & Kopf], the unequal dispensation of rights and benefits to committed same-sex partners can no longer be tolerated under our State Constitution. With this State’s legislative and judicial commitment to eradicating sexual orientation discrimination as our backdrop, we now hold that denying rights and benefits to committed same-sex couples ... given to their heterosexual counterparts violates the equal protection guarantee ... [T]he Legislature must either amend the marriage statutes to include same-sex couples or create a parallel statutory structure, which will provide for, on equal terms, the rights and benefits enjoyed and burdens and obligations borne by married couples. ... The name to be given to the statutory scheme ..., whether marriage or some other term, is a matter left to the democratic process.”
A law on same-sex civil unions was passed in 2006.
On 15 May 2008 the California Supreme Court decided In re Marriage Cases, 183 P.3d 384 (2008). It found that legislation excluding same-sex couples from legal marriage breached (prima facie): (a) their fundamental right to marry, an aspect of the right of privacy; and (b) their right to equal protection based on sexual orientation, a ‘suspect classification’. It subjected the legislation to ‘strict scrutiny’ and found that it was not ‘necessary’ to further a ‘compelling constitutional interest’, even though same-sex couples could acquire nearly all the rights and obligations attached to marriage by California law through a “domestic partnership”.
On 10 October 2008 the Connecticut Supreme Court agreed with the California Court in Kerrigan v. Commissioner of Public Health, 957 A.2d 407 (2008).
On 3 April 2009 in Varnum v. Brien, 763 N.W.2d 862 (2009), the Iowa Supreme Court agreed with the decisions in Massachusetts, California and Connecticut:
“[C]ivil marriage with a person of the opposite sex is as unappealing to a gay or lesbian person as civil marriage with a person of the same sex is to a heterosexual. Thus, the right of a gay or lesbian person ... to enter into a civil marriage only with a person of the opposite sex is no right at all. ... State government can have no religious views, either directly or indirectly, expressed through its legislation. ... This ... is the essence of the separation of church and state. ... [C]ivil marriage must be judged under our constitutional standards of equal protection and not under religious doctrines or the religious views of individuals ... [O]ur constitutional principles ... require that the state recognize both opposite-sex and same-sex civil marriage.”
On 5 May 2011 Brazil’s Supremo Tribunal Federal (STF) interpreted Brazil’s Constitution as requiring that existing legal recognition of ‘stable unions’ (cohabitation outside marriage) include same-sex couples. On 25 October 2011 Brazil’s Superior Tribunal de Justiça (STJ) ruled in Recurso Especial no. 1.183.378/RS that, in the absence of an express prohibition (as opposed to authorisation) of same-sex marriage in Brazilian law, two women could convert their ‘stable union’ into a marriage under Article 1726 of the Civil Code (“A stable union can be converted into a marriage at the request of the partners before a judge and following registration in the Civil Registry”). On 14 May 2013, relying on the decisions of the STF and the STJ, the Conselho Nacional de Justiça (CNJ, which regulates the judiciary but is not itself a court, Resolução No. 175) ordered all public officials authorised to marry couples, or to convert ‘stable unions’ into marriages, to do so for same-sex couples. A constitutional challenge to the resolution of the CNJ by the Partido Social Cristão has been pending in the STF since 7 June 2013: Ação Direta de Inconstitucionalidade (ADI) 4966. It seems likely that the STF will endorse the reasoning of the STJ and the CNJ.
On 26 July 2011 Colombia’s Constitutional Court “exhorted” Colombia’s Congress to legislate to provide same-sex couples with the same rights as married different-sex couples. Congress refused to do so, triggering the Court’s default remedy from 20 June 2013: same-sex couples have the right to appear before a notary or judge to “formalise and solemnise their contractual link”.
On 5 December 2012 Mexico’s Supreme Court decided that three same sex couples in the state of Oaxaca had the right under the federal constitution to marry.
On 19 December 2013 in Griego v. Oliver, 316 P.3d 865 (2013), the New Mexico Supreme Court became the fifth state supreme court to require equal access to marriage for same-sex couples:
“We conclude that the purpose of New Mexico marriage laws is to bring stability and order to the legal relationship of committed couples by defining their rights and responsibilities as to one another, their children if they choose to raise children together, and their property. Prohibiting same-gender marriages is not substantially related to the governmental interests advanced ... or to the purposes we have identified. Therefore, barring individuals from marrying and depriving them of the rights, protections, and responsibilities of civil marriage solely because of their sexual orientation violates the Equal Protection Clause ... of the New Mexico Constitution. ... [T]he State of New Mexico is constitutionally required to allow same-gender couples to marry and must extend to them the rights, protections, and responsibilities that derive from civil marriage under New Mexico law.”
136. As regards national supreme courts in Europe, although no court has yet interpreted its national constitution as prohibiting the exclusion of same-sex couples from legal marriage, or requiring alternative means of legal recognition, on 9 July 2009 two of the five judges of Portugal’s Tribunal Constitucional dissented from the majority’s decision to uphold the exclusion. On 2 July 2009, Slovenia’s Constitutional Court held in Blažic & Kern v. Slovenia (U-I-425/06-10) that same-sex registered partners must be granted the same inheritance rights as different-sex spouses. On 7 July 2009, Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court held (1 BvR 1164/07) that same-sex registered partners and different-sex spouses must be granted the same survivor’s pensions. And, since 22 September 2011, Austria’s Constitutional Court has issued five decisions finding that (same-sex) registered partners must have the same rights as (different-sex) married couples.
137. Those intervening further noted that the Parliamentary Assembly of the CoE (PACE) has recommended: (a) that member States “review their policies in the field of social rights and protection of migrants ... to ensure that homosexual partnership[s] and families are treated on the same basis as heterosexual partnerships and families” (Recommendation 1470 (2000)); and (b) that they “adopt legislation which makes provision for registered [same-sex] partnerships”. The EU’s European Parliament first called for equal treatment of different-sex and same-sex couples in a 1994 resolution seeking to end “the barring of [same-sex] couples from marriage or from an equivalent legal framework”.
138. In 2004, the EU’s Council amended the Staff Regulations to provide for benefits for the non-marital partners of EU officials:
“non-marital partnership shall be treated as marriage provided that ... the couple produces a legal document recognised as such by a member State ... acknowledging their status as non-marital partners, ... [and] ... has no access to legal marriage in a member State”.
139. Finally, in 2008, the CoE’s Committee of Ministers agreed that:
“A staff member who is registered as a stable non-marital partner shall not be discriminated against, with regard to pensions, leave and allowances under the Staff Regulations ..., vis-à-vis a married staff member provided that ...: (i.) the couple produces a legal document recognised as such by a member state ... acknowledging their status as non-marital partners; ... (v.) the couple has no access to legal marriage in a member state.”
(?) Discrimination
140. Those intervening considered that, even assuming that the Convention did not yet require equal access to legal marriage for same-sex couples, it was (at least) indirect discrimination based on sexual orientation to limit particular rights or benefits to married different-sex couples, but provide no means for same-sex couples to qualify. Referring to Thlimmenos v. Greece and D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic ([GC], no. 57325/00, ECHR 2007 IV), they considered that failure to treat same-sex couples differently because of their legal inability to marry, by providing them with alternative means of qualifying for the right or benefit, required an objective and reasonable justification. They noted that indirect discrimination, as defined in Council Directive 2000/78/EC, Art. 2(2)(b), occurs when “an apparently neutral ... criterion ... would put persons having a ... particular sexual orientation at a particular disadvantage compared with other persons unless [it] is objectively justified by a legitimate aim and the means of achieving that aim are appropriate and necessary.” In their view, to avoid indirect discrimination against same-sex couples, governments must grant them an exemption from a requirement that they be legally married to qualify for particular rights or benefits. This meant, for example, that a public-sector employer or pension scheme could maintain a marriage requirement for different-sex couples (just as the rule on felony convictions could be maintained in Thlimmenos), but must exempt same-sex couples and find some alternative means for them to qualify (example, a civil union or registered partnership certificate, a sworn statement, or other evidence of a committed relationship).
141. In Christine Goodwin (cited above), the Grand Chamber required CoE member States to legally recognise gender reassignment, but left the details of recognition to each member State. Similarly, an obligation to exempt same-sex couples from a marriage requirement, to avoid indirect discrimination, would leave to member States the choice of the method used to do so. A member State would find at least five options within its margin of appreciation: (1) it could grant same-sex couples who could prove the existence of their relationship for a reasonable period a permanent exemption from the marriage requirement; (2) it could grant the same exemption to unmarried different-sex couples; (3) it could grant a temporary exemption to same-sex couples until it had created an alternative registration system, with a name other than marriage, allowing same-sex couples to qualify; (4) it could grant access to the same system to different sex couples; or (5) if it did not wish to grant the right or benefit to unmarried couples, or to create an alternative registration system, it could grant a temporary exemption to same-sex couples until it had had time to pass a law granting them equal access to legal marriage. It could also decide (subject to subsequent ECtHR supervision) whether any exceptions could be justified, for example relating to parental rights.
142. The principle that marriage requirements discriminate indirectly against same-sex couples was concisely stated by the legal report on homophobia published by the European Union’s Agency for Fundamental Rights in June 2008. The report concluded (at pp. 58-59, emphasis added) that “any measures denying to same-sex couples benefits ... available to opposite-sex married couples, where marriage is not open to same-sex couples, should be treated presumptively as a form of indirect discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation”, and that “international human rights law complements EU law, by requiring that same-sex couples either have access to an institution such as ... registered partnership[,] that would provide them with the same advantages ... [as] marriage, or ... that their de facto durable relationships extend[ ] such advantages to them”. According to Advocate General Jääskinen of the Court of Justice of the European Union, in his opinion of 15 July 2010, in Case C-147/08, Römer v. Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg:
“(§ 76) It is the [EU] Member States that must decide whether or not their national legal order allows any form of legal union available to homosexual couples, or whether or not the institution of marriage is only for couples of the opposite sex. In my view, a situation in which a Member State does not allow any form of legally recognised union available to persons of the same sex may be regarded as practising discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, because it is possible to derive from the principle of equality, together with the duty to respect the human dignity of homosexuals, an obligation to recognise their right to conduct a stable relationship within a legally recognised commitment. However, in my view, this issue, which concerns legislation on marital status, lies outside the sphere of activity of [EU] law.”
Those intervening contended that the potential discrimination noted by the Advocate General fell outside the scope of EU law, but fell squarely within the scope of the Convention, which applies to all legislation of CoE member States, including in the area of family law.
143. Those intervening noted that according to the Court’s case-law differences in treatment based on sexual orientation were analogous to difference in treatment based on race, religion and sex, and could only be justified by particularly serious reasons. This was relevant for the purposes of the proportionality test in which “It must also be shown that it was necessary in order to achieve that aim to exclude ... persons living in a homosexual relationship ...” (see Karner v. Austria, no. 40016/98, § 41, ECHR 2003 IX) The Court found no evidence of necessity where there was a difference of treatment between unmarried different-sex couples and unmarried same-sex couples. Those intervening considered that the necessity test should also be applied to the prima facie indirect discrimination created by an apparently neutral marriage requirement. Such a requirement failed to treat same-sex couples, who are legally unable to marry, differently from different-sex couples who were legally able to marry but had neglected to do so, or had chosen not to do so (because of a decision by one or both partners). The Court’s reasoning in Vallianatos (cited above, § 85) concerning the burden of proof being on the Government, also applied mutatis mutandis to the present case.
(ii) Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti (ARCD)
144. The ARCD submitted that a survey carried out (amongst Italians aged between 18 and 74) in 2011 by the ISTAT (Italian institute for statistics) found as follows: 61.3% thought that homosexuals were discriminated against or severely discriminated against; 74.8% thought that homosexuality was not a threat to the family; 65.8% declared themselves in agreement with the content of the phrase “It is possible to love a person of a different sex or the same sex, love is what is important”; 62.8% of those responding to the survey agreed with the phrase “it is just and fair for a homosexual couple living as though they were married to have before the law the same rights as a married heterosexual couple”; 40.3% of the one million homosexuals or bisexuals living in central Italy declared themselves to have been discriminated against; the 40.3% increases to 53.7% if discrimination clearly based on homosexual or bisexual orientation is added in relation to the search for apartments (10.2%), their relations with neighbours (14.3%), their needs in the medical sector (10.2%) or in relations in with others in public places, offices or on public transport (12.4%).
145. Those intervening submitted that to date a same-sex partner was “recognised” in written legislation only in limited cases, namely:
Article 14 quarter and Article 18 of the prison regulations, through which cohabitees have the right to visit the person incarcerated;
Law no. 91/99 concerning organ donation, where the partner more uxorio must be informed of the nature and circumstances surrounding the removal of the organ. They also have the right to object to such a procedure;
Article 199 (3) (a) of the Code of Criminal Procedure concerning the right not to testify against a partner;
Article 681 of the Code of Criminal Procedure regarding presidential pardon which may be signed by a cohabitee;
Circular no. 8996 issued by the Italian Minister for the Interior of 26 October 2012, which had as its object same-sex unions and residence permits in connection with legislative decree no. 30/2007;
The inclusion in the medical insurance scheme of the partners of homosexual parliamentarians;
146. In this connection domestic judges made various pronouncements, namely:
Judgment no. 404/88 of the Constitutional Court, which found that it was unconstitutional to evict a cohabiting surviving partner from a leased property. By means of the judgment of the Court of Cassation no. 5544/94 this right was extended to same-sex couples living more uxorio; (see also judgment of the Court of Cassation no. 33305/02 regarding rights to sue as a civil party for civil damage);
Ordinance no. 25661/10 of the Court of Cassation of 17 December 2010, which found that the right of entry [to Italian territory] and stay for the purposes of family reunification with an Italian citizen is solely regulated by EU directives.
Judgment no. 1328/11 of the Court of Cassation, which held that the notion of “spouse” must be understood according to the judicial regime where the marriage was celebrated. Thus, a foreigner who marries an EU national in Spain must be considered related for the purposes of their stay in Italy;
Judgment no. 9965/11 of the Milan Tribunal (at first instance) of 13 June 2011 which recognised the right of a homosexual partner to compensation following the loss suffered pursuant to the death of the partner in a traffic accident;
Judgment no. 7176/12 of the Milan Court of Appeal, Labour Section, (mentioned above) which confirmed that a same-sex partner had the right to be covered under the employed partner’s medical insurance.
147. The ARCD further referred to the importance of the findings in judgments nos. 138/10 and 4184/12 (for both, see Relevant domestic law above) as well as those in the Tribunal of Reggio Emilia’s ordinance of 13 February 2012. These decisions went to prove that Italian jurisprudence had assimilated the relevant notions, and the meticulous reasoning of the decisions (particularly that of the Court of Cassation, no. 4184/12) left no room for future U-turns on the matter.
148. In conclusion, the ARCD noted that given that the Court had established that same-sex couples had the same protection under Article 8 as different-sex couples did, the recognition of their right to some kind of a union was desirable to ensure such protection.
(iii) European Centre for Law and Justice (ECLJ)
149. The ECLJ feared that if the Court established that same-sex couples had a right to recognition in the form of a civil union, the next issue would be what rights to attach to such a union, in particular in connection with procreation. They noted that in Vallianatos the Court had not established such an obligation, but had solely considered that to provide for such unions for heterosexual couples but not for same-sex couples gave rise to discrimination. It followed that the Court could not find a violation in the present case.
150. In their view, Article 8 did not oblige States to provide a legal framework beyond that of marriage to safeguard family life. They considered that family life essentially concerned the relations between children and their parents. They noted that before the judgment in Schalk and Kopf the Court used to consider that in the absence of marriage it was only the existence of a child which brought into play the concept of family (they referred to Johnston and Others v. Ireland, 18 December 1986, Series A no. 112, and Elsholz v. Germany [GC], no. 25735/94, ECHR 2000 VIII). This was in line with international instruments and the Convention. They considered that any recognition given to a couple by society depended on the couple’s contribution to the common good through founding a family, and definitely not on the basis that the couple had feelings for each other, that being a matter concerning private life only.
151. The Centre, intervening, noted that Article 8 § 2 set limits on the protection of family life by the State. Such limits justified the refusal of the State to recognise certain families, such as polygamous or incestuous ones. In their view, Article 8 did not provide an obligation to give non-married couples a status equivalent to married ones. This was a matter to be regulated by the States and not the Convention. Neither could the States’ consent be assumed through the adoption of the CoE’s Committee of Ministers recommendation (2010)5. According to the ECLJ, during the preparatory work of the commission of experts and rapporteurs on the mentioned text the States refused to recommend the adoption of a legal framework for non-married couples, finally settling for a text which reads as follows:
“25. Where national legislation does not recognise nor confer rights or obligations on registered same-sex partnerships and unmarried couples, member states are invited to consider the possibility of providing, without discrimination of any kind, including against different sex couples, same-sex couples with legal or other means to address the practical problems related to the social reality in which they live.”
152. ECLJ considered that although the Court had to interpret the Convention as a living instrument, it could not substitute it, as it remained the principal reference. Otherwise, the Court would transform itself into an instrument of ideological actualisation on the basis of national legislations, in matters related to society – a role which surely did not fall within its competence. The intervener questioned whether it was prudent and respectful of the subsidiarity principle for the Court to supervise whether states were updating legislation according to evolving customs and morals (moeurs), as interpreted by a majority of judges. This would make the protection of human rights dependant less on the Convention and its protocols and more on the Court’s composition (as evidenced by the slight (10-7) majority in X and Others v. Austria [GC], no. 19010/07, ECHR 2013). They considered therefore that the Court should not usurp the role of States, especially given that the latter were free to add an additional protocol to the Convention had they wished to regulate sexual orientation (as was done to abolish the death penalty).
153. The ECLJ questioned why homosexuality was more acceptable than polygamy. They considered that if the legislator had to take account of an evolving society, then it had also to legislate in favour of polygamy and child marriage, even more so given that in many countries (such as Turkey, Switzerland, Belgium and the United Kingdom), there were more practising Muslims than same-sex couples.
154. They further referred to the comparative situations of States (discussed above), and added that referendums in favour of civil unions had been rejected by the majority of voters in Slovenia and Northern Ireland.
155. They considered that if the Court had to consider that an obligation to facilitate the common life of same-sex couples arose from Article 8 of the Convention, then such an obligation would need to relate solely to the specific needs of such couples and of society, allowing the State a margin of appreciation, and in their view the Italian State had fulfilled that duty of protection through judicial or contractual acts (as mainly explained by the Government). Further, they considered that protecting the family in its traditional sense constituted a legitimate aim justifying a difference in treatment (they referred to X and Others, cited above). They considered that since no obligation arose from the Convention, nor was there a right guaranteed by the State which fell within the ambit of the Convention, there was no room for a margin of appreciation.
156. As regards discrimination, the ECLJ considered that same-sex couples and different-sex couples were not in identical or similar situations, since the former could not procreate naturally. The difference was not one of sexual orientation but of sexual identity, based on objective biological causes, thus there was no room for justifying a difference in treatment. They considered that the States had an interest in protecting children, their birth and their well-being, as they were the common good of parents and society. If children stopped being at the heart of the family, then it would only be the concept of interpersonal relations which would subsist – an entirely individualistic notion.
157. They disapproved of the Court’s findings in Schalk and Kopf (§ 94), claiming that they were findings of a political not a juridical nature, which excluded children from being the essence of family life. Even worse, in Vallianatos (§ 49), the Grand Chamber considered that not even cohabitation was necessary to constitute family life. They also wondered whether stability of a relationship was a pertinent criterion (ibid., § 73). In this light they questioned what constituted family life, given that it no longer required a public commitment, or the presence of children, or cohabitation. It thus appeared that the existence of feelings was enough to establish family life. However, in their view, feelings could play a part in private life only, but not in family life. It followed that there was no objective definition of family life. This loss of definition was further reaffirmed in Burden v. the United Kingdom ([GC], no. 13378/05, ECHR 2008), and Stübing v. Germany (no. 43547/08, 12 April 2012).
158. The ECLJ submitted that the refusal to consider on an equal footing a marital family and a stable homosexual relationship was justified on the basis of the consequences connected to procreation and filiation, as well as the relationship between society and the State. In their view, to consider them as comparable would mean that all the rights applicable to married couples would also apply to them, including those related to parental issues, given that it would be illusory to allow them to marry but not to found a family. It would therefore mean accepting medically assisted procreation for female couples and surrogacy for male couples, with the consequences this would have for the children so conceived. As regards the relation with the State, they noted that a State wanting to define “family” would be a totalitarian state. Indeed, in their view, the drafters of the Convention wanted to safeguard the family from the actions of the State, and not allow the State to define the concept of family, according to the majority’s view of it – which was based on a view that it was the individual and not the family who was at the core of society.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Article 8
(i) General principles
159. While the essential object of Article 8 is to protect individuals against arbitrary interference by public authorities, it may also impose on a State certain positive obligations to ensure effective respect for the rights protected by Article 8 (see, among other authorities, X and Y v. the Netherlands, 26 March 1985, § 23, Series A no. 91; Maumousseau and Washington v. France, no. 39388/05, § 83, 6 December 2007; Söderman v. Sweden [GC], no. 5786/08, § 78, ECHR 2013; and Hämäläinen v. Finland [GC], no. 37359/09, § 62, ECHR 2014). These obligations may involve the adoption of measures designed to secure respect for private or family life even in the sphere of the relations of individuals between themselves (see, inter alia, S.H. and Others v. Austria [GC], no. 57813/00, § 87, ECHR 2011, and Söderman, cited above, § 78).
160. The principles applicable to assessing a State’s positive and negative obligations under the Convention are similar. Regard must be had to the fair balance that has to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole, the aims in the second paragraph of Article 8 being of a certain relevance (see Gaskin v. the United Kingdom, 7 July 1989, § 42, Series A no. 160, and Roche v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 32555/96, § 157, ECHR 2005 X).
161. The notion of “respect” is not clear-cut, especially as far as positive obligations are concerned: having regard to the diversity of the practices followed and the situations obtaining in the Contracting States, the notion’s requirements will vary considerably from case to case (see Christine Goodwin v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 28957/95, § 72, ECHR 2002 VI). Nonetheless, certain factors have been considered relevant for the assessment of the content of those positive obligations on States (see Hämäläinen, cited above, § 66). Of relevance to the present case is the impact on an applicant of a situation where there is discordance between social reality and the law, the coherence of the administrative and legal practices within the domestic system being regarded as an important factor in the assessment carried out under Article 8 (see, mutatis mutandis, Christine Goodwin, cited above, §§ 77-78; I. v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 25680/94, § 58, 11 July 2002, and Hämäläinen, cited above, § 66). Other factors relate to the impact of the alleged positive obligation at stake on the State concerned. The question here is whether the alleged obligation is narrow and precise or broad and indeterminate (see Botta v. Italy, 24 February 1998, § 35, Reports 1998 I) or about the extent of any burden the obligation would impose on the State (see Christine Goodwin, cited above, §§ 86-88).
162. In implementing their positive obligation under Article 8 the States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation. A number of factors must be taken into account when determining the breadth of that margin. In the context of “private life” the Court has considered that where a particularly important facet of an individual’s existence or identity is at stake the margin allowed to the State will be restricted (see, for example, X and Y, cited above, §§ 24 and 27; Christine Goodwin, cited above, § 90; see also Pretty v. the United Kingdom, no. 2346/02, § 71, ECHR 2002 III). Where, however, there is no consensus within the member States of the Council of Europe, either as to the relative importance of the interest at stake or as to the best means of protecting it, particularly where the case raises sensitive moral or ethical issues, the margin will be wider (see X, Y and Z v. the United Kingdom, 22 April 1997, § 44, Reports 1997-II; Fretté v. France, no. 36515/97, § 41, ECHR 2002-I; and Christine Goodwin, cited above, § 85). There will also usually be a wide margin if the State is required to strike a balance between competing private and public interests or Convention rights (see Fretté, cited above, § 42; Odièvre v. France [GC], no. 42326/98, §§ 44 49, ECHR 2003 III; Evans v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 6339/05, § 77, ECHR 2007 I; Dickson v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44362/04, § 78, ECHR 2007 V; and S.H. and Others, cited above, § 94).
(ii) Recent relevant case-law and the scope of the present case
163. The Court has already been faced with complaints concerning the lack of recognition of same-sex unions. However, in the most recent case of Schalk and Kopf v. Austria, when the Court delivered judgment the applicants had already obtained the opportunity to enter into a registered partnership. Thus, the Court had solely to determine whether the respondent State should have had provided the applicants with an alternative means of legal recognition of their partnership any earlier than it did (that is, before 1 January 2010). Having noted the rapidly developing European consensus which had emerged in the previous decade, but that there was not yet a majority of States providing for legal recognition of same-sex couples (at the time nineteen states), the Court considered the area in question to be one of evolving rights with no established consensus, where States enjoyed a margin of appreciation in the timing of the introduction of legislative changes (§ 105). Thus, the Court concluded that, though not in the vanguard, the Austrian legislator could not be reproached for not having introduced the Registered Partnership Act any earlier than 2010 (see ibid., § 106). In that case the Court also found that Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8 did not impose an obligation on Contracting States to grant same-sex couples access to marriage (ibid, § 101).
164. In the present case the applicants still today have no opportunity to enter into a civil union or registered partnership (in the absence of marriage) in Italy. It is thus for the Court to determine whether Italy, at the date of the analysis of the Court, namely in 2015, failed to comply with a positive obligation to ensure respect for the applicants’ private and family life, in particular through the provision of a legal framework allowing them to have their relationship recognised and protected under domestic law.
(iii) Application of the general principles to the present case
165. The Court reiterates that it has already held that same-sex couples are just as capable as different-sex couples of entering into stable, committed relationships, and that they are in a relevantly similar situation to a different-sex couple as regards their need for legal recognition and protection of their relationship (see Schalk and Kopf, § 99, and Vallianatos, §§ 78 and 81, both cited above). It follows that the Court has already acknowledged that same-sex couples are in need of legal recognition and protection of their relationship.
166. That same need, as well as the will to provide for it, has been expressed by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, which recommended that the Committee of Ministers call upon member States, among other things, “to adopt legislation making provision for registered partnerships” as long as fifteen years ago, and more recently by the Committee of Ministers (in its Recommendation CM/Rec(2010)5) which invited member States, where national legislation did not recognise nor confer rights or obligations on registered same-sex partnerships, to consider the possibility of providing same-sex couples with legal or other means to address the practical problems related to the social reality in which they live (see paragraphs 57 and 59 above).
167. The Court notes that the applicants in the present case, who are unable to marry, have been unable to have access to a specific legal framework (such as that for civil unions or registered partnerships) capable of providing them with the recognition of their status and guaranteeing to them certain rights relevant to a couple in a stable and committed relationship.
168. The Court takes note of the applicants’ situation within the Italian domestic system. As regards registration of the applicants’ same-sex unions with the “local registers for civil unions”, the Court notes that where this is possible (that is in less than 2% of existing municipalities) this action has merely symbolic value and is relevant for statistical purposes; it does not confer on the applicants any official civil status, and it by no means confers any rights on same-sex couples. It is even devoid of any probative value (of a stable union) before the domestic courts (see paragraph 115 above).
169. The applicants’ current status in the domestic legal context can only be considered a “de facto” union, which may be regulated by certain private contractual agreements of limited scope. As regards the mentioned cohabitation agreements, the Court notes that while providing for some domestic arrangements in relation to cohabitation (see paragraphs 41 and 129 above) such private agreements fail to provide for some basic needs which are fundamental to the regulation of a relationship between a couple in a stable and committed relationship, such as, inter alia, the mutual rights and obligations they have towards each other, including moral and material support, maintenance obligations and inheritance rights (compare Vallianatos, § 81 in fine, and Schalk and Kopf, § 109, both cited above). The fact that the aim of such contracts is not that of the recognition and protection of the couple is evident from the fact that they are open to anyone cohabiting, irrespective of whether they are a couple in a committed stable relationship (see paragraph 41 above). Furthermore, such a contract requires the persons to be cohabiting; however, the Court has already accepted that the existence of a stable union is independent of cohabitation (see Vallianatos, §§ 49 and 73). Indeed, in the globalised world of today various couples, married or in a registered partnership, experience periods during which they conduct their relationship at long distance, needing to maintain residence in different countries, for professional or other reasons. The Court considers that that fact in itself has no bearing on the existence of a stable committed relationship and the need for it to be protected. It follows that, quite apart from the fact that cohabitation agreements were not even available to the applicants before December 2013, such agreements cannot be considered as giving recognition and the requisite protection to the applicants’ unions.
170. Further, it has not been proved that the domestic courts could issue a statement of formal recognition, nor has the Government explained what would have been the implications of such a statement (see paragraph 82 above). While the national courts have repeatedly upheld the need to ensure protection for same sex-unions and to avoid discriminatory treatment, currently, in order to receive such protection the applicants, as with others in their position, must raise a number of recurring issues with the domestic courts and possibly even the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 16 above), to which the applicants have no direct access (see Scoppola v. Italy (no. 2) [GC], no. 10249/03, § 70, 17 September 2009). From the case-law brought to the Court’s attention, it transpires that while recognition of certain rights has been rigorously upheld, other matters in connection with same-sex unions remain uncertain, given that, as reiterated by the Government, the courts make findings on a case-by-case basis. The Government also admitted that protection of same-sex unions received more acceptance in certain branches than in others (see paragraph 131 above). In this connection it is also noted that the Government persistently exercise their right to object to such claims (see, for example, the appeal against the decision of the Tribunal of Grosseto) and thus they show little support for the findings on which they are hereby relying.
171. As indicated by the ARCD the law provides explicitly for the recognition of a same-sex partner in very limited circumstances (see paragraph 146 above). It follows that even the most regular of “needs” arising in the context of a same-sex couple must be determined judicially, in the uncertain circumstances mentioned above. In the Court’s view, the necessity to refer repeatedly to the domestic courts to call for equal treatment in respect of each one of the plurality of aspects which concern the rights and duties between a couple, especially in an overburdened justice system such as the one in Italy, already amounts to a not-insignificant hindrance to the applicants’ efforts to obtain respect for their private and family life. This is further aggravated by a state of uncertainty.
172. It follows from the above that the current available protection is not only lacking in content, in so far as it fails to provide for the core needs relevant to a couple in a stable committed relationship, but is also not sufficiently stable – it is dependent on cohabitation, as well as the judicial (or sometimes administrative) attitude in the context of a country that is not bound by a system of judicial precedent (see Torri and Others v. Italy, (dec.), nos. 11838/07 and 12302/07, § 42, 24 January 2012). In this connection the Court reiterates that coherence of administrative and legal practices within the domestic system must be regarded as an important factor in the assessment carried out under Article 8 (see paragraph 161 above).
173. In connection with the general principles mentioned in paragraph 161 above, the Court observes that, it also follows from the above examination of the domestic context that there exists a conflict between the social reality of the applicants, who for the most part live their relationship openly in Italy, and the law, which gives them no official recognition on the territory. In the Court’s view an obligation to provide for the recognition and protection of same-sex unions, and thus to allow for the law to reflect the realities of the applicants’ situations, would not amount to any particular burden on the Italian State be it legislative, administrative or other. Moreover, such legislation would serve an important social need – as observed by the ARCD, official national statistics show that there are around one million homosexuals (or bisexuals), in central Italy alone.
174. In view of the above considerations, the Court considers that in the absence of marriage, same-sex couples like the applicants have a particular interest in obtaining the option of entering into a form of civil union or registered partnership, since this would be the most appropriate way in which they could have their relationship legally recognised and which would guarantee them the relevant protection – in the form of core rights relevant to a couple in a stable and committed relationship – without unnecessary hindrance. Further, the Court has already held that such civil partnerships have an intrinsic value for persons in the applicants’ position, irrespective of the legal effects, however narrow or extensive, that they would produce (see Vallianatos, cited above, § 81). This recognition would further bring a sense of legitimacy to same-sex couples.
175. The Court reiterates that in assessing a State’s positive obligations regard must be had to the fair balance that has to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole. Having identified above the individuals’ interests at play, the Court must proceed to weigh them against the community interests.
176. Nevertheless, in this connection the Court notes that the Italian Government have failed to explicitly highlight what, in their view, corresponded to the interests of the community as a whole. They however considered that “time was necessarily required to achieve a gradual maturation of a common view of the national community on the recognition of this new form of family”. They also referred to “the different sensitivities on such a delicate and deeply felt social issue” and the search for a “unanimous consent of different currents of thought and feeling, even of religious inspiration, present in society”. At the same time, they categorically denied that the absence of a specific legal framework providing for the recognition and protection of same-sex unions attempted to protect the traditional concept of family, or the morals of society. The Government instead relied on their margin of appreciation in the choice of times and the modes of a specific legal framework, considering that they were better placed to assess the feelings of their community.
177. As regards the breadth of the margin of appreciation, the Court notes that this is dependent on various factors. While the Court can accept that the subject matter of the present case may be linked to sensitive moral or ethical issues which allow for a wider margin of appreciation in the absence of consensus among member States, it notes that the instant case is not concerned with certain specific “supplementary” (as opposed to core) rights which may or may not arise from such a union and which may be subject to fierce controversy in the light of their sensitive dimension. In this connection the Court has already held that States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation as regards the exact status conferred by alternative means of recognition and the rights and obligations conferred by such a union or registered partnership (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, §§ 108-09). Indeed, the instant case concerns solely the general need for legal recognition and the core protection of the applicants as same-sex couples. The Court considers the latter to be facets of an individual’s existence and identity to which the relevant margin should apply.
178. In addition to the above, of relevance to the Court’s consideration is also the movement towards legal recognition of same-sex couples which has continued to develop rapidly in Europe since the Court’s judgment in Schalk and Kopf. To date a thin majority of CoE States (twenty-four out of forty seven, see paragraph 55 above) have already legislated in favour of such recognition and the relevant protection. The same rapid development can be identified globally, with particular reference to countries in the Americas and Australasia (see paragraphs 65 and 135 above). The information available thus goes to show the continuing international movement towards legal recognition, to which the Court cannot but attach some importance (see, mutatis mutandis, Christine Goodwin, § 85, and Vallianatos, § 91, both cited above).
179. Turning back to the situation in Italy, the Court observes that while the Government is usually better placed to assess community interests, in the present case the Italian legislature seems not to have attached particular importance to the indications set out by the national community, including the general Italian population and the highest judicial authorities in Italy.
180. The Court notes that in Italy the need to recognise and protect such relationships has been given a high profile by the highest judicial authorities, including the Constitutional Court and the Court of Cassation. Reference is made particularly to the judgment of the Constitutional Court no. 138/10 in the first two applicants’ case, the findings of which were reiterated in a series of subsequent judgments in the following years (see some examples at paragraph 45 above). In such cases, the Constitutional Court, notably and repeatedly called for a juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties of homosexual unions (see, inter alia, paragraph 16 above), a measure which could only be put in place by Parliament.
181. The Court observes that such an expression reflects the sentiments of a majority of the Italian population, as shown through official surveys (see paragraph 144 above). The statistics submitted indicate that there is amongst the Italian population a popular acceptance of homosexual couples, as well as popular support for their recognition and protection.
182. Indeed, in their observations before this Court, the same Italian Government have not denied the need for such protection, claiming that it was not limited to recognition (see paragraph 128 above), which moreover they admitted was growing in popularity amongst the Italian community (see paragraph 130 above).
183. Nevertheless, despite some attempts over three decades (see paragraphs 126 and 46-47 above) the Italian legislature has been unable to enact the relevant legislation.
184. In this connection the Court recalls that, although in a different context, it has previously held that “a deliberate attempt to prevent the implementation of a final and enforceable judgment and which is, in addition, tolerated, if not tacitly approved, by the executive and legislative branch of the State, cannot be explained in terms of any legitimate public interest or the interests of the community as a whole. On the contrary, it is capable of undermining the credibility and authority of the judiciary and of jeopardising its effectiveness, factors which are of the utmost importance from the point of view of the fundamental principles underlying the Convention (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 175, ECHR 2004 V). While the Court is aware of the important legal and factual differences between Broniowski and the present case, it nevertheless considers that in the instant case, the legislature, be it willingly or for failure to have the necessary determination, left unheeded the repetitive calls by the highest courts in Italy. Indeed the President of the Constitutional Court himself in the annual report of the court regretted the lack of reaction on behalf of the legislator to the Constitutional Court’s pronouncement in the case of the first two applicants (see paragraph 43 above). The Court considers that this repetitive failure of legislators to take account of Constitutional Court pronouncements or the recommendations therein relating to consistency with the Constitution over a significant period of time, potentially undermines the responsibilities of the judiciary and in the present case left the concerned individuals in a situation of legal uncertainty which has to be taken into account.
185. In conclusion, in the absence of a prevailing community interest being put forward by the Italian Government, against which to balance the applicants’ momentous interests as identified above, and in the light of domestic courts’ conclusions on the matter which remained unheeded, the Court finds that the Italian Government have overstepped their margin of appreciation and failed to fulfil their positive obligation to ensure that the applicants have available a specific legal framework providing for the recognition and protection of their same-sex unions.
186. To find otherwise today, the Court would have to be unwilling to take note of the changing conditions in Italy and be reluctant to apply the Convention in a way which is practical and effective.
187. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention.
(b) Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8
188. Having regard to its finding under Article 8 (see paragraph 187 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine whether, in this case, there has also been a violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 12 ALONE AND ARTICLE 14 READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 12 OF THE CONVENTION
189. The applicants in application no. 18766/11 relied on Article 12 on its own, and argue that since the judgment in Schalk and Kopf (cited above), more countries have legislated in favour of gay marriage, and many more are in the process of discussing the issue. Therefore, given that the Convention is a living instrument, the Court should redetermine the question in the light of the position today.
190. All the applicants further complained that they had suffered discrimination as a result of the prohibition to marry applicable to them. Noting the Court’s recent acceptance in Schalk and Kopf of the applicability of Article 12 (apart from Article 8) to such situations, the applicants argued that while it was true that the Court held that the provision did not oblige states to confer such a right on homosexual couples, it was nevertheless for the Court to examine whether the failure to provide for same-sex marriage was justified in view of all the relevant circumstances. They argued that in the present cases it was particularly relevant that no other option was open for the applicants to have their unions legally recognised. Moreover, such exclusion could no longer be held as legitimate, given the social reality (according to a 2010 study by Eurispes 61.4% of Italians were in favour of some sort of union, 20.4% of whom were in favour of it being in the form of a marriage). To persist on denying certain rights to same-sex couples only continued to marginalise and stigmatise a minority group in favour of a majority with discriminatory tendencies. Lastly, they submitted that even assuming it could be considered legitimate it was clearly not proportionate, given the narrow margin of appreciation afforded to States when applying different treatment on the basis of sexual orientation. The same margin had to be considered narrow also in view of the fact that most States had in fact regulated for some form of civil union (see Schalk and Kopf, cited above, § 105).
191. The Court notes that in Schalk and Kopf the Court found under Article 12 that it would no longer consider that the right to marry must in all circumstances be limited to marriage between two persons of the opposite sex. However, as matters stood (at the time only six out of forty-seven CoE member States allowed same-sex marriage), the question whether or not to allow same-sex marriage was left to regulation by the national law of the Contracting State. The Court felt it must not rush to substitute its own judgment in place of that of the national authorities, who are best placed to assess and respond to the needs of society. It followed that Article 12 of the Convention did not impose an obligation on the respondent Government to grant a same-sex couple like the applicants access to marriage (§§ 61-63). The same conclusion was reiterated in the more recent Hämäläinen (cited above, § 96), where the Court held that while it is true that some Contracting States have extended marriage to same-sex partners, Article 12 cannot be construed as imposing an obligation on the Contracting States to grant access to marriage to same-sex couples.
192. The Court notes that despite the gradual evolution of States on the matter (today there are eleven CoE states that have recognised same-sex marriage) the findings reached in the cases mentioned above remain pertinent. In consequence the Court reiterates that Article 12 of the Convention does not impose an obligation on the respondent Government to grant a same-sex couple like the applicants access to marriage.
193. Similarly, in Schalk and Kopf, the Court held that Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8, a provision of more general purpose and scope, cannot be interpreted as imposing such an obligation either. The Court considers that the same can be said of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 12.
194. It follows that both the complaint under Article 12 alone, and that under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 12 are manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
195. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
196. The applicants in application no. 18766/11 claimed that they had suffered material damage, as a result of losses in leave days for family reasons as well as bonuses, and inability to enjoy a loan, losses which were however difficult to quantify. They further noted they had suffered non pecuniary damage, without making a specific claim in that respect.
197. The applicants in application no. 36030/11 claimed non-pecuniary damage in a sum to be determined by the Court, though they considered that EUR 7,000 for each applicant may be considered equitable in line with the award made in Vallianatos (cited above). They also requested the Court to make specific recommendations to the Government with a view to legislating in favour of civil unions for same-sex couples.
198. The Government submitted that the applicants had not suffered any actual damage.
199. The Court notes that the pecuniary claim of the applicants in applications no. 18766/11 is both unquantified and unsubstantiated. On the other hand, the Court considers that all the applicants have suffered non pecuniary damage, and awards the applicants EUR 5,000 each, plus any tax that may be chargeable to them, in this respect.
200. Lastly, in connection with the applicants’ request, the Court notes that it has found that the absence of a legal framework allowing for recognition and protection of their relationship violates their rights under Article 8 of the Convention. In accordance with Article 46 of the Convention, it will be for the respondent State to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to fulfil its obligations to secure the right of the applicants and other persons in their position to respect for their private and family life (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000 VIII, Christine Goodwin, cited above, § 120, ECHR 2002 VI; and S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 30562/04 and 30566/04, § 134, ECHR 2008).
B. Costs and expenses
201. The applicants in application no. 18766/11 also claimed EUR 8,200 for costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and EUR 5,000 for those incurred before the Court.
202. The applicants in application no. 36030/11 claimed EUR 11,672.96 for costs and expenses incurred before this Court as calculated in accordance with Italian law and bearing in mind the complex issues dealt with in the case as well as the extensive observations, including those of the third parties.
203. The Government submitted that the applicants’ claims for expenses were “groundless and lacking any support”.
204. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court rejects the claim for costs and expenses in the domestic proceedings, as it has not been substantiated by means of any documents. The Court, having considered the two claims made by the different lawyers and the lack of detail in the claim concerning application no. 18766/11, further considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 4,000 jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants in respect of application no. 18766/11, and EUR 10,000, jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, to be paid directly into their representatives’ bank accounts, in respect of application no. 36030/11 for the proceedings before the Court.
C. Default interest
205. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaints under Article 8 alone and Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 admissible, and the remainder of the applications inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention;

3. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention;

4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros) each, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 4,000 (four thousand euros), jointly, to the applicants in application no. 18766/11, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(iii) EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros), jointly, to the applicants in application no. 36030/11, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses, to be paid directly into their representatives’ bank accounts;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 21 July 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Françoise Elens-Passos Päivi Hirvelä
Registrar President


In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Mahoney joined by Judges Tsotsoria and Vehabovi? is annexed to this judgment.

P.H.
F.E.P.

CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE MAHONEY JOINED BY JUDGES TSOTSORIA AND VEHABOVI?

1. We, the three judges subscribing to this concurring opinion, have voted with our four colleagues for a violation of Article 8 of the Convention in the present case, but on the basis of different, narrower reasoning. In short, we find no need to assert that today Article 8 imposes on Italy what our colleagues characterise as a positive obligation to provide same-sex couples such as the applicants with a specific legal framework providing for the recognition and protection of their same-sex unions (paragraph 185 in fine of the judgment). What is decisive for us in the present case may be briefly summarised as follows:
- the Italian State has chosen, through its highest courts, notably the Constitutional Court, to declare that two people of the same sex living in stable cohabitation are invested by the Italian Constitution with a fundamental right to obtain juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties attaching to their union;
- it is this voluntary, active intervention by the Italian State into the sphere of personal relations covered by Article 8 that attracts the application of the Convention’s guarantee of the right to respect for private and family life, without there being any call to invoke the pre-existence of a positive Convention obligation;
- the requirements flowing from Article 8 as regards any State regulation of the exercise of the right to respect for private and family life were not met in the circumstances of the present case because of the defective nature of the follow-up, within the Italian legal order, to the Constitutional Court’s authoritative judicial declaration of a constitutional entitlement for persons in the position of the applicants to some form of adequate legal recognition of stable same-sex unions.

This reasoning is explained in further detail below.

2. In its judgment no. 138 of 15 April 2010 in relation to the constitutional challenges of the applicants Mr Oliari and Mr A, the Italian Constitutional Court, while rejecting the arguments under Article 29 of the Constitution (on the institution of marriage), ruled that, by virtue of Article 2 of the Constitution, two people of the same sex in stable cohabitation have a fundamental right to freely express their personality in a couple, obtaining – in time and by the means and the limits to be set by law – juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties (these are the words in which the ruling is summarised in paragraph 16 of the judgment; the text of Articles 2 and 29 of the Italian Constitution is set out in paragraph 33 of the judgment). This ruling represents an authoritative statement of the regulation, within the Italian legal order, of the applicants’ right to respect for their private and family life as far as the legal status that should be given to their union as a same-sex couple is concerned. The “fundamental right” thereby recognised to obtain juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties attaching to a same-sex union is one deriving, not from any positive obligation enshrined in the Convention, but from the wording of Article 2 of the Italian Constitution.

3. Under the constitutional arrangements in Italy, while the Constitutional Court may make a pronouncement of unconstitutionality in respect of existing legislation, it has no power to fill a legislative lacuna even though, as in its judgment no. 138/2010, it may have identified that lacuna as entailing a situation which is not compatible with the Constitution. Thus, in the case of Mr Oliari and Mr A in 2010, it was not for the Constitutional Court to proceed to the formulation of the appropriate legal provisions, but for the Italian Parliament (see paragraphs 36 and 45 of the present judgment for similar explanations of its powers given by the Constitutional Court in its subsequent rulings reiterating the general conclusion stated in judgment no. 138/10). As the present judgment (at paragraph 82) puts it, “the Constitutional Court … could not but invite the legislature to take action” (see likewise paragraphs 84 and 180 in fine of the judgment). In this connection it is worth citing the report that the then President of the Constitutional Court addressed to the highest Italian constitutional authorities in 2013 (quoted at paragraph 43 of the judgment):

“Dialogue is sometimes more difficult with the [Constitutional] Court’s natural interlocutor. This is particularly so in cases where it solicits the legislature to modify a legal norm which it considered to be in contrast with the Constitution. Such requests are not to be underestimated. They constitute, in fact, the only means available to the [Constitutional] Court to oblige the legislative organs to eliminate any situation which is not compatible with the Constitution, and which, albeit identified by the [Constitutional] Court, does not lead to a pronouncement of anti-constitutionality. … A request of this type which remained unheeded was that made in judgment no. 138/10, which, while finding the fact that a marriage could only be contracted by persons of a different sex to be constitutional compliant, also affirmed that same-sex couples had a fundamental right to obtain legal recognition, with the relevant rights and duties, of their union. It left it to Parliament to provide for such regulation, by the means and within the limits deemed appropriate.”

In sum, as explained by the then President of the Constitutional Court:
- the Constitutional Court had affirmed the fundamental right of same-sex couples under the Italian Constitution to obtain legal recognition of their union;
- however, the only means available to the Constitutional Court to “oblige” the legislative organs to eliminate the unconstitutional lacuna in Italian law denying same-sex couples this nationally guaranteed fundamental right was to “solicit”, or address a “request” to, Parliament to take the necessary legislative action.

The applicants in application no. 36030/11 added their explanation that “Constitutional Court judgment no. 138/10 had the effect of affirming the existence of … a constitutional duty upon the legislature to enact an appropriate general regulation on the recognition of same-sex unions, with consequent rights and duties for partners” (paragraph 114 of the judgment).

4. Yet, to date, five years have elapsed since the judgment of the Constitutional Court, with no appropriate legislation having been enacted by the Italian Parliament. The applicants are thus in the unsatisfactory position of being recognised by the Constitutional Court as enjoying under Italian constitutional law an inchoate “fundamental right” affecting an important aspect of the legal status to be accorded to their private and family life, but this inchoate “fundamental right” has not received adequate concrete implementation from the competent arm of government, namely the legislature. The applicants, like other same-sex couples in their position, have been left in limbo, in a state of legal uncertainty as regards the legal recognition of their union to which they are entitled under the Italian Constitution.

5. On the basis of the foregoing facts, it is not necessary for the Court to decide whether Italy has a positive obligation under paragraph 1 of Article 8 of the Convention to accord appropriate legal recognition within its legal order to the union of same-sex couples. The declaration by the Constitutional Court that Article 2 of the Italian Constitution confers on two people of the same sex living in stable cohabitation a “fundamental right” under domestic constitutional law to obtain juridical recognition of their union constitutes an active intervention by the State into the sphere of private and family life covered by Article 8 of the Convention. Judgment no. 138/10 was not an isolated ruling: in the words of the present judgment (at paragraph 180), “in Italy the need to recognise and protect such relationships has been given a high profile by the highest judicial authorities, including the Constitutional Court and the Court of Cassation”, with the Constitutional Court repeatedly calling on Parliament to adopt the requisite legislation giving juridical recognition of the relevant rights and duties of homosexual unions. In our view, this voluntary action of the State in relation to the legal regulation of the applicants’ private and family life in itself and of itself attracts the application of Article 8 of the Convention in their cases and the accompanying obligation on the Italian State to comply with the requirements flowing from Article 8, notably those set out in its paragraph 2.

6. Undeniably, given what the respondent Government describe as the difficult exercise of reaching a balance between “different sensitivities on such a delicate and deeply felt social issue” (paragraph 126 of the judgment), the Italian State is to be recognised as having a certain margin of appreciation in regard both to the choice of the precise legal status to be accorded to same-sex unions and to the timing for the enactment of the relevant legislation (see paragraph 177 of the judgment, which makes a similar point).

7. On the other hand, whatever constitutional framework and distribution of powers between the arms of government a Contracting State may choose to adopt, there is an overall duty of trust and good faith owed by the State and its public authorities to the citizen in a democratic society governed by the rule of law (see, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, §§173 and 175, ECHR 2004-V). In our view, despite the margin of appreciation available to the Italian State, this duty of trust was not respected in the present case as regards the follow-up to judgment no. 138/10 of the Constitutional Court in which an unconstitutional lacuna, involving the denial of a “fundamental right”, was identified as existing in the Italian legal order. There is, and has remained for five years, a discordance between the Constitutional Court’s declaration as to the entitlement of a given category of individuals under the Constitution and the action, or rather inaction, of the Italian legislature, as the competent arm of government, in implementing that entitlement. The beneficiaries of the declaration of the Constitutional Court as to the incompatibility with the Constitution of the lack of adequate legal recognition of same-sex unions have been denied the level of protection of their private and family life to which they are entitled under Article 2 of the Italian Constitution.

8. Furthermore, Italian law regarding the legal status to be accorded to same-sex unions has been left in a state of unregulated uncertainty over an excessive period of time. This enduring situation of legal uncertainty, relied on in the present judgment (for example, at paragraphs 170, 171 and 184 in fine), is such as to render the domestic regulation of the applicants’ same-sex union incompatible with the democratic concept of “law” inherent in paragraph 2’s requirement that any “interference” with the right to respect for private and family life be “in accordance with the law”. This is especially so since, as the judgment points out (at paragraph 171),

“the necessity to refer repeatedly to the domestic courts to call for equal treatment in respect of each one of the plurality of aspects which concern the rights and duties between a couple, especially in an overburdened justice system such as the one in Italy, already amounts to a not-insignificant hindrance to the applicants’ efforts to obtain respect for their private and family life”.

What is more, the judgment adds (at paragraph 170), the Government persistently exercise their right to object to such claims of equal treatment brought before the national courts on a case-by-case basis in various branches of the law by same-sex couples.

9. Like our colleagues, we note that “the Italian Government have failed to explicitly highlight what, in their view, corresponded to the interests of the community as a whole” in order to explain the omission of the Parliament to legislate so as to implement the fundamental constitutional right identified by the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 176 of the judgment). We likewise agree with our colleagues in rejecting the various arguments that the Government did adduce by way of justification of this continuing omission, notably the arguments as to registration of same-sex unions by some municipalities, private contractual agreements and the capacity of the domestic courts on the domestic law as it stands to afford adequate legal recognition and protection (see, in particular, paragraphs 81-82 and 168-172). As our colleagues point out, it is also significant that “there is amongst the Italian population a popular acceptance of homosexual couples, as well as popular support for their recognition and protection”, such that the rulings of the highest judicial authorities in Italy, including the Constitutional Court and the Court of Cassation, reflect the sentiments of a majority of the community in Italy (paragraphs 180-181 of the judgment).

10. Where we part company with our colleagues is as regards the question where to situate the analysis of the facts of the case for the purposes of Article 8 of the Convention. Our colleagues are careful to limit their finding of the existence of a positive obligation to Italy and to ground their conclusion on a combination of factors not necessarily found in other Contracting States. To begin with, we are not sure that such a limitation of a positive obligation under the Convention to local conditions is conceptually possible. Secondly, at some points our colleagues nonetheless appear to rely, at least partly, on general reasoning capable of being read as implying a free-standing positive obligation incumbent on all the Contracting States to provide a legal framework for same-sex unions (see, for example, paragraph 165 of the judgment). It might conceivably be reasoned that, on analogy with A, B and C v. Ireland [GC] (application no. 25579/05, ECHR 2010, §§253, 264 and 267), a “positive obligation” on the Italian State to enact adequate implementing legislation arises from Article 2 of the Italian Constitution as interpreted by the Constitutional Court. That may well be true as a matter of Italian constitutional law, as argued by the applicants in application no. 36030/11 (see paragraph 3 in fine above of the present concurring opinion). However, this is not what is normally meant by a positive obligation being imposed by a Convention Article. In particular, whenever a State chooses to regulate the exercise of an activity coming within the scope of a Convention right, it is obliged to do so in compliance with the express and inherent requirements of the Convention Article in question – for example, in a manner that does not involve excessive legal uncertainty for the Convention right-holder. In such circumstances, we are in the realm of right-regulation, not the realm of positive Convention obligations. This is why we have urged (at paragraph 5 above in the present concurring opinion) that the applicants’ grievance should be analysed in terms of defective State intervention in the sphere of private and family life, rather than in terms of failure to fulfil a positive Convention obligation.

11. In conclusion, for us, the unsatisfactory state of the relevant domestic law on the recognition of same-sex unions, displaying a prolonged failure to implement a nationally recognised fundamental constitutional right in an effective manner and giving rise to continuing uncertainty, renders the active intervention of the Italian State into the regulation of the applicants’ right to respect for their private and family life incompatible with the requirements of Article 8 of the Convention.

12. The foregoing concurring opinion is not to be taken as expressing a view on whether, in the present-day conditions of 2015 in the light of evolving attitudes in democratic society in Europe, paragraph 1 of Article 8 should now be interpreted as embodying, for Italy or generally for all Contracting States, a positive obligation to accord appropriate legal recognition and protection to same-sex unions. Our point is that there is no necessity in the present case to have recourse to such a “new” interpretation, as in any event a finding in favour of the applicants is dictated on a narrower ground on the basis of existing jurisprudence and the existing classic analysis of the requirements accompanying active State intervention regulating the exercise of the right under Article 8 of the Convention to respect for private and family life.

APPENDIX
Application no. 18766/11

OMISSIS

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Violazione di Articolo 8 - Diritto per rispettare per privato e la vita di famiglia (Articolo 8 - obblighi Positivi Articolo 8-1 - Riguardo per la vita di famiglia
Rispetti per la vita privata) danno Patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinse (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale la soddisfazione Equa)
Danno non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale
Soddisfazione equa)



QUARTA SEZIONE





CAUSA OLIARI ED ALTRI C. ITALIA

(Richieste N. 18766/11 e 36030/11)













SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

21 luglio 2015



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Oliari ed Altri c. l'Italia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Päivi Hirvelä, Presidente
Guido Raimondi,
Ledi Bianku,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paul Mahoney,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Yonko Grozev, giudici
e Françoise Elens-Passos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 30 giugno 2015,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in due richieste (N. 18766/11 e 36030/11) contro la Repubblica italiana depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con sei cittadini italiani, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 21 marzo e 10 giugno 2011 rispettivamente.
2. I primi due richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Trento. I richiedenti rimanenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, avvocati che praticano a Milano. Il Governo italiano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Ersiliagrazia Spatafora.
3. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la legislazione italiana non li concedè per sposarsi o entrare in qualsiasi l'altro tipo di unione civile e loro erano discriminati così contro come un risultato del loro orientamento sessuale. Loro citarono Articoli 8, 12 e 14 della Convenzione.
4. 3 dicembre 2013 la Camera alla quale fu assegnata la causa decise che le azioni di reclamo riguardo ad Articolo 8 da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 sarebbe comunicato al Governo. Decise inoltre che le richieste dovrebbero essere congiunte.
5. 7 gennaio 2013 il Vicepresidente della Sezione al quale la causa era stata assegnata decise di accordare l'anonimia ad uno dei richiedenti sotto Articolo 47 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
6. Osservazioni scritto furono ricevute anche congiuntamente da FIDH, Centre di AIRE, ILGA-Europa, ECSOL, UFTDU ed UDU, Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti, ed ECLJ (Centre europeo per Legge e la Giustizia) che era stato dato permesso per intervenire col Vicepresidente della Camera (l'Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione). Il Sig. Pavel Parfentev in favore di sette NGOS russi (Famiglia e Fondamento di Demografia, Per Famiglia Diritti Mosca Genitori Comitato Urbano, Santo-Petersburg Genitori Comitato Urbano, Genitori Comitato di Città di Volgodonsk la carità regionale “Svetlitsa” Genitori ' Cultura Centre, ed il “il mnogodetki di Peterburgskie” organizzazione sociale), e tre NGOS ucraini (il Comitato Parentale di Ucraina, il Comitato Parentale ed Ortodosso, e la Salute Nazione organizzazione sociale), era stato dato anche permesso per intervenire col Vicepresidente della Camera. Comunque, nessuno osservazione è stato ricevuto con la Corte.
7. Il Governo obiettò alle osservazioni presentate congiuntamente con FIDH, Centre di AIRE, ILGA-Europa, ECSOL, UFTDU ed UDU, siccome loro erano giunti alla Corte dopo il termine massimo fisso, vale a dire 27 marzo 2014 invece di 26 marzo 2014. La Corte nota che al tempo attinente il Vicepresidente della Camera non prese una decisione di respingere le osservazioni presentate che era infatti spedì alle parti per commento. La Corte, avendo considerato che le osservazioni furono anticipate con ed impostino e ricevettero con la Corte a 2.00 di mattina 27 marzo 2014, e che la copia permanente ricevette più tardi con fax che giorno contenne una scusa così come un chiarimento per il ritardo, respinge l'eccezione del Governo.
8. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11 richiesero che un'udienza orale sia contenuta nella causa. 30 giugno 2015 la Corte considerò questa richiesta. Decise che avendo riguardo ad ai materiali di fronte a sé un'udienza orale non era necessaria.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
9. I dettagli riguardo ai richiedenti possono essere trovati nell'Annetta.
Lo sfondo alla causa
1. Il Sig. OMISSIS ed il Sig. A.

10. A luglio 2008 questi due richiedenti che erano l'un con l'altro in una relazione stabile ed impegnata dichiararono la loro intenzione di sposarsi, e richiese l’Ufficio di Stato Civile del Comune di Trento per emettere l’atto del matrimonio attinente.
11. 25 luglio 2008 la loro richiesta fu respinta.
12. I due richiedenti impugnarono la decisione di fronte al Tribunale di Trento (nella conformità con Articolo 98 del Codice civile). Loro dibatterono che legge italiana non proibì esplicitamente matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso, e che, anche se quel era la causa, tale posizione sarebbe incostituzionale.
13. Con una decisione di 24 febbraio 2009 il Tribunale di Trento respinse la loro rivendicazione. Notò che la Costituzione non stabilì i requisiti per contrarre matrimonio, ma il Codice civile faceva e previde precisamente che uno che simile requisito era che consorti sono del sesso opposto. Un matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso mancò così, uno dei requisiti più essenziali a renderlo un atto legale e valido, vale a dire una differenza in sesso fra le parti. In qualsiasi l'evento non c'era nessun diritto essenziale da sposarsi, neanche le disposizioni di legge limitate costituisca la discriminazione, poiché le limitazioni subirono coi richiedenti era gli stessi come quelli fatti domanda ad ognuno. Inoltre, notò che Unione europea (“EU”) legge lasciò simile diritti per essere regolata all'interno dell'ordine nazionale.
14. I richiedenti fecero appello alla Corte d'appello di Trento. Mentre la corte reiterò l'interpretazione unanime data a legge italiana nel campo, vale a dire all'effetto che legge ordinaria, particolarmente il Codice civile non ha concesso matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso lo considerò attinente fare una raccomandazione alla Corte Costituzionale in collegamento con le rivendicazioni di incostituzionalità del diritto vigente.
15. La Corte Costituzionale italiana in sentenza n. 138 15 aprile 2010 dichiarato inammissibile i richiedenti ' richiesta costituzionale ad Articoli 93, 96, 98, 107 108, 143 143 bis e 231 del Codice civile italiano, come sé fu diretto all'ottenimento di norme supplementari non previsto per con la Costituzione (il diretta ad ottenere una pronunzia additiva non costituzionalmente obbligata).
16. La Corte Costituzionale considerò Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana che previde che la Repubblica riconosce e garantisce i diritti inviolabili della persona, come un individuo ed in gruppi sociali dove la personalità è espressa, così come i doveri della solidarietà politica, economica e sociale contro che non c'era derogazione. Notò che col sociale di gruppo capire qualsiasi forma della comunità, semplice o complesso intese di abilitare ed incoraggiare lo sviluppo gratis aveva di qualsiasi individuale con vuole dire di relazioni. Tale nozione incluse unioni di omosessuale, capì come una convivenza stabile di due persone dello stesso sesso che ha un diritto essenziale per esprimere liberamente la loro personalità in una coppia mentre ottenne-in tempo e coi mezzi e limiti per essere esposto con legge-riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri. Comunque, questo riconoscimento che necessariamente richiede regolamentazione legale e generale mirò ad esponendo fuori i diritti ed i doveri dei partner in una coppia, potrebbe essere realizzato separatamente negli altri modi dall'istituzione di matrimonio fra omosessuali. Siccome mostrato coi sistemi diversi in Europa, la questione del tipo di riconoscimento fu lasciata a regolamentazione con Parlamento, nell'esercizio della sua piena discrezione. Ciononostante, la Corte Costituzionale chiarificò che senza pregiudizio alla discrezione di Parlamento, potesse intervenire comunque secondo il principio dell'uguaglianza nelle specifiche situazioni riferite ai diritti essenziali di una coppia di omosessuale, dove lo stesso trattamento di coppie sposate e coppie di omosessuale fu richiesto. La corte può in simile cause valuti la ragionevolezza delle misure.
17. Seguì a considerare che era vero che i concetti di famiglia e matrimonio non potevano essere considerati “cristallizzò” in riferimento al momento quando la Costituzione entrò in vigore, determinato che principi costituzionali devono essere interpretati che porta in cambi di mente nell'ordine legale e l'evoluzione di società e le sue dogane. Ciononostante, tale interpretazione non poteva essere prolungata al punto dove colpì la molta essenza di norme legali, mentre li cambia in tale modo come includere fenomeni e problemi che non erano stati considerati in qualsiasi il modo quando fu decretato. Infatti sembrò dal lavoro preparatorio alla Costituzione che la questione di unioni di omosessuale non era stata dibattuta con la riunione, nonostante il fatto che l'omosessualità non era ignota. Nel redigere Articolo 29 della Costituzione, la riunione aveva discusso un'istituzione con una forma precisa ed una disciplina articolata previde per col Codice civile. Così, nell'assenza di qualsiasi simile riferimento, era inevitabile per concludere che che che era stato considerato era la nozione di matrimonio come definito nel Codice civile che entrò in vigore nel 1942 e quale al tempo, ed ancora oggi, stabilito che consorti dovevano essere del sesso opposto. Perciò, il significato di questo precetto costituzionale non poteva essere alterato con un'interpretazione creativa. In conseguenza, la norma costituzionale non prolungò ad unioni di omosessuale, e fu inteso di riferirsi a matrimonio nel suo senso tradizionale.
18. Infine, la corte considerò che, in riguardo di Articolo 3 della Costituzione riguardo al principio dell'uguaglianza, la legislazione attinente non creò la discriminazione irragionevole, determinato che unioni di omosessuale non potevano essere considerate equivalenti a matrimonio. Anche Articolo 12 della Convenzione europea su Diritti umani ed Articolo 9 dello Statuto di Diritti essenziali non richiese la piena uguaglianza fra unioni di omosessuale e matrimoni fra un uomo ed una donna, come questo una questione della discrezione Parlamentare era essere regolata con legge nazionale, siccome attestato con gli approcci diversi che esistono in Europa.
19. In conseguenza della sentenza sopra, con una decisione (l'ordinanza) depositò nella cancelleria attinente 21 settembre 2010 la Corte d'appello respinse i richiedenti che ' chiede in pieno.
2. Il Sig. OMISSIS ed il Sig. OMISSIS
20. Nel 2003 questi due richiedenti si incontrarono ed entrarono l'un con l'altro in una relazione. Nel 2004 il Sig. OMISSIS decise di intraprendere gli ulteriori studi (e così fermò guadagno qualsiasi il reddito), una possibilità aperto a lui grazie all'appoggio finanziario del Sig. OMISSIS.
21. 1 luglio 2005 la coppia si mosse insieme in. Nel 2005 e 2007 i richiedenti scrissero al Presidente della Repubblica che accentua le difficoltà incontrato con coppie di stesso-sesso e sollecitando la promulgazione di legislazione in favore di unioni civili.
22. Nel 2008 la convivenza fisica dei è stata registrata nei documenti delle autorità . Nel 2009 loro designarono l’un l'altro come custodi in caso di incapacità (amministratori di sostegno).
23. 19 febbraio 2011 loro richiesero il loro atto del matrimonio per essere emessi. 9 aprile 2011 la loro richiesta fu respinta sulla base della legge e la giurisprudenza che concernono all'argomento (vedere diritto nazionale Attinente sotto).
24. I due richiedenti non intrapresero la via di ricorso prevista per sotto Articolo 98 del Codice civile, in finora come sé non poteva essere considerato seguire effettivo la dichiarazione di Corte Costituzionale menzionata sopra di.
3. Il Sig. OMISSIS ed il Sig. OMISSIS
25. Nel 2002 questi due richiedenti si incontrarono ed entrarono l'un con l'altro in una relazione. Di stesso anno loro cominciarono a coabitare e da allora poi loro sono stati in una relazione impegnata.
26. Nel 2006 loro aprirono un conto bancario unito.
27. Nel 2007 i richiedenti ' che la convivenza fisica è stata registrata nelle autorità i documenti di '.
28. 3 novembre 2009 loro richiesero che il loro atto del matrimonio sia emesso. La persona in accusa all'ufficio non li richiese per riempire nella richiesta attinente, mentre allegando semplicemente la loro richiesta ad un numero di richieste analoghe rese con le altre coppie.
29. 5 novembre 2009 la loro richiesta fu respinta sulla base della legge e la giurisprudenza che concernono all'argomento (vedere diritto nazionale Attinente sotto).
30. OMISSIS impugnò la decisione di fronte al Tribunale di Milano.
31. Con una decisione (il decreto) di 9 giugno 2010 depositato nella cancelleria attinente 1 luglio 2010 il Tribunale di Milano respinse la loro rivendicazione, mentre considerando che era legittimo per lo Status Ufficio Civile per rifiutare una richiesta avere atto del matrimonio emesso per i fini di un matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso, in linea con la sentenza della sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 138 15 aprile 2010.
32. I richiedenti non depositarono un'ulteriore richiesta (il reclamo) sotto Articolo 739 del Codice di Procedura Civile, in finora come sé non poteva essere considerato seguire effettivo la dichiarazione di Corte Costituzionale.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE E PRATICA
A. diritto nazionale Attinente e pratica
1. La Costituzione italiana
33. Articoli 2, 3 e 29 della Costituzione italiana lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 2
“La Repubblica riconosce e garantisce diritti umani inviolabili, sia come un individuo ed in gruppi sociali dove la personalità è sviluppata, e richiede l'adempimento di obblighi della solidarietà politica, economica, sociale contro che non c'è derogazione.”
Articolo 3
“Tutti i cittadini hanno la dignità sociale ed uguale e sono uguali di fronte alla legge, senza distinzione di sesso razza, lingua, religione, opinione politica, condizioni personali e sociali. È il dovere della Repubblica di rimuovere quegli ostacoli di una natura economica o sociale che costringe la libertà e l'uguaglianza di cittadini, mentre impedendo con ciò il pieno sviluppo della persona umana e la partecipazione effettiva di tutti i lavoratori nel politico, organizzazione economica e sociale del paese.”
Articolo 29
“La Repubblica riconosce i diritti della famiglia come una naturale società fondata su matrimonio. Matrimonio è basato sul morale e l'uguaglianza legale dei consorti all'interno dei limiti posati in giù con legge per garantire l'unità della famiglia.”
2. Matrimonio
34. Sotto diritto nazionale italiano, a coppie di stesso-sesso non è permesso per contrarre matrimonio, siccome affermato nella sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 138 (menzionò sopra).
35. Lo stesso è stato affermato con la Corte italiana di Cassazione nella sua sentenza n. 4184 15 marzo 2012 che concerne due cittadini italiani dello stesso sesso che si sposò nei Paesi Bassi e che aveva impugnato il rifiuto di autorità italiane per registrare il loro matrimonio nel documento di status civile sulla base del “non-configurability come un matrimonio.” La Corte di Cassazione concluse che i rivendicatori avevano nessuno diritto registrare il loro matrimonio, non perché non esistè o era nullo, ma a causa della sua incapacità per produrre qualsiasi effetto legale nell'ordine italiano. Contenne inoltre che persone dello stesso sesso che vive insieme in una relazione stabile avevano diritto a rispettare per loro privato e la vita di famiglia sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione europea; perciò, nell'esercizio del diritto per vivere liberamente il loro status inviolabile come una coppia loro possono portare un'azione di fronte ad una corte per chiedere, nelle specifiche situazioni riferite a diritti essenziali loro lo stesso trattamento come quel riconobbe con legge a coppie sposate.
36. Inoltre, la Corte Costituzionale nella sua sentenza n. 170/2014 che riguardano “il forzato divorzio” riassegnamento di genere seguente di uno dei consorti, fondò che era per il legislatore per assicurare che un'alternativa a matrimonio fu offerta, mentre permettendo tale coppia di evitare la trasformazione nella loro situazione, da una di tutela giuridica di massimo ad un assolutamente incerto. La Corte Costituzionale seguì ad affermare che il legislatore doveva agire prontamente chiarire l'aspirapolvere legale che provoca una mancanza di protezione per la coppia.
3. Altra giurisprudenzaattinente nel contesto di coppie di stesso-sesso
37. In una causa di fronte al Tribunale di Reggio Emilia, i rivendicatori (una coppia di stesso-sesso) non aveva richiesto il tribunale per riconoscere il loro matrimonio entrato in in Spagna, ma riconoscere il loro diritto alla vita di famiglia in Italia, sulla base che loro sono stati riferiti. Il Tribunale di Reggio Emilia, con vuole dire di un'ordinanza di 13 febbraio 2012, nella luce dei che indica la direzione di EU e la loro trasposizione in legge italiana così come l'EU Charter di Diritti essenziali, considerato che tale matrimonio era valido per i fini di ottenere un permesso di soggiorno in Italia.
38. Nella sentenza del Tribunale di Grosseto di 3 aprile 2014, consegnò con un giudice di prima istanza, si contenne che il rifiuto per registrare un matrimonio estero era illegale. La corte ordinò così l'autorità pubblica e competente per procedere con registrazione del matrimonio. Mentre l'ordine era eseguito, la causa fu piaciuta contro con lo Stato. Con una sentenza di 19 settembre 2014 la Corte d'appello di Firenze, mentre avendo scoperto un errore procedurale, annullò la decisione di prima - istanzae rinviò la causa al tribunale di Grosseto.
4. Accordi di convivenza
39. Accordi di convivenza non sono offerti specificamente per in legge italiana.
40. Protezione di coabitare coppie more uxorio è stata derivata da Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana sempre, siccome interpretato nelle varie sentenze di corte durante il corso degli anni (posto 1988). Nei più recenti anni (2012 in avanti) sentenze nazionali hanno considerato coabitare anche lo stesso sesso accoppia come meritando simile protezione.
41. Con effetto da 2 dicembre 2013 è stato possibile entrare in per riempire la lacuna nella legge scritto “accordi di convivenza”, vale a dire un atto privato che non ha una forma specificata previsto con legge, e quale può essere entrato in coabitando persone, sia loro in una relazione parentale, partner, amici, i semplici flatmates o carers, ma non con coppie sposate. Simile contratti regolano principalmente gli aspetti finanziari di vivere insieme, cessazione della convivenza ed assistenza nell'evento di malattia o l'incapacità.
5. Unioni civili
42. Diritto nazionale italiano non prevede per qualsiasi unione alternativa a matrimonio, o per coppie di omosessuale o per uni eterosessuali. I precedenti non hanno così nessuno mezzi di riconoscimento.
43. In un rapporto di 2013 preparato con Professore F. Gallo (poi Presidente della Corte Costituzionale) rivolse alle autorità costituzionali italiane e più alte, il secondo determinato:
“Dialogo è più difficile con qualche volta il [Costituzionale] il naturale interlocutore di Corte. Questo è particolarmente così in cause dove sollecita la legislatura per cambiare una norma legale che considerò essere in contrasto con la Costituzione. Simile richieste non saranno sottovalutate. Loro costituiscono, infatti, il solo vuole dire disponibile al [Costituzionale] Corte per obbligare gli organi legislativi ad eliminare qualsiasi situazione che non è compatibile con la Costituzione, e quale, benché identificò col [Costituzionale] la Corte, non conduca ad una dichiarazione dell'anti-costituzionalità. ... Una richiesta di questo tipo che rimase inosservato era quel rese in sentenza n. 138/10 che, mentre trovando il fatto che un matrimonio potrebbe essere contratto solamente con persone di un sesso diverso per essere costituzionale conforme, anche affermò che coppie di stesso-sesso avevano un diritto essenziale per ottenere riconoscimento legale, coi diritti attinenti ed i doveri, della loro unione. Lo lasciò a Parlamento per prevedere per simile regolamentazione, coi mezzi ed all'interno dei limiti ritenuti appropriato.”
44. Ciononostante, delle città hanno stabilito registri di “unioni civili” fra persone non sposate dello stesso sesso o di sessi diversi: fra altri le città di Empoli, Pisa, Milano, Firenze e Napoli sono. Comunque, la registrazione di “unioni civili” di coppie non sposate in simile registri un valore soltanto simbolico ha.
6. Giurisprudenza nazionale e susseguente
45. Similmente, la Corte Costituzionale italiana, nelle sue sentenze N. 276/2010 7 luglio 2010 depositarono nella cancelleria 22 luglio 2010, e 4/2011 16 dicembre 2010 depositarono nella cancelleria 5 gennaio 2011, rivendicazioni manifestamente mal-fondate e dichiarate che gli articoli summenzionati del Codice civile (in finora siccome loro non concederono matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso) non era in conformità ad Articolo 2 della Costituzione. La Corte Costituzionale reiterò che riconoscimento giuridico di unioni di omosessuale non richiese un'unione uguale a matrimonio, siccome mostrato con gli approcci diversi si impegnati in paesi diversi, e che sotto Articolo 2 della Costituzione era per il Parlamento, nell'esercizio della sua discrezione regolare ed approvvigionare garantiscono e riconoscimento a simile unioni.
Più recentemente, in una causa riguardo al rifiuto per emettere atto del matrimonio ad una coppia di stesso-sesso che aveva richiesto così, la Corte di Cassazione nella sua sentenza n. 2400/15 9 febbraio 2015, respinse i rivendicatori la richiesta di '. Avendo considerato la recente giurisprudenza nazionale ed internazionale, concluse che-mentre coppie di stesso-sesso dovevano essere protette sotto Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana e che era per la legislatura per intentare causa per assicurare riconoscimento dell'unione fra simile coppie-l'assenza di matrimonio di stesso-sesso non era incompatibile col sistema nazionale ed internazionale applicabile di diritti umani. Di conseguenza, la mancanza di matrimonio di stesso-sesso non poteva corrispondere a trattamento discriminatorio: il problema nell'ordinamento giuridico corrente girato circa il fatto che non c'era nessuna altra unione disponibile, separatamente da matrimonio sia sé per eterosessuale o coppie di omosessuale. Comunque, notò che la corte non potesse stabilire tramite questioni di giurisprudenza che andarono oltre la sua competenza.
7. Recente e corrente legislazione
46. La Casa di Sostituti ha esaminato recentemente Bill n. 242 chiamarono “Emendamenti al Codice civile e le altre disposizioni sull'uguaglianza in accesso a matrimonio e filiazione con stesso-sesso accoppiano” e Bill n. 15 “Norme contro la discriminazione in matrimonio.” Il Senato in 2014 Bill esaminato n. 14 su unioni civili e Bill n. 197 riguardo ad emendamenti al Codice civile in relazione alla convivenza, così come Bill n. 239 sull'introduzione nel Codice civile di un accordo sulla convivenza e la solidarietà.
47. Un conto unificato che concerne tutte le proposte legali ed attinenti fu presentato al Senato nel 2015 e fu adottato col Senato 26 marzo 2015 come un testo di base abilitare le ulteriori discussioni con la Commissione di Giustizia. Emendamenti sarebbero presentati con maggio 2015, ed un testo presentò alle due Camere che costituiscono Parlamento con estate 2015. 10 giugno 2015 la Casa più Bassa adottò un'istanza a favore l'approvazione di una legge su unioni civili, prendendo il particolare conto della situazione di persone dello stesso sesso.
8. Via di ricorso nel sistema nazionale
48. Una decisione dello Status Ufficio Civile può essere impugnata (entro Trentoa giorni) di fronte al tribunale ordinario, in conformità con Articolo 98 del Codice civile.
49. Un decreto del tribunale ordinario può a turno sia impugnato di fronte alla Corte d'appello (entro dieci giorni) con virtù di Articolo 739 del Codice di Procedura Civile.
50. Secondo il suo paragrafo (3) nessuna ulteriore disposizione di ricorso contro la decisione della Corte d'appello. Comunque, secondo Articolo 111 (7) della Costituzione siccome interpretato con giurisprudenza consolidata, così come Articolo 360 (4) del Codice di Procedura Civile (siccome cambiato con decreto legislativo n. 40/06) se il decreto di ricorso colpisce diritti soggettivi, è di una natura decisiva, e costituisce una determinazione di una questione potenzialmente irreversibile (avendo così il valore di una sentenza), la decisione di ricorso può essere impugnata di fronte alla Corte di Cassazione entro sessanta giorni, nelle circostanze e forma stabilite con Articolo 360 del Codice di Procedura Civile. Secondo Articolo 742 del Codice di Procedura Civile un decreto che non incorre la definizione summenzionata sotto rimane revocabile e modificabile a qualsiasi data futura soggetto ad un cambio nelle circostanze fattuale o legge fondamentale (diritto di di di presupposti).
51. Secondo Articoli 325 a 327 del Codice di Procedura Civile, un ricorso alla Corte di Cassazione deve essere depositato entro sessanta giorni della data sui quali la decisione di ricorso è notificata sulla parte. In qualsiasi l'evento, nell'assenza di notificazione tale ricorso non può essere depositato più tardi che sei mesi dalla data fu depositato nella cancelleria (la pubblicazione).
52. Secondo Articolo 324 del Codice di Procedura Civile, una decisione diviene definitivo, inter alia, quando non è più soggetto ad un ricorso, alla Corte d'appello o Cassazione a meno che altrimenti purché per con legge.
B. legge Comparativa ed europea e pratica
1. Materiale di giurisprudenza comparativs
53. Il materiale di comparativo-legge disponibile alla Corte sull'introduzione di forme ufficiali di associazione non-maritale all'interno degli ordinamenti giuridici di Consiglio dell'Europa (CoE) il membro gli show di Stati che undici paesi (Belgio, Danimarca, Francia, Islanda, Lussemburgo, i Paesi Bassi, Norvegia, Portogallo, Spagna, Svezia ed il Regno Unito) riconosca matrimonio di stesso-sesso.
54. Diciotto membro gli Stati (Andorra, Austria, Belgio, Croatia, la Repubblica ceca, Finlandia, Francia, Germania, Ungheria, Irlanda, Liechtenstein, Lussemburgo, Malta, i Paesi Bassi, Slovenia, Spagna, Svizzera ed il Regno Unito) autorizzi della forma di associazione civile per coppie di stesso-sesso. Nelle certe cause simile unione può conferire il pieno set di diritti ed i doveri applicabile all'istituto di matrimonio, e così, è uguale a matrimonio in tutto ma chiama, come per esempio in Malta. In oltre, sulla 9 ottobre 2014 Estonia anche riconobbe giuridicamente unioni di stesso-sesso con decretando l'Associazione Atto Registrato che entrerà in vigore 1 gennaio 2016. Portogallo non ha una forma ufficiale di unione civile. Ciononostante, la legge riconosce unioni civili e de facto che hanno effetto automatico e non costringono la coppia a prendere qualsiasi passi formali per riconoscimento. Danimarca, Norvegia, Svezia e l'Islanda prevedevano per associazione registrata nella causa di unioni di stesso-sesso, ma fu abolito in favore di matrimonio di stesso-sesso.
55. Segue che datare ventiquattro paesi fuori del membro di CoE del quaranta-sette Stati già ha decretato legislazione che permette stesso-sesso accoppia avere la loro relazione riconosciuto come un matrimonio legale o come una forma di unione civile o associazione registrata.
2. Consiglio attinente dei materiali di Europa
56. Nella sua Raccomandazione 924 (1981) sulla discriminazione contro omosessuali, la Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa (il Ritmo) criticò le varie forme della discriminazione contro omosessuali nel certo membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa.
57. In Raccomandazione 1474 (2000) sulla situazione di lesbiche e gays in Consiglio del membro di Europa gli Stati, il Ritmo raccomandò che il Comitato di chiamata di Ministri su membro Stati, fra le altre cose “adottare legislazione che costituisce disposizione associazioni registrate.” Inoltre, in Raccomandazione 1470 (2000) sulla più specifica materia della situazione di gays e lesbiche ed i loro partner in riguardo di asilo e l'immigrazione nel membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa, raccomandò al Comitato di Ministri che esorta membro Stati, inter l'alia, “fare una rassegna le loro politiche nel campo di diritti sociali e protezione di emigranti per assicurare che associazioni di omosessuale e famiglie sono trattate sulla stessa base come associazioni eterosessuali e famiglie....”
58. Cammini Decisione 1547 (2007) di 18 aprile 2007 concesso “Stato di diritti umani e la democrazia in Europa” fece appello ad ogni membro Stati del CoE, ed in particolare i loro rispettivi corpi parlamentari, rivolgere tutti i problemi sollevati nei rapporti ed opinioni che sono posto sotto a questa decisione ed in particolare, a, inter l'alia, combatta efficacemente tutte le forme della discriminazione basate su genere od orientamento sessuale, introduca anti legislazione di discriminazione, diritti di associazione e programmes che consapevolezza-sollevano dove già non sono a posto questi;” (punto 34.14.).
59. Decisione 1728 (2010) della Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa, adottò 29 aprile 2010 e ammise “la Discriminazione sulla base di orientamento sessuale e l'identità di genere”, chiama su membro Stati a “assicura riconoscimento legale di associazioni di stesso-sesso quando legislazione nazionale prevede simile riconoscimento, come già raccomandato con la Riunione nel 2000”, con prevedendo, inter alia, per:
“16.9.1. gli stessi diritti patrimoniali ed obblighi come quelli che concernono a coppie di sesso diverse;
16.9.2. ‘parente prossimo lo status di ';
16.9.3. misure per assicurare che, dove è estero un partner in una relazione di stesso-sesso, questo partner è concesso gli stessi diritti di residenza siccome farebbe domanda se lei o lui fossero in una relazione eterosessuale;
16.9.4. riconoscimento di disposizioni con effetti simili adottati con gli altri stati membro;”
60. In Raccomandazione CM/Rec(2010)5 su misure per combattere la discriminazione sui motivi di orientamento sessuale o l'identità di genere, il Comitato di Ministri raccomandò quel il membro gli Stati:
“1. Esamini esistendo misure legislative ed altre, li tenga sotto revisione, e raccolga ed analizzi dati attinenti per esaminare e compensazione qualsiasi la discriminazione diretta o indiretta sui motivi di orientamento sessuale o l'identità di genere;
2. Assicuri che misure legislative ed altre sono adottate ed implementarono efficacemente combattere la discriminazione sui motivi di orientamento sessuale o l'identità di genere, assicurare riguardo per i diritti umani di lesbica gaio, bisessuale e persone di transgender e promuovere la tolleranza verso loro...”
61. La Raccomandazione osservò anche siccome segue:
“23. Dove legislazione nazionale conferisce diritti ed obblighi su coppie non sposate, stati membro dovrebbero assicurare che fa domanda in un modo non-discriminatorio a sia lo stesso sesso e diverso-sesso accoppia, incluso riguardo alla pensione di superstite trae profitto e diritti di affitto.
24. Dove legislazione nazionale riconosce associazioni di stesso-sesso registrate, stati membro dovrebbero cercare di assicurare che la loro condizione giuridica ed i loro diritti ed obblighi sono equivalenti a quelli di coppie eterosessuali in una situazione comparabile.
25. Dove legislazione nazionale non riconosce né conferisce diritti od obblighi su associazioni di stesso-sesso registrate e coppie non sposate, stati membro sono invitati per considerare la possibilità di prevedere, senza la discriminazione di qualsiasi il genere, incluso contro coppie di diverso-sesso, stesso-sesso accoppia con legale o altro vuole dire rivolgere i problemi pratici riferiti alla realtà sociale nella quale loro vivono.”
3. Legge di Unione europea
62. Articoli 7, 9 e 21 dello Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea che fu firmata 7 dicembre 2000 ed entrò in vigore 1 dicembre 2009 lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 7
“Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo o lei privato e la vita di famiglia, casa e comunicazioni.”
Articolo 9
“Il diritto per sposarsi e fondare una famiglia sarà garantito in conformità con le leggi nazionali che governano l'esercizio di questi diritti.”
Articolo 21
“1. Qualsiasi la discriminazione basò su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, origine etnica o sociale, caratteristiche genetiche, lingua, religione o credenza, politico o qualsiasi l'altra opinione, appartenenza di una minoranza nazionale che proprietà, nascita, l'invalidità, età od orientamento sessuale saranno proibite.
2. All'interno della sfera di applicazione del Trattato che stabilisce la Comunità europea e del Trattato su Unione europea, e senza pregiudizio alle disposizioni speciali di quelli Trattati qualsiasi la discriminazione sui motivi della nazionalità sarà proibita.”
63. Il Commentario dello Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea, preparato in 2006 dell'EU Network di Esperti Indipendenti su Diritti essenziali, stati siccome segue con riguardo all’ Articolo 9 dello Statuto:
“Trend moderni e sviluppi nei diritti nazionali in un numero di paesi verso la più grande franchezza e l'accettazione di coppie di stesso-sesso nonostante, alcuni stati ancora hanno regolamentazioni di and/or di politiche pubbliche che esplicitamente impediscono la nozione che coppie di stesso-sesso hanno diritto a sposarsi. C'è attualmente riconoscimento legale e molto limitato di relazioni di stesso-sesso nel senso che matrimonio non è disponibile a coppie di stesso-sesso. I diritti nazionali della maggioranza di stati presuppongono, nelle altre parole, che i consorti che proporsi sono di sessi diversi. Ciononostante, in alcuni paesi, e.g., nei Paesi Bassi ed in Belgio, matrimonio fra persone dello stesso sesso è riconosciuto giuridicamente. Altri, come i paesi nordici hanno girato una legislazione di associazione registrata che implica fra le altre cose che più disposizioni riguardo a matrimonio, cioé. le sue conseguenze legali come distribuzione di proprietà, diritti di eredità, ecc. sono anche applicabili a queste unioni. Allo stesso tempo è importante per indicare che il nome ‘registrò associazione ' è stato scelto intenzionalmente di non confonderlo con matrimonio e è stato stabilito come un metodo alternativo di riconoscere relazioni personali. Questa istituzione nuova è, di conseguenza, come un articolo solamente accessibile a coppie che non possono sposarsi, e la stessa associazione di sesso non ha lo stesso status e gli stessi benefici come matrimonio...
Per prendere in considerazione la diversità di regolamentazioni nazionali su matrimonio Articolo 9 dello Statuto si riferisce a legislazione nazionale. Come sé sembra dalla sua formulazione, la disposizione è più larga nella sua sfera che gli articoli corrispondenti negli altri strumenti internazionali. Non c'è da allora riferimento esplicito agli uomini di ‘e donne ' come la causa è negli altri strumenti di diritti umani, si può dibattere che non c'è nessun ostacolo per riconoscere relazioni di stesso-sesso nel contesto di matrimonio. Non c'è comunque, requisito esplicito che diritti nazionali dovrebbero facilitare simile matrimoni. Corti internazionali e comitati hanno esitato finora a prolungare la richiesta del diritto per sposarsi a coppie di stesso-sesso...”
64. Un numero di altri Direttiva può essere anche di interesse nella causa presente: loro possono essere trovati in Vallianatos ed Altri c. la Grecia ([GC], N. 29381/09 e 32684/09, §§ 33-34 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti)).
4. Gli Stati Uniti
65. 26 giugno 2015, nella causa di al di et di Obergefell. c. Hodges, Direttore, Settore di Ohio di al di et di Salute che la Corte Suprema degli Stati Uniti ha sostenuto che coppie di stesso-sesso possono esercitare il diritto essenziale per sposarsi in ogni Stati, e che non c'era base legale per un Stato per rifiutare di riconoscere un matrimonio di stesso-sesso legale compiè in un altro Stato sulla base del suo carattere di stesso-sesso.
I postulanti avevano chiesto che gli ufficiali statali e rispondenti violarono il quattordicesimo Emendamento negando loro il diritto a sposarsi o avere matrimoni compiuti legalmente in un altro pieno riconoscimento dello Stato.
La Corte Suprema sostenne che le leggi impugnate oppressero la libertà di coppie di stesso-sesso, e compendiò precetti centrali dell'uguaglianza. Considerò che i diritti matrimoniali eseguirono coi convenuti era disuguale come coppie di stesso-sesso fu negato tutti i benefici riconosciuti a coppie di opposto-sesso e fu sbarrato dall'esercitare un diritto essenziale. Questo rifiuto a stesso-sesso accoppia del diritto per sposarsi lavorò una tomba e continuando danno e l'imposizione di questa invalidità su gays e lesbiche notificò a mancanza di rispetto e li subordina. Effettivamente, la Protezione Clausola Uguale, come l'Elaborazione Clausola Dovuta proibì questa violazione ingiustificata del diritto essenziale per sposarsi. Queste considerazioni condussero alla conclusione che il diritto per sposarsi era un diritto essenziale inerente nella libertà della persona, e sotto l'Elaborazione Dovuta e Protezione Clausole Uguali delle quattordicesimo coppie di Emendamento dello stesso-sesso non può essere privato di che diritto e quel la libertà. La Corte Suprema sostenne così che coppie di stesso-sesso possono esercitare il diritto essenziale per sposarsi.
Avendo notato che attenzione sostanziale era stata dedicata alla questione coi vari attori in società, e che secondo i loro individui di sistema costituzionali attendere azione legislativa prima di asserire un diritto essenziale non ha bisogno, considerò quel era la Corte Suprema per sospendere la sua mano e concedere più lento, la determinazione di causa-con-causa della disponibilità richiesta di specifici benefici pubblici alle stesse coppie di sesso ancora negherebbe gays e lesbiche che molti diritti e le responsabilità hanno attorcigliato con matrimonio.
Infine, notando che i molti Stati già concederono matrimonio di stesso-sesso-e già era accaduto centinaio di migliaia di questi matrimoni-opinò che la disgregazione causò con le proibizioni di riconoscimento era significativo e mai crescendo. La Corte Suprema fondò anche così, che non c'era base legale per un Stato per rifiutare di riconoscere un matrimonio di stesso-sesso legale compiuto in un altro Stato.
LA LEGGE
I. ECCEZIONI PRELIMINARI
A. Regola 47
66. Il Governo citò Articolo 47 degli Articoli di Corte. Loro accentuarono che secondo la recente revisione di Articolo 47 degli Articoli emessa con la Corte Assoluta, gli articoli su che che deve contenere una richiesta deve essere fatto domanda in un modo più severo. Così, inosservanza coi requisiti esposti fuori in paragrafi che 1 e 2 di questo articolo possono dare luogo alla richiesta che non è esaminata con la Corte.
67. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11 presentarono che sulla base del principio di actum di regit di tempus, l'Articolo 47 nuovo adottato nel 2013 non potesse fare domanda ad una richiesta depositata nel 2011.
68. La Corte nota che, piuttosto separatamente dall'insuccesso del Governo per indicare in che modo i richiedenti non riuscirono ad adempiere i requisiti di Articolo 47, è solamente di 1 gennaio 2014 che l'Articolo corretto le 47 condizioni più severe fatte domanda per l'introduzione di una richiesta con la Corte. Presentela causa, la Corte nota che tutti i richiedenti depositarono le loro richieste nel 2011, e non c'è nessuna ragione di considerare che loro non hanno adempiuto ai requisiti di Articolo 47 come applicabile al tempo.
69. Segue che qualsiasi eccezione Statale in questo riguardo deve essere respinta.
B. Status di Vittima
70. Benché non sollevò esplicitamente come un'eccezione alle richieste l'ammissibilità di ', il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non avevano indicato in che modo loro avevano subito qualsiasi danno effettivo, ed il riferimento al danno dei richiedenti era solamente astratto (diritti di eredità, assistenza al partner supplire-entrata in atti di relazioni economici). Loro indicarono che la Corte poteva solamente giudice sulle specifiche circostanze di una causa e non fa valutazioni che vanno oltre la sfera delle richieste.
71. La Corte lo considera appropriato trattare con l'argomento a questo stadio. Nota che i richiedenti sono individui oltre l'età del discernimento che, secondo le informazioni presentate, è in relazioni di stesso-sesso ed in delle cause sta coabitando. Alla misura che la Costituzione italiana siccome interpretato con le corti nazionali esclude coppie di stesso-sesso dalla sfera di diritto matrimoniale, e che a causa dell'assenza di qualsiasi struttura legale a quell'effetto i richiedenti non possono entrare in un'unione civile e possono organizzare di conseguenza la loro relazione, la Corte considera che loro concernono direttamente con la situazione e hanno un interesse personale e legittimo nel vederlo portò ad una fine (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Vallianatos ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], N. 29381/09 e 32684/09, § 49 ECHR 2013 (gli estratti), e con implicazione, Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria, n. 30141/04, ECHR 2010).
72. Di conseguenza, la Corte conclude che gli individui nelle richieste presenti dovrebbero essere considerati “le vittime” delle violazioni allegato all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione.
C. Esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
1. Il Governo
73. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali. Loro notarono che in cause come il presente è possibile fare appello contro rifiuto per pubblicare sposando atto di fronte al tribunale attinente. La decisione di prima – istanza potrebbe essere impugnata poi di fronte alla Corte d'appello e la Corte di Cassazione. Comunque, OMISSIS ed il Sig. A. erano andati a vuoto a depositare un ulteriore ricorso alla Corte di Cassazione, OMISSIS non avevano reso qualsiasi richiesta al rifiuto amministrativo per pubblicare il loro atto, ed OMISSIS erano andati a vuoto a fare appello contro la sentenza di prima -istanza diede in giù nella loro causa.
74. Il Governo si riferì al principio di sussidiarietà, e considerato che le corti nazionali avessero potuto dare i richiedenti compensazione adeguata per il danno subito ed avrebbero potuto offrire loro il legale e giudiziale vuole dire tradizionalmente ottenere almeno una dichiarazione recognising la loro unione come una formazione sociale come un'associazione di vita come capì [sic]. In appoggio di questo il Governo fece riferimento alla Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184 consegnarono nel 2012 riguardo alla registrazione di stesso matrimonio di sesso contratta all'estero che secondo la loro traduzione legge siccome segue:
“[Il diritto giurisprudenziale di T]he di questa Corte (di Cassazione)-secondo che è la differenza in sesso della coppia occupata, insieme con la manifestazione della volontà espressa con lo stesso nella presenza del celebrante di ufficiale statale e civile, minimo requisito indispensabile per l'esistenza di ‘di matrimonio civile ' come atto giuridicamente attinente-è nessuno più appropriato alla realtà legale e corrente, stato stato superato radicalmente l'idea che la differenza in sesso accoppia preparando per matrimonio è un requisito indispensabile, come dire naturale ' della stessa esistenza di ‘‘' di matrimonio. Per tutte le ragioni sopra, la nessuno-trascrizione di unioni di omosessuale dipende,-non dalla loro non-esistenza di ‘', né col loro invalidamento di ‘' ma-con la loro incapacità per produrre, come documenti di matrimonio precisamente, effetti legali nel sistema italiano.”
In che luce, il Governo considerò che se i richiedenti avessero portato la loro causa di fronte ai giudici nazionali loro avrebbero avuto almeno un riconoscimento legale della loro unione. Loro avevano scelto intenzionalmente comunque, di non fare così.
75. Inoltre, loro notarono che le rivendicazioni depositarono solamente di fronte alle corti nazionali riguardava la loro incapacità per ottenere matrimonio di stesso-sesso e non l'incapacità per ottenere una forma alternativa di riconoscimento per simile coppie.
2. I richiedenti
76. I richiedenti presentarono che mentre la Corte Costituzionale nella sua sentenza di n. 138/10 avevano trovato che Articolo 2 della Costituzione richiese tutela giuridica di unioni di stesso-sesso, non aveva altra scelta ma dichiarare l'azione di reclamo inammissibile, dato la competenza della legislatura nella questione. Una situazione simile ottenne in sentenza n. 170/14 (vedere paragrafo 36 sopra). Inoltre, i richiedenti presentarono che il Governo aveva non provò, con vuole dire di esempi che le corti nazionali potrebbero offrire qualsiasi riconoscimento legale delle loro unioni. Effettivamente, dato che il difetto riferì alla legge (o manca al riguardo), a corti nazionali ed ordinarie furono impedite di prendere qualsiasi azione riparatore: anche la corte con competenza per fare una rassegna le leggi non era capace di fare questo. All'interno del sistema nazionale la via di ricorso appropriata sarebbe stata una richiesta di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale che già aveva affermato la Corte non era una via di ricorso per essere usato, sé che non è direttamente accessibile ad individui (vedere Scoppola c. l'Italia (n. 2) [GC], n. 10249/03, § 70 17 settembre 2009). Inoltre, presentela causa tale richiesta non avrebbe avuto successo il precedente che posò in sentenza n. 138/10, successivamente confermati con le altre decisioni.
3. La valutazione della Corte
77. La Corte reitera che Articolo che 35 § 1 della Convenzione richiede che azioni di reclamo intesero di essere rese successivamente a Strasbourg sarebbe dovuto essere reso al corpo nazionale ed appropriato, almeno in sostanza (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, § 66 le Relazioni 1996 IV, e Gäfgen c. la Germania [GC], n. 22978/05 §§ 144 e 146, ECHR 2010). Il fine dell'articolo di esaurimento è riconoscere gli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolando o mettere diritto le violazioni addotta contro loro prima che quelle dichiarazioni sono presentate a sé (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Selmouni c. la Francia [GC], n. 25803/94, § 74 il 1999-V di ECHR). Che articolo è basato sull'assunzione, riflettè in Articolo 13 della Convenzione col quale ha affinità vicina che c'è una via di ricorso effettiva disponibile in riguardo della violazione allegato nel sistema nazionale (l'ibid.). Una via di ricorso deve essere capace di rimediare a direttamente lo stato contestato di affari per essere effettivo, e deve offrire prospettive ragionevoli del successo (vedere Sejdovic c. l'Italia [GC], n. 56581/00, § 46 ECHR 2006 II).
78. La sfera degli Stati Contraenti gli obblighi di ' sotto Articolo 13 variano dipendendo dalla natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente; comunque, la via di ricorso richiesta con Articolo 13 deve essere “effettivo” in pratica così come in legge (vedere, per esempio, ?lhan c. la Turchia [GC], n. 22277/93, § 97 ECHR 2000-VII). È per la Corte per determinare se i mezzi disponibile ad un richiedente per sollevare un'azione di reclamo è “effettivo” nel senso entrambi ostacolare la violazione allegato o la sua continuazione, o di offrire compensazione adeguata per qualsiasi violazione che già era accaduta (vedere Kuda ?c. la Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, §§ 157-158 ECHR 2000 XI). Se la compensazione data è effettiva dipenderà, fra le altre cose, essere stati violati addusse sulla natura del diritto, le ragioni date per la decisione e la persistenza delle conseguenze sfavorevoli per la persona riguardata dopo che decisione (vedere, per esempio, Freimanis e Ldums ?c. la Lettonia, N. 73443/01 e 74860/01, § 68 9 febbraio 2006). Nelle certe cause una violazione non può essere resa buona per il pagamento mero del risarcimento (vedere, per esempio, Petkov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 77568/01, 178/02 e 505/02, § 80 11 giugno 2009 nel collegamento con Articolo 3 di Protocollo N.ro 1) e l'incapacità per rendere una decisione vincolante che accorda compensazione può sollevare anche problemi (vedere Argento ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 25 marzo 1983, § 115 la Serie Un n. 61; Leander c. la Svezia, 26 marzo 1987, § 82 la Serie Un n. 116; e Segerstedt-Wiberg ed Altri c. la Svezia, n. 62332/00, § 118 ECHR 2006 VII).
79. Le via di ricorso sole che Articolo 35 della Convenzione costringe ad essere esaurito sono quelle che riferiscono alle violazioni addotte ed allo stesso tempo è disponibile e sufficiente. L'esistenza di simile via di ricorso non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicura in teoria ma anche in pratica, fallendo a loro mancherà quale l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia (vedere Akdivar ed Altri, citato sopra, § 66, e Vukovi ?ed Altri c. Serbia [GC], n. 17153/11, § 71 25 marzo 2014).
80. In oltre, secondo il “generalmente riconobbe principi di diritto internazionale”, ci possono essere circostanze speciali che assolvono il richiedente dall'obbligo per esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali alla sua disposizione (vedere Selmouni, citato sopra, § 75). Comunque, la Corte indica che l'esistenza di dubbi meri come alle prospettive del successo di una particolare via di ricorso che non è evidentemente futile una ragione valida non è per non riuscire ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali (vedere Vukovi ?ed Altri, citato sopra, § 74, e Brusco c. l'Italia (il dec.), n. 69789/01, ECHR 2001 IX). Il problema di se via di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite sarà determinato con riferimento alla data normalmente quando la richiesta fu depositata con la Corte. Questo articolo è soggetto ad eccezioni che sarebbero giustificate con le specifiche circostanze di ogni causa comunque (vedere, per esempio, Baumann c. la Francia, n. 33592/96, § 47 22 maggio 2001; Nogolica c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 77784/01, ECHR 2002-VIII; e Mariën c. il Belgio (il dec.), n. 46046/99, 24 giugno 2004).
81. Come riguardi l'argomento principale del Governo che nessuni dei richiedenti si è giovato a della piena serie di via di ricorso disponibile (su alla Corte di Cassazione), la Corte osserva che al tempo quando tutti i richiedenti introdussero le loro richieste di fronte alla Corte (marzo e giugno 2011) la Corte Costituzionale già aveva dato sentenza sui meriti dei primi due richiedenti ' chiede (15 aprile 2010), come un risultato del quale la Corte d'appello respinse le loro rivendicazioni 21 settembre 2010. La Corte Costituzionale reiterò successivamente quelle sentenze in due ulteriori sentenze (depositò nella cancelleria attinente il 2010 e 5 gennaio 2011 di 22 luglio, vedere paragrafo 45 sopra) anche consegnò di fronte ai richiedenti introdusse le loro richieste con la Corte. Così, al tempo quando i richiedenti desiderarono lamentarsi delle violazioni allegato là fu consolidato giurisprudenza della corte più alta della terra che indica che le loro rivendicazioni non avevano nessuna prospettiva del successo.
82. Il Governo non ha mostrato, né la Corte immagina, che le giurisdizioni ordinarie avessero potuto ignorare le sentenze della Corte Costituzionale e conclusioni diverse e consegnate accompagnate con la compensazione attinente. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che la Corte Costituzionale stessa non poteva ma invita la legislatura ad intentare causa, e non si ha dimostrato che le corti ordinarie avessero potuto agire più efficacemente nel compensare le situazioni nelle cause presenti. In questo collegamento, e nella luce dell'argomento del Governo che loro avessero potuto ottenere almeno una dichiarazione sul riconoscimento della loro unione basò sulla Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184/12, la Corte nota siccome segue: in primo luogo, il Governo andò a vuoto a dare anche un esempio di tale riconoscimento formale con le corti nazionali; in secondo luogo, è discutibile se simile riconoscimento, se a del tutto possibile, avrebbe avuto qualsiasi effetto legale sulla situazione pratica dei richiedenti nell'assenza di una struttura legale-davvero il Governo non ha spiegato che che questo ad dichiarazione di hoc di riconoscimento comporterebbe; ed in terzo luogo, sentenza n. 4184, assegnò a col Governo (quale rende solamente certo cita en passant), fu consegnato dopo che i richiedenti avevano introdotto la loro richiesta con la Corte.
83. Tenendo presente il sopra, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna prova che l'abilita per sostenere che sulla data quando le richieste furono depositate con la Corte le via di ricorso disponibile nel sistema nazionale italiano avrebbe avuto qualsiasi prospettive del successo. Segue che i richiedenti non possono essere biasimati per non avere intrapreso una via di ricorso inefficace, o a tutti o sino alla fine dell'elaborazione giudiziale. Così, la Corte accetta che c'erano circostanze speciali che assolsero i richiedenti dal loro obbligo normale per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali (vedere Vilnes ed Altri c. la Norvegia, N. 52806/09 e 22703/10, § 178 5 dicembre 2013).
84. Senza pregiudizio al sopra, la Corte osserva in replica allo scorso argomento del Governo che i procedimenti nazionali (si impegnato entro quattro dei richiedenti nella causa presente) relativo alle autorità il rifiuto di ' per permettere i richiedenti per sposarsi. Come l'opportunità di entrare in un'associazione registrata non esista in Italia, è difficile vedere come i richiedenti avrebbero potuto sollevare la problema di riconoscimento legale di associazione loro eccetto con cercando di sposarsi, specialmente dato che loro non avevano accesso diretto alla Corte Costituzionale. Di conseguenza, la loro azione di reclamo nazionale si concentrò sulla loro mancanza di accesso a matrimonio. Effettivamente, la Corte considera che il problema di riconoscimento legale ed alternativo è connesso così da vicino al problema di mancanza di accesso a matrimonio che doveva essere considerato come inerente nella richiesta presente (vedere Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, § 76). Così, la Corte accetta che tale azione di reclamo, almeno in sostanza incluso la mancanza di qualsiasi altro vuole dire avere la loro relazione riconosciuto con legge (l'ibid., § 75). Segue che le corti nazionali, particolarmente l'udienza di Corte Costituzionale la causa riguardo ai primi due richiedenti, era in una posizione per trattare col problema e, davvero, lo rivolse brevemente, benché solamente concludere che era per la legislatura per intentare causa sulla questione. In queste circostanze, la Corte è soddisfatta, che giurisdizioni nazionali furono date l'opportunità di compensare le violazioni allegato che si sono lamentate di in Strasbourg, come anche caratterizzò con la Corte (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Gatt c. il Malta, n. 28221/08, § 24 ECHR 2010).
85. Segue che in queste circostanze l'eccezione del Governo deve essere respinta.

D. Sei mesi
1. Il Governo
86. Il Governo presentò che la richiesta completa n. 18766/11 4 agosto 2011 furono ricevuti con la Corte 9 agosto 2011, un anno dopo la sentenza della Corte d'appello di Trento datò 23 settembre 2010, e che la richiesta completa n. 36030/11 10 giugno 2011 furono ricevuti con la Corte 17 giugno 2011, un anno dopo la sentenza del Tribunale di Milano di 9 giugno 2010 depositato nella cancelleria attinente 1 luglio 2010 in riguardo del Sig. Perelli Cippo ed il Sig. Zaccheo e nell'assenza di qualsiasi sentenza in riguardo del Sig. Felicetti ed il Sig. Zappa. Qualsiasi materiale presentato alla Corte di fronte a quelle date non aveva contenuto tutte le caratteristiche della richiesta.
2. I richiedenti
87. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11 presentarono che sotto legge italiana la decisione della Corte d'appello di Trento notificata sui richiedenti 23 settembre 2010 divenne definitivo dopo sei mesi. Seguì che la richiesta introdusse 21 marzo 2011 si attenuto con l'articolo di mese del sei previsto nella Convenzione.
88. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 36030/11 considerato che le violazioni allegato avevano un carattere continuo, come lungo come unioni di stesso-sesso non furono riconosciute sotto legge italiana.
3. La valutazione della Corte
(un) date di introduzione delle richieste
89. La Corte reitera che il periodo di sei-mese è interrotto sulla data di introduzione di una richiesta. Nella conformità con la sua pratica stabilita e Decide 47 § 5 degli Articoli di Corte, come normalmente considerò che la data dell'introduzione di una richiesta fosse la data della prima comunicazione indicando un'intenzione di depositare una richiesta e dando dell'indicazione della natura della richiesta in vigore al tempo attinente. Simile prima comunicazione che al tempo potrebbe prendere la forma di una lettera spedita con fax, in interruzione di principio la gestione del periodo di sei-mese (vedere Yartsev c. la Russia (il dec.) n. 1376/11, § 21 26 marzo 2013; Abdulrahman c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 66994/12, 5 febbraio 2013; e Centre Biblico della Repubblica di Chuvash c. la Russia, n. 33203/08, § 45 12 giugno 2014).
90. Nella causa presente, riguardo alla richiesta n. 18766/11, la prima comunicazione che indica il desiderio per depositare una causa con la Corte così come l'oggetto della richiesta (nella causa presente nella forma di una richiesta incompleta), fu depositato a mano alla Corte Cancelleria 21 marzo 2011: una richiesta completata seguì in conformità con le istruzioni della Cancelleria. C'è così senza dubbio che la data di introduzione in riguardo della richiesta n. 18766/11 erano 21 marzo 2011. Similmente, riguardo alla richiesta n. 36030/11 che una richiesta completa è stata ricevuta con la Corte con fax 10 giugno 2011, fu seguito con l'originale ricevette con la Corte 17 giugno 2011. C'è perciò anche senza dubbio che la data di introduzione in riguardo della richiesta n. si deve considerare che 36030/11 a siano 10 giugno 2011. Segue che in queste circostanze la data di “la ricevuta” con la Corte degli originali o i moduli di domanda completati è irrilevante per determinare la data di introduzione; l'argomento del Governo a che effetto è giudicato male perciò.
91. Rimane essere determinato se le richieste introdussero in quelli giorni si attenuti con LA norma dei sei- mesI.
(b) Ottemperanza col tempo-limite di sei -mesi
(i) principi di Generale
92. Come un articolo, il periodo di sei-mese funziona dalla data della definitivo decisione nell'elaborazione dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali. Dove è chiaro dall'inizio, comunque che nessuna via di ricorso effettiva è disponibile al richiedente, il periodo funziona dalla data degli atti o misure si lamentò di, o dalla data di conoscenza di che atto o il suo effetto su o pregiudizio al richiedente (vedere Mocanu ed Altri c. la Romania [GC], N. 10865/09, 45886/07 e 32431/08, § 259 ECHR 2014 (gli estratti)). Dove un richiedente si giova a di una via di ricorso evidentemente esistente e solamente successivamente diviene consapevole di circostanze che rendono la via di ricorso inefficace, può essere appropriato per i fini di Articolo 35 § 1 prendere l'inizio del periodo di sei -mesi come la data quando il richiedente prima divenne o sarebbe dovuto divenire consapevole di quelle circostanze (l'ibid., § 260; vedere anche El-Masri c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia [GC], n. 39630/09, § 136, ECHR 2012, e Paul ed Audrey Edwards c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 46477/99, 4 giugno 2001).
93. In cause dove c'è una situazione che continua, il periodo avvia correre da capo ogni giorno, e è solamente in generale quando che fini di situazione che il periodo di mese del sei davvero avvia correre (vedere Varnava ed Altri c. la Turchia [GC], N. 16064/90, 16065/90, 16066/90 16068/90, 16069/90 16070/90, 16071/90 16072/90 e 16073/90, § 159 ECHR 2009).
94. Il concetto di un “continuando situazione” si riferisce ad un stato di affari col quale operano con attività continue o da parte dello Stato che rende le vittime di richiedenti (vedere Ananyev ed Altri c. la Russia, N. 42525/07 e 60800/08, § 75 10 gennaio 2012; vedere anche, al contrario., McDaid ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, n. 25681/94, decisione di Commissione di 9 aprile 1996, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 85-un, p. 134, e Posti e Rahko c. la Finlandia, n. 27824/95, § 39 ECHR 2002 VII). La Corte ha stabilito comunque anche che omissioni da parte delle autorità possono costituire anche “le attività continue con o da parte dello Stato” (vedere, per esempio, Vasilescu c. la Romania, 22 maggio 1998, § 49 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998 III riguardo ad una sentenza che impedisce al richiedente del riguadagnare proprietà della sua proprietà; Sabin Popescu c. la Romania, n. 48102/99, § 51 2 marzo 2004 riguardo all'incapacità di un genitore per riguadagnare diritto parentale; Iordache c. la Romania, n. 6817/02, § 66 14 ottobre 2008; e Hadzhigeorgievi c. la Bulgaria, n. 41064/05, §§ 56-57, 16 luglio 2013 sia riguardo a non-esecuzione di sentenze, così come, con implicazione, Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. e Di Stefano c. l'Italia [GC], n. 38433/09, § 104, ECHR 2012 riguardo all'incapacità per trasmettere programmi della televisione).
95. In giurisprudenza la Corte ha considerato che c'era “continuando situazioni” portando la causa all'interno di competenza sua con riguardo ad ad Articolo 35 § 1, dove una disposizione legale generò un stato permanente di affari, nella forma di una limitazione permanente su una Convenzione individuale diritto protetto, come il diritto per votare o stare in piedi per elezione (vedere Paksas c. la Lituania [GC], n. 34932/04, § 83, 6 gennaio 2011, ed Anchugov e Gladkov c. la Russia, N. 11157/04 e 15162/05, § 77 4 luglio 2013) o il diritto di accesso per corteggiare (vedere Nataliya Mikhaylenko c. l'Ucraina, n. 49069/11, § 25 30 maggio 2013), o nella forma di una disposizione legislativa che si intrude sulla vita privata di un individuo continuamente (vedere Dudgeon c. il Regno Unito, 22 ottobre 1981, § 41 la Serie Un n. 45, e Daróczy c. l'Ungheria, n. 44378/05, § 19 1 luglio 2008)
(l'ii) la Richiesta alla causa presente
96. Rivolgendosi alle particolari caratteristiche della causa presente, la Corte nota che in finora come i diritti sotto Articoli 8, 12 e 14 riguardo all'incapacità per sposarsi o entrare in un'unione civile sono in questione i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' non concernono un atto che accade ad un punto determinato in tempo o anche gli effetti durevoli di tale atto, ma piuttosto disposizioni interessate (o in questa causa la mancanza al riguardo) generando un stato che continua di affari, vale a dire una mancanza di riconoscimento della loro unione con tutte le sue conseguenze pratiche su una base quotidiana contro le quali nessuna via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva era infatti disponibile. Gli organi di Convenzione prima hanno contenuto che quando loro ricevono una richiesta riguardo ad una disposizione legale che genera un stato permanente di affari per che non c'è via di ricorso nazionale, la questione del periodo di sei- mesi sorge solamente dopo che questo stato di affari ha cessato esistere: “... nelle circostanze, è precisamente, come se la violazione allegato era ripetuta quotidiano, mentre ostacolando così la gestione del periodo di mese del sei” (vedere De Becker c. il Belgio, (il dec.) 9 giugno 1958, n. 214/56, Annuario 2, e Paksas citato sopra, § 83).
97. Nella causa presente, nell'assenza di una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva data lo stato di giurisprudenza nazionale ed il fatto che lo stato di affari si lamentò di non ha cessato chiaramente, la situazione deve essere considerata come un continuando (vedere, per esempio, Anchugov e Gladkov c. la Russia, N. 11157/04 e 15162/05, § 77, 4 luglio 2013 benché una linea diversa prima era stata presa in cause britanniche che concernono circostanze simili, vedere Toner c. Il Regno Unito (il dec.), § 29, n. 8195/08, 15 febbraio 2011, e Mclean e Cole c. Il Regno Unito (il dec.), § 25, 11 giugno 2013). Non si può sostenere perciò che le richieste sono fuori termini.
98. Di conseguenza, l'eccezione del Governo è respinta.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 8 Di La Convenzione Ed Articolo 14 In Concomitanza Con Articolo 8
99. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11 si lamentarono che loro non avevano nessuno mezzi di salvaguardare giuridicamente la loro relazione, in che era impossibile per entrare in qualsiasi dattilografa di unione civile in Italia. Loro invocarono Articolo 8 da soli. I richiedenti in richiesta N. 18766/11 e 36030/11 si lamentarono che loro erano discriminati contro in violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8. Quelle disposizioni lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 8
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
Articolo 14
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
100. La Corte reitera che è il padrone del carattere da dare in legge ai fatti della causa (vedere, per esempio, Gatt, citato sopra, § 19). Presentecausa che la Corte considera che le azioni di reclamo sollevarono coi richiedenti in richiesta n. 36030/11, anche incorra essere esaminato sotto Articolo 8 da solo.
A. Ammissibilità
1. Applicabilità
101. Il Governo, riferendosi a Schalk e Kopf (§§ 93-95), non contesti l'applicabilità di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8.
102. Siccome ha sostenuto costantemente la Corte, l'Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente, poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. Benché la richiesta di Articolo 14 non presupponga una violazione di quelle disposizioni -ed a questa misura è autonomo-non ci può essere stanza per richiesta sua a meno che i fatti in questione incorra all'interno dell'ambito di uno o più del secondo (vedere, per istanza, E.B. c. la Francia [GC], n. 43546/02, § 47 22 gennaio 2008; Karner c. l'Austria, n. 40016/98, § 32 ECHR 2003 IX; e Petrovic c. l'Austria, 27 marzo 1998, § 22 le Relazioni 1998 II).
103. È incontrastato che la relazione di una coppia di stesso-sesso, come quelli dei richiedenti incorre all'interno della nozione di “la vita privata” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8. La Corte già ha sostenuto similmente, che la relazione di una coppia di stesso-sesso che coabita che vive in un'associazione de facto e stabile incorre all'interno della nozione di “la vita di famiglia” (vedere Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, § 94). Segue che i fatti delle richieste presenti incorrono all'interno della nozione di “la vita privata” così come “la vita di famiglia” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8. Di conseguenza, ambo l'Articolo 8 da solo ed Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8 della Convenzione fa domanda.
2. Conclusione
104. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Merits
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11
105. I richiedenti si riferirono all'evoluzione che aveva avuto luogo, come un risultato del quale molti paesi avevano legiferato in favore di del tipo di istituzione per stesso-sesso accoppia, le più recenti addizioni che sono Gibralta ed il Malta la cui legislazione decretò nel 2014 diedero stesso-sesso si accoppia gli stessi diritti ed i doveri grosso modo applicabili a coppie sposate; associazione registrata per coppie di stesso-sesso era stata avviata anche in Croatia. Loro considerarono che non c'era ragione perché quelle unioni non dovrebbero essere offerte per in Italia. Loro notarono in particolare che la Corte Costituzionale italiana stessa aveva considerato che lo stato aveva un obbligo per introdurre nel suo ordinamento giuridico della forma di unione civile per coppie di stesso-sesso. Loro si riferirono alla giurisprudenza della Corte riguardo agli obblighi positivi inerente in un riguardo effettivo per privato e la vita di famiglia, e reiterò che secondo la Corte, dove era in pericolo una particolare sfaccettatura dell'esistenza di un individuo o l'identità, o dove le attività in pericolo comportarono un aspetto più intimo della vita privata, il margine concesso ad un Stato era corrispondentemente stretto (Söderman c. la Svezia [GC], n. 5786/08, § 79 ECHR 2013).
106. I richiedenti notarono che il Governo non aveva dato giustificazione per l'insuccesso per legiferare a questo effetto. Sul contrario, loro avevano tentato di convincere la Corte che coppie di stesso-sesso già furono protette, nonostante la mancanza di una specifica struttura legale. Questo era in se stesso contraddittorio, perché se il Governo riconoscesse il bisogno di proteggere, non c'era poi nessun altro modo di fare così che con offrendo una struttura legale e stabile, come matrimonio o un'istituzione simile di associazione registrata o il piaccia. Inoltre, i richiedenti non riuscirono a capire il collegamento fra la protezione di famiglia nel suo senso tradizionale ed il riconoscimento legale di una relazione stabile di una coppia di stesso-sesso.
107. I richiedenti considerarono che il riconoscimento in legge della vita di famiglia di uno e status era cruciale per l'esistenza e benessere di un individuo e per suo o la sua dignità. Nell'assenza di matrimonio lo Stato deve, almeno, accesso determinato ad un'unione riconosciuta con vuole dire di un'istituzione giuridica e solenne, basato su un impegno pubblico e capace di offerta loro la certezza legale. Attualmente loro furono negati simile protezione in legge, e coppie di stesso-sesso subirono un stato dell'incertezza, siccome mostrato con le cause nazionali citate col Governo che persone sinistre nei richiedenti la situazione di ' alla misericordia della discrezione giudiziale. I richiedenti notarono che nonostante il fatto che Italia aveva trasposto EU direttivo 78/2000, l'amministrazione continuò a negare i certi benefici a coppie di stesso-sesso, e non li considerò uguale a coppie eterosessuali.
108. I richiedenti considerarono che il Governo stava fuorviando la Corte con un'interpretazione sbagliata della decisione del municipio di Milano riguardo a registrazione (vedere paragrafo 130 sotto). La registrazione assegnata a non previde per l'emissione di un documento che certifica un “unione civile” basato su un'obbligazione dell'affezione, ma di un “unione per fini di documento (unione anagrafica)” basato su un'obbligazione dell'affezione. Concernè solamente registrazione per i fini di documenti statistici della popolazione esistente che non sarebbe confusa con la nozione dello status civile di un individuo. Mentre notò che i certi municipi avevano abbracciato questo sistema, coppie molto poche davvero avevano registrato, poiché non aveva effetto sullo status civile di una persona, e potrebbe essere prodotto solamente come prova della convivenza. Effettivamente non aveva effetti terze parti vis-à-vis, né sé quantità con questioni come successione, le questioni parentali, l'adozione, ed il diritto per creare un affari di famiglia (impresa famigliare). Similmente, la sentenza del tribunale di Grosseto riguardo alla registrazione del matrimonio di una coppia di omosessuale (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra) era stato una sentenza unica ed era stato, al tempo dell'osservazione di osservazioni, ricorso pendente alla richiesta del Governo. Loro notarono inoltre che i commenti resero con la Corte di Cassazione nella sua sentenza n. 4184/12, all'effetto che un matrimonio di stesso-sesso ha contratto all'estero era più contrario all'ordine pubblico italiano, era stato detto nel passare (affermazione di obiter), non stava legando e l'amministrazione non aveva seguito abito. Effettivamente la Corte di Cassazione chiaramente aveva deciso la questione, nel senso che nessuno simile matrimonio era possibile.
109. Nel collegamento con Articolo 14, i richiedenti reiterarono, che il margine dello Stato della valutazione era stretto quando la giustificazione per evadere tale obbligo fu basata sull'orientamento sessuale di individui (loro si riferirono a X ed Altri c. l'Austria [GC], n. 19010/07, ECHR 2013, e X c. la Turchia, n. 24626/09, 9 ottobre 2012), e ragioni molto pesanti erano necessarie per giustificare una differenza di trattamento basata su simile motivi. Loro si appellarono sulle opinioni che dissentono nella sentenza di Schalk e Kopf. Loro considerarono inoltre che nella causa presente non era punto nel dibattere che non era aperto per coppie eterosessuali per entrare in del genere di unione registrata, dato che coppie eterosessuali avevano l'opportunità di sposarsi, mentre coppie di omosessuale non avevano qualsiasi nessuna protezione di qualche genere.
(b) I richiedenti in richiesta n. 36030/11
110. I richiedenti presentarono che in prospettiva del trend positivo registrata in Europa, la Corte ora dovrebbe imporre sugli Stati un obbligo positivo per assicurare che le stesse sesso-coppie hanno accesso ad un'istituzione, di nome purchessia che era più equivalente a matrimonio. Questo si diede particolarmente così che in Italia la Corte Costituzionale aveva sostenuto il bisogno per unioni di omosessuale per essere riconosciuto in legge coi diritti attinenti ed i doveri; nonostante questo il legislatore era rimasto inerte.
111. I richiedenti notarono che il Governo era andato a vuoto a dimostrare come riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso colpirebbe avversamente effettivo ed esistente “famiglie tradizionali.” Né il Governo aveva spiegato che prevenzione di qualsiasi effetti avversi non potevano essere raggiunti per meno restrittivo vuole dire. I richiedenti notarono anche che una sentenza di una violazione nella causa presente avrebbe obbligato solamente Italia a prendere misure legislative in questo riguardo, mentre lasciò allo Stato lo spazio per rivolgere qualsiasi scopo legittimo con facendo il sarto la legislazione attinente. Seguì che il margine di valutazione che era particolarmente stretta in riguardo di un rifiuto totale di riconoscimento legale a stesso-sesso accoppia, era, al contrario., esistente in relazione alla forma e contenuto di simile riconoscimento che comunque non era la materia di questa richiesta. Loro notarono inoltre che la causa presente non sollevò problemi morali ed etici della sensibilità acuta (come il problema dell'aborto) né comportò un equilibrio coi diritti di altri, nei particolari figli (come adozione con omosessuali): la causa presente riferì semplicemente ai diritti ed i doveri di partner verso l'un l'altro (irrispettoso del riconoscimento di diritti come diritto parentale, l'adozione o accesso a procreazione medicalmente assistita).
112. I richiedenti presentarono che in Schalk e Kopf uno delle Camere della Corte nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 aveva trovato in concomitanza con Articolo 8, con una maggioranza stretta (4-3), considerando che Stati goderono un margine della valutazione come al tempismo di simile riconoscimento, e che al tempo non era ancora una maggioranza di Stati che prevedono per simile riconoscimento. I richiedenti notarono che sino a giugno 2014 (data di osservazioni) 22 dei 47 Stati riconobbero della forma di unione di stesso-sesso. Questi inclusero tutto il Consiglio dell'Europa (CoE) Stati fondatore eccetto l'Italia, così come paesi dividendo, come l'Italia un sequestro profondo alla religione cattolica (come Irlanda ed il Malta). In oltre Grecia era anche sotto un obbligo per introdurre simile riconoscimento che segue la sentenza in Vallianatos. Questo volle dire che, al tempo loro presentarono le loro osservazioni, 49% degli Stati avevano riconosciuto unioni di stesso-sesso. Comunque, i richiedenti notarono, con riguardo che in Schalk e Kopf la Camera aveva preso come un fattore decisivo “la maggioranza di membro gli Stati”, mentre nella più prima giurisprudenza(vale a dire Christine Goodwin c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 28957/95, § 84 ECHR 2002 VI), nonostante la piccola base comune che è esistita fra gli Stati, ed il fatto che un approccio comune europeo ancora stava mancando, la Grande Camera scelse di dare meno l'importanza a quelli criterio e dare più importanza al chiaro e prova incontestata di un trend internazionale che continua. Inoltre, i richiedenti notarono che nella causa presente non poteva essere detto che c'era un consentimento sulla pratica seguita con l'Italia.
113. I richiedenti contesero che la Corte non poteva essere ridotta ad essendo un “il ragioniere” di majoritarian prospettive nazionali. Sul contrario, doveva essere il guardiano della Convenzione ed i suoi valori che sono posto sotto a che includono la protezione di minoranze (loro si riferirono in questo collegamento a L. e V. c. l'Austria, N. 39392/98 e 39829/98, § 52 ECHR 2003 io, e Smith e Grady c. il Regno Unito, N. 33985/96 e 33986/96, § 97 ECHR 1999 VI). I richiedenti notarono che la parzialità ancora era presente in tutta l'Europa, e potrebbe essere più forte nei certi paesi dove era radicato in tradizionale pregiudizio contro omosessuali, se non arcaico, le condanne e dove ideals democratici e pratiche li avevano stabiliti solamente nei recenti tempi. I richiedenti notarono che prova empirica (presentò alla Corte) mostrò che mancanza di riconoscimento di coppie di stesso-sesso in un stato determinato corrisposto ad un grado più basso dell'accettazione sociale dell'omosessualità. Seguì che con semplicemente deferring scelte normative alle autorità nazionali, la Corte andrebbe a vuoto a prendere conto del fatto che le certe scelte nazionali erano infatti basato su prevalere atteggiamenti discriminatori contro omosessuali, piuttosto che la conseguenza di un'elaborazione democratica e genuina guidata con la considerazione di che che è severamente necessario in una società democratica.
114. Nei richiedenti ' vede, mentre accettare anche sé un certo margine della valutazione non era appropriato per il Governo italiano per appellarsi su sé per la specifica ragione che le corti nazionali avevano sostenuto l'esistenza in legge costituzionale e nazionale di un obbligo per riconoscere unioni di stesso-sesso. I richiedenti contesero che sotto la giurisprudenza della Corte un Stato previde una volta per un diritto in diritto nazionale fu obbligato poi per offrire protezione effettiva e non-discriminatoria di tale diritto (loro assegnarono Un, B e C c. l'Irlanda [GC], n. 25579/05, § 249 ECHR 2010). I richiedenti notarono che sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 138/10 avevano l'effetto di affermare l'esistenza di un diritto essenziale costituzionale per partner di stesso-sesso per ottenere riconoscimento della loro unione e, a questo effetto, di un dovere costituzionale sulla legislatura per decretare una regolamentazione generale ed appropriata sul riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso, con diritti conseguenti ed i doveri per partner. Il riconoscimento con le corti nazionali che il concetto di famiglia non è stato limitato alla nozione tradizionale basate su matrimonio era andato anche oltre sentenza n. 138/10. Altre sentenze nel campo di diritti essenziali sostenuto che come una questione di legge costituzionale e nazionale la nozione di famiglia tradizionale ebbe un ruolo minore nel giustificare restrizioni: esempi concernerono a procreazione medicalmente assistita (N. 162/14 e 151/09); articoli sulla trasmissione del cognome a figli (n. 61/06); il diritto di un partner per succedere in un contratto di contratto d'affitto (n. 404/88); ed il diritto di un partner per frenarsi dal dare testimonianza in procedimenti giudiziali (n. 7/97).
115. La mancanza di riconoscimento della loro unione colpì e svantaggiato i richiedenti in molti specifici e concreti modi. I richiedenti notarono che anche se la legge riconobbe degli specifici e limitati diritti per non-sposato (eterosessuale o stesso-sesso) le coppie, questi non erano dipendenti su status, ma su una situazione de facto della convivenza più uxorio. Infatti, nelle cause nazionali riguardo a riparazione nella causa della morte di un partner, la Corte di Cassazione (la sentenza n. 23725/08) aveva sostenuto che per simile fini l'esistenza di una relazione stabile che prevede reciproco, morale ed assistenza di materiale dovrebbe essere provò, e che dichiarazioni resero con gli individui interessati (l'affidavit) o indicazioni date all'amministrazione per i fini di statistiche non basterebbero. Così, i richiedenti presentarono che esercitare o chiedere i loro diritti loro non potevano appellarsi su status che è il risultato di un atto della volontà comune, ma doveva ricorrere a provando l'esistenza di una situazione che riguarda i fatti. In oltre, solamente un numero limitato di diritti era stato riconosciuto in riguardo di partner de facto, ed in più cause loro rimasero senza tutela giuridica. Loro presentarono il seguente come un non ruolo esauriente di esempi del secondo (sulla base di disposizioni legali, e nelle certe cause confermate con causa-legge): la legge andò a vuoto a regolare i rispettivi diritti ed i doveri di partner (come anche notò con la Corte Costituzionale) in sfere come materiale ed assistenza morale fra partner, le responsabilità nel contribuire alle necessità della famiglia, o le loro scelte riguardo alla vita di famiglia; c'era una mancanza di diritti di eredità nella causa di successione intestata; partner de facto non furono concessi ad una porzione riservata (il legitim) ed un partner sopravvivente non godè un diritto in rem per vivere nella casa di famiglia possedette col partner deceduto (sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 310/89); là non esisteva nessuno diritto alla pensione di un superstite (sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 461/2000); partner de facto avevano limitato diritti riguardo ad assistenza ad un partner ricoverato in ospedale quando il secondo non era in grado esprimere suo o la sua volontà; in principio un partner de facto aveva nessuno diritto accedere suo o l'archivio medico del suo compagno (benché il Garante della Riserbo nella sua decisione di 17 settembre 2009, trovò altrimenti, nell'evento di prova di beneplacito scritto); partner de facto non avevano diritti di mantenimento ed i doveri; partner de facto non furono concessi a permesso speciale da lavoro per assistere un partner colpito con un'invalidità seria; partner de facto non trassero profitto da più tassazione o politiche sociali relativo a famiglia: per esempio, loro non potevano trarre profitto da deduzioni di tassa applicabile a consorti dipendenti; e partner de facto non avevano accesso all'adozione o a procreazione medicalmente assistita.
116. I richiedenti notarono che mentre un certo grado limitato di protezione sarebbe potuto essere ottenuto con vuole dire di accordi privati, questo era irrilevante, e la Grande Camera della Corte già aveva respinto tale argomento in Vallianatos (§ 81). Inoltre, simile disposizioni erano tempo che consuma e costoso, così come stressante, e di nuovo era solamente un carico per essere portato coi richiedenti e non con coppie eterosessuali che potrebbero optare per matrimonio o con coppie che non furono interessate ad avere qualsiasi riconoscimento legale. La mancanza di riconoscimento legale dell'unione, oltre al provocare problemi legali e pratici impedì anche ai richiedenti di avere un ritualised cerimonia pubblica per la quale loro potevano, sotto la protezione della legge solennemente intraprenda i doveri attinenti verso l'un l'altro. Loro considerarono che simile cerimonie portarono legittimità sociale e l'accettazione, e particolarmente nella causa di omosessuali, loro andarono a mostrare che loro hanno diritto anche a vivere liberamente e vivere le loro relazioni su una base uguale, sia in privato ed in pubblico. Loro notarono che l'assenza di simile riconoscimento provocò in loro un senso di appartenere ad una classe inferiore di persone, nonostante le loro necessità nella sfera di amore che è lo stesso.
117. I richiedenti presentarono che il fatto che 155 dell'esistere 8,000 municipi avevano avviato recentemente che noto come che è “registri di unioni civili” non aveva corretto la situazione. Accettando la loro importanza politica e simbolica, i richiedenti presentarono che simile registri, disponibile solamente su una piccola porzione del territorio, era atti soltanto amministrativi che non erano capaci di conferire un status sui richiedenti o dare qualsiasi i diritti. Simile iniziative testimoniarono solamente alla buona volontà di certe autorità per includere unioni fuori di matrimonio quando prendendo misure riguardo a famiglie, all'interno della loro sfera della competenza.
118. I richiedenti presentarono che la violazione allegato era una conseguenza diretta dell'aspirapolvere nell'ordinamento giuridico in vigore. I richiedenti ' sia in un pertinentemente situazione simile a quello di una coppia di diverso-sesso come riguardi il loro bisogno per riconoscimento legale e protezione della loro relazione. Loro dissero inoltre che loro erano anche in una posizione dalla quale era significativamente diversa che di coppie di opposto-sesso che, sebbene eleggibile per matrimonio, non desideri ottenere riconoscimento legale della loro unione. Loro notarono che la base sola per la differenza in trattamento subito coi richiedenti era il loro orientamento sessuale, e che il Governo era andato a vuoto a dare ragioni pesanti che giustificano simile trattamento che costituì la discriminazione diretta. Nessuno era qualsiasi la giustificazione presentò come a perché loro erano soggetto alla discriminazione indiretta, in che loro furono trattati nello stesso modo come persone che erano in una situazione significativamente diversa (loro si riferirono a Thlimmenos c. la Grecia [GC], n. 34369/97, ECHR 2000 IV), vale a dire che di coppie eterosessuali che non erano disposte per sposarsi.
119. Il Governo, mentre appellandosi solamente sul loro margine della valutazione, non diede ragioni a tutti, affitti uni pesanti, giustificare tale situazione da solo. Nei richiedenti ' vede questa posizione era già sufficiente per trovare una violazione delle disposizioni citate.
120. Ciononostante, presumendo anche che si può considerare che la differenza in trattamento stia mirando a, “la protezione della famiglia nel senso tradizionale”, determinato la Corte sta evolvendo giurisprudenza che loro hanno considerato che sarebbe inaccettabile per incorniciare restrizioni sulla base di orientamento sessuale siccome mirato a proteggendo morale pubblica. Questo, nella loro prospettiva sarebbe in contrasto di radicale con le richieste del pluralismo, la tolleranza e l’apertura mentale senza che non c'era società democratica (loro si riferirono a Handyside c. il Regno Unito, 7 dicembre 1976, § 50 la Serie Un n. 24). Nel collegamento con la nozione della famiglia tradizionale i richiedenti si riferirono alle sentenze della Corte in Vallianatos (citò sopra, § 84) e Konstantin Markin (citò sopra, § 127).
121. Infine, loro notarono che in Vallianatos la Corte sottolineò che “il principio della proporzionalità non richiede soltanto la misura scelta di essere appropriato in principio per conseguimento dello scopo chiesta. Si deve mostrare anche che era necessario per realizzare che scopo, escludere le certe categorie di persone-in queste persone di istanza che vivono in una relazione di omosessuale-dalla sfera di applicazione delle disposizioni in questione... l'onere della prova in questo riguardo è sul Governo rispondente.” Inoltre, il bisogno per qualsiasi restrizione sarebbe valutata in relazione ai principi che normalmente prevalgono in una società democratica (loro si riferirono a Konstantin Markin, citato sopra).
(il c) Il Governo
122. Il Governo notò che la Corte riconobbe il diritto di Convenzione di coppie di stesso-sesso per vedere la loro unione ammessa giuridicamente, ma considerò che le disposizioni attinenti (Articoli 8, 12 e 14) non generi un obbligo legale sugli Stati Contraenti, come il secondo un margine più ampio della valutazione godè nell'adozione di cambi legislativi in grado soddisfare i cambiarono “senso comune” della comunità. Effettivamente, in che luce, in Schalk e Kopf benché mancando legislazione su matrimonio o le altre forme di riconoscimento di unioni di omosessuale, lo Stato austriaco non fu sostenuto responsabile per violazioni della Convenzione. Nella prospettiva del Governo, come in Benzina e Dubois c. la Francia, (n. 25951/07, ECHR 2012), la Corte aveva ammesso che lo Stato non aveva nessun obbligo per prevedere per matrimonio di stesso-sesso, così non aveva anche nessun obbligo per prevedere per altre unioni di stesso-sesso.
123. Riferendosi ai principi posò in giù con la Corte, il Governo osservò che i sociali e le sensibilità culturali del problema di riconoscimento legale di coppie di omosessuale diedero ogni Stato Contraente un margine ampio della valutazione nella scelta delle volte e maniere di una specifica struttura legale. Loro si appellarono inoltre sulle disposizioni di Protocollo N.ro 15. Loro notarono che lo stesso margine era stato offerto per in legge di EU, particolarmente Articolo 9 del Bill di Diritti. Questa questione doveva essere lasciata così allo Stato individuale (in questa causa l'Italia) che era l'entità sola capace di avere giurisdizione del “senso comune” della sua propria comunità, particolarmente riguardo ad una questione delicata che colpì la sensibilità di individui e le loro identità culturali, e dove tempo necessariamente fu costretto a realizzare una maturazione graduale di un senso comune della comunità nazionale sul riconoscimento di questa forma nuova di famiglia nel senso di Convenzione.
124. Nella prospettiva del Governo la Corte non aveva nessun potere per imporre tale obbligo. Né tale obbligo potrebbe essere dettato con gli altri Stati che, nel frattempo-la maggior parte di loro solamente recentemente (vedere per esempio, Malta 2014)-aveva adottato un articolo come un risultato di un'elaborazione interna di maturazione sociale. Il Governo notò che, al tempo dell'osservazione delle loro osservazioni, meno che mezzo gli Stati Contraenti europei avevano offerto forme legali di protezione per coppie non sposate, incluso omosessuali e molti avevano fatto così solamente recentemente (per esempio, Austria nel 2010, Irlanda nel 2011, e Finlandia nel 2012), e nell'altra metà non fu offerto affatto per. Loro considerarono inoltre che il fatto che alla fine di un'evoluzione graduale un Stato era in una posizione isolata con riguardo ad ad un aspetto della sua legislazione non voglia dire necessariamente che che aspetto era in conflitto con la Convenzione (loro si riferirono a Vallianatos, § 92). Il Governo considerò così che nessun obbligo positivo per legiferare nella questione di coppie di omosessuale discese da qualsiasi articolo della Convenzione. Era solamente per lo Stato per decidere se proibire o concedere unioni di stesso-sesso, e non c'era attualmente trend a questo effetto (questa elaborazione e risultato potrebbe essere visto anche negli Stati Uniti dell'America, dove ad ogni stato fu permesso per regolare la questione).
125. Rivolgendosi alla situazione che concerne ad Italia, il Governo si riferì a sentenza n. 138/10 (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra) in che la Corte Costituzionale aveva riconosciuto l'importanza per stesso-sesso accoppia di essere in grado vedere la loro unione ammise giuridicamente, ma l'aveva lasciato a Parlamento per identificare il tempismo, metodi e limiti di tale struttura regolatore. Così, contrari ai richiedenti l'argomento di ', non c'era obbligo immediato, e la Corte Costituzionale non aveva custodito tale obbligo costituzionale. Citi a questa sentenza era stato reso anche nella recente sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 170/14 che riguardano “il forzato divorzio” riassegnamento di genere seguente. Comunque, diversamente da nella causa seconda la Corte Costituzionale aveva invitato il legislatore ad agire prontamente nella causa presente, perché gli individui riguardati già avevano stabilito una relazione maritale produttivo di effetti e conseguenze che furono portati improvvisamente ad un alt. Nella causa presente, la Corte Costituzionale diede credito all'esistenza di un diritto essenziale, con un bisogno conseguente di assicurare ogni qualvolta la tutela giuridica di unioni di stesso-sesso trattamento disuguale sorse. Comunque, aveva delegato alle corti nazionali ed ordinarie il ruolo di controllare, su una base di causa-con-causa se in ogni specifica causa gli articoli previsti per unioni di genere diverse erano estensibili allo stesso sesso uni. Se, nelle corti ' vede, c'era trattamento disuguale al danno di coppie di stesso-sesso, loro potrebbero riferirsi la questione alla Corte Costituzionale che chiede l'articolo esaminò essere discriminatorio e mandando a chiamare intervento correttivo col giudice.
126. Il Governo presentò inoltre che lo Stato italiano era stato preso parte in condizione giuridica in sviluppo per unioni di stesso-sesso fin da 1986, con vuole dire di dibattito intenso ed una varietà di conti sul riconoscimento di unioni civili (anche fra coppie di stesso-sesso). Il problema era stato considerato conti opportuni ed attinenti, e recenti a questo effetto, introdotto coi vari partiti politici sempre era nell'elaborazione di subire scrutinio parlamentare (vedere divide in paragrafi 46-47 sopra). Così, mentre notando il fermento sociale e legale molto esteso sul problema, il Governo accentuò che la questione aveva continuato ad essere dibattuta nei recenti tempi. Loro si riferirono particolarmente al Presidente del Consiglio italiano di Ministri che aveva chiesto di avere assegnato pubblicamente priorità di cima al riconoscimento legale di unioni di stesso-sesso ed alla discussione imminente ed esame nel Senato di Bill n. 14 su unioni civili per coppie di stesso-sesso che, in termini di obblighi, specificamente corrispose all'istituzione di matrimonio ed il therein dei diritti, incluso l'adozione diritti di eredità, lo status dei figli di una coppia, assistenza sanitaria e cura penitenziaria la residenza e lavorando benefici. Italia era perfettamente così, in linea col ritmo di maturazione che condurrebbe ad un consentimento europeo, e non poteva essere biasimato per non avere legiferato ancora sulla questione. Questa attività intensa di Trento a anni passati mostrò un'intenzione da parte dello Stato per trovare una soluzione che si incontrerebbe con approvazione pubblica, così come corrispondendo alle necessità della protezione di una parte della comunità. Mostrò anche comunque, che nonostante l'attenzione pagata al problema coi vari vigori politici, era difficile giungere ad un equilibrio fra le sensibilità diverse su tale delicato e profondamente sentì problema sociale. Loro notarono che le scelte delicate coinvolsero in politica sociale e legislativa doveva realizzare il consenso unanime di correnti diverse di pensiero e sentendo, così come sentimento religioso che era presente in società. Seguì che lo Stato italiano non poteva essere sostenuto responsabile per il corso tortuoso verso riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso.
127. Comunque, il Governo contese che loro ancora avevano, in molti modi, dimostrò che loro riconobbero unioni di omosessuale come esistendo giuridicamente ed attinente, e che loro avevano offerto loro le specifiche e concrete forme di tutela giuridica, per giudiziale e non-giudiziale vuole dire. La giurisprudenza nazionale aveva in più circostanze riconosciuto unioni di stesso-sesso come una realtà, con importanza legale e sociale. Effettivamente, le corti supreme italiane riconobbero che, in delle specifiche circostanze, coppie di stesso-sesso possono avere gli stessi diritti come coppie sposate ed eterosessuali: loro si riferirono alle sentenze di Corte Costituzionali N. 138/10; 276/2010 e 4/2011 (tutti menzionarono sopra) e particolarmente la Corte di sentenza di Cassazione n. 4184/12, così come la Reggio Emilia ordinanza di 13 febbraio 2012 e la decisione del Tribunale di Grosseto (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra): secondo il Governo, susseguente alla registrazione di decisione seconda di simile matrimoni la pratica comune divenne (un esempio era la decisione del Municipio di Milano di 7 maggio 2013).
128. Il Governo indicò che la protezione di coppie di stesso-sesso non fu limitata al riconoscimento dell'unione e la relazione di famiglia stessa. Davvero fu assicurato con lo specifico riferimento ad aspetti concreti di vita comune loro. Il Governo si riferì ad un numero di sentenze delle corti ordinarie: la sentenza di Tribunale di Roma n. 13445/82 20 novembre 1982 quale, in una causa riguardo al contratto d'affitto di un appartamento la convivenza considerata con una coppia di omosessuale per essere su un appiglio uguale con che di una coppia eterosessuale; l'ordinanza di Tribunale di Milano di 13 febbraio 2011 nella quale il partner sopravvivente che aveva avuto una relazione di vecchia data con la vittima fu assegnato danni non-patrimoniali per la perdita del partner di stesso-sesso; l'ordinanza di Tribunale di Milano di 13 novembre 2009 [sic] ammettendo la richiesta come una parte civile del partner di omosessuale di una vittima per i fini del risarcimento per la perdita subì; la Sentenza n. 7176/12 della Corte d'appello di Milano, Operi Sezione di 29 marzo 2012, depositò nella cancelleria attinente 31 agosto 2012 che concesso al partner di stesso-sesso i benefici di welfare pagabile col datore di lavoro alla famiglia che vive con l'impiegato; Sentenza della Corte di Roma di Minors n. 299/14 30 giugno 2014 quale concesso “il diritto per adottare ad una coppia di omosessuale” [sic], recte: il diritto di un non-biologico “la madre” adottare il figlio del suo partner lesbio (concepì per procreazione medicalmente assistita, all'estero nell'adempimento del loro desiderio per genitura unita) determinato i migliori interessi del figlio.
129. Il Governo sottolineò inoltre che stesso-sesso accoppia desiderando dare una struttura legale ai vari aspetti di vita di comunità loro potrebbe entrare in accordi di convivenza (convivenza di di di contratti). Simile accordi abilitarono stesso-sesso accoppia regolare aspetti riferiti a; i) la maniera di dividere spese comuni, ii) il criterio per l'allocazione di proprietà dei beni acquisita durante la convivenza; l'iii) la maniera di uso della residenza comune (se posseduto con uno o ambo partner); l'iv) la procedura per la distribuzione dei beni nell'evento di conclusione della convivenza; v) approvvigiona relativo a diritti in cause di malattia fisica o mentale o l'incapacità; e vi) atti della disposizione testamentaria in favore del partner che coabita. Simile accordi erano stati pubblicati recentemente col Consiglio Nazionale di Notai, nella luce del fenomeno crescente di unioni de facto. Il Governo spiegò che per dare accordi di convivenza la natura organica di una struttura legale per unioni de facto, se fra coppie dello stesso o sesso diverso, una proposta era stata costituita il Codice civile per essere corretta che introdusse un corpo regolatore dedicò a queste situazioni (Codice civile Capitolo XXVI, Articolo 1986 bis et sequi).
130. Il Governo notò inoltre che fin da 1993 un numero crescente di municipi (datare 155) aveva stabilito un Registro di Unioni Civili che concederono omosessuale accoppia registrarli per abilitare il loro riconoscimento come famiglie per i fini di amministrativo, politico, sociale e politica di welfare della città. Questo era a posto in sia le piccole e più grandi città, ed era un segnale inequivocabile di un consentimento sociale e progressivo e crescente in favore del riconoscimento di simile famiglie. Riguardo al contenuto ed effetti di questa forma di protezione, il Governo si riferito con modo di esempio alle regolamentazioni del registro di unioni civili emesse con la città di Milano (la decisione n. 30 26 luglio 2012) secondo che la città fu commessa a proteggendo e sostenendo unioni civili per superare situazioni della discriminazione e promuovere l'integrazione nel sociale, sviluppo culturale ed economico del territorio. Le aree tematiche entro le quali fu richiesta azione prioritaria erano alloggio, salute e servizi sociali, politiche per gioventù, genitori e seniors, sport ed agio, istruzione, scuola e servizi istruttivi, diritti, partecipazione, e trasporto. Gli atti dell'amministrazione erano prevedere non accesso discriminatorio a queste aree ed ostacolare condizioni di svantaggio sociale ed economico. All'interno della città di Milano, una persona iscritta nel registro era equivalente a “il parente prossimo della persona con chi lui o lei sono registrate” per i fini di assistenza. Il Consiglio Urbano può, alla richiesta di parti interessate, accordi un certificato di unione civile basato su un'obbligazione affettiva di reciproco, morale ed assistenza di materiale.
131. Il Governo presentò inoltre che poiché 2003 legislazione italiana era stata a posto per l'uguaglianza di trattamento in lavoro ed occupazione sotto Direttiva 2000/78/EC. Loro notarono che la protezione di unioni civili ricevette più accettazione nei certi rami dello Stato che in altri. Per esempio, loro si riferirono ad una decisione del Garante della Riserbo (un corpo collegiale rese di quattro abili parlamentari eletti che trattano con la protezione di dati personali) di 17 settembre 2009 che riconobbe il diritto di un partner sopravvivente per richiedere una copia dell'archivio medico del partner deceduto nonostante gli eredi l'opposizione di '.
132. Nelle loro osservazioni in replica, il Governo negò categoricamente, che lo scopo della misura contestata, o piuttosto l'assenza di tale misura, era proteggere la famiglia tradizionale o la morale di società (siccome era stato chiesto coi richiedenti).
133. In particolare, nel collegamento con Articolo 14, il Governo distinse la causa presente da che di Vallianatos. Loro notarono che non era ancora possibile affermare che là esistè una prospettiva comune europea sulla questione e la maggior parte di stati erano, infatti, ancora privò di qualche genere di struttura regolatore. Loro si appellarono inoltre sulle sentenze della Corte in Shalk e Kopf. Il Governo presentò che mentre lo Stato italiano aveva preso parte nello sviluppo di un numero di conti che concernono coppie de facto, loro non avevano generato trattamento disuguale o la discriminazione. Similmente, determinato il riconoscimento concreto e protezione giudiziale, legislativa, ed amministrativa e legale assegnò a coppie di stesso-sesso (siccome descritto sopra), la condotta dello Stato italiano non poteva essere considerata discriminatoria. Inoltre, i richiedenti non avevano dato gli specifici dettagli della sofferenza che loro hanno addotto, e qualsiasi danno astratto o generico non poteva essere considerato discriminatorio. Se fosse stato così, potrebbe essere considerato anche discriminatorio contro coppie non sposate ed eterosessuali, come nessuna differenza di trattamento esistita fra i due tipi menzionati di coppie.
(d) interveners di Terzo-parte
(i) Prof Robert Wintemute, in favore delle organizzazioni non-governative FIDH (Fédération Internationale des ligues du Droit de l'Homme), Centre di AIRE (Consiglio su Diritti Individuali in Europa), l'ILGA-Europa (Regione europea della Lesbica Internazionale, Gay, Ermafrodito, Trans ed Associazione di Intersex), ECSOL (Commissione europea su Orientamento Legge Sessuale), UFTDU (forense di Unione per la tutela dei diritti umani) e LIDU (Lega il dei di Italiana il dell'Uomo di Diritti).
(?) obbligo positivo per offrire dei mezzi di riconoscimento
134. Quegli intervenendo presentò che là esistè un consentimento che emerge, in europeo e le altre società democratiche che un governo non può limitare un particolare diritto, beneficio od obbligo a coppie sposate, all'esclusione di coppie di stesso-sesso da che furono ostacolate giuridicamente si sposato. Loro si riferirono alla situazione a marzo 2014, dove al tempo 44.7% del membro di CoE Stati avevano legiferato in favore di relazioni di stesso-sesso (vedere sopra per la situazione corrente) e dove Grecia dovette correggere ancora la sua legislazione che segue la sentenza in Vallianatos, così come l'invito della Corte Costituzionale italiana alla legislatura per legiferare di conseguenza. Loro notarono che su sino a marzo 2014, fuori della legislazione di Europa era stato adottato in Argentina, Australia, Canada, Messico, Nuova Zelanda, Africa Meridionale e l'Uruguay. Negli Stati Uniti, 21 di 50 stati (42%) ed il Distretto di Columbia aveva accordato riconoscimento legale a stesso-sesso accoppia, per accesso a matrimonio, unione civile o associazione nazionale, come il risultato di legislazione o una decisione giudiziale. Gli interveners opinarono che c'era un consentimento crescente in europeo e le altre società democratiche alle quali coppie di stesso-sesso devono essere fornite dei mezzi di qualificare per particolari diritti, benefici ed obblighi allegarono a matrimonio legale, e come notato in Smith e Grady c. il Regno Unito (N. 33985/96 e 33986/96, § 104 ECHR 1999 VI), anche se relativamente recente, la Corte non può trascurare il molto estesa e costantemente prospettive in sviluppo e cambi legali ed associati ai diritti nazionali degli Stati Contraenti su questo problema. La Corte doveva prendere perciò conto di questa evoluzione e qualsiasi l'ulteriore sviluppo sino alla data della sua sentenza. Loro considerarono che l'approccio della Corte in Goodwin (§ 85; vedere anche §§ 91, 93 103) dare più peso a “un trend internazionale che continua” fece domanda, mutatis mutandis, presente causa.
135. Loro presentarono che ragionando giudiziali in un numero crescente di decisioni richiesero almeno un'alternativa a matrimonio legale, se non accesso a matrimonio legale per coppie di stesso-sesso. Loro notarono che benché molte delle corti (menzionò sotto) trovi discriminazione diretta basata su orientamento sessuale, ed accesso uguale e richiesto a matrimonio legale per stesso-sesso accoppia, il loro ragionamento sostenne un fortiori (almeno) una sentenza della discriminazione indiretta basò su orientamento sessuale, e (almeno) un requisito che governi offrono alternativa vuole dire di riconoscimento legale a coppie di stesso-sesso. Loro notarono il seguente:
La prima corte per richiedere accesso uguale per stesso-sesso accoppia ai diritti, benefici ed obblighi di matrimonio legale, mentre lasciandolo alla legislatura per decidere se questo accesso sarebbe per matrimonio legale o un sistema di registrazione alternativo, era il Vermont Corte Suprema in Panettiere c. lo Stato, 744 A.2d 864 (1999):
“Noi conteniamo solamente che querelanti sono concessi sotto... la Costituzione di Vermont per ottenere gli stessi benefici e protezioni riconosciute... a coppie di opposto-sesso sposate. Noi non stabiliamo infrangere sulle prerogative della Legislatura... altro che notare... [l'esistenza di] ‘registrò associazione ' agisce che... stabilisca una condizione giuridica alternativa a matrimonio per stesso-sesso accoppia,... crei un parallelo... schema di registrazione, e prolunga tutti o la maggior parte degli stessi diritti ed obblighi... [T]he schema legale e corrente rimarrà in effetto per un periodo ragionevole di tempo per abilitare la Legislatura a... decreti implementando legislazione in una maniera ordinata e spedita.”
Una legge sullo stesso-sesso unioni civili furono passate nel 2000.
La Corte d'appello di Columbia britannica andò inoltre in EGALE Canada (1 maggio 2003), 225 D.L.R. (4) 472, sostenendo che l'esclusione di coppie di stesso-sesso da matrimonio legale corrisposto a discriminazione che viola lo Statuto canadese. Non poteva vedere (§ 127):
“... come secondo coppie di stesso-sesso i benefici che fluiscono a coppie di opposto-sesso in qualsiasi modo interdice, dissuade o impedisce la formazione di unioni eterosessuali...”
La Corte d'appello di Ontario si confece col sopra in Halpern (10 giugno 2003), 65 O.R. (3d) 161 (§ 107):
“... [Coppie di stesso]-sesso sono escluse da... i benefici che sono solamente disponibili a persone sposate... Esclusione perpetua la prospettiva che relazioni di stesso-sesso sono meno degne di riconoscimento che relazioni di opposto-sesso... [e] offende la dignità di persone in relazioni di stesso-sesso.”
L'Ordine della corte di Ontario l'emissione di licenze di matrimonio a coppie di stesso-sesso che giorno.
La Corte di Columbia britannica seguì 8 luglio 2003 (228 D.L.R. (4) 416). Una legge federale (approvò con la Corte Suprema del Canada) si estese queste decisioni di appello a tutte le dieci province e tre territori da 20 luglio 2005.
18 novembre 2003 la Massachusetts Corte Giudiziale e Suprema giunse alla stessa conclusione come le corti canadesi in Goodridge, 798 N.E.2d 941:
“La questione di fronte a noi è se, coerente con la Costituzione di Massachusetts, il [lo Stato] può negare le protezioni, benefici, ed obblighi conferite con matrimonio civile a due individui dello stesso sesso... Noi concludiamo che non può.”
30 novembre 2004, la Corte d'appello Suprema di Africa Meridionale si confece col canadese e Massachusetts corteggia, e riaffermò la definizione di comune-legge di matrimonio come: “l'unione fra due persone all'esclusione di tutti altri per la vita.” 1 dicembre 2005 la Corte Costituzionale di Africa Meridionale concluse, che l'ostacolo legale e rimanente a matrimonio per stesse coppie di sesso era discriminatorio (§ 71):
“... L'esclusione di coppie di stesso-sesso da... matrimonio... rappresenta un aspro se dichiarazione obliqua con la legge che coppie di stesso-sesso sono outsider... che il loro bisogno per l'affermazione e protezione delle loro relazioni intime come esseri umani è in qualche modo meno che che di coppie eterosessuali... che la loro veste per amore, impegno ed accettare la responsabilità è con definizione meno degno di riguardo a che che di coppie eterosessuali...”
Il Parlamento dell'Africa meridionale risposto con decretando l'Unione Atto Civile (N.ro 17 di 2006, in vigore 30 novembre 2006), concedendo qualsiasi coppia, diverso-sesso o stesso-sesso per contrarre un “unione civile” e sceglie se dovrebbe essere noto come un matrimonio di ‘' o un ‘associazione civile '.
25 ottobre 2006, in Lewis c. Harris, 908 A.2d 196 (2006), il New Jersey Corte Suprema adottò lo stesso approccio come il Vermont Corte Suprema:
“Benché noi non possiamo trovare che un diritto essenziale a matrimonio di stesso-sesso esiste in questo Stato [il cf. Schalk & Kopf], la dispensa disuguale di diritti e benefici a partner di stesso-sesso impegnati può essere tollerata più sotto la nostra Costituzione Statale. Con questo impegno legislativo e giudiziale Statale a sradicando la discriminazione di orientamento sessuale come il nostro fondale, noi ora conteniamo, che negando diritti e benefici a coppie di stesso-sesso impegnate... dato alle loro cose uguale eterosessuali viola la garanzia di protezione uguale... [Legislatura di T]he o deve correggere gli statuti di matrimonio per includere stesso-sesso accoppia o crea una struttura legale e parallela per la quale prevedrà su termini uguali, i diritti e benefici goderono ed opprimono ed obblighi sopportati con coppie sposate. ... Il nome per essere dato allo schema legale..., se matrimonio o dell'altro termine, è una questione lasciata all'elaborazione democratica.”
Una legge sullo stesso-sesso unioni civili furono passate nel 2006.
In 15 maggio 2008 la California che Corte Suprema ha deciso In Cause del Matrimonio del re, 183 P.3d 384 (2008). Fondò che legislazione che esclude coppie di stesso-sesso da matrimonio legale violò (prima facie): (un) il loro diritto essenziale per sposarsi, un aspetto del diritto di riserbo; e (b) il loro diritto per uguagliare protezione basata su orientamento sessuale, una classificazione di persona sospetta di ‘'. Sottopose la legislazione a ‘scrutinio severo ' e fondò che non era ‘' necessario ad ulteriore un ‘che obbliga interesse costituzionale ', anche se coppie di stesso-sesso potessero acquisire quasi tutti i diritti ed obblighi allegati a matrimonio con legge di California per un “associazione nazionale.”
10 ottobre 2008 il Connecticut Corte Suprema si confece con la Corte di California in Kerrigan c. Commissario di Salute Pubblica, 957 A.2d 407 (2008).
3 aprile 2009 in Varnum c. Brien, 763 N.W.2d 862 (2009), l'Iowa che Corte Suprema si è confatta con le decisioni in Massachusetts, California e Connecticut:
“[Il matrimonio di C]ivil con una persona del sesso opposto è come unappealing ad una persona gaia o lesbia come matrimonio civile con una persona dello stesso sesso è ad un eterosessuale. Così, il diritto di una persona gaia o lesbia... entrare solamente in un matrimonio civile con una persona del sesso opposto è nessuno corretto affatto. ... Governo statale può fare esprimere nessuno prospettive religiose, direttamente o indirettamente per la sua legislazione. ... Questo... è l'essenza della separazione di chiesa e stato. ... [Il matrimonio di C]ivil deve essere judged sotto i nostri standard costituzionali di protezione uguale e non sotto dottrine religiose o le prospettive religiose di individui... [O]ur principi costituzionali... richieda che lo stato riconosca opposto-sesso e matrimonio civile di stesso-sesso.”
In 5 maggio il Tribunale di Supremo del 2011 Brasile Federale (STF) interpretò la Costituzione del Brasile siccome richiedendo che esistendo riconoscimento legale di ‘unioni stabili ' (la convivenza fuori di matrimonio) includa coppie di stesso-sesso. 25 ottobre il de di Tribunale Superiore di 2011 Brasile Justiça (STJ) rigato in Recurso Especial n. 1.183.378/RS che, nell'assenza di una proibizione espressa (come opposto ad auorizzazione) due donne potrebbero convertire il loro ‘unione stabile ' in un matrimonio di matrimonio di stesso-sesso in legge brasiliana, sotto Articolo 1726 del Codice civile (“Un'unione stabile può essere convertita in un matrimonio alla richiesta dei partner di fronte ad un giudice e registrazione seguente nella Cancelleria Civile”). In 14 maggio 2013, appellandosi sulle decisioni del STF ed il STJ, il Conselho il de di Nacional Justiça (CNJ che regola l'ordinamento giudiziario ma non si è una corte, Resolução N.ro 175) ordinò tutti gli ufficiali pubblici autorizzarono a sposarsi coppie, o convertire ‘unioni stabili ' in matrimoni, fare così per coppie di stesso-sesso. Una richiesta costituzionale alla decisione del CNJ del Partido Cristão Sociale è stato pendente nel STF fin da 7 giugno 2013: Ação il de di Direta Inconstitucionalidade (ADI) 4966. Sembra probabile che i STF gireranno il ragionamento del STJ ed il CNJ.
26 luglio la Corte Costituzionale di 2011 Colombia “esortò” il Congresso della Colombia per legiferare fornire a coppie di stesso-sesso gli stessi diritti come coppie di diverso-sesso sposate. Congresso rifiutò di fare così, provocando la via di ricorso di contumacia della Corte da 20 giugno 2013: coppie di stesso-sesso hanno diritto a sembrare di fronte ad un notaio o giudice a “formalizzi e solennizzi il loro collegamento contrattuale.”
5 dicembre la Corte Suprema di 2012 Messico decise che tre stesso sesso accoppia nello stato di Oaxaca aveva diritto sotto la costituzione federale a sposarsi.
19 dicembre 2013 in Griego c. Oliver, 316 P.3d 865 (2013), il Messico Nuovo Corte Suprema succedè corte suprema per richiedere accesso uguale a matrimonio per coppie di stesso-sesso il quinto stato:
“Noi concludiamo che il fine di diritti matrimoniali di Messico Nuovi è portare la stabilità ed ordinare alla relazione legale di coppie impegnate con definendo i loro diritti e le responsabilità come all'un l'altro, i loro figli se loro scelgono di allevare insieme figli, e la loro proprietà. Proibendo matrimoni di stesso-genere non è riferito sostanzialmente agli interessi governativi avanzati... o ai fini noi abbiamo identificato. Eccetto individui da sposandosi e spogliarli solamente dei diritti, protezioni, e le responsabilità di matrimonio civile a causa del loro orientamento sessuale la Protezione Clausola Uguale viola perciò,... della Costituzione di Messico Nuova. ... [T]he State del Messico Nuovo è costretto costituzionalmente a permettere coppie di stesso-genere di sposarsi e deve prolungare a loro i diritti, protezioni, e le responsabilità che derivano da matrimonio civile sotto legge di Messico Nuova.”
136. Come riguardi corti supreme e nazionali in Europa, benché nessuna corte abbia interpretato ancora la sua costituzione nazionale siccome proibendo l'esclusione di coppie di stesso-sesso da matrimonio legale, o richiedendo alternativa vuole dire di riconoscimento legale, 9 luglio 2009 due dei cinque giudici del Tribunale del Portogallo Constitucional dissentì dalla decisione della maggioranza di sostenere l'esclusione. 2 luglio 2009, la Corte Costituzionale di Slovenia sostenne in Blažic & Kern c. la Slovenia (U-io-425/06-10) che stesso-sesso registrò partner devono essere accordati gli stessi diritti di eredità come consorti di diverso-sesso. 7 luglio 2009 la Corte Costituzionale Federale di Germania sostenne, (1 BvR 1164/07) che stesso-sesso registrò partner e consorti di diverso-sesso devono essere accordati le pensioni dello stesso superstite. E, da 22 settembre 2011, la Corte Costituzionale di Austria emette cinque decisioni che trovano che (lo stesso-sesso) partner registrati devono avere gli stessi diritti come (il diverso-sesso) coppie sposate.
137. Quegli intervenendo inoltre notò che la Riunione Parlamentare del CoE (il Ritmo) ha raccomandato: (un) che membro gli Stati “faccia una rassegna le loro politiche nel campo di diritti sociali e protezione di emigranti... assicurare che partnership[s dell'omosessuale] e famiglie sono trattate sulla stessa base come associazioni eterosessuali e famiglie” (Raccomandazione 1470 (2000)); e (b) che loro “adotti legislazione che fa disposizione per registrato [lo stesso-sesso] le associazioni.” Il Parlamento europeo dell'EU prima mandato a chiamare uguaglianza di trattamento di diverso-sesso e stesso-sesso accoppia in una decisione del 1994 che cerca di terminare “lo sbarrare di [lo stesso-sesso] coppie da matrimonio o da una struttura legale ed equivalente.”
138. Nel 2004, il Consiglio dell'EU corresse le Personale Regolamentazioni per prevedere per benefici per i partner non-maritali degli ufficiali di EU:
“associazione non-maritale sarà trattata come matrimonio previde che... la coppia produce un documento legale riconosciuto come simile con un Stato membro... dando credito al loro status come partner non-maritali,... [e]... non ha accesso a matrimonio legale in un Stato membro.”
139. Nel 2008, il Comitato del CoE di Ministri infine concordò, quel:
“Un membro di personale che è registrato come un partner non-maritale e stabile non sarà discriminato contro, con riguardo ad a pensioni, permesso ed assegni sotto le Personale Regolamentazioni..., vis-à-vis un membro di personale sposato previde che...: (i.) la coppia produce un documento legale riconosciuto come simile con un stato membro... dando credito al loro status come partner non-maritali;... (c.) la coppia non ha accesso a matrimonio legale in un stato membro.”
(?) La discriminazione
140. Quelli che intervengono considerato che, presumendo anche che la Convenzione non richiese ancora accesso uguale a matrimonio legale per stesso-sesso accoppia, era (almeno) la discriminazione indiretta basò su orientamento sessuale per limitare i particolari diritti o benefici a coppie di diverso-sesso sposate, ma non offre mezzi per coppie di stesso-sesso per qualificare. Riferendosi a Thlimmenos c. Grecia e D.H. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca ([GC], n. 57325/00, ECHR 2007 IV), loro considerarono che insuccesso per trattare stesso-sesso accoppia differentemente a causa della loro incapacità legale per sposarsi, con offrendoli con alternativa vuole dire di qualificare per il diritto o trae profitto, richiesto una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole. Loro notarono che la discriminazione indiretta, come definito in Consiglio Direttiva 2000/78/EC, Art. 2(2)(b), accade quando “un evidentemente neutrale... criterio... metterebbe persone che hanno un... particolare orientamento sessuale ad un particolare svantaggio comparato con le altre persone a meno che [sé] è giustificato obiettivamente con un scopo legittimo ed i mezzi di realizzare che scopo è appropriato e necessario.” Nella loro prospettiva, evitare la discriminazione indiretta contro stesso-sesso accoppia, governi devono accordarli un'esenzione da un requisito che loro si sposino giuridicamente per qualificare per particolari diritti o benefici. Questo volle dire, per esempio che un datore di lavoro di pubblico-settore o schema di pensione potrebbe mantenere un requisito di matrimonio per diverso-sesso accoppia (nel momento in cui l'articolo su condanne di crimine potrebbe essere sostenuto in Thlimmenos), ma deve esentare stesso-sesso accoppia e trova dell'alternativa vuole dire per loro per qualificare (esempio, un'unione civile o certificato di associazione registrato, una dichiarazione giurata, o l'altra prova di una relazione impegnata).
141. In Christine Goodwin (citò sopra), la Grande Camera costrinse il membro di CoE Stati a riconoscere giuridicamente riassegnamento di genere, ma sinistra i dettagli di riconoscimento ad ogni Stato membro. Similmente, un obbligo per esentare coppie di stesso-sesso da un requisito di matrimonio, evitare la discriminazione indiretta lascerebbe a membro Stati che la scelta del metodo faceva così. Un Stato membro troverebbe almeno cinque scelte all'interno del suo margine della valutazione: (1) potrebbe accordare coppie di stesso-sesso che potrebbero provare l'esistenza della loro relazione per un periodo ragionevole un'esenzione permanente dal requisito di matrimonio; (2) potrebbe accordare la stessa esenzione a diverso-sesso non sposato accoppia; (3) potrebbe accordare un'esenzione provvisoria a stesso-sesso accoppia finché aveva creato un sistema di registrazione alternativo, con un nome altro che il matrimonio, concedendo che stesso-sesso, accoppia qualificare; (4) potrebbe accordare accesso allo stesso sistema a sesso diverso accoppia; o (5) se non augurasse accordare il diritto o trarre profitto a coppie non sposate, o potrebbe accordare un'esenzione provvisoria a stesso-sesso per creare un sistema di registrazione alternativo, accoppia finché aveva avuto tempo per varare una legge che li accorda accesso uguale a matrimonio legale. Potrebbe decidere anche (soggetto a soprintendenza di ECtHR susseguente) se qualsiasi eccezioni potrebbero essere giustificate, per esempio relativo a diritto parentale.
142. Il principio che requisiti di matrimonio discriminano indirettamente contro coppie di stesso-sesso fu affermato concisamente col rapporto legale su homophobia pubblicato con l'AGENZIA dell'Unione europea per Diritti essenziali a giugno 2008. Il rapporto concluse (a pp. 58-59, enfasi aggiunse) che “qualsiasi misure che negano a benefici di coppie di stesso-sesso... disponibile ad opposto-sesso coppie si sposarono, dove non è aperto a coppie di stesso-sesso matrimonio, dovrebbe essere trattato presuntivamente come una forma della discriminazione indiretta sui motivi di orientamento sessuale”, e che “legge di diritti umani internazionale completa la legge di EU, con richiedendo che coppie di stesso-sesso o hanno accesso ad un'istituzione come... associazione registrata [,] quel li offrirebbe con gli stessi vantaggi... [come] il matrimonio, o... che le loro relazioni durevoli e de facto prolungano [] simile vantaggi a loro.” Secondo Avvocato General Jääskinen della Corte di giustizia dell'Unione europea, nella sua opinione di 15 luglio 2010 in Causa C-147/08, Römer c. l'und di Freie Hansestadt Amburgo:
“(§ 76) è il [EU] il Membro Stati che devono decidere se o non il loro ordine legale e nazionale concede qualsiasi forma di unione legale disponibile a coppie di omosessuale, o se o non l'istituzione di matrimonio è solamente per coppie del sesso opposto. Nella mia prospettiva, una situazione nella quale non concede un Stato membro qualsiasi forma di unione giuridicamente riconosciuta disponibile a persone dello stesso sesso può essere considerato praticando la discriminazione sulla base di orientamento sessuale, perché è possibile derivare dal principio dell'uguaglianza, insieme col dovere di rispettare la dignità umana di omosessuali un obbligo per riconoscere il loro diritto per condurre una relazione stabile all'interno di un impegno giuridicamente riconosciuto. Nella mia prospettiva, questo problema che concerne legislazione su status maritale giace comunque, fuori della sfera dell'attività di [EU] la legge.”
Quegli intervenendo contese che la discriminazione potenziale notò con la pelle di Generale di Difensore fuori della sfera della legge di EU, ma incorse ad angolo retto all'interno della sfera della Convenzione che fa domanda ad ogni legislazione del membro di CoE Stati incluso nell'area di diritto di famiglia.
143. Quelli che intervengono celebre che secondo la giurisprudenzadella Corte differenzia in trattamento basato su orientamento sessuale era analogo per differenziare in trattamento basò su razza, religione e sesso, e potrebbe essere giustificato solamente con ragioni particolarmente serie. Questo era attinente per i fini della proporzionalità esamini in che “si deve mostrare anche che era necessario per realizzare che scopo per escludere... persone che vivono in una relazione di omosessuale...” (vedere Karner c. l'Austria, n. 40016/98, § 41 ECHR 2003 IX) La Corte non trovò nessuna prova della necessità dove c'era una differenza di trattamento fra diverso-sesso non sposato accoppia e coppie di stesso-sesso non sposate. Quelli che intervengono considerato che la prova di necessità dovrebbe essere fatta domanda anche al prima facie la discriminazione indiretta creò con un requisito di matrimonio evidentemente neutrale. Tale requisito non riuscito a trattare stesso-sesso accoppia che è giuridicamente incapace per sposarsi differentemente da coppie di diverso-sesso che erano giuridicamente in grado sposarsi ma avevano trascurato fare così, o aveva scelto di non fare così (a causa di una decisione con uno o ambo partner). La Corte sta ragionando in Vallianatos (citò sopra, § 85) riguardo all'onere della prova che è sul Governo, mutatis mutandis anche fatto domanda alla causa presente.
(l'ii) Associazione Radicale Certi Diritti (ARCD)
144. L'ARCD presentò che un esame eseguì (fra italiani invecchiato fra il 18 ed il 74) in 2011 dell'ISTAT (istituto italiano per statistiche) fondi siccome segue: 61.3% pensarono che omosessuali furono discriminati contro o discriminarono severamente contro; 74.8% pensarono che l'omosessualità non era una minaccia alla famiglia; 65.8% si dichiararono in conformità col contenuto della frase “è possibile amare una persona di un sesso diverso o lo stesso sesso, amore è che che è importante”; 62.8% di quelli rispondendo all'esame si confece con la frase “è equo ed equo per una coppia di omosessuale che vive come se loro si sposarono per avere di fronte alla legge gli stessi diritti come una coppia eterosessuale e sposata”; 40.3% degli uno milione di omosessuali o ermafroditi che vivono in Italia centrale li dichiararono per essere stati discriminati contro; i 40.3% aumenti a 53.7% se la discriminazione chiaramente basasse su omosessuale od orientamento bisessuale è aggiunto in relazione alla ricerca per appartamenti (10.2%), le loro relazioni con vicini di casa (14.3%), le loro necessità nel settore medico (10.2%) o in relazioni in con altri in posti pubblici, uffici o su trasporto pubblico (12.4%).
145. Quegli intervenendo presentò che datare un partner di stesso-sesso era “riconobbe” in legislazione scritto solamente in cause limitate, vale a dire:
Articolo che 14 quartiere ed Articolo 18 delle regolamentazioni di prigione per i quali conviventes hanno diritto a visitare la persona hanno incarcerato;
Legge n. 91/99 riguardo a donazione di organo, dove il partner che più uxorio devono essere informati della natura e circostanze che circondano l'allontanamento dell'organo. Loro hanno diritto anche ad obiettare a tale procedura;
Articolo 199 (3) (un) del Codice di Diritto processuale penale riguardo al diritto per non testimoniare contro un partner;
Articolo 681 del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale che riguarda perdono presidenziale che può essere firmato con un convivente;
Circolare n. 8996 emessi col Ministro italiano per l'Interno di 26 ottobre 2012 che aveva come le sue unioni di stesso-sesso di oggetto e permessi di soggiorno in collegamento con decreto legislativo n. 30/2007;
L'inclusione nel piano assicurativo medico dei partner di abili parlamentari di omosessuale;
146. In questo collegamento giudici nazionali fecero le varie dichiarazioni, vale a dire:
Sentenza n. 404/88 della Corte Costituzionale che fondò che era incostituzionale per sfrattare un partner sopravvivente che coabita da una proprietà affittata. Con vuole dire della sentenza della Corte di Cassazione n. 5544/94 questo diritto fu prolungato a coppie di stesso-sesso che vivono più uxorio; (vedere anche sentenza della Corte di Cassazione n. 33305/02 riguardo a diritti per chiamare in giudizio come una parte civile per danno civile);
Ordinanza n. 25661/10 della Corte di Cassazione di 17 dicembre 2010 che fondò che il diritto di entrata [a territorio italiano] e sospende per i fini di riunificazione di famiglia con un cittadino italiano è regolato solamente con che indica la direzione di EU.
Sentenza n. 1328/11 della Corte di Cassazione che sostenne che la nozione di “il consorte” deve essere capito secondo il regime giudiziale dove il matrimonio fu celebrato. Così, un straniero che si sposa un cittadino di EU in Spagna deve essere considerato relativo per i fini della loro sospensione in Italia;
Sentenza n. 9965/11 del Tribunale di Milano (per prima l'istanza) di 13 giugno 2011 quale riconobbe il diritto di un partner di omosessuale a risarcimento che segue la perdita subito facendo seguito alla morte del partner in un incidente di traffico;
Sentenza n. 7176/12 della Corte d'appello di Milano, Operi Sezione, (menzionò sopra) quale inveterato che un partner di stesso-sesso aveva il diritto per essere coperto sotto l'assicurazione medica del partner impiegato.
147. L'ARCD si riferì inoltre all'importanza delle sentenze in sentenze N. 138/10 e 4184/12 (per sia, vedere diritto nazionale Attinente sopra) così come quelli nel Tribunale dell'ordinanza di Reggio Emilia di 13 febbraio 2012. Queste decisioni andarono a provare che la giurisprudenza italiana aveva assimilato le nozioni attinenti, ed il ragionamento meticoloso delle decisioni (particolarmente che della Corte di Cassazione, n. 4184/12) sinistro nessuna stanza per futuro U-gira la questione.
148. In conclusione, l'ARCD notò, che determinato che la Corte aveva stabilito che coppie di stesso-sesso avevano la stessa protezione sotto Articolo 8 come coppie di diverso-sesso faceva, il riconoscimento del loro diritto a qualche genere di un'unione era desiderabile per assicurare simile protezione.
(l'iii) Centre europeo per Legge e la Giustizia (ECLJ)
149. L'ECLJ temè che se la Corte stabilisse che coppie di stesso-sesso avevano un diritto a riconoscimento nella forma di un'unione civile, il prossimo problema sarebbe che diritti per allegare a tale unione, in particolare nel collegamento con procreazione. Loro notarono che in Vallianatos la Corte non aveva stabilito tale obbligo, ma aveva considerato solamente che prevedere per simile unioni per coppie eterosessuali ma non per coppie di stesso-sesso generò la discriminazione. Seguì che la Corte non potesse trovare una violazione nella causa presente.
150. In prospettiva loro, Articolo 8 non obbligò Stati ad offrire una struttura legale oltre che di matrimonio per salvaguardare la vita di famiglia. Loro considerarono che la vita di famiglia essenzialmente concernè le relazioni fra figli ed i loro genitori. Loro notarono che di fronte alla sentenza in Schalk e Kopf la Corte considerava che nell'assenza di matrimonio era solamente l'esistenza di un figlio nella quale portò giochi il concetto di famiglia (loro si riferirono a Johnston ed Altri c. Irlanda, 18 dicembre 1986 la Serie Un n. 112, ed Elsholz c. la Germania [GC], n. 25735/94, ECHR 2000 VIII). Questo era in linea con strumenti internazionali e la Convenzione. Loro considerarono che qualsiasi riconoscimento dato ad una coppia con società dipese sul contributo della coppia al terreno di proprietà comune buono per fondando una famiglia, e definitivamente non sulla base che la coppia aveva l'un per l'altro i sentimenti, che essendo una questione che concerne solamente la vita privata.
151. Il Centre, intervenendo celebre che Articolo 8 § 2 limiti di set sulla protezione della vita di famiglia dello Stato. Simile limiti giustificarono il rifiuto dello Stato per riconoscere le certe famiglie, come uni poligami o incestuosi. Nella loro prospettiva, Articolo 8 non offrì un obbligo per dare coppie non-sposate un status equivalente ad uni sposati. Questa era una questione per essere regolata con gli Stati e non la Convenzione. Né poteva gli Stati il beneplacito di ' sia presunto tramite l'adozione del Comitato del CoE di raccomandazione di Ministri (2010)5. Durante il lavoro preparatorio del perpetrazione di esperti e relatori sul testo menzionato gli Stati rifiutarono di raccomandare l'adozione di una struttura legale per coppie non-sposate secondo l'ECLJ, mentre infine stabilendo per un testo che legge siccome segue:
“25. Dove legislazione nazionale non riconosce né conferisce diritti od obblighi su associazioni di stesso-sesso registrate e coppie non sposate, stati membro sono invitati per considerare la possibilità di prevedere, senza la discriminazione di qualsiasi il genere, incluso contro coppie di sesso diverse, stesso-sesso accoppia con legale o altro vuole dire rivolgere i problemi pratici riferiti alla realtà sociale nella quale loro vivono.”
152. ECLJ considerò che benché la Corte dovesse interpretare la Convenzione come un strumento vivente, non poteva sostituirlo, come sé il riferimento principale rimase. Altrimenti, la Corte si trasformerebbe in un strumento di actualisation ideologico sulla base di legislazioni nazionali, in questioni riferite a società-un ruolo che certamente non incorse all'interno della sua competenza. Gli intervener interrogarono se era prudente e rispettoso del principio di sussidiarietà per la Corte supervisionare se stati stavano aggiornando legislazione secondo evolvendo dogane e morale (il moeurs), siccome interpretato con una maggioranza di giudici. Questi fabbricherebbero meno la protezione di persona a carico di diritti umani sulla Convenzione ed i suoi protocolli e più sulla composizione della Corte (siccome attestato col disdegni (10-7) maggioranza in X ed Altri c. l'Austria [GC], n. 19010/07, ECHR 2013). Loro considerarono perciò che la Corte non dovrebbe usurpare il ruolo degli Stati, specialmente dato che i secondi erano gratis per aggiungere un protocollo supplementare alla Convenzione li aveva desiderato regolare orientamento sessuale (siccome era fatto per abolire la pena di morte).
153. L'ECLJ interrogò perché l'omosessualità era più accettabile della poligamia. Loro considerarono che se il legislatore dovesse prendere conto di una società che evolve, doveva poi legiferare anche in favore di poligamia e matrimonio di figlio, addirittura più così dato che in molti paesi (come Turchia, Svizzera, Belgio ed il Regno Unito), là stava praticando più musulmani che coppie di stesso-sesso.
154. Loro si riferirono inoltre alle situazioni comparative degli Stati (discusse sopra), ed aggiunse che referendums in favore di unioni civili erano stati respinti con la maggioranza di elettori in Slovenia e l'Irlanda Settentrionale.
155. Loro considerarono che se la Corte dovesse considerare che un obbligo per facilitare la vita comune di coppie di stesso-sesso sorse da Articolo 8 della Convenzione, tale obbligo avrebbe bisogno di poi riferire solamente alle specifiche necessità di simile coppie e di società, concedendo lo Stato un margine della valutazione, ed in prospettiva loro lo Stato italiano aveva adempiuto che il dovere di protezione per atti giudiziali o contrattuali (come principalmente spiegò col Governo). Inoltre, loro considerarono che proteggendo la famiglia nel suo senso tradizionale costituì un scopo legittimo che giustifica una differenza in trattamento (loro si riferirono a X ed Altri, citato sopra). Loro considerarono che poiché nessun obbligo sorse dalla Convenzione, né era un diritto garantito con lo Stato che incorse all'interno dell'ambito della Convenzione là, non c'era stanza per un margine della valutazione.
156. Come discriminazione di riguardi, l'ECLJ considerò, che coppie di stesso-sesso e coppie di diverso-sesso non erano in situazioni identiche o simili, poiché i precedenti non potevano procreare naturalmente. La differenza non era nessuno di orientamento sessuale ma dell'identità sessuale, basò su cause biologiche ed obiettive, non c'era così stanza per giustificare una differenza in trattamento. Loro considerarono che gli Stati avevano un interesse nel proteggere figli, la loro nascita ed il loro benessere, siccome loro erano il terreno di proprietà comune buono di genitori e società. Se figli fermassero di essere al cuore della famiglia, poi sarebbe solamente il concetto di relazioni di interpersonal che si sosterrebbero-una nozione completamente individualistica.
157. Loro disapprovarono delle sentenze della Corte in Schalk e Kopf (§ 94), chiedendo che loro erano sentenze di un politico non una natura giuridica che escluse figli dall'essere l'essenza della vita di famiglia. Anche peggio, in Vallianatos (§ 49), la Grande Camera considerò che la convivenza non addirittura era necessaria per costituire la vita di famiglia. Loro si chiesero anche se la stabilità di una relazione era un criterio pertinente (l'ibid., § 73). In questa luce loro interrogarono che che costituì la vita di famiglia, determinato che non richiese più un impegno pubblico, o la presenza di figli, o la convivenza. Sembrò così che l'esistenza dei sentimenti era abbastanza per stabilire la vita di famiglia. In prospettiva loro, i sentimenti potrebbero giocare solamente comunque, una parte nella vita privata, ma non nella vita di famiglia. Seguì che non c'era nessuna definizione obiettiva della vita di famiglia. Questa perdita di definizione fu riaffermata inoltre in Carico c. il Regno Unito ([GC], n. 13378/05, ECHR 2008), e Stübing c. la Germania (n. 43547/08, 12 aprile 2012).
158. L'ECLJ presentò che il rifiuto per considerare su un appiglio uguale una famiglia maritale ed una relazione di omosessuale stabile fu giustificata sulla base delle conseguenze connessa a procreazione e filiazione, così come la relazione fra società e lo Stato. Nella loro prospettiva, considerarli come comparabile vorrebbe dire, che tutti i diritti applicabile a coppie sposate farebbe domanda anche a loro, incluso quelli riferiti a problemi parentali dato che sarebbe illusorio per concederloro sposarsi ma non fondare una famiglia. Intenderebbe accettando perciò procreazione medicalmente assistita per coppie femmina e surrogacy per coppie di maschio, con le conseguenze questo avrebbe per i figli così concepì. Come riguardi la relazione con lo Stato, loro notarono che un Stato che vuole definire “la famiglia” sarebbe un stato totalitario. Nella loro prospettiva, gli estensori della Convenzione vollero effettivamente, salvaguardare la famiglia dalle azioni dello Stato, e non permette allo Stato di definire il concetto di famiglia, secondo la prospettiva della maggioranza di sé-quale fu basato su una prospettiva che era l'individuo e non la famiglia che era al centro di società.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Articolo 8
(i) principi Generali.
159. Mentre l'oggetto essenziale di Articolo 8 è proteggere individui contro interferenza arbitraria con autorità pubbliche, può imporre anche su un Stato i certi obblighi positivi per assicurare riguardo effettivo per i diritti proteggè con Articolo 8 (vedere, fra le altre autorità, X e Y c. i Paesi Bassi, 26 marzo 1985, § 23 la Serie Un n. 91; Maumousseau e Washington c. la Francia, n. 39388/05, § 83 6 dicembre 2007; Söderman c. la Svezia [GC], n. 5786/08, § 78 ECHR 2013; e Hämäläinen c. la Finlandia [GC], n. 37359/09, § 62 ECHR 2014). Questi obblighi possono coinvolgere l'adozione di misure progettò per garantire riguardo per privato o la vita di famiglia anche nella sfera delle relazioni di individui fra loro (vedere, inter alia, S.H. ed Altri c. l'Austria [GC], n. 57813/00, § 87, ECHR 2011, e Söderman citato sopra, § 78).
160. I principi applicabile a valutando gli obblighi positivi e negativi di un Stato sotto la Convenzione è simile. Riguardo a deve essere avuto all'equilibrio equo che doveva essere previsto fra gli interessi che competono dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme, gli scopi nel secondo paragrafo di Articolo 8 essere di una certa attinenza (vedere Gaskin c. il Regno Unito, 7 luglio 1989, § 42 la Serie Un n. 160, e Roche c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 32555/96, § 157 ECHR 2005 X).
161. La nozione di “il riguardo” non è chiaro, specialmente come lontano siccome concernono obblighi positivi: avendo riguardo ad alla diversità delle pratiche seguita e le situazioni che ottengono negli Stati Contraenti, i requisiti della nozione varieranno notevolmente da causa a causa (vedere Christine Goodwin c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 28957/95, § 72 ECHR 2002 VI). Nondimeno, i certi fattori sono stati considerati attinenti per la valutazione del contenuto di quegli obblighi positivi sugli Stati (vedere Hämäläinen, citato sopra, § 66). Di attinenza alla causa presente l'impatto è su un richiedente di una situazione dove c'è discordanza fra la realtà sociale e la legge, la coesione degli amministrativi e pratiche legali all'interno del sistema nazionale che è considerato un importante fattore nella valutazione eseguito sotto Articolo 8 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Christine Goodwin citato sopra, §§ 77-78; io. c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 25680/94, § 58, 11 luglio 2002, e Hämäläinen citato sopra, § 66). Gli altri fattori riferiscono all'impatto dell'obbligo positivo ed allegato in pericolo sullo Stato riguardato. La questione qui è se l'obbligo allegato è stretto e preciso o largo ed indeterminato (vedere Botta c. l'Italia, 24 febbraio 1998, § 35 Relazioni 1998 io) o della misura di qualsiasi il carico l'obbligo imporrebbe sullo Stato (vedere Christine Goodwin, citato sopra, §§ 86-88).
162. Nell'implementare il loro obbligo positivo sotto Articolo 8 gli Stati goda un certo margine della valutazione. Un numero di fattori deve essere preso in considerazione quando determinando la larghezza di quel il margine. Nel contesto di “la vita privata” la Corte ha considerato che dove è in pericolo il margine concesso allo Stato una sfaccettatura particolarmente importante dell'esistenza di un individuo o l'identità sarà restretto (vedere, per esempio, X e Y, citato sopra, §§ 24 e 27; Christine Goodwin, citato sopra, § 90; vedere anche Bello c. il Regno Unito, n. 2346/02, § 71 ECHR 2002 III). Comunque, dove non c'è consentimento all'interno del membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa, o come all'importanza relativa dell'interesse in pericolo o come al meglio vuole dire di proteggerlo, particolarmente dove la causa solleva problemi morali o etici e sensibili, il margine sarà più ampio (vedere X, Y e Z c. il Regno Unito, 22 aprile 1997, § 44 Relazioni 1997-II; Fretté c. la Francia, n. 36515/97, § 41 ECHR 2002-io; e Christine Goodwin, citato sopra, § 85). Ci sarà anche di solito un margine ampio se lo Stato è costretto a prevedere un equilibrio fra competendo interessi privati e pubblici o diritti di Convenzione (vedere Fretté, citato sopra, § 42; Odièvre c. la Francia [GC], n. 42326/98, §§ 44 49 ECHR 2003 III; Evans c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 6339/05, § 77 ECHR 2007 io; Dickson c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 44362/04, § 78 ECHR 2007 V; e S.H. ed Altri, citato sopra, § 94).
(l'ii) la Recente giurisprudenza attinente e la sfera della causa presente
163. La Corte già è stata affrontata con azioni di reclamo riguardo alla mancanza di riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso. Comunque, nella più recente causa di Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria, quando la Corte consegnò sentenza i richiedenti già avevano ottenuto l'opportunità di entrare in un'associazione registrata. La Corte doveva determinare solamente così, se lo Stato rispondente avrebbe dovuto fornire ai richiedenti un'alternativa vuole dire di riconoscimento legale della loro associazione qualsiasi più primo di sé (quel è, di fronte a 1 gennaio 2010). Avendo notato il rapidamente consentimento europeo ed in sviluppo che era emerso di decade precedente, ma che non c'era ancora una maggioranza di Stati che prevedono per riconoscimento legale di coppie di stesso-sesso (al tempo diciannove stati), la Corte considerò l'area in oggetto essere uno di evolvere diritti senza consentimento stabilito, dove Stati goderono un margine della valutazione nel tempismo dell'introduzione di cambi legislativi (§ 105). Così, la Corte concluse che, sebbene non nell'avanguardia, il legislatore austriaco non poteva essere rimproverato per non avere introdotto l'Associazione Atto Registrato qualsiasi più primo che 2010 (vedere ibid., § 106). In che causa che la Corte ha fondato anche che Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8 non impose un obbligo sugli Stati Contraenti per accordare stesso-sesso accoppia accesso a matrimonio (l'ibid, § 101).
164. la Presente causa i richiedenti ancora non abbia nessuna opportunità di entrare in un'unione civile o associazione registrata oggi (nell'assenza di matrimonio) in Italia. È così per la Corte per determinare se Italia, alla data dell'analisi della Corte vale a dire nel 2015, non riuscì ad attenersi con un obbligo positivo per assicurare riguardo per i richiedenti ' privato e la vita di famiglia, in particolare per la disposizione di una struttura legale che li concede avere la loro relazione riconobbe e proteggè sotto diritto nazionale.
(l'iii) la Richiesta dei principi generali alla causa presente
165. La Corte reitera che già ha contenuto che coppie di stesso-sesso sono nel momento in cui capace come coppie di diverso-sesso di entrare in stalla, relazioni impegnate e che loro sono in un modo pertinente situazione simile ad una coppia di diverso-sesso come riguardi il loro bisogno per riconoscimento legale e protezione della loro relazione (vedere Schalk e Kopf, § 99, e Vallianatos, §§ 78 e 81, sia citò sopra). Segue che la Corte già ha ammesso che coppie di stesso-sesso sono in bisogno di riconoscimento legale e protezione della loro relazione.
166. Che stesso bisogno, così come la volontà per prevedere per sé, è stato espresso con la Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio di Europa che raccomandò che il Comitato di chiamata di Ministri su membro Stati, fra le altre cose “adottare legislazione che costituisce disposizione associazioni registrate” lungo come quindici anni fa, e più recentemente col Comitato di Ministri (nella sua Raccomandazione CM/Rec(2010)5) quale invitò membro Stati, dove legislazione nazionale non riconobbe né conferì diritti od obblighi su associazioni di stesso-sesso registrate, considerare la possibilità di offrire coppie di stesso-sesso con legale o altro vuole dire rivolgere i problemi pratici riferiti alla realtà sociale nella quale loro vivono (vedere divide in paragrafi 57 e 59 sopra).
167. La Corte nota che i richiedenti nella causa presente che è incapace per sposarsi non sono stati capaci di avere accesso ad una specifica struttura legale (come che per unioni civili o associazioni registrate) capace di offrendoli col riconoscimento del loro status e garantire a loro i certi diritti attinente ad una coppia in una relazione stabile ed impegnata.
168. Le prese di Corte notano dei richiedenti la situazione di ' all'interno del sistema nazionale italiano. Come registrazione di riguardi dei richiedenti unioni di stesso-sesso di ' col “registri locali per unioni civili”, la Corte nota che dove è possibile questo (quel è in meno di 2% di municipi esistenti) questa azione ha valore soltanto simbolico e è attinente per fini statistici; non conferisce sui richiedenti qualsiasi status civile ed ufficiale, e con nessuno mezzi conferisce qualsiasi diritti su coppie di stesso-sesso. È anche privo di qualsiasi il valore probatorio (di un'unione stabile) di fronte alle corti nazionali (vedere paragrafo 115 sopra).
169. I richiedenti ' status corrente nel contesto legale e nazionale può essere considerato solamente un “de facto” unione che può essere regolata coi certi accordi contrattuali privati di sfera limitata. Come riguardi gli accordi di convivenza menzionati, la Corte nota che mentre prevedendo per delle disposizioni nazionali in relazione alla convivenza (vedere divide in paragrafi 41 e 129 sopra) accordi così privati vanno a vuoto a prevedere per delle necessità di base che sono fondamentali alla regolamentazione di una relazione fra una coppia in una relazione stabile ed impegnata, come, inter alia, i diritti reciproci ed obblighi che loro hanno verso l'un l'altro, incluso morale ed appoggio di materiale, obblighi di mantenimento e diritti di eredità (compari Vallianatos, § 81 in multa e Schalk e Kopf, § 109 sia citò sopra). Il fatto che lo scopo di simile contratti non è che del riconoscimento e protezione della coppia è evidente dal fatto che loro sono aperti a chiunque coabitando, irrispettoso di se loro sono una coppia in una relazione stabile ed impegnata (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra). Inoltre, tale contratto costringe le persone a stare coabitando; la Corte già ha accettato comunque, che l'esistenza di un'unione stabile è indipendente dalla convivenza (vedere Vallianatos, §§ 49 e 73). Effettivamente, nel mondo globalizzato di oggi le varie coppie, si sposò o in un'associazione registrata, esperimenti periodi durante i quali loro conducono la loro relazione a distanza lunga, mentre avendo bisogno di mantenere residenza in paesi diversi, per professionale o le altre ragioni. La Corte considera che che fatto non ha in se stesso nascendo sull'esistenza di una relazione impegnata e stabile ed il bisogno per sé per essere protegguto. Segue che, piuttosto separatamente dal fatto che accordi di convivenza non erano anche disponibili ai richiedenti di fronte a dicembre 2013, simile accordi non possono essere considerati come dare riconoscimento e la protezione richiesta ai richiedenti le unioni di '.
170. Inoltre, non è stato provò che le corti nazionali potessero emettere una dichiarazione di riconoscimento formale, né il Governo ha spiegato che che sarebbe stato le implicazioni di tale dichiarazione (vedere paragrafo 82 sopra). Mentre le corti nazionali hanno sostenuto ripetutamente il bisogno di assicurare protezione per stesse sesso-unioni ed evitare trattamento discriminatorio, attualmente per ricevere simile protezione i richiedenti come con altri nella loro posizione, deve sollevare un numero di riandare problemi con le corti nazionali e possibilmente anche la Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra) a che i richiedenti non hanno accesso diretto (vedere Scoppola c. l'Italia (n. 2) [GC], n. 10249/03, § 70 17 settembre 2009). Dalla giurisprudenzaportata all'attenzione della Corte, traspira, che mentre riconoscimento di certi diritti è stato sostenuto rigorosamente, le altre questioni nel collegamento con unioni di stesso-sesso rimangono incerte, determinato che, siccome reiterato col Governo, le corti fanno sentenze su una base di causa-con-causa. Il Governo ammise anche che protezione di unioni di stesso-sesso ricevette più accettazione nei certi rami che in altri (vedere paragrafo 131 sopra). In questo collegamento è notato anche che il Governo insistentemente l'esercizio il loro diritto per obiettare a simile rivendicazioni (vedere, per esempio, il ricorso contro la decisione del Tribunale di Grosseto) e così loro mostrano il piccolo appoggio per le sentenze sulle quali loro stanno appellandosi col presente.
171. Siccome indicato con l'ARCD la legge prevede esplicitamente per il riconoscimento di un partner di stesso-sesso in circostanze molto limitate (vedere paragrafo 146 sopra). Segue che anche il più regolare di “le necessità” sorgendo nel contesto di una coppia di stesso-sesso deve essere determinato giudizialmente, nelle circostanze incerte menzionate sopra di. Nella prospettiva della Corte, la necessità di riferirsi ripetutamente alle corti nazionali per mandare a chiamare l'uguaglianza di trattamento in riguardo di ogni una della molteplicità di aspetti che concernono i diritti ed i doveri fra una coppia, specialmente in un sistema di giustizia sovraccaricato come quell'in Italia, già importi ad un ostacolo non-insignificante ai richiedenti gli sforzi di ' di ottenere riguardo per loro privato e la vita di famiglia. Questo è aggravato inoltre con un stato dell'incertezza.
172. Segue dal sopra che la protezione disponibile e corrente non solo sta mancando in contenuto, in finora come sé non riesce a prevedere per le necessità di centro attinente ad una coppia in una relazione impegnata e stabile, ma è neanche sufficientemente stabile-è dipendente su convivenza, così come il giudiziale (o qualche volta amministrativo) atteggiamento nel contesto di un paese che non è legato con un sistema di precedente giudiziale (vedere Torri ed Altri c. l'Italia, (il dec.), N. 11838/07 e 12302/07, § 42 24 gennaio 2012). In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che coesione di pratiche amministrative e legali all'interno del sistema nazionale deve essere considerata un importante fattore nella valutazione eseguita sotto Articolo 8 (vedere paragrafo 161 sopra).
173. Nel collegamento coi principi generali menzionato in paragrafo 161 sopra, la Corte osserva, che, segue anche dall'esame sopra del contesto nazionale che là esiste un conflitto fra la realtà sociale dei richiedenti che vivono in gran parte apertamente la loro relazione in Italia e la legge che li dà nessun riconoscimento ufficiale sul territorio. Nella prospettiva della Corte un obbligo per prevedere per il riconoscimento e protezione di unioni di stesso-sesso, e così lasciare spazio alla legge riflettere le realtà dei richiedenti le situazioni di ', non corrisponderebbe a qualsiasi il particolare carico sullo Stato italiano è sé legislativo, amministrativo o altro. Inoltre, simile legislazione notificherebbe un importante bisogno sociale- come osservato con l'ARCD, show di statistica nazionale ed ufficiale che ci sono circa uno milione di omosessuali (o ermafroditi), in Italia centrale da solo.
174. In prospettiva delle considerazioni sopra, la Corte considera, che nell'assenza di matrimonio, coppie di stesso-sesso piacciono, i richiedenti hanno un particolare interesse nell'ottenere la scelta di entrare in una forma di unione civile o associazione registrata, poiché questo sarebbe il modo più appropriato dove loro potrebbero avere la loro relazione riconosciuto giuridicamente e quali li garantirebbero la protezione attinente-nella forma di diritti di centro attinente ad una coppia in una relazione stabile ed impegnata-senza ostacolo non necessario. La Corte già ha sostenuto inoltre, che associazioni così civili hanno un valore intrinseco per persone nei richiedenti ' posiziona, irrispettoso degli effetti legali, comunque stretto o esteso, che loro produrrebbero (vedere Vallianatos, citato sopra, § 81). Questo riconoscimento porterebbe inoltre un senso della legittimità a coppie di stesso-sesso.
175. La Corte reitera che nel valutare gli obblighi positivi di un Stato riguardi deve essere avuto all'equilibrio equo che doveva essere previsto fra gli interessi che competono dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme. Avendo identificato sopra degli individui ' interessa a giochi, la Corte deve procedere pesarli contro gli interessi di comunità.
176. In questo collegamento la Corte nota ciononostante, che il Governo italiano è andato a vuoto ad accentuare esplicitamente che che, nella loro prospettiva, corrispose agli interessi della comunità nell'insieme. Loro considerarono comunque che “tempo necessariamente fu costretto a realizzare una maturazione graduale di una prospettiva comune della comunità nazionale sul riconoscimento di questa forma nuova di famiglia.” Loro assegnarono anche “le sensibilità diverse su tale delicato e profondamente sentì problema sociale” e la ricerca per un “consenso unanime di correnti diverse di pensiero e sentendo, anche di inspirazione religiosa presente in società.” Allo stesso tempo, loro negarono categoricamente, che l'assenza di una specifica struttura legale che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione di unioni di stesso-sesso tentò di proteggere il concetto tradizionale di famiglia, o la morale di società. Il Governo si appellò invece sul loro margine della valutazione nella scelta di tempi e le maniere di una specifica struttura legale, mentre considerando che loro furono messi meglio per valutare i sentimenti della loro comunità.
177. Come riguardi la larghezza del margine della valutazione, la Corte nota che questo è dipendente su vari fattori. Mentre la Corte può accettare che l'argomento della causa presente può essere collegato a problemi morali o etici e sensibili che lasciano spazio ad un margine più ampio della valutazione nell'assenza di consentimento fra membro Stati, nota che la causa presente non concerne con certo specifico “supplementare” (come opposto a centro) diritti che possono o non possono sorgere da tale unione e quale può essere soggetto a controversia fiera nella luce della loro dimensione sensibile. In questo collegamento la Corte già ha sostenuto che Stati godono un certo margine della valutazione come riguardi lo status esatto conferito con alternativa vuole dire di riconoscimento ed i diritti ed obblighi conferiti con tale unione o associazione registrata (vedere Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, §§ 108-09). La causa presente concerne solamente effettivamente, il bisogno generale per riconoscimento legale e la protezione di centro dei richiedenti come coppie di stesso-sesso. La Corte considera il seconda per essere sfaccettature dell'esistenza di un individuo e l'identità alle quali il margine attinente dovrebbe fare domanda.
178. Di attinenza alla considerazione della Corte il movimento è anche verso riconoscimento legale di coppie di stesso-sesso che hanno continuato a sviluppare rapidamente in Europa fin dalla sentenza della Corte in Schalk e Kopf oltre al sopra. Datare una maggioranza sottile dei CoE Stati (ventiquattro fuori di quaranta sette, vedere paragrafo 55 sopra) già ha legiferato in favore di simile riconoscimento e la protezione attinente. Lo stesso sviluppo rapido può essere identificato globalmente, col particolare riferimento a paesi nell'Americas ed Australasia (vedere divide in paragrafi 65 e 135 sopra). Le informazioni disponibile così va a mostrare il movimento internazionale che continua verso riconoscimento legale al quale la Corte non può ma dà dell'importanza (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Christine Goodwin, § 85, e Vallianatos, § 91, sia citò sopra).
179. Rivolgendosi di nuovo alla situazione in Italia, la Corte osserva che mentre il Governo di solito è messo meglio per valutare la comunità interessa, presentecausa che la legislatura italiana sembra non avere dato la particolare importanza alle indicazioni esposto fuori con la comunità nazionale, incluso la popolazione italiana e generale e le autorità giudiziali e più alte in Italia.
180. La Corte nota che in Italia il bisogno di riconoscere e proteggere simile relazioni è stato dato un profilo alto con le autorità giudiziali e più alte, incluso la Corte Costituzionale e la Corte di Cassazione. Riferimento è reso particolarmente alla sentenza della Corte Costituzionale n. 138/10 nei primi due richiedenti la causa di ', le sentenze di che fu reiterato in una serie di sentenze susseguenti di anni seguenti (vedere degli esempi a paragrafo 45 sopra). In simile cause, la Corte Costituzionale, notevolmente e ripetutamente mandò a chiamare un riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri di unioni di omosessuale (vedere, inter l'alia, divida in paragrafi 16 sopra), una misura che potrebbe essere fissata solamente in posto con Parlamento.
181. La Corte osserva che tale espressione riflette i sentimenti di una maggioranza della popolazione italiana, siccome mostrato per esami ufficiali (vedere paragrafo 144 sopra). Le statistiche presentate indicano che c'è fra la popolazione italiana un'accettazione popolare di coppie di omosessuale, così come appoggio popolare per il loro riconoscimento e protezione.
182. Nelle loro osservazioni di fronte a questa Corte, lo stesso Governo italiano non ha negato effettivamente, il bisogno per simile protezione, mentre chiedendo che non fu limitato a riconoscimento (vedere paragrafo 128 sopra) che inoltre loro ammisero stava crescendo in popolarità fra la comunità italiana (vedere paragrafo 130 sopra).
183. Ciononostante, nonostante dei tentativi più di tre decadi (vedere divide in paragrafi 126 e 46-47 sopra) la legislatura italiana non è stata capace di decretare la legislazione attinente.
184. In questo collegamento i richiami di Corte che, benché in un contesto diverso, prima abbia contenuto, che “un tentativo intenzionale di ostacolare l'attuazione di un definitivo e sentenza esecutiva e quale è, in oltre, tollerò, se non tacitamente approvato, col ramo esecutivo e legislativo dello Stato, non può essere spiegato in termini di qualsiasi interesse pubblico e legittimo o gli interessi della comunità nell'insieme. Sul contrario, è capace di minare la credibilità ed autorità dell'ordinamento giudiziario e di rischioso la sua efficacia, fattori che sono della massima importanza dal punto di vista dei principi fondamentali che sono posto sotto alla Convenzione (vedere Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 175 ECHR 2004 V). Mentre la Corte è consapevole delle importanti differenze legali e che riguarda i fatti fra Broniowski e la causa presente, considera ciononostante che nella causa presente, la legislatura, sia volentieri sé o per insuccesso per avere la determinazione necessaria, lasciato inosservato le chiamate ripetitive con le corti più alte in Italia. Effettivamente il Presidente della Corte Costituzionale lui nella relazione annuale della corte pentì la mancanza di reazione in favore del legislatore alla dichiarazione della Corte Costituzionale nella causa dei primi due richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 43 sopra). La Corte considera che questo insuccesso ripetitivo di legislatori per prendere conto di dichiarazioni di Corte Costituzionali o i therein delle raccomandazioni relativo a consistenza con la Costituzione su un periodo significativo di tempo, potenzialmente mina le responsabilità dell'ordinamento giudiziario e nella sinistra di causa presente gli individui interessati in una situazione di incertezza legale che doveva essere presa in considerazione.
185. In conclusione, nell'assenza di un essere di interesse di comunità prevalente fissata in avanti col Governo italiano contro che bilanciare i richiedenti ' interessi gravi siccome identificato sopra, e nella luce di nazionale corteggia le conclusioni di ' sulla questione che rimase inosservato, i costatazione di Corte che il Governo italiano ha oltrepassato il loro margine della valutazione e non riuscì ad adempiere il loro obbligo positivo per assicurare che i richiedenti hanno disponibili una specifica struttura legale che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni di stesso-sesso.
186. La Corte dovrebbe essere non disposto per prendere nota delle condizioni di cambio in Italia per trovare altrimenti oggi, e sarebbe riluttante per fare domanda la Convenzione in un modo che è pratico ed effettivo.
187. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
(b) Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8
188. Avendo riguardo ad alla sua sentenza sotto Articolo 8 (vedere paragrafo 187 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario per esaminare se, in questa causa, è stata anche una violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 12 DA SOLO E DELL’ARTICOLO 14 LETTO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 12 DELLA CONVENZIONE
189. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11 si appellarono su Articolo 12 da solo, e dibatte che fin dalla sentenza in Schalk e Kopf (citò sopra), più paesi hanno legiferato in favore di matrimonio gaio, e molti più sono nell'elaborazione di discutere il problema. Perciò, determinato che la Convenzione è un strumento vivente, la Corte deve redetermine la questione nella luce della posizione oggi.
190. Tutti i richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre che loro avevano sofferto della discriminazione come un risultato della proibizione per sposarsi applicabile a loro. Notando la recente accettazione della Corte in Schalk e Kopf dell'applicabilità di Articolo 12 (separatamente da Articolo 8) a simile situazioni, i richiedenti dibatterono, che mentre era vero che la Corte sostenne che la disposizione non obbligò stati a conferire tale diritto su omosessuale accoppia, era ciononostante per la Corte per esaminare se l'insuccesso per prevedere per matrimonio di stesso-sesso fu giustificato in prospettiva di tutte le circostanze attinenti. Loro dibatterono che nelle cause presenti era particolarmente attinente che nessuna altra scelta era aperta per i richiedenti per avere le loro unioni riconosciuto giuridicamente. Simile esclusione potrebbe essere contenuta più inoltre, come legittima, dato la realtà sociale (secondo un studio del 2010 di Eurispes 61.4% dell'italiani erano in favore di del genere di unione, 20.4% di chi erano in favore di sé che è nella forma di un matrimonio). Persistere su negare solamente i certi diritti a coppie di stesso-sesso continuò ad emarginare e stigmatizzare un gruppo di minoranza in favore di una maggioranza con tendenze discriminatorie. Infine, loro presentarono che presumendolo anche potrebbe essere considerato legittimo non era chiaramente proporzionato, determinato il margine stretto della valutazione riconosciuto a Stati quando facendo domanda trattamento diverso sulla base di orientamento sessuale. Lo stesso margine doveva essere considerato restringe anche in prospettiva del fatto che la maggior parte di Stati avevano infatti regolò per della forma di unione civile (vedere Schalk e Kopf, citato sopra, § 105).
191. La Corte nota che in Schalk e Kopf la Corte trovata sotto Articolo 12 che non considererebbe più che il diritto per sposarsi deve in tutte le circostanze sia limitato a matrimonio fra due persone del sesso opposto. Comunque, siccome stettero in piedi le questioni (al tempo solamente sei fuori di quaranta-sette membro di CoE Stati concederono matrimonio di stesso-sesso), la questione se o non concedere matrimonio di stesso-sesso fu lasciato a regolamentazione con la legge nazionale dello Stato Contraente. La Corte sentì non deve precipitarsi sostituire la sua propria sentenza in posto di che delle autorità nazionali che sono messe meglio valutare e rispondere alle necessità di società. Seguì che Articolo 12 della Convenzione non impose un obbligo sul Governo rispondente per accordare una coppia di stesso-sesso come l'accesso di richiedenti a matrimonio (§§ 61-63). La stessa conclusione fu reiterata nel più recente Hämäläinen (citò sopra, § 96), dove la Corte sostenne che mentre è vero che alcuni Stati Contraenti hanno prolungato matrimonio a partner di stesso-sesso, Articolo 12 non può essere costruito come imponendo un obbligo sugli Stati Contraenti per accordare accesso a matrimonio a coppie di stesso-sesso.
192. La Corte nota che nonostante l'evoluzione graduale degli Stati sulla questione (ci sono oggi undici stati di CoE che hanno riconosciuto matrimonio di stesso-sesso) le sentenze giunte alle cause menzionate sopra di rimangono pertinenti. In conseguenza la Corte reitera che Articolo 12 della Convenzione non impone un obbligo sul Governo rispondente per accordare una coppia di stesso-sesso come l'accesso di richiedenti a matrimonio.
193. In Schalk e Kopf, la Corte sostenne similmente, che Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 8, una disposizione di più universale e sfera, non può essere interpretato come o imponendo tale obbligo. La Corte considera che gli stessi possono essere detti di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 12.
194. Segue che sia l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 12 da solo, e che sotto Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 12 è mal-fondato manifestamente e deve essere respinto in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
195. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
196. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11 affermarono che loro avevano sofferto di danno di materiale, come un risultato di perdite in giorni di permesso per ragioni di famiglia così come i bonus, e l'incapacità per godere un prestito, perdite che erano difficili quantificare comunque. Loro notarono inoltre loro avevano subito non danno patrimoniale, senza fare una specifica rivendicazione in quel il riguardo.
197. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 36030/11 danno non-patrimoniale chiesto in una somma per essere determinato con la Corte, sebbene loro considerarono che EUR 7,000 per ogni richiedente può essere considerato equo in linea con l'assegnazione resa in Vallianatos (citò sopra). Loro richiesero anche la Corte per fare le specifiche raccomandazioni al Governo con una prospettiva a legiferando in favore di unioni civili per coppie di stesso-sesso.
198. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non avevano subito qualsiasi danno effettivo.
199. La Corte nota che la rivendicazione patrimoniale dei richiedenti in richieste n. 18766/11 sono unquantified e non comprovato. D'altra parte la Corte considera che tutti i richiedenti hanno subito non danno patrimoniale, ed assegnazioni i richiedenti EUR 5,000 ognuno, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico di loro, in questo riguardo.
200. Nel collegamento coi richiedenti ' richiede infine, la Corte nota che ha trovato che l'assenza di una struttura legale che lascia spazio a riconoscimento e protezione della loro relazione viola i loro diritti sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Nella conformità con Articolo 46 della Convenzione, sarà per lo Stato rispondente per implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato di Ministri and/or generale ed appropriato misure individuali per adempiere i suoi obblighi per garantire il diritto dei richiedenti e le altre persone in posizione loro per rispettare per loro privato e la vita di famiglia (vedere Scozzari e Giunta c. l'Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000 VIII, Christine Goodwin citato sopra, § 120, ECHR 2002 VI; e S. e Marper c. il Regno Unito [GC], N. 30562/04 e 30566/04, § 134 ECHR 2008).
Costi di B. e spese
201. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 18766/11 EUR 8,200 anche chiesti per costi e spese incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali ed EUR 5,000 per quegli incorsi in di fronte alla Corte.
202. I richiedenti in richiesta n. 36030/11 EUR 11,672.96 chiesti per costi e spese incorse in di fronte a questa Corte siccome calcolato in conformità con legge italiana e tenendo presente i problemi complessi dato con nella causa così come le osservazioni estese, incluso quelli delle terze parti.
203. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti che ' chiede per spese erano “infondato e mancando qualsiasi sostiene.”
204. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Presentela causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte respinge la rivendicazione per costi e spese nei procedimenti nazionali, come sé non è stato provato con vuole dire di qualsiasi i documenti. La Corte, avendo considerato le due rivendicazioni rese con gli avvocati diversi e la mancanza di dettaglio nella rivendicazione riguardo alla richiesta n. 18766/11, inoltre lo considera ragionevole assegnare congiuntamente la somma di EUR 4,000, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti in riguardo della richiesta n. 18766/11, ed EUR 10,000, congiuntamente più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, essere pagato direttamente nei loro rappresentanti i conti bancari di ' in riguardo della richiesta n. 36030/11 per i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte.
Interesse di mora di C.
205. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 8 da solo e l’ Articolo 14 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8 ammissibili, ed il resto delle richieste inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione;

4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi:
(i) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro) ognuno, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 4,000 (quattro mila euro), congiuntamente, ai richiedenti nella richiesta n. 18766/11, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, a riguardo di costi e spese;
(iii) EUR 10,000 (dieci mila euro), congiuntamente, ai richiedenti nella richiesta n. 36030/11, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, a riguardo di costi e spese da pagare direttamente sui conti bancari dei loro rappresentanti ;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;

5. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 21 luglio 2015, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento della Corte.
Françoise Elens-Passos Päivi Hirvelä
Cancelliere Presidente


In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudice Mahoney congiunta con Giudici Tsotsoria e Vehabovi è ?annesso a questa sentenza.

P.H.
F.E.P.

OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE MAHONEY UNITA DAI GIUDICI TSOTSORIA E VEHABOVI?

1. Noi, i tre giudici che sottoscrivono a questa opinione concordante abbiamo votato coi nostri quattro colleghi per una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione nella causa presente, ma sulla base di diverso, ragionamento di narrower. In breve, noi non troviamo nessun bisogno di asserire che oggi Articolo 8 impone sull'Italia che che i nostri colleghi caratterizzano come un obbligo positivo per fornire a coppie di stesso-sesso come i richiedenti una specifica struttura legale che prevede per il riconoscimento e protezione delle loro unioni di stesso-sesso (paragrafo 185 in multa della sentenza). Che che è decisivo per noi nella causa presente può essere riassunto brevemente siccome segue:
- lo Stato italiano ha scelto, per le sue corti più alte, notevolmente la Corte Costituzionale, dichiarare che due persone dello stesso sesso che vive in convivenza stabile sono investite con la Costituzione italiana con un diritto essenziale per ottenere riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri che allegano alla loro unione;
- è questo intervento volontario, attivo con lo Stato italiano nella sfera di relazioni personali coperta con Articolo 8 quel attira la richiesta della garanzia della Convenzione del diritto per rispettare per privato e la vita di famiglia, senza là essendo qualsiasi chiama per invocare la pre-esistenza di un obbligo di Convenzione positivo;
- i requisiti che fluiscono da Articolo 8 come riguardi qualsiasi regolamentazione Statale dell'esercizio del diritto per rispettare per privato e la vita di famiglia non fu soddisfatta nelle circostanze della causa presente a causa della natura difettosa del seguito, all'interno dell'ordine legale italiano alla dichiarazione giudiziale autorevole della Corte Costituzionale di un diritto costituzionale per persone nella posizione dei richiedenti a della forma di riconoscimento legale ed adeguato di unioni di stesso-sesso stabili.

Questo ragionamento è spiegato sotto nell'ulteriore dettaglio.

2. Nella sua sentenza n. 138 15 aprile 2010 in relazione alle richieste costituzionali dei richiedenti il Sig. Oliari e Sig. Un, la Corte Costituzionale italiana, mentre respingendo gli argomenti sotto Articolo 29 della Costituzione (sull'istituzione di matrimonio), rigato che, con virtù di Articolo 2 della Costituzione, due persone dello stesso sesso in convivenza stabile hanno un diritto essenziale per esprimere liberamente la loro personalità in una coppia, mentre ottenendo-in tempo e coi mezzi ed i limiti per essere esposto con legge-riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri (queste sono le parole nelle quali la direttiva è riassunta in paragrafo 16 della sentenza; il testo di Articoli 2 e 29 della Costituzione italiana sono esposti fuori in paragrafo 33 della sentenza). Questa direttiva rappresenta una dichiarazione autorevole della regolamentazione, all'interno dell'ordine legale italiano dei richiedenti il diritto di ' per rispettare per loro privato e come lontano come la condizione giuridica vita di famiglia che dovrebbe essere data ad unione loro come una coppia di stesso-sesso concerne. Il “il diritto essenziale” con ciò riconobbe ottenere riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri che allegano ad un'unione di stesso-sesso è uno derivando, non da qualsiasi obbligo positivo custodì nella Convenzione, ma dall'enunciazione di Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana.

3. Sotto le disposizioni costituzionali in Italia, mentre la Corte Costituzionale può fare una dichiarazione di unconstitutionality in riguardo di legislazione esistente, non ha nessun potere per riempire una lacuna legislativa anche se, come nella sua sentenza n. 138/2010, ha potuto identificare che lacuna siccome comportando una situazione che non è compatibile con la Costituzione. Così, nella causa del Sig. Oliari e Sig. Un nel 2010, non era per la Corte Costituzionale per procedere alla formulazione delle disposizioni legali ed appropriate, ma per il Parlamento italiano (vedere divide in paragrafi 36 e 45 della sentenza presente per chiarimenti simili dei suoi poteri dati con la Corte Costituzionale nelle sue direttive susseguenti che reiterano la conclusione generale affermate in sentenza n. 138/10). Come la sentenza presente (a paragrafo 82) lo mette, “la Corte Costituzionale… non poteva ma invita la legislatura ad intentare causa” (vedere similmente divide in paragrafi 84 e 180 in multa della sentenza). In questo collegamento vale che il poi Presidente della Corte Costituzionale rivolse alle autorità costituzionali italiane e più alte nel 2013 (citò a paragrafo 43 della sentenza):

“Dialogo è più difficile con qualche volta il [Costituzionale] il naturale interlocutore di Corte. Questo è particolarmente così in cause dove sollecita la legislatura per cambiare una norma legale che considerò essere in contrasto con la Costituzione. Simile richieste non saranno sottovalutate. Loro costituiscono, infatti, il solo vuole dire disponibile al [Costituzionale] Corte per obbligare gli organi legislativi ad eliminare qualsiasi situazione che non è compatibile con la Costituzione, e quale, benché identificò col [Costituzionale] la Corte, non conduca ad una dichiarazione dell'anti-costituzionalità. … Una richiesta di questo tipo che rimase inosservato era quel rese in sentenza n. 138/10 che, mentre trovando il fatto che un matrimonio potrebbe essere contratto solamente con persone di un sesso diverso per essere costituzionale conforme, anche affermò che coppie di stesso-sesso avevano un diritto essenziale per ottenere riconoscimento legale, coi diritti attinenti ed i doveri, della loro unione. Lo lasciò a Parlamento per prevedere per simile regolamentazione, coi mezzi ed all'interno dei limiti ritenuti appropriato.”

In somma, siccome spiegato col poi Presidente della Corte Costituzionale:
- la Corte Costituzionale aveva affermato il diritto essenziale di coppie di stesso-sesso sotto la Costituzione italiana per ottenere riconoscimento legale della loro unione;
- comunque, il solo vuole dire disponibile alla Corte Costituzionale a “obblighi” gli organi legislativi per eliminare la lacuna incostituzionale in legge italiana che nega stesso-sesso accoppiano questo garantito nazionalmente diritto essenziale era “solleciti”, o rivolge un “la richiesta” a, Parlamento per intentare la causa legislativa e necessaria.

I richiedenti in richiesta n. 36030/11 aggiunsero il loro chiarimento che “sentenza di Corte Costituzionale n. 138/10 avevano l'effetto di affermare l'esistenza di… un dovere costituzionale sulla legislatura di decretare una regolamentazione generale ed appropriata sul riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso, con diritti conseguenti ed i doveri per partner” (paragrafo 114 della sentenza).

4. Datare, cinque anni sono passati ancora, fin dalla sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, senza legislazione appropriata stato stato decretato col Parlamento italiano. I richiedenti sono così nella posizione insoddisfacente di essere riconosciuto con la Corte Costituzionale siccome godendo legge costituzionale italiana sotto un incipiente “il diritto essenziale” colpendo un importante aspetto della condizione giuridica per essere concesso a loro privato e la vita di famiglia, ma questo incipiente “il diritto essenziale” non ha ricevuto attuazione concreta ed adeguata dal braccio competente di governo, vale a dire la legislatura. I richiedenti, come le altre coppie di stesso-sesso nella loro posizione sono stati lasciati in limbo, in un stato dell'incertezza legale come riguardi il riconoscimento legale della loro unione al quale loro sono concessi sotto la Costituzione italiana.

5. Sulla base dei fatti precedenti, non è necessario per la Corte per decidere se Italia ha un obbligo positivo sotto paragrafo 1 di Articolo 8 della Convenzione per concedere riconoscimento legale ed appropriato all'interno del suo ordine legale all'unione di coppie di stesso-sesso. La dichiarazione della Corte Costituzionale che Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana conferisce su due persone dello stesso sesso che vive in convivenza stabile un “il diritto essenziale” sotto legge costituzionale e nazionale ottenere riconoscimento giuridico di unione loro costituisce un intervento attivo con lo Stato nella sfera di privato e la vita di famiglia coprì con Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Sentenza n. 138/10 non erano una direttiva isolata: nelle parole della sentenza presente (a paragrafo 180), “in Italia il bisogno di riconoscere e proteggere simile relazioni è stato dato un profilo alto con le autorità giudiziali e più alte, incluso la Corte Costituzionale e la Corte di Cassazione”, con la Corte Costituzionale che chiama ripetutamente su Parlamento per adottare la legislazione richiesta che dà riconoscimento giuridico dei diritti attinenti ed i doveri di unioni di omosessuale. In prospettiva nostra, questa azione volontaria dello Stato in relazione alla regolamentazione legale dei richiedenti ' privato e la vita di famiglia in se stesso e di sé la richiesta di Articolo 8 della Convenzione attira nelle loro cause e l'obbligo accompagnante sullo Stato italiano per attenersi coi requisiti che fluiscono da Articolo 8, notevolmente quegli esposero fuori in paragrafo 2 suo.

6. Innegabilmente, determinato che che il Governo rispondente descrive come l'esercizio difficile di giungere ad un equilibrio fra “le sensibilità diverse su tale delicato e profondamente sentì problema sociale” (paragrafo 126 della sentenza), lo Stato italiano si riconoscerà siccome avendo un certo margine della valutazione in riguardo a sia alla scelta della condizione giuridica precisa per essere concesso ad unioni di stesso-sesso ed al tempismo per la promulgazione della legislazione attinente (vedere paragrafo 177 della sentenza che fa un punto simile).

7. D'altra parte struttura costituzionale e purchessia e la distribuzione dei poteri fra le braccio di governo un Stato Contraente può scegliere di adottare, c'è un dovere complessivo della fiducia e la buon fede dovuto con lo Stato e le sue autorità pubbliche al cittadino in una società democratica governata con l'articolo di legge (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, §§173 e 175 il 2004-V di ECHR). Nella nostra prospettiva, nonostante il margine della valutazione disponibile questo dovere della fiducia non fu rispettato nella causa presente come riguardi il seguito a sentenza allo Stato italiano, n. 138/10 della Corte Costituzionale in che una lacuna incostituzionale, comportando il rifiuto di un “il diritto essenziale”, fu identificato come esistendo nell'ordine legale italiano. C'è, e rimane da cinque anni, una discordanza fra la dichiarazione della Corte Costituzionale come al diritto di una categoria determinata di individui sotto la Costituzione e l'azione, o piuttosto l'inazione, della legislatura italiana, come il braccio competente di governo nell'implementare quel il diritto. I beneficiari della dichiarazione della Corte Costituzionale come all'incompatibilità con la Costituzione della mancanza di riconoscimento legale ed adeguato di unioni di stesso-sesso è stato negato il livello di protezione di loro privato e vita di famiglia alla quale loro sono concessi sotto Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana.

8. Inoltre, legge italiana riguardo alla condizione giuridica per essere concesso ad unioni di stesso-sesso è stata lasciata in un stato dell'incertezza irregolata su un periodo eccessivo di tempo. Questa situazione durevole dell'incertezza legale, si appellò su nella sentenza presente (per esempio, a paragrafi 170 171 e 184 in multa), è come per rendere la regolamentazione nazionale dei richiedenti unione di stesso-sesso di ' incompatibile col concetto democratico di “la legge” inerente in paragrafo 2's requisito che qualsiasi “l'interferenza” col diritto per rispettare per privato e la vita di famiglia è “nella conformità con la legge.” Questo è specialmente così da allora, come i punti di sentenza fuori (a paragrafo 171),

“la necessità di riferirsi ripetutamente alle corti nazionali per mandare a chiamare l'uguaglianza di trattamento in riguardo di ogni una della molteplicità di aspetti che concernono i diritti ed i doveri fra una coppia, specialmente in un sistema di giustizia sovraccaricato come quell'in Italia, già importi ad un ostacolo non-insignificante ai richiedenti gli sforzi di ' di ottenere riguardo per loro privato e la vita di famiglia.”

Che che è più, la sentenza aggiunge (a paragrafo 170), il Governo insistentemente l'esercizio il loro diritto per obiettare a simile rivendicazioni dell'uguaglianza di trattamento portò di fronte alle corti nazionali su una base di causa-con-causa nei vari rami della legge con coppie di stesso-sesso.

9. Come i nostri colleghi, noi notiamo, che “il Governo italiano è andato a vuoto ad accentuare esplicitamente che che, nella loro prospettiva, corrispose agli interessi della comunità nell'insieme” per spiegare l'omissione del Parlamento per legiferare così come implementare il diritto costituzionale fondamentale identificato con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 176 della sentenza). Noi concordiamo similmente coi nostri colleghi nel respingere i vari argomenti che il Governo ha addotto con modo della giustificazione di questa omissione che continua, notevolmente gli argomenti come a registrazione di unioni di stesso-sesso con dei municipi, accordi contrattuali e privati e la veste delle corti nazionali sul diritto nazionale come sé sostiene riconoscere riconoscimento legale ed adeguato e protezione (vedere, in particolare, divide in paragrafi 81-82 e 168-172). Siccome indicano i nostri colleghi, è anche significativo che “c'è fra la popolazione italiana un'accettazione popolare di coppie di omosessuale, così come appoggio popolare per il loro riconoscimento e protezione”, simile che le direttive delle autorità giudiziali e più alte in Italia, incluso la Corte Costituzionale e la Corte di Cassazione riflettono i sentimenti di una maggioranza della comunità in Italia (divide in paragrafi 180-181 della sentenza).

10. Dove noi società di parte coi nostri colleghi è come riguardi la questione dove situare l'analisi dei fatti della causa per i fini di Articolo 8 della Convenzione. I nostri colleghi sono accurati limitare la loro sentenza dell'esistenza di un obbligo positivo ad Italia e non incagliare la loro conclusione su una combinazione di fattori necessariamente fondi negli altri Stati Contraenti. Noi non siamo sicuri per cominciare con, che tale limitazione di un obbligo positivo sotto la Convenzione alle condizioni locali è concettualmente possibile. A dei punti i nostri colleghi sembrano nondimeno in secondo luogo, appellarsi, almeno in parte, su ragionamento generale capace di essere letto siccome implicando un obbligo positivo ed autostabile in carica su tutti gli Stati Contraenti offrire una struttura legale per unioni di stesso-sesso (vedere, per esempio, divida in paragrafi 165 della sentenza). È probabile che sia ragionato concepibilmente che, su analogia con Un, B e C c. l'Irlanda [GC] (richiesta n. 25579/05, ECHR 2010, §§253 264 e 267), un “obbligo positivo” sullo Stato italiano decretare legislazione che implementa adeguata sorge da Articolo 2 della Costituzione italiana siccome interpretato con la Corte Costituzionale. Quel può essere bene vero come una questione di legge costituzionale italiana, siccome dibattuto coi richiedenti in richiesta n. 36030/11 (vedere paragrafo 3 in multa sopra dell'opinione concordante presente). Comunque, questo non è che che è voluto dire con un obbligo positivo che è imposto con un Convenzione Articolo normalmente. In particolare, ogni qualvolta un Stato sceglie di regolare l'esercizio di un'attività che viene all'interno della sfera di un diritto di Convenzione, è obbligato per fare così in ottemperanza coi requisiti espressi ed inerenti del Convenzione Articolo in oggetto-per esempio, in una maniera che non comporta l'incertezza legale ed eccessiva per il diritto-possessore di Convenzione. In simile circostanze, noi siamo nel reame di diritto-regolamentazione, non il reame di obblighi di Convenzione positivi. Questo è perché noi abbiamo esortato (a paragrafo 5 sopra nell'opinione concordante presente) che i richiedenti il danno di ' dovrebbe essere analizzato in termini di intervento Statale e difettoso nella sfera di privato e la vita di famiglia, piuttosto che in termini di insuccesso per adempiere un obbligo di Convenzione positivo.

11. In conclusione, per noi lo stato insoddisfacente del diritto nazionale attinente sul riconoscimento di unioni di stesso-sesso, mentre visualizzando un insuccesso prolungato per implementare un diritto costituzionale fondamentale e nazionalmente riconosciuto in una maniera effettiva ed aumento che dà a continuando l'incertezza, rende l'intervento attivo dello Stato italiano nella regolamentazione dei richiedenti il diritto di ' rispettare per loro privato e la vita di famiglia incompatibile coi requisiti di Articolo 8 della Convenzione.

12. L'opinione concordante precedente non si prenderà siccome esprimendo una prospettiva su se, nelle condizioni attuali di 2015 nella luce di evolvere atteggiamenti in società democratica in Europa, divida in paragrafi 1 di Articolo 8 ora si dovrebbe interpretare siccome incarnando, per l'Italia o generalmente per ogni Stati Contraenti, un obbligo positivo per concedere riconoscimento legale ed appropriato e protezione ad unioni di stesso-sesso. Il nostro punto è che non c'è necessità nella causa presente per avere ricorso a tale “nuovo” l'interpretazione come in qualsiasi l'evento una sentenza in favore dei richiedenti è dettata su una base di narrower sulla base della giurisprudenza esistente e l'analisi classica ed esistente dei requisiti che accompagnano intervento Statale ed attivo che regola l'esercizio del diritto sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione per rispettare per privato e la vita di famiglia.

APPENDICE
Richiesta n. 18766/11

OMISSIS




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 05/04/2021.