Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF S.L. AND J.L. v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41

NUMERO: 13712/11/2015
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 07/05/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (Article 35-1 - Exhaustion of domestic remedies) Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Positive obligations) Pecuniary damage - reserved (Article 41 - Just satisfaction)



FIRST SECTION







CASE OF S.L. AND J.L. v. CROATIA

(Application no. 13712/11)









JUDGMENT
(Merits)


STRASBOURG

7 May 2015





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of S.L. and J.L. v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Isabelle Berro, President,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Dmitry Dedov, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 14 April 2015,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 13712/11) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by the Croatian nationals, Ms S.L. and Ms J.L. (“the applicants”), on 7 January 2011.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in P. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicants alleged a violation of their property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 21 October 2013 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants are sisters who were born in 1987 and 1992 respectively and live in P.
A. Background to the case
6. In June 1997 the applicants, represented by their mother V.L., concluded a real estate agreement with B.P. in which they expressed their intention of buying a villa of 87 square metres and the adjacent courtyard of 624 square metres in V., a seaside neighbourhood of P. (hereinafter: the “house”). The agreement stated that the house was in poor condition as certain individuals had lived there for several years without any legal basis and had ruined the furniture and installations.
7. The agreement was formalised in a real estate purchase contract of 17 December 1997 by which the applicants acquired ownership of the house for an amount of 450,000 Croatian kunas (HRK).
8. On 26 November 1999 the applicants registered their ownership of the house and the plot of land in the land register in equal shares.
B. The real estate swap agreement
9. On an unspecified date V.L. requested from the relevant Social Welfare Centre (hereinafter: the “Centre”) the authorisation to sell the house owned by the applicants, such authorisation being required under the relevant domestic law in cases where a parent wishes to dispose of a child’s property (see paragraph 39 below).
10. As a result of that request, on 10 April 2000 V.L. and her husband Z.L. (the father of the second applicant) were interviewed at the Centre. They stated that they had bought the house in 1997 for HRK 450,000 and that they had already spent approximately 80,000 Deutsche marks (DEM) renovating it. However, the house required some further investment for which they lacked the necessary means and thus they intended to sell it and to live with one of their parents. They further explained that they owned a retail business and that they had no problems with their children, who both had excellent marks at school. V.L. and Z.L. also promised that they would open a bank account on behalf of their children, into which they would deposit the money from the sale of the house. They pointed out that they had contacted a real estate agency, which was looking for a potential buyer. They also agreed that V.L. would conclude the sale contract once they had managed to find a buyer.
11. In February 2001 Z.L. was arrested and held in detention in connection with a suspected attempted murder and the unlawful possession of firearms. He was later indicted on the same charges in the P. County Court (Županijski sud u P.), which on 10 October 2001 found him guilty and sentenced him to six years’ imprisonment. During the criminal proceedings his defence lawyer was M.I, a lawyer practising in P.
12. On 15 October 2001 M.I. submitted a request to the Centre seeking authorisation for a real estate swap agreement between the applicants and a certain D.M., who was in fact M.I.’s mother-in-law. He provided powers of attorney signed by V.L., Z.L. and E.B. (the father of the first applicant) authorising him to obtain the Centre’s consent to a swap real estate agreement.
13. Together with his request, M.I. provided a draft swap agreement stipulating that D.M. would transfer to the applicants her four-room flat of 78.27 square metres, situated on the fourth floor of a residential building in P. (hereinafter: the “flat”), while the applicants would transfer their ownership of the house to D.M. The draft swap agreement also stated that the values of the properties to be exchanged were the same and that the parties waived their right to object that they had sustained damage as a result of giving the exchanged property away at below half of its real value. M.I. also submitted another document, a supplement to the swap agreement, in which the parties to that agreement acknowledged that V.L. and Z.L. had invested significant sums of money in the house and that, on the basis of the amounts shown on certain available invoices, D.M. would compensate them for those investments.
14. V.L. was invited to the Centre for an interview on 23 October 2001 in connection with M.I.’s request. She stated that her husband had meanwhile been imprisoned and that their retail business had started to go badly, leading her to close it in August 2001. She also explained that she was unemployed and that this situation had affected the applicants, who were no longer doing so well at school. She further stated that she had been obliged to borrow money to pay the bills for the house and that the overall situation had prompted her and Z.L. to exchange the house for a flat in P. with the additional obligation on the part of the flat-owner to pay them the difference in value between the two properties, amounting to some 100,000 DEM according to her estimate. Lastly, V.L. pointed out that E.B., the father of the first applicant, had given his consent to the swap agreement. She also undertook to register the ownership of the flat in the applicants’ names.
15. On 13 November 2001 the Centre gave its authorisation for the swap agreement, whereby the applicants would transfer their ownership of the house to D.M. while the latter would transfer her ownership of the flat and a garage to the applicants. The decision drafted by the Centre specified that V.L. was obliged to provide the Centre with a copy of the swap agreement.
16. In its statement of reasons behind the decision, the Centre pointed out that it had taken note of the powers of attorney provided to M.I. by the applicants’ parents, V.L.’s statement of 23 October 2001, birth certificates for the applicants and land registry certificates for the properties, and the draft swap agreement. It had also noted the fact that Z.L. had been convicted at first-instance of the offence of attempted murder and unlawful possession of firearms. Based on this information, the Centre concluded that the swap agreement was not contrary to the best interests of the applicants since their property rights would not be extinguished or reduced as they would become the owners of a flat which would provide fully suitable living accommodation.
17. On the same day, the Centre gave its authorisation for the supplementary document to the swap agreement by virtue of which D.M. would pay the applicants 5,000 DEM each on account of the difference in value between the exchanged properties. As a condition of this decision, V.L. was obliged to provide the Centre with a bank statement attesting that the payment had been made. In its statement of reasons, the Centre referred to a request made by V.L. for the conclusion of a supplement to the swap agreement and the statement she had given to the Centre. The Centre also found that this would not be contrary to the interests of the applicants.
18. The above two decisions issued by the Centre on 13 November 2001 were forwarded to the lawyer M.I.
19. On 16 December 2001 the applicants, represented by V.L., concluded the real estate swap agreement with D.M. before a Public Notary in P., and the applicants thereby transferred their ownership of the house to D.M. while the latter transferred her ownership of the flat and the garage to the applicants. The swap agreement contained a clause under which the parties agreed that there was no difference in the value of the exchanged properties, and that they had no further claims on that account. It also set down the value of the properties at some HRK 400,000.
20. Based on this contract, the applicants and D.M. duly registered their ownership of the properties with the land registry.
21. On 28 December 2001 lawyer M.I. submitted to the Centre a certificate from the land registry showing that the applicants had registered their ownership of the flat and bank statements showing that they had received the amount of 5,000 DEM each.
22. On 2 and 12 March 2002 the P. Tax Office (Ministarstvo financija, Porezna uprava) declared a tax obligation of HRK 20,000 for each of the parties ? based on the declared value of the transaction involved in the swap agreement ? which was divided by half in respect of the applicants, who were thus obliged to pay HRK 10,000 each.
C. The applicants’ civil proceedings
23. On 17 November 2004 the applicants, represented by Z.L. as their legal guardian, brought an action against D.M.in the P. Municipal Court (Op?inski sud u P.), asking the court to declare the swap agreement null and void (ništav).
24. During the proceedings the applicants argued that the swap agreement had effected the exchange of the ownership of the house ? which comprised two flats, each measuring 87 square metres, was only five minutes’ walk from the sea and was worth approximately 300,000 euros (EUR) ? for a flat and a garage worth in total no more than EUR 70,000. Given that at the time when the contract was concluded they were only fourteen and nine years old, the Centre should have defended their rights and should not have given its consent to a swap agreement of that kind. In this respect they pointed out that section 265 § 1 of the Family Act listed specific instances in which the property of a minor could be disposed of, and that no such instance had existed in their case. Moreover, the Centre had failed to carry out an on-site inspection or to commission an expert report which would have allowed it to estimate the value of the house and adopt a proper decision concerning the request for authorisation of the swap agreement. The applicants therefore considered that, by failing to take such vital measures, the Centre had allowed an unlawful and immoral property exchange to be executed. In their view, this had resulted in ab initio invalidity of the exchange. The applicants also pointed out that their legal guardian Z.L. had not been party to the discussions concerning the swap agreement. They therefore proposed that the trial court examine several witnesses, including the participants to the swap agreement, the employees of the Centre, the first applicant ? who was by that time already seventeen years old ? and several other witnesses who were aware of the circumstances of the case, and commission an expert report establishing the value of the properties.
25. On 1 March 2005 the P. Municipal Court dismissed the applicants’ request to take any of the proposed evidence on the grounds that the case could be decided on the basis of the documents from the case file.
26. On 15 April 2005 the P. Municipal Court dismissed the applicants’ civil action. It argued that it was not in a position to re-examine the Centre’s decision to authorise the swap agreement, since that was an administrative decision which could only have been challenged in administrative proceedings. Thus, given that such a decision existed, the P. Municipal Court could not find the swap agreement to be unlawful or contrary to the morals of society. It also pointed out that the swap agreement could possibly be only a voidable contract (pobojan) but no claim to that effect had been made by the applicants.
27. The applicants challenged that judgment by means of an appeal lodged before the P. County Court, arguing that the first-instance court had failed to examine any of their arguments and had thus erred in its decision concerning the validity of the swap agreement.
28. On 19 March 2007 the P. County Court dismissed the applicants’ appeal as ill-founded, endorsing the reasoning of the first-instance court.
29. The applicants then lodged an appeal on points of law before the Supreme Court (Vrhovni sud Republike Hrvatske) on 8 June 2007. The second applicant was represented by V.L., and the first applicant, having in the meantime reached the age of majority, was able to conduct the legal action herself.
30. In their appeal on points of law the applicants argued, inter alia, that the P. Municipal Court had failed to examine any of the relevant evidence and had incorrectly assessed the circumstances of the case. In particular, it had failed to take into account that the Centre had negligently allowed the swap agreement to be concluded without taking into account the value of the properties and the nature of their family circumstances at the time, namely the fact that Z.L. was in detention and that V.L. was known as a person with a problem of drug abuse.
31. On 19 December 2007 the Supreme Court dismissed the applicants’ appeal on points of law as ill-founded and endorsed the decisions of the lower courts, which found that the civil courts were not in a position to re-examine the Centre’s final administrative decision allowing the conclusion of the swap agreement. Moreover, it did not appear to the Supreme Court that the Centre had failed in its protection of the best interests of the applicants.
32. The applicants then lodged a constitutional complaint before the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) reiterating their previous arguments before the lower courts. The second applicant was represented by V.L.
33. On 9 June 2010 the Constitutional Court declared the applicants’ constitutional complaint inadmissible as manifestly ill-founded.
D. Other relevant information
34. A report by the Ministry of Social Policy and Youth (Ministarstvo socijalne politike i mladih) of 30 January 2014 submitted to the Court suggests that the Centre was not aware of V.L.’s drug abuse problem nor had it been alerted concerning M.I.’s conflict of interest.
35. According to a report by the Ministry of Health (Ministarstvo zdravlja) of 7 February 2014, V.L. started her drug addiction therapy on 12 December 2003 and terminated it in 2004. She then started again in 2007 and she was still undergoing therapy at the present time.
36. The information available from the e-land registry concerning property in Croatia shows that the house and the land on which it is located measure 225 square metres with an adjacent courtyard of 476 square metres, all of which is registered in the name of D.M. as owner.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND INTERNATIONAL LAW
A. Relevant domestic law
1. Constitution
37. The relevant provision of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette nos. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998 (consolidated text), 113/2000, 124/2000 (consolidated text), 28/2001 and 41/2001 (consolidated text), 55/2001 (corrigendum), 76/2010, 85/2010, 05/2014) reads:
Article 48
“The right of ownership shall be guaranteed ...“
Article 63
“The State shall protect ... children and youth ...”
Article 65
“Everyone shall have the duty to protect the children ...”
2. Civil Obligations Act
38. The relevant provisions of the Civil Obligations Act (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Official Gazette nos. 53/1991, 73/1991, 111/1993, 3/1994, 7/1996, 91/1996 and 112/1999) provide:
Permissible [legal] basis
Section 51
“(1) Each contractual obligation shall have a permissible [legal] basis [causa].
(2) A basis is not permissible if it contravenes the Constitution, fundamental principles of law, or morals.
...”
Contract null and void on grounds of its [legal] basis
Section 52
“Where there is no [legal] basis [for a contract] or where its [basis] is not permissible, the contract is null and void.”
Nullity
Section 103
“A contract which is contrary to the Constitution, fundamental principles of law, or morals is null and void, unless there is some other [applicable] sanction or the law provides differently in a particular case.”
Unlimited right to plead nullity
Section 110
“The right to plead nullity shall be inextinguishable.”
Voidable contract
Section 111
“A contract shall be voidable where one of its parties lacked legal capacity, where it was concluded on the basis of misconceptions, or where so provided under this Act or other special legislation.”
Termination of the right
Section 117
“(1) The right to claim that a contract is voidable shall lapse one year after it was learned that there are reasons making it voidable ...
(2) In any case, that right shall lapse three years after conclusion of the contract.”
Obvious disproportionality in amount given
Section 139
“(1) If at the time of the conclusion of the contract there was an obvious disproportionality in the amount given, the damaged party may claim that the contract is voidable if that party did not know, or had no reason to know, of its real value.
(2) The right to claim that the contract is voidable shall lapse one year after its conclusion.
(3) Waiver of this right shall be without any legal effect.”
3. Family Act
39. The relevant part of the Family Act (Obiteljski zakon, Official Gazette no. 162/1998), as in force at the relevant time, provided:
Section 121
“(1) Legal capacity shall be obtained by the individual’s coming of age or by the conclusion of a marriage before legal adulthood.
(2) A person who is eighteen years old is legally an adult.
...”
Section 192
“A special guardian shall be appointed to a child who is in the care of [biological] or adoptive parents, in the event of a dispute between the child and the parents, for the purposes of concluding a contract between them, and in other cases where the interest of the child runs contrary to the interest of the parents.”
Section 265
“(1) Subject to the consent of the competent Social Welfare Centre, parents may dispose of or encumber the property of a child who is a minor for the purposes of the child’s maintenance, medical treatment, upbringing, schooling, education or other important needs.
(2) The consent of the Social Welfare Centre is also necessary for the taking of certain procedural actions before the court or another state body concerning the child’s property.”
4. Real Estate Transfer Tax Act
40. The relevant provision of the Real Estate Transfer Tax Act (Zakon o porezu na promet nekretnina, Official Gazette no. 69/1997) provides:
Section 9
“(1) The tax basis for a real estate transaction is the market value of the real estate at the moment of its acquisition.
(2) The market value of the real estate is considered to be the value which the real estate has or could have on the market at the time of its acquisition. The market value of the real estate shall be established, in principle, on the basis of the document of acquisition.
...”
5. Civil Procedure Act
41. The relevant part of the Civil Procedure Act (Official Gazette nos. 53/1991, 91/1992, 58/1993, 112/1999, 88/2001, 117/2003, 88/2005, 2/2007, 84/2008, 123/2008, 57/2011, 148/2011, 25/2013 and 89/2014) provides:
Section 428a
“(1) When the European Court of Human Rights has found a violation of a human right or fundamental freedom guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms or additional protocols thereto ratified by the Republic of Croatia, a party may, within thirty days of the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights becoming final, file a petition with the court in the Republic of Croatia which adjudicated in the first instance in the proceedings in which the decision violating the human right or fundamental freedom was rendered, to set aside the decision by which the human right or fundamental freedom was violated.
(2) The proceedings referred to in paragraph 1 of this section shall be conducted by applying, mutatis mutandis, the provisions on the reopening of proceedings.
(3) In the reopened proceedings the courts are required to respect the legal opinions expressed in the final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom.”
B. Relevant international law
1. Convention on the Rights of the Child
42. The relevant provision of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child of 20 November 1989, which came into force in respect of Croatia on 8 October 1991 (Official Gazette – International Agreements no. 12/1993), provides:
Article 3
“1. In all actions concerning children, whether undertaken by public or private social welfare institutions, courts of law, administrative authorities or legislative bodies, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration.
...”
43. The Committee on the Rights of the Child has recently explained the content of this obligation in its “General comment No. 14 (2013) on the right of the child to have his or her best interests taken as a primary consideration (art. 3, para. 1)” (CRC/C/GC/14, 29 May 2013) in the following terms:
“A. The best interests of the child: a right, a principle and a rule of procedure
1. Article 3, paragraph 1, of the Convention on the Rights of the Child gives the child the right to have his or her best interests assessed and taken into account as a primary consideration in all actions or decisions that concern him or her, both in the public and private sphere. Moreover, it expresses one of the fundamental values of the Convention. The Committee on the Rights of the Child (the Committee) has identified article 3, paragraph 1, as one of the four general principles of the Convention for interpreting and implementing all the rights of the child, and applies it is a dynamic concept that requires an assessment appropriate to the specific context.
...
4. The concept of the child’s best interests is aimed at ensuring both the full and effective enjoyment of all the rights recognized in the Convention and the holistic development of the child. The Committee has already pointed out that “an adult’s judgment of a child’s best interests cannot override the obligation to respect all the child’s rights under the Convention.” It recalls that there is no hierarchy of rights in the Convention; all the rights provided for therein are in the “child’s best interests” and no right could be compromised by a negative interpretation of the child’s best interests.
6. The Committee underlines that the child’s best interests is a threefold concept:
(a) A substantive right: The right of the child to have his or her best interests assessed and taken as a primary consideration when different interests are being considered in order to reach a decision on the issue at stake, and the guarantee that this right will be implemented whenever a decision is to be made concerning a child, a group of identified or unidentified children or children in general. Article 3, paragraph 1, creates an intrinsic obligation for States, is directly applicable (self-executing) and can be invoked before a court.
(b) A fundamental, interpretative legal principle: If a legal provision is open to more than one interpretation, the interpretation which most effectively serves the child’s best interests should be chosen. The rights enshrined in the Convention and its Optional Protocols provide the framework for interpretation.
(c) A rule of procedure: Whenever a decision is to be made that will affect a specific child, an identified group of children or children in general, the decision-making process must include an evaluation of the possible impact (positive or negative) of the decision on the child or children concerned. Assessing and determining the best interests of the child require procedural guarantees. Furthermore, the justification of a decision must show that the right has been explicitly taken into account. In this regard, States parties shall explain how the right has been respected in the decision, that is, what has been considered to be in the child’s best interests; what criteria it is based on; and how the child’s interests have been weighed against other considerations, be they broad issues of policy or individual cases.
...
III. Nature and scope of the obligations of States parties
13. Each State party must respect and implement the right of the child to have his or her best interests assessed and taken as a primary consideration, and is under the obligation to take all necessary, deliberate and concrete measures for the full implementation of this right.
14. Article 3, paragraph 1, establishes a framework with three different types of obligations for States parties:
(a) The obligation to ensure that the child’s best interests are appropriately integrated and consistently applied in every action taken by a public institution, especially in all implementation measures, administrative and judicial proceedings which directly or indirectly impact on children;
(b) The obligation to ensure that all judicial and administrative decisions as well as policies and legislation concerning children demonstrate that the child’s best interests have been a primary consideration. This includes describing how the best interests have been examined and assessed, and what weight has been ascribed to them in the decision.
(c) The obligation to ensure that the interests of the child have been assessed and taken as a primary consideration in decisions and actions taken by the private sector, including those providing services, or any other private entity or institution making decisions that concern or impact on a child.”
2. Charter of Fundamental Rights
44. The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (2010/C 83/02) in its relevant part provides:
Article 24
The rights of the child
“...
(2) In all actions relating to children, whether taken by public authorities or private institutions, the child’s best interests must be a primary consideration.
...”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
45. The applicants complained about the failure of the State to protect their property interests in the alleged unlawful and immoral real estate swap agreement. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Abuse of the right of individual application
(a) The parties’ arguments
46. The Government submitted that in the applicants’ initial application to the Court the latter had stated that the house measured 174 square metres, whereas in fact it measured only half that, namely 87 square metres. They had also failed to disclose that they had received the additional payment of 10,000 DEM corresponding to their parents’ investment in the house, and had falsely stated that V.L. had been a registered drug addict at the time relevant to the events. In the Government’s view, all these facts had been relevant to the case and, by failing to disclose them correctly, the applicants had therefore abused their right of individual application.
47. The applicants maintained their complaints, explaining, in particular, that the house in fact consisted of two floors and that the ground floor measured approximately 80 square metres. Thus, the Government’s reference to 87 square metres applied only in relation to the ground plan but not the overall surface area of the house, which they considered to be relevant. They also pointed out that this could have been seen from the changes to that effect in the land register.
(b) The Court’s assessment
48. The notion of “abuse”, within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention, must be understood as any conduct on the part of the applicant that is manifestly contrary to the purpose of the right of individual application as provided for in the Convention and which impedes the proper functioning of the Court or the proper conduct of the proceedings before it (see Miro?ubovs and Others v. Latvia, no. 798/05, §§ 62 and 65, 15 September 2009). An application may exceptionally be rejected on that ground if, among other things, it is knowingly based on untrue facts (see, as a recent example, F.A. v. Cyprus (dec.), no. 41816/10, §§ 39, 40, 42 and 43, 25 March 2014; and Gross v. Switzerland [GC], no. 67810/10, § 28, ECHR 2014), the most egregious example being applications based on forged documents (see, for instance, Jian v. Romania (dec.), no. 46640/99, 30 March 2004; Bagheri and Maliki v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 30164/06, 15 May 2007; and Poznanski and Others v. Germany (dec.), no. 25101/05, 3 July 2007). However, any deliberate attempt to mislead the Court must be established with sufficient certainty (see, amongst many others, Gross, cited above, § 28).
49. In the case at issue the Court does not take the view that the applicants deliberately provided false information concerning the surface area of the house or the receipt of the additional payment, since this information was apparent from the documents available to the Court. In any event it forms part of the dispute between the parties as to whether or not there has been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in relation to the swap agreement. As such, it can be the subject of the parties’ arguments and counter-arguments, which the Court can accept or reject, but cannot in itself be regarded as an abuse of the right of individual application (see Udovi?i? v. Croatia, no. 27310/09, § 125, 24 April 2014; and Harakchiev and Tolumov v. Bulgaria, nos. 15018/11 and 61199/12, § 185, 8 July 2014). This is also true in respect of the changes in the land register concerning the surface area of the property (see paragraph 36 above). Similarly, the Court notes that the question of whether V.L.’s drug abuse problem was known to the Centre is another contentious issue which had already been argued at the domestic level, and in any event does not appear central to the case (see paragraphs 30 and 32 above). Accordingly, irrespective of whether or not she had been registered as a drug addict in a particular database of the competent authorities, it cannot be said that the applicants abused their right of individual application by pursuing those arguments before the Court.
50. The Government’s objection should thus be rejected.
2. Non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
(a) The parties’ arguments
51. The Government pointed out that the applicants’ guardians, namely their parents, had failed to challenge on behalf of their children the Centre’s decision authorising the swap agreement, which they could have done through the available administrative remedies, thereby raising all their complaints concerning the aforementioned agreement. The decision authorising the swap agreement had been duly served on their representative and they had therefore been at liberty to challenge it before the competent bodies. Moreover, the applicants’ parents had failed to lodge a civil claim in order to establish that the swap agreement was voidable, as provided under Article 139 of the Civil Obligations Act. Instead, they had erroneously lodged a civil action asking for the swap agreement to be declared null and void, which had prevented the domestic courts ? which held that the claim was ill-founded ? to reclassify their action as a claim under Article 139 of the Civil Obligations Act. In the Government’s view, their capacity for using such remedies had perhaps been hampered by the fact that Z.L. had been in detention at the time, but that could not explain his failure to undertake the necessary inquiries and actions concerning the swap agreement, or the failure of V.L. and E.B. to challenge the Centre’s decision and the conclusion of the swap agreement, as provided under the relevant domestic law.
52. The applicants considered that they had properly exhausted the domestic remedies, and maintained that it had been incumbent on the Centre to protect their interests in relation to the conclusion of the swap agreement, which it had failed to do. In particular, it had been impossible for them to lodge a complaint concerning the Centre’s decision authorising the swap agreement when the decision had been served exclusively on M.I., whose conflict of interest meant that he had no reason to complain about the aforementioned decision.
(b) The Court’s assessment
53. The Court considers that the question of the exhaustion of domestic remedies as argued by the parties should be joined to the merits, since it is closely linked to the substance of the applicants’ complaints.
3. Conclusion
54. The Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ arguments
55. The applicants contended that it had been self-evident that the house had a significantly higher value than the flat which they had received from D.M. on the basis of the real estate swap agreement. They explained that the amount of HRK 450,000 (approximately EUR 60,000), for which their parents had bought the house, had not corresponded to its real value as they had bought it in 1997 ? in circumstances of post-war uncertainty ? from its previous owners, who had left Croatia and were living in Belgrade at the time. In any event, the applicants argued that it was undisputed that their parents had invested some 80,000 DEM (approximately EUR 40,000) in the house which, together with the amount which they had paid for it, amounted in total to some EUR 100,000. It had thus been unclear why the Centre had consented to a swap agreement by which they had received a flat worth approximately EUR 55,000. Moreover, the applicants took the view that the Centre had been well aware that their father had been in prison at the time, that their mother had had drug abuse problems, and that the lawyer M.I. had a conflict of interest. Nonetheless, the Centre had never attempted to interview their father nor had it commissioned any expert report assessing the value of the property or conducted an on-site inspection to assess all the circumstances of the property exchange. Similarly, the tax authorities had assessed the value of the property exchange solely on the basis of the value indicated in the swap agreement without carrying out any further inquiries. In these circumstances ? in which their parents had not been able to protect their rights and interests properly ? the applicants considered that the State authorities had been under an obligation to approach the case with the requisite diligence, taking into account the State’s incumbent duty to prevent any actions which could run contrary to the applicants’ best interests.
56. The Government accepted that the domestic authorities had had a positive obligation to protect the best interests of the applicants, who had been only children at the time of the conclusion of the swap agreement. The Government, however, considered that the State authorities had duly complied with that obligation. The Government pointed out that the swap agreement had been concluded in very difficult circumstances for the applicants’ family, given that at the time their father had been in detention pending criminal trial on very serious charges and their mother had had financial problems, all of which had affected the applicants themselves. Thus, the Centre’s decision authorising the swap agreement, which had been intended to secure a normal upbringing and education for the applicants, had been the only possible solution. As to the value of the properties, the Government pointed out that the flat was only about ten square metres smaller than the house and, unlike the house, needed no further investment or renovation. Moreover, the applicants had received an additional sum of 10,000 DEM on account of the difference in value between the two properties. In the Government’s view, the tax assessment of the value of the property exchange also suggested that neither party to the swap agreement had sustained any damage thereby. In any case, it was not only the value of the property which had been a relevant factor but rather the applicants’ family circumstances had warranted the swap agreement to which the Centre had consented. The Government conceded that the Centre had failed to commission an expert report assessing the value of the house, but considered that there had been no reason to do so since the Centre had been able to assess the relevant facts on the basis of the documents in the case file. Moreover, the Centre had had no reason to doubt that the applicants’ well-being was being safeguarded by V.L., as at the time nothing suggested that she had had any problems with drug abuse. Similarly, the Centre had had no reason to believe that the lawyer M.I. had been in the conflict-of-interest situation, as he had appeared before it as an authorised representative of the applicants’ parents.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
57. The Court notes at the outset that it is undisputed in the present case that the questions relating to the applicants’ proprietary interests concerning the real estate swap agreement fall to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
58. While the essential object of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is to protect the individual against unjustified interference by the State with the peaceful enjoyment of his or her possessions, it may also entail positive obligations requiring the State to take certain measures necessary to protect property rights, particularly where there is a direct link between the measures an applicant may legitimately expect from the authorities and his or her effective enjoyment of his or her possessions (see Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine, no. 48553/99, § 96, ECHR 2002-VII, and cases cited therein; Önery?ld?z v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 134, ECHR 2004 XII; Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 143, ECHR 2004-V; P?duraru v. Romania, no. 63252/00, § 88, ECHR 2005-XII; Bistrovi? v. Croatia, no. 25774/05, § 35, 31 May 2007; and Zolotas v. Greece (no. 2), no. 66610/09, § 47, CEDH 2013). In particular, allegations of a failure on the part of the State to take positive action in order to protect private property should be examined in the light of the general rule in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which lays down the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Kolyadenko and Others v. Russia, nos. 17423/05, 20534/05, 20678/05, 23263/05, 24283/05 and 35673/05, § 213, 28 February 2012).
59. Although the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 do not lend themselves to precise definition the applicable principles are nonetheless similar. Whether the case is analysed in terms of a positive duty on the part of the State or in terms of interference by a public authority which needs to be justified, the criteria to be applied do not differ in substance. In both the case of an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions and that of an abstention from action, a fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interests of the community and the requirement to protect the individual’s fundamental rights (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 69, Series A no. 52, and Kotov v. Russia [GC], no. 54522/00, § 110, 3 April 2012).
60. In order to assess whether the State’s conduct satisfied the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must have regard to the fact that the Convention is intended to guarantee rights that are practical and effective. It must go beneath superficial appearances and look into the reality of the situation, which requires an overall examination of the various interests in issue; this may call for an analysis of, inter alia, the conduct of the parties to the proceedings, including the steps taken by the State (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 114, ECHR 2000 I; Novoseletskiy v. Ukraine, no. 47148/99, § 102, 22 February 2005).
61. Furthermore, the positive obligations imply, in particular, that States are obliged to provide judicial procedures that offer the necessary procedural guarantees and therefore enable the domestic courts and tribunals to adjudicate effectively and fairly any cases concerning property matters (see Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 83, ECHR 2007 I, and Chadzitaskos and Franta v. the Czech Republic, nos. 7398/07, 31244/07, 11993/08 and 3957/09, § 48, 27 September 2012), including those between private parties (see Zehentner v. Austria, no. 20082/02, §§ 73 and 75, 16 July 2009). The proceedings at issue must afford the individual a reasonable opportunity of putting his or her case to the relevant authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision. In ascertaining whether this condition has been satisfied, the Court takes a comprehensive view (see Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002 IV, and cases cited therein, and Zehentner, cited above, § 73).
62. The Court has also held that where children are involved, their best interests must be taken into account (see, for example, X v. Latvia [GC], no. 27853/09, § 96, ECHR 2013). On this particular point, the Court reiterates that there is a broad consensus, including in international law, in support of the idea that in all decisions concerning children, their best interests are of paramount importance. Whilst alone they cannot be decisive, such interests certainly must be afforded significant weight (see Jeunesse v. the Netherlands [GC], no. 12738/10, § 109, 3 October 2014). Indeed, the Convention on the Rights of the Child gives the child the right to have his or her best interests assessed and taken into account as a primary consideration in all actions or decisions that concern him or her, both in the public and private sphere, which expresses one of the fundamental values of that Convention (see paragraphs 42 and 43 above).
63. The Court’s case-law shows that these considerations are of significance also in the area of protection of the child’s proprietary interests that falls under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Thus, the Court must assess the manner in which the domestic authorities’ acted in protecting the child’s proprietary interests against any malevolent or negligent actions on the part of others, including their legal representatives and natural parents (see Lazarev and Lazarev v. Russia (dec.), no. 16153/03, 24 November 2005).
(b) Application of these principles to the present case
64. The Court notes that the central question in the case at issue is the alleged failure of the State to take adequately into account the best interests of the applicants and to protect their property rights in the allegedly unlawful and immoral real estate swap agreement. While it is true that under the relevant domestic law the precondition for such an agreement was the consent of the Centre ? which could also raise an issue from the perspective of the State’s negative obligations (see Lazarev, cited above) ? the Court considers that, in the circumstances, it is more appropriate to analyse the case from the perspective of the State’s positive obligations, bearing in mind that the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 do not lend themselves to precise definition and yet the applicable principles are nonetheless similar (see paragraph 59 above).
65. The Court observes that it is undisputed between the parties that prior to the impugned real estate swap agreement the applicants were the owners of the house in which they lived with their mother V.L., and their legal guardian Z.L., who is the father of the second applicant. The house was purchased by V.L. and Z.L. in 1997, although the ownership was from the very outset registered as vesting in both applicants in equal shares (see paragraph 8 above). It thus represented the applicants’ possession legally protected from an unjustified interference or action by any third party, including the applicants’ parents (see paragraph 37 above, Article 48 of the Constitution; and paragraph 39 above, section 265 of the Family Act).
66. The house is a seaside villa consisting of two floors plus an adjacent courtyard, located in a seaside neighbourhood of P. At the time of its acquisition by the applicants, the house was in poor condition. Thus, in addition to paying HRK 450,000 (approximately EUR 60,000) as the purchase price of the house, V.L. and Z.L. invested additional funds of 80,000 DEM (approximately EUR 40,000) in its renovation (see paragraphs 6-8, and 54-55 above).
67. The Court notes that the applicants’ ownership of the house was exchanged for the ownership of a flat and a garage in P. The flat at issue is a four-room flat located on the fourth floor of a residential building in P. (see paragraph 13 above). This exchange occurred by the disposition of the applicants’ parents and consent of the Centre which was involved in the case due to the fact that at the relevant time the first applicant was fourteen years old and the second applicant was nine years old, which meant that their parents could dispose of their property only with the consent of the Centre (see paragraph 39 above).
68. In this connection the Court observes a complex set of factual circumstances in which the real estate swap agreement took place. In particular, the Court notes that V.L. and Z.L. first approached the Centre in 2000 asking for its consent to the sale of the applicants’ house, but without specifying to whom or for what amount (see paragraph 10 above). Meanwhile, V.L. and Z.L. fell into financial difficulties and Z.L. was arrested and held in detention pending criminal proceedings on charges of attempted murder and unlawful possession of firearms, for which he was sentenced to six years’ imprisonment (see paragraphs 11 and 14 above).
69. It was within these circumstances that lawyer M.I., acting as the representative of V.L., Z.L. and E.B. (the father of the first applicant), submitted a formal request to the Centre in October 2001 asking for consent to a real estate swap agreement whereby the applicants would transfer their house to a certain D.M. while she would transfer her ownership of the flat to the applicants.
70. The Court notes that the circumstances in which V.L., Z.L. and E.B. authorised M.I. to act on their behalf for the real estate swap agreement are not fully clear. M.I. had been the defence lawyer to Z.L. in the above-mentioned criminal proceedings against him, and D.M., who was the other party to the swap agreement, was M.I.’s mother-in-law. Furthermore, the powers of attorney in favour of M.I. were issued for the purpose of obtaining the Centre’s consent to an unspecified real estate swap agreement (see paragraph 12 above), and it does not appear that V.L., while interviewed at the Centre in connection with M.I.’s request, was ever presented with the specific details of the draft swap agreement in question (see paragraph 14 above). This, therefore, leaves unexplained the discrepancy in her statement as to the difference in value between the house and the flat ? estimated at some 100,000 DEM (see paragraph 14 above) ? and the amount of 10,000 DEM which the Centre eventually accepted as the amount that the applicants should receive in that regard (see paragraph 17 above).
71. It is equally unclear why the Centre, when giving its consent to the swap agreement, also mentioned a garage as forming part of the property exchange when no garage had been mentioned in the draft swap agreement submitted by lawyer M.I. (see paragraphs 13 and 15 above) and nothing to that effect had been mentioned by V.L. during her interview at the Centre. Moreover, the Centre did not interview any of the other parties with a direct interest in the swap agreement, namely Z.L. and E.B., which in turn raises the issue of whether, and to what extent, they were aware of the substance of the draft swap agreement in question.
72. The Court further observes that the draft swap agreement contained a clause stating that the value of the exchanged property was equal and that the parties waived their right to object that they had sustained damage as a result of giving the exchanged property away at below half of its real value. The draft swap agreement was supplemented by a document in which the parties thereto acknowledged that V.L. and Z.L. had made significant investments in the house and that D.M. would compensate for those investments in an unspecified amount (see paragraph 13 above).
73. Eventually, this draft was formalised in the swap agreement of 16 December 2001 under which the applicants transferred their ownership of the house to D.M. while she transferred her ownership of the flat and a garage to the applicants. This version of the swap agreement contains a clause under which the parties agreed that there was no difference in value between the exchanged properties, and that they had no further claims on that account. The value of the property exchange was assessed at some HRK 400,000 (see paragraph 19 above). Based on this swap agreement, the applicants acquired ownership of the flat and the garage in exchange for their ownership of the house. In addition, they each received 5,000 DEM on account of the difference in value between the two properties (see paragraphs 17, 20 and 21 above).
74. In these circumstances, in assessing the protection of the applicants’ property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the initial concerns are raised with regard to the actual relative value of the exchanged properties (see, inter alia, Lazarev, cited above). While, in principle, it is not for the Court to substitute itself for the national courts and to deal with such matters, it is unfortunate that the domestic courts dismissed all the applicants’ evidence in the civil proceedings and thus left this question unexplained (see paragraph 25 above).
75. The Court therefore observes that it is undisputed between the parties that V.L. and Z.L. purchased the house for HRK 450,000 (approximately EUR 60,000) and that they additionally invested some 80,000 DEM in the house (approximately EUR 40,000). If nothing else, this fails to explain how the value of the house could have corresponded to the value of the flat and the garage ? estimated at a total of some HRK 400,000 (approximately EUR 55,000; see paragraphs 19 and 55-56 above) ? and an additional amount of 10,000 DEM (approximately EUR 5,000).
76. As to the Government’s reference to the tax assessment of the properties, the Court notes that the assessment was based only on the declared value of the transaction from the swap agreement (see paragraph 22 above) while Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 requires an assessment that goes beneath superficial appearances and looks into the reality of the situation (see, for example, Bistrovi?, cited above, § 35). Similarly, in view of the fact that the Centre took no action in assessing the reality of the circumstances of the property exchange (see paragraph 79 below), the Court cannot accept the Government’s argument that the flat needed no further investment or renovation and was in a better condition than the house. In these circumstances, given that the real estate swap agreement on the face of it raises an issue of the equality of giving which remained unexplained by the domestic authorities, it is difficult to adhere to the argument of equal value of the exchanged properties.
77. Against the above background, given that under the relevant domestic (see paragraph 39 above; section 265 of the Family Act) and international law (see paragraph 62 above) the applicants, as children, could legitimately have expected the domestic authorities to take measures to safeguard their rights, the Court must assess whether the State authorities took the necessary measures to safeguard their proprietary interests in the event of the alienation of their property (see Lazarev, cited above). It will thus, in view of the principle that the best interests of the child must be taken as a primary consideration (see paragraphs 42 and 62 above), asses the actions taken by the Centre and the manner in which the competent domestic courts have approached the matter once it had been brought to their attention.
78. As to the conduct of the Centre, the Court notes that following M.I.’s request for authorisation of the swap agreement, the only action taken by the Centre in assessing the circumstances of the case was the questioning of V.L. (see paragraph 14 above). None of the other legal guardians was interviewed or informed about the draft swap agreement, though the Government have at no point suggested that it had not been possible to arrange their questioning.
79. Furthermore, the Centre failed to take any action to assess the actual condition or the value of the properties which could reasonably have been expected given the reality of the circumstances of the property exchange and the available information. In particular, the Centre had been informed of the purchase price of the house and the applicants’ parents’ further investment in its renovation, which, as noted above, amounted to some EUR 100,000 in total (see paragraph 66 above). In spite of this knowledge, without conducting further assessments through, for example, an on-site inspection or an expert report, the Centre accepted that the total value of the house could be assessed and the exchange carried out at a value of some EUR 60,000 in total (HRK 400,000 and 10,000 DEM; see paragraph 75 above).
80. The Court is likewise not persuaded that the Centre approached the applicants’ particular family situation with the necessary diligence, in terms of assessing whether their proprietary interests were adequately protected against malevolent and/or negligent actions on the part of their parents (see Lazarev, cited above). In particular, the Centre was well aware of the fact that Z.L. was in detention and had been convicted on serious charges in criminal proceedings, and that V.L. was facing financial problems, all of which could have prompted them to take injudicious actions to the detriment of the applicants’ property.
81. It this connection the Court observes that when V.L. was interviewed in the Centre she alleged poor financial situation of her family which allegedly affected the applicants’ upbringing and results in school. Whereas this would be an aspect of importance in the assessment of the overall situation surrounding the impugned real estate swap agreement, the Court notes that the Centre took no further measures to verify or evaluate V.L.’s submissions concerning her financial situation, nor did it interview Z.L. or consult the relevant authorities concerning their particular situation. Thus, for instance, it did not accordingly verify the applicants’ school results nor did it interview the applicants although the first applicant was at the time fourteen years old and thus could have provided relevant information concerning her family’s situation.
82. Moreover, the Centre gave no consideration to whether, in the particular circumstances of the case, a special guardian should have been appointed who could have impartially and independently protected the applicants’ interests against all those involved in the impugned swap agreement, including their parents (see paragraph 39 above; section 192 of the Family Act).
83. In these circumstances, the Court finds that the Centre did not asses adequately the applicants’ family situation and the possible adverse impact of the impugned real estate swap agreement on their rights. It thereby failed to evaluate whether the circumstances of the real estate swap agreement complied with the principle of the best interests of the child in the applicants’ particular case.
84. As to the civil proceedings before the competent courts in which the applicants challenged the validity of the real estate swap agreement, the Court firstly notes that the procedural position of the applicants, as minors, in the administrative proceedings before the Centre was fully in the hands of their legal representatives, V.L. and Z.L., who were represented by M.I., a lawyer who had a conflict of interest. The applicants were thus unable to take any autonomous procedural actions, such as challenging the Centre’s decision authorising the swap agreement (compare Zehentner, cited above, § 76), nor, as noted above, had the authorities appointed a guardian ad litem who could have independently protected the applicants’ interests against all those involved in the swap agreement.
85. In these circumstances, the civil proceedings instituted by the applicants represented were the only means by which the circumstances of the property exchange could have been scrutinised. Nevertheless, even this possibility remained in the hands of their legal representatives at least until one of the applicants reached the age of majority and was able to take the legal actions herself, namely by lodging an appeal on points of law before the Supreme Court in 2007 (see paragraph 29 above).
86. However, the civil courts failed to appreciate the particular circumstances of the case and dismissed the applicants’ civil action solely on the grounds that the Centre’s decision authorising the swap agreement had not been challenged in the administrative proceedings (see paragraphs 25-26, 28 and 31 above). The civil courts thereby ignored the applicants’ position in the administrative proceedings (see paragraph 83 above); the evidence concerning M.I.’s conflict of interest as well as the applicants’ family circumstances, namely, at the time of the civil proceedings already disclosed, V.L.’s drug addiction and her financial problems; and Z.L.’s criminal conviction in the period leading up to the conclusion of the swap agreement. They also ignored the allegations of the Centre’s failure to protect the applicants’ best interests in relation to the conclusion of the swap agreement.
87. In the Court’s view, all the allegations concerning the conclusion of the swap agreement ? if nothing else ? raised the issue of compliance with the relevant constitutional obligation of the State to protect children (see paragraph 37, Articles 63 and 65 of the Constitution), as a result of which it was incumbent on the civil courts to examine the allegations carefully (see paragraph 38, sections 103 and 110 of the Civil Obligations Act) in accordance with the principle of the best interests of the child (see paragraph 43 above).
88. Consequently, the Court sees no relevance in the civil courts’ reference to the applicants’ possibility of claiming that the swap agreement was perhaps only voidable ? on which the Government also relied (see paragraphs 26 and 51 above) ? since the applicants, as minors, were not able to lodge such a claim autonomously within the relevant statutory prescription period of one year after the conclusion of the swap agreement (see paragraph 38 above; sections 111 and 139 of the Civil Obligations Act; and compare Stagno v. Belgium, no. 1062/07, §§ 32-33, 7 July 2009). The Court therefore dismisses the Government’s preliminary objection concerning the non-exhaustion of domestic remedies (see paragraph 53 above).
89. Taking the above into account, the Court finds that the domestic authorities failed to take the necessary measures to safeguard the proprietary interests of the applicants, as children, in the impugned real estate swap agreement and to afford them a reasonable opportunity to effectively challenge the measures interfering with their rights guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
90. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
91. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
92. In their initial application the applicants requested the Court to order restitutio in integrum and claimed the amount of “at least” 300,000 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage. They did not claim any costs and expenses.
93. The Government contended that claim.
94. The Court is of the view that the question of the application of Article 41, concerning pecuniary damage, is not ready for decision (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court). Accordingly, the Court reserves that question and the further procedure and invites the Government and the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, to submit their observations on the matter and, in particular, to inform it of any agreement that they may reach.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Decides to join to the merits the Government’s objection as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies and rejects it;

2. Declares the application admissible;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41, concerning the claim for pecuniary damage, is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 7 May 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Eccezione preliminare congiunta ai meriti e respinta (Articolo 35-1 - Esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali) Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - obblighi Positivi) danno Patrimoniale - riservato (Articolo 41 - soddisfazione Equa)



PRIMA SEZIONE







CAUSA S.L. E J.L. C. CROATIA

(Richiesta n. 13712/11)









SENTENZA
(I meriti)


STRASBOURG

7 maggio 2015





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di S.L. e J.L. c. Croatia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Isabelle Berro, Presidente
Elisabeth Steiner,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Dmitry Dedov, giudici
e Søren Nielsen, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 14 aprile 2015,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 13712/11) contro la Repubblica di Croatia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) coi cittadini croati, il Sig.ra S.L. ed il Sig.ra J.L. (“i richiedenti”), 7 gennaio 2011.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in P. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. I richiedenti addussero una violazione dei loro diritti di proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. 21 ottobre 2013 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti sono sorelle che nacquero rispettivamente nel 1987 e 1992 e vivono in P.
Sfondo di A. alla causa
6. A giugno 1997 i richiedenti, rappresentò con loro madre V.L., concluse un accordo di beni immobili con B.P. in che loro espressero la loro intenzione di comprare una villa di 87 metri di piazza ed il cortile adiacente di 624 metri di piazza in V., un neighbourhood della spiaggia di P. (in seguito: il “l'alloggio”). L'accordo affermò che l'alloggio era in condizione povera come i certi individui viveva dal molti anni là senza qualsiasi base legale ed aveva rovinato la mobilia ed installazioni.
7. L'accordo fu formalizzato in un contratto di acquisto di beni immobili di 17 dicembre 1997 col quale i richiedenti acquisirono proprietà dell'alloggio per un importo di 450,000 kunas croati (HRK).
8. 26 novembre 1999 i richiedenti registrarono la loro proprietà dell'alloggio e l'area di terra nel registro di terra in quote uguali.
B. Il beni immobili baratta accordo
9. Su una data non specificata V.L. richiesto dal Benessere sociale Centre attinente (in seguito: il “il Centre”) l'auorizzazione per vendere l'alloggio posseduto coi richiedenti, simile auorizzazione che è richiesto sotto il diritto nazionale attinente in cause dove un genitore desidera sbarazzarsi della proprietà di un figlio (veda paragrafo 39 sotto).
10. Come un risultato di che richiesta, sul 2000 V.L di 10 aprile. e suo marito Z.L. (il padre del secondo richiedente) fu intervistato al Centre. Loro affermarono che loro avevano comprato l'alloggio nel 1997 per HRK 450,000 e che loro già avevano speso approssimativamente 80,000 Deutsche marca (DEM) rinnovandolo. Comunque, l'alloggio richiese dell'ulteriore investimento per il quale a loro mancò il necessari vuole dire e così loro intesero di venderlo e vivere con uno dei loro genitori. Loro spiegarono inoltre che loro possedettero un affari di vendita al dettaglio e che loro non avevano problemi coi loro figli che sia aveva marchi eccellenti a scuola. V.L. e Z.L. anche promise che loro avrebbero aperto un conto bancario in favore dei loro figli nei quali loro depositerebbero i soldi dalla vendita dell'alloggio. Loro indicarono che loro avevano contattato un'agenzia di beni immobili che stava cercando un acquirente potenziale. Loro concordarono anche quel V.L. concluderebbe una volta il contratto di vendita loro erano riusciti a trovare un acquirente.
11. A febbraio 2001 Z.L. fu arrestato e sostenne in detenzione in collegamento con un tentato omicidio sospettato e la proprietà illegale di arma da fuoco. Lui fu accusato più tardi sulle stesse accuse nell'Organo giudiziario locale di P. (sud di Županijski u P.) che 10 ottobre 2001 lo trovi colpevole e lo condannò al reclusione di ' di sei anni. Durante i procedimenti penali il suo avvocato di difesa era M.I, un avvocato che pratica in P.
12. Sul 2001 M.I di 15 ottobre. presentato una richiesta al Centre che chiede auorizzazione per un beni immobili baratti accordo fra i richiedenti ed un certo D.M. che era infatti M.I. ' suocera di s. Lui offrì procure firmate con V.L., Z.L. ed E.B. (il padre del primo richiedente) l'authorising lui per ottenere il beneplacito del Centre ad un baratti accordo di beni immobili.
13. Insieme con la sua richiesta, M.I. purché una bozza baratta accordo che conviene quel D.M. trasferirebbe ai richiedenti il suo appartamento di quattro-stanza di 78.27 metri di piazza, situato sul quarto pavimento di un edificio residenziale in P. (in seguito: il “l'appartamento”), mentre i richiedenti trasferirebbero la loro proprietà dell'alloggio a D.M. La bozza baratta anche accordo affermato che i valori delle proprietà per essere scambiato erano gli stessi e che le parti rinunciarono al loro diritto per obiettare che loro avevano subito danno come un risultato di dare via la proprietà scambiata a sotto la metà del suo vero valore. M.I. anche presentò un altro documento, un supplemento al baratti accordo in che le parti a che accordo ammise quel V.L. e Z.L. aveva investito somme significative di soldi nell'alloggio e che, sulla base degli importi mostrata su certe fatture disponibili, D.M. li compenserebbe per quegli investimenti.
14. V.L. fu invitato al Centre per un colloquio 23 ottobre 2001 in collegamento con M.I. ' richiesta di s. Lei affermò che suo marito era stato imprigionato nel frattempo e che i loro affari di vendita al dettaglio aveva avviato andare male, mentre conducendola a chiusura sé ad agosto 2001. Lei spiegò anche che lei era inutilizzata e che questa situazione aveva colpito i richiedenti che stavano facendo più così bene a scuola. Lei affermò inoltre che lei era stata obbligata per prendere in prestito soldi per pagare i conti per l'alloggio e che la situazione complessiva aveva incitato lei e Z.L. scambiare l'alloggio per un appartamento in P. con l'obbligo supplementare da parte dell'appartamento-proprietario per pagarli la differenza nel valore fra le due proprietà, corrispondendo a dei 100,000 DEM secondo la sua stima. Infine, V.L. indicato che E.B., il padre del primo richiedente, aveva dato il suo beneplacito al baratti accordo. Lei si impegnò anche registrare la proprietà dell'appartamento nei richiedenti i nomi di '.
15. 13 novembre 2001 i Centre diedero il suo auorizzazione per il baratti accordo, da che cosa i richiedenti trasferirebbero la loro proprietà dell'alloggio a D.M. mentre i secondi trasferirebbero la sua proprietà dell'appartamento ed un garage ai richiedenti. La decisione redatta col Centre specificato quel V.L. fu obbligato per fornire al Centre una copia del baratti accordo.
16. Nella sua dichiarazione di ragioni dietro alla decisione, i Centre indicarono, che aveva preso noti delle procure previste a M.I. coi richiedenti i genitori di ', V.L. ' dichiarazione di s di 23 ottobre 2001, certificati di nascita per i richiedenti e certificati di cancelleria di terra per le proprietà, e la bozza baratta accordo. Aveva notato anche il fatto che Z.L. era stato dichiarato colpevole a primo-istanza del reato di tentato omicidio e proprietà illegale di arma da fuoco. Basato su queste informazioni, i Centre conclusero che il baratti accordo non era contrario ai migliori interessi dei richiedenti poiché i loro diritti di proprietà non sarebbero estinti o ridussero siccome loro sarebbero divenuti i proprietari di un appartamento che offrirebbe alloggio vivente e completamente appropriato.
17. Nello stesso giorno, i Centre diedero il suo auorizzazione per il documento supplementare al baratti accordo con virtù di che D.M. pagherebbe i richiedenti 5,000 DEM ognuno su conto della differenza nel valore fra le proprietà scambiate. Come una condizione di questa decisione, V.L. fu obbligato per fornire al Centre una dichiarazione di banca che attesta che il pagamento era stato reso. Nella sua dichiarazione di ragioni, i Centre si riferirono ad una richiesta resa con V.L. per la conclusione di un supplemento al baratti accordo e la dichiarazione che lei aveva dato al Centre. I Centre fondarono anche che questo non sarebbe stato contrario agli interessi dei richiedenti.
18. Le due decisioni sopra emesse col Centre 13 novembre 2001 furono spedite all'avvocato M.I.
19. 16 dicembre 2001 i richiedenti, rappresentò con V.L., concluse il beni immobili baratti accordo con D.M. di fronte ad un Notaio Pubblico in P., ed i richiedenti trasferirono con ciò la loro proprietà dell'alloggio a D.M. mentre i secondi trasferirono la sua proprietà dell'appartamento ed il garage ai richiedenti. Il baratti accordo contenne una clausola sotto la quale concordarono le parti che non c'era differenza nel valore delle proprietà scambiate, e che loro non avevano ulteriori rivendicazioni su quel il conto. Espose anche in giù il valore delle proprietà a del HRK 400,000.
20. Basato su questo contratto, i richiedenti e D.M. registrato debitamente la loro proprietà delle proprietà con la cancelleria di terra.
21. Sul 2001 avvocato M.I di 28 dicembre. presentò al Centre un certificato dalla cancelleria di terra che mostra che i richiedenti avevano registrato la loro proprietà dell'appartamento e dichiarazioni di banca che mostrano che loro avevano ricevuto l'importo di 5,000 DEM ognuno.
22. 2 e 12 marzo 2002 il P. Tassa Ufficio (financija di Ministarstvo, l'uprava di Porezna) dichiarò un obbligo di tassa di HRK 20,000 per ognuno delle parti ?basate sul valore dichiarato dell'operazione coinvolto nel baratti accordo che fu diviso con metà in riguardo dei richiedenti che furono obbligati così per pagare HRK 10,000 ognuno.
C. I richiedenti ' procedimenti civili
23. 17 novembre 2004 i richiedenti, rappresentati con Z.L. come il loro guardiano legale, portò un'azione contro D.M.in il P. Corte Municipale (?sud di Opinski u P.), chiedendo alla corte di dichiarare il baratti accordo privo di valore legale (il ništav).
24. Durante i procedimenti i richiedenti dibatterono che il baratti accordo aveva effettuato il cambio della proprietà dell'alloggio ?che il comprised due appartamenti, ognuno che misura 87 metri di piazza, era solamente il ' di cinque minuti camminano dal mare e valevano approssimativamente 300,000 euros (EUR) per un appartamento ed un valore di garage in totale nessuno più di EUR 70,000. Dato che al tempo quando il contratto fu concluso loro avevano solamente quattordici anni e nove anni vecchio, i Centre avrebbero dovuto difendere i loro diritti e non avrebbero dovuto dare il suo beneplacito ad un baratti accordo di quel il genere. In questo riguardo loro indicarono che sezione 265 § 1 del Famiglia Atto elencò le specifiche istanze in che la proprietà di un minore potrebbe essere disposto di, e che nessuno simile istanza era esistita nella loro causa. Inoltre, i Centre erano andati a vuoto ad eseguire un'ispezione di su-luogo o commissionare un rapporto competente che gli avrebbe concesso valutare il valore dell'alloggio ed adottare una decisione corretta riguardo alla richiesta per auorizzazione del baratti accordo. I richiedenti considerarono perciò che, non riuscendo a prendere misure così vitali, i Centre avevano concesso un cambio di proprietà illegale ed immorale per essere eseguiti. Nella loro prospettiva, questo aveva dato luogo all'invalidamento di ab initio del cambio. I richiedenti indicarono anche che il loro Z.L custode e legale. non era stato parte alle discussioni riguardo al baratti accordo. Loro proposero perciò che il giudice esamina molti testimoni, incluso i partecipanti al baratti accordo, gli impiegati del Centre il primo richiedente con che era che già calcola diciassette anni vecchio e molti altri testimoni che erano consapevoli delle circostanze della causa, e commissiona un rapporto competente che stabilisce il valore delle proprietà.
25. 1 marzo 2005 il P. Corte Municipale respinse i richiedenti ' richiede di prendere qualsiasi della prova proposta per motivi che la causa potrebbe essere decisa sulla base dei documenti dall'archivio di causa.
26. 15 aprile 2005 il P. Corte Municipale respinse i richiedenti ' azione civile. Dibattè che non era in una posizione per riesaminare la decisione del Centre di autorizzare il baratti accordo, poiché quel era una decisione amministrativa che sarebbe potuta essere impugnata solamente in procedimenti amministrativi. Così, determinato che tale decisione esistè, il P. Corte Municipale non poteva trovare il baratti accordo per essere illegale o contrariare alla morale di società. Indicò anche che il baratti accordo possibilmente potrebbe essere solamente un contratto annullabile (il pobojan) ma nessuna rivendicazione a che effetto era stato reso coi richiedenti.
27. I richiedenti impugnarono che sentenza con vuole dire di un ricorso depositato di fronte all'Organo giudiziario locale di P., mentre dibattendo che la corte di primo-istanza era andata a vuoto ad esaminare qualsiasi dei loro argomenti ed aveva errato così nella sua decisione riguardo alla validità del baratti accordo.
28. 19 marzo 2007 l'Organo giudiziario locale di P. respinse i richiedenti che ' piace siccome mal-fondato, mentre girando il ragionamento della corte di primo-istanza.
29. I richiedenti depositarono poi un ricorso su questioni di diritto di fronte alla Corte Suprema (sud di Vrhovni Republike Hrvatske) 8 giugno 2007. Il secondo richiedente fu rappresentato con V.L., ed il primo richiedente, mentre essendo giunto nel frattempo all'età del discernimento, era in grado condurre l'azione legale lei.
30. Nel loro ricorso su questioni di diritto i richiedenti dibatterono, inter l'alia che il P. Corte Municipale era andata a vuoto ad esaminare qualsiasi della prova attinente ed aveva valutato erroneamente le circostanze della causa. In particolare, non era riuscito a prendere in considerazione che i Centre avevano concesso trascuratamente il baratti accordo per essere concluso senza prendere in considerazione il valore delle proprietà e la natura delle loro circostanze di famiglia al tempo, vale a dire il fatto che Z.L. era in detenzione e quel V.L. era noto come una persona con un problema dell'abuso di droga.
31. 19 dicembre 2007 la Corte Suprema respinse i richiedenti che ' piace su questioni di diritto siccome mal-fondato e girato le decisioni delle corti più basse che fondarono che le corti civili non erano in una posizione per riesaminare la definitivo decisione amministrativa del Centre che concede la conclusione del baratti accordo. Inoltre, non sembrò alla Corte Suprema che i Centre erano andati a vuoto nella sua protezione dei migliori interessi dei richiedenti.
32. I richiedenti presentarono poi un reclamo costituzionale di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale (sud di Ustavni Republike Hrvatske) reiterando i loro argomenti precedenti di fronte alle corti più basse. Il secondo richiedente fu rappresentato con V.L.
33. 9 giugno 2010 la Corte Costituzionale dichiarò i richiedenti ' azione di reclamo costituzionale inammissibile come manifestamente mal-fondò.
D. le Altre informazioni attinenti
34. Un rapporto del Ministero di Politica Sociale e Gioventù (politike di socijalne di Ministarstvo i mladih) di 30 gennaio 2014 presentato alla Corte suggerisce che il Centre non era consapevole di V.L. ' s drogano problema di abuso né era stata alerted riguardo a M.I. ' conflitto di interessi di s.
35. Secondo un rapporto del Ministero di Salute (zdravlja di Ministarstvo) di 7 febbraio 2014, V.L. avviato la sua terapia di tossicodipendenza 12 dicembre 2003 e lo terminò nel 2004. Lei cominciò poi di nuovo nel 2007 e lei ancora stava subendo la terapia al tempo presente.
36. Le informazioni disponibile dalla cancelleria di e-terra riguardo a proprietà in show di Croatia che l'alloggio e la terra sulle quali è localizzato misura 225 metri di piazza con un cortile adiacente di 476 metri di piazza tutti di che sono registrati nel nome di D.M. come proprietario.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE
A. diritto nazionale Attinente
1. Costituzione
37. La disposizione attinente della Costituzione della Repubblica di Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 56/1990, 135/1997 8/1998 (testo consolidato), 113/2000, 124/2000 (testo consolidato), 28/2001 e 41/2001 (testo consolidato), 55/2001 (il corrigendum), 76/2010, 85/2010 05/2014) le letture:
Articolo 48
“Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito... “
Articolo 63
“Lo Stato proteggerà... figli e gioventù...”
Articolo 65
“Ognuno avrà il dovere di proteggere i figli...”
2. atto degli obblighi civili
38. Le disposizioni attinenti dell’Atto degli Obblighi Civili (Zakon odnosima di obveznim di o, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 53/1991, 73/1991, 111/1993 3/1994, 7/1996 91/1996 e 112/1999) preveda:
Lecito [legale] la base
Sezione 51
“(1) ogni obbligo contrattuale avrà un lecito [legale] la base [la causa].
(2) una base non è lecita se contravviene alla Costituzione, principi fondamentali di legge o morale.
...”
Contraente privo di valore legale su motivi di suo [legale] la base
Sezione 52
“Dove c'è nessuno [legale] la base [per un contratto] o dove suo [la base] non è lecito, il contratto è privo di valore legale.”
Nullità
Sezione 103
“Un contratto che è contrario alla Costituzione, principi fondamentali di legge o morale è privo di valore legale, a meno che c'è dell'altro [applicabile] la sanzione o la legge prevede differentemente in una particolare causa.”
Diritto illimitato per supplicare la nullità
Sezione 110
“Il diritto per supplicare la nullità sarà inestinguibile.”
Contratto annullabile
Sezione 111
“Un contratto sarà annullabile dove una delle sue parti mancò qualità giuridica, dove fu concluso sulla base di equivoci, o dove così previde sotto questo Atto o l'altra legislazione speciale.”
Conclusione del diritto
Sezione 117
“(1) il diritto per chiedere che un contratto è annullabile passerà un anno dopo che fu imparato che ci sono ragioni che lo fanno annullabile...
(2) in qualsiasi causa che diritto passerà tre anni dopo conclusione del contratto.”
Disproportionality ovvio in importo dato
Sezione 139
“(1) se al tempo della conclusione del contratto era un disproportionality ovvio nell'importo dato, la parte danneggiata può affermare che il contratto è annullabile se che parte non seppe, o aveva nessuna ragione di sapere, del suo vero valore.
(2) il diritto per chiedere che il contratto è annullabile passerà un anno dopo la sua conclusione.
(3) rinuncia di questo diritto sarà senza qualsiasi effetto legale.”
3. Famiglia Atto
39. La parte attinente del Famiglia Atto (zakon di Obiteljski, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 162/1998), come in vigore al tempo attinente, purché:
Sezione 121
“(1) qualità giuridica sarà ottenuta col raggiungimento della maggiore età dell'individuo o con la conclusione di un matrimonio di fronte alla maturità legale.
(2) una persona che è diciotto anni vecchia è giuridicamente un adulto.
...”
Sezione 192
“Un guardiano speciale sarà nominato ad un figlio di che è nella cura [biologico] o genitori adottivi, nell'evento di una controversia fra il figlio ed i genitori, per i fini di concludere un contratto fra loro e nelle altre cause dove l'interesse del figlio funziona contrario all'interesse dei genitori.”
Sezione 265
“(1) soggetto al beneplacito del Benessere sociale Centre competente, genitori possono disporre di o possono ingombrare la proprietà di un figlio che è un minore per i fini del mantenimento del figlio, trattamento medico, educazione, istruzione, istruzione o le altre importanti necessità.
(2) il beneplacito del Benessere sociale Centre è anche necessario per la presa di certe azioni procedurali di fronte alla corte o un altro corpo statale riguardo alla proprietà del figlio.”
4. Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto
40. La disposizione attinente del Beni immobili Trasferimento Tassa Atto (Zakon o porezu na promet nekretnina, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 69/1997) prevede:
Sezione 9
“(1) la base di tassa per un'operazione di beni immobili è il valore di mercato del beni immobili al momento della sua acquisizione.
(2) si considera che il valore di mercato del beni immobili sia il valore che il beni immobili ha o potrebbe avere sul mercato al tempo della sua acquisizione. Il valore di mercato del beni immobili sarà stabilito, in principio, sulla base del documento dell'acquisizione.
...”
5. Procedura Atto civile
41. La parte attinente del Procedura Atto Civile (Ufficiale Pubblica N. 53/1991, 91/1992 58/1993, 112/1999 88/2001, 117/2003 88/2005, 2/2007 84/2008, 123/2008 57/2011, 148/2011 25/2013 e 89/2014) prevede:
Sezione 428a
“(1) quando la Corte europea di Diritti umani ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale garantita con la Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali o protocolli supplementari inoltre ratificò con la Repubblica di Croatia, una parte può, entro trenta giorni della sentenza della Corte europea di Diritti umani che diviene definitivo, registri un ricorso con la corte nella Repubblica di Croatia che aggiudicò nella prima istanza nei procedimenti in che la decisione che viola il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale fu resa, accantonare la decisione con che il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale fu violata.
(2) i procedimenti assegnati ad in paragrafo 1 di questa sezione saranno condotti con facendo domanda, mutatis mutandis, le disposizioni sulla riapertura di procedimenti.
(3) nei procedimenti riaperti le corti sono costrette a rispettare le opinioni giuridiche espresse nella definitivo sentenza della Corte europea di Diritti umani che trova una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o la libertà.”
B. diritto internazionale Attinente
1. Convenzione sui Diritti del Figlio
42. La disposizione attinente della Nazioni Convenzione Unito sui Diritti del Figlio di 20 novembre 1989 che entrò in vigore in riguardo di Croatia 8 ottobre 1991 (Ufficiale Pubblica-Accordi Internazionali n. 12/1993), prevede:
Articolo 3
“1. In tutte le azioni riguardo a figli, se si impegnato con pubblico o istituzioni di benessere sociale private, corti di legge, autorità amministrative o corpi legislativi i migliori interessi del figlio saranno una considerazione primaria.
...”
43. Il Comitato sui Diritti del Figlio ha spiegato recentemente il contenuto di questo obbligo in suo “commento di Generale N.ro 14 (2013) sul diritto del figlio per avere suo o i suoi migliori interessi presi come una considerazione primaria (l'arte. 3, parà. 1)” (CRC/C/GC/14, 29 maggio 2013) nei termini seguenti:
“A. I migliori interessi del figlio: un diritto, un principio ed un articolo di procedura
1. Articolo 3, divida in paragrafi 1, della Convenzione sui Diritti del Figlio il figlio dà il diritto per avere suo o i suoi migliori interessi valutarono e presi in considerazione come una considerazione primaria in tutte le azioni o decisioni che li concernono lui o, sia nella sfera pubblica e privata. Inoltre, esprime uno dei valori fondamentali della Convenzione. Il Comitato sui Diritti del Figlio (il Comitato) ha identificato articolo 3, ha diviso in paragrafi 1, come uno dei quattro principi generali della Convenzione per interpretando ed implementare tutti i diritti del figlio e ha fatto domanda è un concetto dinamico che richiede una valutazione appropriato allo specifico contesto.
...
4. Il concetto dei migliori interessi del figlio che assicura è tirato sia il pieno e godimento effettivo di tutti i diritti riconobbero nella Convenzione e lo sviluppo di holistic del figlio. Il Comitato già ha indicato che “la sentenza di un adulto dei migliori interessi di un figlio non può avere la priorità l'obbligo per rispettare tutti il diritti di figlio sotto la Convenzione.” ricorda che non c'è nessuna gerarchia di diritti nella Convenzione; tutti i diritti previsti per therein sono nel “i migliori interessi di figlio” e nessun diritto potrebbe essere compromesso con un'interpretazione negativa dei migliori interessi del figlio.
6. Le sottolineature di Comitato che i migliori interessi del figlio sono un concetto di threefold:
(un) Un diritto effettivo: Il diritto del figlio per avere suo o i suoi migliori interessi valutarono e presi come una considerazione primaria quando interessi diversi sono considerati per giungere ad una decisione sul problema in pericolo, e la garanzia che questo diritto sarà implementato ogni qualvolta una decisione sarà reso riguardo ad un figlio, un gruppo di identificò o figli non identificati o figli in generale. Articolo 3, divida in paragrafi 1, crea un obbligo intrinseco per gli Stati, è direttamente applicabile (stesso-eseguendo) e può essere invocato di fronte ad una corte.
(b) Un principio, principio legale ed interpretativo: Se una disposizione legale è aperta a più di un'interpretazione, l'interpretazione che più efficacemente notifica i migliori interessi del figlio dovrebbe essere scelta. I diritti custodirono nella Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli Opzionali offrono la struttura per interpretazione.
(il c) Un articolo di procedura: Ogni qualvolta una decisione sarà presa che colpirà un specifico figlio, un gruppo identificato di figli o figli in generale, l'elaborazione decisionale deve includere una valutazione del possibile impatto (positivo o negativo) della decisione sul figlio o figli riguardarono. Valutando e determinando i migliori interessi del figlio richiedono garanzie procedurali. Inoltre, la giustificazione di una decisione deve mostrare che il diritto è stato preso esplicitamente in considerazione. In questo riguardo a, le parti di Stati spiegheranno come il diritto è stato rispettato nella decisione che è che che si ha considerato che sia nei migliori interessi del figlio,; che criterio è basato su; e come gli interessi del figlio sono stati pesati contro le altre considerazioni, sia loro problemi larghi di politica o cause individuali.
...
III. Natura e sfera degli obblighi delle parti di Stati
13. Ogni parte in Stato deve rispettare e deve implementare il diritto del figlio per avere suo o i suoi migliori interessi valutarono e presi come una considerazione primaria, e è sotto l'obbligo per prendere misure del tutto necessarie, intenzionali e concrete per la piena attuazione di questo diritto.
14. Articolo 3, divida in paragrafi 1, stabilisce una struttura con tre tipi diversi di obblighi per le parti di Stati:
(un) L'obbligo per assicurare che i migliori interessi del figlio sono integrati fatto domanda propriamente e costantemente in ogni azione presa con un'istituzione pubblica, specialmente in tutte le misure di attuazione procedimenti amministrativi e giudiziali che direttamente o indirettamente hanno un impatto su su figli;
(b) L'obbligo per assicurare che decisioni del tutto giudiziali ed amministrative così come politiche e legislazione riguardo a figli dimostrano che i migliori interessi del figlio sono stati una considerazione primaria. Questo include descrivendo come i migliori interessi sono stati esaminati e sono stati valutati, e che peso è stato attribuito a loro nella decisione.
(il c) L'obbligo per assicurare che gli interessi del figlio sono stati valutati e sono stati presi come una considerazione primaria in decisioni ed azioni prese col settore privato, incluso quegli offrendo servizi, o qualsiasi l'altra entità privata o istituzione che prendono decisioni che riguardano o hanno un impatto su su un figlio.”
2. Statuto di Diritti essenziali
44. Lo Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea (2010/C 83/02) nella sua parte attinente prevede:
Articolo 24
I diritti del figlio
“...
(2) in tutte le azioni relativo a figli, se preso con autorità pubbliche o istituzioni private, i migliori interessi del figlio devono essere una considerazione primaria.
...”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
45. I richiedenti si lamentarono dell'insuccesso dello Stato per proteggere i loro interessi di proprietà nel beni immobili illegale ed immorale allegato baratti accordo. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che le letture:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'abuso del diritto della richiesta individuale
(un) Gli argomenti delle parti 46. Il Governo presentò che nei richiedenti ' la richiesta iniziale alla Corte i secondi avevano affermato che l'alloggio misurò 174 metri di piazza, mentre infatti misurò solamente metà che, vale a dire 87 metri di piazza. Loro non erano riusciti anche a rivelare che loro avevano ricevuto il pagamento supplementare di 10,000 DEM che corrispondono al loro investimento di ' di genitori nell'alloggio, ed aveva affermato falsamente quel V.L. era stato un tossicodipendente di droga registrato al tempo attinente agli eventi. Nella prospettiva del Governo, tutti questi fatti erano stati attinenti alla causa e, non riuscendo a rivelarli correttamente, i richiedenti avevano abusato perciò il loro diritto della richiesta individuale.
47. I richiedenti mantennero le loro azioni di reclamo, mentre spiegando, in particolare, che l'alloggio infatti consisteva di due pavimenti e che il pianterreno misurò verso 80 metri di piazza. Così, il riferimento del Governo a 87 metri quadrati fatti domanda solamente in relazione al piano base ma non l'area di superficie complessiva dell'alloggio che loro considerarono essere attinenti. Loro indicarono anche che questo sarebbe potuto essere visto dai cambi a che effetto nel registro di terra.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
48. La nozione di “l'abuso”, all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione, deve essere capito come qualsiasi condotta da parte del richiedente come il quale è manifestamente contrario al fine del diritto della richiesta individuale prevista per nella Convenzione e quale impedisce il corretto funzionando della Corte o la condotta corretta dei procedimenti di fronte a sé (veda Miroubovs ?ed Altri c. la Lettonia, n. 798/05, §§ 62 e 65, 15 settembre 2009). Una richiesta può essere respinta insolitamente su che base se, fra le altre cose, è basato di proposito su fatti falsi (veda, per recente esempio, F.A. c. la Cipro (il dec.), n. 41816/10, §§ 39 40, 42 e 43 25 marzo 2014; e Lordo c. la Svizzera [GC], n. 67810/10, § 28 ECHR 2014), l'esempio più egregio che è le richieste basò su documenti fucinati (veda, per istanza, Jian c. la Romania (il dec.), n. 46640/99, 30 marzo 2004; Bagheri e Maliki c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 30164/06, 15 maggio 2007; e Poznanski ed Altri c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 25101/05, 3 luglio 2007). Comunque qualsiasi intenzionale tenti di fuorviare la Corte deve essere stabilito con certezza sufficiente (veda, fra molti altri, Lordo, citato sopra, § 28).
49. Nella causa in questione la Corte la prospettiva non prende che i richiedenti offrirono intenzionalmente informazioni false riguardo all'area di superficie dell'alloggio o la ricevuta del pagamento supplementare, poiché queste informazioni erano evidenti dai documenti disponibile alla Corte. In qualsiasi l'evento forma parte della controversia fra le parti come a se o c'è stata non una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in relazione al baratti accordo. Come così, può essere la materia delle parti gli argomenti di ' e cassa-argomenti che la Corte può accettare o può respingere, ma non può essere considerato in se stesso un abuso del diritto della richiesta individuale (veda Udovii ?c. Croatia, n. 27310/09, § 125 24 aprile 2014; e Harakchiev e Tolumov c. la Bulgaria, N. 15018/11 e 61199/12, § 185 8 luglio 2014). Questo è anche vero in riguardo dei cambi nel registro di terra riguardo all'area di superficie della proprietà (veda paragrafo 36 sopra). Similmente, la Corte nota che la questione di se V.L. ' s drogano problema di abuso fu conosciuto al Centre è un altro problema di contenzioso che già era stato dibattuto al livello nazionale, ed in qualsiasi evento non sembra centrale alla causa (veda divide in paragrafi 30 e 32 sopra). Di conseguenza, irrispettoso di se o non lei era stata registrata come un tossicodipendente di droga in un particolare database delle autorità competenti, non si può dire che i richiedenti abusarono il loro diritto della richiesta individuale con intraprendendo quegli argomenti di fronte alla Corte.
50. L'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere respinta così.
2. La non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali
(un) Gli argomenti delle parti
51. Il Governo indicò che i richiedenti che ' tutela, vale a dire i loro genitori non erano riusciti ad impugnare in favore dei loro figli l'authorising della decisione del Centre il baratta accordo che loro avrebbero potuto fare per le via di ricorso amministrative e disponibili, mentre sollevando con ciò tutte le loro azioni di reclamo riguardo all'accordo summenzionato. L'autorizzazione della decisione il baratti accordo era stato notificato debitamente sul loro rappresentante e loro erano stati perciò alla libertà per impugnarlo di fronte ai corpi competenti. Inoltre, i richiedenti i genitori di ' non erano riusciti a depositare una rivendicazione civile per stabilire che il baratti accordo era annullabile, come previsto sotto Articolo 139 dell'Obblighi Atto Civile. Loro avevano depositato erroneamente invece, un'azione civile che chiede il baratta accordo per essere dichiarato privo di valore legale che aveva ostacolato le corti nazionali ?che contennero che la rivendicazione fu mal-fondata per riclassificare la loro azione come una rivendicazione sotto Articolo 139 dell'Obblighi Atto Civile. Nella prospettiva del Governo, la loro veste per usare simile via di ricorso forse era stata impedita col fatto che Z.L. era stato in detenzione al tempo, ma quel non poteva spiegare il suo insuccesso per intraprendere le indagini necessarie ed azioni riguardo al baratti accordo, o l'insuccesso di V.L. ed E.B. impugnare la decisione del Centre e la conclusione del baratti accordo, come previsto sotto il diritto nazionale attinente.
52. I richiedenti considerarono che loro in modo appropriato avevano esaurito le via di ricorso nazionali, e sostenne che era stato in carica sul Centre per proteggere i loro interessi in relazione alla conclusione del baratti accordo che non era riuscito a fare. In particolare, era stato impossibile per loro per presentare un reclamo riguardo all'authorising della decisione del Centre il baratta accordo quando la decisione era stata notificata esclusivamente su M.I. cui conflitto di interessi volle dire che lui non aveva nessuna ragione di lamentarsi della decisione summenzionata.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
53. La Corte considera che la questione dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali siccome dibattuto con le parti dovrebbe essere congiunto ai meriti, poiché è collegato da vicino alla sostanza dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di '.
3. Conclusione
54. La Corte nota che la richiesta non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Gli argomenti delle parti 55. I richiedenti contesero che era stato ovvio che l'alloggio aveva un valore significativamente più alto che l'appartamento che loro avevano ricevuto da D.M. sulla base del beni immobili baratti accordo. Loro spiegarono che l'importo di HRK 450,000 (verso EUR 60,000) per che i loro genitori avevano comprato l'alloggio, non aveva corrisposto al suo vero valore siccome loro l'avevano comprato nel 1997 ?in circostanze dell'incertezza dopoguerra dai suoi proprietari precedenti che avevano lasciato Croatia e stavano vivendo in Belgrade al tempo. In qualsiasi l'evento, i richiedenti dibatterono che era incontrastato che i loro genitori avevano investito dei 80,000 DEM (verso EUR 40,000) nell'alloggio che, insieme con l'importo che loro avevano pagato per sé, corrispose in totale a dell'EUR 100,000. Era stato così poco chiaro perché i Centre avevano acconsentito un baratti accordo col quale loro avevano ricevuto un valore piatto verso EUR 55,000. Inoltre, i richiedenti presero la prospettiva che i Centre erano stati bene consapevoli che loro padre era stato in prigione al tempo, che loro madre aveva avuto problemi di abuso di droga, e che l'avvocato M.I. aveva un conflitto di interessi. I Centre non avevano tentato mai nondimeno, di intervistare loro padre né aveva commissionato qualsiasi rapporto competente che valuta il valore della proprietà o condusse un'ispezione di su-luogo per valutare tutte le circostanze della proprietà scambi. Le autorità fiscali avevano valutato solamente similmente, il valore del cambio di proprietà sulla base del valore indicata nel baratti accordo senza portare fuori qualsiasi le ulteriori indagini. In queste circostanze nelle quali i loro genitori non erano stati in grado in modo appropriato proteggere i loro diritti ed interessi i richiedenti considerate che le autorità Statali erano state sotto un obbligo per avvicinarsi alla causa con la diligenza richiesta, mentre prendendo in considerazione il dovere in carica dello Stato di ostacolare qualsiasi azioni che potrebbero funzionare contrario ai richiedenti ' i migliori interessi.
56. Il Governo accettò che le autorità nazionali avevano avuto un obbligo positivo per proteggere i migliori interessi dei richiedenti di che erano stati solamente figli al tempo della conclusione il baratti accordo. Comunque, il Governo considerò che le autorità Statali si erano attenute debitamente con quel l'obbligo. Il Governo indicò che il baratti accordo era stato concluso in circostanze molto difficili per i richiedenti la famiglia di ', determinato che al tempo loro padre era stato in detenzione processo penale e pendente su accuse molto serie e loro madre aveva avuto problemi finanziari tutti di che avevano colpito i richiedenti stessi. Così, l'authorising della decisione del Centre il baratti accordo che era stato inteso di garantire un'educazione normale ed istruzione per i richiedenti era stato la possibile soluzione sola. Come al valore delle proprietà, il Governo indicò, che l'appartamento era solamente approssimativamente dieci piazza misura più piccola dell'alloggio e, diversamente da alloggio, ebbe bisogno di nessun ulteriore investimento o rinnovamento. Inoltre, i richiedenti avevano ricevuto una somma supplementare di 10,000 DEM su conto della differenza nel valore fra le due proprietà. Nella prospettiva del Governo, l'accertamento tributario del valore del cambio di proprietà suggerì anche, che nessuna parte al baratti accordo aveva subito qualsiasi danneggia con ciò. In qualsiasi la causa, non solo era il valore della proprietà che era stata un fattore attinente ma piuttosto i richiedenti circostanze di famiglia di ' avevano garantito il baratti accordo al quale avevano acconsentito i Centre. Il Governo concedè che i Centre erano andati a vuoto a commissionare un rapporto competente che valuta il valore dell'alloggio, ma considerò che non c'era stata nessuna ragione di fare così poiché i Centre erano stati in grado valutare i fatti attinenti sulla base dei documenti nell'archivio di causa. Inoltre, i Centre non avevano avuto nessuna ragione di dubitare che i richiedenti il benessere di ' era salvaguardato con V.L., come al tempo nulla suggerì che lei aveva avuto qualsiasi problemi con abuso di droga. Similmente, i Centre non avevano avuto nessuna ragione di credere che l'avvocato M.I. era stato nella situazione di conflitto-di-interesse, siccome lui l'era sembrato prima un rappresentante autorizzato dei richiedenti i genitori di '.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) principi di Generale
57. La Corte nota all'inizio che è incontrastato nella causa presente che le questioni relativo ai richiedenti ' interessi di proprietà riservati riguardo al beni immobili barattano accordo incorra essere esaminato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
58. Mentre l'oggetto essenziale di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è proteggere l'individuo contro interferenza ingiustificata con lo Stato col godimento tranquillo di suo o le sue proprietà, può comportare anche obblighi positivi che costringono lo Stato a prendere le certe misure necessarie proteggere diritti di proprietà, particolarmente dove c'è un collegamento diretto fra le misure un richiedente legittimamente può aspettarsi dalle autorità e suo o il suo godimento effettivo di suo o le sue proprietà (veda Sovtransavto Holding c. l'Ucraina, n. 48553/99, § 96, ECHR 2002-VII, e cause citati therein; Öneryldz ?c. la Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 134 ECHR 2004 XII; Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 143 il 2004-V di ECHR; Pduraru ?c. la Romania, n. 63252/00, § 88 ECHR 2005-XII; Bistrovi ?c. Croatia, n. 25774/05, § 35 31 maggio 2007; e Zolotas c. la Grecia (n. 2), n. 66610/09, § 47 CEDH 2013). In particolare, le dichiarazioni di un insuccesso da parte dello Stato per intentare causa positiva per proteggere proprietà privata dovrebbero essere esaminate nella luce dell'articolo generale nella prima frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che posa in giù il diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà (veda Kolyadenko ed Altri c. la Russia, N. 17423/05, 20534/05 20678/05, 23263/05 24283/05 e 35673/05, § 213 28 febbraio 2012).
59. Benché i confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non si presta a definizione precisa i principi applicabili sono nondimeno simili. Se la causa è analizzata in termini di un dovere positivo da parte dello Stato o in termini di interferenza con un'autorità pubblica che ha bisogno di essere giustificata, il criterio per essere fatto domanda non differisce in sostanza. In sia la causa di un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di proprietà e che di un'astensione da azione, un equilibrio equo deve essere previsto fra le richieste degli interessi generali della comunità ed il requisito per proteggere i diritti essenziali dell'individuo (veda, fra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 69 la Serie Un n. 52, e Kotov c. la Russia [GC], n. 54522/00, § 110 3 aprile 2012).
60. Per valutare se la condotta dello Stato soddisfece i requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve avere riguardo ad al fatto che si intende che la Convenzione garantisca diritti che sono pratici ed effettivi. Deve andare sotto di comparizioni superficiali e deve guardare nella realtà della situazione che richiede un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in problema; questo può mandare a chiamare un'analisi di, inter alia, la condotta delle parti ai procedimenti incluso i passi presi con lo Stato (veda Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 114 ECHR 2000 io; Novoseletskiy c. l'Ucraina, n. 47148/99, § 102 22 febbraio 2005).
61. Inoltre, gli obblighi positivi implicano, in particolare, che Stati sono obbligati per offrire procedure giudiziali che offrono le garanzie procedurali e necessarie e perciò abilitano le corti nazionali e tribunali per aggiudicare efficacemente ed equamente qualsiasi cause riguardo alle questioni di proprietà (veda Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 83 ECHR 2007 io, e Chadzitaskos e Franta c. la Repubblica ceca, N. 7398/07, 31244/07 11993/08 e 3957/09, § 48 27 settembre 2012), incluso quelli fra parti private (veda Zehentner c. l'Austria, n. 20082/02, §§ 73 e 75, 16 luglio 2009). I procedimenti in questione deve riconoscere l'individuo un'opportunità ragionevole di fissare suo o la sua causa alle autorità attinenti per il fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantito con questa disposizione. Nell'accertare se questa condizione è stata soddisfatta, la Corte prende una prospettiva comprensiva (veda Jokela c. la Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 45 ECHR 2002 IV, e cause citate therein, e Zehentner, citato sopra, § 73).
62. La Corte ha sostenuto anche che dove figli sono comportati, i loro migliori interessi devono essere presi in considerazione (veda, per esempio, X c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 27853/09, § 96 ECHR 2013). Su questo particolare punto, la Corte reitera, che c'è un consentimento largo, incluso in diritto internazionale, in appoggio dell'idea che in tutte le decisioni riguardo a figli, i loro migliori interessi sono dell'importanza eminente. Mentre da solo loro non possono essere decisivi, simile interessi certamente devono essere riconosciuti peso significativo (veda Jeunesse c. i Paesi Bassi [GC], n. 12738/10, § 109 3 ottobre 2014). Effettivamente, la Convenzione sui Diritti del Figlio dà il figlio il diritto per avere suo o i suoi migliori interessi valutarono e presi in considerazione come una considerazione primaria in tutte le azioni o decisioni che li concernono lui o, sia nella sfera pubblica e privata della quale esprime uno dei valori fondamentali che Convenzione (veda divide in paragrafi 42 e 43 sopra).
63. La causa-legge della Corte mostra che queste considerazioni sono anche di significato nell'area di protezione degli interessi di proprietà riservati del figlio che incorrono Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1. Così, la Corte deve valutare la maniera in che le autorità nazionali ' agì nel proteggere gli interessi di proprietà riservati del figlio contro qualsiasi azioni malevole o negligenti da parte di altri, incluso i loro rappresentanti legali ed i naturali genitori (veda Lazarev e Lazarev c. la Russia (il dec.), n. 16153/03, 24 novembre 2005).
(b) la Richiesta di questi principi alla causa presente
64. La Corte nota che la questione centrale nella causa in questione è l'insuccesso allegato dello Stato per prendere adeguatamente in considerazione i migliori interessi dei richiedenti e proteggere i loro diritti di proprietà nel presumibilmente illegale e beni immobili immorale baratti accordo. Mentre è vero che sotto il diritto nazionale attinente il requisito indispensabile per tale accordo era il beneplacito del Centre ?che potrebbe sollevare anche un problema dalla prospettiva degli obblighi negativi dello Stato (veda Lazarev, citato sopra) la Corte considera che, nelle circostanze, è più appropriato per analizzare la causa dalla prospettiva degli obblighi positivi dello Stato, mentre tenendo presente che i confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non si presta a definizione precisa ed ancora i principi applicabili sono nondimeno simili (veda paragrafo 59 sopra).
65. La Corte osserva che è incontrastato fra le parti che prima del beni immobili contestato barattano accordo i richiedenti era i proprietari dell'alloggio nei quali loro vissero con loro madre V.L., ed il loro Z.L custode e legale. che è il padre del secondo richiedente. L'alloggio fu acquistato con V.L. e Z.L. nel 1997, benché la proprietà fosse dal molto inizio registrato come vesting in ambo i richiedenti in quote uguali (veda paragrafo 8 sopra). Rappresentò così i richiedenti proprietà di ' protegguta giuridicamente da un'interferenza ingiustificata o azione con qualsiasi terza parte, incluso i richiedenti i genitori di ' (veda paragrafo 37 sopra, Articolo 48 della Costituzione; e divide in paragrafi 39 sopra, sezione 265 della Famiglia Agisce).
66. L'alloggio è una villa di spiaggia che consiste di due pavimenti più un cortile adiacente, localizzato in un neighbourhood della spiaggia di P. Al tempo della sua acquisizione coi richiedenti che l'alloggio era in condizione povera. Così, oltre a pagando HRK 450,000 (verso EUR 60,000) come il prezzo di acquisto dell'alloggio, V.L. e Z.L. finanziamenti supplementari ed investiti di 80,000 DEM (verso EUR 40,000) nel suo rinnovamento (veda divide in paragrafi 6-8, e 54-55 sopra).
67. La Corte nota che i richiedenti la proprietà di ' dell'alloggio fu scambiata per la proprietà di un appartamento ed un garage in P. L'appartamento in questione è un appartamento di quattro-stanza localizzato sul quarto pavimento di un edificio residenziale in P. (veda paragrafo 13 sopra). Questo cambio accaduto con la disposizione dei richiedenti i genitori di ' e beneplacito del Centre che fu comportato nella causa a causa del fatto che al tempo attinente il primo richiedente era quattordici anni vecchio ed il secondo richiedente aveva nove anni che volle dire che i loro genitori potessero sbarazzarsi solamente della loro proprietà col beneplacito del Centre (veda paragrafo 39 sopra).
68. In questo collegamento la Corte osserva un set complesso di circostanze fattuale nel quale il beni immobili baratta accordo ebbe luogo. In particolare, la Corte nota quel V.L. e Z.L. prima si avvicinò al Centre nel 2000 chiedendo il suo beneplacito alla vendita dei richiedenti l'alloggio di ', ma senza specificare a chi o per che importo (veda paragrafo 10 sopra). Nel frattempo, V.L. e Z.L. incorra nelle difficoltà finanziarie e Z.L. fu arrestato e sostenne in detenzione procedimenti penali e pendenti su accuse di tentato omicidio e proprietà illegale di arma da fuoco per i quali lui fu condannato al reclusione di ' di sei anni (veda divide in paragrafi 11 e 14 sopra).
69. Era all'interno di queste circostanze che avvocato M.I., comportandosi come il rappresentante di V.L., Z.L. ed E.B. (il padre del primo richiedente), presentò una richiesta formale al Centre in ottobre 2001 che chiede beneplacito ad un beni immobili baratti accordo da che cosa i richiedenti trasferirebbero il loro alloggio ad un certo D.M. mentre lei trasferirebbe la sua proprietà dell'appartamento ai richiedenti.
70. La Corte nota che le circostanze in che V.L., Z.L. ed E.B. M.I autorizzato. agire sul loro conto per il beni immobili baratta accordo non è completamente in modo chiaro. M.I. era stato l'avvocato di difesa a Z.L. nei procedimenti penali e summenzionati contro lui, e D.M. a che era l'altra parte il baratti accordo, era M.I. ' suocera di s. Inoltre, le procure in favore di M.I. fu emesso per il fine di ottenere il beneplacito del Centre ad un beni immobili non specificato baratti accordo (veda paragrafo 12 sopra), e non sembra che V.L., mentre intervistò al Centre in collegamento con M.I. ' s richiedono, mai fu presentato con gli specifici dettagli della bozza baratti accordo in oggetto (veda paragrafo 14 sopra). Questo, perciò lascia inspiegato la discrepanza nella sua dichiarazione come alla differenza in valore fra l'alloggio e l'appartamento ?valutò a dei 100,000 DEM (veda paragrafo 14 sopra) e l'importo di 10,000 DEM che i Centre accettarono infine come l'importo che i richiedenti dovrebbero ricevere in che riguardo a (veda paragrafo 17 sopra).
71. È ugualmente poco chiaro perché il Centre, quando dando il suo beneplacito al baratti accordo, anche menzionò un garage come formando parte del cambio di proprietà quando nessun garage era stato menzionato nella bozza baratti accordo presentato con avvocato M.I. (veda divide in paragrafi 13 e 15 sopra) e nulla a che effetto era stato menzionato con V.L. durante il suo colloquio al Centre. Inoltre, i Centre non intervistarono qualsiasi delle altre parti con un interesse diretto nel baratti accordo, vale a dire Z.L. ed E.B. che a turno aumenti il problema di se, ed a che misura, loro erano consapevoli della sostanza della bozza baratti accordo in oggetto.
72. La Corte osserva inoltre che la bozza baratta accordo contenne una clausola che afferma che il valore della proprietà scambiata era uguale e che le parti rinunciarono al loro diritto per obiettare che loro avevano subito danno come un risultato di dare via la proprietà scambiata a sotto la metà del suo vero valore. La bozza baratta accordo fu completato con un documento in che le parti inoltre ammise quel V.L. e Z.L. aveva fatto investimenti significativi nell'alloggio e quel D.M. compenserebbe per quegli investimenti in un importo non specificato (veda paragrafo 13 sopra).
73. Infine, questa bozza fu formalizzata nel baratti accordo di 16 dicembre 2001 sotto il quale i richiedenti trasferirono la loro proprietà dell'alloggio a D.M. mentre lei trasferì la sua proprietà dell'appartamento ed un garage ai richiedenti. Questa versione del baratti accordo contiene una clausola sotto la quale concordarono le parti che non c'era differenza nel valore fra le proprietà scambiate, e che loro non avevano ulteriori rivendicazioni su quel il conto. Il valore del cambio di proprietà fu valutato a del HRK 400,000 (veda paragrafo 19 sopra). Basato su questo baratti accordo, i richiedenti acquisirono proprietà dell'appartamento ed il garage in cambio per la loro proprietà dell'alloggio. In oltre, loro ognuno ricevette 5,000 DEM su conto della differenza nel valore fra le due proprietà (veda divide in paragrafi 17, 20 e 21 sopra).
74. In queste circostanze, nel valutare la protezione dei richiedenti diritti di proprietà di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, le preoccupazioni iniziali sono sollevate con riguardo ad al valore relativo ed effettivo delle proprietà scambiate (veda, inter alia, Lazarev citato sopra). Mentre, in principio, non è per la Corte per sostituirsi per le corti nazionali e trattare con simile questioni, è sfortunato che le corti nazionali respinsero tutti i richiedenti ' attesta nei procedimenti civili e così lasciò questa questione inspiegata (veda paragrafo 25 sopra).
75. La Corte osserva perciò che è incontrastato fra le parti che V.L. e Z.L. acquistato l'alloggio per HRK 450,000 (verso EUR 60,000) e che loro investirono inoltre dei 80,000 DEM nell'alloggio (verso EUR 40,000). Se nulla altro, questo va a vuoto a spiegare come il valore dell'alloggio avrebbe potuto corrispondere al valore dell'appartamento ed il garage ?valutato ad un totale di alcuno HRK 400,000 (verso EUR 55,000; veda divide in paragrafi 19 e 55-56 sopra) ed un importo supplementare di 10,000 DEM (verso EUR 5,000).
76. Come al riferimento del Governo all'accertamento tributario delle proprietà, la Corte nota, che la valutazione fu basata solamente sul valore dichiarato dell'operazione dal baratti accordo (veda paragrafo 22 sopra) mentre Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede una valutazione che va sotto di comparizioni superficiali ed occhiate nella realtà della situazione (veda, per esempio, Bistrovi?, citato sopra, § 35). Similmente, in prospettiva del fatto che i Centre non intentarono causa nel valutare la realtà delle circostanze della proprietà scambi (veda paragrafo 79 sotto), la Corte non può accettare l'argomento del Governo che l'appartamento ebbe bisogno di nessun ulteriore investimento o rinnovamento ed era in una migliore condizione che l'alloggio. In queste circostanze, determinato che il beni immobili baratta accordo sulla faccia di sé solleva un problema dell'uguaglianza di dare quale rimase inspiegato con le autorità nazionali, è difficile aderire all'argomento di valore uguale delle proprietà scambiate.
77. Contro lo sfondo sopra, determinato che sotto l'attinente nazionale (veda paragrafo 39 sopra; sezione 265 della Famiglia Agisce) e diritto internazionale (veda paragrafo 62 sopra) i richiedenti, come figli legittimamente si sarebbero potuti aspettare le autorità nazionali per prendere misure per salvaguardare i loro diritti, la Corte deve valutare se le autorità Statali presero le misure necessarie per salvaguardare i loro interessi di proprietà riservati nell'evento dell'alienazione della loro proprietà (veda Lazarev, citato sopra). Vuole così, in prospettiva del principio che i migliori interessi del figlio devono essere presi come una considerazione primaria (veda divide in paragrafi 42 e 62 sopra), asini le azioni prese col Centre e la maniera nelle quali le corti nazionali e competenti si sono avvicinate una volta alla questione sé era stato portato alla loro attenzione.
78. Come alla condotta del Centre, la Corte nota, che M.I seguente. ' s richiedono per auorizzazione del baratti accordo, l'azione sola presa col Centre nel valutare le circostanze della causa era l'interrogatorio di V.L. (veda paragrafo 14 sopra). Nessuni degli altri guardiani legali fu intervistato o informò della bozza baratta accordo, sebbene il Governo ha a nessun punto suggerito che non era stato possibile sistemare il loro interrogatorio.
79. Inoltre, i Centre andarono a vuoto a prendere qualsiasi azione per valutare la condizione effettiva o il valore delle proprietà che si sarebbero potute essere aspettate ragionevolmente determinato la realtà delle circostanze della proprietà scambia e le informazioni disponibili. In particolare, i Centre erano stati informati del prezzo di acquisto dell'alloggio ed i richiedenti ' genitori ' l'ulteriore investimento nel suo rinnovamento che, come notato sopra, corrispose a dell'EUR 100,000 in totale (veda paragrafo 66 sopra). Nonostante questa conoscenza, i Centre accettarono senza condurre le ulteriori valutazioni per, per esempio, un'ispezione di su-luogo o un rapporto competente che il valore totale dell'alloggio potrebbe essere valutato ed il cambio eseguì ad un valore di alcuno EUR 60,000 in totale (HRK 400,000 e 10,000 DEM; veda paragrafo 75 sopra).
80. La Corte non si persuade similmente che i Centre si avvicinarono ai richiedenti ' la particolare situazione di famiglia con la diligenza necessaria, in termini di valutare se i loro interessi di proprietà riservati furono protegguti adeguatamente contro and/or malevolo azioni negligenti da parte dei loro genitori (veda Lazarev, citato sopra). In particolare, il Centre era bene consapevole del fatto che Z.L. era in detenzione ed era stato dichiarato colpevole su accuse serie in procedimenti penali, e quel V.L. stava affrontando problemi finanziari tutti di che li avrebbero potuti incitare ad intentare cause imprudenti al danno dei richiedenti la proprietà di '.
81. Sé questo collegamento che la Corte osserva che quando V.L. fu intervistato nel Centre lei addusse situazione finanziaria e povera della sua famiglia che colpì presumibilmente i richiedenti l'educazione di ' e dà luogo a scuola. Mentre questo sarebbe un aspetto dell'importanza nella valutazione della situazione complessiva che circonda il beni immobili contestato baratti accordo, la Corte nota che i Centre non presero nessuno ulteriori misure per verificare o valutare V.L. ' osservazioni di s che concernono la sua situazione finanziaria, né sé il colloquio Z.L. o consulta le autorità attinenti che concernono la loro particolare situazione. Per istanza, non verificò di conseguenza così, i richiedenti la scuola di ' risulta né intervistò i richiedenti benché il primo richiedente era al tempo quattordici anni vecchio e così avrebbe potuto offrire informazioni attinenti che concernono la situazione della sua famiglia.
82. Inoltre, i Centre non diedero considerazione a se, nelle particolari circostanze della causa, un guardiano speciale sarebbe dovuto essere nominato, chi potesse avere protegguto imparzialmente ed indipendentemente i richiedenti che ' interessa contro tutti quelli coinvolti nei contestarono barattano accordo, incluso i loro genitori (veda paragrafo 39 sopra; sezione 192 della Famiglia Agisce).
83. In queste circostanze, la Corte trova, che i Centre non facevano adeguatamente asini i richiedenti situazione di famiglia di ' ed il possibile impatto avverso del beni immobili contestato barattano accordo sui loro diritti. Non riuscì con ciò a valutare se le circostanze del beni immobili barattano accordo si attenuto col principio dei migliori interessi del figlio nei richiedenti ' la particolare causa.
84. Come ai procedimenti civili di fronte alle corti competenti nei quali i richiedenti impugnarono la validità del beni immobili baratti accordo, la Corte nota in primo luogo che la posizione procedurale dei richiedenti, come minors nei procedimenti amministrativi di fronte al Centre era pienamente nelle mani dei loro rappresentanti legali, V.L. e Z.L. che fu rappresentato con M.I., un avvocato che aveva un conflitto di interessi. I richiedenti erano così incapaci per prendere qualsiasi azioni procedurali ed autonome, come impugnando l'authorising della decisione del Centre il baratti accordo (compari Zehentner, citato sopra, § 76), né, come notato sopra, aveva le autorità nominate un custode ad litem che avrebbe potuto proteggere indipendentemente i richiedenti ' interessa contro tutti quelli coinvolti nel baratti accordo.
85. In queste circostanze, i procedimenti civili avviati coi richiedenti rappresentati erano, il solo vuole dire con che sarebbero potute essere scrutate le circostanze del cambio di proprietà. Questa possibilità rimasta almeno nelle mani dei loro rappresentanti legali fino ad uno dei richiedenti giunse anche ciononostante, all'età del discernimento ed era in grado intentare le cause legali lei, vale a dire con depositando un ricorso su questioni di diritto di fronte alla Corte Suprema nel 2007 (veda paragrafo 29 sopra).
86. Comunque, le corti civili andarono a vuoto ad apprezzare le particolari circostanze della causa e respinsero solamente i richiedenti ' azione civile per motivi che l'authorising della decisione del Centre il baratti accordo non era stato impugnato nei procedimenti amministrativi (veda divide in paragrafi 25-26, 28 e 31 sopra). Le corti civili ignorarono con ciò i richiedenti ' posiziona nei procedimenti amministrativi (veda paragrafo 83 sopra); la prova riguardo a M.I. ' conflitto di interessi di s così come i richiedenti circostanze di famiglia di ', vale a dire al tempo dei procedimenti civili già rivelato, V.L. ' la tossicodipendenza di s ed i suoi problemi finanziari; e Z.L. ' s la condanna penale nel periodo che conduce alla conclusione del baratti accordo. Loro ignorarono anche le dichiarazioni dell'insuccesso del Centre per proteggere i richiedenti ' i migliori interessi di relazione alla conclusione del baratti accordo.
87. Nella prospettiva della Corte, tutte le dichiarazioni riguardo alla conclusione del baratti accordo ?se nulla altro sollevò il problema di ottemperanza con l'obbligo costituzionale ed attinente dello Stato per proteggere figli (veda paragrafo 37, Articoli 63 e 65 della Costituzione), come un risultato del quale era in carica sulle corti civili per esaminare attentamente le dichiarazioni (veda paragrafo 38, sezioni 103 e 110 degli Obblighi Civili Agiscono) nella conformità col principio dei migliori interessi del figlio (veda paragrafo 43 sopra).
88. Di conseguenza, la Corte non vede attinenza nel civile corteggia ' cita ai richiedenti la possibilità di ' di chiedere che il baratti accordo forse era solamente annullabile ?su che si appellò anche il Governo (veda divide in paragrafi 26 e 51 sopra) fin dai richiedenti, come minors non era in grado depositare autonomamente tale rivendicazione entro il periodo di prescrizione legale ed attinente di un anno dopo la conclusione del baratti accordo (veda paragrafo 38 sopra; le sezioni 111 e 139 degli Obblighi Civili Agiscono; e compara Stagno c. il Belgio, n. 1062/07, §§ 32-33 7 luglio 2009). La Corte respinge perciò l'eccezione preliminare del Governo che concerne la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali (veda paragrafo 53 sopra).
89. Prendendo il sopra in considerazione, i costatazione di Corte che le autorità nazionali sono andate a vuoto a prendere le misure necessarie per salvaguardare gli interessi di proprietà riservati dei richiedenti, come figli nel beni immobili contestato barattano accordo e riconoscerli un'opportunità ragionevole di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi loro diritti garantita con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
90. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
91. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
92. Nella loro richiesta iniziale i richiedenti richiesero la Corte per ordinare restitutio in integrum e chiesero l'importo di “almeno” 300,000 euros (EUR) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale. Loro non dissero qualsiasi costi e spese.
93. Il Governo contese quel la rivendicazione.
94. La Corte è della prospettiva che la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41, mentre concernendo danno patrimoniale, non è pronto per decisione (l'Articolo 75 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte). Di conseguenza, le riserve di Corte che interrogano e l'ulteriore procedura ed invita il Governo ed i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione presentare le loro osservazioni sulla questione e, in particolare, informarlo di qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere ai meriti l'eccezione del Governo come all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali e lo respinge;

2. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

4. Sostiene che la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41, riguardo alla rivendicazione per danno patrimoniale non è pronta per decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) le riserve la questione detta;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere per fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto in 7 maggio 2015, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.