Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GOGITIDZE AND OTHERS v. GEORGIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 35

NUMERO: 36862/05/2015
STATO: Georgia
DATA: 12/05/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible
No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property)



FOURTH SECTION






CASE OF GOGITIDZE AND OTHERS v. GEORGIA

(Application no. 36862/05)















STRASBOURG

12 May 2015



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Gogitidze and Others v. Georgia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Päivi Hirvelä, President,
George Nicolaou,
Ledi Bianku,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paul Mahoney,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Faris Vehabovi?, judges,
and Françoise Elens-Passos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 14 April 2015,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 36862/05) against Georgia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by four Georgian nationals, OMISSIS (“the first applicant”), OMISSIS (“the second applicant”), OMISSIS (“the third applicant”) and OMISSIS (“the fourth applicant”), on 4 July 2005.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Tbilisi. The Georgian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr L. Meskhoradze, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that a court-imposed confiscation measure amounted to a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 9 November 2009 the Government were given notice of the application.
5. On 22 June 2010 the Court was informed for the first time that the third applicant had died on 7 May 2005, prior to the introduction of the present application in his name.
6. On 14 April 2105 the Court decided to dispense with a hearing.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
7. The first, second, third and fourth applicants were born in 1951, 1973, 1940 and 1978 respectively. The second and fourth applicants are the first applicant’s sons and the third applicant is his brother. The first, second and fourth applicants live in Moscow, the Russian Federation.
A. The initiation of proceedings for forfeiture of property
8. New political forces came to power in the Ajarian Autonomous Republic (“the AAR”) in May 2004, following the so-called “Rose Revolution” which occurred in the country in November 2003 (see Georgian Labour Party v. Georgia, no. 9103/04, §§ 11-13, ECHR 2008).
9. On 25 August 2004 the first applicant, who had previously held the posts of Ajarian Deputy Minister of the Interior and President of the Audit Office, was charged, amongst other offences, with abuse of authority and extortion.
10. On 26 August 2004 the Public Prosecutor’s Office of the AAR initiated proceedings before the Ajarian Supreme Court to confiscate wrongfully and inexplicably acquired property from the applicants under Article 37 § 1 (1) of the Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCP”) and Article 21 §§ 5 and 6 of the Code of Administrative Procedure (“CAP”); the legislative provisions in question had been adopted on 13 February 2004.
11. The public prosecutor affirmed that he had reasonable grounds to believe that the salaries received by the first applicant in his capacity as Deputy Minister of the Interior between 1994 and 1997 and President of the Audit Office between November 1997 and May 2004 could not have sufficed to finance the acquisition of the property, which had occurred during the same time span, by himself, his sons and his brother.
12. The prosecutor attached to his brief numerous items of evidence (twenty-three documents) which showed that, on the one hand, the first applicant had earned 1,644 and 6,023 euros (EUR) respectively in official salaries when he had occupied the above-mentioned two posts in the Ajarian Government, whilst, on the other hand, the total value of the property that he and the other applicants had acquired corresponded to some EUR 450,000 (1,053,000 Georgian laris (GEL)). The latter figure was based on the expert opinions of two independent auditors who had conducted an assessment of the disputed property on 20 August 2004.
13. The public prosecutor therefore requested the Ajarian Supreme Court to rule that the items of property concerned, which are listed below, should be confiscated from the applicants and transferred to the State.
14. The first applicant’s property included:
(a) a house located at 54 Mazniashvili Street, Batumi;
(b) a house located at 13 Griboyedov Street, Batumi;
(c) the first floor of a house located at 60 Gorgasali Street, Batumi;
(d) a share in the capital of the Sanapiro Hotel, Kobuleti;
(e) a Mercedes car;
(f) a flat located at 1 Ninoshvili Street, Kobuleti.
15. The second applicant’s property included:
(g) two guest houses located at 32 April 9th Street, Kobuleti.
16. The third applicant’s property included:
(h) a house located at 245 Aghmashenebeli Street, Kobuleti.
17. The fourth applicant’s property included:
(i) a flat located at 58b Gorgasali Street, Batumi;
(j) a flat located at 4-6 Gudiashvili Street, Batumi;
(k) a flat located at 20 H. Abashidze Street, Batumi;
(l) a house located at 6 General A. Abashidze Close;
(m) a house located at 186 Aghmashenebeli Street, Kobuleti.
B. The proceedings for forfeiture of property before the court of first instance
18. On 30 August 2004 the Ajarian Supreme Court accepted the public prosecutor’s request for an examination on the merits. It transmitted the prosecutor’s brief together with all the supporting documents to the applicants, inviting them to submit their written replies and attend an oral hearing scheduled for 7 September 2004.
19. As attested by the relevant postal acknowledgements of receipt, the Ajarian Supreme Court’s subpoenas were duly served at all four applicants’ home addresses, but only the second applicant, represented by legal counsel, filed written comments on 6 September 2004.
20. The second applicant submitted that the property mentioned at (b) above in fact belonged to him and not to the first applicant. To prove it he produced a contract of sale dated 2 December 1997, between himself and a certain G.V., plus a document from the Land Registry. He stated that he had purchased the property for EUR 10,174. His father-in-law, with whom the second applicant and his wife lived after they married, had helped him purchase the property. He produced a certificate from the bank stating that his father-in-law had taken out the loan, as well as statements by different witnesses.
21. The second applicant further explained that the property mentioned at (f) above belonged to Mr N.U., who was neither a close relative nor in any way connected with the first applicant. It was therefore not subject to confiscation.
22. As to the property mentioned at (g) above, the second applicant alleged that the first applicant had had no part in purchasing or renovating it and that he, the second applicant, was the sole owner. He had bought the property from a lady for EUR 4,069 with the help of his godfather, V.M., who had allegedly lent him 50,000 United States dollars (USD) to renovate the site.
23. In sum, the second applicant requested that the properties mentioned at (b) and (f) and (g) above be removed from the confiscation list, and that due consideration be given to the evidence he had presented showing that the property concerned had not been wrongfully acquired.
24. As the first, third and fourth applicants failed to submit written arguments or appear before the Ajarian Supreme Court on 7 September 2004, the latter decided to postpone the hearing until 9 September 2004. The relevant subpoenas were again duly served at those applicants’ home addresses, but none of them appeared before the court, either in person or by designating an advocate, on the second occasion either.
25. The Ajarian Supreme Court opened a hearing on 9 September 2004 which the first, third and fourth applicants and their lawyers failed to attend, without giving reasons. It was attended by the second applicant’s lawyer, who additionally pleaded that the property mentioned at (d) above also belonged to him, but that he was giving it to the State as a gift. In response, the Ajarian Supreme Court changed the name of the defendant in that part of the case and named the second applicant as the owner of the property concerned. The second applicant further explained that in addition to the money his godfather had lent him, he had bought and renovated the property mentioned at (g) above with his salary as the director of a company in which he owned a quarter of the shares. According to the minutes of that company’s board meeting of 1 July 2004, the profit generated by its activities was EUR 17,987.
26. On 10 September 2004 the Ajarian Supreme Court gave judgment in the absence of the first, third and fourth applicants, who had been notified twice but had failed to appear without good reason (Article 26 § 1 (2) of the CAP).
27. Thus, the Ajarian Supreme Court ordered the confiscation of the property belonging to the first applicant listed under (a), (c) and (e), that belonging to the second applicant listed under (d) and (g), and that listed under (i) to (m) belonging to the fourth applicant. It considered in particular that the sums of EUR 1,644 and EUR 6,023 which the first applicant had earned as Deputy Minister of the Interior and President of the Audit Office respectively could not have sufficed to acquire the property in issue, and that the other applicants did not earn enough either. The salaries the first applicant earned were only enough to provide for the needs of a family of four. The court stated that the applicants, in particular the three who had failed to appear before the court, had failed to discharge their burden of proof by refuting the public prosecutor’s claim.
28. As regards the property mentioned at (g) above, the Ajarian Supreme Court concluded that the second applicant had failed to prove the lawful origins of the money he had used to acquire the property, which had been valued by independent auditors who had assessed both the plot of land and the four guest houses situated on it at no less than EUR 94,000.
29. Furthermore, the Supreme Court of Ajara considered it established that the property mentioned at (b) above belonged to the second applicant and that the property mentioned at (f) belonged to a third party. The prosecutor’s case concerning these two properties was thus dismissed: concerning the first property, the court accepted the second applicant’s arguments as to its lawful origins.
30. As regards the third applicant’s property mentioned at (h) above, it was established that this was a family home unrelated to the first applicant’s activities. However, as the property had been refurbished while the first applicant was in public office, making it worth EUR 24,418 according to an official valuation, the third applicant was ordered to pay the State compensation in the amount of EUR 10,174.
C. The proceedings for forfeiture of property before the cassation court
31. All four applicants, represented by legal counsel, as well as the public prosecutor, appealed against the first-instance court’s judgment of 10 September 2004.
32. The applicants requested that the confiscation proceedings be suspended pending the termination of the criminal proceedings against the first applicant. They complained that the burden of proof had been shifted onto them in the confiscation proceedings. The first, third and fourth applicants also complained that they had not been given an opportunity to submit their arguments before the first-instance court. The first applicant additionally complained that he had been denied the right to be presumed innocent in the confiscation proceedings.
33. On 22 October 2004 the first applicant’s wife asserted before the Supreme Court of Georgia that she and her son, the fourth applicant, were the owners of the property mentioned at (m) above. She explained that she was a Russian national and had sold the family house in the Smolensk region, with her siblings’ consent, to buy the property in Kobuleti, where her Russian relatives would spend their summer holidays.
34. On 3 November 2004 a third party, Mr S. Tchitchinadze, applied to the Supreme Court of Georgia, stating that the decision of the Ajarian Supreme Court concerning the property mentioned at (a) above was unlawful because the property had previously belonged to him and was currently the subject of a dispute between himself and the first applicant. On 15 December 2004 Mr Tchitchinadze sent the Supreme Court of Georgia a decision of the Batumi City Court dated 14 November 2004 recognising him as the owner of the property in question. He requested that his property be removed from the confiscation list submitted by the public prosecutor (for more details, see Tchitchinadze v. Georgia, no. 18156/05, § 13, 27 May 2010).
35. At the hearing the four applicants’ legal counsel contended that the case concerning the first, third and fourth applicants should be remitted for fresh examination because the three men had not been able to participate in the proceedings at first instance. He further complained that the evidence presented by the second applicant had not been given due consideration.
36. On 17 January 2005 the Supreme Court of Georgia set aside the first-instance decision only in so far as it concerned the property mentioned at (a) above, the house located at 54 Mazniashvili Street in Batumi, acknowledging that the estate was the property of Mr S. Tchitchinadze (for further details see Tchitchinadze, cited above, §§ 16-17). For the remainder, it followed the reasoning of the Ajarian Supreme Court, namely that the first applicant’s income was not sufficient for him and his family members to have acquired the properties in issue, whilst the other applicants’ income was also insufficient. Concerning the arguments of the first applicant’s wife, the Supreme Court of Georgia noted that the land register named only the fourth applicant as the owner of the property mentioned at (m) above.
D. Constitutional proceedings
37. On 6 December 2004 the first applicant lodged a constitutional complaint. He argued that Article 37 § 1 (1) of the Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCP”) and Article 21 §§ 5 and 6 of the Code of Administrative Procedure (“the CAP”), adopted on 13 February 2004, were contrary to the following constitutional provisions – Article 14 (prohibition of discrimination), Article 21 (protection of property), Article 40 (presumption of innocence) and Article 42 §§ 2 and 5 (no criminal punishment without law and prohibition of retroactive application of criminal law) of the Constitution of Georgia.
38. In his constitutional complaint the first applicant mostly reiterated the arguments that he had previously submitted before the Supreme Court of Georgia. In particular, he complained that the confiscation of his property and that of his family members amounted to a criminal punishment being imposed on him in the absence of a final conviction establishing his guilt, and that he should not have been made to bear the burden of proving his innocence, that is, the lawfulness of the disputed property. He also complained that the confiscation of the property in such circumstances was in breach of his right to be presumed innocent of the corruption charges. The first applicant also stated that he and his family had acquired the property in question well before the amendments of 13 February 2004 were enacted and that, consequently, the retroactive extension of those provisions to their situation was unconstitutional. For those reasons, he argued that the confiscation procedure provided for by the impugned provisions of the CCP and CAP had been arbitrary and amounted to a violation of the constitutional guarantee of protection of his private property.
39. By a judgment of 13 July 2005 the Constitutional Court, after having heard the parties’ arguments and evidence from a number of legal experts and witnesses, dismissed the first applicant’s complaint as ill-founded on the basis of the following reasoning.
40. First, drawing an analogy with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the Constitutional Court stated that the Georgian constitutional provision protecting the right to property (Article 21 of the Constitution) likewise did not exclude the possibility of deprivation of property if such a measure was lawful, pursued a public interest and satisfied the proportionality test. The court then went on to emphasise that only lawfully obtained property enjoyed full constitutional protection; in the first applicant’s case there had been a legitimate suspicion as to the lawful origins of the property, a suspicion which he and his family members had been unable to refute in the course of the relevant judicial proceedings.
41. The Constitutional Court further stated that the administrative confiscation proceedings provided for in Article 37 § 1 (1) of the CCP and Article 21 §§ 5 and 6 of the CAP, could in no way be equated with criminal proceedings, as no determination of a criminal charge was at stake; on the contrary, such proceedings were a classic example of a civil dispute between the State, represented by the public prosecutor, and private individuals. Given the “civil” nature of the proceedings in question, it was acceptable that the burden of proof in the proceedings should be shifted onto the respondent, the second applicant. Referring to its own comparative legal research and the Court’s judgments in the cases of Raimondo v. Italy (22 February 1994, §§ 16-20, Series A no. 281 A) and AGOSI v. the United Kingdom (24 October 1986, §§ 33-42, Series A no. 108), the Constitutional Court added that such civil mechanisms, involving the forfeiture of the proceeds of crime or otherwise unlawfully obtained or unexplained property, were not unknown in a number of Western democracies, including Italy, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.
42. As to the issue of the alleged retroactivity of the application of the amendment of 13 February 2004 introducing the administrative confiscation procedure, and the second applicant’s presumption of innocence, the Constitutional Court ruled that since the proceedings in question had been “civil” and not “criminal”, the above-mentioned criminal-law guarantees could not apply. Furthermore, the amendment of 13 February 2004 had not introduced any new concept but rather had regulated anew, in a more efficient manner, the existing measures aimed at the prevention and eradication of corruption in the public service. In particular, the Constitutional Court referred to the 1997 Act on Conflict of Interests and Corruption in the Public Service, which had required all public officials not only to declare their own property and that of their family and close relatives, but also to show that the declared property had been acquired lawfully.
43. The Constitutional Court concluded that the amendments of 13 February 2004 undoubtedly served the public interest of intensifying the fight against corruption and that the test of proportionality had also been duly satisfied during the confiscation proceedings, which had been conducted fairly before the domestic courts.
II. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTS AND DOMESTIC LAW
A. The 1997 Act on Conflict of Interests and Corruption in the Public Service, as in force at the material time
44. On 17 October 1997 the Act on Conflict of Interests and Corruption in the Public Service, the first major piece of legislation in independent Georgia’s history setting out the principles and methods for preventing and eradicating corruption in the public service, was adopted by the Parliament of Georgia.
45. Section 1 of the Act proclaimed that its main objective was to prevent, uncover and put an end to instances of corruption, and to hold corrupt public officials liable.
46. Section 3 of the Act defined the notion of “corruption in the public service” as the use by a public official of his or her public post or of the influence associated with that post for the purposes of undue enrichment. The same provision defined the term of “a corruption offence” as an act which contained the elements of “corruption in the public service” and which could be subject to disciplinary, administrative or criminal liability. Section 4 explained what exactly should be understood by a public official’s “family members” and “close relatives”, a definition which included such categories as siblings, children and parents.
47. Chapter IV of the Act (sections 14 and 19) imposed upon public officials an obligation to declare their property each year (between 1 and 30 April). The declaration had to contain not only a list of the assets owned by the public official personally and by his or her “family members” and “close relatives”, and the property’s actual market value, but also information accounting for the origins of the property in question. The declarations submitted annually by public officials were public documents.
48. According to section 20(1) and (2) of the Act, a corruption offence or another breach of the requirements laid down by the Act gave rise to liability under the rules laid down for that specific purpose either by the criminal or the administrative legislation. If neither criminal nor administrative liability arose, disciplinary action, such as dismissal from the post, was to be taken.
B. Domestic law on the forfeiture of wrongfully acquired property or unexplained wealth, as in force at the material time
49. On 13 February 2004 two major legislative amendments aimed at bolstering efforts to combat criminality, with a particular emphasis on economic offences and those committed in the public service, were adopted. One of those amendments introduced plea bargaining into the Code of Criminal Procedure (see Natsvlishvili and Togonidze v. Georgia, no. 9043/05, § 49, ECHR 2014 (extracts)), whilst the second one, which concerned both the Code of Criminal Procedure and the Code of Administrative Procedure, regulated the mechanism for the forfeiture of wrongfully acquired property.
50. As a result of that second amendment of 13 February 2004, Georgian law provided for two procedures for the forfeiture of property: “criminal confiscation” and “administrative confiscation”. Criminal confiscation was of a general nature and dealt with deprivation of the objects of an offence and the instrumentalities of and proceeds from crime, imposed as part of the sentencing proceedings following a final conviction establishing the person’s guilt. Meanwhile, the latter procedure, which was governed by Article 37 § 1 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCP”) and Articles 21 §§ 4 to 11 of the Code of Administrative Procedure (“the CAP”), was specifically aimed at recovering wrongfully acquired property and unexplained wealth from a public official, as well as from the latter’s family members, close relatives and so-called “connected persons”, even without the prior criminal conviction of the official concerned.
51. Although a criminal conviction was not a necessary precondition, administrative confiscation could only be initiated if an official had first been charged with offences (including corruption) committed during his or her term in office against the interests of the public service, the enterprise or organisation concerned, or of one of the following offences: money laundering, extortion, misappropriation, embezzlement, tax evasion or violations of custom regulations, regardless of whether the official in question was still in office or not.
52. Thus, if the public official in question was accused of one or more of the above-mentioned offences, and the public prosecutor in charge of the investigation had a reasonable suspicion that the property in the possession of that public official and/or of his or her family members, close persons and “connected persons” might have been acquired wrongfully, the prosecutor could file “a civil action” (???????) with the court under Article 37 § 1 CCP, demanding the confiscation of the “ill-gotten” property and unexplained wealth.
53. Once a public prosecutor had filed a civil action for confiscation, which had to be substantiated with sufficient documentary evidence, the burden of proof would then shift onto the respondent. If the latter failed to refute the public prosecutor’s claim by producing documents proving that the property (or the financial resources for the purchase of the property) had been lawfully acquired or that taxes on the property had been duly paid, the court, after having ensured that the prosecutor’s claim was properly substantiated, would order the confiscation of the property in question (Article 21 § 6 of the CAP).
54. According to Article 21 § 8 of the CAP, the purpose of administrative confiscation was to restore the situation which had existed prior to acquisition of the impugned property by the public official through wrongful means. In particular, the property confiscated in those administrative proceedings was then to be restored to its legitimate owner(s), which could be a private individual or a legal entity, after the legal claims on the property of all other third parties had been satisfied. If the legitimate owner could not be determined during the confiscation proceedings, the property was forfeited in favour of the State (Article 21 § 8 (1) of the CAP). Value confiscation was also possible under Article 21 § 8 (3) of the CAP, which stated that if the property subject to forfeiture could not be transferred to the State in its original form, the respondent should pay monetary compensation corresponding to the value of the property.
C. The United Nations Convention Against Corruption
55. The 2005 United Nations Convention against Corruption was ratified and entered into force in respect of Georgia on 8 November 2008.
56. Articles 31 and 54 § 1 (c) of this Convention, which set forth the principle of universal recognition of confiscation of property linked to corruption, or proceeds of crime derived from corruption offences, read as follows:
Article 31: Freezing, seizure and confiscation
“1. Each State Party shall take, to the greatest extent possible within its domestic legal system, such measures as may be necessary to enable confiscation of:
(a) Proceeds of crime derived from offences established in accordance with this Convention or property the value of which corresponds to that of such proceeds; ...
4. If such proceeds of crime have been transformed or converted, in part or in full, into other property, such property shall be liable to the measures referred to in this article instead of the proceeds.
5. If such proceeds of crime have been intermingled with property acquired from legitimate sources, such property shall, without prejudice to any powers relating to freezing or seizure, be liable to confiscation up to the assessed value of the intermingled proceeds.
6. Income or other benefits derived from such proceeds of crime, from property into which such proceeds of crime have been transformed or converted or from property with which such proceeds of crime have been intermingled shall also be liable to the measures referred to in this article, in the same manner and to the same extent as proceeds of crime. ...
8. States Parties may consider the possibility of requiring that an offender demonstrate the lawful origin of such alleged proceeds of crime or other property liable to confiscation, to the extent that such a requirement is consistent with the fundamental principles of their domestic law and with the nature of judicial and other proceedings.
9. The provisions of this article shall not be so construed as to prejudice the rights of bona fide third parties. ...”
Article 54. Mechanisms for recovery of property through international cooperation in confiscation
“1. Each State Party, ... , shall, in accordance with its domestic law: ...
(c) consider taking such measures as may be necessary to allow confiscation of such property without a criminal conviction in cases in which the offender cannot be prosecuted by reason of death, flight or absence or in other appropriate cases.”
57. The relevant excerpts from the Technical Guide to the United Nations Convention Against Corruption further clarified a number of key legal notions relating to the confiscation of proceeds of crime related to corruption offences:
“IV. What to consider as proceeds of crime for purposes of confiscation
Paragraphs 4, 5 and 6 of article 31 outline the minimum scope of measures to implement the article.
Paragraph 4
This refers to the situation in which proceeds have been transformed or converted into other property. In this case, States Parties are required to subject to confiscation the property transformed or converted, instead of the direct proceeds.
Given that offenders will part as soon as they can with the primary proceeds of crime in order to obstruct investigative efforts to trace such property, the provision is of major relevance when applying an object-based model of confiscation, in order to avoid conflicts with potential bona fide third parties and facilitate investigative and prosecutorial activity. The provision reflects the same theory that lies behind a value-based model of confiscation: what matters is not to allow the offender to enrich him or herself by illegal means.
The provision follows the so-called theory of “tainted property,” whereby, as tainted property is exchanged for “clean property”, the latter becomes tainted. While this may raise issues about receipt in good faith, countries have developed requirements, whereby legislation gives primacy to the irrevocability of the “taint” irrespective of the iterations of transfer, receipt and conversion.
Paragraph 5
This refers to the situation where proceeds of crime have been intermingled with property from legitimate sources. States Parties are required to subject to confiscation any such property up to the assessed value of the proceeds. As stated above, both situations may pose a problem when the confiscation system operates under an object confiscation system, which requires a determination of property obtained through the offence. When operating a value confiscation system these situations do not pose any problem.
Paragraph 6
This requires States Parties to subject to confiscation not only primary but also secondary proceeds of crime. Primary proceeds are those assets directly obtained through the commission of the offence – e.g., a bribe of $100,000. The secondary proceeds, by contrast, refer to benefits derived from the original proceeds, like bank interest or the amount increased as a consequence of investment. In this regard, the Convention requires States Parties to provide mandatory confiscation for both the primary and secondary proceeds.
Though the definition of the proceeds of crime given in article 2 (g) includes property “obtained through a crime” and property “derived from a crime,” the paragraph explicitly refers to “[I]ncome or other benefits” derived from the proceeds of crime and applies to benefits coming from any of the situations referred into paragraphs 4 and 5 – property transformed or converted and intermingled property. In other words, any appreciation in value of the proceeds of crime, even when not attributable to any criminal activity must also be liable to confiscation. ...
Paragraph 8
Paragraph 8 recommends that States Parties consider the possibility of shifting the burden of proof in regard to the origin of the alleged proceeds of crime. ...
[I]n addition to the sui generis procedures that accept non-criminal standards of evidence after the conviction is reached, a number of jurisdictions have also adopted civil procedures of confiscation that operate in rem and are governed by a standard of the preponderance of evidence.
VII. Protection of bona fide third parties
Paragraph 9 requires States Parties not to construct any of the provisions of that article as to prejudice the rights of bona fide third parties. The Convention does not, however, specify to what extent third parties should be provided with effective legal remedies in order to preserve their rights. Thus, in implementing this provision, States Parties may wish to take into account that some jurisdictions have opted to establish a specific procedure for third parties claiming ownership over seized property, in which the prosecution evaluates whether the claimant(s):
• Have acted with the purpose of concealing the predicate offence, or are implicated in any of the ancillary offences;
• Have legal interest in the property;
• Acted diligently according to the law and commercial practice;
• If the property requires a public registration of the transaction or any administrative procedure, such information has conducted (e.g., real estate, or vehicles);
• If the transaction was onerous, whether it followed real market values.”
D. The Council of Europe Conventions
1. The 1990 Council of Europe Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime
58. The 1990 Council of Europe Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime (ETS No. 141), which entered into force in respect of Georgia on 1 September 2004, proclaimed that one of the “modern and effective methods” in the “fight against serious crime ... consists in depriving criminals of the proceeds from crime” (see the Preamble to the Convention).
59. The Convention called upon the Signatory Parties to “adopt such legislative and other measures as may be necessary to enable it to confiscate instrumentalities and proceeds or property the value of which corresponds to such proceeds” (see Article 2). At the same time, the term “confiscation” was defined as “a penalty or a measure, ordered by a court following proceedings in relation to a criminal offence or criminal offences resulting in the final deprivation of property” (see Article 1).
60. The Explanatory Report to the 1999 Convention further clarified the relevant legal terms:
“15. ... The experts were also able to identify considerable differences in respect of the procedural organisation of the taking of decisions to confiscate (decisions taken by criminal courts, administrative courts, separate judicial authorities, in civil or criminal proceedings totally separate from those in which the guilt of the offender is determined (these proceedings are referred to in the text of the Convention as ‘proceedings for the purpose of confiscation’ and in the explanatory report sometimes as ‘in rem proceedings’). It was also possible to distinguish differences in respect of the procedural framework of such decisions (presumptions of illicitly acquired property, time-limits, etc.) ...
23. The committee discussed whether it was necessary to define ‘confiscation’ or ‘confiscation order’ under the Convention. ... The definition of ‘confiscation’ was drafted in order to make it clear that, on the one hand, the Convention only deals with criminal activities or acts connected therewith, such as acts related to civil in rem actions and, on the other hand, that differences in the organisation of the judicial systems and the rules of procedure do not exclude the application of the Convention. For instance, the fact that confiscation in some States is not considered as a penal sanction but as a security or other measure is irrelevant to the extent that the confiscation is related to criminal activity. It is also irrelevant that confiscation might sometimes be ordered by a judge who is, strictly speaking, not a criminal judge, as long as the decision was taken by a judge. The term ‘court’ has the same meaning as in Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The experts agreed that purely administrative confiscation was not included in the scope of application of the Convention.”
2. The 2005 Council of Europe Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime and on the Financing of Terrorism
61. In 2005 the Council of Europe adopted another, more comprehensive, Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime and on the Financing of Terrorism (ETS No. 198). It entered into force in respect of Georgia on 1 May 2014.
62. Articles 3 and 5 of the 2005 Convention, in so far as relevant, state as follows:
Article 3 – Confiscation measures
“4. Each Party shall adopt such legislative or other measures as may be necessary to require that, in respect of a serious offence or offences as defined by national law, an offender demonstrates the origin of alleged proceeds or other property liable to confiscation to the extent that such a requirement is consistent with the principles of its domestic law.”
Article 5 – Freezing, seizure and confiscation
“Each Party shall adopt such legislative and other measures as may be necessary to ensure that the measures to freeze, seize and confiscate also encompass:
(a) the property into which the proceeds have been transformed or converted;
(b) property acquired from legitimate sources, if proceeds have been intermingled, in whole or in part, with such property, up to the assessed value of the intermingled proceeds;
(c) income or other benefits derived from proceeds, from property into which proceeds of crime have been transformed or converted or from property with which proceeds of crime have been intermingled, up to the assessed value of the intermingled proceeds, in the same manner and to the same extent as proceeds.”
63. The Explanatory Report to the Convention of 2005 reaffirmed that:
“39. The definition of ‘confiscation’ was drafted in order to make it clear that, on the one hand, the 1990 Convention only deals with criminal activities or acts connected therewith, such as acts related to civil in rem actions and, on the other hand, that differences in the organisation of the judicial systems and the rules of procedure do not exclude the application of the 1990 Convention and this Convention. For instance, the fact that confiscation in some states is not considered as a penal sanction but as a security or other measure is irrelevant to the extent that the confiscation is related to criminal activity. It is also irrelevant that confiscation might sometimes be ordered by a judge who is, strictly speaking, not a criminal judge, as long as the decision was taken by a judge.”
64. The Explanatory Report further stated that:
“71. Paragraph 4 of Article 3 requires Parties to provide the possibility for the burden of proof to be reversed regarding the lawful origin of alleged proceeds or other property liable to confiscation in serious offences. ...
76. This provision underlines in particular the need to apply such measures also to proceeds which have been intermingled with property acquired from legitimate sources or which has been otherwise transformed or converted.”
E. Financial Action Task Force
65. The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) was established in July 1989 as an inter-governmental group by a Group of Seven (G-7) Summit in Paris. It has since been globally recognised as an authoritative body setting universal standards and developing policies for combating, amongst other, money laundering. In 2003 it issued a specific recommendation, which was endorsed by Georgia, calling for confiscation even in the absence of a prior criminal conviction (known as Recommendation no. 3):
“Provisional measures and confiscation
3. ... Countries may consider adopting measures that allow such proceeds or instrumentalities to be confiscated without requiring a criminal conviction, or which require an offender to demonstrate the lawful origin of the property alleged to be liable to confiscation, to the extent that such a requirement is consistent with the principles of their domestic law.”
F. The Council of Europe Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti-Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism (MONEYVAL)
66. In its First Evaluation Report on Georgia, which concerned a visit to the country by a team of examiners between 23 and 26 October 2000, MONEYVAL observed and recommended the following:
“2. The main areas generating illegal proceeds and seriously jeopardising the economic development of Georgia are corruption, fraud and tax evasion as well as smuggling in goods. ...
6. The examiners consider that the seizure and confiscation regime should be reviewed and brought up to internationally accepted standards. ...In the view of the examiners, the confiscation procedure should conform to the requirements of the Strasbourg Convention – with the introduction of the possibility of confiscating instrumentalities and proceeds, and if they have been altered into another kind of property, the corresponding value may be confiscated.”
67. In the context of a second evaluation visit to Georgia by a MONEYVAL team of examiners, which took place between 21 and 23 May 2003, the Second Round Evaluation Report again criticised the domestic authorities for lacunae in the legal framework concerning the confiscation of proceeds of crime:
“8. ... [V]alue confiscation was not regulated in Georgian legislation at the time of the on-site visit. Indeed, the absence of a real measure of confiscation was given as one of the prime reasons for the lack of money laundering investigations or prosecutions. There needs to be a completion of the legal framework to create an enabling legal structure to support confiscation in respect of all criminal proceeds (both direct and indirect), and equivalent value based confiscation should be introduced. It is advised that elements of practice which have proved of value elsewhere, including the reversal of the onus of proof regarding the lawful origin of alleged proceeds, should be considered in particular serious proceeds-generating offences.”
68. After its visit to Georgia between 23 and 29 April 2006, MONEYVAL made a number of positive comments in its Third Round Detailed Assessment Report about the administrative confiscation scheme introduced on 13 February 2004:
“18. The Georgian legal framework covering ... confiscation has been significantly developed and now there is a basic legal structure in place for ... forfeiture of objects, instrumentalities and criminally acquired assets (proceeds). ...
19. There are also some innovative administrative forfeiture provisions in place in special cases involving public officials and organised crime groups – which incorporates elements of civil standard of proof, which are very welcome developments. ...
239. The procedure for confiscating from third parties property which has been transferred to defeat confiscation orders were first addressed by administrative provisions dealing with family members and close relatives of officials where officials are subject of prosecution. ... These provisions (and the associated changes to the burden of proof for forfeiture in these cases) are very welcome, and should cover many third parties into whose hands illegal assets fall in sensitive cases.
240. ... Clearly the new administrative provisions for confiscation in respect of cases being brought against officials have been successful. ...”
G. The Council of Europe Group of States Against Corruption (GRECO)
69. In its Second Evaluation Report on Georgia, adopted at its 31st Plenary Meeting held from 4 to 8 December 2006 in Strasbourg, GRECO observed and recommended the following:
“31. In the past few years Georgia has adopted a vast array of new legislation, among other things on seizure and confiscation of the instrumentalities and proceeds of crime, including corruption and the laundering of these proceeds. The introduction of an administrative confiscation scheme in 2004, specifically directed at illegally acquired property and unexplained wealth of officials, gave law enforcement authorities an effective tool to deprive officials as well as their relatives and so-called connected persons, of the benefits of their crimes.
Administrative confiscation requires no prior conviction, it explicitly allows for confiscation from third parties as well as of assets of equivalent value and requires a relatively low standard of proof, by providing that once the prosecutor has presented his/her claim to the court that the defendant’s property is illegal or cannot be explained the burden of proof shifts to the defendant to show that this property (or the financial resources required for acquiring the property) has been legally obtained.
The GET [the Group’s Evaluation Team] was told that so far property with a value of more than €40 million had been reclaimed which illustrates the commitment of the Georgian authorities not to let officials benefit from crimes committed during their term in office. However, the GET also heard that there have been some concerns about the arbitrariness of the administrative confiscation regime, in that allegedly, only proponents of the previous administration were being targeted.
There was also concern about the lack of transparency in the destination of confiscated property in that it was unclear to whom this property was being transferred (in case of existence of a legitimate owner of the property) or sold (in case of transfer to the State) and as to whether anyone other than the State stood to benefit from it. The Georgian authorities however informed the GET after the visit that the perceived lack of transparency in the destination of the confiscated property had been addressed, inter alia by abolishing the special state fund to which this property was allegedly transferred and that the value of the property confiscated was reflected in the State budget.
Although the GET was not in a position to assess whether the aforementioned concerns are still prevalent, it considers that any doubt about the legitimate use of administrative confiscation must be avoided. The GET therefore observes that the Georgian authorities should ensure the utmost transparency in the use of administrative confiscation to avoid any impression that this mechanism is being misused.”
H. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on anti-corruption measures in Georgia and on the global level
70. On 21 January 2004 the OECD’s Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies (“the ACN”) issued the following recommendation, referred to as “Recommendation no. 9”, to the Georgian authorities:
“9. [to] consider amending the Criminal Code to ensure that the confiscation of proceeds applies mandatory to all corruption and corruption-related offences. Ensure that the confiscation regime allowed for confiscation of proceeds of corruption, or property the value of which corresponds to that of such proceeds or monetary sanctions of comparable effect, and that confiscation from third persons is possible. Review the provisional measures to make the procedure for identification and seizure of proceeds from corruption in the criminal investigation and prosecution phases efficient and operational. Explore the possibilities to check and, if necessary, to seize unexplained wealth.”
71. In June 2004 the ACN had already commended the Georgian authorities for having promptly undertaken a number of anti corruption measures, including on the legislative level. The relevant excerpt from the Addendum to the Summary Assessment and Recommendations, which was endorsed on 17 June 2004, reads as follows:
“Despite a very short time since the January review, Georgian updated report informs of a number of important changes in the national legislation, some of which are related to the January recommendations. The main changes are summarised below: ...
• Confiscation: adoption of legal provisions for the investigation of illegal or unjustified property, introduction of the institution of withdrawal of illegal property;
• Efficiency of investigation and prosecution: introducing plea-bargaining in the criminal procedure; enhancing the possibilities to apply special investigative means in collection of evidence;
• Confiscation of proceeds from crime: Georgia has adopted a new law, which provides legal basis for confiscation of unjustified property, and addresses January recommendation 9 concerning the confiscation of proceeds of corruption; additionally new measures are being introduced outside criminal process to enable confiscation of unexplained wealth (through the reversal of burden of proof) ...”
72. Subsequently, in its First Monitoring Report on Georgia, which was adopted on 13 June 2006, the ACN concluded that the authorities had largely complied with its previous Recommendation no. 9 (compare with paragraph 70 above):
“The legislation of Georgia is compatible with the appropriate requirements of the international legislation, in particular with the relevant Council of Europe Convention, in providing for confiscation not only within a criminal procedure, but also through other means. Thus the Georgian Administrative Code empowers the prosecutor to claim the illegal property and unexplained wealth, the notion of which is described in the Law on Conflict of Interests. There are measures provided by the Criminal Procedure Code, such as the power to make civil claims in relation to the criminal offence. Georgia also supplied information regarding the application of these norms that substantiate the claims for effectiveness. It seems that the procedure for identification and seizure of proceeds of corruption exist and it is efficient and operational.”
73. In its Third Monitoring Report on Georgia, which was adopted on 25 September 2013, the ACN made the following observations concerning the results of the anti-corruption measures undertaken in the country:
“Corruption in Georgia has been a significant obstacle to economic development since the country gained independence. Its pervasive nature and high visibility had seriously undermined the credibility of the government. However, the new Georgian government in 2004, which came to power after the ‘Rose Revolution’, committed to tackle corruption and achieved impressive results in eradicating administrative corruption.
Georgia’s Transparency International Corruption Perception Index score increased from 1.8 in 2003 to 5.2 in 2012; Georgia is ranked 51st out of 174 countries (leader in the region of Eastern Europe and Central Asia). This is by far the most significant increase for all Istanbul Action Plan countries. Georgia is now ranking higher than a number of EU member countries (Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Slovakia and Romania). While all studies confirm that corruption has been widely eradicated from the citizens’ daily life, many civil society representatives and representatives of international organisations believed that high level corruption persisted. It is considered to be one of the reasons for the previous governing party’s loss at the October 2012 parliamentary elections.
Progress in anti-corruption efforts has made the most significant impact on investment and business climate. In the latest World Bank’s Doing Business report (2013) Georgia moved up to 9th spot globally (from 112th in 2006) with the nearest country from the region being Armenia (32nd) and average regional rank of 73. Georgia was the top improving country since 2005 both in the Eastern Europe and Central Asia and globally with 35 institutional and regulatory reforms carried out.”
THE LAW
I. THE GOVERNMENT’S PRELIMINARY OBJECTION
74. After notice of the present application had been given to the Government on 9 November 2009, the Court was informed on 22 June 2010 for the first time that the third applicant, Mr Tengiz Gogitidze, had died on 7 May 2005 (see paragraphs 4 and 5 above). Referring to the above fact, the Government raised an objection of abuse of the right of petition in respect of the deceased applicant. They claimed that the applicants’ legal counsel had deliberately concealed from the Court the fact of that person’s death when deceitfully submitting the application form on the deceased person’s behalf.
75. The applicants did not comment on the Government’s objection.
76. The Court reiterates that an application may be rejected as abusive under Article 35 § 3 of the Convention if it was knowingly based on untrue facts (see, among other authorities, Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, §§ 53-54, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 IV, and Keretchashvili v. Georgia (dec.), no. 5667/02, 2 May 2006) or if incomplete and therefore misleading information was submitted to the Court (see Bekauri v. Georgia (preliminary objection), no. 14102/02, §§ 21 and 24, 10 April 2012, and Hüttner v. Germany (dec.), no. 23130/04, 9 June 2006).
77. In this connection the Court observes that whilst Mr Tengiz Gogitidze died on 7 May 2005, a fact confirmed by a death certificate added to the case file after communication of the application, legal counsel lodged the application on behalf of the deceased on 4 July 2005. Indeed, the application form presented Mr Gogitidze as an applicant with full legal capacity, living at that time in Moscow, Russia. Furthermore, on 2 November 2005 legal counsel submitted to the Court an authority form which mentioned that it had been issued and signed by the third applicant in Moscow on 22 October 2005.
78. In such circumstances, the Court considers that the application form was based on the false claim that Mr Gogitidze was alive and willing to lodge an application with the Court, whilst the authority form added to the file on 2 November 2005 and bearing the signature “Tengiz Gogitidze” was necessarily a forged document. Although it is unclear who exactly sought to deceive the Court and falsified the signature on the authority form, and there is no indication that legal counsel was aware of the fraud at the time of the introduction of the application, the consequence of such misleading procedural manipulations is obviously incompatible with the purpose of the right of individual application (compare, for instance, with Poznanski and Others v. Germany (dec.), no. 25101/05, 3 July 2007).
79. That being so, the part of the application lodged in the name of Mr Tengiz Gogitidze is abusive for the purposes of Article 35 § 3 (a) in fine of the Convention and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
80. The applicants complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 about the confiscation of their property. This provision reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
81. The Court finds that these complaints are not manifestly ill founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The Government’s submissions
82. At the outset the Government asked the Court to take note of the scale of the corruption phenomenon that had been ravaging the country prior to the launching of a vast array of anti-corruption measures by the authorities in February 2004. The corrupt environment had been particularly apparent in the Ajarian Autonomous Republic, in whose government the first applicant had occupied high-ranking posts at the material time. On the other hand, only a few years after the State had undertaken a number of crucial legislative initiatives to bolster efforts to combat corruption, of which administrative confiscation constituted a major part, a firm trend of significant reduction in corruption could be readily observed, from 2006 onwards. In 2009 the Transparency International Corruption Perception Index had increased Georgia’s score from 1.8 in 2003 to 4.1, thus ranking it 66th out of 174 countries (see paragraphs 69-73 above).
83. The Government emphasised that all those positive results in the fight against corruption could never have been achieved without the mechanism of administrative confiscation which had been applied in the applicants’ case. They briefly described the nature of that legal mechanism. In particular, administrative confiscation did not constitute a part of criminal proceedings and was not of a punitive nature but, on the contrary, was of a civil-law, compensatory nature, being aimed at remedying the pecuniary damage caused either to private individuals or to the State (see paragraphs 49-54 above). The Government stated that such a procedure – confiscation of the property in question in the absence of a final criminal conviction, with the burden of proof being shifted onto the respondent – was in full conformity with the relevant international standards. In fact, it was the Council of Europe bodies and the OECD who had been the first to insist that Georgia should introduce such a measure (see paragraphs 66-70 above).
84. Observing that the proceedings for confiscation of the applicants’ property had strictly followed the judicial procedure laid down for that purpose by Article 37 § 1 of the CCP and Articles 21 §§ 4 to 11 of the CAP, the Government submitted that the resulting confiscation had been lawful. Those legal provisions were readily accessible to the public and their legal consequences were clear and foreseeable to the public at large, including the applicants. Furthermore, it could not be said that the legislative amendments in question had suddenly introduced revolutionary methods in the fight against corruption in February 2004, as seven years prior to those amendments there had already existed a law providing for the principles of prevention, exposure and eradication of corruption and the need to hold corrupt officials criminally, administratively and disciplinarily liable for their illicit deeds, namely the 1997 Act on Conflict of Interests and Corruption in the Public Service (see paragraphs 44-48 above). The Government then argued, by reference to the Court’s judgments in the cases of AGOSI (cited above, § 51) and Raimondo (cited above, § 29), that confiscation should be considered as a measure to control the use of property.
85. The Government firmly maintained that the introduction of the procedure of administrative confiscation served the public interest of the eradication of corruption in the public service. As to the implication of “relatives” and “connected persons”, that particular aspect was intended as a response to the well-known and widespread practice whereby corrupt public officials would hide the proceeds of their illicit deeds by fictitiously registering those proceeds in the names of their friends or relatives. In doing so, corrupt officials attempted to avoid financial accountability before the public, meaning that the legal obligation to submit financial declarations in their own names, as initially provided for by the 1997 Act on Conflict of Interests and Corruption in the Public Service, was deprived of any real value. The confiscation of the applicants’ property had therefore been justified by socio-legal and economic considerations, namely the need to eradicate corruption and to return the illicitly acquired property to the lawful owners or, in the absence of such, to the State budget.
86. As to the proportionality of the confiscation, the Government argued that that requirement was satisfied by the fact that the civil dispute between the State and the applicants had been the subject of a comprehensive judicial review by an independent and objective court. However, the applicants had failed to prove, in the relevant judicial proceedings, that they had had legal incomes that were sufficient to enable them to acquire the property, which had a much higher value. In this connection the Government also stated that, given that the impugned confiscation represented a measure to control the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the respondent State enjoyed a particularly wide margin of appreciation in the context of the policy of fighting such a major crime as corruption.
2. The applicants’ submissions
87. The applicants’ submissions were mostly aimed at criticising the political and legal reforms undertaken by the Georgian Government in general, accusing the ruling forces of anti-democratic methods of governing and of adjusting the law, including the legislation on confiscation, to their own whims.
88. With regard to the subject matter of the present case, the applicants confined their arguments to complaining about the major constituent elements of the administrative confiscation procedure as such. In particular, they stated that the confiscation of their property had been arbitrary, the authorities having claimed that it had been obtained as a result of the first applicant’s corrupt activities, without first having a final conviction against him proving his involvement in the commission of the impugned activities. In that regard they stated that the first applicant had been convicted of the offences with which he had been charged on 25 August 2004 (see paragraph 9 above); the launching of that criminal case had acted as a spur to the initiation of the administrative confiscation proceedings, as late as January 2010, that is, five years after the confiscation order had become final (see paragraph 36 above; no copy of the first applicant’s conviction was submitted). The applicants also complained that the burden of proof in the confiscation proceedings had been shifted onto them, arguing that, according to the general principles of criminal procedure, it was always the public prosecutor who should carry the burden of proving a defendant’s guilt beyond reasonable doubt.
89. The applicants also argued that the confiscation of their property had not been a provisional measure but, on the contrary, an irreversible act, which thus could not be characterised as control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, but should be treated as de facto expropriation of their property. Maintaining that the confiscation measure in their case amounted to a criminal sanction, the applicants also complained that the amendments of 13 February 2004 to the Code of Administrative Procedure had been applied retroactively in their case, since the property confiscated had in reality been acquired between November 1997 and May 2004. In that connection they added that the amendments in question had not been sufficiently clear and understandable to them as persons without any meaningful legal education.
90. The applicants’ further submissions were aimed at calling into question the factual findings of the domestic courts. In particular they asserted, without submitting any evidence in that regard, that the majority of the confiscated property had in reality been financed from the personal savings of the first applicant’s wife, a Russian national, and her distant relatives living and doing business in Russia. They complained that those facts had not been taken into account by the Supreme Court of Georgia during the relevant cassation proceedings. As to the reasons for the first, third and fourth applicants’ failure to attend the court hearings, the applicants explained that the first applicant had by that time already fled from Georgia to Russia for fear of criminal prosecution, whilst the remaining two applicants had simply had no trust in the country’s judicial system.
3. The Court’s assessment
(a) General observations
91. The subject matter of the applicants’ complaints is the compatibility of the so-called administrative confiscation procedure, under which some of their property was forfeited in favour of either third persons or the State, with the right to protection of property. Having regard to the relevant domestic legislative framework (see paragraphs 49-54 above) and comparing it with the relevant legal concepts employed by the international community (see paragraphs 55-64 above), the Court notes that the disputed procedure, despite the terminology used to describe it in domestic law, is far from being a purely administrative confiscation but, on the contrary, is linked to the prior existence of a criminal charge against a public official and thus represents by its nature a civil action in rem aimed at the recovery of assets wrongfully or inexplicably accumulated by the public officials concerned and their close entourage.
(b) The applicable rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
92. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which guarantees in substance the right to property, comprises three distinct rules. The first one, which is expressed in the first sentence of the first paragraph, lays down the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property in general. The second rule, in the second sentence of the same paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and makes it subject to certain conditions. The third, contained in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, among other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules, which are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property, must be construed in the light of the general principle laid down in the first rule (see, among many authorities, Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 44, ECHR 1999-V).
93. The Court first observes that it is not in dispute between the parties that the confiscation order concerning the applicants’ movable and immovable assets amounted to interference with their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, and that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is therefore applicable.
94. As to which exactly of the three above-mentioned property rules should apply to the applicants’ situation, the Court reiterates that where a confiscation measure has been imposed independently of the existence of a criminal conviction but rather as a result of separate “civil” (within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention) judicial proceedings aimed at the recovery of assets deemed to have been acquired unlawfully, such a measure, even if it involves the irrevocable forfeiture of possessions, constitutes nevertheless control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, amongst many other authorities, Air Canada v. the United Kingdom, 5 May 1995, § 34, Series A no. 316?A; Riela and Others v. Italy (dec.), no. 52439/99, 4 September 2001; Veits v. Estonia, no. 12951/11, § 70, 15 January 2015; and Sun v. Russia, no. 31004/02, § 25, 5 February 2009).
95. Accordingly, the Court considers that the same approach must be followed in the present case.
(c) Compliance with the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
96. An essential condition for interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful: the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Furthermore, any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 27265/95, § 85, 17 October 2002, and Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 59, 8 December 2009).
97. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 also requires that any interference be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised. In other words, a “fair balance” must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The requisite balance will not be found if the person or persons concerned have had to bear an individual and excessive burden (see, amongst many other authorities, The Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, §§ 79 and 82, ECHR 2000-XII, and Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, §§ 81 94, ECHR 2005-VI). Furthermore, a wide margin of appreciation is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of political, economic or social strategy, and the Court generally respects the legislature’s policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (see Azienda Agricola Silverfunghi S.a.s. and Others v. Italy, nos. 48357/07, 52677/07, 52687/07 and 52701/07, § 103, 24 June 2014).
(i) Lawfulness of the interference
98. The Court notes that the forfeiture of the applicants’ property was ordered by the domestic courts on the basis of Article 37 § 1 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and Chapter IV (Articles 21 §§ 4 to 11) of the Code of Administrative Procedure, introduced by the amendment of 13 February 2004. Having regard to the wording of those provisions, the Court considers that there cannot be any doubt about their clarity, precision or foreseeability (see, for instance, Khoniakina v. Georgia, no. 17767/08, § 75, 19 June 2012, and Grifhorst v. France, no. 28336/02, § 91, 26 February 2009).
99. As to the applicants’ argument that it was arbitrary to extend retrospectively the scope of the confiscation mechanism to the property that they had acquired prior to the entry into force of the amendment of 13 February 2004, the Court observes at the outset that the amendment in question was not the first piece of legislation in the country which required public officials to be held accountable for the unexplained origins of their wealth. Thus, as far back as 1997 the Act on Conflict of Interests and Corruption in the Public Service had already addressed such issues as corruption offences and the obligation of public officials to declare and justify the origins of their property and that of their close entourage, subject to possible criminal, administrative or disciplinary liability the exact nature of which was to be regulated by separate laws governing breaches of those anti corruption requirements (see paragraphs 44-48 above). That being so, it is clear that the amendment of 13 February 2004 merely regulated afresh the pecuniary aspects of the existing anti-corruption legal standards. Furthermore, the Court reiterates that the “lawfulness” requirement contained in Article of Protocol No. 1 cannot normally be construed as preventing the legislature from controlling the use of property or otherwise interfering with pecuniary rights via new retrospective provisions regulating continuing factual situations or legal relations anew (see Azienda Agricola Silverfunghi S.a.s. and Others, cited above, § 104, 24 June 2014; Arras and Others v. Italy, no. 17972/07, § 81, 14 February 2012; Huitson v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 50131/12, §§ 31-35, 13 January 2015; and Khoniakina, cited above, § 74). It finds no reason to find otherwise in the present case.
100. The Court therefore finds that the forfeiture of the applicants’ property was in full conformity with the “lawfulness” requirement contained in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(ii) Legitimate aim
101. As regards the legitimacy of the aim pursued by the impugned confiscation, the Court observes that the measure formed an essential part of a larger legislative package aimed at intensifying the fight against corruption in the public service (see paragraphs 49, 82 and 83 above). Having regard to the domestic legal framework (see paragraphs 52-54 and 85 above), it is evident that the rationale behind the forfeiture of wrongfully acquired property and unexplained wealth owned by persons accused of serious offences committed while in public office and from their family members and close relatives was twofold, having both a compensatory and a preventive aim.
102. The compensatory aspect consisted in the obligation to restore the injured party in civil proceedings to the status which had existed prior to the unjust enrichment of the public official in question, by returning wrongfully acquired property either to its previous lawful owner or, in the absence of such, to the State. This was, for instance, a consequence of the proceedings in rem in the present case, where one of the houses in the first applicant’s wrongful possession turned out to have been obtained from a third party as the result of duress; that third party, a private individual, then acquired entitlement to benefit from the confiscation of that particular property (see paragraphs 34 and 36 above, as well as the Court’s judgment in the case of Tchitchinadze, cited above, §§ 9, 13 and 16). The aim of the civil proceedings in rem was to prevent unjust enrichment through corruption as such, by sending a clear signal to public officials already involved in corruption or considering so doing that their wrongful acts, even if they passed unscaled by the criminal justice system, would nevertheless not procure pecuniary advantage either for them or for their families (see, mutatis mutandis, Raimondo, cited above, § 30; Veits, cited above, § 71; and Silickien? v. Lithuania, no. 20496/02, § 65, 10 April 2012).
103. The Court accordingly finds that the forfeiture measure in the instant case was effected in accordance with the general interest in ensuring that the use of the property in question did not procure advantage for the applicants to the detriment of the community (compare also with Phillips v. the United Kingdom, no. 41087/98, § 52, ECHR 2001 VII).
(iii) Proportionality of the interference
104. As regards the requisite balance to be struck between the means employed for forfeiture of the applicants’ assets and the above-mentioned general interest in combatting corruption in the public service, the Court notes that the tenor of the applicants’ submissions in this respect was limited to calling into question the two major constituent elements of the civil proceedings in rem. They considered it to be unreasonable (i) that the domestic law allowed for confiscation of their property as having been wrongfully acquired and/or being unexplained, without the first applicant’s guilt on corruption charges having first been proved and (ii) that the burden of proof in the associated proceedings had been shifted onto them.
(?) Whether the procedure for forfeiture of property was arbitrary
105. Having regard to such international legal mechanisms as the 2005 United Nations Convention against Corruption, the Financial Action Task Force’s (FATF) Recommendations and the two relevant Council of Europe Conventions of 1990 and 2005 concerning confiscation of the proceeds of crime (ETS No. 141 and ETS No. 198) (see paragraphs 55-65 above), the Court observes that common European and even universal legal standards can be said to exist which encourage, firstly, the confiscation of property linked to serious criminal offences such as corruption, money laundering, drug offences and so on, without the prior existence of a criminal conviction. Secondly, the onus of proving the lawful origin of the property presumed to have been wrongfully acquired may legitimately be shifted onto the respondents in such non-criminal proceedings for confiscation, including civil proceedings in rem. Thirdly, confiscation measures may be applied not only to the direct proceeds of crime but also to property, including any incomes and other indirect benefits, obtained by converting or transforming the direct proceeds of crime or intermingling them with other, possibly lawful, assets. Finally, confiscation measures may be applied not only to persons directly suspected of criminal offences but also to any third parties which hold ownership rights without the requisite bona fide with a view to disguising their wrongful role in amassing the wealth in question.
106. It was on the basis of those internationally acclaimed standards for combatting serious offences which entail unjust enrichment that the Council of Europe Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism (MONEYVAL), Group of States Against Corruption (GRECO) and the OECD’s Anti Corruption Network for Transition Economies, noticing the alarming levels of corruption in the country at all levels, repeatedly advised the Georgian authorities that they undertake legislative measures to ensure that the confiscation of proceeds, including value confiscations, applied mandatorily to all corruption and corruption-related offences and that confiscation from third parties should also be possible. The Court observes that the domestic authorities put the received instructions into practice by adopting the amendment of 13 February 2004. As far back as April and June 2006, and then again in September 2013, the above-mentioned international legal expert bodies commended the authorities for having largely complied with their instructions. They noted that, thanks to the introduction of civil proceedings in rem in addition to the possibility of confiscation through criminal proceedings, the Georgian legislation had been brought into line with the appropriate requirements of the international legislation, and in particular with the relevant Council of Europe Conventions, although they still warned the Georgian authorities against possible misuse of that procedure, calling for the utmost transparency in that regard (see paragraphs 66-73 above). Indeed, the Court considers it important to emphasise that those legislative measures considerably helped Georgia to move in the right direction in combating the corruption (see paragraph 73 above).
107. The Court also recalls previous cases in which it was required to examine, from the standpoint of the proportionality test of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, broadly similar procedures for the forfeiture of property linked to the alleged commission of various serious offences entailing unjust enrichment. As regards property presumed to have been acquired either in full or in part with the proceeds of drug-trafficking offences or other illicit activities of mafia-type or criminal organisations, the Court did not see any problem in finding the confiscation measures to be proportionate even in the absence of a conviction establishing the guilt of the accused persons. The Court also found it legitimate for the relevant domestic authorities to issue confiscation orders on the basis of a preponderance of evidence which suggested that the respondents’ lawful incomes could not have sufficed for them to acquire the property in question. Indeed, whenever a confiscation order was the result of civil proceedings in rem which related to the proceeds of crime derived from serious offences, the Court did not require proof “beyond reasonable doubt” of the illicit origins of the property in such proceedings. Instead, proof on a balance of probabilities or a high probability of illicit origins, combined with the inability of the owner to prove the contrary, was found to suffice for the purposes of the proportionality test under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The domestic authorities were further given leeway under the Convention to apply confiscation measures not only to persons directly accused of offences but also to their family members and other close relatives who were presumed to possess and manage the ill-gotten property informally on behalf of the suspected offenders, or who otherwise lacked the necessary bona fide status (see Raimondo, cited above, § 30; Arcuri and Others v. Italy (dec.), no. 52024/99, ECHR 2001 VII; Morabito and Others v. Italy (dec.), 58572/00, ECHR 7 June 2005; Butler v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 41661/98, 27 June 2002; Webb v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 56054/00, 10 February 2004; and Saccoccia v. Austria, no. 69917/01, §§ 87 91, 18 December 2008; compare also with the more recent case of Silickien?, cited above, §§ 60-70, where a confiscation measure was applied to the widow of a corrupt public official).
108. Having regard to all the above considerations the Court finds, by analogy, that the civil proceedings in rem in the present case, conducted under the procedure regulated by Article 37 § 1 of the CCP and Article 21 §§ 4 to 11 of the CAP, can likewise not be considered to have been arbitrary or to have upset the proportionality test under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In this connection the Court also attaches importance to the similar conclusions of the Constitutional Court of Georgia, which found the civil proceedings in rem to be devoid of any arbitrariness (see paragraphs 37 43 above) Indeed, it was only reasonable to expect all three applicants – one of whom had been directly accused of corruption in a separate set of criminal proceedings, whilst the remaining two were presumed, as the accused’s family members, to have benefited unduly from the proceeds of his crime – to discharge their part of the burden of proof by refuting the prosecutor’s substantiated suspicions about the wrongful origins of their assets. Moreover, those civil proceedings for confiscation clearly formed part of a policy aimed at the prevention and eradication of corruption in the public service, and the Court reiterates that in implementing such policies, respondent States must be given a wide margin of appreciation with regard to what constitutes the appropriate means of applying measures to control the use of property such as the confiscation of all types of proceeds of crime (see, for instance, Yildirim v. Italy (dec.), no. 38602/02, ECHR 2003 IV, and Butler, cited above).
(?) Whether the domestic courts acted without arbitrariness
109. Notwithstanding the above finding, the Court observes that it must also ascertain whether the applicants, as the respondents in the civil proceedings for confiscation, were afforded a reasonable opportunity of putting their arguments before the domestic courts (see, Veits, cited above, §§ 72 and 74, and Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002 IV).
110. In this connection the Court notes that the Ajarian Supreme Court, as well as transmitting the public prosecutor’s claim together with all the supporting documents, duly summoned all three applicants to make written submissions in reply and to take part in an oral hearing (contrast with Silickien?, cited above, § 48, and Veits, cited above, § 58). Those summonses were served at the applicants’ postal addresses twice, with the domestic court even postponing a hearing on one occasion, but the first and fourth applicants still failed to avail themselves of their procedural rights (see paragraphs 18, 19, 24 and 25 above). The first applicant’s reference to the fact that he was seeking to evade the criminal investigation at that time (see paragraph 90 above) is irrelevant in this regard, since he and the fourth applicant could have designated lawyers to represent their interests at first instance, as they did subsequently before the cassation court (compare with Bongiorno and Others v. Italy, no. 4514/07, § 49, 5 January 2010). In such circumstances, the Court considers that the first and fourth applicants merely chose to exercise their freedom to waive their procedural right to submit arguments before the first-instance court (see Scoppola v. Italy (no. 2) [GC], no. 10249/03, § 135, 17 September 2009), with the result that they failed to refute the prosecutor’s claim. As to the second applicant, who was represented by a lawyer of his choice before the first instance court, it is noteworthy that some of his arguments and evidence relating to the lawful origin of certain assets were accepted by the Ajarian Supreme Court, leading to the removal of those assets from the confiscation list.
111. As regards the proceedings before the cassation court, the Supreme Court of Georgia, all three applicants availed themselves of the opportunity of presenting their arguments on points of law both in writing and at an oral hearing. The proceedings were conducted, like those at first instance, in an adversarial manner. The applicants did not claim before the Court that there had been any procedural unfairness in the cassation proceedings, limiting their arguments to calling into question the findings of fact (see paragraph 90 above). However, the Court reiterates that it is not within its province to substitute its own assessment of the facts for that of the domestic courts, who are better placed to assess the evidence before them (see Grayson and Barnham v. the United Kingdom, nos. 19955/05 and 15085/06, § 48, 23 September 2008).
112. As to the applicants’ argument that the domestic courts ordered the confiscation of their property on the ground of a mere, unsubstantiated suspicion put forward by the public prosecutor, the Court finds it ill founded. The domestic courts duly examined the public prosecutor’s claim in the adversarial proceedings in the light of the numerous supporting documents available in the case file (see paragraph 12 above). That evidence led the domestic courts to the finding that the considerable assets acquired by the Gogitidze family during the tenure of the first applicant in public office could not have been financed by his official salaries alone, whilst the remaining applicants had had no other significant sources of income either. A careful examination of the applicants’ financial situation confirmed the existence of a considerable discrepancy between their income and their wealth, and that discrepancy, which was a well-documented factual finding, then became the basis for confiscation.
113. The Court thus finds that there is nothing in the conduct of the civil proceedings in rem to suggest either that the applicants were denied a reasonable opportunity of putting forward their case or that the domestic courts’ findings were tainted with manifest arbitrariness (contrast, mutatis mutandis, Denisova and Moiseyeva v. Russia, no. 16903/03, §§ 59-64, 1 April 2010).
(d) Conclusion
114. In the light of the foregoing, having regard to the Georgian authorities’ wide margin of appreciation in their pursuit of the policy designed to combat corruption in the public service and to the fact that the domestic courts afforded the applicants a reasonable opportunity of putting their case through the adversarial proceedings, the Court concludes that the civil proceedings in rem for the forfeiture of the applicants’ property, based on a procedure which was moreover in line with the relevant international standards, did not upset the requisite fair balance.
115. Accordingly, there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 6 §§ 1 and 2 OF THE CONVENTION
116. All three applicants complained that the confiscation proceedings had been conducted in breach of the principle of equality of arms contained in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. The first applicant complained that the confiscation of his property in the absence of a final conviction establishing his guilt amounted to an encroachment upon the principle of presumption of innocence.
117. The relevant provisions read as follows:
Article 6
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law. ...
2. Everyone charged with a criminal offence shall be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ submissions
118. The Government contested the applicants’ arguments. They first submitted that the administrative confiscation proceedings represented a “civil” dispute within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. During the examination of that dispute, the domestic courts had given ample opportunity to the first, second and fourth applicants to submit their written and oral arguments. However, only one of them, the second applicant, had availed himself of that opportunity, whilst the remaining applicants had ignored the domestic court’s two summonses. As to the second applicant, his arguments had been duly heard by the domestic courts; as a result of the courts’ thorough examination, some of his property had eventually been removed from the confiscation list. In general, the judicial examination, in which the burden of proof was placed on the respondent applicants by law, had been fair, and the court decisions had been sufficiently reasoned. As to the first applicant’s complaint under Article 6 § 2 of the Convention, the Government submitted that the provision in question could not apply to the administrative confiscation proceedings, as the latter had not involved the determination of any criminal charge against the applicant. All in all, the Government concluded that the applicants’ complaints under Articles 6 §§ 1 and 2 were manifestly ill-founded.
119. The applicants reiterated that the administrative confiscation proceedings had been in breach of the principle of equality of arms contained in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, given that the hearing before the court of first instance had been conducted in the first and fourth applicants’ absence. As to the reasons for that absence, the applicants explained that the first applicant had been obliged to leave Georgia for fear of criminal prosecution, whilst the fourth applicant had been distrustful towards the Georgian judiciary in general. The applicants’ submissions did not contain any explanation as to why their lawyers had not attended the hearing. The applicants also called into question the outcome of the proceedings, accusing the domestic courts of an erroneous assessment of the factual circumstances of the case. As to his complaint under Article 6 § 2 of the Convention, the first applicant reiterated that by requiring him to prove the lawful origins of his property prior to establishing his guilt on corruption charges, the domestic authorities had infringed his right to be presumed innocent.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) The applicants’ complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention
120. Having regard to the applicants’ submissions, the Court observes that it is not clear under which limb of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (“civil” or “criminal”), they intended to complain of.
121. Be that as it may, the Court reiterates its well-established case-law to the effect that proceedings for confiscation such as the civil proceedings in rem in the present case, which do not stem from a criminal conviction or sentencing proceedings and thus do not qualify as a penalty but rather represent a measure of control of the use of property within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol N. 1, cannot amount to “the determination of a criminal charge” within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and should be examined under the “civil” head of that provision (see, amongst many other authorities, Arcuri and Others, cited above; Butler, cited above; Veits, cited above, § 58; and Silickien? cited above, §§ 45 and 56; contrast with, for instance, Phillips, cited above, § 39).
122. As regards the first and fourth applicants’ complaint that the judicial proceedings at first instance had been conducted in their absence, the Court reiterates its previous finding that the applicants themselves chose to waive their procedural right to take part in the proceedings (see paragraph 110 above). As to the applicants’ argument that they should not have been made to bear the burden of proving the lawfulness of the origins of their property, the Court reiterates there can be nothing arbitrary, for the purposes of the “civil” limb of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, in the reversal of the burden of proof onto the respondents in the forfeiture proceedings in rem after the public prosecutor had submitted a substantiated claim (see, among other authorities, Grayson and Barnham, cited above, §§ 37-49, as well as the Court’s findings at paragraphs 103 and 104 above). As to the calling into question by the applicants of the domestic courts’ findings of fact, the Court reiterates that it cannot act as a fourth instance and will not therefore question those domestic findings (see, for instance, Bochan v. Ukraine (no. 2) [GC], no. 22251/08, § 61, 5 February 2015).
123. It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
(b) The first applicant’s complaint under Article 6 § 2 of the Convention
124. The Court reiterates that the question of the applicability of Article 6 § 2 of the Convention is normally to be examined under two aspects: a narrow aspect relating to the conduct of the relevant criminal trial as such, and a more extensive one which can go beyond the scope of the trial under certain conditions (see, for instance, Vanjak v. Croatia, no. 29889/04, § 67, 14 January 2010).
125. In this connection the Court observes that the forfeiture proceedings in rem in the present case did not take place after the criminal prosecution of the first applicant, but on the contrary preceded it. Consequently, the second, more extensive, aspect of Article 6 § 2 of the Convention, the role of which is to prevent the principle of presumption of innocence from being undermined after the relevant criminal proceedings have ended with an outcome other than conviction (such as acquittal, discontinuation of the criminal proceedings as being statute-barred, the death of an accused, and so on), is of no relevance in the present case (see Allen v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 25424/09, §§ 103 and 104, ECHR 2013; Geerings v. the Netherlands, no. 30810/03, §§ 43-50, 1 March 2007; Phillips, cited above, § 35; and Lagardère v. France, no. 18851/07, §§ 58-64, 12 April 2012).
126. As to the first, more limited aspect of Article 6 § 2, the role of which is to protect an accused person’s right to be presumed innocent exclusively within the framework of the pending criminal trial itself (see Allen, cited above, § 93, with further references mentioned in the same paragraph), the Court reiterates, in the light of its well-established case law, that the forfeiture of property ordered as a result of civil proceedings in rem, without involving determination of a criminal charge, is not of a punitive but of a preventive and/or compensatory nature and thus cannot give rise to the application of the provision in question (see, amongst other authorities, Butler, cited above; AGOSI, cited above, § 65; Riela, cited above; and Arcuri, cited above).
127. It follows that the first applicant’s complaint is incompatible ratione materiae with Article 6 § 2 of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
VI. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
128. The applicants, citing Articles 7 and 14 of the Convention, reiterated their complaints about the outcome of the domestic proceedings.
129. Having regard to all the material in its possession, and in so far as these complaints fall within its competence, the Court, noting its previous findings (see paragraphs 121, 123 and 127 above), considers that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. It follows that this part of the application must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the first, second and fourth applicants’ complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

Done in English, and notified in writing on 12 May 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Françoise Elens-Passos Päivi Hirvelä
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 2 del Protocollo N.ro 1 – Controllo dell'uso della proprietà)



QUARTA SEZIONE






CAUSA GOGITIDZE ED ALTRI C. GEORGIA

(Richiesta n. 36862/05)















STRASBOURG

12 maggio 2015



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Gogitidze ed Altri c. la Georgia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Päivi Hirvelä, Presidente
Giorgio Nicolaou,
Ledi Bianku,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Paul Mahoney,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Faris Vehabovi, ?giudici
e Françoise Elens-Passos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 14 aprile 2015,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 36862/05) contro la Georgia depositò con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con quattro cittadini Georgiani, OMISSIS (“il primo richiedente”), OMISSIS (“il secondo richiedente”), OMISSIS (“il terzo richiedente”) ed OMISSIS (“il quarto richiedente”), 4 luglio 2005.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Tbilisi. Il Governo Georgiano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. L. Meskhoradze, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che una misura di sequestro corte-imposta corrispose ad una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
4. 9 novembre 2009 il Governo fu dato avviso della richiesta.
5. 22 giugno 2010 la Corte fu informata per la prima volta che il terzo richiedente era morto in 7 maggio 2005, prima dell'introduzione della richiesta presente nel suo nome.
6. 14 aprile 2105 la Corte decise di dispensare con un'udienza.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
7. Il primo, secondo che terzo e quarto richiedenti sono nati in 1951, 1973 1940 e 1978 rispettivamente. Il secondo e quarto richiedenti sono i figli del primo richiedente ed il terzo richiedente è suo fratello. Il primo, secondo e quarto richiedenti vivono a Mosca, la Federazione russa.
A. L'iniziazione di procedimenti per la confisca di proprietà
8. Vigori politici e Nuovi vennero a motorizzare nell'Ajarian Repubblica Autonoma (“l'AAR”) in maggio 2004, seguendo il così definito “Rose Rivoluzione” quale accadde nel paese a novembre 2003 (vedere Abitante della Georgia Operare Parte c. la Georgia, n. 9103/04, §§ 11-13 ECHR 2008).
9. 25 agosto 2004 il primo richiedente che prima aveva sostenuto i posti di Ajarian Sostituto Ministro dell'Interno e Presidente del Revisione Ufficio fu accusato, fra gli altri reati, con abuso di autorità e l'estorsione.
10. 26 agosto 2004 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Pubblico dell'AAR iniziò procedimenti di fronte all'Ajarian Corte Suprema confiscare erroneamente e proprietà inesplicabilmente acquisita dai richiedenti sotto Articolo 37 § 1 (1) del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (“il CCP”) ed Articolo 21 §§ 5 e 6 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa (“la Copertura”); le disposizioni legislative in oggetto era stato adottato 13 febbraio 2004.
11. L'accusatore pubblico confermò che lui aveva i motivi ragionevoli per credere che i salari ricevettero col primo richiedente nella sua veste come Ministro Aggiunto dell'Interno fra 1994 e 1997 e Presidente del Revisione Ufficio fra novembre 1997 e maggio 2004 non poteva bastare finanziare l'acquisizione della proprietà che era accaduta durante la stessa spanna di tempo da solo, i suoi figli e suo fratello.
12. L'accusatore allegò ai suoi brevi articoli numerosi di prova (ventitrè documenti) quale mostrò che, sulla mano del una, il primo richiedente aveva guadagnato 1,644 e 6,023 euros (EUR) rispettivamente in salari ufficiali quando lui aveva occupato i due posti summenzionati nel Governo di Ajarian, mentre, d'altra parte il valore totale della proprietà che lui e gli altri richiedenti avevano acquisito corrispose a dell'EUR 450,000 (1,053,000 laris Georgiani (il Gel)). La cifra seconda fu basata sulle opinioni competenti di due revisori dei conti indipendenti che avevano condotto una valutazione della proprietà contestata 20 agosto 2004.
13. L'accusatore pubblico richiese perciò l'Ajarian Corte Suprema per decidere che gli articoli di proprietà riguardarono che è elencato sotto dovrebbe essere confiscato dai richiedenti e dovrebbe essere trasferito allo Stato.
14. La proprietà del primo richiedente incluse:
(un) un alloggio localizzò a 54 Strada di Mazniashvili, Batumi;
(b) un alloggio localizzò a 13 Strada di Griboyedov, Batumi;
(il c) il primo piano di un alloggio localizzò a 60 Strada di Gorgasali, Batumi;
(d) una quota nella capitale dell'Albergo di Sanapiro, Kobuleti;
(e) una macchina di Mercedes;
(f) un appartamento localizzò a 1 Strada di Ninoshvili, Kobuleti.
15. La proprietà del secondo richiedente incluse:
(il grammo) due alloggi di ospite localizzarono al 9 Strada di 32 aprile, Kobuleti.
16. La proprietà del terzo richiedente incluse:
(h) un alloggio localizzò a 245 Strada di Aghmashenebeli, Kobuleti.
17. La proprietà del quarto richiedente incluse:
(i) un appartamento localizzò a 58b Strada di Gorgasali, Batumi;
(j) un appartamento localizzò a 4-6 Strada di Gudiashvili, Batumi;
(il k) un appartamento localizzò a 20 H. Abashidze Strada, Batumi;
(l) un alloggio localizzò a 6 Generale A. Abashidze Chiusura;
(il metro) un alloggio localizzò a 186 Strada di Aghmashenebeli, Kobuleti.
B. I procedimenti per la confisca di proprietà di fronte al giudice di prima istanza
18. 30 agosto 2004 l'Ajarian che Corte Suprema ha accettato la richiesta dell'accusatore pubblico per un esame sui meriti. Trasmise insieme la breve dell'accusatore con tutti i documenti che sostengono ai richiedenti, invitando che li presentare le loro repliche scritto e frequentare un'udienza orale, elencò per 7 settembre 2004.
19. Siccome attestato con gli avvisi di ricevimento postali ed attinenti, l'Ajarian che le citazioni in giudizio di Corte Suprema sono state notificate debitamente a tutti i quattro richiedenti gli indirizzi di traccia di ' ma solamente il secondo richiedente, rappresentato con consiglio legale commenti scritto e registrati 6 settembre 2004.
20. Il secondo richiedente presentò che la proprietà menzionò a (b) sopra infatti appartenne a lui e non al primo richiedente. Provarlo lui produsse un contratto di vendita datò 2 dicembre 1997, fra lui ed un certo G.V., più un documento dalla Terra Cancelleria. Lui affermò che lui aveva acquistato la proprietà per EUR 10,174. Suo suocero, con chi il secondo richiedente e sua moglie visse dopo che loro si sposarono, l'aveva aiutato ad acquistare la proprietà. Lui produsse un certificato dalla banca che afferma che suo suocero aveva preso il prestito, così come dichiarazioni con testimoni diversi.
21. Il secondo richiedente spiegò inoltre che la proprietà menzionò a (f) sopra appartenne al Sig. N.U. che era un parente vicino né in qualsiasi modo connesse col primo richiedente. Non era perciò soggetto al sequestro.
22. Come alla proprietà menzionata a (il grammo) sopra, il secondo richiedente addusse che il primo richiedente non aveva avuto parte nell'acquistando o rinnovarlo e che lui, il secondo richiedente era il risuoli proprietario. Lui aveva comprato la proprietà da una signora per EUR 4,069 con l'aiuto di suo padrino, V.M. che gli aveva prestato presumibilmente 50,000 dollari di Stati Uniti (USD) rinnovare il luogo.
23. In somma, il secondo richiedente richiese, che le proprietà menzionarono a (b) e (f) e (il grammo) sopra sia rimosso dal ruolo di sequestro, e che la considerazione dovuta sia data alla prova lui aveva presentato esposizione che la proprietà concernita non era stata acquisita erroneamente.
24. Come il primo, terzo e quarto richiedenti non riuscirono a presentare argomenti scritto o sembrare di fronte all'Ajarian Corte Suprema 7 settembre 2004, il secondo decise di posticipare l'udienza sino a 9 settembre 2004. Le citazioni in giudizio attinenti furono notificate di nuovo debitamente a quelli richiedenti gli indirizzi di traccia di ', ma nessuno di loro sembrò di fronte alla corte, o in persona o con designando un difensore, sulla seconda occasione uno.
25. L'Ajarian Corte Suprema aprì un'udienza 9 settembre 2004 quale i primi, terzo e quarto richiedenti ed i loro avvocati non riuscirono a frequentare, senza dare ragioni. Fu frequentato con l'avvocato del secondo richiedente che inoltre pleaded al quale la proprietà ha menzionato (d) sopra anche appartenne a lui, ma che lui stava dandolo allo Stato come un regalo. In risposta, l'Ajarian Corte Suprema cambiò il nome dell'imputato in che parte della causa e chiamò il secondo richiedente come il proprietario della proprietà riguardato. Il secondo richiedente spiegò inoltre che oltre ai soldi suo padrino l'aveva prestato, lui aveva comprato ed aveva rinnovato la proprietà menzionata a (il grammo) sopra col suo salario come il direttore di una società nel quale lui possedette un quartiere delle quote. Secondo i minuti di che l'asse di società che si incontra di 1 luglio 2004, il profitto generato con le sue attività era EUR 17,987.
26. 10 settembre 2004 l'Ajarian Corte Suprema diede sentenza nell'assenza del primo, terzo e quarto richiedenti che erano stati notificati due volte ma non erano riusciti a sembrare senza la buon ragione (l'Articolo 26 § 1 (2) della Copertura).
27. Così, l'Ajarian Ordine della corte Supremo il sequestro della proprietà che appartiene al primo richiedente elencò sotto (un), (il c) e (e), che appartenendo al secondo richiedente elencò sotto (d) e (il grammo), e quel elencò sotto (i) a (il metro) appartenendo al quarto richiedente. Considerò in particolare che le somme di EUR 1,644 ed EUR 6,023 quale il primo richiedente aveva guadagnato rispettivamente come Ministro Aggiunto dell'Interno e Presidente del Revisione Ufficio non poteva bastare acquisire la proprietà in problema, e che gli altri richiedenti non guadagnarono abbastanza o. I salari che il primo richiedente ha guadagnato erano solamente abbastanza per prevedere per le necessità di una famiglia di quattro. La corte affermò che i richiedenti, in particolare i tre che chi era andato a vuoto a sembrare di fronte alla corte, non era riuscito ad assolvere il loro onere della prova con confutando la rivendicazione dell'accusatore pubblico.
28. Come riguardi la proprietà menzionò a (il grammo) sopra, l'Ajarian che Corte Suprema ha concluso che il secondo richiedente non era riuscito a provare le origini legali dei soldi lui acquisiva la proprietà che era stata valutata con revisori dei conti indipendenti che avevano valutato sia l'area di terra ed i quattro alloggi di ospite situò su sé a nessuno meno che EUR 94,000.
29. Inoltre, la Corte Suprema di Ajara considerò stabilì che la proprietà menzionò a (b) sopra appartenne al secondo richiedente e che la proprietà menzionò a (f) appartenne ad una terza parte. La causa dell'accusatore che concerne queste due proprietà fu archiviata così: riguardo alla prima proprietà, la corte accettò gli argomenti del secondo richiedente come alle sue origini legali.
30. Come riguardi la proprietà del terzo richiedente menzionò a (h) sopra, si stabilì che questa era ad una casa di famiglia non correlato alle attività del primo richiedente. Comunque, siccome era stata messa a nuovo la proprietà mentre il primo richiedente era in ufficio pubblico, mentre fabbricandogli valore EUR 24,418 secondo una valutazione ufficiale, il terzo richiedente fu ordinato per pagare il risarcimento Statale nell'importo di EUR 10,174.
C. I procedimenti per la confisca di proprietà di fronte alla corte di cassazione
31. Tutti i quattro richiedenti, rappresentati con consiglio legale così come l'accusatore pubblico, fatto appello contro la sentenza della corte di primo-istanza di 10 settembre 2004.
32. I richiedenti richiesero che i procedimenti di sequestro siano sospesi durante la conclusione dei procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente. Loro si lamentarono che l'onere della prova era stato spostato sopra loro nei procedimenti di sequestro. Il primo, terzo e quarto richiedenti si lamentarono anche che loro non erano stati dati un'opportunità di presentare i loro argomenti di fronte alla corte di primo-istanza. Il primo richiedente si lamentò inoltre che lui era stato negato il diritto per essere presunto innocente nei procedimenti di sequestro.
33. 22 ottobre 2004 la moglie del primo richiedente asserì di fronte alla Corte Suprema della Georgia che lei e suo figlio, il quarto richiedente erano i proprietari della proprietà menzionati a (il metro) sopra. Lei spiegò che lei era una cittadina russa ed aveva venduto l'alloggio di famiglia nella regione di Smolensk, coi suoi fratelli ' acconsente, comprare la proprietà in Kobuleti, dove i suoi russi parenti spenderebbero le loro feste di estate.
34. 3 novembre 2004 una terza parte, il Sig. S. Tchitchinadze, fatto domanda alla Corte Suprema della Georgia mentre affermando che la decisione dell'Ajarian Corte Suprema riguardo alla proprietà menzionata a (un) sopra era illegale perché la proprietà prima aveva appartenuto a lui ed era stata attualmente la materia di una controversia fra lui ed il primo richiedente. Sul 2004 Sig. Tchitchinadze di 15 dicembre la Corte Suprema della Georgia spedì una decisione della Batumi Città Corte datò il 2004 recognising di 14 novembre lui come il proprietario della proprietà in oggetto. Lui richiese che la sua proprietà sia rimossa dal ruolo di sequestro presentato con l'accusatore pubblico (per più i dettagli, vedere Tchitchinadze c. la Georgia, n. 18156/05, § 13 27 maggio 2010).
35. All'ascolti i quattro richiedenti ' consiglio legale conteso che la causa riguardo al primo, terzo e quarto richiedenti dovrebbero essere rinviati per esame nuovo perché i tre uomini non erano stati in grado partecipare nei procedimenti per prima citi un esempio. Lui si lamentò inoltre che la prova presentò col secondo richiedente non era stato dato la considerazione dovuta.
36. 17 gennaio 2005 la Corte Suprema della Georgia insorta a parte solamente finora la decisione di primo-istanza come sé concernè la proprietà menzionata a (un) sopra, l'alloggio localizzò a 54 Strada di Mazniashvili in Batumi, mentre ammettendo che l'appezzamento di terreno era la proprietà del Sig. S. Tchitchinadze (per ulteriori dettagli Tchitchinadze vede, citata sopra, §§ 16-17). Per il resto, fece seguire Corte Suprema il ragionamento dell'Ajarian, vale a dire che il reddito del primo richiedente non era sufficiente per lui ed i suoi membri di famiglia per avere acquisito le proprietà in problema, mentre gli altri richiedenti il reddito di ' era anche insufficiente. Riguardo agli argomenti della moglie del primo richiedente, la Corte Suprema della Georgia notò, che il registro di terra chiamò solamente il quarto richiedente come il proprietario della proprietà menzionato a (il metro) sopra.
D. procedimenti Costituzionali
37. 6 dicembre 2004 il primo richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale. Lui dibattè che Articolo 37 § 1 (1) del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (“il CCP”) ed Articolo 21 §§ 5 e 6 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa (“la Copertura”), adottò 13 febbraio 2004, era contrario alle disposizioni costituzionali e seguenti-Articolo 14 (proibizione della discriminazione), Articolo 21 (protezione di proprietà), Articolo 40 (presunzione dell'innocenza) ed Articolo 42 §§ 2 e 5 (nessuna sanzione penale senza legge e proibizione della richiesta retroattiva di diritto penale) della Costituzione della Georgia.
38. Nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale il primo richiedente reiterò soprattutto gli argomenti che lui prima aveva presentato di fronte alla Corte Suprema della Georgia. In particolare, lui si lamentò che il sequestro della sua proprietà e che dei suoi membri di famiglia corrisposti ad una sanzione penale che è imposta su lui nell'assenza di una definitivo condanna che stabilisce la sua colpa, e che lui non sarebbe dovuto essere reso per sopportare il carico di provare la sua innocenza che è la legalità della proprietà contestata. Lui si lamentò anche che il sequestro della proprietà in simile circostanze era in violazione del suo diritto per essere presunto innocente delle accuse di corruzione. Il primo richiedente affermò anche che lui e la sua famiglia avevano acquisito bene la proprietà in oggetto di fronte agli emendamenti di 13 febbraio 2004 fu decretato e che, di conseguenza, la proroga retroattiva di quelle disposizioni alla loro situazione era incostituzionale. Per quelle ragioni, lui dibattè, che la procedura di sequestro previde per con le disposizioni contestate del CCP e Copertura era stata arbitrario ed aveva corrisposto ad una violazione della garanzia costituzionale di protezione della sua proprietà privata.
39. Con una sentenza di 13 luglio 2005 la Corte Costituzionale, dopo avere ascoltato le parti gli argomenti di ' ed attesta da un numero di esperti legali e testimoni, respinse l'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente siccome mal-fondato sulla base del ragionamento seguente.
40. Prima, disegnando un'analogia con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, la Corte Costituzionale affermò che la disposizione costituzionale e Georgiana che protegge il diritto a proprietà (Articolo 21 della Costituzione) similmente non escluda la possibilità della privazione di proprietà se tale misura fosse legale, intraprese un interesse pubblico e soddisfatto la prova di proporzionalità. La corte seguì a poi enfatizzare che solamente ottenne legalmente proprietà godè la piena protezione costituzionale; nella causa del primo richiedente era stato un sospetto legittimo come alle origini legali della proprietà, un sospetto che lui ed i suoi membri di famiglia non erano stati capaci di confutare nel corso dei procedimenti giudiziali ed attinenti.
41. La Corte Costituzionale affermò inoltre che i procedimenti di sequestro amministrativi previdero per in Articolo 37 § 1 (1) del CCP ed Articolo 21 §§ 5 e 6 della Copertura, poteva in nessun modo sia associato a con procedimenti penali, come nessuna determinazione di un'accusa criminale era in pericolo; sul contrario, simile procedimenti erano un esempio classico di una controversia civile fra lo Stato, rappresentato con l'accusatore pubblico ed individui privati. Dato il “civile” natura dei procedimenti in oggetto, era accettabile che l'onere della prova nei procedimenti dovrebbe essere spostato sopra il convenuto, il secondo richiedente. Riferendosi alla sua propria ricerca legale comparativa e le sentenze della Corte nelle cause di Raimondo c. l'Italia (22 febbraio 1994, §§ 16-20 la Serie Un n. 281 Un) ed AGOSI c. il Regno Unito (24 ottobre 1986, §§ 33-42 la Serie Un n. 108), la Corte Costituzionale aggiunse che meccanismi così civili, comportando la confisca degli incassi di crimine o altrimenti ottenne illegalmente o proprietà inspiegata, non era ignoto in un numero delle democrazie Occidentali, incluso Italia, il Regno Unito e gli Stati Uniti dell'America.
42. Come al problema della retroattività allegato della richiesta dell'emendamento di 13 febbraio 2004 che introduce la procedura di sequestro amministrativa, e la presunzione del secondo richiedente dell'innocenza, la Corte Costituzionale decise che fin dai procedimenti in oggetto era stato “civile” e non “penale”, le garanzie di penale-legge summenzionate non potevano fare domanda. Inoltre, l'emendamento di 13 febbraio 2004 non aveva introdotto qualsiasi concetto nuovo ma piuttosto aveva regolato di nuovo, in una maniera più efficiente, le misure esistenti mirarono alla prevenzione e lo sradicamento della corruzione nel servizio pubblico. In particolare, la Corte Costituzionale si riferì all'Atto del 1997 su Conflitto di Interessi e la Corruzione nel Servizio Pubblico che non solo aveva costretto tutti gli ufficiali pubblici a dichiarare la loro propria proprietà e che della loro famiglia e parenti vicini, ma anche mostrare che la proprietà dichiarata era stata acquisita legalmente.
43. La Corte Costituzionale concluse che gli emendamenti di 13 febbraio 2004 notificarono indubbiamente l'interesse pubblico di intensificare la lotta contro la corruzione e che la prova della proporzionalità era stata soddisfatta anche debitamente durante i procedimenti di sequestro che erano stati condotti abbastanza di fronte alle corti nazionali.
II. DOCUMENTI INTERNAZIONALI ED ATTINENTI E DIRITTO NAZIONALE
A. L'Atto del 1997 su Conflitto di Interessi e la Corruzione nel Servizio Pubblico, come in vigore al tempo di materiale
44. 17 ottobre 1997 l'Atto su Conflitto di Interessi e la Corruzione nel Servizio Pubblico, il primo pezzo di maggiore di legislazione nella storia della Georgia indipendente che espone fuori i principi e metodi per ostacolando e sradicare la corruzione nel servizio pubblico, fu adottato col Parlamento della Georgia.
45. Sezione 1 dell'Atto proclamò che il suo obiettivo principale era ostacolare, scopre e pose fine ad istanze della corruzione, e sostenere ufficiali pubblici e corrotti responsabili.
46. Sezione 3 dell'Atto definì la nozione di “la corruzione nel servizio pubblico” come l'uso con un ufficiale pubblico di suo o il suo posto pubblico o dell'influenza associata con che posto per i fini dell'arricchimento indebito. La stessa disposizione definì il termine di “un reato di corruzione” come un atto del quale contenne gli elementi “la corruzione nel servizio pubblico” e quale potrebbe essere soggetto a disciplinare, amministrativo o la responsabilità penale. Sezione 4 spiegò che con che dovrebbe essere capito precisamente un ufficiale pubblico “membri di famiglia” e “parenti vicini”, una definizione che incluse simile categorie come fratelli, figli e genitori.
47. Capitolo IV dell'Atto (le sezioni 14 e 19) impose su ufficiali pubblici un obbligo per dichiarare la loro proprietà ogni anno (fra 1 e 30 aprile). La dichiarazione doveva non solo contenere un ruolo dei beni posseduto personalmente con l'ufficiale pubblico e con suo o lei “membri di famiglia” e “parenti vicini”, ed il valore di mercato effettivo della proprietà, ma anche la contabilità di informazioni per le origini della proprietà in oggetto. Le dichiarazioni presentate annualmente con ufficiali pubblici erano documenti pubblici.
48. Secondo sezione 20(1) e (2) dell'Atto, un reato di corruzione o un'altra violazione dei requisiti posate in giù con l'Atto aumento diede alla responsabilità sotto gli articoli posati in giù per che specifico fine o col criminale o la legislazione amministrativa. Se la responsabilità né penale né amministrativa sorgesse, causa disciplinare, come proscioglimento dal posto sarebbe intentata.
Diritto nazionale di B. sulla confisca di proprietà erroneamente acquisita o ricchezza inspiegata, come in vigore al tempo di materiale
49. Sul 2004 due maggiore di 13 febbraio emendamenti legislativi mirarono a sostenendo sforzi di combattere la criminosità, con una particolare enfasi su reati economici e quelli commisero nel servizio pubblico, fu adottato. Uno di quegli emendamenti introdusse negoziato nel Codice di Diritto processuale penale (vedere Natsvlishvili e Togonidze c. la Georgia, n. 9043/05, § 49 ECHR 2014 (gli estratti)), mentre il secondo che interessato sia il Codice di Diritto processuale penale ed il Codice di Procedura Amministrativa, regolò il meccanismo per la confisca di proprietà erroneamente acquisita.
50. Come un risultato di che secondo emendamento di 13 febbraio 2004, legge Georgiana previde per due procedure per la confisca di proprietà: “il sequestro penale” e “il sequestro amministrativo.” Il sequestro penale era di una natura generale e trattò con privazione degli oggetti di un reato e proventi da crimine, impose come parte dei procedimenti di giorno della sentenza che seguono una definitivo condanna che stabilisce la colpa della persona. Nel frattempo, la procedura seconda che fu governata con Articolo 37 § 1 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (“il CCP”) ed Articoli 21 §§ 4 a 11 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa (“la Copertura”), specificamente fu mirato a recuperando proprietà erroneamente acquisita e ricchezza inspiegata da un ufficiale pubblico, così come dai membri di famiglia secondi, parenti vicini e così definito “persone collegate”, anche senza la condanna penale e precedente dell'ufficiale riguardata.
51. Benché una condanna penale non fosse un requisito indispensabile necessario, il sequestro amministrativo si potrebbe iniziare solamente se un ufficiale fosse stato accusato con reati prima (incluso la corruzione) impegnato durante suo o il suo termine in ufficio contro gli interessi del servizio pubblico, l'impresa od organizzazione riguardati, o di uno dei reati seguenti: soldi lavando, l'estorsione, appropriazione indebita, appropriazione indebita, evasione fiscale o violazione di regolamentazioni di costume, nonostante se l'ufficiale in oggetto era ancora in ufficio o non.
52. Così, se l'ufficiale pubblico in oggetto fu accusato di uno o più dei reati summenzionati, e l'accusatore pubblico in accusa dell'indagine aveva un ragionevole sospetto che la proprietà nella proprietà di che and/or ufficiale e pubblico di suo o i suoi membri di famiglia, persone vicine e “persone collegate” sarebbe stato acquisito erroneamente, l'accusatore potrebbe registrare “un'azione civile” (?) con la corte sotto Articolo 37 § 1 CCP, esigendo il sequestro del “mal-ottenuto” proprietà e ricchezza inspiegata.
53. Una volta un accusatore pubblico aveva registrato un'azione civile per sequestro che doveva essere provato con prova di documentario sufficiente l'onere della prova sposterebbe poi sopra il convenuto. Se i secondi andassero a vuoto a confutare la rivendicazione dell'accusatore pubblico con producendo documenti che provano che la proprietà (o le risorse finanziarie per l'acquisto della proprietà) era stato acquisito legalmente o che tasse sulla proprietà erano state pagate debitamente, la corte, dopo avere assicurato che la rivendicazione dell'accusatore in modo appropriato fu provata, ordinerebbe il sequestro della proprietà in oggetto (l'Articolo 21 § 6 della Copertura).
54. Secondo Articolo 21 § 8 della Copertura, il fine del sequestro amministrativo era ripristinare la situazione che era esistita prima dell'acquisizione della proprietà contestata con l'ufficiale pubblico per sbagliato vuole dire. In particolare, la proprietà confiscata poi in quelli procedimenti amministrativi sarebbe ripristinata al suo owner(s legittimo) che potrebbe essere un individuo privato o una persona giuridica dopo le rivendicazioni legali sulla proprietà di tutte le altre terze parti era stato soddisfatto. Se il proprietario legittimo non potesse essere determinato durante i procedimenti di sequestro, la proprietà fu confiscata in favore dello Stato (l'Articolo 21 § 8 (1) della Copertura). Il sequestro di valore era anche possibile sotto Articolo 21 § 8 (3) della Copertura che affermò che se la proprietà soggetto alla confisca non potesse essere trasferita allo Stato nella sua forma originale, il convenuto dovrebbe pagare risarcimento valutario che corrisponde al valore della proprietà.
C. La Nazioni Convenzione Unito Contro la Corruzione
55. L'Unito del 2005 Nazioni Convenzione contro la Corruzione fu ratificata ed entrò in vigore in riguardo della Georgia 8 novembre 2008.
56. Articoli 31 e 54 § 1 (il c) di questa Convenzione che espose il principio di riconoscimento universale della confisca dei beni collegata alla corruzione, o incassi di crimine derivarono da reati di corruzione, legga siccome segue:
Articolo 31: Gelandosi, confisca ed il sequestro
“1. Ogni Parte Statale prenderà, alla più grande misura possibile all'interno del suo ordinamento giuridico nazionale, simile misure siccome può essere necessario per abilitare il sequestro di:
(un) Incassi di crimine derivarono da reati stabiliti in conformità con questa Convenzione o proprietà il valore di che corrisponde a che di simile incassi;...
4. Se simile incassi di crimine sono stati trasformati o sono stati convertiti, in parte o in pieno, nell'altra proprietà, simile proprietà sarà responsabile alle misure assegnate ad in questo articolo invece degli incassi.
5. Se simile incassi di crimine sono stati mescolati con proprietà acquisita da fonti legittime, simile proprietà può, senza pregiudizio a qualsiasi i poteri relativo a gelandosi o la confisca, dipenda responsabile dal sequestro al valore valutato degli incassi mescolati.
6. Reddito o gli altri benefici derivarono da simile incassi di crimine, da proprietà nella quale simile incassi di crimine sono stati trasformati o sono stati convertiti o da proprietà con la quale sono stati mescolati simile incassi di crimine sarà anche responsabile alle misure assegnate ad in questo articolo, nella stessa maniera ed alla stessa misura come incassi di crimine. ...
8. Parti in Stati possono considerare la possibilità di richiedere che un offensore dimostra l'origine legale di simile incassi allegato di crimine o l'altra proprietà responsabile al sequestro, alla misura che tale requisito è coerente coi principi fondamentali del loro diritto nazionale e con la natura di procedimenti giudiziali ed altri.
9. Le disposizioni di questo articolo non saranno costruite così come a pregiudizio i diritti di terze parti in buona fede. ...”
Articolo 54. Meccanismi per ricupero di proprietà tramite la cooperazione internazionale in sequestro
“1. Ogni Parte Statale,... , nella conformità col suo diritto nazionale: ...
(il c) consideri prendere simile misure siccome può essere necessario per concedere sequestro di simile proprietà senza una condanna penale in cause nelle quali l'offensore non può essere perseguito con ragione di morte, volo o l'assenza o nelle altre cause appropriate.”
57. Gli estratti attinenti dalla Guida Tecnica alla Nazioni Convenzione Unito Contro la Corruzione chiarificarono inoltre un numero di chiave nozioni legali relativo al sequestro di incassi di crimine riferito a reati di corruzione:
“IV. Cosa per considerare come incassi di crimine per fini del sequestro
Paragrafi 4, 5 e 6 di articolo 31 contorno la minima sfera di misure per implementare l'articolo.
Divida in paragrafi 4
Questo si riferisce alla situazione nella quale incassi sono stati trasformati o sono stati convertiti nell'altra proprietà. In questa causa, Parti di Stati è richiesta a soggetto al sequestro la proprietà trasformata o è convertita, invece degli incassi diretti.
Dato che offensori vogliono parte appena loro possono con gli incassi primari di crimine per ostruire sforzi investigativi di tracciare simile proprietà, la disposizione è di attinenza notevole quando facendo domanda un modello oggetto-basato del sequestro per evitare conflitti con terze parti in buona fede e potenziali e facilitare investigativo e l'attività di prosecutorial. La disposizione riflette la stessa teoria che giace dietro ad un modello valore-basato del sequestro: che questioni sono non permettere l'offensore per arricchirli lui o con illegale vuole dire.
La disposizione segue la così definita teoria di “proprietà contaminata,” da che cosa, siccome proprietà contaminata è scambiata per “proprietà pulita”, il secondo diviene contaminato. Mentre questo può sollevare emette di ricevuta in buon fede, paesi hanno sviluppato requisiti, da che cosa legislazione dà primato all'irrevocability del “la macchia” irrispettoso delle iterazioni di trasferimento, ricevuta e conversione.
Divida in paragrafi 5
Questo si riferisce alla situazione dove procede di crimine è stato mescolato con proprietà da fonti legittime. Parti in Stati sono richieste a soggetto al sequestro qualsiasi simile proprietà su al valore valutato degli incassi. Come ambo le situazioni sopra ed affermate un problema può posare quando il sistema di sequestro opera sotto un sistema di sequestro di oggetto che richiede una determinazione di proprietà ottenuto per il reato. Quando azionando un sistema di sequestro di valore queste situazioni non posa qualsiasi il problema.
Divida in paragrafi 6
Questo non solo richiede Parti di Stati a soggetto al sequestro primario ma anche incassi secondari di crimine. Incassi primari sono quelli beni ottenuti direttamente per il perpetrazione del reato-e.g., un dono di $100,000. Gli incassi secondari, con contrasto si riferiscono a benefici derivati dagli incassi originali, come interesse bancario o l'importo aumentati come una conseguenza di investimento. In questo riguardo a, la Convenzione costringe Stati Parties ad offrire il sequestro obbligatorio per sia gli incassi primari e secondari.
Sebbene la definizione degli incassi di crimine data in articolo 2 (il grammo) include proprietà “ottenne per un crimine” e proprietà “derivò da un crimine,” il paragrafo assegna esplicitamente “[I]ncome o gli altri benefici” derivò dagli incassi di crimine e fa domanda a benefici che vengono da qualsiasi delle situazioni assegnate in paragrafi 4 e 5-proprietà trasformò o convertì e mescolò proprietà. Nelle altre parole qualsiasi la valutazione in valore degli incassi di crimine, anche quando non attribuibile a qualsiasi l'attività penale deve essere anche responsabile al sequestro. ...
Divida in paragrafi 8
Divida in paragrafi 8 raccomanda che Parti di Stati considera la possibilità di spostare l'onere della prova in riguardo ad all'origine degli incassi allegato di crimine. ...
[I]n oltre alle procedure di generis di sui che accettano standard non-penali di prova dopo che la condanna ha raggiunto, un numero di giurisdizioni ha adottato anche procedure civili di sequestro che opera in rem e è governato con un standard della preponderanza di prova.
VII. Protezione di terze parti in buona fede
Divida in paragrafi 9 costringe Stati Parties a non costruire qualsiasi delle disposizioni di che articolo come a pregiudizio i diritti di terze parti in buona fede. Comunque, la Convenzione non specifica a che misura alla quale terze parti dovrebbero essere fornite via di ricorso legali ed effettive per preservare i loro diritti. Nell'implementare questa disposizione, Parti di Stati può desiderare così, prendere in considerazione che delle giurisdizioni hanno optato di stabilire una specifica procedura per terze parti che chiedono proprietà su proprietà sequestrata nella quale valuta l'accusa se il richiedente:
• ha agito col fine di celare il reato predicativo, o è implicato in qualsiasi dei reati subordinati;
• Ha interesse legale nella proprietà;
• Acted diligentemente a norma di legge e pratica commerciale;
• Se la proprietà richiede una registrazione pubblica dell'operazione o qualsiasi procedura amministrativa, simile informazioni hanno condotto (e.g., beni immobili, o veicoli);
• Se l'operazione fosse onerosa, se seguì i veri valori di mercato.”
D. Il Consiglio di Convenzioni di Europa
1. Il Consiglio del 1990 di Convenzione di Europa su Lavare, Ricerca, la Confisca ed il Sequestro degli Incassi da Crimine
58. Il Consiglio del 1990 di Convenzione di Europa su Lavare, Ricerca, la Confisca ed il Sequestro degli Incassi da Crimine (ETS N.ro 141) che entrò in vigore in riguardo della Georgia 1 settembre 2004 proclamò che uno del “metodi moderni ed effettivi” nel “lotta contro crimine serio... consiste nello spogliare criminali degli incassi da crimine” (vedere il Preambolo alla Convenzione).
59. La Convenzione fece appello alle Parti Firmatarie a “adotti misure così legislative ed altre siccome può essere necessario per abilitarlo per confiscare instrumentalities ed incassi o proprietà il valore di che corrisponde a simile incassi” (vedere Articolo 2). Allo stesso tempo, il termine “il sequestro” fu definito come “una sanzione penale o una misura, ordinò con una corte procedimenti seguenti in relazione ad un reato penale o reati penali che danno luogo alla definitivo privazione di proprietà” (vedere Articolo 1).
60. La Relazione Esplicativa alla Convenzione del 1999 chiarificò inoltre i termini legali ed attinenti:
“15. ... Gli esperti erano anche in grado identificare le differenze considerevoli in riguardo dell'organizzazione procedurale della presa di decisioni per confiscare (decisioni prese con tribunali penale, corti amministrative, autorità giudiziali e separate in procedimenti civili o penali totalmente separato da quegli in che è determinata la colpa dell'offensore (questi procedimenti sono assegnati a nel testo della Convenzione come procedimenti di ‘per il fine del sequestro ' e nel rapporto esplicativo qualche volta come ‘in procedimenti di rem '). Era anche possibile distinguere le differenze in riguardo della struttura procedurale di simile decisioni (presunzioni di proprietà illecitamente acquisita, tempo-limiti ecc.)...
23. Il comitato discusse se era necessario per definire il sequestro di ‘' od ordine di sequestro di ‘' sotto la Convenzione. ... La definizione del sequestro di ‘che ' è stato redatto per per farlo chiaro che, sulla mano del una, la Convenzione tratta solamente con attività penali o atti connesse therewith, come atti riferiti a civile in azioni di rem e, d'altra parte che le differenze nell'organizzazione dei sistemi giudiziali e gli articoli di procedura non escludono la richiesta della Convenzione. Per istanza, il fatto che il sequestro in degli Stati non è considerato come una sanzione penale ma come una sicurezza o l'altra misura è irrilevante alla misura che il sequestro è riferito all'attività penale. È anche irrilevante che è probabile che il sequestro sia ordinato qualche volta con un giudice che è, mentre parlando severamente, non un giudice penale come lungo come la decisione fu presa con un giudice. Il termine che ‘corteggia ' ha lo stesso significato come in Articolo 6 della Convenzione europea su Diritti umani. Gli esperti concordarono che puramente il sequestro amministrativo non fu incluso nella sfera di applicazione della Convenzione.”
2. Il Consiglio del 2005 di Convenzione di Europa su Lavare, Ricerca, la Confisca ed il Sequestro degli Incassi da Crimine e sul Finanziamento del Terrorismo
61. Nel 2005 il Consiglio dell'Europa adottò un altro, più comprensivo Convenzione su Lavare, Ricerca, la Confisca ed il Sequestro degli Incassi da Crimine e sul Finanziamento del Terrorismo (ETS N.ro 198). Entrò in vigore in riguardo della Georgia in 1 maggio 2014.
62. Articoli 3 e 5 della Convenzione del 2005, in finora come attinente, affermi siccome segue:
Articolo 3-misure di Sequestro
“4. Ogni Parte adotterà misure così legislative o altre siccome può essere necessario per richiedere che, in riguardo di un reato serio o reati come definito con legge nazionale, un offensore dimostra l'origine di incassi allegato o l'altra proprietà responsabile al sequestro alla misura che tale requisito è coerente coi principi del suo diritto nazionale.”
Articolo 5-Gelandosi, confisca ed il sequestro
“Ogni Parte adotterà misure così legislative ed altre siccome può essere necessario per assicurare che le misure per gelarsi, sequestri e confischi anche includa:
(un) la proprietà nella quale gli incassi sono stati trasformati o sono stati convertiti;
(b) proprietà acquisì da fonti legittime, se incassi sono stati mescolati, in intero o in parte, con simile proprietà su al valore valutato degli incassi mescolati;
(il c) reddito o gli altri benefici derivarono da incassi, da proprietà nella quale incassi di crimine sono stati trasformati o sono stati convertiti o da proprietà con la quale sono stati mescolati incassi di crimine, su al valore valutato degli incassi mescolati, nella stessa maniera ed alla stessa misura come incassi.”
63. La Relazione Esplicativa alla Convenzione di 2005 riaffermata quel:
“39. La definizione del sequestro di ‘che ' è stato redatto per per farlo chiaro che, sulla mano del una, la Convenzione del 1990 solamente quantità con attività penali o atti connessero therewith, come atti riferiti a civile in azioni di rem e, d'altra parte che le differenze nell'organizzazione dei sistemi giudiziali e gli articoli di procedura non escludono la richiesta della Convenzione del 1990 e questa Convenzione. Per istanza, il fatto che il sequestro in degli stati non è considerato come una sanzione penale ma come una sicurezza o l'altra misura è irrilevante alla misura che il sequestro è riferito all'attività penale. È anche irrilevante che è probabile che il sequestro sia ordinato qualche volta con un giudice che è, mentre parlando severamente, non un giudice penale come lungo come la decisione fu presa con un giudice.”
64. La Relazione Esplicativa affermò inoltre quel:
“71. Divida in paragrafi 4 di Articolo 3 costringe Parti ad offrire la possibilità per l'onere della prova per essere revocato riguardo all'origine legale di incassi allegato o l'altra proprietà responsabile al sequestro in reati seri. ...
76. Questa disposizione sottolinea in particolare il bisogno di fare domanda anche simile misure ad incassi che sono stati mescolati con proprietà acquisito da fonti legittime o quale è stato trasformato altrimenti o è stato convertito.”
E. Vigore del Compito dell'Azione Finanziario
65. Il Vigore del Compito dell'Azione Finanziario (FATF) fu stabilito a luglio 1989 come un gruppo inter-governativo con un Gruppo di Sette (G-7) Cima a Parigi. È stato riconosciuto da allora globalmente come un corpo autorevole che espone standard universali e politiche in sviluppo per combating, fra altro, soldi lavando. Nel 2003 emise anche una specifica raccomandazione che fu girata con la Georgia gridare per il sequestro nell'assenza di una condanna penale e precedente (noto come Raccomandazione n. 3):
“Misure provvisorie ed il sequestro
3. ... Paesi possono considerare adottare misure che permettono a simile incassi o instrumentalities di essere confiscati senza richiedere una condanna penale, o quali costringono un offensore a dimostrare l'origine legale della proprietà addotta per essere responsabile al sequestro, alla misura che tale requisito è coerente coi principi del loro diritto nazionale.”
F. Il Consiglio di Comitato di Europa di Esperti sulla Valutazione di Anti-soldi che Lava Misure ed il Finanziamento del Terrorismo (MONEYVAL)
66. Nella sua prima Valutazione Relazione su Georgia che concerneva una visita al paese con una squadra di esaminatori fra 23 e 26 ottobre 2000 MONEYVAL osservò e raccomandò il seguente:
“2. Le aree principali che generano incassi illegali e seriamente rischioso lo sviluppo economico della Georgia è corruzione, frode ed evasione fiscale così come importandosi di contrabbando beni. ...
6. Gli esaminatori considerano che la confisca e regime di sequestro dovrebbero essere fatti una rassegna e dovrebbero essere portati su ad internazionalmente accettò standard. ... Nella prospettiva degli esaminatori, la procedura di sequestro dovrebbe adattare ai requisiti della Convenzione di Strasbourg -con l'introduzione della possibilità di strumeni confiscatori ed incassi, e se loro sono stati alterati in qualche genere di proprietà, il valore corrispondente può essere confiscato.”
67. Nel contesto di una seconda visita di valutazione a Georgia con una squadra di MONEYVAL di esaminatori che ebbero luogo fra 21 e 23 maggio 2003 la Seconda Valutazione Relazione Rotonda criticò di nuovo le autorità nazionali per lacunae nella struttura legale riguardo al sequestro di incassi di crimine:
“8. ... [Il sequestro di V]alue non fu regolato in legislazione Georgiana al tempo della visita di su-luogo. Effettivamente, l'assenza di una vera misura del sequestro fu data come una delle prime ragioni per la mancanza di soldi che lava indagini o accuse. Ha bisogno di essere un completamento della struttura legale per creare una struttura legale ed abilitante per sostenere il sequestro in riguardo di tutti gli incassi penali (sia diretto ed indiretto), e valore equivalente basò il sequestro dovrebbe essere introdotto. È messo al corrente che elementi di pratica che ha provarono altrove di valore, incluso l'inversione dell'onere di prova riguardo all'origine legale di incassi allegato dovrebbe essere considerato nei particolari reati incasso-generatori seri.”
68. MONEYVAL fece un numero di commenti positivi nel suo terzo Tondo Valutazione Relazione Particolareggiata sullo schema di sequestro amministrativo introdotto 13 febbraio 2004 dopo la sua visita a Georgia fra 23 e 29 aprile 2006,:
“18. La struttura legale e Georgiana che copre... il sequestro è stato sviluppato significativamente ed ora c'è una struttura legale e di base a posto per... la confisca di oggetti, strumenti ed i beni criminalmente acquisiti (gli incassi). ...
19. C'è anche della confisca amministrativa ed innovativa approvvigiona in posto in cause speciali che comportano ufficiali pubblici e malavita raggruppa-quale incorpora elementi di standard civile di prova che è sviluppi molto benvenuti. ...
239. La procedura per confiscare da terza proprietà di parti che è stata trasferita per sconfiggere ordini di sequestro fu rivolta con disposizioni amministrative che trattano con membri di famiglia e parenti vicini di ufficiali prima dove sono soggetti di accusa ufficiali. ... Queste disposizioni (ed i cambi associati all'onere della prova per la confisca in queste cause) è molto benvenuto, e dovrebbe coprire molti terze parti in cui mani che i beni illegali incorrono in cause sensibili.
240. ... Chiaramente le disposizioni amministrative e nuove per il sequestro in riguardo di cause che sono portate contro ufficiali hanno avuto successo. ...”
G. Il Consiglio di Gruppo di Europa degli Stati Contro la Corruzione (GRECO)
69. Nella sua Seconda Valutazione Relazione sulla Georgia, adottò alla sua 31 Seduta plenaria sostenuta da 4 a 8 dicembre 2006 in Strasbourg, GRECO osservò e raccomandò il seguente:
“31. Di anni passati Georgia ha adottato un ordine enorme di legislazione nuova, fra le altre cose sulla confisca ed il sequestro degli strumenti ed incassi di crimine incluso la corruzione ed il lavare di questi incassi. L'introduzione di un schema di sequestro amministrativo nel 2004, specificamente diresse a proprietà illegalmente acquisita e ricchezza inspiegata di ufficiali, diede autorità di esecuzione di legge un attrezzo effettivo per spogliare ufficiali così come i loro parenti e le così definite persone collegate, dei benefici dei loro crimini.
Il sequestro amministrativo non richiede condanna precedente, lascia spazio esplicitamente al sequestro da terze parti così come dei beni di valore equivalente e richiede un relativamente standard basso di prova, prevedendo che una volta l'accusatore ha presentato his/her affermano alla corte che la proprietà dell'imputato è illegale o non può essere spiegata i turni di onere della prova all'imputato per mostrare che questa proprietà (o le risorse finanziarie richiesero per acquisire la proprietà) è stato ottenuto giuridicamente.
L'Ottenga [la Valutazione Squadra del Gruppo] fu detto che finora proprietà con un valore di più di €40 milione era stata reclaimed che illustrano l'impegno delle autorità Georgiane per non affittare ufficiali traggono profitto da crimini commessi durante termine loro in ufficio. Comunque, l'è ascoltato anche che ci sono state delle preoccupazioni dell'arbitrarietà del regime di sequestro amministrativo, in che presumibilmente, solamente proponenti dell'amministrazione precedente erano designati come bersaglio.
C'era anche interessato della mancanza di trasparenza nella destinazione di proprietà confiscata in che era poco chiaro a chi questa proprietà era trasferita (in causa di esistenza di un proprietario legittimo della proprietà) o venduto (in causa di trasferimento allo Stato) e come a se chiunque altro che lo Stato sostenne trarre profitto da sé. Le autorità Georgiane informarono comunque l'Ottenga dopo la visita che la mancanza percepita di trasparenza nella destinazione della proprietà confiscata era stata rivolta, inter alia con abolendo il finanziamento statale e speciale al quale fu trasferita presumibilmente questa proprietà e che il valore della proprietà confiscato fu riflesso nel bilancio Statale.
Benché l'Ottenga non era in una posizione per valutare se le preoccupazioni summenzionate ancora sono comuni, considera che qualsiasi dubita dell'uso legittimo del sequestro amministrativo deve essere evitato. L'Ottenga perciò osserva che le autorità Georgiane dovrebbero assicurare la massima trasparenza nell'uso del sequestro amministrativo per evitare qualsiasi impressione che questo meccanismo è adoperato male.”
H. L'Organizzazione per Co-operazione Economica e Sviluppo (OECD) su misure di anti-corruzione in Georgia e sul livello globale
70. 21 gennaio 2004 l'Anti-corruzione Rete dell'OECD per Transizione Economie (“l'ACN”) emesso la raccomandazione seguente, assegnò a come “la Raccomandazione n. 9”, alle autorità Georgiane:
“9. [a] considera correggere il Codice Penale per assicurare che il sequestro di incassi fa domanda obbligatorio ad ogni corruzione e reati corruzione-relativi. Assicuri che il regime di sequestro lasciò spazio al sequestro di incassi della corruzione, o proprietà il valore di che corrisponde a che di simile incassi o sanzioni valutarie di effetto comparabile, e che il sequestro da terza persona è possibile. Faccia una rassegna le misure provvisorie per costituire la procedura l'identificazione e la confisca di incassi dalla corruzione nell'indagine penale ed accusa mette in fase efficiente ed operativo. Esplori le possibilità di controllare e, se necessario, prendere ricchezza inspiegata.”
71. A giugno 2004 l'ACN già aveva lodato le autorità Georgiane per avere intrapreso prontamente un numero di anti la corruzione misura, incluso sul livello legislativo. L'estratto attinente dall'Aggiunta alla Valutazione Riassuntiva e Raccomandazioni che furono girate 17 giugno 2004 legge siccome segue:
“Nonostante un tempo molto breve fin dalla revisione di gennaio, Abitante della Georgia aggiornò, rapporto informa di un numero di importanti cambi nella legislazione nazionale alcuni/e dei/lle quali è riferita alle raccomandazioni di gennaio. I cambi principali sono riassunti sotto: ...
Sequestro di •: l'adozione di disposizioni legali per l'indagine di proprietà illegale o ingiustificata, introduzione dell'istituzione di ritiro di proprietà illegale;
Efficienza di • di indagine ed accusa: dichiarazione -mercanteggiamento che introduce nel diritto processuale penale; migliorando le possibilità di fare domanda speciale investigativo vuole dire in raccolta di prova;
Il Sequestro di • di incassi da crimine: Georgia ha adottato una legge nuova che offre base legale per il sequestro di proprietà ingiustificata ed indirizzi gennaio raccomandazione 9 riguardo al sequestro di incassi della corruzione; misure inoltre nuove sono introdotte fuori di elaborazione penale abilitare sequestro di ricchezza inspiegata (per l'inversione di onere della prova)...”
72. Nella sua prima Monitoraggio Relazione su Georgia che fu adottata 13 giugno 2006 l'ACN concluse successivamente, che le autorità si erano attenute grandemente con la sua Raccomandazione precedente n. 9 (compari con paragrafo 70 sopra):
“La legislazione della Georgia è compatibile coi requisiti appropriati della legislazione internazionale, in particolare col Consiglio attinente di Convenzione di Europa, nel non solo prevedere per il sequestro all'interno di un diritto processuale penale ma anche per altro vuole dire. Così il Codice Amministrativo e Georgiano conferisce poteri l'accusatore per chiedere la proprietà illegale e ricchezza inspiegata, la nozione di che è descritto nella Legge su Conflitto di Interessi. Ci sono misure previste col Diritto processuale penale Codice, come il potere per fare rivendicazioni civili in relazione al reato penale. Georgia provvide anche informazioni riguardo alla richiesta di queste norme che provano le rivendicazioni per l'efficacia. Sembra che la procedura per l'identificazione e la confisca di incassi della corruzione esiste e è efficiente ed operativo.”
73. Nella sua terza Monitoraggio Relazione su Georgia che fu adottata 25 settembre 2013 l'ACN fece le osservazioni seguenti riguardo ai risultati delle misure di anti-corruzione si impegnati nel paese:
“La corruzione in Georgia è stata un ostacolo significativo a sviluppo economico poiché il paese guadagnò l'indipendenza. La sua natura penetrante e la visibilità alta avevano minato la credibilità del governo seriamente. Comunque, il governo Georgiano e nuovo in 2004 che vennero a motorizzare dopo la ‘Rose Rivoluzione ' impegnato afferrare la corruzione e realizzò impressionante dà luogo allo sradicare la corruzione amministrativa.
La Trasparenza della Georgia Corruzione Percezione Indice risultato Internazionale aumentò da 1.8 nel 2003 a 5.2 nel 2012; Georgia è classificata 51 fuori di 174 paesi (leader nella regione di Europa Orientale e l'Asia Centrale). Questo è di gran lunga l'aumento più significativo per tutti gli Istanbul Azione Piano paesi. Georgia ora sta classificando più alta di un numero dei paesi membro di EU (Bulgaria, Croatia, Repubblica ceca, Grecia, Italia, Lettonia, Slovacchia e la Romania). Mentre tutti gli studi confermano che la corruzione è stata sradicata estesamente dai cittadini ' la vita quotidiana, molti rappresentanti di società civili e rappresentanti di organizzazioni internazionali creduti che la corruzione di livello alta persistè. Si considera che sia una delle ragioni per la perdita della parte governante precedente all'ottobre 2012 elezioni parlamentari.
Avanzi in sforzi di anti-corruzione ha fatto l'impatto più significativo su investimento e clima di affari. Nell'ultima Mondo Banca rapporto di Affari sta Facendo (2013) Georgia si mosse globalmente su a 9 macchia (da 112 nel 2006) col paese più vicino dalla regione che è Armenia (32) e media fila regionale di 73. Georgia era la cima che migliora paese fin da 2005 sia nell'Europa Orientale e l'Asia Centrale e globalmente con 35 riforme istituzionali e regolatore eseguite.”
LA LEGGE
I. L'ECCEZIONE PRELIMINARE DEL GOVERNO
74. Dopo avviso della richiesta presente era stato dato al Governo 9 novembre 2009, la Corte fu informata 22 giugno 2010 per la prima volta che il terzo richiedente, il Sig. Tengiz Gogitidze era morto in 7 maggio 2005 (vedere divide in paragrafi 4 e 5 sopra). Riferendosi al fatto sopra, il Governo sollevò una difficoltà dell'abuso del diritto di ricorso in riguardo del richiedente deceduto. Loro dissero che i richiedenti ' del quale consiglio legale aveva celato intenzionalmente dalla Corte il fatto che la morte di persona quando presentando ingannevolmente il modulo di domanda sul conto della persona deceduta.
75. I richiedenti non fecero commenti sull'eccezione del Governo.
76. La Corte reitera che una richiesta può essere respinta come abusivo sotto Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione se fosse basato di proposito su fatti falsi (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, §§ 53-54 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996 IV, e Keretchashvili c. la Georgia (il dec.), n. 5667/02, 2 maggio 2006) o se incompleto e perciò informazioni ingannevoli furono presentate alla Corte (vedere Bekauri c. la Georgia (eccezione preliminare), n. 14102/02, §§ 21 e 24, 10 aprile 2012, e Hüttner c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 23130/04, 9 giugno 2006).
77. In questo collegamento la Corte osserva che mentre il Sig. Tengiz Gogitidze morì in 7 maggio 2005, un fatto confermato con un certificato di morte aggiunto all'archivio di causa dopo comunicazione della richiesta consiglio legale depositò la richiesta in favore del defunto 4 luglio 2005. Effettivamente, il modulo di domanda presentò il Sig. Gogitidze come un richiedente con la piena qualità giuridica, vivendo a che momento di entrata Mosca, Russia. Inoltre, sul 2005 consiglio legale di 2 novembre presentato alla Corte una forma di autorità che menzionò che era stato emesso ed era stato firmato col terzo richiedente a Mosca 22 ottobre 2005.
78. In simile circostanze, la Corte considera, che il modulo di domanda fu basato sulla rivendicazione falsa che il Sig. Gogitidze era vivo e disposto per depositare una richiesta con la Corte, mentre la forma di autorità aggiunse all'archivio 2 novembre 2005 e sopportando la firma “Tengiz Gogitidze” necessariamente era un documento fucinato. Benché sia poco chiaro chi cercò precisamente di ingannare la Corte e falsificò la firma sulla forma di autorità, e non c'è indicazione che consiglio legale era consapevole della frode al tempo dell'introduzione della richiesta, la conseguenza di manipolazioni procedurali e così ingannevoli è evidentemente incompatibile col fine del diritto della richiesta individuale (paragone, per istanza con Poznanski ed Altri c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 25101/05, 3 luglio 2007).
79. Che essendo così, la parte della richiesta depositata nel nome del Sig. Tengiz Gogitidze è abusiva per i fini di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) in multa della Convenzione e deve essere respinto in conformità con Articolo 35 § 4.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
80. I richiedenti si lamentarono Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 del sequestro della loro proprietà. Questa disposizione legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
81. La Corte trova che queste azioni di reclamo non sono manifestamente mal fondato all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni del Governo
82. All'inizio il Governo chiesto alla Corte di prendere nota della scala del fenomeno di corruzione che stava devastando il paese prima del varo di un ordine enorme di misure di anti-corruzione con le autorità a febbraio 2004. L'ambiente corrotto era stato particolarmente evidente nell'Ajarian Repubblica Autonoma in cui il governo il primo richiedente aveva occupato alto-classificazione affigge al tempo di materiale. D'altra parte solamente alcuni anni dopo lo Stato avevano intrapreso un numero di iniziative legislative e cruciali per sostenere sforzi di combattere corruzione della quale il sequestro amministrativo costituì una parte notevole, un trend fisso di riduzione significativa in corruzione potrebbe essere osservato prontamente, da 2006 onwards. Nel 2009 la Trasparenza Indice della Percezione della Corruzione Internazionale aumentava il risultato della Georgia dal 1.8 nel 2003 a 4.1, classificandolo così 66 fuori di 174 paesi (vedere divide in paragrafi 69-73 sopra).
83. Il Governo enfatizzò che tutti quelli positivo dà luogo alla lotta contro la corruzione non sarebbe potuto essere realizzato mai senza il meccanismo di sequestro amministrativo che era stato fatto domanda nei richiedenti la causa di '. Loro descrissero brevemente la natura di quel meccanismo legale. In particolare, amministrativo sequestro una parte di procedimenti penali non costituì e non era di una natura punitiva ma, sul contrario, era di una civile-legge, natura compensativa essendo mirati a rimediando al danno patrimoniale o causò ad individui privati o allo Stato (vedere divide in paragrafi 49-54 sopra). Il Governo affermò che tale procedura-il sequestro della proprietà in oggetto nell'assenza di una definitivo condanna penale, con l'onere della prova che è spostato sopra il convenuto-era in piena conformità con gli standard internazionali ed attinenti. Infatti, era il Consiglio dei corpi di Europa e gli OECD che erano stati i primi ad insistere che Georgia dovrebbe introdurre tale misura (vedere divide in paragrafi 66-70 sopra).
84. Osservando che i procedimenti per il sequestro dei richiedenti la proprietà di ' aveva seguito severamente la procedura giudiziale posata in giù per che fine di Articolo 37 § 1 dei CCP ed Articoli 21 §§ 4 a 11 della Copertura, il Governo presentò che il sequestro risultante era stato legale. Quelle disposizioni legali erano prontamente accessibili al pubblico e le loro conseguenze legali erano chiare e prevedibili al pubblico a grande, incluso i richiedenti. Inoltre, non poteva essere detto che gli emendamenti legislativi in oggetto aveva introdotto improvvisamente metodi rivoluzionari nella lotta contro la corruzione a febbraio 2004, come sette anni prima di quegli emendamenti là già era esistito una legge che prevede per i principi di prevenzione, esposizione e lo sradicamento della corruzione ed il bisogno per sostenere criminalmente ufficiali corrotti, amministrativamente e disciplinarmente responsabile per i loro atti illeciti, vale a dire l'Atto del 1997 su Conflitto di Interessi e la Corruzione nel Servizio Pubblico (vedere divide in paragrafi 44-48 sopra). Il Governo dibattè poi, con riferimento alle sentenze della Corte nelle cause di AGOSI (citò sopra, § 51) e Raimondo (citò sopra, § 29), che il sequestro dovrebbe essere considerato che come una misura controlli l'uso di proprietà.
85. Il Governo sostenne fermamente che l'introduzione della procedura del sequestro amministrativo notificò l'interesse pubblico dello sradicamento della corruzione nel servizio pubblico. Come all'implicazione di “i parenti” e “persone collegate”, che il particolare aspetto fu proporsi come una risposta al notorio e pratica molto estesa da che cosa ufficiali pubblici e corrotti nasconderebbero gli incassi dei loro atti illeciti con registrando in modo fittizio quegli incassi nei nomi dei loro amici o parenti. Nel fare così, ufficiali corrotti tentarono di evitare la responsabilità finanziaria di fronte al pubblico, mentre volendo dire che l'obbligo legale per presentare dichiarazioni finanziarie nei loro propri nomi, come inizialmente purché per con l'Atto del 1997 su Conflitto di Interessi e la Corruzione nel Servizio Pubblico, fu privato di qualsiasi il vero valore. Il sequestro dei richiedenti che la proprietà di ' era stata giustificata perciò con considerazioni socio-legali ed economiche, vale a dire il bisogno di sradicare la corruzione e ritornare l'illecitamente proprietà acquisita ai proprietari legali o, nell'assenza di così, al bilancio Statale.
86. Come alla proporzionalità del sequestro, il Governo dibatté, che che requisito fu soddisfatto col fatto che la controversia civile fra lo Stato ed i richiedenti erano stati la materia di un controllo giurisdizionale comprensivo con una corte indipendente ed obiettiva. Comunque, i richiedenti non erano riusciti a provare, nei procedimenti giudiziali ed attinenti che loro avevano avuto redditi legali che erano sufficienti per abilitarli per acquisire la proprietà che aveva un valore molto più alto. In questo collegamento il Governo affermò anche che, determinato che il sequestro contestato rappresentò una misura per controllare l'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, lo Stato rispondente godè un margine particolarmente ampio della valutazione nel contesto della politica di lottare contro tale crimine notevole come corruzione.
2. I richiedenti le osservazioni di '
87. I richiedenti che le osservazioni di ' sono state tirate soprattutto criticising i politici e riforme legali si impegnate col Governo Georgiano in generale, accusando i vigori dominanti di metodi anti-democratici di governare e di aggiustare la legge, incluso la legislazione su sequestro, ai loro propri capricci.
88. Con riguardo ad all'argomento della causa presente, i richiedenti confinarono i loro argomenti a lamentandosi degli elementi costituenti e notevoli della procedura di sequestro amministrativa come così. In particolare, loro affermarono che il sequestro della loro proprietà era stato arbitrario, le autorità che hanno chiesto che era stato ottenuto come un risultato delle attività corrotte del primo richiedente, senza avere una definitivo condanna contro lui provando il suo coinvolgimento nel perpetrazione delle attività contestate prima. In che riguardo a loro affermarono che il primo richiedente era stato dichiarato colpevole dei reati coi quali lui era stato accusato 25 agosto 2004 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra); il varo di che causa penale si era comportata come un incitamento all'iniziazione dei procedimenti di sequestro amministrativi, come in ritardo come gennaio 2010 quel è, cinque anni dopo l'ordine di sequestro erano divenuti definitivo (vedere paragrafo 36 sopra; nessuna copia della condanna del primo richiedente fu presentata). I richiedenti si lamentarono anche che l'onere della prova nei procedimenti di sequestro era stato spostato sopra loro, mentre dibattè che, secondo i principi generali di diritto processuale penale, era sempre l'accusatore pubblico che dovrebbe portare il carico di provare la colpa di un imputato oltre dubbio ragionevole.
89. I richiedenti dibatterono anche che il sequestro della loro proprietà non era stato una misura provvisoria ma, sul contrario, un atto irreversibile che così non poteva essere caratterizzato come controllo dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, ma dovrebbe essere trattato come espropriazione de facto della loro proprietà. Sostenendo che la misura di sequestro nella loro causa corrisposta ad una sanzione penale, i richiedenti si lamentarono anche che gli emendamenti di 13 febbraio 2004 al Codice di Procedura Amministrativa erano stati fatti domanda retroattivamente nella loro causa, poiché la proprietà confiscata avuto in realtà stato acquisito fra novembre 1997 e maggio 2004. In che collegamento che loro hanno aggiunto che gli emendamenti in oggetto non era stato sufficientemente chiaro e comprensibile a loro come persone senza qualsiasi istruzione legale e significativa.
90. I richiedenti ' che le ulteriori osservazioni che chiamarono in questione le sentenze che riguarda i fatti delle corti nazionali sono state tirate. In particolare loro asserirono, senza presentare qualsiasi la prova in che riguardo a, che la maggioranza della proprietà confiscata aveva in realtà stato finanziato dai risparmi personali della moglie del primo richiedente, un cittadino russo, ed i suoi distanti parenti vivendo e facendo affari in Russia. Loro si lamentarono che quelli fatti non erano stati presi in considerazione con la Corte Suprema della Georgia durante i procedimenti di cassazione attinenti. Come alle ragioni per il primo, terzo e quarto richiedenti che l'insuccesso di ' per frequentare la corte ascolta, i richiedenti spiegarono che il primo richiedente aveva con che tempo già fuggì dalla Georgia a Russia per paura di azione penale, mentre i rimanere due richiedenti non avevano avuto semplicemente fiducia nel sistema giudiziale del paese.
3. La valutazione della Corte
(a) osservazioni di Generale
91. L'argomento dei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sono la compatibilità della così definita procedura di sequestro amministrativa sotto la quale alcuna della loro proprietà fu confiscato in favore di terza persona o lo Stato, col diritto a protezione di proprietà. Avendo riguardo ad alla struttura legislativa nazionale ed attinente (vedere divide in paragrafi 49-54 sopra) e comparandolo coi concetti legali ed attinenti assunse con la comunità internazionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 55-64 sopra), la Corte nota che la procedura contestata, nonostante la terminologia lo descriveva in diritto nazionale, è lontano dall'essere un puramente il sequestro amministrativo ma, sul contrario, è collegato all'esistenza precedente di un'accusa criminale contro un ufficiale pubblico e così rappresenta con la sua natura un'azione civile in rem mirato erroneamente o inesplicabilmente al ricupero dei beni accumulato con gli ufficiali pubblici riguardati ed il loro entourage vicino.
(b) L'articolo applicabile di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
92. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che garantisce in sostanza il diritto a proprietà comprende tre articoli distinti. Il primo che è espresso nella prima frase del primo paragrafo posa in giù il principio di godimento tranquillo di proprietà in generale. Il secondo articolo, nella seconda frase dello stesso paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e lo fa soggetto alle certe condizioni. Il terzo, contenuto nel secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo e terzi articoli che concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà devono essere costruiti nella luce del principio generale posata in giù nel primo articolo (vedere, fra molte autorità, Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 44 il 1999-V di ECHR).
93. La Corte prima osserva che non è in controversia fra le parti che l'ordine di sequestro riguardo ai richiedenti ' che i beni mobili ed immobili hanno corrisposto ad interferenza col loro diritto a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà, e che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è perciò applicabile.
94. Come a che precisamente dei tre articoli di proprietà summenzionati dovrebbe fare domanda ai richiedenti la situazione di ', la Corte reitera che dove una misura di sequestro è stata imposta indipendentemente dell'esistenza di una condanna penale ma piuttosto come un risultato di separato “civile” (all'interno del significato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione) procedimenti giudiziali mirati al ricupero dei beni ritennero essere stati acquisiti illegalmente, tale misura anche se comporta la confisca irrevocabile di proprietà, costituisce ciononostante controlli dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Aria il Canada c. il Regno Unito, 5 maggio 1995, § 34 la Serie Un n. 316A?; Riela ed Altri c. l'Italia (il dec.), n. 52439/99, 4 settembre 2001; Veits c. l'Estonia, n. 12951/11, § 70 15 gennaio 2015; e Sole c. la Russia, n. 31004/02, § 25 5 febbraio 2009).
95. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che lo stesso approccio deve essere seguito nella causa presente.
(il c) Ottemperanza col secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
96. Una condizione essenziale per interferenza per essere ritenuto compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale: il secondo paragrafo riconosce che Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso di proprietà con eseguendo “le leggi.” Inoltre qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà si può giustificare solamente se notifica un pubblico legittimo (o generale) l'interesse. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 27265/95, § 85, 17 ottobre 2002, e Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 59 8 dicembre 2009).
97. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede anche che qualsiasi interferenza è ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Nelle altre parole, un “equilibrio equo” deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. L'equilibrio richiesto non si troverà se la persona o persone riguardate hanno dovuto sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, §§ 79 e 82, ECHR 2000-XII, e Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, §§ 81 94 ECHR 2005-VI). Ad un margine ampio della valutazione di solito è concesso inoltre, allo Stato sotto la Convenzione quando viene a misure generali della strategia politica, economica o sociale, e la Corte rispetta la scelta di politica della legislatura generalmente a meno che è “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (vedere Azienda Agricola Silverfunghi S.a.s. ed Altri c. l'Italia, N. 48357/07, 52677/07 52687/07 e 52701/07, § 103 24 giugno 2014).
(i) la Legalità dell'interferenza
98. La Corte nota che la confisca dei richiedenti la proprietà di ' fu ordinata con le corti nazionali sulla base di Articolo 37 § 1 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale e Capitolo IV (gli Articoli 21 §§ 4 a 11) del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa, introdusse con l'emendamento di 13 febbraio 2004. Avendo riguardo ad all'enunciazione di quelle disposizioni, la Corte considera, che non ci può essere qualsiasi dubita della loro chiarezza, precisione o prevedibilità (vedere, per istanza, Khoniakina c. la Georgia, n. 17767/08, § 75, 19 giugno 2012, e Grifhorst c. la Francia, n. 28336/02, § 91 26 febbraio 2009).
99. Come ai richiedenti l'argomento di ' che era arbitrario per prolungare retrospettivamente la sfera del meccanismo di sequestro alla proprietà che loro avevano acquisito prima dell'entrata in vigore dell'emendamento di 13 febbraio 2004, la Corte osserva all'inizio che l'emendamento in oggetto non era il primo pezzo di legislazione nel paese che costrinse ufficiali pubblici ad essere sostenuto responsabile per le origini inspiegate della loro ricchezza. Così, come lontano indietro come 1997 l'Atto su Conflitto di Interessi e la Corruzione nel Servizio Pubblico già aveva rivolto simile problemi come reati di corruzione e l'obbligo di ufficiali pubblici per dichiarare e giustificare le origini della loro proprietà e che del loro entourage vicino, soggetto al possibile criminale la responsabilità amministrativa o disciplinare la natura esatta di che sarebbe regolato con leggi separate violazioni governante di quegli anti requisiti di corruzione (vedere divide in paragrafi 44-48 sopra). Che essendo così, è chiaro che l'emendamento di 13 febbraio 2004 regolò soltanto da capo gli aspetti patrimoniali dell'anti-corruzione esistente standard legali. Inoltre, la Corte reitera che il “la legalità” requisito contenne in Articolo di Protocollo N.ro 1 non si può costruire normalmente siccome impedendo alla legislatura di controllare l'uso di proprietà o interferendo altrimenti con via di diritti patrimoniale retrospettiva disposizioni regolando nuovo continuando di nuovo situazioni che riguarda i fatti o relazioni legali (vedere Azienda Agricola Silverfunghi S.a.s. ed Altri, citata sopra, § 104, 24 giugno 2014; Arras ed Altri c. l'Italia, n. 17972/07, § 81 14 febbraio 2012; Huitson c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 50131/12, §§ 31-35 13 gennaio 2015; e Khoniakina, citata sopra, § 74). Non trova nessuna ragione di trovare altrimenti nella causa presente.
100. La Corte perciò i costatazione che la confisca dei richiedenti la proprietà di ' era in piena conformità col “la legalità” requisito contenne in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(l'ii) scopo Legittimo
101. Come riguardi la legittimità dello scopo perseguita col sequestro contestato, la Corte osserva che la misura formò una parte essenziale di un più grande pacco legislativo mirata ad intensificando la lotta contro la corruzione nel servizio pubblico (vedere divide in paragrafi 49, 82 e 83 sopra). Avendo riguardo ad alla struttura legale e nazionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 52-54 e 85 sopra), è evidente che la base razionale dietro alla confisca di proprietà erroneamente acquisita e ricchezza inspiegata posseduta con persone accusate di reati seri commessi mentre in ufficio pubblico e dai loro membri di famiglia e parenti vicini era duplice, mentre avendo sia un compensativo ed un scopo preventivo.
102. L'aspetto compensativo consistè nell'obbligo per ripristinare la vittima in procedimenti civili allo status in oggetto il quale era esistito prima dell'arricchimento ingiusto dell'ufficiale pubblico, con o restituendo proprietà erroneamente acquisita al suo proprietario legale e precedente o, nell'assenza di così, allo Stato. Questo era, per istanza, una conseguenza dei procedimenti in rem nella causa presente, dove uno degli alloggi nella proprietà sbagliata del primo richiedente risultata per essere stata ottenuta da una terza parte come il risultato di prigionia; che terza parte, un individuo privato poi diritto acquisito per trarre profitto dal sequestro di che particolare proprietà (vedere divide in paragrafi 34 e 36 sopra, così come la sentenza della Corte nella causa di Tchitchinadze, citata sopra, §§ 9, 13 e 16). Lo scopo dei procedimenti civili in rem era ostacolare l'arricchimento ingiusto tramite la corruzione come così, con spedendo un chiaro già segnali ad ufficiali pubblici coinvolti in corruzione o considerando fare così che i loro atti sbagliati, anche se loro passarono unscaled col sistema di giustizia penale, non procurerebbe ciononostante o vantaggio patrimoniale per loro o per le loro famiglie (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Raimondo citata sopra, § 30; Veits, citata sopra, § 71; e Silickien ?c. la Lituania, n. 20496/02, § 65 10 aprile 2012).
103. La Corte di conseguenza costatazione che la misura di confisca nella causa presente è stata effettuata in conformità con l'interesse generale nell'assicurare che l'uso della proprietà in oggetto non procuri vantaggio per i richiedenti al danno della comunità (compari anche con Phillips c. il Regno Unito, n. 41087/98, § 52 ECHR 2001 VII).
(l'iii) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
104. Come riguardi l'equilibrio richiesto per essere previsto fra i mezzi assunse per la confisca dei richiedenti i beni di ' e l'interesse generale e summenzionato nel combattere la corruzione nel servizio pubblico, la Corte nota che il tenore dei richiedenti le osservazioni di ' in questo riguardo furono limitate a chiamando in questione il maggiore del due elementi costituenti dei procedimenti civili in rem. Loro considerarono che sé fosse irragionevole (i) che il diritto nazionale lasciò spazio al sequestro della loro proprietà siccome stato stato acquisito erroneamente and/or che è inspiegato, senza la colpa del primo richiedente su corruzione accusa prima essendo stato provò e (l'ii) che l'onere della prova nei procedimenti associati era stato spostato sopra loro.
(?) Se la procedura per la confisca di proprietà era arbitraria
105. Avendo riguardo ad a meccanismi legali e così internazionali come l'Unito del 2005 Nazioni Convenzione contro la Corruzione, il Vigore del Compito dell'Azione Finanziario (FATF) Raccomandazioni e l'attinente del due Consiglio di Convenzioni di Europa di 1990 e 2005 riguardo al sequestro degli incassi di crimine (ETS N.ro 141 ed ETS N.ro 198) (vedere divide in paragrafi 55-65 sopra), la Corte osserva che europeo comune ed anche si può dire che standard legali ed universali esistano, quali incoraggiano, in primo luogo, la confisca dei beni collegò a reati penali e seri come corruzione, soldi lavando reati di droga e così su, senza l'esistenza precedente di una condanna penale. L'onere di provare l'origine legale della proprietà presunto per essere stato acquisito erroneamente legittimamente può essere spostato in secondo luogo, sopra i convenuti in simile procedimenti non-penali per il sequestro, incluso procedimenti civili in rem. Misure di sequestro non solo possono essere fatte domanda in terzo luogo, agli incassi diretti di crimine ma anche a proprietà incluso qualsiasi redditi e gli altri benefici indiretti, ottenuti con convertendo o trasformando gli incassi diretti di crimine o mescolandoli con altro possibilmente legale, i beni. Misure di sequestro non solo possono essere fatte domanda infine, a persone sospettate direttamente di reati penali ma anche a qualsiasi terze parti senza le quali sostengono diritti di proprietà il richiesto in buona fede con una prospettiva a travestendo il loro ruolo sbagliato nell'ammassare la ricchezza in oggetto.
106. Era sulla base di quegli internazionalmente acclamò standard per combattere reati seri che comportano l'arricchimento ingiusto che il Consiglio di Comitato di Europa di Esperti sulla Valutazione di Anti Soldi che Lava Misure ed il Finanziamento del Terrorismo (MONEYVAL), Gruppo degli Stati Contro la Corruzione (GRECO) e l'OECD Anti Rete di Corruzione per Transizione Economie, mentre osservando i livelli allarmanti della corruzione nel paese a tutti i livelli, consigliò ripetutamente le autorità Georgiane che loro intraprendono misure legislative per assicurare che il sequestro di incassi, incluso i sequestri di valore fece domanda obbligatoriamente ad ogni corruzione e reati corruzione-relativi e che il sequestro da terze parti dovrebbe essere anche possibile. La Corte osserva che le autorità nazionali misero le istruzioni ricevute in pratica con adottando l'emendamento di 13 febbraio 2004. Come lontano indietro come aprile e giugno 2006, ed a settembre 2013, i corpi di esperto legali internazionali e summenzionati lodarono poi di nuovo le autorità per essersi attenuto grandemente con le loro istruzioni. Loro notarono che, grazie all'introduzione di procedimenti civili in rem oltre alla possibilità del sequestro per procedimenti penali, la legislazione Georgiana era stata portata in linea coi requisiti appropriati della legislazione internazionale, ed in particolare col Consiglio attinente di Convenzioni di Europa, benché loro ancora avvertissero le autorità Georgiane contro il possibile cattivo uso di che procedura, mandando a chiamare la massima trasparenza in che riguardo a (vedere divide in paragrafi 66-73 sopra). Effettivamente, la Corte lo considera importante enfatizzare che quelle misure legislative aiutarono notevolmente Georgia a muoversi nella direzione corretta in combating la corruzione (vedere paragrafo 73 sopra).
107. La Corte richiama anche cause precedenti nelle quali fu costretto ad esaminare, dal posto d'osservazione della prova di proporzionalità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, largamente procedure simili per la confisca di proprietà collegata al perpetrazione allegato di vari reati seri che comportano l'arricchimento ingiusto. Siccome proprietà di riguardi presunse o essere stata acquisita in pieno o in parte con gli incassi di droga-trafficare reati o le altre attività illecite di mafia-tipo od organizzazioni penali, la Corte non vide, qualsiasi problema nel trovare il sequestro misura essere anche proporzionato nell'assenza di una condanna che stabilisce la colpa delle persone accusato. La Corte lo trovò anche legittimo per le autorità nazionali ed attinenti emettere ordini di sequestro sulla base di una preponderanza di prova che suggerì che i convenuti ' che redditi legali non potevano bastare per loro per acquisire la proprietà in oggetto. Un ordine di sequestro era ogni qualvolta effettivamente, il risultato di procedimenti civili in rem che riferì agli incassi di crimine derivato da reati seri, la Corte non richiese prova “oltre dubbio ragionevole” delle origini illecite della proprietà in simile procedimenti. Invece, renda impermeabile su un equilibrio delle probabilità o una probabilità alta di origini illecite, combinato con l'incapacità del proprietario per provare il contrario, fu trovato bastare per i fini della proporzionalità esamini sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Le autorità nazionali furono date inoltre scarroccio sotto la Convenzione per fare domanda il sequestro non solo misura a persone accusate direttamente di reati ma anche ai loro membri di famiglia e gli altri parenti vicini che furono congetturati possedere e maneggiare informalmente la proprietà mal-ottenuta in favore degli offensori sospettati, o che altrimenti mancò lo status in buona fede e necessario (vedere Raimondo, citata sopra, § 30; Arcuri ed Altri c. l'Italia (il dec.), n. 52024/99, ECHR 2001 VII; Morabito ed Altri c. l'Italia (il dec.), 58572/00, ECHR 7 giugno 2005; il Maggiordomo c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 41661/98, 27 giugno 2002; Webb c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 56054/00, 10 febbraio 2004; e Saccoccia c. l'Austria, n. 69917/01, §§ 87 91 18 dicembre 2008; compari anche con la più recente causa di Silickien?, citata sopra, §§ 60-70, dove una misura di sequestro fu fatta domanda alla vedova di un ufficiale pubblico e corrotto).
108. Avendo riguardo ad a tutte le considerazioni sopra la Corte trova, con analogia che i procedimenti civili in rem nella causa presente, condusse sotto la procedura regolata con Articolo 37 § 1 del CCP ed Articolo 21 §§ 4 a 11 della Copertura, non si può considerare similmente che sia stato arbitrario o avere sconvolto la prova di proporzionalità sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo, N.ro 1. In questo collegamento la Corte dà anche l'importanza alle conclusioni simili della Corte Costituzionale di Georgia che trovò i procedimenti civili in rem per essere privo di qualsiasi l'arbitrarietà (vedere divide in paragrafi 37 43 sopra) era solamente Davvero, ragionevole per aspettarsi tutti i tre richiedenti-uno di chi era stato accusato direttamente della corruzione in un set separato di procedimenti penali, mentre i rimanere due furono presunti, come i membri di famiglia dell'accusato, avere tratto profitto impropriamente dagli incassi del suo crimine-assolvere la loro parte dell'onere della prova confutando i sospetti provati dell'accusatore delle origini sbagliate dei loro beni. Quelli procedimenti civili per il sequestro chiaramente formarono inoltre, parte di una politica mirata alla prevenzione e lo sradicamento della corruzione nel servizio pubblico, e la Corte reitera che nell'implementare simile politiche, Stati rispondenti devono essere dati un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo ad a che che costituisce l'appropriato vuole dire di fare domanda misure per controllare l'uso di proprietà come il sequestro di tutti i tipi di incassi di crimine (vedere, per istanza, Yildirim c. l'Italia (il dec.), n. 38602/02, ECHR 2003 IV, e Maggiordomo, citata sopra).
(?) Se le corti nazionali agirono senza l'arbitrarietà
109. Nonostante la sentenza sopra, la Corte osserva, che deve accertare anche se i richiedenti, come i convenuti nei procedimenti civili per il sequestro, fu riconosciuto un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere i loro argomenti di fronte alle corti nazionali (vedere, Veits, citata sopra, §§ 72 e 74, e Jokela c. la Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 45 ECHR 2002 IV).
110. In questo collegamento la Corte nota che l'Ajarian Corte Suprema, così come trasmettendo insieme la rivendicazione dell'accusatore pubblico con tutti i documenti che sostengono, chiamò in causa debitamente tutti i tre richiedenti per fare osservazioni scritte in replica e prendere parte in un'udienza orale (contrasto con Silickien?, citata sopra, § 48, e Veits, citata sopra, § 58). Quelle citazioni furono notificate due volte ai richiedenti ' indirizzi postali, con la corte nazionale che posticipa anche un'udienza su un'occasione ma i primo e quarto richiedenti ancora non riuscirono a giovarsi a dei loro diritti procedurali (vedere divide in paragrafi 18, 19 24 e 25 sopra). Il riferimento del primo richiedente al fatto che lui stava cercando di evadere l'indagine penale a che tempo (vedere paragrafo 90 sopra) è irrilevante in questo riguardo a, poiché lui ed il quarto richiedente avrebbero potuto designare avvocati per rappresentare i loro interessi per prima cita un esempio, siccome loro facevano successivamente di fronte alla corte di cassazione (compari con Bongiorno ed Altri c. l'Italia, n. 4514/07, § 49 5 gennaio 2010). In simile circostanze, la Corte considera, che i primo e quarto richiedenti scelsero soltanto di esercitare la loro libertà per rinunciare al loro diritto procedurale per presentare argomenti di fronte alla corte di primo-istanza (vedere Scoppola c. l'Italia (n. 2) [GC], n. 10249/03, § 135 17 settembre 2009), col risultato che loro non sono riusciti a confutare la rivendicazione dell'accusatore. Come al secondo richiedente che fu rappresentato con un avvocato della sua scelta di fronte al primo giudice di prima istanza è notevole che alcuni dei suoi argomenti ed attesta relativo all'origine legale dei certi beni fu accettato con l'Ajarian Corte Suprema, mentre conducendo all'allontanamento di quelli beni dal ruolo di sequestro.
111. Come riguardi i procedimenti di fronte alla corte di cassazione, la Corte Suprema della Georgia, tutti i tre richiedenti si giovarono a dell'opportunità di presentare i loro argomenti su questioni di diritto sia per iscritto ed ad un'udienza orale. I procedimenti furono condotti, come quelli per prima istanza, in una maniera di adversarial. I richiedenti non chiesero di fronte alla Corte che c'era stata qualsiasi l'iniquità procedurale nei procedimenti di cassazione, limitando i loro argomenti a chiamando in questione le sentenze di fatto (vedere paragrafo 90 sopra). Comunque, la Corte reitera che non è all'interno della sua provincia per sostituire la sua propria valutazione dei fatti per che delle corti nazionali che sono messe meglio per valutare la prova di fronte a loro (vedere Grayson e Barnham c. il Regno Unito, N. 19955/05 e 15085/06, § 48 23 settembre 2008).
112. Come ai richiedenti l'argomento di ' che le corti nazionali ordinarono il sequestro della loro proprietà sulla base di un lago, sospetto non comprovato fissato in avanti con l'accusatore pubblico, la Corte lo trova mal fondò. Le corti nazionali esaminarono debitamente la rivendicazione dell'accusatore pubblico nei procedimenti di adversarial nella luce del numeroso che sostiene documenti disponibile nell'archivio di causa (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra). Che prova condusse le corti nazionali alla sentenza che i beni considerevoli hanno acquisito con la famiglia di Gogitidze durante la tenuta del primo richiedente in ufficio pubblico non poteva essere finanziato coi suoi salari ufficiali da solo, mentre i richiedenti rimanenti o non avevano avuto altre fonti di reddito significative. Un esame accurato dei richiedenti ' situazione finanziaria confermò l'esistenza di una discrepanza considerevole fra il loro reddito e la loro ricchezza, e che discrepanza che era una sentenza che riguarda i fatti e bene-documentata divenne poi la base per il sequestro.
113. La Corte così costatazione che ci non è niente nella condotta dei procedimenti civili in rem suggerire uno che i richiedenti furono negati un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere in avanti la loro causa o che il nazionale corteggia le sentenze di ' erano contaminate con arbitrarietà manifesta (contrasto, mutatis mutandis, Denisova e Moiseyeva c. la Russia, n. 16903/03, §§ 59-64 1 aprile 2010).
(d) la Conclusione
114. Nella luce del precedente, avendo riguardo ad alle autorità Georgiane ' margine ampio della valutazione nella loro ricerca della politica progettò per combattere la corruzione nel servizio pubblico ed al fatto che le corti nazionali riconobbero i richiedenti un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere la loro causa per i procedimenti di adversarial, la Corte conclude che i procedimenti civili in rem per la confisca dei richiedenti la proprietà di ', basato su una procedura che era inoltre in linea con gli standard internazionali ed attinenti, non sconvolga l'equilibrio equo e richiesto.
115. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. Violazioni allegato Di Articolo 6 §§ 1 e 2 Di La Convenzione
116. Tutti i tre richiedenti si lamentarono che i procedimenti di sequestro erano stati condotti in violazione del principio dell'uguaglianza di braccio contenuta in Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Il primo richiedente si lamentò che il sequestro della sua proprietà nell'assenza di una definitivo condanna che stabilisce la sua colpa corrisposta ad un abuso sul principio di presunzione dell'innocenza.
117. Le disposizioni attinenti lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 6
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi o di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro lui, ognuno è concesso ad una fiera ed udienza pubblica all'interno di un termine ragionevole con un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito con legge. ...
2. Ognuno accusato con un reato penale sarà presunto innocente sino a si dimostrò colpevole secondo legge.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
118. Il Governo contestò i richiedenti gli argomenti di '. Loro prima presentarono che i procedimenti di sequestro amministrativi rappresentarono un “civile” controversia all'interno del significato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Durante l'esame di che controversia, le corti nazionali avevano dato l'opportunità ampia al primo, secondo e quarto richiedenti per presentare i loro argomenti scritto ed orali. Comunque, solamente uno di loro, il secondo richiedente, si era giovato a di che l'opportunità, mentre i richiedenti rimanenti avevano ignorato le due citazioni della corte nazionale. Come al secondo richiedente, i suoi argomenti erano stati ascoltati debitamente con le corti nazionali; come un risultato delle corti ' esame completo, alcuna della sua proprietà erano stati rimossi infine dal ruolo di sequestro. In generale, l'esame giudiziale nel quale l'onere della prova fu messo sui richiedenti rispondenti con legge, era stato equo, e le decisioni di corte sufficientemente erano state ragionate. Come all'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente sotto Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione, il Governo presentò che la disposizione in oggetto non poteva fare domanda ai procedimenti di sequestro amministrativi, come il secondo la determinazione non aveva coinvolto di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro il richiedente. Tutti in tutti, il Governo concluse che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto Articoli 6 §§ 1 e 2 fu mal-fondato manifestamente.
119. I richiedenti reiterarono che i procedimenti di sequestro amministrativi erano stati in violazione del principio dell'uguaglianza di braccio contenuta in Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, determinato che l'udienza di fronte al giudice di prima istanza era stata condotta nei primo e quarto richiedenti l'assenza di '. Come alle ragioni per che l'assenza, i richiedenti spiegarono che il primo richiedente era stato obbligato per lasciare Georgia per paura di azione penale, mentre il quarto richiedente era stato diffidente verso l'ordinamento giudiziario Georgiano in generale. I richiedenti le osservazioni di ' non contennero qualsiasi il chiarimento come a perché i loro avvocati non avevano frequentato l'udienza. I richiedenti chiamarono anche in questione la conseguenza dei procedimenti, mentre accusando le corti nazionali di una valutazione erronea delle circostanze fattuale della causa. Come alla sua azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione, il primo richiedente reiterò che costringendolo a provare le origini legali della sua proprietà prima di stabilendo la sua colpa su corruzione accusa, le autorità nazionali avevano infranto il suo diritto per essere presunte innocente.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) I richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione
120. Avendo riguardo ad ai richiedenti le osservazioni di ', la Corte osserva che non è chiaro sotto che margine di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (“civile” o “penale”), loro intesero di lamentarsi di.
121. Sia che come sé, la Corte reitera la sua causa-legge ben stabilita all'effetto che procedimenti per il sequestro come i procedimenti civili in rem nella causa presente che non scaturisce da una condanna penale o procedimenti che condannano e così non qualifica come una sanzione penale ma piuttosto rappresenta una misura di controllo dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N. 1, non può corrispondere a “la determinazione di un'accusa criminale” all'interno del significato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dovrebbe essere esaminato sotto il “civile” il capo di che approvvigiona (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Arcuri ed Altri, citata sopra; il Maggiordomo, citata sopra; Veits, citata sopra, § 58; e Silickien ? citò sopra di, §§ 45 e 56; il contrasto con, per istanza, Phillips, citata sopra, § 39).
122. Come riguardi i primo e quarto richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' che i procedimenti giudiziali per prima istanza era stata condotta nella loro assenza, la Corte reitera la sua sentenza precedente che i richiedenti stessi hanno scelto di rinunciare al loro diritto procedurale per prendere parte nei procedimenti (vedere paragrafo 110 sopra). Come ai richiedenti argomento di ' che loro non sarebbero dovuti essere resi per sopportare il carico di provare la legalità delle origini della loro proprietà, la Corte reitera non ci può essere niente arbitrario, per i fini del “civile” margine di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, nell'inversione dell'onere della prova sopra i convenuti nei procedimenti di confisca in rem dopo che l'accusatore pubblico aveva presentato una rivendicazione provata (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Grayson e Barnham, citata sopra, §§ 37-49, così come le sentenze della Corte a paragrafi 103 e 104 sopra). Come al gridare in questione coi richiedenti del nazionale corteggia sentenze di ' di fatto, la Corte reitera che non può comportarsi come una quarta istanza e non metterà in dubbio perciò quelle sentenze nazionali (vedere, per istanza, Bochan c. l'Ucraina (n. 2) [GC], n. 22251/08, § 61 5 febbraio 2015).
123. Segue che questa parte della richiesta è manifestamente mal fondato e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
(b) l'azione di reclamo di Il primo richiedente sotto Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione
124. La Corte reitera che la questione dell'applicabilità di Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione normalmente saranno esaminati sotto due aspetti: un aspetto stretto relativo alla condotta del processo penale ed attinente come così, ed un più esteso quale può andare oltre la sfera del processo sotto le certe condizioni (vedere, per istanza, Vanjak c. Croatia, n. 29889/04, § 67 14 gennaio 2010).
125. In questo collegamento la Corte osserva che i procedimenti di confisca in rem nella causa presente non ebbero luogo dopo l'azione penale del primo richiedente, ma sul contrario lo precedè. Di conseguenza, il secondo, più esteso aspetto di Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione, il ruolo di che è impedire al principio di presunzione dell'innocenza dell'essere minato dopo che i procedimenti penali ed attinenti hanno terminato con una conseguenza altro che la condanna (come assoluzione, interruzione dei procedimenti penali come essendo statuto-sbarrato, la morte di un accusato, e così su), è di nessuna attinenza nella causa presente (vedere Allen c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 25424/09, §§ 103 e 104, ECHR 2013; Geerings c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 30810/03, §§ 43-50 1 marzo 2007; Phillips, citata sopra, § 35; e Lagardère c. la Francia, n. 18851/07, §§ 58-64 12 aprile 2012).
126. Come al primo, aspetto più limitato di Articolo 6 § 2, il ruolo di che è proteggere il diritto di una persona accusato per essere presunto esclusivamente innocente all'interno della struttura del processo penale e pendente stesso (vedere Allen, citata sopra, § 93, con gli ulteriori riferimenti menzionati nello stesso paragrafo), la Corte reitera, nella luce del suo diritto giurisprudenziale ben stabilito che la confisca di proprietà ha ordinato come un risultato di procedimenti civili in rem, senza comportare determinazione di un'accusa criminale non è di un punitivo ma di un and/or preventivo natura compensativa e così non può generare la richiesta della disposizione in oggetto (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Maggiordomo, citata sopra; AGOSI, citata sopra, § 65; Riela, citata sopra; ed Arcuri, citata sopra).
127. Segue che l'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente è ratione materiae incompatibile con Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) e deve essere respinto in conformità con Articolo 35 § 4.
VI. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELLA CONVENZIONE
128. I richiedenti, mentre citando Articoli 7 e 14 della Convenzione, reiterò le loro azioni di reclamo della conseguenza dei procedimenti nazionali.
129. Avendo riguardo ad a tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come queste azioni di reclamo incorra all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte notando le sue sentenze precedenti (vedere divide in paragrafi 121, 123 e 127 sopra), considera che loro non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e le libertà espose fuori nella Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli. Segue che questa parte della richiesta deve essere respinta come essendo mal-fondata manifestamente, facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara ammissibili le azioni di reclamo del primo, secondo e quarto l’sotto Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.

Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto il 12 maggio 2015, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Françoise Elens-Passos Päivi Hirvelä
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.