Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VEITS v. ESTONIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 35

NUMERO: 12951/11/2015
STATO: Estonia
DATA: 15/01/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions: No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Criminal proceedings Article 6-1 - Fair hearing)
No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property)


FIRST SECTION







CASE OF VEITS v. ESTONIA

(Application no. 12951/11)








JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

15 January 2015





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Veits v. Estonia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, President,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 16 December 2014,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 12951/11) against the Republic of Estonia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Estonian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 14 February 2011.
2. The applicant, who had been granted legal aid, was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Riga. The Estonian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Kuurberg, of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged that her ownership rights had been violated by a confiscation decision taken by the domestic courts and that she had not been involved in the proceedings in which the confiscation of her property had been decided.
4. On 31 January 2013 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1990 and lives in Tallinn.
6. In 1995 the applicant’s grandmother N. privatised (bought on favourable terms from the public authorities) an apartment at 9 Mahtra Street in Tallinn. In 1996 she gave the apartment to the applicant, who was represented by her mother V. in the transaction.
7. On 21 April 2003 Zh. signed a power of attorney, witnessed by a notary, whereby he authorised N. to sell his apartment at 33 Punane Street in Tallinn. On 20 May 2003 N., acting on behalf of Zh., sold the apartment to her daughter V. For Zh., N. bought an apartment in the countryside worth about a twentieth of the value of the apartment at Punane Street.
8. It appears that on 7 August 2003 V. asked the social security service of the local municipality to approve the sale of the then thirteen-year-old applicant’s apartment at 9 Mahtra Street. She submitted that she had bought another apartment at 33 Punane Street by means of a loan. She wished to pay back the loan with the money to be received from the sale of her daughter’s apartment and give the newly acquired apartment to her daughter. It appears that the approval was granted by the social security service and the apartment at Mahtra Street was sold. On 28 October 2003 V. gave the apartment at Punane Street to the applicant, while V. herself acted as the applicant’s legal representative in the transaction.
9. On different dates several sets of criminal investigations into the circumstances of the sale of several apartments by various persons, including Zh., were initiated. The persons concerned had sold their apartments in Tallinn and in some cases acquired cheaper apartments in rural areas. For various reasons, such as mental health problems or alcohol abuse, these individuals had had difficulties in understanding the true nature of their transactions. Some of the individuals in question died soon after the transactions. Thus, Zh. died on 3 January 2004 of ethylene glycol poisoning. Criminal investigations into these deaths were also opened.
10. In the meantime, on 27 November 2003, an investigator ordered the attachment of the apartment at 33 Punane Street. The attachment order was quashed on 6 February 2004 and the criminal proceedings concerning the apartment at Punane Street were discontinued on 13 January 2005.
11. In the spring of 2007 a fresh criminal investigation was opened in respect of transactions concerning an apartment, and several other sets of criminal proceedings which had been discontinued in the meantime were reopened and joined to the criminal case. On 5 April 2007 the Harju County Court remanded N. in custody.
12. On 14 June 2007 the Harju County Court attached at the prosecutor’s request two apartments, including the one at 33 Punane Street. The County Court noted that the apartment at Punane Street had been acquired by N. and V., whereas V. had been registered as its owner immediately after the apartment had been obtained fraudulently from Zh. The court found that there was reason to believe that with the aim of avoiding transfer of the property it was deliberately registered in the name of the applicant, although its actual owner was V. The court noted that the apartments had to be attached in order to ensure the protection of the interests of the victims and to prevent them from being sold. In ordering the attachment of the apartments the court relied on Article 142 § 1 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Kriminaalmenetluse seadustik), and on Article 83-1 §§ 1 and 2 of the Penal Code (Karistusseadustik). The court added that in this case it could be suspected that the financial means of the suspects derived from crime, and therefore a possible outcome was confiscation of the property as received through crime; securing the confiscation by any other measure than attachment was not possible. In accordance with the County Court’s decision copies of the decision were to be sent to V. and the applicant for information. The copy of the decision on file bears V.’s signature next to a notice that she had received a copy of it. It was noted in the decision that an appeal against it could be lodged within ten days.
13. On 31 July 2007 the applicant was interviewed as a witness. She said that she did not remember the details of the purchase of the apartment at Punane Street, as she was still a young child in 2003. She further said that she and her mother had sold the apartment at 9 Mahtra Street, and the apartment at Punane Street had been bought with the money received. She affirmed that she knew that the apartment was in her name but she had never lived there, it was undergoing repair, and her mother was paying for the apartment.
14. On 28 September 2007 the Prosecutor’s Office approved the statement of charges and on 2 October 2007 N. and V., with two others, were committed for trial by the Harju County Court. N. was charged with a number of offences, including the murder of Zh. and the attempted murder of another person, as well as several counts of fraud. V. was charged with several counts of fraud and aiding and abetting an attempted murder.
15. On 27 April 2008 the applicant reached the age of eighteen.
16. The episode concerning the apartment at Punane Street was dealt with at several hearings. In particular, at the hearing on 6 May 2009 the accused N. submitted that the apartment at Punane Street had been meant for the applicant from the very beginning, but as she was a child at the time she had not been told any details. The deed of gift had been drawn up after the applicant’s apartment at 9 Mahtra Street had been sold and V. had paid her debt. N. gave explanations about the origin of the money allegedly paid by N. to Zh. for the apartment.
17. At the hearing on 8 June 2009 the accused V. gave statements about the origin of the money with which the apartment had allegedly been bought. She submitted that she had received permission from the social security service to sell her daughter’s (the applicant’s) apartment at 9 Mahtra Street and to buy her the apartment at Punane Street.
18. At the hearing on 23 November 2009 V.’s counsel noted that, as concerned the apartment belonging to the applicant, Article 83-1 §§ 2 and 3 of the Penal Code was applied only if the property had been acquired completely or in substance on account of the actions of the offender as a gift, emphasising that confiscation would not necessarily be applied if it would be unreasonably burdensome on the person. When the deed of gift was drawn up the applicant was still a minor; confiscation would therefore be unjustified.
19. By a judgment of 12 January 2010 N. and V. were convicted as charged. N. was sentenced to fifteen years and V. to eight years’ imprisonment. In respect of the transactions related to the apartment at 33 Punane Street, the County Court established, relying on a psychiatric expert opinion, that Zh., who had been suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, had not understood the meaning of his actions when he signed the power of attorney for the sale of the apartment. Zh. had died by the time of the court hearing, but according to the statements he made during the preliminary investigation N. had promised to pay him for the apartment and also to buy him another apartment. She had told him to sign a confirmation that he had received the money, but in fact he had got no money. The court found implausible the allegation of the accused, supported by N.’s husband, that V. had borrowed some of the money to pay for the apartment from N.’s husband, who had sold his apartment five years before and kept the cash at home. It noted that according to N. the money from the sale of her husband’s apartment had been used to buy yet another apartment. The court also noted that V. had been unable to explain the origin of the second half of the money allegedly paid to Zh. for the apartment at Punane Street, and established that Zh. had received no money. Relying on Article 83 § 3 (2) of the Penal Code, the court ordered the confiscation of the apartment at 33 Punane Street, belonging to the applicant, as property obtained through crime committed against Zh. The court noted that the apartment had been transferred from Zh.’s ownership against his will, and that the applicant, who was thirteen years old in 2003, could not have been a bona fide acquirer, because the transaction had been concluded by her mother V. on her behalf. The transaction had been concluded a couple of months after the purchase of the apartment in order to prevent it from being confiscated.
20. V. and N. appealed. V. argued, inter alia, that the apartment at 33 Punane Street belonged to the applicant. In order to buy the apartment, another apartment at 9 Mahtra Street had been sold, with the approval of the social security service. Thus, the apartment at Punane Street had not been obtained through crime and it was not subject to confiscation.
21. By a judgment of 14 June 2010 the Tallinn Court of Appeal dismissed the appeals. In respect of the confiscation of the applicant’s apartment at Punane Street, the Court of Appeal noted that she had obtained the apartment when she was a minor, and was not capable of understanding the transaction at the time. The apartment had been the object of the commission of an offence (a fraud) by the accused, and was liable to be confiscated under Articles 83 § 3 (2) and 83-1 § 2 of the Penal Code. The Court of Appeal noted that the apartment had not been obtained legally but on account of the actions of the offenders N. and V.
22. On 18 August 2010 the Supreme Court decided not to examine the appeals lodged by N.’s and V.’s counsel, and the lower courts’ judgments became final.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relevant domestic law
23. Article 83 § 3 (2) of the Penal Code (Karistusseadustik) provides that a court may exceptionally confiscate the object of an intentional offence if it belongs to a third person at the time of the making of the judgment and the person has acquired the object, completely or in substance, on account of the actions of the offender as a gift or in any other manner for a price which is considerably lower than the normal market price.
24. The relevant provisions of the Penal Code further provide as follows:
Article 83-1 Confiscation (konfiskeerimine) of assets acquired through offence
“(1) A court shall confiscate (konfiskeerib) assets acquired through an intentional offence if these belong to the offender at the time of the making of the judgment or decision.
(2) A court may exceptionally confiscate assets specified in paragraph 1 of this Article if these belong to a third person at the time of the making of the judgment or decision, and if:
1. these were acquired, completely or in substance, on account of the actions of the offender as a gift or in any other manner for a price which is considerably lower than the normal market price, or
2. the third person knew that that the assets were transferred to him or her in order to prevent them from being confiscated.
(3) The court may decide not to confiscate, in part or in full, property acquired through an offence if, taking account of the circumstances of the offence or the situation of the person, confiscation would be unreasonably burdensome or if the value of the assets is disproportionably small in comparison to the costs of storage, transfer or destruction of the property. The court may, for the purpose of satisfaction of a civil action, decrease the amount of the property or assets to be confiscated by the amount of the object of the action.”
Article 85 – Effect of confiscation
“(1) Confiscated objects shall be transferred into State ownership or, if they fall under an international agreement, shall be returned.
(2) In the case of confiscation, the rights of third parties remain in force. The State shall pay compensation to third parties, except in the cases provided for in Article 83 §§ 3 and 4, Article 83-1 § 2 and Article 83-2 § 2 of this Code.”
25. The relevant provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Kriminaalmenetluse seadustik), as in force at the material time, were as follows:
Article 40-1 – Third party
“(1) A body conducting criminal proceedings may involve a third party in the proceedings if the rights or freedoms of the person which are protected by law may be adjudicated on in the criminal matter or in special proceedings.”
Article 142 – Attachment of property
“(1) The objective of attachment of property is to secure a civil action, confiscation or fine to the extent of assets. “Attachment of property” means recording the property of a suspect, accused, civil defendant or third party or the property which is the object of money laundering or terrorist financing and preventing the transfer of the property.
(2) Property is attached at the request of a prosecutor’s office and on the basis of an order of a preliminary investigation judge or on the basis of a court decision ...
(4) Upon attachment of property in order to secure a civil action, the extent of the damage caused by the criminal offence shall be taken into consideration ...
(8) An item of immovable property may be attached at the request of a prosecutor’s office and on the basis of an order of a preliminary investigation judge or on the basis of a court decision. For the attachment of an item of immovable property, a prosecutor’s office shall submit an attachment order to the land registry department of the location of the property in question in order for a prohibition on the disposal of the property to be made in the land register.”
B. Case-law of the Supreme Court
26. In a decision of 20 February 2012 (case no. 3-1-1-1-12), the Supreme Court noted that from the point of view of attachment what was important was the connection of the property to the crime committed rather than its ownership. In a decision of 12 November 2012 (case no. 3 1 1 102 12), the Supreme Court held that attachment of the property of a third person to secure confiscation was possible only in order to secure the possible confiscation under Articles 83 § 3, 83-1 § 2 or 83-2 § 3 of the Penal Code of the property belonging to the third person himself or herself. In that case the Supreme Court found that the attachment had been unlawful, as the confiscated property had not derived from the specific criminal offence. In a decision of 17 December 2012 (case no. 3 1 1 118 12), the Supreme Court released the attached immovable property belonging to a third person, because neither the request from the prosecutor’s office nor the disputed court ruling had demonstrated that the attached immovable property had been the means of the commission of the alleged offences by the suspect, or their direct object. Neither was there reason to presume that the suspect had acquired them through crime, or that prior to the transfer of the immovable property to the third party it could have been the suspect’s proceeds of crime.
27. In a judgment of 14 December 2011 (case no. 3-1-1-89-11), the Supreme Court noted that a person who was not an accused in criminal proceedings could be an object to the decision to confiscate only if he had been involved in the proceedings as a third party. In the case at hand this had not been the case, and the Supreme Court, on the basis of appeals lodged by the accused, quashed the lower courts’ judgments in respect of the confiscation of a third party’s property. Similarly, in a judgment of 22 May 2012 (case no. 3-1-1-53-12), the Supreme Court found that in order to attach a third party’s property that third party had to be involved in the criminal proceedings as third party. It released the attached property on the basis of an appeal lodged by the convicted person, although the conviction of the latter was upheld.
28. In a decision of 30 April 2013 (case no. 3-1-2-3-12), the Supreme Court, sitting in plenary session, dealt with a case where confiscation in criminal proceedings of property that allegedly belonged to a person not involved in criminal proceedings was at issue. The confiscation had been ordered by a court on the basis of Article 83 § 1 of the Penal Code, which allowed confiscation of the object used to commit an intentional offence if it belonged to the offender at the time of the making of the ruling. The Supreme Court referred to Article 85 § 2 of the Penal Code, and stated that if property was confiscated from a person who had not been involved in the proceedings and who was allegedly the owner of the property but not the object to the decision to confiscate, that person did not lose ownership on entry into force of the confiscation decision, as in such a case ownership does not transfer to the State. Confiscation meant that property or other rights were transferred from one person (the object to the decision to confiscate) to another person (the State); it did not mean the transfer of the property to the State regardless of who had been its owner. The Supreme Court also noted that the identity of the object to the decision to confiscate had to be unequivocally clear from the operative part of the court ruling.
29. An alleged actual owner of confiscated property who was not the addressee of the confiscation decision could assert his ownership under the Property Act (Asjaõigusseadus) in civil proceedings or claim compensation for the lost ownership in administrative court proceedings. If the person had been involved as a third party in criminal proceedings as a potential owner but his alleged ownership rights proved unfounded in those proceedings, the decision made in the criminal proceedings was binding on him and the above-mentioned remedies in civil and administrative law would not be available to him.
30. In the judgments of 20 November 2003 (case no. 3-2-1-128-03) and of 11 April 2006 (case no. 3-2-1-164-05), the Supreme Court held that intestate successors of the first and second order could not rely on bona fide acquisition of immovable property where the property had been transferred to them through a gratis transaction.
31. In a judgment of 3 November 2008 (case no. 3-2-1-90-08), the Supreme Court noted that it followed from section 123 (1) of the Civil Code (General Principles) Act (Tsiviilseadustiku üldosa seadus) that in assessing whether the person knew or should have known, it was necessary to proceed from whether the representative of the minor knew or had to know – and not whether the minor knew or had to know – certain circumstances.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL INSTRUMENTS
32. Pursuant to the Council of Europe Convention on Laundering, Search, Attachment and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime (CETS No. 141), the parties undertake to adopt such legislative and other measures as may be necessary to enable them to confiscate instrumentalities and proceeds, that is any economic advantage from criminal offences, or property the value of which corresponds to such proceeds. This Convention entered into force in respect of Estonia on 1 September 2000.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
33. The applicant complained that she had not been invited to take part in the court proceedings involving the determination of her civil rights and obligations. She relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
34. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The Government
35. The Government argued that the domestic remedies had not been exhausted.
36. Firstly, the Government contended that the applicant had failed to contest the decision of 14 June 2007 in which the apartment at Punane Street had been attached. Although the applicant had been a minor at that time, the decision had been sent to her and her mother V., who had given the apartment to the applicant and represented her in that transaction. Thus, both the applicant and V. had been aware of the attachment decision but had not contested it. However, the domestic case-law indicated that contestation of an attachment ruling constituted an effective remedy (see paragraphs 26 and 27 above). The Government acknowledged that in the attachment decision as regards the disputed property the guidelines given by the Supreme Court had been followed; it was therefore hard to say whether any grounds to quash the ruling had existed. However, it remained a fact that the applicant – who at that time should have been represented by her mother – had not contested the attachment ruling, and the higher-level courts had not assessed the grounds and reasoning of the attachment of the apartment.
37. Secondly, the Government argued that the applicant could have requested the release of her attached property in civil court proceedings even if she had not contested the attachment ruling in criminal proceedings. She had had more than two years to do so between her attaining the legal age of majority and the entry into force of the confiscation judgment.
38. Thirdly, the Government submitted that as the applicant had not contested the attachment of the apartment in the proceedings mentioned above, she had also not made use of the opportunity to request that any of the applicable legal provisions be declared unconstitutional and set aside. According to the Government it would have been possible to request the review of the constitutionality of the grounds for confiscation of property belonging to a third party as well as the procedural rights of a third party in these proceedings.
39. Lastly, referring to the Supreme Court’s recent practice (see paragraphs 28 and 29 above), the Government argued that the applicant had not submitted an administrative complaint with a claim for compensation for the loss of the apartment.
(b) The applicant
40. The applicant considered that the domestic case-law referred to by the Government was not applicable to the case at hand. She reiterated that her ownership rights to the apartment had been terminated by the judgment passed in the criminal proceedings, and that the judgment had been upheld on appeal. Therefore, any attempts to address the issue of the right of ownership by means of civil or administrative court proceedings, or even constitutional proceedings, would not have yielded positive results. The applicant also pointed out that although she had reached the legal age of majority by the time the criminal proceedings were at their final stages, she had not been able to fully exercise her rights and represent herself, because she lacked proper education and legal knowledge, especially in the circumstances, as she had never been informed about the decision, her right to participate in the hearings, or her right of appeal against the decision of the court. Lastly, the applicant submitted that she had had insufficient income to pay for legal representation, several lawyers had refused to represent her, and State legal aid had not been available in those circumstances.
2. The Court’s assessment
41. The Court notes that the Government mainly referred to domestic case-law that post-dated the measures taken by the authorities in the present case. However, in so far as the case-law in question concerns the interpretation of the same legal provisions that were applied in the applicant’s case, the Court has had regard to the case-law in question, considering that it may be of some relevance for the clarification of the issue of exhaustion of domestic remedies.
42. As regards the Government’s argument that the applicant should have contested the County Court’s decision of 14 June 2007 concerning the attachment of the apartment in order to be considered to have satisfied the requirement of exhaustion of domestic remedies, the Court notes that the case-law referred to by the Government to support their argument firstly demonstrates that it is possible to obtain reversal of a lower court’s attachment order on appeal. However, in the cases referred to by the Government there existed specific grounds for the higher courts to overturn the attachment order, such as the lower court’s failure to demonstrate that the attached property had been acquired as a result of the criminal offence in question (see paragraph 26 above). The Court notes that the Government were unable to point to any such omissions or faults in the present case. Secondly, the Government referred to case-law according to which property of a third party could be attached or confiscated only if that third party had been involved in the proceedings (see paragraph 27 above). The Court considers that it cannot be ruled out that an appeal against the attachment decision could have been overturned on this ground in the present case too. However, it notes that although by the attachment of the apartment the applicant’s right of peaceful enjoyment of her possessions was interfered with, the attachment order did not determine what was to finally happen to the property and the applicant was not deprived of it by virtue of that decision. The interference the applicant complains about before the Court was the confiscation of the apartment, for which the attachment as such was not an inevitable precondition.
43. As regards the Government’s argument that the applicant could have requested the release of her attached property in civil court proceedings, the Court reiterates that the applicant’s complaint before it does not relate to attachment but to confiscation, which was decided in criminal proceedings. The Court considers that the Government have not convincingly demonstrated that contestation of the attachment decision in civil proceedings would have been capable of preventing the confiscation of the property in criminal proceedings. The same applies to the Government’s argument concerning the opportunity to request constitutional review, which was available to the applicant in the proceedings mentioned above: the Court considers that the Government have not convincingly explained how any unconstitutionality plea related to the attachment could have prevented the subsequent confiscation of the apartment. The Court also refers in this connection to a recent case concerning Estonia, in which it found that it was sufficient for an applicant to raise a Convention issue in substance before the domestic courts, who were also empowered to set aside unconstitutional legal provisions of their own motion if they found that a provision of the pertinent code of procedure could not be interpreted as permitting the granting of the applicant’s request in question (see Ovsjannikov v. Estonia, no. 1346/12, §§ 60-62, 20 February 2014). Thus, a separate request for constitutional review cannot in itself be considered a distinct remedy to be exhausted in the Estonian court proceedings, given that the Convention complaint is raised in substance.
44. As concerns the Government’s reference to the Supreme Court’s decision of 30 April 2013 (see paragraphs 28 and 29 above), the Court considers its relevance questionable, as in that case the factual circumstances and legal basis for the confiscation were different from those in the present case. Moreover, although in the present case the applicant, who was the object to the decision to confiscate, was not mentioned in the operative provisions of the judgments, it is clear from the text of the judgments that the courts were fully aware that the apartment belonged to the applicant. The courts knowingly ordered confiscation of a third party’s property, and they also relied on the pertinent legal basis (Article 83 § 3 (2) of the Penal Code). The Court doubts that the findings of the Supreme Court’s decision in question can be extended to the circumstances of the present case, also having regard to the fact that the decision in question post-dates the facts of the present case, as well as the time of the lodging of the present application.
45. Therefore, the Court is unable to conclude that the applicant can be considered not to have exhausted domestic remedies owing to her failure to contest the attachment decision concerning the apartment in question.
46. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant
47. The applicant argued that Article 6 of the Convention had been violated in that she had not been invited to take part in the court proceedings involving the determination of her civil rights and obligations. As she had been a minor at the time when the criminal proceedings had been brought before the court, the authorities should have provided for the representation of her rights and lawful interests by appointing a representative for her. Even if the applicant’s legal representation had been carried out by her mother V. before she reached the age of majority, the quality of that representation was highly questionable and had not ensured the full protection of her interests. To fully protect the minor’s rights under such circumstances, the same social service authority of the municipality that had approved the sale of the apartment at 9 Mahtra Street should have been involved in the court hearings.
48. Furthermore, even after the applicant had reached the legal age of majority she had not been involved in the proceedings as a third party. Because of her lack of legal knowledge and proper education and the fact that she had never been informed that there would be a decision and of her right to participate in the hearings and to appeal against any decision of the court, she had been unable to fully exercise her rights.
(b) The Government
49. The Government considered that the requirements of Article 6 of the Convention had been complied with in the present case, as the applicant had had access to court. They referred to the case of Silickien? v. Lithuania (no. 20496/02, §§ 48-49, 10 April 2012) where the Court had found that although the applicant had not been a party to the criminal proceedings, the system in question had not been without safeguards.
50. The Government emphasised that the ruling on the attachment of the applicant’s property clearly described that it had been intended for securing both the civil action and the confiscation. Thus, the ruling gave a clear indication of the possible risk of confiscation of the property at a later stage, and therefore should have been contested.
51. The Government pointed out that the applicant herself had never sought to be involved in the proceedings as a third party, although she had been aware of the progress of the criminal proceedings.
52. The Government also placed emphasis on the fact that the applicant had been thirteen years old at the time of the transaction whereby the apartment was given to her by her mother, who had acted in the transaction both as the donor and the representative of the applicant (the recipient of the gift). The applicant herself had submitted in the pre-trial proceedings that she did not remember the details of buying the apartment, as she had still been a child in 2003 and her grandmother had submitted that no details of acquiring the apartment had been told to the thirteen-year-old applicant. The Government concluded that the applicant had not known anything about the circumstances of acquiring the disputed apartment and could not have offered any additional arguments of her own in the criminal proceedings at issue. The applicant’s interests had been essentially protected by the accused V. and N., as from the very beginning the reason for the attachment of the apartment had been the charges against the applicant’s mother V. and grandmother N. As the apartment at 33 Punane Street had been deemed to have been acquired through fraud and given to the applicant as a minor in order to avoid confiscation, only V. and N. had had to respond to the charges and prove that the apartment had been acquired legally and not through crime.
53. The Government further pointed out that both the Harju County Court and the Tallinn Court of Appeal had assessed the requests of the applicant’s mother V. and grandmother N. for the attached apartment to be released, and later for the confiscation to be overturned. The courts had clearly noted that there was no dispute that the apartment at 33 Punane Street was in the name of the applicant, while also stressing that because the applicant was a minor at the time of its acquisition she had been unable to understand the circumstances. However, as the apartment had been transferred from Zh.’s ownership against his will, no bona fide acquisition by the applicant, represented by the accused V. at the time of the receipt of the gift as a minor, could have occurred. Thus it was clear from the reasoning of the courts that the applicant could not have provided any additional explanations or statements concerning the acquisition or donation of the apartment.
54. The Government also considered that it was of significance that V. and N. in their appeals to the Court of Appeal and to the Supreme Court had contested the confiscation of the apartment in question. Although persons not parties to proceedings had no right to lodge appeals, the Supreme Court’s case-law affirmed that decisions on the attachment and confiscation of property could also be overturned on the basis of appeals lodged by others (see paragraph 27 above). Thus, the applicant’s rights had been protected at all the three levels of court jurisdiction, and the courts had concluded in their decisions that the confiscation had been lawful.
55. The Government added that although in the appeals the fact of confiscation of the apartment at 33 Punane Street had been contested, the non-involvement of the applicant in the proceedings had never been contested. They also referred to Silickene (cited above, § 49) where the Court had agreed that the advocate hired to protect the applicant’s deceased spouse in the criminal case had de facto defended her interests as well.
56. The Government concluded that in the light of the above and in the particular circumstances of the present case the Estonian authorities had de facto afforded the applicant a reasonable and sufficient opportunity to protect her interests adequately. Accordingly, there had been no violation of the applicant’s rights under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
2. The Court’s assessment
57. As the Court framed in the Silickien? judgment (cited above, § 47), in a case like the present one it is called to determine whether the way in which the confiscation was applied in respect of the applicant offended the basic principles of a fair procedure inherent in Article 6 § 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Salabiaku v. France, 7 October 1988, § 30, Series A no. 141-A). It must be ascertained whether the procedure in the domestic legal system afforded the applicant, in the light of the severity of the measure to which she was liable, an adequate opportunity to put her case to the courts, pleading, as the case might be, illegality or arbitrariness of that measure and that the courts had acted unreasonably (see AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, 24 October 1986, § 55, Series A no. 108; also see, mutatis mutandis, Arcuri and Others v. Italy (dec.), no. 52024/99, 5 July 2001, and Riela and Others v. Italy (dec.), no. 52439/99, 4 September 2001). It is not, however, within the province of the Court to substitute its own assessment of the facts for that of the domestic courts and, as a general rule, it is for these courts to assess the evidence before them (see Edwards v. the United Kingdom, 16 December 1992, § 34, Series A no. 247-B).
58. The Court notes that the domestic courts in the present case determined the applicant’s civil rights without inviting her to take part in the proceedings, despite the opportunity provided under Article 40-1 of the Code of Criminal Procedure to involve her in the proceedings as a third party. It would appear that the judicial authorities could have done so of their own motion. At the same time, the applicant has not argued that she took any action herself to seek to be involved in the proceedings. The Court further notes that it has not been disputed that the applicant was aware of the criminal proceedings in general and – at least through her mother V., who was her legal representative until she reached the age of majority – of the attachment of the apartment in particular. Nor has it been argued that the applicant’s mother was excluded from representing her because of a conflict of interests. While it is true that the attachment order itself was of a temporary nature and the failure to challenge it did not amount to a failure to exhaust domestic remedies, the fact that it was possible to contest it nevertheless constituted a procedural guarantee allowing the arguments against the attachment to be presented to the court, and thus the applicant’s title to the property to be supported (see Silickien?, cited above, § 48). Furthermore, and more importantly, the applicant’s mother V. and grandmother N. presented arguments to the court against the confiscation of the apartment, and also appealed on that issue. In this connection, the Court considers it to be of importance that there is no dispute that the applicant acquired the apartment as a gift from her mother when she was thirteen years old, and that she did not know the circumstances of the acquisition of the apartment. At the same time, the details concerning the acquisition of the apartment were well known to the applicant’s mother and grandmother who, as mentioned above, countered the confiscation and presented the arguments they were in a position to present, having been directly involved in the transactions related to the acquisition of the apartment. However, the courts were not persuaded by these arguments, found, on evidence, that the apartment had been obtained through crime, and held that its bona fide acquisition by the applicant could not have occurred (see paragraph 19 above). Thus, the arguments in favour of the applicant were presented to the courts by her mother and grandmother, and the courts dealt with those arguments but rejected them on their merits. The applicant has not pointed to any further arguments or evidence that could have been adduced on her behalf in the domestic proceedings, had she been party to those proceedings.
59. The Court reiterates that, as a general principle, persons whose property is confiscated should be formally granted the status of parties to the proceedings in which the confiscation is ordered (see Silickien?, cited above, § 50). However, in the specific circumstances of the present case it accepts that the applicant’s interests were de facto protected by her mother V. and grandmother N., and that it cannot be said that her interests remained unrepresented in the proceedings where her civil rights were determined.
60. Therefore, the Court concludes that the applicant’s right to a fair trial was not breached in the present case.
There has accordingly been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
61. The applicant complained that she had been deprived of her apartment, of which she had been the bona fide owner. She relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
62. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
63. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant
64. The applicant argued that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention had been violated. She submitted that the apartment at 33 Punane Street had been acquired lawfully in a transaction approved by the authorities. She was to be clearly recognised as a bona fide acquirer of that apartment, and that her ownership of it had been terminated upon its confiscation.
(b) The Government
65. The Government considered that the confiscation of the apartment had been in accordance with domestic law and constituted a justified control of the use of property in the general interest. States had a wide margin of appreciation in controlling property obtained by unlawful means or used for unlawful purposes.
66. The Government noted that the domestic courts had established that the apartment at 33 Punane Street had been acquired through crime. It had been confiscated on the basis of Article 83 § 3 (2) and Article 83-1 § 2 (2) of the Penal Code. The confiscation measure had been effected with a view to preventing the illicit acquisition of property through criminal activities, and thus pursued a legitimate aim in the general interest. The Government considered that a fair balance had been struck between the public and individual interests in the present case. They pointed out that the applicant had received the apartment at 33 Punane Street free of charge, and argued that the fact that V. had later sold the applicant’s apartment at 9 Mahtra Street was of no relevance and could only give rise to a claim by the applicant against her mother V. The Government also noted that the applicant was not living in the apartment at 33 Punane Street, either at the time of the attachment or in 2011, so the confiscation had not resulted in the applicant’s losing her home.
67. The Government contended that the applicant had “acquired” the apartment as a result of criminal activity by her mother and grandmother and she had “lost” it for the same reason. She had actually never acquired it in good faith. To avoid a situation where property obtained through crime could be donated to a minor in the family, domestic law provided that bona fide acquisition by successors of the first and second order was not possible in such a situation (see paragraph 30 above).
68. The Government also argued that the applicant could have contested the attachment decision, and that in any event her interests in the criminal proceedings had been de facto represented.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
69. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which guarantees in substance the right to property, comprises three distinct rules. The first, which is expressed in the first sentence of the first paragraph and is of a general nature, lays down the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property. The second rule, in the second sentence of the same paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and makes it subject to certain conditions. The third, contained in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, among other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules, which are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property, must be construed in the light of the general principle laid down in the first rule (see, among many authorities, Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 44, ECHR 1999-V, and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 134, ECHR 2004 V).
70. The Court’s constant approach has been that confiscation, while it involves deprivation of possessions, also constitutes control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Sun v. Russia, no. 31004/02, § 25, 5 February 2009; Riela and Others, cited above; Arcuri and Others, cited above; C.M. v. France (dec.), no. 28078/95, 26 June 2001; Air Canada v. the United Kingdom, 5 May 1995, § 34, Series A no. 316 A; and AGOSI, cited above, § 51). Accordingly, it considers that the same approach must be followed in the present case.
71. The Court considers that confiscation in criminal proceedings is in line with the general interest of the community, because the forfeiture of money or assets obtained through illegal activities or paid for with the proceeds of crime is a necessary and effective means of combating criminal activities (see Raimondo v. Italy, 22 February 1994, § 30, Series A no. 281 A). Confiscation in this context is therefore in keeping with the goals of the Council of Europe Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime, which requires State Parties to introduce confiscation of instrumentalities and the proceeds of crime in respect of serious offences. Thus, a confiscation order in respect of criminally acquired property operates in the general interest as a deterrent to those considering engaging in criminal activities, and also guarantees that crime does not pay (see Denisova and Moiseyeva v. Russia, no. 16903/03, § 58, 1 April 2010, with further references to Phillips v. the United Kingdom, no. 41087/98, § 52, ECHR 2001 VII, and Dassa Foundation and Others v. Liechtenstein (dec.), no. 696/05, 10 July 2007).
72. The Court further reiterates that, although the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements, it has been its constant requirement that the domestic proceedings afford the aggrieved individual a reasonable opportunity of putting his or her case to the responsible authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision. In ascertaining whether this condition has been satisfied, a comprehensive view must be taken of the applicable procedures (see Denisova and Moiseyeva, cited above, § 59; Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002-IV; and AGOSI, cited above, § 55).
(b) Application of the principles to the present case
73. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the Harju County Court, when ordering the confiscation of the apartment in question, relied on Article 83 § 3 (2) of the Penal Code. Under that provision, a court may confiscate the object of an intentional offence if it belongs to a third person at the time of the making of the judgment and the person had acquired it on account of the actions of the offender, for example as a gift. Thus, the Court is satisfied that the confiscation had a legal basis. Furthermore, the Court considers that the confiscation of property obtained through crime is in line with the general interest of the community (see paragraph 71 above). It therefore needs to examine whether a fair balance was struck between the legitimate aim and the applicant’s fundamental rights, and whether there were sufficient procedural guarantees in place.
74. In this connection, the Court reiterates that the applicant was not charged with or convicted of any offence related to the confiscated property. Indeed, she was a minor at the time of the commission of the offences. However, as established by the domestic courts, the apartment in question – in which the applicant did not live – had been acquired by the applicant’s mother and grandmother through crime and had been transferred to the applicant free of charge. The Court considers that the domestic rules according to which in such circumstances the property could be confiscated and its acquirer could not rely on bona fide ownership did not amount to a disproportionate interference with the applicant’s property rights. The Court reiterates that the domestic courts dealt with, and rejected with sufficient reasoning, the arguments by the applicant’s mother V. and grandmother N. to the effect that the apartment in question had not been obtained through crime, and that the applicant’s apartment at 9 Mahtra Street had been sold in order to pay back a loan taken for buying the apartment in dispute. The Court considers that its findings in respect of Article 6 § 1 (see paragraphs 57 to 60 above) are also relevant in the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as regards the question whether the domestic proceedings afforded the applicant a reasonable opportunity of putting her case to the authorities in order to effectively challenge the confiscation measure. Thus, without repeating the above conclusions in further detail, the Court notes that it is satisfied that the applicant’s interests were de facto represented in the domestic proceedings by her mother and grandmother, and the fact that she was not personally involved in the proceedings did not, in the particular circumstances of the present case, upset the fair balance between the protection of the right to property and the requirements of the general interest.
Accordingly, there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
75. Lastly, the applicant in substance also complained that she had had at her disposal no effective domestic remedy for her complaint about the peaceful enjoyment of possessions required under Article 13 of the Convention. That provision reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
76. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
77. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined above, and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
78. The applicant argued that her property had been confiscated without her having been invited to take part in the proceedings.
79. The Government reiterated that the applicant had had at her disposal effective remedies which she had not made use of (see paragraphs 35 to 38 above). They added that the applicant’s ownership interests in criminal proceedings at all the three levels of court jurisdiction had been protected by her mother V. and grandmother N.
80. The Government also noted that after the confiscation of the apartment the applicant could have protected her interests against the State by bringing a claim for damages under the State Liability Act. She could also have brought a claim for damages against her mother, who as the guardian of the applicant as a minor had transferred her apartment at 9 Mahtra Street against her interest.
2. The Court’s assessment
81. Having regard to its findings as regards Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see paragraphs 57 to 60 above) and in respect of the procedural guarantees under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraphs 73 and 74 above), the Court considers it unnecessary also to examine these issues under Article 13 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;

3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

4. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 January 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni: Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Penali Articolo 6-1 - l'udienza corretta)
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 parà. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Privazione della proprietà Articolo 1 par. 2 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso della proprietà)


PRIMA LA SEZIONE







CAUSA VEITS C. ESTONIA

(Richiesta n. 12951/11)








SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

15 gennaio 2015





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Veits c. l'Estonia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Presidente
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, giudici
e Søren Nielsen, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 16 dicembre 2014,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 12951/11) contro la Repubblica dell'Estonia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino estone, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 14 febbraio 2011.
2. Il richiedente che era stato accordato patrocinio gratuito fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Riga. Il Governo estone (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra M. Kuurberg, del Ministero di Affari Esteri.
3. Il richiedente addusse che i suoi diritti di proprietà erano stati violati con una decisione di sequestro presa con le corti nazionali e che lei non era stata coinvolta nei procedimenti nei quali era stato deciso il sequestro della sua proprietà.
4. 31 gennaio 2013 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1990 e vive in Tallinn.
6. Nel 1995 il nonna N. della richiedente privatizzò (comprò su termini favorevoli dalle autorità pubbliche) un appartamento a 9 Strada di Mahtra in Tallinn. Nel 1996 lei diede l'appartamento al richiedente che fu rappresentato con sua madre V. nell'operazione.
7. Sul 2003 Zh di 21 aprile. firmato una procura, testimoniata con un notaio da che cosa lui autorizzò che N. vendesse il suo appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane in Tallinn. Sul 2003 N. di 20 maggio, agendo in favore di Zh., venduto l'appartamento al sua figlia V. Per Zh., N. comprò un appartamento nel valore di campagna di un ventesimo del valore dell'appartamento a Strada di Punane.
8. Sembra che sul 2003 V. di 7 agosto il servizio di previdenza sociale del municipio locale chiese ad approvare la vendita del poi l'appartamento di richiedente di tredici anni a 9 Strada di Mahtra. Lei presentò che lei aveva comprato un altro appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane con vuole dire di un prestito. Lei desiderò pagare di nuovo il prestito coi soldi per essere ricevuto dalla vendita dell'appartamento di sua figlia e dare il di recente appartamento acquisito a sua figlia. Sembra che l'approvazione fu accordata col servizio di previdenza sociale e l'appartamento a Strada di Mahtra fu venduto. Sul 2003 V. di 28 ottobre l'appartamento diede a Strada di Punane al richiedente, mentre V. stessa si comportò come il rappresentante legale del richiedente nell'operazione.
9. Su date diverse molti set di indagini penali nelle circostanze della vendita di molti appartamenti con le varie persone, incluso Zh., fu iniziato. Le persone riguardate avevano venduto i loro appartamenti in Tallinn ed in delle cause appartamenti più convenienti acquisirono in aree rurali. Per varie ragioni, come problemi di salute mentali o l'abuso di alcol questi individui avevano avuto le difficoltà nel capire la vera natura delle loro operazioni. Alcuni degli individui in oggetto morì presto dopo le operazioni. Così, Zh. morto 3 gennaio 2004 a causa di avvelenamento di glycol di ethylene. Indagini penali in queste morti furono aperte anche.
10. 27 novembre 2003, un investigatore ordinò nel frattempo, il sequestro dell'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane. L'ordine di sequestro fu annullato su 6 febbraio 2004 ed i procedimenti penali riguardo all'appartamento a Strada di Punane fu cessato 13 gennaio 2005.
11. Nella primavera di 2007 un'indagine penale e nuova fu aperta in riguardo di operazioni riguardo ad un appartamento, e molti altri set di procedimenti penali che erano stati cessati nel frattempo furono riaperti e congiunsero alla causa penale. 5 aprile 2007 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Harju mandò indietro N. in custodia.
12. 14 giugno 2007 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Harju allegò alla richiesta dell'accusatore due appartamenti, incluso quell'a 33 Strada di Punane. L'Organo giudiziario locale notò che l'appartamento a Strada di Punane era stato acquisito con N. e V., mentre V. immediatamente era stato registrato come il suo proprietario dopo che l'appartamento era stato ottenuto dolosamente da Zh. La corte fondò che c'era ragione di credere che con lo scopo di evitare trasferimento della proprietà sé fu registrato intenzionalmente nel nome del richiedente, benché il suo proprietario effettivo fosse V. La corte notata che gli appartamenti dovevano essere allegati per per assicurare la protezione degli interessi delle vittime ed impedirloro dall'essere venduto. Nell'ordinare il sequestro degli appartamenti la corte si appellò su Articolo 142 § 1 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (seadustik di Kriminaalmenetluse), e su Articolo 83-1 §§ 1 e 2 del Codice penale (Karistusseadustik). La corte aggiunse che in questa causa potrebbe essere sospettato che il finanziario vuole dire delle persone sospette derivate da crimine, e perciò una possibile conseguenza era sequestro della proprietà siccome ricevuto per crimine; garantendo il sequestro con qualsiasi l'altra misura che sequestro non era possibile. Nella conformità con la decisione dell'Organo giudiziario locale copia della decisione sarebbe spedito a V. ed il richiedente per informazioni. La copia della decisione su archivio sopporta seguente V. ' firma di s ad un avviso che lei aveva ne ricevuto una copia. Fu notato nella decisione che un ricorso contro sé potrebbe essere depositato entro dieci giorni.
13. 31 luglio 2007 il richiedente fu intervistato come un testimone. Lei disse che lei non ricordò i dettagli dell'acquisto dell'appartamento a Strada di Punane, siccome lei ancora era un giovane figlio nel 2003. Lei disse inoltre che lei e sua madre avevano venduto l'appartamento a 9 Strada di Mahtra, e l'appartamento a Strada di Punane era stato comprato coi soldi ricevuto. Lei affermò che lei seppe che l'appartamento era nel suo nome ma lei non aveva vissuto mai là, stava subendo ripari, e sua madre stava pagando per l'appartamento.
14. 28 settembre 2007 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore approvò la dichiarazione di accuse e sul 2007 N. di 2 ottobre e V., con due altri fu rinviato a giudizio con l'Organo giudiziario locale di Harju. N. fu accusato con un numero di reati, incluso l'assassinio di Zh. ed il tentato omicidio di un'altra persona, così come molti conti di frode. C. fu accusato con molti conti di frode e favoreggiamento un tentato omicidio.
15. 27 aprile 2008 il richiedente giunse all'età di diciotto.
16. L'episodio riguardo all'appartamento a Strada di Punane fu dato con a molte udienze. In particolare, all'udienza in 6 maggio 2009 il N. accusato presentò che l'appartamento a Strada di Punane era stato voluto dire per il richiedente dal molto inizio, ma siccome lei era un figlio al tempo le non era stato detto qualsiasi i dettagli. L'atto di regalo era stato disegnato su dopo che l'appartamento del richiedente alle 9 Strada di Mahtra era stata venduta e V. aveva pagato il suo debito. N. diede chiarimenti dell'origine dei soldi pagata presumibilmente con N. a Zh. per l'appartamento.
17. All'udienza 8 giugno 2009 il V. accusato diede dichiarazioni dell'origine dei soldi con la quale l'appartamento era stato comprato presumibilmente. Lei presentò che lei aveva ricevuto permesso dal servizio di previdenza sociale per vendere sua figlia (il richiedente) appartamento a 9 Strada di Mahtra e comprarle l'appartamento a Strada di Punane.
18. All'udienza sul 2009 V. ' di 23 novembre consiglio di s notò che, come concernito l'appartamento che appartiene al richiedente, Articolo 83-1 §§ 2 e 3 del Codice penale si fecero domanda solamente se la proprietà fosse stata acquisita completamente o in sostanza su conto delle azioni dell'offensore come un regalo, emphasising che il sequestro non sarebbe fatto domanda necessariamente se fosse irragionevolmente gravoso sulla persona. Quando l'atto di regalo fu disegnato sul richiedente ancora era un minore; il sequestro sarebbe perciò ingiustificato.
19. Con una sentenza del 2010 N. di 12 gennaio e V. fu dichiarato colpevole siccome accusato. N. fu condannato a quindici anni e V. al reclusione di ' di otto anni. In riguardo delle operazioni riferito all'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane, l'Organo giudiziario locale stabilì, mentre appellandosi su un'opinione competente e psichiatrica che Zh. che stava subendo da schizofrenia paranoica non aveva capito il significato delle sue azioni quando lui firmò la procura per la vendita dell'appartamento. Zh. era morto col tempo dell'udienza di corte, ma secondo le dichiarazioni lui rese durante l'indagine preliminare N. aveva promesso di pagarlo per l'appartamento ed anche comprargli un altro appartamento. Lei l'aveva detto per firmare una conferma che lui aveva ricevuto i soldi, ma infatti lui non aveva soldi. La corte trovata non plausibile la dichiarazione dell'accusato, sostenuta con N. ' marito di s che V. aveva preso in prestito alcuno dei soldi per pagare per l'appartamento da N. ' marito di s di fronte a che aveva venduto cinque anni il suo appartamento e tenuto i soldi a casa. Notò che secondo N. i soldi dalla vendita dell'appartamento di suo marito era usato per comprare ancora un altro appartamento. La corte notò anche che V. non era stato capace di spiegare l'origine del secondo la metà dei soldi pagato presumibilmente a Zh. per l'appartamento a Strada di Punane, e stabilito quel Zh. non aveva ricevuto soldi. Appellandosi su Articolo 83 § 3 (2) del Codice penale, l'ordine della corte il sequestro dell'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane, appartenendo al richiedente, siccome proprietà ottenne per crimine commesso contro Zh. La corte notò che l'appartamento era stato trasferito da Zh. ' proprietà di s contro la sua volontà, e che il richiedente che era tredici anni vecchio nel 2003 non potesse essere un acquisitore in buona fede, perché l'operazione era stata conclusa con sua madre V. sul suo conto. L'operazione era stata conclusa un paio di mesi dopo l'acquisto dell'appartamento per impedirgli dall'essere confiscato.
20. C. e N. piacque. C. dibattè, inter alia che l'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane ha appartenuto al richiedente. Per comprare l'appartamento, un altro appartamento alle 9 Strada di Mahtra era stata venduta, con l'approvazione del servizio di previdenza sociale. Così, l'appartamento a Strada di Punane non era stato ottenuto per crimine e non era soggetto al sequestro.
21. Con una sentenza di 14 giugno 2010 la Corte d'appello di Tallinn respinse i ricorsi. In riguardo del sequestro dell'appartamento del richiedente a Strada di Punane, la Corte d'appello notò, che lei aveva ottenuto l'appartamento quando lei era un minore, e non era capace di comprensione l'operazione al tempo. L'appartamento era stato l'oggetto del perpetrazione di un reato (una frode) con l'accusato, ed era responsabile per essere confiscato sotto Articoli 83 § 3 (2) e 83-1 § 2 del Codice penale. La Corte d'appello notò che l'appartamento non era stato ottenuto giuridicamente ma su conto delle azioni degli offensori N. e V.
22. 18 agosto 2010 la Corte Suprema decise di non esaminare i ricorsi depositati con N. ' s e V. che ' s consigliano, ed il più basso corteggia le sentenze di ' divennero definitivo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. diritto nazionale Attinente
23. Articolo 83 § 3 (2) del Codice penale (Karistusseadustik) prevede che una corte può confiscare insolitamente l'oggetto di un reato intenzionale se appartiene ad un terza persona al tempo della creazione della sentenza e la persona ha acquisito l'oggetto, completamente o in sostanza, su conto delle azioni dell'offensore come un regalo o in qualsiasi l'altra maniera per un prezzo che è notevolmente più basso del prezzo di mercato normale.
24. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice penale prevedono inoltre siccome segue:
Articolo il 83-1 Sequestro (il konfiskeerimine) di beni acquisiti per reato
“(1) una corte confischerà (il konfiskeerib) i beni acquisirono per un reato intenzionale se questi appartengono all'offensore al tempo della creazione della sentenza o decisione.
(2) una corte può confiscare insolitamente beni specificati in paragrafo 1 di questo Articolo se questi appartengono ad un terza persona al tempo della creazione della sentenza o decisione, e se:
1. questi furono acquisiti, completamente o in sostanza, su conto delle azioni dell'offensore come un regalo o in qualsiasi l'altra maniera per un prezzo che è notevolmente più basso del prezzo di mercato normale, o
2. il terza persona seppe che che i beni furono trasferiti a lui o lei per impedirloro dall'essere confiscato.
(3) la corte può decidere di non confiscare, in parte o in pieno, proprietà acquisì per un reato se, prendendo conto delle circostanze del reato o la situazione della persona, il sequestro sarebbe irragionevolmente gravoso o se il valore dei beni è disproportionably piccolo rispetto ai costi di deposito, trasferimento o la distruzione della proprietà. La corte può, per il fine della soddisfazione di un'azione civile, decresca l'importo della proprietà o i beni per essere confiscato con l'importo dell'oggetto dell'azione.”
Articolo 85-Effetto del sequestro
“(1) confiscò oggetti saranno trasferiti in proprietà Statale o, se loro incorrono un accordo internazionale sotto, sarà ritornato.
(2) nella causa del sequestro, i diritti di terze parti rimangono in vigore. Lo Stato pagherà il risarcimento a terze parti, eccetto nelle cause previste per in Articolo 83 §§ 3 e 4, Articolo 83-1 § 2 ed Articolo 83-2 § 2 di questo Codice.”
25. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (seadustik di Kriminaalmenetluse), come in vigore al tempo di materiale, era siccome segue:
Articolo 40-1-terza parte
“(1) un corpo che conduce procedimenti penali può comportare una terza parte nei procedimenti se i diritti o le libertà della persona che è protegguta con legge possono essere aggiudicate su nella questione penale o in procedimenti speciali.”
Articolo 142-Sequestro di proprietà
“(1) l'obiettivo di sequestro di proprietà è garantire un'azione civile, il sequestro o multa alla misura dei beni. “Sequestro di proprietà” intende incisione la proprietà di una persona sospetta, imputato accusato, civile o terza parte o la proprietà che sono l'oggetto di soldi che lava o finanziamento terrorista ed ostacolando il trasferimento della proprietà.
(2) proprietà è allegata alla richiesta dell'ufficio di un accusatore e sulla base di un ordine di un giudice di indagine preliminare o sulla base di una decisione di corte...
(4) su sequestro di proprietà per garantire un'azione civile, la misura del danno causata col reato penale sarà presa nell'esame...
(8) un articolo di patrimonio immobiliare può essere allegato alla richiesta dell'ufficio di un accusatore e sulla base di un ordine di un giudice di indagine preliminare o sulla base di una decisione di corte. L'ufficio di un accusatore presenterà un ordine di sequestro al reparto di cancelleria di terra dell'ubicazione della proprietà in oggetto in ordine per il sequestro di un articolo di patrimonio immobiliare, per una proibizione sulla disposizione della proprietà per essere reso nel registro di terra.”
B. Giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema
26. In una decisione di 20 febbraio 2012 (la causa n. 3-1-1-1-12), la Corte Suprema notò che dal punto di vista di sequestro che che era importante era il collegamento della proprietà al crimine commesso piuttosto che la sua proprietà. In una decisione di 12 novembre 2012 (la causa n. 3 1 1 102 12), la Corte Suprema sostenne che sequestro della proprietà di un terza persona per garantire il sequestro era solamente possibile per garantire il possibile sequestro sotto Articoli 83 § 3, 83-1 § 2 o 83-2 § 3 del Codice penale della proprietà che appartiene al terza persona lui o lei. In che causa che la Corte Suprema ha fondato che il sequestro era stato illegale, come la proprietà confiscata non era derivato dallo specifico reato penale. In una decisione di 17 dicembre 2012 (la causa n. 3 1 1 118 12), la Corte Suprema rilasciò il patrimonio immobiliare attaccato che appartiene ad un terza persona, perché né la richiesta dall'ufficio dell'accusatore né la direttiva di corte contestata aveva dimostrato che il patrimonio immobiliare attaccato era stato il mezzi del perpetrazione dei reati allegato con la persona sospetta, o il loro oggetto diretto. Nessuna era ragione di presumere là che la persona sospetta li aveva acquisiti per crimine, o che prima del trasferimento del patrimonio immobiliare alla terza parte fosse potuto essere gli incassi della persona sospetta di crimine.
27. In una sentenza di 14 dicembre 2011 (la causa n. 3-1-1-89-11), la Corte Suprema notò che una persona che non era un accusato in procedimenti penali potesse essere un oggetto alla decisione per confiscare solamente se lui fosse stato coinvolto nei procedimenti come una terza parte. Nella causa a mano questa non era stata la causa, e la Corte Suprema, sulla base di ricorsi depositata con l'accusato annullò il più basso corteggia le sentenze di ' in riguardo del sequestro della proprietà di una terza parte. Similmente, in una sentenza di 22 maggio 2012 (la causa n. 3-1-1-53-12), la Corte Suprema fondò che per allegare la proprietà di una terza parte che terza parte doveva essere coinvolta nei procedimenti penali come terza parte. Rilasciò la proprietà attaccata sulla base di un ricorso depositata con la persona condannato, benché la condanna del secondo fu sostenuta.
28. In una decisione di 30 aprile 2013 (la causa n. 3-1-2-3-12), la Corte Suprema, mentre riunendosi nella sessione assoluta, trattò con una causa dove era in questione il sequestro in procedimenti penali di proprietà che ha fatto parte presumibilmente ad una persona non coinvolto di procedimenti penali. Il sequestro era stato ordinato con una corte sulla base di Articolo 83 § 1 del Codice penale che concedè sequestro dell'oggetto commetteva un reato intenzionale se appartenesse all'offensore al tempo della creazione della direttiva. La Corte Suprema si riferì ad Articolo 85 § 2 del Codice penale, e determinato che se proprietà fosse confiscata da una persona che non era stata comportata nei procedimenti e che era presumibilmente il proprietario della proprietà ma non l'oggetto alla decisione per confiscare, che persona non perse proprietà su entrata in vigore della decisione di sequestro, come in tale proprietà di causa non trasferisca allo Stato. Il sequestro volle dire che proprietà o gli altri diritti furono trasferiti da una persona (l'oggetto alla decisione per confiscare) ad un'altra persona (lo Stato); non intese il trasferimento della proprietà allo Stato nonostante chi era stato il suo proprietario. La Corte Suprema notò anche che l'identità dell'oggetto alla decisione per confiscare doveva essere inequivocabilmente chiara dalla parte operativa della direttiva di corte.
29. Un proprietario effettivo ed allegato di proprietà confiscata che non era il destinatario della decisione di sequestro potrebbe asserire la sua proprietà sotto il Proprietà Atto (Asjaõigusseadus) in procedimenti civili o il risarcimento di rivendicazione per la proprietà perduta in procedimenti di corte amministrativa. Se la persona fosse stata comportata come una terza parte in procedimenti penali come un proprietario potenziale ma i suoi diritti di proprietà allegato si dimostrarono infondati in quelli procedimenti, la decisione resa nei procedimenti penali era vincolante per lui e le via di ricorso summenzionate in legge civile ed amministrativa non sarebbe disponibile a lui.
30. Nelle sentenze di 20 novembre 2003 (la causa n. 3-2-1-128-03) e di 11 aprile 2006 (la causa n. 3-2-1-164-05), la Corte Suprema sostenne che successori intestati del primo e secondo ordine non potessero appellarsi sull'acquisizione in buona fede di patrimonio immobiliare dove la proprietà era stata trasferita a loro per un'operazione di gratis.
31. In una sentenza di 3 novembre 2008 (la causa n. 3-2-1-90-08), la Corte Suprema notò che seguì da sezione 123 (1) del Codice civile (Generale Principi) l'Atto (seadus di üldosa di Tsiviilseadustiku) che nel valutare se la persona seppe o avrebbe dovuto sapere, era necessario per procedere da se il rappresentante del minore seppe o doveva sapere-e non se i minori seppero o dovevano sapere-le certe circostanze.
III. STRUMENTI INTERNAZIONALI ATTINENTI
32. Facendo seguito al Consiglio di Convenzione di Europa su Lavare, Ricerca, Sequestro ed il Sequestro degli Incassi da Crimine (CETS N.ro 141), le parti si impegnano adottare misure così legislative ed altre siccome può essere necessario per abilitarli per confiscare instrumentalities ed incassi che sono qualsiasi vantaggio economico da reati penali, o proprietà il valore di che corrisponde a simile incassi. Questa Convenzione entrò in vigore in riguardo dell'Estonia 1 settembre 2000.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
33. Il richiedente si lamentò che lei non era stata invitata per prendere parte negli atti che comportano la determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi. Lei si appellò su Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ad ognuno è concesso un udienza equa...... da parte di [un]... tribunale...”
34. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il Governo
35. Il Governo dibatté che le via di ricorso nazionali non erano state esaurite.
36. In primo luogo, il Governo contese che il richiedente non era riuscito a contestare la decisione di 14 giugno 2007 nella quale l'appartamento a Strada di Punane era stato allegato. Benché il richiedente era stato un minore a che tempo, la decisione era stata spedita a lei e sua madre V. che aveva dato l'appartamento al richiedente e l'aveva rappresentata in quel l'operazione. Così, sia il richiedente e V. erano stati consapevoli della decisione di sequestro ma non l'avevano contestato. Comunque, la causa-legge nazionale indicò che contestazione di un sequestro decidere costituì una via di ricorso effettiva (vedere divide in paragrafi 26 e 27 sopra). Il Governo ammise che nella decisione di sequestro come riguardi la proprietà contestata gli orientamenti dati con la Corte Suprema erano stati seguiti; era perciò difficile dire se qualsiasi i motivi per annullare la direttiva erano esistiti. Comunque, rimase un fatto che il richiedente-chi a che tempo sarebbe dovuto essere rappresentato con sua madre-non aveva contestato il sequestro decidere, e le corti di alto-livello non avevano valutato i motivi e ragionando del sequestro dell'appartamento.
37. In secondo luogo, il Governo dibattè che il richiedente avesse potuto richiedere la liberazione della sua proprietà attaccata in atti civili anche se lei non aveva contestato il sequestro che decide in procedimenti penali. Lei aveva avuto più che due anni per fare così fra lei raggiungendo la maggiore età di maggioranza e l'entrata in vigore della sentenza di sequestro.
38. In terzo luogo, il Governo presentò che siccome il richiedente non aveva contestato il sequestro dell'appartamento nei procedimenti menzionati sopra di, lei si era avvalsa neanche dell'opportunità di richiedere che qualsiasi delle disposizioni legali ed applicabili sia dichiarato incostituzionale ed accantonò. Secondo il Governo sarebbe stato possibile richiedere la revisione della costituzionalità dei motivi per confisca dei beni che appartiene ad una terza parte così come i diritti procedurali di una terza parte in questi procedimenti.
39. Infine, riferendosi alla recente pratica della Corte Suprema (vedere divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 sopra), il Governo dibattè che il richiedente non aveva presentato un'azione di reclamo amministrativa con una rivendicazione per il risarcimento per la perdita dell'appartamento.
(b) Il richiedente
40. Il richiedente considerò che la causa-legge nazionale assegnò a col Governo non era a portata di mano applicabile alla causa. Lei reiterò che i suoi diritti di proprietà all'appartamento erano stati terminati con la sentenza passata nei procedimenti penali, e che la sentenza era stata sostenuta su ricorso. Perciò qualsiasi tenta di rivolgere il problema del diritto di proprietà con vuole dire di procedimenti di corte civili o amministrativi, o anche procedimenti costituzionali, non avrebbe prodotto risultati positivi. Il richiedente indicò anche che benché lei fosse giunta alla maggiore età di maggioranza col tempo i procedimenti penali erano alle loro definitivo tappa, lei non era stata in grado esercitare pienamente i suoi diritti e rappresentarsi, perché le mancò istruzione corretta e conoscenza legale, specialmente nelle circostanze siccome lei non era stata informata mai della decisione, il suo diritto per partecipare nelle udienze, o il suo diritto di appello contro la decisione della corte. Infine, il richiedente presentò che lei aveva avuto reddito insufficiente per pagare per rappresentanza legale, molti avvocati avevano rifiutato di rappresentarla, e patrocinio gratuito Statale non era stato disponibile in quelle circostanze.
2. La valutazione della Corte
41. La Corte nota che il Governo si riferì principalmente a causa-legge nazionale che ha posto-datato le misure presa con le autorità nella causa presente. Comunque, in finora come la causa-legge in oggetto preoccupazioni l'interpretazione delle stesse disposizioni legali che sono state fatte domanda nella causa del richiedente, la Corte ha avuto riguardo ad alla causa-legge in oggetto, considerando che può essere di alcuna attinenza per la chiarificazione del problema dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
42. Come riguardi l'argomento del Governo che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto contestare la decisione dell'Organo giudiziario locale di 14 giugno 2007 riguardo al sequestro dell'appartamento per si considerare che avere soddisfatto il requisito dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali, la Corte nota che la causa-legge assegnò a col Governo per sostenere in primo luogo il loro argomento dimostra che è possibile ottenere inversione dell'ordine di sequestro di una corte più bassa su ricorso. Nelle cause assegnate a col Governo là gli specifici motivi esisterono comunque, per le corti più alte per rovesciare l'ordine di sequestro, come l'insuccesso della corte più bassa per dimostrare che la proprietà attaccata era stata acquisita come un risultato del reato penale in oggetto (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). La Corte nota che il Governo sia incapace evidenziare qualsiasi simile omissioni o colpe nella causa presente. In secondo luogo, il Governo si riferì a causa-legge secondo la quale proprietà di una terza parte potrebbe essere allegata o potrebbe essere confiscata solamente se che terza parte era stata comportata nei procedimenti (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra). La Corte considera che non può essere deciso fuori che un ricorso contro la decisione di sequestro sarebbe potuto essere rovesciato su questa base nella causa presente anche. Comunque, nota che benché col sequestro dell'appartamento il diritto del richiedente di godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà fosse interferito con, l'ordine di sequestro non determinò che che era infine accadere alla proprietà ed il richiedente non fu privato di sé con virtù di quel la decisione. L'interferenza che il richiedente si lamenta di di fronte alla Corte era il sequestro dell'appartamento per che il sequestro come simile non era un requisito indispensabile inevitabile.
43. Come riguardi l'argomento del Governo che il richiedente avesse potuto richiedere la liberazione della sua proprietà attaccata in atti civili, la Corte reitera che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente prima che non riferisce a sequestro ma a sequestro che fu deciso in procedimenti penali. La Corte considera che il Governo non ha dimostrato convincentemente che contestazione della decisione di sequestro in procedimenti civili sarebbe stata capace di ostacolare il sequestro della proprietà in procedimenti penali. Lo stesso fa domanda all'argomento del Governo riguardo all'opportunità di richiedere revisione costituzionale che era disponibile al richiedente nei procedimenti menzionata sopra di: la Corte considera che il Governo non ha spiegato convincentemente come qualsiasi dichiarazione di incostituzionale riferita al sequestro avrebbe potuto ostacolare il sequestro susseguente dell'appartamento. La Corte si riferisce anche in questo collegamento ad una recente causa riguardo ad Estonia dove fondò che era sufficiente per un richiedente per sollevare un problema di Convenzione in sostanza di fronte alle corti nazionali che furono conferite poteri anche per accantonare disposizioni legali ed incostituzionali di loro propria istanza se loro fondassero che una disposizione del codice pertinente di procedura non poteva essere interpretata siccome permettendo l'accordare della richiesta del richiedente in oggetto (vedere Ovsjannikov c. l'Estonia, n. 1346/12, §§ 60-62 20 febbraio 2014). Una richiesta separata per revisione costituzionale non può essere considerata in se stesso così, una via di ricorso distinta per essere esaurita negli atti estoni, determinato che l'azione di reclamo di Convenzione è sollevata in sostanza.
44. A riguardo del riferimento del Governo alla decisione della Corte Suprema di 30 aprile 2013 (vedere divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 sopra), la Corte considera la sua attinenza discutibile, come in che causa le circostanze fattuale e base legale per il sequestro erano diverse da quelli nella causa presente. Inoltre, benché nella causa presente il richiedente che era l'oggetto alla decisione per confiscare non fosse menzionato nelle disposizioni operative delle sentenze, è chiaro dal testo delle sentenze che le corti erano completamente consapevoli che l'appartamento appartenne al richiedente. Le corti ordinarono di proposito sequestro della proprietà di una terza parte, e loro si appellarono anche sulla base legale e pertinente (l'Articolo 83 § 3 (2) del Codice penale). La Corte dubita che le sentenze della decisione della Corte Suprema in oggetto può essere prolungato alle circostanze della causa presente, mentre avendo anche riguardo ad al fatto che la decisione in oggetto posto-date i fatti della causa presente, così come il tempo dell'alloggio della richiesta presente.
45. Perciò, la Corte è incapace per concludere che si può considerare che il richiedente non abbia esaurito via di ricorso nazionali che devono al suo insuccesso per contestare la decisione di sequestro riguardo all'appartamento in oggetto.
46. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
47. Il richiedente dibatté che A’rticolo 6 della Convenzione era stato violato in che lei non era stata invitata per prendere parte negli atti che comportano la determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi. Siccome lei era stata un minore al tempo quando i procedimenti penali erano stati portati di fronte alla corte, le autorità avrebbero dovuto prevedere per la rappresentanza dei suoi diritti ed interessi legali con nominando un rappresentante per lei. Anche se la rappresentanza legale del richiedente era stata eseguita con sua madre V. prima che lei giunse all'età del discernimento, la qualità di che rappresentanza era estremamente discutibile e non aveva assicurato la piena protezione dei suoi interessi. Proteggere pienamente i diritti minori sotto simile circostanze, la stessa autorità di servizio sociale del municipio che aveva approvato la vendita dell'appartamento a 9 Strada di Mahtra sarebbe dovuta essere comportata nelle udienze di corte.
48. Inoltre, anche dopo che il richiedente era giunto alla maggiore età di maggioranza lei non era stata coinvolta nei procedimenti come una terza parte. A causa della sua mancanza di conoscenza legale ed istruzione corretta ed il fatto che le non era stato informato mai che ci sarebbe una decisione e del suo diritto per partecipare nelle udienze e fare appello contro qualsiasi decisione della corte, lei non era stata capace di esercitare pienamente i suoi diritti.
(b) Il Governo
49. Il Governo considerò che i requisiti di Articolo 6 della Convenzione si erano stati attenuti con nella causa presente, siccome il richiedente aveva avuto accesso per corteggiare. Loro si riferirono alla causa di Silickien ?c. la Lituania (n. 20496/02, §§ 48-49 10 aprile 2012) dove la Corte aveva trovato che benché il richiedente non fosse stato una parte ai procedimenti penali, il sistema in oggetto non era stato senza le salvaguardie.
50. Il Governo enfatizzò che la direttiva sul sequestro della proprietà del richiedente chiaramente descritto che era stato proporsi per garantire sia l'azione civile ed il sequestro. Così, la direttiva diede un'indicazione chiara del possibile rischio del sequestro della proprietà ad un più tardi lo stadio, e perciò sarebbe dovuto essere contestato.
51. Il Governo indicò che il richiedente stessa non aveva cercato mai di essere coinvolto nei procedimenti come una terza parte, benché lei fosse stata consapevole del progresso dei procedimenti penali.
52. Il Governo mise anche enfasi sul fatto che il richiedente era stato tredici anni vecchio al tempo dell'operazione da che cosa l'appartamento fu dato a lei con sua madre che aveva agito nell'operazione sia come il donatore ed il rappresentante del richiedente (il destinatario del regalo). Il richiedente stessa aveva presentato nei procedimenti di pre-processo che lei non ricordò i dettagli di comprare l'appartamento, siccome lei ancora era stata un figlio in 2003 e sua nonna aveva presentato che nessuno dettagli di acquisire l'appartamento erano stati detti al richiedente di tredici anni. Il Governo concluse che il richiedente non aveva conosciuto qualsiasi cosa le circostanze di acquisire l'appartamento contestato e non poteva offrire qualsiasi argomenti supplementari di lei proprio nei procedimenti penali in questione. Gli interessi del richiedente essenzialmente erano stati protegguti col V. accusato e N., come dal molto cominciare la ragione per il sequestro dell'appartamento era stata le accuse contro la madre del richiedente V. e nonna N. Come l'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane era stato ritenuto per essere stato acquisito per frode e determinato al richiedente come un minore per evitare sequestro, solamente V. e N. rispondere alle accuse e provare avevano avuto che l'appartamento era stato acquisito giuridicamente e non per crimine.
53. Il Governo indicò inoltre che sia l'Organo giudiziario locale di Harju e la Corte d'appello di Tallinn avevano valutato le richieste della madre del richiedente V. e nonna N. per l'appartamento attaccato per essere rilasciato, e più tardi per il sequestro essere rovesciato. Le corti chiaramente avevano notato che non c'era controversia che l'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane era nel nome del richiedente, mentre sottolineò anche che perché il richiedente era un minore al tempo della sua acquisizione lei non era stata capace di capire le circostanze. Comunque, siccome l'appartamento era stato trasferito da Zh. ' proprietà di s contro la sua volontà, nessuna acquisizione in buona fede col richiedente, rappresentò col V. accusato al tempo della ricevuta del regalo come un minore, sarebbe potuto essere accaduto. Così era chiaro dal ragionamento delle corti che il richiedente non poteva offrire qualsiasi chiarimenti supplementari o dichiarazioni riguardo all'acquisizione o donazione dell'appartamento.
54. Il Governo considerò anche che era di significato che V. e N. nei loro ricorsi alla Corte d'appello ed alla Corte Suprema il sequestro dell'appartamento aveva contestato in oggetto. Benché persone non parti a procedimenti avuti nessuno diritto la causa-legge della Corte Suprema affermò depositare ricorsi, che decisioni sul sequestro e la confisca dei beni potrebbe essere rovesciata anche sulla base di ricorsi depositata con altri (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra). Così, i diritti del richiedente erano stati protegguti a tutti i tre livelli di giurisdizione di corte, e le corti avevano concluso nelle loro decisioni che il sequestro era stato legale.
55. Il Governo aggiunse che benché nei ricorsi il fatto del sequestro dell'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane era stata contestata, la non-coinvolgimento del richiedente nei procedimenti non era stata contestata mai. Loro si riferirono anche a Silickene (citata sopra, § 49) dove la Corte aveva concordato che il difensore noleggiò proteggere il consorte deceduto del richiedente nella causa penale aveva de facto difeso come bene i suoi interessi.
56. Il Governo concluse che nella luce del sopra e nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente le autorità estoni avevano de facto riconosciuto il richiedente un'opportunità ragionevole e sufficiente di proteggere adeguatamente i suoi interessi. Non c'era stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione dei diritti del richiedente sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
2. La valutazione della Corte
57. Siccome la Corte incorniciò nella sentenza di Silickien (citata sopra, § 47), in una causa come il presente è chiamato per determinare se il modo dove il sequestro fu fatto domanda in riguardo del richiedente offese i principi di base di una procedura equa inerenti in Articolo 6 § 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Salabiaku c. la Francia, 7 ottobre 1988, § 30 la Serie Un n. 141-un). Deve essere accertato se la procedura nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale riconobbe il richiedente, nella luce della gravità della misura alla quale lei era responsabile un'opportunità adeguata di mettere la sua causa alle corti, supplicando siccome è probabile che la causa sia, l'illegalità o l'arbitrarietà di che misura e che le corti avevano agito irragionevolmente (vedere AGOSI c. il Regno Unito, 24 ottobre 1986, § 55 la Serie Un n. 108; anche vedere, mutatis mutandis, Arcuri ed Altri c. l'Italia (il dec.), n. 52024/99, 5 luglio 2001, e Riela ed Altri c. l'Italia (il dec.), n. 52439/99, 4 settembre 2001). Comunque, non è all'interno della provincia della Corte per sostituire la sua propria valutazione dei fatti per che delle corti nazionali e, come un articolo generale, è per queste corti per valutare la prova di fronte a loro (vedere Edwards c. il Regno Unito, 16 dicembre 1992, § 34 la Serie Un n. 247-B).
58. La Corte nota che le corti nazionali nella causa presente determinarono i diritti civili del richiedente senza invitarla a prendere parte nei procedimenti, nonostante l'opportunità prevista sotto Articolo 40-1 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale per coinvolgerla nei procedimenti come una terza parte. Sembrerebbe che le autorità giudiziali avessero potuto fare così di loro propria istanza. Allo stesso tempo, il richiedente non ha dibattuto, che lei prese qualsiasi azione lei per cercare di essere coinvolto nei procedimenti. La Corte nota inoltre che non è stato contestato che il richiedente era consapevole dei procedimenti penali in generale e-almeno per sua madre V. che era il suo rappresentante legale finché lei giunse all'età del discernimento-del sequestro dell'appartamento in particolare. Né si ha dibattuto che la madre del richiedente fu esclusa dal rappresentarla a causa di un conflitto di interessi. Mentre è vero che l'ordine di sequestro stesso era di una natura provvisoria e l'insuccesso per impugnarlo non corrisponda ad un insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali, il fatto che era possibile contestarlo ciononostante costituì una garanzia procedurale che concede gli argomenti contro il sequestro per essere presentato alla corte, e così il titolo del richiedente alla proprietà per essere sostenuto (vedere Silickien?, citato sopra, § 48). Inoltre, e più importantemente, la madre del richiedente V. e nonna N. presentarono argomenti alla corte contro il sequestro dell'appartamento, ed anche fece appello su quel il problema. La Corte considera che sé sia di importanza che non c'è controversia in questo collegamento, che il richiedente acquisì l'appartamento come un regalo da sua madre quando lei aveva tredici anni, e che lei non conobbe le circostanze dell'acquisizione dell'appartamento. Allo stesso tempo, i dettagli riguardo all'acquisizione dell'appartamento furono conosciuti bene alla madre del richiedente e nonna che, siccome menzionato sopra, contraddisse il sequestro e presentò gli argomenti che loro erano in una posizione per presentare, stato stato coinvolto direttamente nelle operazioni riferite all'acquisizione dell'appartamento. Comunque, le corti non furono persuase con questi argomenti, fondi, su prova che l'appartamento era stato ottenuto per crimine, e sostenne che non potesse essere accaduta la sua acquisizione in buona fede col richiedente (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra). Così, gli argomenti in favore del richiedente furono presentati alle corti con sua madre e nonna, e le corti trattarono con quegli argomenti ma li respinsero sui loro meriti. Il richiedente non ha aguzzato a qualsiasi gli ulteriori argomenti o prova che sarebbero potute essere addotte sul suo conto nei procedimenti nazionali, l'aveva stato parte a quelli procedimenti.
59. La Corte reitera che, come un principio generale, persone la cui proprietà è confiscata dovrebbero essere accordate formalmente lo status di parti ai procedimenti nei quali è ordinato il sequestro (vedere Silickien?, citato sopra, § 50). Nelle specifiche circostanze della causa presente accetta comunque, che gli interessi del richiedente erano de facto protetto da sua madre V. e nonna N., e che non può essere detto che i suoi interessi rimasero non rappresentato nei procedimenti dove i suoi diritti civili furono determinati.
60. Perciò, la Corte conclude che il diritto del richiedente ad un processo equanime non fu violato nella causa presente.
Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
61. Il richiedente si lamentò che lei era stata privata del suo appartamento del quale lei era stata il proprietario in buona fede. Lei si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
62. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
63. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo ha collegato all'esaminato sopra e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
64. Il richiedente dibatté che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione era stato violato. Lei presentò che l'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane era stata acquisita legalmente in un'operazione approvata con le autorità. Lei era chiaramente essere riconosciuta come un acquisitore in buona fede di che appartamento, e che la sua proprietà di sé era stata terminata sul suo sequestro.
(b) Il Governo
65. Il Governo considerò che il sequestro dell'appartamento era stato in conformità con diritto nazionale ed aveva costituito un controllo allineato dell'uso di proprietà nell'interesse generale. Stati avuto un margine ampio della valutazione in proprietà di controllare ottenuta con illegale vogliono dire o usarono per fini illegali.
66. Il Governo notò che le corti nazionali avevano stabilito che l'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane era stata acquisita per crimine. Era stato confiscato sulla base di Articolo 83 § 3 (2) ed Articolo 83-1 § 2 (2) del Codice penale. La misura di sequestro era stata effettuata con una prospettiva ad ostacolando l'acquisto di proprietà illecito per le attività penali, e così intraprese un scopo legittimo nell'interesse generale. Il Governo considerò che un equilibrio equo era stato previsto fra gli interessi pubblici ed individuali nella causa presente. Loro indicarono che il richiedente aveva ricevuto l'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane esente da spese, e dibattè che il fatto che V. aveva venduto più tardi l'appartamento del richiedente a 9 Strada di Mahtra era di nessuna attinenza e potrebbe generare una rivendicazione col richiedente contro sua madre V. che Il Governo ha notato anche che il richiedente non stava vivendo nell'appartamento a 33 Strada di Punane, o al tempo del sequestro o nel 2011, così il sequestro non aveva dato luogo al richiedente sta perdendo la sua casa.
67. Il Governo contese che il richiedente aveva “acquisito” l'appartamento come un risultato dell'attività penale con sua madre e nonna e lei avevano “perduto” sé per la stessa ragione. Lei davvero l'aveva acquisito mai in buon fede. Evitare una situazione dove proprietà ottenne per crimine potrebbe essere donato un minore nella famiglia, diritto nazionale previde che l'acquisizione in buona fede con successori del primo e secondo ordine non era possibile in tale situazione (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra).
68. Il Governo dibattè anche che il richiedente avesse potuto contestare la decisione di sequestro, e che in qualsiasi l'evento i suoi interessi nei procedimenti penali erano stati de facto rappresentato.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Principi generali
69. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che garantisce in sostanza il diritto a proprietà comprende tre articoli distinti. Il primo che è espresso nella prima frase del primo paragrafo e è di una natura generale, posa in giù il principio di godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Il secondo articolo, nella seconda frase dello stesso paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e lo fa soggetto alle certe condizioni. Il terzo, contenuto nel secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo e terzi articoli che concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà devono essere costruiti nella luce del principio generale posata in giù nel primo articolo (vedere, fra molte autorità, Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 44, il 1999-V di ECHR, e Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 134 ECHR 2004 V).
70. L'approccio continuo della Corte è stato che il sequestro, mentre comporta privazione di proprietà, anche costituisce controllo dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Sole c. la Russia, n. 31004/02, § 25 5 febbraio 2009; Riela ed Altri, citato sopra; Arcuri ed Altri, citato sopra; C.M. c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 28078/95, 26 giugno 2001; l'Aria il Canada c. il Regno Unito, 5 maggio 1995, § 34 la Serie Un n. 316 Un; ed AGOSI, citato sopra, § 51). Di conseguenza, considera che lo stesso approccio deve essere seguito nella causa presente.
71. La Corte considera che il sequestro in procedimenti penali è in linea con l'interesse generale della comunità, perché la confisca di soldi o i beni ottenne per le attività illegali o pagato per con gli incassi di crimine è un necessario ed effettivo vuole dire di combating le attività penali (vedere Raimondo c. l'Italia, 22 febbraio 1994, § 30 la Serie Un n. 281 Un). Il sequestro in questo contesto è perciò nel continuare con le mete del Consiglio di Convenzione di Europa a Lavare, Ricerca, la Confisca ed il Sequestro degli Incassi da Crimine che costringe Parti Statali ad introdurre sequestro di instrumentalities e gli incassi di crimine in riguardo di reati seri. Così, un ordine di sequestro in riguardo di proprietà criminalmente acquisita opera nell'interesse generale come un deterrente a quelli che considerano prendere parte in attività penali, ed anche garantisce che crimine non paga (vedere Denisova e Moiseyeva c. la Russia, n. 16903/03, § 58, 1 aprile 2010 con gli ulteriori riferimenti a Phillips c. il Regno Unito, n. 41087/98, § 52 ECHR 2001 VII, e Fondamento di Dassa ed Altri c. il Liechtenstein (il dec.), n. 696/05, 10 luglio 2007).
72. La Corte reitera inoltre che, benché il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non contiene requisiti procedurali ed espliciti, è stata il suo requisito continuo che i procedimenti nazionali riconoscono l'individuo addolorato un'opportunità ragionevole di fissare suo o la sua causa alle autorità responsabili per il fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantito con questa disposizione. Nell'accertare se questa condizione è stata soddisfatta, una prospettiva comprensiva deve essere presa delle procedure applicabili (vedere Denisova e Moiseyeva, citato sopra, § 59; Jokela c. la Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 45 ECHR 2002-IV; ed AGOSI, citato sopra, § 55).
(b) la Richiesta dei principi alla causa presente
73. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte nota che l'Organo giudiziario locale di Harju, quando ordinando il sequestro dell'appartamento in oggetto, si appellò su Articolo 83 § 3 (2) del Codice penale. Sotto che disposizione, una corte può confiscare l'oggetto di un reato intenzionale se appartiene ad un terza persona al tempo della creazione della sentenza e la persona l'aveva acquisito su conto delle azioni dell'offensore, per esempio come un regalo. Così, la Corte si soddisfa che il sequestro aveva una base legale. Inoltre, la Corte considera che la confisca dei beni ottenne per crimine è in linea con l'interesse generale della comunità (vedere paragrafo 71 sopra). Ha bisogno di esaminare perciò se un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra lo scopo legittimo ed i diritti essenziali del richiedente, e se c'erano garanzie procedurali e sufficienti a posto.
74. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che il richiedente non fu accusato con o condannato di qualsiasi reato riferì alla proprietà confiscata. Effettivamente, lei era un minore al tempo del perpetrazione dei reati. Comunque, come stabilito con le corti nazionali, l'appartamento in oggetto-in che non abitò il richiedente-era stato acquisito con la madre del richiedente e nonna per crimine ed era stato trasferito al richiedente esente da spese. La Corte considera che gli articoli nazionali secondo che in simile circostanze la proprietà potrebbe essere confiscata ed il suo acquisitore non poteva appellarsi su proprietà in buona fede non corrisponda ad un'interferenza sproporzionata coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente. La Corte reitera che le corti nazionali diedero con, e respinto con ragionamento sufficiente, gli argomenti con la madre del richiedente V. e nonna N. all'effetto che l'appartamento in oggetto non era stato ottenuto per crimine, e che l'appartamento del richiedente alle 9 Strada di Mahtra era stata venduta per per pagare di nuovo un prestito preso per comprare l'appartamento in controversia. La Corte considera che le sue sentenze in riguardo di Articolo 6 § 1 (vedere divide in paragrafi 57 a 60 sopra) è anche attinente nel contesto di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 come riguardi la questione se i procedimenti nazionali riconobbero il richiedente un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere la sua causa alle autorità per impugnare efficacemente la misura di sequestro. Senza ripetere le conclusioni sopra nell'ulteriore dettaglio, la Corte nota così, che è soddisfatto che gli interessi del richiedente erano de facto rappresentato nei procedimenti nazionali con sua madre e nonna, ed il fatto che lei non fu coinvolta personalmente nei procedimenti non faceva, nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente, sconvolga l'equilibrio equo fra la protezione del diritto a proprietà ed i requisiti dell'interesse generale.
Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
75. Il richiedente in sostanza si lamentò anche infine, che lei aveva avuto alla sua disposizione nessuna via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva per la sua azione di reclamo del godimento tranquillo di proprietà richiesto sotto Articolo 13 della Convenzione. Che approvvigiona legge siccome segue:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
76. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
77. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo ha collegato all'esaminato sopra, e deve essere dichiarato perciò similmente ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
78. Il richiedente dibatté che la sua proprietà era stata confiscata senza suo stato stato invitato per prendere parte nei procedimenti.
79. Il Governo reiterò che il richiedente aveva avuto alla sua disposizione via di ricorso effettive delle quali lei non si era avvalsa (vedere divide in paragrafi 35 a 38 sopra). Loro aggiunsero che la proprietà del richiedente interessa in procedimenti penali a tutti i tre livelli di giurisdizione di corte era stato protetto da sua madre V. e nonna N.
80. Il Governo notò anche che dopo il sequestro dell'appartamento il richiedente avesse potuto proteggere i suoi interessi contro lo Stato con portando una rivendicazione per danni sotto l'Atto di Responsabilità Statale. Lei avrebbe potuto portare anche una rivendicazione per danni contro sua madre che come il guardiano del richiedente come un minore aveva trasferito il suo appartamento a 9 Strada di Mahtra contro il suo interesse.
2. La valutazione della Corte
81. Avendo riguardo ad alle sue sentenze come riguardi Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere divide in paragrafi 57 a 60 sopra) ed in riguardo delle garanzie procedurali sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere divide in paragrafi 73 e 74 sopra), la Corte lo considera anche non necessario esaminare questi problemi sotto Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

4. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 15 gennaio 2015, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.