Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ?URI? AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41

NUMERO: 79867/12/2015
STATO: Bosnia Herzegovina
DATA: 20/01/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Enforcement proceedings Article 6-1 - Access to court)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)
Respondent State to take measures of a general character (Article 46-2 - Measures of a general character) Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage
Just satisfaction)



FOURTH SECTION








CASE OF ?URI? AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

(Applications nos. 79867/12, 79873/12, 80027/12, 80182/12, 80203/12 and 115/13)








JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG

20 January 2015




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of ?uri? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Ineta Ziemele, President,
George Nicolaou,
Ledi Bianku,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Paul Mahoney,
Faris Vehabovi?, judges,
and Françoise Elens-Passos, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 16 December 2014,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in six applications (nos. 79867/12, 79873/12, 80027/12, 80182/12, 80203/12 and 115/13) against Bosnia and Herzegovina lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by 18 citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 4 and 5 December 2012.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Banja Luka. The Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Miji?.
3. This case, like ?oli? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 1218/07 et al., 10 November 2009, concerns the non-enforcement of final and enforceable domestic judgments awarding war damages to the applicants.
4. On 2 September 2013 the applications were communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. By six judgments of the Banja Luka Court of First Instance (“the Court of First Instance”) of 17 February 2000, 25 October 2000, 12 December 2008, 8 July 2003, 11 February 2003 and 31 August 1999, which became final on 15 May 2001, 18 March 2004, 12 January 2009, 30 June 2005 and 4 December 2000 respectively, the Republika Srpska (an Entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina) was ordered to pay, within 15 days, the following amounts in respect of war damage together with default interest at the statutory rate:
(i) BAM 21,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, BAM 2,300 in respect of pecuniary damage and BAM 2,350 in respect of legal costs to the ?uri?s;
(ii) BAM 31,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, BAM 2,500 in respect of pecuniary damage and BAM 3,570 in respect of legal costs to the Bošnjaks;
(iii) BAM 28,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, BAM 2,500 in respect of pecuniary damage and BAM 4,470.60 in respect of legal costs to the Bojani?s and Ms Banjac;
(iv) BAM 40,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage and BAM 2,835 in respect of legal costs to the ?oli?s;
(v) BAM 19,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage and BAM 600 in respect of legal costs to Mr Lazarevi?;
(vi) BAM 14,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, BAM 2,500 in respect of pecuniary damage and BAM 1,810 in respect of legal costs to the Komljenovi?s.
6. The Court of First Instance issued writs of execution (rješenje o izvršenju) on 24 August 2001, 16 August 2004, 4 April 2011, 8 August 2007, 27 April 2009 and 28 March 2001.
7. The applicants complained of the non-enforcement to the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Constitutional Court”).
8. On 16 January 2013 the Constitutional Court found a breach of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the cases of the ?uri?s, Mr Lazarevi?, the Bojani?s and Ms Banjac. In line with its established practice in cases of this type, it refused the applicants? compensation claims, holding that a finding of a violation constituted in itself sufficient just satisfaction.
9. The cases of the ?oli?s, the Komljenovi?s and the Bošnjaks are still pending before the Constitutional Court.
10. On 10 April 2008, 12 November 2010, 13 December 2010 and 18 July 2008 respectively the ?uri?s, the Bošnjaks, the ?oli?s, Mr Lazarevi? and the Komljenovi?s were paid legal costs and default interest.
11. Under the new settlement plan (see paragraph 16 below) the ?uri?s? case was scheduled for enforcement in 2014; the Bošnjaks? in 2019; the Bojani?s? and Ms Banjac?s in 2030; the ?oli?s? in 2024; Mr Lazarevi??s in 2026; and the Komljenovi?s? in 2017.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
12. In view of the large number of civil actions brought under the ordinary rules of tort law on 29 November 2005 the Republika Srpska created a general compensation scheme for war damage and extinguished the pending civil actions under the terms of the War Damage Act 2005 (Zakon o ostvarivanju prava na naknadu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. do 19. juna 1996. godine, Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska (“OG RS”) nos. 103/05, 1/09 and 49/09). Compensation awarded under this scheme was to be paid in government bonds, which were to be amortised in ten annual instalments.
13. Some 9,000 judgments became final by 29 November 2005. The Republika Srpska was ordered to pay approximately BAM 140,000,000 in total plus default interest. Their enforcement has been suspended since 28 May 2002 pursuant to the Postponement of Enforcement Act 2002, the Temporary Postponement of Enforcement Act 2003 and the Domestic Debt Act 2004 (Zakon o odlaganju od izvršenja sudskih odluka na teret sredstava budžeta Republike Srpske po osnovu isplate naknade materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale uslijed ratnih dejstava i po osnovu isplate stare devizne štednje, OG RS nos. 25/02 and 51/03; Zakon o privremenom odlaganju od izvršenja potraživanja iz budžeta Republike Srpske, OG RS nos. 110/03 and 63/04; Zakon o utvr?ivanju i na?inu izmirenja unutrašnjeg duga Republike Srpske, OG RS nos. 63/04, 47/06, 68/07, 17/08, 64/08 and 34/09).
14. In accordance with the settlement plan envisaged under the Domestic Debt Act 2004, principal debt and associated default interest were to be paid in ten annual instalments between 2014 and 2023 (Odluka o emisiji obveznica Republike Srpske za izmirenje obaveza po osnovu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. do 19. juna 1996. godine, OG RS no. 62/08). The bonds earned interest at an annual rate of 1.5% and could be sold on the Stock Exchange.
15. Following ?oli? and Others, cited above, on 13 January 2012 the Domestic Debt Act 2012 entered into force, thereby repealing the Domestic Debt Act 2004 (Zakon o unutrašnjem dugu Republike Srpske, OG RS nos. 1/12, 28/13 and 59/13). As regards the payment of war damage, it envisages that the judgments will be enforced in cash and in government bonds, if the creditors so accept. The maturity of the bonds is now 13 years. They can be sold at the Stock Exchange, used to pay direct taxes accrued by 31 December 2007, used to finance up to 60% of the purchase price of State-owned flats, commercial buildings, garages and business premises, and for paying a fee for certain administrative decisions (odobrenje legalizacije objekta).
16. In December 2010 the Action Plan (Odluka o usvajanju Akcionog plana za utvr?ivanje ukupnih obaveza po osnovu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. do 19. juna 1996. godine, OG RS, no. 136/10) was introduced in order to implement general measures ordered in ?oli? and Others. On 9 October 2012, after the identification of the exact number of unenforced judgments and the aggregate debt (10,257 judgments and 149,285,957.37 convertible marks (BAM) ), the Republika Srpska introduced the new settlement plan for the payment of war damages. It envisaged the enforcement of final judgments ordering payment of war damages in cash within 13 years starting from 2013, in the order in which they were received at the Ministry of Finance of the Republika Srpska, provided the creditors had submitted all necessary documents. Furthermore, the Republika Srpska undertook to pay 50 euros (EUR; to be converted into convertible marks at the rate applicable at the date of payment) in compensation for non-pecuniary damage. This amount was to be paid first in respect of final judgments which had already been enforced in the form of government bonds. The non-pecuniary damage in respect of other judgments was to be paid in the same year in which the judgment in question would be enforced in accordance with the settlement plan.
17. In July 2013 the time-frame for the enforcement was extended to 20 years starting from 2013 (Plan isplate obaveza po osnovu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. do 19. juna 1996.godine koje se izmiruju u gotovini).
18. Furthermore, after ?oli? and Others, the War Damage Act 2005 was amended in that any civil actions previously extinguished could be resumed before the competent courts (see paragraph 12 above; Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Zakona o ostvarivanju prava na naknadu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. do 19. juna 1996. godine, OG RS no. 118/09). There are around 3,030 pending cases before the domestic courts.
THE LAW
19. The applicants complained of the non-enforcement of the final domestic judgments indicated in paragraph 5 above. They relied on Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Article 6, in so far as relevant, provides:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
20. Given their common factual and legal background, the Court decides to join these six applications pursuant to Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
A. Admissibility
21. The Court notes that the applications are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
22. The applicants essentially maintained that the principle of the rule of law, which Bosnia and Herzegovina had undertaken to respect when it ratified the Convention, required that every judgment be enforced without delay.
(b) The Government
23. The Government argued that in view of the number of domestic judgments concerning war damage and the size of the Republika Srpska’s public debt, the enforcement scheme envisaged under the settlement plan was adequate and justified. In December 2013 the aggregate debt was BAM 166,518,564.87 and the number of unenforced judgments was 4,089. There were around 3,030 pending cases before the domestic courts.
The Government further submitted that, following Ignjati? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (nos. 6179/08 et al., 15 January 2013; see paragraph 28 below), there was an increase in the number of unenforced judgments. For that reason in July 2013 the time-limit for the enforcement was extended to 20 years. Moreover, since the Domestic Debt Act 2012 envisaged two options of enforcement, in cash and in government bonds, the settlement plan was to be revised periodically as some creditors might choose enforcement in bonds.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Background to the present case
24. On 10 November 2009 the Court adopted a leading judgment concerning the non-enforcement of final domestic judgments awarding war damages (see ?oli? and Others, cited above). It held that the size of public debt could not justify the statutory suspension of the enforcement of an entire category of final judgments and found that there had been a breach of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention on account of the excessive delay in the enforcement.
The relevant part of ?oli? and Others reads (see § 15):
“The present case is similar – although not identical – to Jeli?i? v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 41183/02, ECHR 2006 XII, in which the Court found a breach of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It concerns, as Jeli?i? did, the statutory suspension of the enforcement of an entire category of final judgments on account of the size of public debt arising from these judgments. While the applicants invited the Court to apply the Jeli?i? jurisprudence to their case, the Government sought to distinguish the two cases on the following grounds.
First, the Government maintained that there were considerably more domestic judgments ordering the payment of compensation for war damage (under consideration in the present case) than those ordering the release of “old” foreign-currency savings (under consideration in Jeli?i?). The Court notes, however, that the size of public debt seemingly arising from these two categories of judgments is similar (see Pejakovi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 337/04 et al., §§ 26-27, 18 December 2007).
Secondly, the Government submitted that many people fell under the general compensation scheme, described in paragraph 10 above, and that it would be unacceptable to treat them differently from those with final judgments in their favour. The Court disagrees. While a situation where a significant number of war-related civil claims are pending may call for their replacement by a general compensation scheme (see, by analogy, Poznanski and Others v. Germany (dec.), no. 25101/05, 3 July 2007), this is of no relevance to the obligation of the respondent State to enforce judgments which became final before the creation of such a scheme.
The Court therefore does not see any reason to depart from the Jeli?i? jurisprudence. Since the final judgments under consideration in the present case have not yet been fully enforced and the situation has already lasted more than four years, there has been a breach of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.”
In view of the number of similar cases, the Court invited the respondent State, under Article 46 of the Convention, to solve the problem that had led to the finding of a violation by way of implementing appropriate general and/or individual measures (ibid., § 17). As regards Article 41 of the Convention, the Court ordered full enforcement of the domestic judgments in question in respect of pecuniary damage and awarded EUR 1,500 per application in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
25. In a following judgment, Runi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 28735/06 et al., 15 November 2011, in which the applicants had accepted government bonds in lieu of cash as means of enforcement, the Court held that domestic judgments ordering payment of war damage had been fully enforced by the issuance of bonds (ibid., § 15). However, it found a breach of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the prolonged non-enforcement.
26. In a further judgment, Ignjati? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (nos. 6179/08 et al., 15 January 2013), the Court held that in the absence of creditors’ consent, the enforcement courts could not have ordered the enforcement in bonds of the final judgments awarding war damages. It found that this was contrary to Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (ibid., § 17).
27. After the adoption of the above-mentioned judgments, around 300 similar applications were resolved through friendly settlements on the basis of the Government’s undertaking to pay EUR 1,000 per application in respect of non-pecuniary damage and costs and expenses within three months, and to enforce domestic judgments at issue in cash within nine months, that is, as from June 2013, within twenty-seven months (in four installments) of the Court’s decisions. In some cases the Government made unilateral remedial offers under the same terms except for the amount of compensation in respect of non-pecuniary damage and costs and expenses which was reduced to EUR 900.
28. In December 2010 the Republika Srpska introduced the Action Plan by way of the enforcement of the general measures ordered in ?oli? and Others. After the identification of the exact number of non-enforced judgments and the aggregate debt, a settlement plan for the enforcement was prepared in October 2012. It envisaged the enforcement of final judgments ordering payment of war damages in cash within 13 years starting from 2013, in the order in which they were received at the Ministry of Finance of the Republika Srpska, provided the creditors had submitted the necessary documents. Furthermore, the Republika Srpska undertook to pay EUR 50 in respect of non-pecuniary damage. This amount was to be paid first in respect of final judgments which had already been enforced in the form of government bonds. The non-pecuniary damage in respect of other judgments was to be paid in the same year in which the judgment in question would be enforced in accordance with the settlement plan. In July 2013 the time-frame for the enforcement was extended to 20 years starting from 2013 (see paragraph 17 above).
(b) The present case
29. In the present case the Court will examine the adequacy of the Republika Srpska?s settlement plan for the enforcement of final domestic judgments awarding war damages.
30. As regards the enforcement time-frame, the Court takes the view that, while the system of staggering the enforcement of final judgments may be accepted in exceptional circumstances (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 74, ECHR 1999 V), the proposed time-frame of 20 years is too long in the light of the lengthy delay which has already occurred. The Court is aware of the Republika Srpska?s significant public debt as well as of the number of non-enforced judgments and the number of cases pending before the domestic courts. It reiterates however that it is not open to a State authority to cite lack of funds as an excuse for not honouring a judgment debt (see Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 35, ECHR 2002 III; Teteriny v. Russia, no. 11931/03, § 41, 30 June 2005; and Jeli?i? v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 41183/02, §§ 39 and 42, ECHR 2006 XII).
Moreover, it was the Republika Srpska?s legal system that allowed for the creation of such a high number of judgments awarding war damages: civil actions for war damages were brought under the ordinary rules of tort law (see paragraph 12 above). By the end of 2005 when the War Damage Act 2005 was introduced some 9,000 judgments became final (see paragraph 13 above). While a search for a fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights is inherent in the whole of the Convention, the consequence of the respondent State’s action in delaying for another 20 years the enforcement of these judgments is to impose an individual and excessive burden on the creditors concerned (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, Series A no. 52, §73). Some of the applicants in the present case obtained final judgments in their favour thirteen years ago (see paragraph 6 above) and they remain unenforced to the present day. There are many more in similar situations. It should be noted that around 400 similar cases are pending before this Court.
31. Furthemore, the Court accepts that the payment of compensation for non-pecuniary damage envisaged by the settlement plan is intended by the respondent State to constitute compliance with its obligations under the Convention and commends this gesture, and especially the settlement plan from October 2012. However, in view of the above considerations, the Court cannot but conclude that the Republika Srpska’s settlement plan, as extended in 2013, is not in accordance with Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
32. Accordingly, the Court considers there has been a violation of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in the present case on account of the prolonged non-enforcement of final and enforceable domestic judgments in the applicants’ favour.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
33. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
34. The applicants sought the payment of the outstanding judgment debt in respect of pecuniary damage and EUR 5,000 per application in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
35. The Government considered the claims unsubstantiated.
36. The Court reiterates that the most appropriate form of redress in non-enforcement cases is indeed to ensure full enforcement of the domestic judgments in question (see Jeli?i?, cited above, § 53, and Pejakovi? and Others, cited above, § 31). This principle equally applies to the present case.
37. In respect of non-pecuniary damage, the applicants claimed EUR 5,000 per application.
38. The Government considered the amount claimed to be excessive.
39. The Court considers that the applicants sustained some non-pecuniary loss arising from the breaches of the Convention found in this case. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, it awards EUR 1,000 per application under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
40. The applicants claimed the following sums for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and before the Court: the ?uri?s, BAM 4,095; the Bošnjaks, BAM 4,680; the Bojani?s and Ms Banjac, BAM 4,095; the ?oli?s, BAM 4,680; Mr Lazarevi?, BAM 2,340; and the Komljenovi?s, BAM 3,510.
41. The Government considered the amounts claimed to be excessive.
42. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum (see, for example, Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000-XI). The Court notes that the applicants’ representative submitted initial applications and, at the request of the Court, written pleadings in one of the official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In view of the fact that this case concerns six applications raising the same issue and that the applicants had the same representative, the Court awards EUR 450 per application under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants.
C. Default interest
43. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
44. The Court finds it appropriate in the present case to consider the application of Article 46 of the Convention, which provides, in so far as relevant:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution...”
45. The Court recalls that Article 46 of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of Article 1, imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to secure the right of the applicant which the Court found to be violated. Such measures must also be taken in respect of other persons in the applicant’s position, notably by solving the problems that have led to the Court’s findings (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000 VIII; Karanovi? v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 39462/03, § 28, 20 November 2007; ?oli? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 1218/07 et al., § 17, 10 November 2009; Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 125, ECHR 2009 ...; and Greens and M.T. v. the United Kingdom, nos. 60041/08 and 60054/08, § 106, ECHR 2010 (extracts)).
46. In the present case the Court has found that the settlement plan for the enforcement of domestic judgments ordering the payment of war damages was not in accordance with Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This violation affects many people (see paragraphs 16 and 18 above). Although it is in principle not for the Court to determine what remedial measures may be appropriate to satisfy the respondent State’s obligations under Article 46 of the Convention, the Court considers that in view of the nature of the violation found in the instant case, it would be appropriate to provide the respondent Government with some guidance as to what is required for the proper execution of the present judgment.
47. The Court, therefore, considers that the respondent State should amend the settlement plan within a reasonable time-limit, preferably within a year, of the date on which the present judgment becomes final. In view of the lengthy delay which has already occurred, the Court considers that a more appropriate enforcement interval should be introduced. In that respect, the Court finds that the interval proposed by the initial settlement plan, in October 2012 (see paragraph 28 above), was far more reasonable, at the time it was introduced. In any event, the Court considers that in the cases in which there had already been a delay of more than ten years, the judgments need to be enforced without further delay. Lastly, within the same time-limit, the respondent State should also undertake to pay default interest at the statutory rate in the event of a delay in the enforcement of judgments in accordance with the settlement plan as amended following this judgment.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Decides to join the applications;

2. Declares the applications admissible;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention;

4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
?
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to secure enforcement of the domestic judgments under consideration in the present case within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, and, in addition to pay the applicants, within the same period, the following amount, to be converted into domestic currency at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros) per application, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage; and
(ii) EUR 450 (four hundred and fifty euros) per application, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 20 January 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Françoise Elens-Passos Ineta Ziemele
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti di Esecuzione Articolo 6-1 - Accesso per corteggiare)
Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà)
Stato rispondente deve prendere misure di carattere generale (Articolo 46-2 - Misure di un carattere generale) danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non - patrimoniale Soddisfazione equa)



QUARTA SEZIONE








CAUSA ?URI ? ED ALTRI C. BOSNIA E HERZEGOVINA

(Richieste N. 79867/12, 79873/12 80027/12, 80182/12 80203/12 e 115/13)








SENTENZA



STRASBOURG

20 gennaio 2015




Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di ?uri ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Ineta Ziemele, Presidente
Giorgio Nicolaou,
Ledi Bianku,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Paul Mahoney,
Faris Vehabovi, ?giudici
e Françoise Elens-Passos, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 16 dicembre 2014,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in sei richieste (N. 79867/12, 79873/12 80027/12, 80182/12 80203/12 e 115/13) contro Bosnia e Herzegovina depositò con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con 18 cittadini di Bosnia e Herzegovina, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 4 e 5 dicembre 2012.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Banja Luka. Il Governo di Bosnia e Herzegovina (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra M. Miji.?
3. Questa causa, come ?oli ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 1218/07 et al., 10 novembre 2009, riguarda la non-esecuzione di definitivo e sentenze nazionali ed esecutive che assegna guerra danneggia ai richiedenti.
4. 2 settembre 2013 le richieste furono comunicate al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Con sei sentenze del Banja Luka Giudice di prima istanza (“il Giudice di prima istanza”) di 17 febbraio 2000, 25 ottobre 2000, 12 dicembre 2008, 8 luglio 2003 il 2003 e 31 agosto 1999 di 11 febbraio che divenne definitivo in 15 maggio 2001 18 marzo 2004, 12 gennaio 2009 il 2005 e 4 dicembre 2000 di 30 giugno rispettivamente, il Republika Srpska (una Entità di Bosnia e Herzegovina) fu ordinato pagare, entro 15 giorni gli importi seguenti in riguardo di danno di guerra insieme con interesse di mora al tasso legale:
(i) BAM 21,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, BAM 2,300 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e BAM 2,350 in riguardo di spese processuali all'uris;?
(l'ii) BAM 31,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, BAM 2,500 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e BAM 3,570 in riguardo di spese processuali al Bošnjaks;
(l'iii) BAM 28,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, BAM 2,500 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e BAM 4,470.60 in riguardo di spese processuali al Bojanis ?ed il Sig.ra Banjac;
(l'iv) BAM 40,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale e BAM 2,835 in riguardo di spese processuali all'olis;?
(v) BAM 19,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale e BAM 600 in riguardo di spese processuali al Sig. Lazarevi;?
(il vi) BAM 14,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, BAM 2,500 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e BAM 1,810 in riguardo di spese processuali al Komljenovis.?
6. Il Giudice di prima istanza emise ordini di esecuzione della sentenza (il rješenje o izvršenju) 24 agosto 2001, 16 agosto 2004, 4 aprile 2011, 8 agosto 2007, il 2009 e 28 marzo 2001 di 27 aprile.
7. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione alla Corte Costituzionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina (“la Corte Costituzionale”).
8. 16 gennaio 2013 la Corte Costituzionale trovò una violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nelle cause dell'uris?, il Sig. Lazarevi, il Bojanis ed il Sig.ra Banjac. In linea con la sua pratica stabilita in cause di questo tipo, rifiutò, il ?risarcimento di ?richiedenti ?afferma, mentre sostenendo che una sentenza di una violazione costituì in se stesso la soddisfazione equa e sufficiente.
9. Le cause dell'olis?, il Komljenovis ed i Bošnjaks ancora sono pendenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale.
10. 10 aprile 2008, 12 novembre 2010, il 2010 e 18 luglio 2008 di 13 dicembre rispettivamente gli ?uris?, il Bošnjaks, l'olis, il Sig. Lazarevi ed il Komljenovis furono pagati spese processuali ed interesse di mora.
11. Sotto il piano di accordo nuovo (veda paragrafo 16 sotto) la ?causa di ?uris fu ?elencata per esecuzione nel 2014; il Bošnjaks nel 2019; il Bojanis ed il Sig.ra Banjacs nel 2030; l'olis nel 2024; il Sig. Lazarevis nel 2026; ed il Komljenovis nel 2017.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
12. In prospettiva del grande numero di azioni civili portata sotto gli articoli ordinari di legge di illecito civile 29 novembre 2005 il Republika Srpska creò un schema di risarcimento generale per danno di guerra ed estinse le azioni civili e pendenti sotto i termini del Guerra Danno Atto 2005 (Zakon od ostvarivanju prava na naknadu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. faccia 19. juna 1996. godine, Ufficiale Pubblica del Republika Srpska (“OG RS”) N. 103/05, 1/09 e 49/09). Risarcimento assegnato sotto questo schema sarebbe pagato in obbligazioni statali che sarebbero ammortate in dieci rate annuali.
13. Delle 9,000 sentenze divennero definitivo in 29 novembre 2005. Il Republika Srpska fu ordinato per pagare verso BAM 140,000,000 in totale più l'interesse di mora. La loro esecuzione è sospesa da 28 maggio 2002 facendo seguito alla Proroga di Esecuzione Atto 2002, la Proroga Provvisoria di Esecuzione Atto 2003 ed il Debito Nazionale Atto 2004 (Zakon od odlaganju od izvršenja sudskih odluka na teret sredstava budžeta Republike Srpske po osnovu isplate naknade materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale uslijed ratnih dejstava i po osnovu isplate fissano devizne štednje, OG RS N. 25/02 e 51/03; Zakon o privremenom odlaganju od izvršenja potraživanja iz budžeta Republike Srpske, OG RS N. 110/03 e 63/04; Zakon o utvrivanju ?i nainu ?izmirenja unutrašnjeg duga Republike Srpske, OG RS N. 63/04, 47/06 68/07, 17/08 64/08 e 34/09).
14. Nella conformità col piano di accordo prevista sotto il Debito Nazionale Atto 2004, debito principale ed interesse di mora associato sarebbe pagato in dieci rate annuali fra il 2014 ed il 2023 (Odluka obveznica di emisiji di o Republike Srpske za izmirenje obaveza po osnovu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. faccia 19. juna 1996. godine, OG RS n. 62/08). Le obbligazioni guadagnarono interesse ad un tasso annuale di 1.5% e potrebbero essere vendute sul Borsa Valori.
15. ?Oli seguente ?ed Altri, citato sopra, 13 gennaio 2012 il Debito Nazionale che Atto 2012 è entrato in vigore, mentre abrogando con ciò il Debito Nazionale Atto 2004 (Zakon dugu di unutrašnjem di o Republike Srpske, OG RS N. 1/12, 28/13 e 59/13). Come riguardi il pagamento di danno di guerra, prevede che le sentenze saranno eseguite per contanti ed in obbligazioni statali, se i creditori così accetta. La maturità delle obbligazioni ora è 13 anni. Loro possono essere venduti al Borsa Valori, usato pagare tasse dirette accumulate in 31 dicembre 2007, usato finanziare su a 60% del prezzo di acquisto di appartamenti Statali, edifici commerciali i garage ed affari premette, e per pagare una parcella per certe decisioni amministrative (objekta di legalizacije di odobrenje).
16. A dicembre 2010 l'Azione Piano (Odluka o usvajanju Akcionog plana za utvrivanje ?ukupnih obaveza po osnovu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. faccia 19. juna 1996. godine, OG RS n. 136/10) fu introdotto per per implementare misure generali ordinate in ?oli ?ed Altri. 9 ottobre 2012, dopo l'identificazione del numero esatto di sentenze di unenforced ed il debito globale (10,257 sentenze e 149,285,957.37 marchi convertibili (il BAM)), il Republika Srpska introdusse il piano di accordo nuovo per il pagamento di danni di guerra. Previde l'esecuzione di definitivo sentenze che ordinano pagamento di danni di guerra per contanti entro 13 anni che cominciano da 2013, nell'ordine nel quale loro furono ricevuti al Ministero di Finanza del Republika Srpska purché i creditori avevano presentato tutti i documenti necessari. Inoltre, il Republika Srpska si impegnò pagare 50 euros (EUR; essere convertito in marchi convertibili al tasso applicabile alla data di pagamento) nel risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale. Questo importo sarebbe pagato in riguardo di definitivo sentenze che già erano state eseguite nella forma di obbligazioni statali prima. Il danno non-patrimoniale in riguardo di altre sentenze sarebbe pagato di stesso anno in che la sentenza in oggetto sarebbe eseguito in conformità col piano di accordo.
17. A luglio 2013 la tempo-cornice per l'esecuzione fu prolungata a 20 anni che cominciano da 2013 (Piano isplate obaveza po osnovu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. faccia 19. juna 1996.godine izmiruju di se di koje u gotovini).
18. Inoltre, dopo ?oli ?ed Altri, il Guerra Danno nel quale Atto 2005 è stato corretto che qualsiasi azioni civili prima estinte potrebbero essere ricapitolate di fronte alle corti competenti (veda paragrafo 12 sopra; Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Zakona od ostvarivanju prava na naknadu materijalne i nematerijalne štete nastale u periodu ratnih dejstava od 20. maja 1992. faccia 19. juna 1996. godine, OG RS n. 118/09). Ci sono circa 3,030 cause pendenti di fronte alle corti nazionali.
LA LEGGE
19. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione delle definitivo sentenze nazionali indicata in paragrafo 5 sopra. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Articolo 6, in finora come attinente, prevede:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ognuno è concesso ad una fiera ed udienza pubblica all'interno di un termine ragionevole con un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito con legge.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
I. CONGIUNZIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
20. Dato il loro comune background che riguarda i fatti, la Corte decide di congiungere queste sei richieste facendo seguito all’Articolo 42 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
A. Ammissibilità
21. La Corte nota che le richieste non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) I richiedenti
22. I richiedenti essenzialmente sostennero che il principio dell'articolo di legge che Bosnia e Herzegovina si erano impegnati rispettare quando ratificò la Convenzione, richiesto che ogni sentenza sia eseguita senza ritardo.
(b) Il Governo
23. Il Governo dibatté che in prospettiva del numero di sentenze nazionali riguardo a danno di guerra e la taglia del debito pubblico del Republika Srpska, lo schema di esecuzione previsto sotto il piano di accordo era adeguato ed allineato. A dicembre 2013 il debito globale era BAM 166,518,564.87 ed il numero di sentenze di unenforced era 4,089. C'erano circa 3,030 cause pendenti di fronte alle corti nazionali.
Il Governo presentò inoltre che, Ignjati seguente ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (N. 6179/08 et al., 15 gennaio 2013; veda paragrafo 28 sotto), c'era un aumento nel numero di sentenze di unenforced. Per che ragione a luglio 2013 il tempo-limite per l'esecuzione fu prolungato a 20 anni. Fin dal Debito Nazionale Atto 2012 previde inoltre, due scelte di esecuzione, per contanti ed in obbligazioni statali, il piano di accordo sarebbe revisionato periodicamente come dei creditori sceglierebbe esecuzione in obbligazioni.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Background della causa presente
24. 10 novembre 2009 la Corte adottata una sentenza principale riguardo alla non-esecuzione di definitivo sentenze nazionali che assegnano guerra danneggia (veda ?oli ?ed Altri, citato sopra). Contenne che la taglia di debito pubblico non potesse giustificare la sospensione legale dell'esecuzione di una categoria intera di definitivo sentenze e fondò che c'era stata una violazione di Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione su conto del ritardo eccessivo nell'esecuzione.
La parte attinente di ?oli ?ed Altri legge (veda § 15):
“La causa presente è simile -benché non identica- a Jelii ?c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 41183/02, ECHR 2006 XII in che la Corte trovò una violazione di Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Riguarda, siccome faceva Jelii, la sospensione legale dell'esecuzione di una categoria intera di definitivo sentenze su conto della taglia di debito pubblico che sorge da queste sentenze. Mentre i richiedenti invitarono la Corte a fare domanda la giurisprudenza di Jelii alla loro causa, il Governo cercò di distinguere le due cause sui motivi seguenti.
Prima, il Governo sostenne che c'erano sentenze notevolmente più nazionali che ordinano il pagamento del risarcimento per danno di guerra (sotto la considerazione nella causa presente) che quelli che ordinano la liberazione di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta (sotto la considerazione in Jelii?). Comunque, la Corte nota che la taglia di debito pubblico che sorge apparentemente da queste due categorie di sentenze è simile (veda Pejakovi ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 337/04 et al., §§ 26-27, 18 dicembre 2007).
In secondo luogo, il Governo presentò che molte persone abbatterono lo schema di risarcimento generale, descritto in paragrafo 10 sopra sotto e che sarebbe inaccettabile per trattarli differentemente da quelli con definitivo sentenze nel loro favore. La Corte non è d'accordo. Mentre una situazione dove è pendente un numero significativo di rivendicazioni civili e guerra-relative può mandare a chiamare la loro sostituzione con un schema di risarcimento generale (veda, con analogia, Poznanski ed Altri c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 25101/05, 3 luglio 2007), questo è di nessuna attinenza all'obbligo dello Stato rispondente per eseguire sentenze che divennero definitivo di fronte alla creazione di tale schema.
La Corte non vede perciò qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare dalla ?giurisprudenza di Jelii. Fin dalle definitivo sentenze sotto la considerazione nella causa presente non è stato eseguito ancora pienamente e la situazione già è durata più di quattro anni, c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.”
In prospettiva del numero di cause simili, la Corte invitò lo Stato rispondente, sotto Articolo 46 della Convenzione risolvere il problema che aveva condotto alla sentenza di una violazione con modo di implementare and/or generale ed appropriato misure individuali (l'ibid., § 17). Come riguardi Articolo 41 della Convenzione, l'Ordine della corte la piena esecuzione delle sentenze nazionali in oggetto in riguardo di danno patrimoniale ed EUR 1,500 assegnato per la richiesta in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
25. In una sentenza seguente, Runi ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 28735/06 et al., 15 novembre 2011 nel quale i richiedenti avevano accettato obbligazioni statali al posto di soldi siccome vuole dire di esecuzione, la Corte sostenne che sentenze nazionali che ordinano pagamento di danno di guerra erano state eseguite pienamente con l'emissione di obbligazioni (l'ibid., § 15). Comunque, trovò una violazione di Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in riguardo della non-esecuzione prolungata.
26. In un'ulteriore sentenza, Ignjati ?ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (N. 6179/08 et al., 15 gennaio 2013), la Corte sostenne che nell'assenza di creditori ' acconsente, le corti di esecuzione non potevano ordinare l'esecuzione in obbligazioni delle definitivo sentenze che assegnano danni di guerra. Fondò che questo era contrario ad Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (l'ibid., § 17).
27. Circa il 300 le richieste simili furono risolte per regolamenti amichevoli sulla base del Governo dopo l'adozione delle sentenze summenzionate, sta impegnandosi pagare EUR 1,000 per la richiesta in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale e costa e spese entro tre mesi, ed eseguire sentenze nazionali in questione per contanti entro nove mesi che sono come da giugno 2013, entro ventisetti mesi (in quattro rate) delle decisioni della Corte. In delle cause il Governo fece offerte riparatore ed unilaterali sotto gli stessi termini a parte l'importo del risarcimento in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale e costa e spese che furono ridotte ad EUR 900.
28. A dicembre 2010 il Republika Srpska introdusse l'Azione Piano con modo dell'esecuzione delle misure generali ordinato in ?oli ?ed Altri. Dopo l'identificazione del numero esatto di sentenze non-eseguite ed il debito globale, un piano di accordo per l'esecuzione era preparato ad ottobre 2012. Previde l'esecuzione di definitivo sentenze che ordinano pagamento di danni di guerra per contanti entro 13 anni che cominciano da 2013, nell'ordine nel quale loro furono ricevuti al Ministero di Finanza del Republika Srpska purché i creditori avevano presentato i documenti necessari. Inoltre, il Republika Srpska si impegnò pagare EUR 50 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. Questo importo sarebbe pagato in riguardo di definitivo sentenze che già erano state eseguite nella forma di obbligazioni statali prima. Il danno non-patrimoniale in riguardo di altre sentenze sarebbe pagato di stesso anno in che la sentenza in oggetto sarebbe eseguito in conformità col piano di accordo. A luglio 2013 la tempo-cornice per l'esecuzione fu prolungata a 20 anni che cominciano da 2013 (veda paragrafo 17 sopra).
(b) La causa presente
29. Al giorno d'oggi la causa la Corte esaminerà l'adeguatezza del Republika ?piano di accordo di Srpskas per l'esecuzione di definitivo sentenze nazionali che assegnano danni di guerra.
30. Come riguardi la tempo-cornice di esecuzione, la Corte prende la prospettiva che, mentre il sistema di scaglionamento l'esecuzione di definitivo sentenze può essere accettata in circostanze eccezionali (veda Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 74 ECHR 1999 V), la tempo-cornice proposta di 20 anni è troppo lunga nella luce del lungo ritardo che già è accaduto. La Corte è consapevole del Republika Srpskas ?debito pubblico e significativo così come del numero di sentenze non-eseguite ed il numero di cause pendente di fronte alle corti nazionali. Reitera comunque che non è aperto ad un'autorità Statale per citare mancanza di finanziamenti come una scusa per non onorare un debito di sentenza (veda Burdov c. la Russia, n. 59498/00, § 35 ECHR 2002 III; Teteriny c. la Russia, n. 11931/03, § 41 30 giugno 2005; e Jelii ?c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 41183/02, §§ 39 e 42, ECHR 2006 XII).
Inoltre, era il Republika ordinamento giuridico di Srpskas ?che ha lasciato spazio alla creazione di tale numero alto di sentenze che assegnano danni di guerra: azioni civili per danni di guerra furono portate sotto gli articoli ordinari di legge di illecito civile (veda paragrafo 12 sopra). Con la fine di 2005 quando il Guerra Danno che Atto 2005 è stato introdotto delle 9,000 sentenze divennero definitivo (veda paragrafo 13 sopra). Mentre una ricerca per un equilibrio equo fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo è inerente nell'intero della Convenzione, la conseguenza dell'azione dello Stato rispondente nel differire per un altro 20 anni l'esecuzione di queste sentenze è imporre un carico individuale ed eccessivo sui creditori riguardato (veda, fra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982 la Serie Un n. 52, §73). Alcuni dei richiedenti nella causa presente ottennero tredici anni fa definitivo sentenze nel loro favore (veda paragrafo 6 sopra) e loro rimangono unenforced al giorno presente. Ci sono molti più in situazioni simili. Si dovrebbe notare che circa il 400 cause simili sono pendenti di fronte a questa Corte.
31. Furthemore, la Corte accetta che il pagamento del risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale previsto col piano di accordo è proporsi con lo Stato rispondente per costituire ottemperanza coi suoi obblighi sotto la Convenzione e loda questo gesto, e specialmente il piano di accordo da ottobre 2012. In prospettiva delle considerazioni sopra, la Corte non può comunque, ma conclude che il piano di accordo del Republika Srpska, come prolungato nel 2013, non è in conformità con Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
32. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nella causa presente su conto della non-esecuzione prolungata di definitivo e sentenze nazionali ed esecutive nei richiedenti il favore di '.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
33. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
34. I richiedenti chiesero il pagamento del debito di sentenza insoluto in riguardo di danno patrimoniale ed EUR 5,000 per la richiesta in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
35. Il Governo considerò le rivendicazioni non comprovato.
36. La Corte reitera che la forma più appropriata di compensazione in cause di non-esecuzione deve assicurare davvero la piena esecuzione delle sentenze nazionali in oggetto (veda Jelii?, citato sopra, § 53, e Pejakovi ed Altri, citato sopra, § 31). Questo principio fa domanda ugualmente alla causa presente.
37. In riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, i richiedenti chiesero EUR 5,000 per la richiesta.
38. Il Governo considerò l'importo chiese di essere eccessivo.
39. La Corte considera che i richiedenti subirono della perdita non-patrimoniale che sorge dalle violazioni della Convenzione trovata in questa causa. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto con Articolo 41 della Convenzione, assegna EUR 1,000 per la richiesta sotto questo capo.
Costi di B. e spese
40. I richiedenti chiesero le somme seguenti per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali e di fronte alla Corte: l'uris?, BAM 4,095; il Bošnjaks, BAM 4,680; il Bojanis ed il Sig.ra Banjac, BAM 4,095; l'olis, BAM 4,680; il Sig. Lazarevi, BAM 2,340; ed il Komljenovis, BAM 3,510.
41. Il Governo considerò gli importi chiesero di essere eccessivi.
42. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum (veda, per esempio, Iatridis c. la Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 2000-XI). La Corte nota che i richiedenti il rappresentante di ' presentò le richieste iniziali e, alla richiesta della Corte, note scritto in una delle lingue ufficiali di Bosnia e Herzegovina. In prospettiva del fatto che questa causa concerne sei richieste che sollevano lo stesso problema e che i richiedenti avevano lo stesso rappresentante, la Corte assegna EUR 450 per la richiesta sotto questo capo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti.
C. Interesse di mora
43. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
44. La Corte lo trova appropriato nella causa presente considerare finora la richiesta di Articolo 46 della Convenzione che prevede in come attinente:
“1. Le Alte Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La definitivo sentenza della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato di Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione...”
45. I richiami di Corte che Articolo 46 della Convenzione, siccome interpretato nella luce di Articolo 1, impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato di Ministri and/or generale ed appropriato misure individuali per garantire il diritto del richiedente che la Corte fondò essere violata. Simile misure devono essere prese anche in riguardo di altre persone nella posizione del richiedente, notevolmente con risolvendo i problemi che hanno condotto alle sentenze della Corte (veda Scozzari e Giunta c. l'Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000 VIII; Karanovi ?c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 39462/03, § 28 20 novembre 2007; l'oli ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 1218/07 et al., § 17, 10 novembre 2009; Burdov c. la Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 125 ECHR 2009...; e Verdure e M.T. c. il Regno Unito, N. 60041/08 e 60054/08, § 106 ECHR 2010 (gli estratti)).
46. Al giorno d'oggi causa che la Corte ha trovato che il piano di accordo per l'esecuzione di sentenze nazionali che ordinano il pagamento di danni di guerra non era in conformità con Articolo 6 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Questa violazione colpisce molte persone (veda divide in paragrafi 16 e 18 sopra). Benché non sia in principio per la Corte per determinare che cosa possono essere appropriate per soddisfare gli obblighi dello Stato rispondente sotto Articolo 46 della Convenzione misure riparatore, la Corte considera che in prospettiva della natura della violazione trovata nella causa presente, sarebbe appropriato per fornire al Governo rispondente della guida come a che che è richiesto per l'esecuzione corretta della sentenza presente.
47. La Corte, perciò considera che lo Stato rispondente dovrebbe correggere il piano di accordo all'interno di un tempo-limite ragionevole, preferibilmente entro un anno, della data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo. In prospettiva del lungo ritardo che già è accaduto, la Corte considera che un intervallo di esecuzione più appropriato dovrebbe essere introdotto. In che riguardo, i costatazione di Corte che l'intervallo ha proposto col piano di accordo iniziale ad ottobre 2012 (veda paragrafo 28 sopra), era lontano più ragionevole, al tempo fu introdotto. In qualsiasi l'evento, la Corte considera che nelle cause in che c'era stato già un ritardo di più di dieci anni, le sentenze hanno bisogno di essere eseguite senza l'ulteriore ritardo. All'interno dello stesso tempo-limite, lo Stato rispondente dovrebbe impegnarsi anche infine, pagare interesse di mora al tasso legale nell'evento di un ritardo nell'esecuzione di sentenze in conformità col piano di accordo che segue corretto questa sentenza.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere le richieste;

2. Dichiara le richieste ammissibile;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione;

4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
?
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve garantire l’esecuzione delle sentenze nazionali sotto considerazione nella causa presente entro tre mesi della data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, e, inoltre a pagare i richiedenti, entro lo stesso periodo l'importo seguente, da convertire in valuta nazionale al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 1,000 (mille euro) per la richiesta, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale; e
(ii) EUR 450 (quattrocento e cinquanta euro) per la richiesta, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, a riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;

6. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 20 gennaio 2015, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Françoise Elens-Passos Ineta Ziemele
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 26/03/2020.