Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF AKHVERDIYEV v. AZERBAIJAN

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41

NUMERO: 76254/11/2015
STATO: Azerbaijan
DATA: 29/01/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property Possessions) Just satisfaction reserved (Article 41 - Just satisfaction)



FIRST SECTION







CASE OF AKHVERDIYEV v. AZERBAIJAN

(Application no. 76254/11)









JUDGMENT
(Merits)


STRASBOURG

29 January 2015





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Akhverdiyev v. Azerbaijan,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Isabelle Berro, President,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 6 January 2015,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 76254/11) against the Republic of Azerbaijan lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Azerbaijani national, OMISSIS (?dal?t ?li o?lu Axverdiyev – “the applicant”), on 1 December 2011.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Azerbaijan. The Azerbaijani Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Ç. Asgarov.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that he had been deprived of his house in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 8 of the Convention and that the domestic civil proceedings had been conducted in breach of the requirements of Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention.
4. On 14 January 2013 the Government were given notice of the application.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1972 and lives in Baku.
6. Since his birth the applicant had lived in a house in the Khutor settlement of Baku which previously belonged to his parents. The total surface area of the house was 84.6 sq. m, including a habitable area of 58.8 sq. m. According to the “technical passport” for the house issued on 26 May 2004 by the Technical Inventory and Ownership Rights Registration Department of the Baku City Executive Authority (“the BCEA”), it was located on a plot of land measuring 257 sq. m, of which 93.4 sq. m was occupied by the house and 163.6 sq. m by the courtyard. The applicant lived in the house with his wife and two small children and his elderly mother.
7. The original ownership of the house is unclear. On 8 October 2005 the applicant acquired private ownership of the house and was issued with an ownership certificate by the Technical Inventory and Ownership Rights Registration Department of the BCEA confirming that he was the private owner. The plot of land underneath the house was not registered as being in the applicant’s formal ownership.
A. Acts issued by the city authorities in respect of the area where the applicant’s house was located
8. On 14 May 2004 the Head of the BCEA issued an order assigning various sites in Baku for development by a number of private promoters. The order read, in the relevant part, as follows:
“Order on permission for project designs for a sports complex, a cinema, office buildings, residential buildings, a shopping centre, an underground car park,
cottage-type houses, a dolphinarium and a planetarium on privatised plots of land
For the purpose of coordinating with the General Development Plan [of the City] and completing the facilities [obyektl?rin Ba? Plana uy?unla?d?r?laraq tamamlanmas?] in our capital which are in a state of ruin owing to having remained partially constructed for a long period of time and which undermine the beauty and development of the city, the following plots of land should be assigned [ayr?ls?n] to the following companies and firms:
...
6. Taking into account the request made by Kaspi Nur LLC on 13 May 2004, the land comprising neighbourhoods nos. 1070, 1072, 1073 and 1076 on Shushinski Street in the Narimanov District shall be assigned to the aforementioned company on the basis of a lease, for the purpose of designing and constructing cottage-type houses.
...
9. The developer is instructed [to do the following:]
9.1. To receive the plot of land in kind and carry out the necessary health and safety checks.
9.2. To comply with the instructions of the Chief Department for Architecture and Urban Planning [“the CDAUP”] concerning the timing and procedure of the project design and with the other conditions laid down in the construction certificate [in?aat pasportu].
9.3. Prior to completion of the project design, to coordinate with the [CDAUP] the sketches for the architectural planning of the land and buildings. After completing the project design, to submit the full working plan to the [CDAUP].
9.4. To coordinate [the relocation of utility lines] with [the CDAUP] and the relevant authorities.
9.5. This order, together with the construction certificate, form the basis solely for preparing the project design.
10. In accordance with Articles 66, 67 and 68 of the Land Code, the developer shall obtain [from the relevant authorities] the certificate and other documents confirming its rights over the plot of land ...
11. The construction work shall start after the registration of all the project design documentation by the Baku State Architecture and Construction Surveillance Inspectorate.
...
14. Should the developer fail to comply with the requirements of the above provisions, this order may be repealed in accordance with the law.”
9. The applicant’s house was located in one of the neighbourhoods mentioned in point 6 of the order. According to the applicant, he was never informed of this order by the executive authorities and became aware of its existence for the first time during the court proceedings (see section C below).
10. By a letter of 17 December 2008 the Narimanov District Executive Authority (“the NDEA”), a subordinate body of the BCEA, informed the BCEA that the relocation of the inhabitants of the “old, hostel-type and squatter houses” located in the area specified in the BCEA order of 14 May 2004 “remained a problem”. The NDEA further proposed the following:
“For the purpose of relocation of the families residing in the aforementioned area, we consider it appropriate to assign the empty plot of land in neighbourhood no. 1969 on A.M. Cuma Street ... for the construction of two and three-storey residential houses ... and request you to express your opinion on the construction project submitted by Azyevro LAU LLC as a developer.”
11. There is no information in the case file as to whether the BCEA formally replied to the NDEA’s letter of 17 December 2008.
12. On 24 April 2009 the Head of the NDEA issued an order authorising the construction by Azyevro LAU LLC of new houses for the relocated residents. The order read as follows:
“For the purpose of relocation of the residents of houses located in neighbourhoods nos. 1070, 1072, 1073 and 1076 on Khan Shushinski Street in connection with the construction of an important State facility in the aforementioned area, the project design for the construction of residential houses in neighbourhood no. 1969 on A.M. Cuma Street, submitted by Azyevro LAU LLC, ...was approved by [the CDAUP] in letter no. 18/03-8/2042 dated 23 April 2009.
Taking the above into consideration and for the purpose of completion of the relevant documentation, I hereby decide:
1. To authorise Azyevro LAU LLC to carry out the development project (construction of residential houses) in neighbourhood no. 1969 on A.M. Cuma Street, in accordance with the project design agreed by [the CDAUP] and with the purpose of ensuring the relocation of the residents of neighbourhoods nos. 1070, 1072, 1073 and 1076 on Khan Shushinski Street.
2. To instruct the management of Azyevro LAU LLC to obtain, in accordance with the legislation, documentation relating to the assignment of the plot of land and the construction.
3. To instruct the District Housing Maintenance and Utilities Union to supervise compliance of the construction with the project design and the relocation of the residents in accordance with the requirements of the law.
4. To instruct the District Police Office to ensure the protection of public order during the relocation process.
5. To instruct the Legal Division of [the NDEA] to issue the residents with occupancy vouchers for their new flats.
6. To request the Baku Office of the State Registry Service for Immovable Property reporting to the Cabinet of Ministers to assign specific postal addresses to the residents’ new flats and to provide them with technical passports [for the new flats] and with [the relevant] extracts from the State Register. ...”
B. Destruction of the applicant’s house
13. According to the applicant, in the second half of 2009 employees of the NDEA approached him with oral demands to give up his house and, in compensation, to accept an occupancy voucher (ya?ay?? orderi) for a new five-room flat measuring 123 sq. m under construction on A.M. Cuma Street, an area previously occupied by a relocated cemetery. When the applicant asked to be shown the lawful basis for the demands, he was told that it was a “Government instruction”.
14. The applicant refused, stating that he had no intention of relinquishing his house. He noted that, in any event, for this to be possible he would require prior monetary compensation equal to the market value of the house and the plot of land underneath the house.
15. According to the applicant, his neighbours faced the same situation and many of them gave in to the NDEA’s pressure. They moved out and accepted the occupancy vouchers offered to them. Soon the authorities began demolishing their houses. With large-scale demolition works in the neighbourhood (including the destruction of some walls and fences adjacent or immediately next to the applicant’s house), accompanied by power cuts and the accumulation of debris around his house, the applicant and his family no longer found it possible to stay in it and had to leave the house in October 2009. However, the applicant’s mother remained in the house.
16. According to the applicant, on 8 December 2009 the NDEA evicted his mother and began demolishing his house. The house was demolished over an unspecified number of days, together with the applicant’s belongings that remained inside.
C. The civil proceedings
1. The applicant’s civil action
17. On 8 December 2009 the applicant lodged a court action with the Narimanov District Court against the NDEA. The applicant asked the court to stop the defendant from breaching his right to enjoy his private property, to order the restoration of the property to its previous condition or, if that was no longer possible, to order the defendant to pay him 500,000 Azerbaijani manats (AZN) for pecuniary damage, AZN 200,000 for non-pecuniary damage, and AZN 500 daily for damages in respect of lost opportunity from December 2009 until the date of execution of the judgment. Subsequently, the BCEA, the Ministry of Finance and Azyevro LAU LLC were joined to the case as co-defendants together with the NDEA.
18. In its reply to the applicant’s lawsuit, the NDEA responded that the relocation of the residents from the applicant’s neighbourhood was being conducted in connection with “the important State project” approved by the BCEA order of 14 May 2004. As a legal basis for that order the NDEA indicated the old 1982 Housing Code which had been in effect until 1 October 2009 (on that date it was replaced by the new Housing Code).
19. On 2 March 2010 the NDEA requested the court to order an expert evaluation of the market value of the applicant’s house (which had already been demolished) and the five-room flat offered to the applicant in compensation. The applicant opposed this request, noting, inter alia, that the determination of the new flat’s market value was irrelevant since he had refused to accept it as lawful compensation and since the subject of his claim was the unlawfulness of the interference with his private property.
20. On 2 March 2010 the Narimanov District Court issued an order for an expert evaluation. The applicant challenged this order, relying on various grounds. After a series of appeals, the order was quashed pursuant to a Supreme Court decision of 22 June 2010 and a Baku Court of Appeal decision of 28 July 2010, on the ground that the first-instance court had designated an incorrect category of expert for the evaluation requested. No further expert evaluations were ordered.
2. The first-instance judgment on the merits
21. By a judgment of 4 November 2010 the Narimanov District Court rejected the applicant’s claims.
22. In the legal analysis part of the judgment the court first confirmed that the house had been in the applicant’s private ownership. It noted, however, that the applicant had not formalised his ownership rights over the plot of land and therefore could not make any claims in respect of the land.
23. The court also took note of the BCEA order of 14 May 2004. It further noted that between 2007 and 2009 the BCEA and NDEA had corresponded with each other concerning “problems” in relocating the residents of “old, hostel-type houses and squatter houses” in the applicant’s neighbourhood and that on 24 April 2009 the NDEA had decided to contract a private company (Azyevro LAU) to construct new residential buildings for those residents in a vacant area previously occupied by a relocated cemetery. The court noted that the applicant had been “given” a five-room flat in one of these new buildings, under an occupancy voucher issued in his name on 29 September 2009 pursuant to the NDEA order of 24 April 2009.
24. The court cited Article 157.9 of the Civil Code concerning the expropriation of private property for State needs, although it attempted neither to establish the applicability of that provision to the applicant’s situation nor to determine whether the applicant had been deprived of his house in compliance with its requirements.
25. The court further relied on various provisions of the old 1982 Housing Code, which had been in effect until 1 October 2009. The court noted that the 1982 Housing Code was still in force at the time when the applicant had been issued with an occupancy voucher on 29 September 2009. In particular, the court cited Articles 10 § 4, 40 § 1, 41, 89, 90 § 1, 91, 94 § 1, 96 § 1 and 135 of the 1982 Housing Code, concerning the rules on the provision to citizens of accommodation in residential buildings belonging to “the State housing fund” or “the public housing fund” (see paragraphs 37-48 below).
26. The court found that the BCEA order of 14 May 2004 was “in force” and that the issuance of an occupancy voucher in the applicant’s name for a five-room flat in a newly constructed building constituted “compensation in kind” for his house within the meaning of Articles 41 and 135 of the 1982 Housing Code. For these reasons, the court found that the applicant’s claim that the defendants’ actions had been unlawful was ill-founded.
27. Furthermore, although the order of 2 March 2010 for an expert evaluation had been quashed, the NDEA had nevertheless procured and presented to the court an “expert report” which estimated the market value of the new flat proposed to the applicant as being higher than that of his old house. The court considered that the compensation given to the applicant was fair because the new flat, with a total surface area of 123 sq. m, was larger than the applicant’s house and had a higher market value. Therefore, the court considered that the applicant’s claim in respect of pecuniary damage, seeking payment of the market value of his house in cash, was also unsubstantiated.
28. The court then proceeded to reject the applicant’s claim for non-pecuniary damage, finding that the applicant had failed to demonstrate that he had suffered any moral damage.
3. Appeals
29. The applicant appealed against the judgment of 4 November 2010, raising, inter alia, the following arguments:
(a) although the first-instance court had based its decision on the premise that the applicant’s house had been expropriated for public needs, it did not address the fact that this “expropriation” had not complied with the applicable requirements of the Constitution and the relevant provisions of the Civil Code (in particular, Articles 157.9 and 207 of the Civil Code);
(b) the de facto deprivation of property had been unlawful as there had been no expropriation order issued in accordance with the procedure specified by law; in particular, the reasons for the expropriation given by the defendants in the court proceedings did not fall under any of the lawful grounds for expropriation specified by the law and there had been no expropriation order issued by the Cabinet of Ministers as required by the law; in such circumstances, the applicant had been arbitrarily deprived of his property;
(c) the first-instance court had incorrectly relied on various provisions of the old 1982 Housing Code which had no longer been in force at the time of the interference (which, according to the applicant, had taken place in December 2009, at the time of the demolition of the house); and
(d) the part of the judgment concerning the dismissal of his claim to the plot of land was unlawful, as the right of ownership over the plots of land underneath privately owned houses had been granted to their respective owners by the regulations approved by the Presidential Decree of 10 January 1997 (see paragraph 58 below); therefore, he was the lawful owner of the plot of land by virtue of his ownership of the house, even though he had not formally registered his ownership rights over it.
30. In its submissions to the Baku Court of Appeal, the NDEA noted among other things that, because the applicant had refused to accept the five-room flat offered to him as compensation, the NDEA had issued him with occupancy vouchers for two other flats (a one-room flat and a four-room flat) in the same newly constructed building. However, for unexplained reasons, these two occupancy vouchers were both dated 29 September 2009, the same day as the date of issuance of the voucher for the five-room flat that had originally been proposed (see paragraphs 13 and 23 above).
31. In its judgment of 18 March 2011 the Baku Court of Appeal essentially repeated the Narimanov District Court’s reasoning and upheld that court’s judgment of 4 November 2010, with the exception of the part of the judgment rejecting the applicant’s claim in respect of pecuniary damage. In that part, the Baku Court of Appeal quashed the judgment and ordered that the applicant be given the two new flats on A.M. Cuma Street (the one-room flat and the four-room flat, instead of the single five-room flat offered earlier) as “compensation for pecuniary damage”, and instructed the NDEA to deal with the formalities of transferring the flats to the applicant.
32. The applicant lodged an appeal on points of law, reiterating the points of his previous appeal and further elaborating on them. In particular, he argued as follows:
(a) although his claim specifically sought only to establish the unlawfulness of the destruction of his house within the meaning of the applicable law, as well as to secure payment of monetary compensation for that unlawful action, the courts had ignored his claim and failed to assess the lawfulness of the interference with his property rights; instead, they had forced him to accept as “compensation” the flats given to him by the defendants (first the five-room flat, then the one-room and four-room flats), which he had repeatedly and lawfully refused to accept as lawful compensation;
(b) the interference with his property had taken place in December 2009 and therefore the 1982 Housing Code was not applicable to his situation; in any event, even the provisions of that Code cited by the courts had been misapplied, as those provisions concerned accommodation in “the State and public housing funds” and not privately owned houses and flats;
(c) the courts had also misapplied the Supreme Court Plenum’s decision of 14 February 2003, because that decision concerned the local executive authorities’ and municipalities’ competence in respect of buildings constructed on plots of land occupied without authorisation; however, in the applicant’s case, the land comprising the yard attached to the house was lawfully his to use by virtue of his ownership of the house; moreover, he had been entitled to acquire private ownership of the land free of charge in accordance with the applicable legislation;
(d) the courts’ reliance on an “expert report” presented by the NDEA was unacceptable, as that document had been written not by a qualified expert but by an unqualified person with no relevant credentials, was not based on relevant property valuation standards, used arbitrary figures and contained numerous mistakes;
(e) under the relevant legislation, privately owned property could be lawfully alienated in favour of the State by way of (i) expropriation for State needs, subject to prior payment of compensation as required by Article 29 § IV of the Constitution (see paragraph 36 below) and in accordance with Article 157.9 of the Civil Code (see paragraph 52 below); or (ii) purchase of the property by the State, with the owner’s consent, in accordance with Articles 203.3.3 and 207 of the Civil Code (see paragraphs 54-55 below) and Article 31 of the 2009 Housing Code (see paragraphs 49-50 below); or (iii) other specific situations provided for in Article 203.3 of the Civil Code (see paragraph 54 below); however, none of the above procedures had been complied with and the courts had failed to provide any legal or factual assessment in that regard;
(f) the interference with his property rights had also been in breach of, inter alia, Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
33. The applicant insisted that he had been unlawfully deprived of his house and that, despite his consistent and lawful refusals to accept as compensation any new flats that he did not want, the lower courts had essentially forced him to accept this unlawful compensation.
34. On 8 July 2011 the Supreme Court upheld the Baku Court of Appeal’s judgment of 18 March 2011, reiterating that judgment’s reasoning. The Supreme Court’s decision did not address any of the applicant’s arguments in detail.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The 1995 Constitution
35. Article 13 § I of the Constitution provides as follows:
“Property in the Republic of Azerbaijan is inviolable and is protected by the State”.
36. Article 29 § IV of the Constitution provides as follows:
“No one shall be deprived of his or her property without a court decision. Total confiscation of property is not permitted. Alienation of the property for State needs may be permitted only subject to prior and fair compensation corresponding to its value”.
B. The 1982 Housing Code, in force until 1 October 2009
37. Article 4 defined the “housing fund” as all residential premises located in residential and other buildings situated in the Azerbaijan SSR. The “State housing fund” included such residential premises owned by the State. The “public housing fund” included the residential premises owned by collective farms and other cooperative organisations, and those organisations’ unions, trade unions and other public associations. Residential premises owned by construction cooperatives formed the “construction cooperative housing fund”. The amendment of 1 November 1994 introduced a new definition for the “private housing fund”, which included houses and flats in individuals’ private ownership.
38. Article 10 § 4 provided that no one could be evicted from his or her dwelling and that the right to use one’s dwelling could not be restricted, except on the grounds and under the procedure specified by law.
39. Articles 28 to 50 were part of Chapter 1 of Volume 3 of the Code, entitled “Allocation of living space in houses belonging to the State or public housing fund”, which provided the citizens of the Azerbaijan SSR who were in need of better accommodation with a right to be allocated new housing in residential buildings belonging to the State or public housing fund, and set out the relevant rules and procedures.
40. In particular, Article 40 § 1 set the “living space quota” in the Azerbaijan SSR at 12 sq. m per person.
41. Article 41 specified that dwellings allocated to citizens should be well-appointed in accordance with the standards of the settlement where they were located and should meet the relevant sanitation and technical requirements. Dwellings were to be allocated in accordance with the living space quota defined in Article 40 § 1, but with a surface area not less than that determined in accordance with the rules set by the Soviet of Ministers of the Azerbaijan SSR.
42. Articles 51 to 99 were part of Chapter 2 of Volume 3 of the Code, entitled “Utilisation of living space in houses belonging to the State or public housing fund”, which regulated, inter alia, the rights and obligations of tenants in using the allocated accommodation, as well as the procedures for the eviction of tenants and the provision of new accommodation in the event of eviction.
43. In particular, in accordance with Article 89, eviction from dwellings located in residential buildings belonging to the State or public housing fund was allowed only on the grounds specified by law and on the basis of a court procedure. Eviction under an administrative procedure, that is, by order of a prosecutor, was allowed only in respect of persons who had settled in their dwellings of their own accord in an unauthorised manner or persons living in houses at risk of collapsing. Evicted persons were to be provided with another dwelling.
44. Article 90 § 1 provided that citizens could be evicted from buildings belonging to the State or public housing fund on condition that they were provided with another well-appointed dwelling if, inter alia, the house where their dwelling was located was to be destroyed.
45. In accordance with Article 91, where a residential building was to be destroyed in connection with the alienation of the land for State or public needs or where the building (or a dwelling in that building) was to be transformed into non-residential premises, citizens evicted from that residential building (or dwelling) were to be given another well-appointed dwelling by the State-owned or cooperative organisation or other public organisation to which the plot of land was allocated or to which the residential building (or dwelling) was transferred. In cases where a residential building was destroyed for other purposes, a new well-appointed dwelling could be provided by the executive committee of the local Soviet of people’s deputies.
46. Article 94 § 1 provided that the new dwelling allocated in connection with the eviction from the previous dwelling should meet the requirements of Articles 41 and 42 of the Housing Code and could not be smaller than the previous dwelling.
47. Article 96 § 1 provided that the new dwelling allocated in connection with the eviction should meet the relevant sanitation and technical requirements and should be located in the same settlement as the previous dwelling.
48. In accordance with Article 135, where a house owned by a citizen was destroyed owing to the alienation of the plot of land for State or public needs, that citizen and his family members, as well as other persons living permanently in the house, were to be provided with a dwelling in a residential building belonging to the State or public housing fund or, if the owner so wished, be paid the value of the destroyed house and any outbuildings.
C. The 2009 Housing Code, in force from 1 October 2009, and the relevant presidential decree on its implementation
49. Article 31 of the 2009 Housing Code provided that, in connection with the expropriation of land for State needs, privately owned accommodation located on that land could be alienated from the owner by way of State purchase. The purchase procedure was conducted by the relevant executive authority (the Cabinet of Ministers) and required, inter alia, a Cabinet of Ministers’ decision on the purchase (taken concomitantly with the decision on expropriation of the land), registration of that decision in the State property register, notification of the decision to the owner after the registration and at least one year in advance of the planned purchase, and a mutual agreement with the owner concerning the purchase price, the payment of various relocation-related expenses, the payment schedule and other terms. For a period of one year after notification of the decision to the owner, the property could not be purchased without the owner’s consent. In the event that the owner withheld his consent beyond that period or disagreed with the price or other terms of the purchase, the Cabinet of Ministers could apply to a court requesting the resolution of the dispute or a compulsory purchase order, but not later than two years from the date of notification of the decision on the purchase to the owner.
50. Presidential Decree No. 153 of 27 August 2009 dealing with various aspects of implementation of the 2009 Housing Code, as in force at the material time, designated the Cabinet of Ministers as “the relevant executive authority” referred to in Article 31 of the 2009 Housing Code.
51. After the events in the present case, in connection with the adoption of the Law on the Expropriation of Land for State Needs of 20 April 2010, the text of Article 31 was amended, with the original text in its entirety being deleted and a general reference to the Law on the Expropriation of Land for State Needs being inserted. That Law regulates in greater detail the procedure for the purchase by the State of private property.
D. The 2000 Civil Code and the relevant presidential decree on its implementation
52. Article 157.9 of the Civil Code, as applicable before 30 June 2004, provided:
“Private property may be alienated by the State if required for State needs or public needs only in the cases permitted by law and subject to prior payment of compensation in an amount corresponding to its market value”.
The text of Article 157.9 was subsequently amended by Law No. 677-IIQD of 1 June 2004, which entered into force on 30 June 2004, to read as follows:
“Private property may be alienated by the State if required for State needs or public needs only in the cases permitted by law for the purposes of building roads or other communication lines, delimiting the State border strip or constructing defence facilities, by a decision of the relevant State authority [the Cabinet of Ministers], and subject to prior payment of compensation in an amount corresponding to its market value”.
Pursuant to Article VIII of Law No. 315-IIIQD of 17 April 2007, which entered into force on 31 August 2007, the words “or public needs” were deleted from the text of Article 157.9 of the Civil Code.
After the events in the present case, pursuant to Law No. 332-IVQD of 20 April 2012, which entered into force on 6 June 2012, the text was further amended to read as follows:
“Private property may be alienated by the State if required for State needs only in the cases provided for by the Law of the Republic of Azerbaijan on the Expropriation of Land for State Needs, for the purposes of building and installing roads or other communication lines, ensuring the reliable protection of the State border within the border strip, constructing defence and security facilities, or constructing mining-industry facilities of State importance.”
53. Presidential Decree No. 386 of 25 August 2000 dealing with various aspects of implementation of the 2000 Civil Code, as amended by Presidential Decree No. 78 of 17 June 2004 and as in force at the material time, designated the Cabinet of Ministers as “the relevant State authority” referred to in Article 157.9 of the Civil Code.
54. Article 203.3 of the Civil Code provides as follows:
“203.3. Forcible deprivation of property is not permitted, except for the following measures taken on the grounds provided for by law:
203.3.1. forfeiture of property for liabilities;
203.3.2. alienation of property which, by law, cannot belong to a given person;
203.3.3. alienation of immovable property in connection with the purchase of the land;
203.3.4. purchase of badly maintained cultural assets;
203.3.5. requisition [alienation of property in connection with natural disasters, technological accidents, epidemics and other emergencies];
203.3.6. confiscation.
...
203.5. The alienation of property owned by individuals and legal persons for State or public needs shall be carried out in accordance with paragraph IV of Article 29 of the Constitution of the Republic of Azerbaijan.”
55. Article 207 of the Civil Code provided as follows:
“Where it is impossible to alienate a plot of land for State needs without terminating the ownership rights over buildings, structures or other immovable property located on the land, the State may purchase the property”.
56. Article 243.1 of the Civil Code provides that the owner of immovable property located on a plot of land owned by a third party has a right of use over the part of the plot on which his or her property is located.
E. The relevant domestic land-related legislation
57. In accordance with Article 9 of the 1996 Law on Land Reform, plots of land underneath private residential houses, as well as household plots and various types of gardens, which are being lawfully used by citizens (see also, in this connection, paragraph 56 above), are transferred from State ownership into the occupants’ private ownership free of charge under the procedure specified by law.
58. Clause 1 of the Regulations on the acquisition by citizens of land being lawfully used by them (yards attached to private residential houses, household plots, private, collective and cooperative gardens and gardens managed by the State horticultural businesses), approved by Presidential Degree No. 534 of 10 January 1997, provides that plots of land which are lawfully used or rented by citizens, such as plots of land underneath privately owned houses and the yards attached to such houses, are to be transferred into the citizens’ ownership free of charge, with the dimensions of the relevant plots corresponding to those being lawfully used or lawfully rented. Clauses 2 to 6 provide for the procedure for privatising such plots of land and registering ownership rights to be initiated by the individuals concerned. Clause 7 provides that ownership rights over the plot of land arise from the date of its registration in the State property registry in accordance with the procedure specified by law.
F. Decision of the Plenum of the Supreme Court of 14 February 2003 on the application by the courts of land-related legislation
59. In paragraph 6 of the decision, the Supreme Court Plenum states that, in accordance with the Land and Civil Codes, State registration of rights over plots of land in the State land cadastre and the State land register is mandatory. Where a plot of land is occupied without the relevant document conferring a property right, such occupation is considered as squatting (unauthorised occupation).
60. In paragraph 15, the Plenum instructs the courts that they have jurisdiction to decide on ownership rights over unauthorised constructions on privately owned plots of land. On the other hand, the “fate” of unauthorised constructions on squatted land is determined by the relevant executive authority or municipality to which the land in question belongs.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
61. The applicant complained that the interference with his property had been unlawful and unjustified. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
62. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The Government
63. The Government submitted that the applicant’s house had been “expropriated by the State authorities for public needs in accordance with the [BCEA] order of 14 May 2004”. This order was based on the General Development Plan of the City of Baku. The applicant’s house and other buildings located in the area in question “were like slums” and as such undermined the appearance of the city (the Government submitted some photographs of the applicant’s house showing it in a dilapidated condition). The applicant’s house was destroyed in September 2009.
64. The Government submitted that the interference had been in accordance with the substantive legal provisions applicable at the time of the interference, which had taken place on 15 May 2004, the date on which the BCEA order had been issued. On that date, the applicant did not have any right to the plot of land underneath the house. The house itself was not in the applicant’s private ownership at that time either. Therefore, the provisions of the 1982 Housing Code concerning dwellings belonging to the State and public housing funds, which were in force at the material time, were applicable in the present case. The Government argued that, on the other hand, “all the legal provisions referred to by the applicant [had come] into force after that date [15 May 2004] and therefore [could not] be applied in the present case”.
65. The Government maintained that, when “expropriating” the applicant’s house, the local authorities had acted in accordance with Articles 40, 41, 90, 91, 94 and 96 of the 1982 Housing Code and that all of the requirements of those provisions had been complied with. The Government further summarised the reasoning contained in the domestic courts’ judgments, noting that the applicant had been given fair compensation for his house in accordance with the provisions of the 1982 Housing Code. As for the land, the Government maintained that the applicant had failed to prove, either before the domestic courts or in his submissions before the Court, that he had any right to it.
66. Lastly, the Government argued that the interference had not imposed an excessive individual burden on the applicant and that a reasonable balance had been struck between the means employed and the aim pursued. The destruction of the house had been the result of works related to urban planning and its aim had been to improve the appearance of the city by “destroying the slums” which had once been constructed by residents themselves.
(b) The applicant
67. The applicant maintained that his house had been destroyed in December 2009, which should be considered as the date of the interference with his property rights for the purposes of determining the expropriation law applicable at the material time. The BCEA order of 14 May 2004 did not constitute the actual interference, as claimed by the Government, because the BCEA had no competence to expropriate private property and because he had not even been informed of this order until after he had lodged an action with the domestic courts in December 2009.
68. The applicant noted that the General Development Plan of the City of Baku, adopted by Resolution No. 182 of the Council of Ministers of the Azerbaijan SSR on 18 May 1987, was designed to cover the period up to 2005. However, this plan had not been followed for a number of years prior to that, as the authorities had undertaken a number of urban development projects which had not been envisaged in the plan. In any event, the existence of the General Development Plan could not justify the authorities’ acting in contravention of the Constitution and other laws on property.
69. The applicant disagreed with the Government’s allegation that his house had looked like a “slum”. He noted that the photographs of the house submitted by the Government had been taken after the demolition of the house had begun. Moreover, if the NDEA had believed that the house was in poor condition, it should have lodged an application with a court seeking an order requiring the owner to repair it within a reasonable time.
70. The applicant maintained that, in addition to the house itself, the plot of land belonging to the house also constituted his “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In this regard, he referred to Article 243.1 of the Civil Code, Article 9 of the Law on Land Reform and the Regulations on the acquisition by citizens of land being lawfully used by them (see paragraphs 56-58 above), which conferred on him the right to use the land and to acquire ownership of it free of charge.
71. As to the merits of the complaint, the applicant reiterated his arguments made before the domestic authorities (see paragraphs 29 and 32 above). In particular, he noted that the provisions of the old 1982 Housing Code relied on by the domestic courts and the Government were not applicable in his case. He reiterated that, despite his repeated appeals, the domestic courts and the Government remained silent on the subject of the applicable legislation, including the provisions of the Constitution, the Civil Code, the new Housing Code, the relevant presidential decrees and other legal acts.
72. The applicant submitted that, moreover, he had never been offered prior monetary compensation in accordance with the applicable legal rules concerning the expropriation of immovable property and land. Instead, he had been forced to move into a “barrack-like” block of flats built on the site of a relocated cemetery, which was neither lawful nor equivalent compensation for the private house with a yard where he had lived all his life. In this connection, he also disagreed with the “expert report” on the market value of his house and the new flats presented by the NDEA before the domestic court. According to him, that document had been written by an unqualified person and had not been subjected to any meaningful scrutiny.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether the house and the land in question constituted the applicant’s “possessions”
73. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is not limited to the ownership of material goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law. In the same way as material goods, certain other rights and interests constituting assets can also be regarded as “property rights” and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 1999 II). The concept of “possessions” is not limited to “existing possessions” but may also cover assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a reasonable and “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right. An “expectation” is “legitimate” if it is based on either a legislative provision or a legal act bearing on the property interest in question. In each case the issue that needs to be examined is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Saghinadze and Others v. Georgia, no. 18768/05, § 103, 27 May 2010, with further references).
74. It is undisputed that the applicant’s house had been in his private ownership since 8 October 2005 and had been in his unchallenged possession before that date. This fact was confirmed by the domestic courts and has never been contested at the domestic level.
75. As for the plot of land belonging to the house, with a total surface area of 257 sq. m, the Government claimed that the applicant had failed to prove that he had any right to the land, while the applicant claimed that it constituted part of his “possessions” together with the house.
76. The Court notes that under the Azerbaijani legal system title to the plot of land underneath a building is not automatically attached to title to the building itself. In other words, an owner of immovable property may not necessarily own the land on which the property is located. Thus, an individual can have a building in his ownership while the land remains in State or municipal ownership. However, in accordance with Article 243.1 of the Civil Code, domestic law automatically grants a right of use over a plot of land owned by another person to the owner of immovable property located on the land (see paragraph 56 above). Moreover, individuals who are “lawful users” of State-owned land underneath private residential houses, and of any yards and household plots attached to those houses, have the right to acquire private ownership of the land free of charge. Should they exercise this right, their right of ownership to the land arises from the date of its State registration (see paragraphs 57-58 above for the relevant provisions of the 1996 Law on Land Reform and the 1997 Regulations on the acquisition by citizens of land being lawfully used by them).
77. It is true that the applicant had never applied for registration of his property rights over the plot of land occupied by his house and the courtyard attached to it. Therefore, formally, he did not have ownership title to the land at the time of the demolition of the house. However, in accordance with the applicable legislation, the applicant was a “lawful user” of the land in question by virtue of his ownership of the house. Moreover, he had a legitimate expectation, deriving from the national law, of being able to acquire ownership of the land free of charge. Accordingly, as of 8 October 2005 at the latest, the applicant had a sufficient proprietary interest in the land for it to qualify as a “possession”.
78. Having regard to the above, the Court finds that both the house and the plot of land in question constituted the applicant’s “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(b) Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
79. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. These rules are not, however, unconnected: the second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions and are therefore to be construed in the light of the principle laid down in the first rule (see, for example, Kozac?o?lu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, § 48, 19 February 2009, and Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 93, 25 October 2012).
80. The Court notes that in the present case there was interference with the applicant’s possessions, as they were taken by the State and his house was demolished. This interference amounted to a “deprivation of possessions” within the meaning of the second sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
81. To be compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 an expropriation measure must fulfil three conditions: it must be carried out “subject to the conditions provided for by law”, which excludes any arbitrary action on the part of the national authorities, must be “in the public interest”, and must strike a fair balance between the owner’s rights and the interests of the community.
82. As to the first condition, the Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 requires that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph of that Article authorises the deprivation of possessions “subject to the conditions provided for by law”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is a notion inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Iatridis, cited above, § 58; Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 79, ECHR 2000 XII; and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 147, ECHR 2004 V).
83. The parties in the present case disagreed as to the time when the interference had taken place, a factor which, in their view, was important for determining the domestic law as it stood and was applicable at the material time. In particular, the Government claimed that the interference had taken place at the time of the issuance of the BCEA order of 14 May 2004, while the applicant claimed that it had taken place in December 2009, at the time of the destruction of the house. The Court will deal with this matter in due course as part of its analysis below.
84. The Court also notes that the parties disagreed as to the timing of the destruction of the house, with the Government arguing that it had taken place in September 2009. However, as the Government failed to submit any proof in support of this contention, the Court accepts the applicant’s repeated submissions, made consistently before the domestic courts and the Court, that the house was fully demolished in December 2009.
85. As to the Government’s arguments concerning the lawfulness of the measures taken by the authorities, the Court finds it difficult to accept their contention that the applicant’s house was lawfully “expropriated for public needs in accordance with the BCEA order of 14 May 2004”, for a number of reasons specified below.
86. At the outset, the Court finds that statement itself to be misleading. It notes that the BCEA order of 14 May 2004 had been issued over a year before the applicant acquired private ownership of the house. On 8 October 2005 the ownership certificate was issued to the applicant by the BCEA itself (more precisely, the Technical Inventory and Ownership Rights Registration Department of the BCEA; see paragraph 7 above). In such circumstances it is hard to see how, at the time of its issuance, the BCEA order of 14 May 2004 could properly be described as an act “expropriating” a property which was not yet in the applicant’s ownership.
87. In any event, in so far as this order was subsequently used to justify the destruction of the house, it is necessary to determine whether it could be considered as a lawful basis for interfering with the applicant’s private property after he acquired undisputed ownership rights over it on 8 October 2005.
88. Having regard to the text of the order of 14 May 2004, the Court notes that it was an instrument whose effect was limited to assigning land to a private developer under lease and authorising the developer to prepare a development project design. As noted above, this order was never formally notified to the applicant, as a resident of the area, prior to the actual destruction of the house. The order contained no provisions either relating to the alienation of private property or referring to any decisions taken with regard to the resettlement of residents of the area, whether they lived in privately owned or State-owned houses. In fact, the order explicitly stated that “it [formed] the basis solely for preparing the project design” and for the relevant documentation to be obtained by the project developer. In such circumstances, and in the absence of any subsequent formal decisions by the BCEA or any other State authority in respect of expropriation of the private houses affected, the Court finds that the BCEA order of 14 May 2004, by itself, cannot be equated to a legal instrument expressly authorising the alienation of any privately owned properties located in the area in question.
89. Moreover, the Court does not accept the Government’s contention that the “expropriation” procedure had been carried out lawfully in accordance with a number of provisions of the old 1982 Housing Code. In this connection, the Court agrees with the applicant that those provisions were either irrelevant or inapplicable. In particular, Article 10 § 4 of the 1982 Housing Code was a provision of a general character that did not prescribe any specific cases of permissible interference with property or housing rights. Article 40 § 1 of the same Code concerned a “living space quota” in State or publicly owned housing and was irrelevant in the context of privately owned housing. Articles 41, 89, 90 § 1, 91, 94 § 1 and 96 § 1 concerned the eviction and relocation of residents of houses belonging to the “State or public housing fund” and were therefore inapplicable to privately owned houses. Article 135 was the only provision of the old 1982 Housing Code mentioned by the domestic courts which concerned privately owned housing; however, it merely dealt in general terms with the requirement for compensation to be paid to the owners in the event of expropriation (it also appears that this provision was later superseded by other, lex specialis, legislation on compensation for expropriation). Neither Article 135 nor any of the other above-mentioned provisions laid down a procedure for the expropriation of private property or designated any State authority as being competent to conduct such a procedure. None of the above provisions vested competence in local executive authorities such as the BCEA or NDEA to expropriate private property or to evict private owners from their homes without a court decision.
90. It follows that, even if it could be argued that the provisions of the 1982 Housing Code which were cited could have provided some basis for the BCEA’s and the NDEA’s actions at the time when the applicant was not yet the owner of the property, this was no longer the case after he acquired undisputed ownership rights over the property in question on 8 October 2005.
91. As to paragraphs 6 and 15 of the decision of the Plenum of the Supreme Court of 14 February 2003 (see paragraphs 59-60 above), also cited by the domestic courts, they appear likewise to be inapplicable to the applicant’s situation, as they concern unauthorised constructions on privately owned or squatted land and do not concern buildings which are in private ownership as certified by a valid ownership certificate and registered as such in the State register of immovable property.
92. Furthermore, despite the Court’s specific request in this regard, both the Government and the domestic courts failed to specify any domestic legal provision expressly designating the BCEA as the authority or one of the authorities having the power to take decisions on the expropriation of privately owned property. The Court has also been unable to identify any such domestic legislation of its own accord. It follows that the BCEA did not have competence to expropriate private property.
93. Accordingly, the BCEA order of 14 May 2004 could not be considered as a lawful basis for expropriating the applicant’s property.
94. Having regard to the above, the Court finds that it has not been demonstrated that, prior to the destruction of the applicant’s house in December 2009, there existed any lawful expropriation order taken by a State authority competent to do so. In such circumstances, the actual interference with the applicant’s possessions took place in December 2009 in the form of de facto deprivation of possessions.
95. The Court has had regard to the applicant’s submission that, at the time of the interference, the procedure for the expropriation of private property was regulated by the relevant provisions of the Constitution, the Civil Code and the 2009 Housing Code, as well as the relevant presidential decrees on implementation of those provisions (see paragraphs 35-36 and 49-56 above). With the exception of the 2009 Housing Code, which entered into force on 1 October 2009, all those legal acts had been in force for years before the interference took place. The Court agrees with the applicant that those legal acts appeared to constitute the applicable law pursuant to which the expropriation of the applicant’s property should have been carried out.
96. The Court notes in particular that those legal acts, inter alia, designated the Cabinet of Ministers as the authority competent to decide on the expropriation and State purchase of private property, specified the grounds and conditions on the basis of which expropriation was allowed, specified the procedure for initiating the expropriation and State purchase, required prior payment of monetary compensation for the market value of the expropriated or purchased property and the relocation expenses incurred, specified the procedure for notification of the owner and the procedure for registration and transfer of the title to the property, and so on.
97. However, in the present case the deprivation of the applicant’s property was not carried out in compliance with any of the above conditions specified by law. The Court also notes that the domestic courts refrained from examining the applicability of those legal acts despite the applicant’s repeated requests in that regard. While the domestic courts’ judgments concentrated almost exclusively on the inapplicable legal provisions of the old 1982 Housing Code concerning the relocation of persons residing in State-owned housing, they contained no actual assessment of the lawfulness of the deprivation of private property carried out by the BCEA and the NDEA in the present case, despite the fact that this matter constituted the crux of the civil action initiated by the applicant.
98. Lastly, the Court notes that, in the absence of a formal expropriation decision taken in compliance with the conditions provided for by the applicable domestic law, the applicant was offered occupancy vouchers for two flats in a recently constructed building as compensation for the destroyed house. This compensation was initially offered informally by the NDEA in the absence of a lawful expropriation decision, and later sanctioned by the domestic courts with reference to the above-mentioned provisions of the 1982 Housing Code. Whereas it may be open to discussion whether an occupancy voucher for a State-owned flat can be considered as adequate or equivalent compensation for the loss of a privately owned house with a plot of land, the Court finds that, since the provisions of the 1982 Housing Code examined above were not applicable in the context of the present case, any compensation offered on the basis of those legal provisions could not be lawful either.
99. For the above reasons, the Court concludes that the interference in the present case was not carried out in compliance with “conditions provided for by law”. The applicant was deprived of his possessions arbitrarily and forced to accept unlawful compensation that was determined in an arbitrary manner. This conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see, for example, Iatridis, cited above, § 62).
100. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLES 6, 8 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION
101. The applicant complained under Article 6 of the Convention that the domestic courts had delivered unreasoned judgments by failing to verify the compliance of the interference with the applicable domestic legislation, relying instead on inapplicable and irrelevant legal acts, and essentially attempting to legitimise the executive authorities’ unlawful actions. Article 6 § 1 provides as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
The applicant further complained that the unlawful demolition of his house amounted to a violation of his right to respect for his home under Article 8 of the Convention, which provides as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Lastly, the applicant complained under Article 13 of the Convention, in conjunction with the above complaints and the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, that he had not been afforded a remedy providing effective protection against the violations of his rights. Article 13 provides as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
102. The Government contested the applicant’s arguments, mainly relying on the substance of their observations made in respect of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, and maintained that the interference with the applicant’s right to respect for his home had been lawful and necessary in a democratic society and had pursued the aim of “the improvement of the appearance of the city” which, in the Government’s view, was in the interests of the economic well-being of the country. They argued that the domestic civil proceedings had been fair and that they had constituted an effective domestic remedy.
103. The applicant reiterated his complaints, also referring mostly to his submissions made in respect of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
104. The Court notes that these complaints are linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
105. However, having regard to the finding relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraphs 99-100 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to also examine whether, in this case, there have been violations of Articles 6, 8 and 13 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Iatridis, cited above, § 69, and Minasyan and Semerjyan v. Armenia, no. 27651/05, § 82, 23 June 2009).
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
106. The applicant complained that the unlawful taking and demolition of his house, accompanied by pressure and threats by government officials, had amounted to ill-treatment under Article 3 of the Convention. He further complained that his eviction from his house and forcible removal to the new flat given to him against his will had been in breach of his right to freedom of movement under Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 and had also amounted to a violation of Article 18 of the Convention.
107. In the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court finds that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
108. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
109. The applicant claimed a total of 550,000 new Azerbaijani manats (AZN) in respect of pecuniary damage, comprising:
(a) AZN 541,500 as compensation for the house and the plot of land, comprising: (i) AZN 170,000 for the house; (ii) a sum in the range between AZN 230,000 and AZN 255,000 for the plot of land, and (iii) an unspecified amount to be added to the above amounts as adjustment for inflation during the years 2010 to 2013; and
(b) AZN 8,500 for the medical expenses he had incurred in connection with treatment for a heart condition which he claimed had been aggravated by the fact that for several years he had had to live in a block of flats, instead of a house with a courtyard.
110. He also claimed AZN 20,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage and AZN 7,150 in respect of costs and expenses.
111. The Government contested the claims in respect of the value of the house and the plot of land, arguing that they were exaggerated and based on an invalid expert opinion. The Government argued that the value of the house and the plot of land was much lower, specifically AZN 43,146 for the house and either AZN 55,000 or AZN 41,500 for the plot of land depending on whether it was in private ownership or in lawful possession under the right of use. The Government claimed that, in any event, the applicant could not claim any damages in respect of the plot of land, because it was State-owned and the applicant had no title to it. The Government further argued that the alleged damage incurred in connection with medical treatment had no causal link to the alleged violations. Lastly, the Government also contested the claims in respect of non-pecuniary damage and costs and expenses and argued that they were excessive and unsubstantiated.
112. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. It is therefore necessary to reserve the matter, due regard being had to the possibility of an agreement between the respondent State and the applicant (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaints under Articles 6, 8 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaints under Articles 6, 8 and 13 of the Convention;

4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision, and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 January 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Privazione di proprietà Proprietà) soddisfazione Equa riservata (Articolo 41 - soddisfazione Equa)



PRIMA SEZIONE







CAUSA AKHVERDIYEV C. AZERBAIJAN

(Richiesta n. 76254/11)









SENTENZA
( meriti)


STRASBOURG

29 gennaio 2015





Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Akhverdiyev c. Azerbaijan,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Isabelle Berro, Presidente
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse, giudici
e Søren Nielsen, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 6 gennaio 2015,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 76254/11) contro la Repubblica di Azerbaijan depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino di Azerbaijani, OMISSIS (?olu di li di dalt ?Axverdiyev-“il richiedente”), 1 dicembre 2011.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Azerbaijan. Il Governo di Azerbaijani (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. Ç. Asgarov.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che lui era stato privato di alloggio suo in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ed Articolo 8 della Convenzione e che i procedimenti civili e nazionali erano stati condotti in violazione dei requisiti di Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione.
4. 14 gennaio 2013 il Governo fu dato avviso della richiesta.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1972 e vive in Baku.
6. Fin dalla sua nascita il richiedente aveva vissuto in un alloggio nell'accordo di Khutor di Baku che prima appartenne ai suoi genitori. L'area di superficie totale dell'alloggio era 84.6 sq. metro, incluso un'area abitabile di 58.8 sq. metro. Secondo il “passaporto tecnico” per l'alloggio emesso in 26 maggio 2004 con l'Inventario Tecnico e Proprietà Diritti Registrazione Settore della Città di Baku Autorità Esecutiva (“il BCEA”), fu localizzato su un'area di terra che misura 257 sq. metro di che 93.4 sq. metro fu occupato con l'alloggio e 163.6 sq. metro col cortile. Il richiedente visse nell'alloggio con sua moglie e due piccoli figli e la sua anziana madre.
7. La proprietà originale dell'alloggio è poco chiara. 8 ottobre 2005 il richiedente acquisì proprietà privata dell'alloggio e fu emesso con un certificato di proprietà con l'Inventario Tecnico e Proprietà Diritti Registrazione Settore del BCEA che conferma che lui era il proprietario privato. L'area di terra sotto l'alloggio non fu registrato come essendo nella proprietà formale del richiedente.
Atti di A. emesso con le autorità urbane in riguardo dell'area dove l'alloggio del richiedente fu localizzato
8. In 14 maggio 2004 il Capo del BCEA emise un ordine che assegna i vari luoghi in Baku per sviluppo con un numero di promotori privati. L'ordine lesse, nella parte attinente, siccome segue:
“Ordine su permesso per disegni di progetto per un complesso sportivo, un cinema, palazzi degli uffici, edifici residenziali, un centro acquisti, un posteggio sotterraneo
cottage-dattilografi alloggi, un dolphinarium ed un planetario su aree privatizzate di terra
Per il fine di coordinare col Piano dello Sviluppo del Generale [della Città] e completando gli installazioni [l'obyektlrin ?Ba ?tamamlanmas di ?uyunladrlaraq di Plana?] nel nostro capitale che è in un stato di rovina che deve ad essendo rimasto parzialmente costruito per un periodo lungo di tempo e quale la bellezza e sviluppo della città minano, le aree seguenti di terra dovrebbero essere assegnate [l'ayrlsn] alle società seguenti e ditte:
...
6. Prendendo in considerazione la richiesta rese con Kaspi Nur LLC in 13 maggio 2004, la terra che comprende nelle vicinanze N. 1070, 1072 1073 e 1076 su Strada di Shushinski nel Distretto di Narimanov saranno assegnati alla società summenzionata sulla base di un contratto d'affitto, per il fine di disegnando e costruire alloggi di cottage-tipo.
...
9. Lo sviluppatore è istruito [fare il seguente:]
9.1. Ricevere l'area di terra in natura ed eseguire la salute necessaria e controlli di sicurezza.
9.2. Attenersi con le istruzioni del Settore Principale per Architettura e Pianificazione Urbana [“il CDAUP”] riguardo al tempismo e procedura del disegno di progetto e con le altre condizioni posate in giù nel certificato di costruzione [inaat ?pasportu].
9.3. Prima del completamento del disegno di progetto, coordinare col [CDAUP] gli schizzi per la pianificazione architettonica della terra ed edifici. Dopo avere completato il disegno di progetto, presentare lavorando piano al pieno il [CDAUP].
9.4. Coordinare [il dislocamento di linee di utilità] con [il CDAUP] e le autorità attinenti.
9.5. Questo ordine, insieme col certificato di costruzione forma solamente la base per preparare il disegno di progetto.
10. Nella conformità con Articoli 66, 67 e 68 del Terra Codice, lo sviluppatore otterrà [dalle autorità attinenti] il certificato e gli altri documenti che confermano i suoi diritti sull'area di terra...
11. Il lavoro di costruzione comincerà dopo la registrazione di tutta la documentazione di disegno di progetto con la Baku Stato Architettura e Costruzione Surveillance Inspectorate.
...
14. Se lo sviluppatore non dovesse riuscire ad attenersi coi requisiti delle disposizioni sopra, questo ordine può essere abrogato in conformità con la legge.”
9. L'alloggio del richiedente fu localizzato in uno nele vicinanze menzionato in punto 6 dell'ordine. Secondo il richiedente, lui non fu informato mai di questo ordine con le autorità esecutive e divenne consapevole della sua esistenza durante gli atti per la prima volta (vedere sezione C sotto).
10. Con una lettera di 17 dicembre 2008 il Distretto di Narimanov Autorità Esecutiva (“il NDEA”), un corpo subordinato del BCEA, informato il BCEA che il dislocamento degli abitanti del “vecchio, ostello-tipo ed alloggi più accosciati” localizzò nell'area specificata nell'ordine di BCEA di 14 maggio 2004 “rimase un problema.” Il NDEA propose inoltre il seguente:
“Per il fine di dislocamento delle famiglie che risiedono nell'area summenzionata, noi lo consideriamo appropriato assegnare l'area vuota di terra nelle vicinanze n. 1969 su Di mattina Strada di Cuma... per la costruzione di due e gli alloggi residenziali di tre- piani... e La richiede per esprimere la Sua opinione sul progetto di costruzione presentò con Azyevro LAU LLC come un sviluppatore.”
11. Non ci sono informazioni nell'archivio di causa come a se il BCEA rispose formalmente alla lettera del NDEA di 17 dicembre 2008.
12. 24 aprile 2009 il Capo del NDEA emise autorizzazione dell'ordine la costruzione con Azyevro LAU LLC di alloggi nuovi per i residenti trasferiti. L'ordine lesse siccome segue:
“Per il fine di dislocamento dei residenti di alloggi localizzato nelle vicinanze N. 1070, 1072 1073 e 1076 su Can Strada di Shushinski nel collegamento con la costruzione di un'importante facilità Statale nell'area summenzionata, il disegno di progetto per la costruzione di alloggi residenziali nelle vicinanze n. 1969 su Di mattina Strada di Cuma, presentato da Azyevro LAU LLC,... fu approvato con [il CDAUP] in lettera n. 18/03-8/2042 23 aprile 2009 datato.
Prendendo il sopra nell'esame e per il fine del completamento della documentazione attinente, io decido col presente,:
1. Autorizzare Azyevro LAU LLC ad eseguire il progetto di sviluppo (costruzione di alloggi residenziali) nelle vicinanze n. 1969 su Di mattina Strada di Cuma, nella conformità col disegno di progetto concordato con [il CDAUP] e col fine di assicurare il dislocamento dei residenti di nelle vicinanze N. 1070, 1072 1073 e 1076 su Can Strada di Shushinski.
2. Istruire la gestione di Azyevro LAU LLC ad ottenere, in conformità con la legislazione la documentazione relativo all'assegnazione dell'area di terra e la costruzione.
3. Istruire il Mantenimento dell'Alloggio del Distretto ed Unione di Utilità a soprintendere ad ottemperanza della costruzione col disegno di progetto ed il dislocamento dei residenti in conformità coi requisiti della legge.
4. Istruire l'Ufficio della Polizia del Distretto ad assicurare la protezione di ordine pubblico durante l'elaborazione di dislocamento.
5. Istruire la Divisione Legale di [il NDEA] emettere i residenti con ricevute di occupazione per i loro appartamenti nuovi.
6. Richiedere l'Ufficio di Baku del Servizio di Cancelleria Statale per Patrimonio immobiliare che riporta al Gabinetto di Ministri per assegnare gli specifici indirizzi postali ai residenti ' appartamenti nuovi ed offrirli con passaporti tecnici [per gli appartamenti nuovi] e con [l'attinente] estratti dal Registro Statale. ...”
La Distruzione di B. dell'alloggio del richiedente
13. Nel secondo la metà di 2009 impiegati del NDEA si avvicinato con orale richiede di abbandonare il suo alloggio secondo il richiedente, e, in risarcimento, accettare una ricevuta di occupazione (yaay ?orderi) per un appartamento di cinque- stanze nuovo che misura 123 sq. metro sotto costruzione su Di mattina Strada di Cuma, un'area prima occupata con un cimitero trasferito. Quando il richiedente chiese ad essere mostrato la base legale per le richieste, lui si disse che era un “istruzione Statale.”
14. Il richiedente rifiutò, mentre affermando che lui non aveva nessuna intenzione di abbandonare il suo alloggio. Lui notò che in qualsiasi l'evento, per questo per essere possibile lui richiederebbe sotto il risarcimento valutario e precedente uguale al valore di mercato dell'alloggio e l'area di terra l'alloggio.
15. Secondo il richiedente, i suoi vicini di casa affrontarono la stessa situazione e molti di loro diedero in alla pressione del NDEA. Loro si mossero fuori ed accettarono le ricevute di occupazione proposte a loro. Presto le autorità cominciarono a demolire i loro alloggi. Con lavori di demolizione di grande potenza nel neighbourhood (incluso la distruzione di dei muri e recinti adiacente o immediatamente seguente all'alloggio del richiedente), accompagnò più con tagli di potere e l'accumulazione di detriti circa il suo alloggio, il richiedente e la sua famiglia lo trovi possibile per sospendere in sé e doveva lasciare l'alloggio ad ottobre 2009. Comunque, la madre del richiedente rimase nell'alloggio.
16. 8 dicembre 2009 il NDEA sfrattò sua madre secondo il richiedente, e cominciò a demolire il suo alloggio. L'alloggio fu demolito su un numero non specificato di giorni, insieme agli oggetti di proprietà del richiedente nel quale è rimasto.
C. I procedimenti civili
1. L'azione civile del richiedente
17. 8 dicembre 2009 il richiedente depositò un'azione di corte con la Corte distrettuale di Narimanov contro il NDEA. Il richiedente chiese alla corte di fermare l'imputato dal violare il suo diritto per godere la sua proprietà privata, ordinare la restituzione della proprietà alla sua condizione precedente o, se quel era più possibile, ordinare che l'imputato pagarlo 500,000 Azerbaijani manats (AZN) per danno patrimoniale, AZN 200,000 per danno non-patrimoniale, ed AZN 500 quotidiano per danni in riguardo dell'opportunità perduta da dicembre 2009 sino alla data di esecuzione della sentenza. Successivamente, il BCEA, al Ministero di Finanza ed Azyevro LAU LLC si fu unito insieme alla causa come co-imputati col NDEA.
18. Nella sua replica al processo del richiedente, il NDEA rispose, che il dislocamento dei residenti dal neighbourhood del richiedente era condotto in collegamento con “l'importante progetto Statale” approvò con l'ordine di BCEA di 14 maggio 2004. Come una base legale per che ordine il NDEA indicò l'Alloggio Codice vecchio del 1982 che era stato in effetto fino a 1 ottobre 2009 (su che data fu sostituito con l'Alloggio Codice nuovo).
19. 2 marzo 2010 il NDEA richiese la corte per ordinare una valutazione competente del valore di mercato dell'alloggio del richiedente (quale già era stato demolito) e l'appartamento di cinque- stanze propose al richiedente in risarcimento. Il richiedente oppose questa richiesta, mentre notando, inter alia, che la determinazione del valore di mercato dell'appartamento nuovo era irrilevante poiché lui aveva rifiutato di accettarlo come risarcimento legale e fin dalla materia della sua rivendicazione l'illegalità dell'interferenza era con la sua proprietà privata.
20. 2 marzo 2010 la Corte distrettuale di Narimanov emise un ordine per una valutazione competente. Il richiedente impugnò questo ordine, mentre appellandosi su vari motivi. Dopo una serie di ricorsi, l'ordine fu annullato, facendo seguito ad una decisione di Corte Suprema di 22 giugno 2010 ed una decisione di Corte d'appello di Baku di 28 luglio 2010, sulla base che la corte di prima- istanza aveva designato una categoria incorretta di esperto per la valutazione richiese. Nessuno ulteriori valutazioni competenti furono ordinate.
2. La sentenza di primo-istanza sui meriti
21. Con una sentenza di 4 novembre 2010 la Corte distrettuale di Narimanov respinse le rivendicazioni del richiedente.
22. Nella parte di analisi legale della sentenza la corte prima confermò che l'alloggio era stato nella proprietà privata del richiedente. Comunque, notò che il richiedente non aveva formalizzato i suoi diritti di proprietà sull'area di terra e perciò non poteva rendere qualsiasi rivendicazioni in riguardo della terra.
23. La corte prese anche noti dell'ordine di BCEA di 14 maggio 2004. Notò inoltre che fra il 2007 ed il 2009 il BCEA e NDEA avevano corrisposto riguardando l'un con l'altro “i problemi” nel trasferire i residenti di “alloggi vecchio tipo vecchio” nelle vicinanze del richiedente e che 24 aprile 2009 il NDEA aveva deciso di contrarre una società privata (Azyevro LAU) prima costruire edifici residenziali e nuovi per quelli residenti in un'area vacante occupò con un cimitero trasferito. La corte notò che il richiedente era stato “determinato” un appartamento di cinque-stanze in uno di questi edifici nuovi, sotto una ricevuta di occupazione emessa nel suo nome 29 settembre 2009 facendo seguito all'ordine di NDEA di 24 aprile 2009.
24. La corte citò Articolo 157.9 del Codice civile riguardo all'espropriazione di proprietà privata per le necessità di Stato, benché né tentasse di stabilire l'applicabilità di che approvvigiona alla situazione del richiedente né determinare se il richiedente era stato privato di alloggio suo in ottemperanza coi suoi requisiti.
25. La corte si appellò inoltre su varie disposizioni dell'Alloggio Codice vecchio del 1982 che era stato in effetto sino a 1 ottobre 2009. La corte notò che l'Alloggio Codice del 1982 era ancora in vigore al tempo quando il richiedente era stato emesso con una ricevuta di occupazione 29 settembre 2009. In particolare, la corte citata Articoli 10 § 4, 40 § 1, 41 89, 90 § 1 91, 94 § 1 96 § 1 e 135 dell'Alloggio del 1982 Programmano, riguardo agli articoli sulla disposizione a cittadini di alloggio in edifici residenziali che appartengono a “il finanziamento di alloggio Statale” o “il finanziamento di alloggio pubblico” (vedere divide in paragrafi 37-48 sotto).
26. La corte fondò che i BCEA ordinano di 14 maggio 2004 era “in vigore” e che l'emissione di una ricevuta di occupazione nel nome del richiedente per un appartamento di cinque-stanze in un edificio di recente costruito costituito “il risarcimento in natura” per il suo alloggio all'interno del significato di Articoli 41 e 135 dell'Alloggio Codice del 1982. Per queste ragioni, la corte trovata, che la rivendicazione del richiedente che gli imputati le azioni di ' erano state illegali fu mal-fondato.
27. Inoltre, benché l'ordine di 2 marzo 2010 per una valutazione competente era stato annullato, il NDEA aveva procurato ciononostante ed aveva presentato alla corte un “rapporto competente” quale valutò il valore di mercato dell'appartamento nuovo proposto al richiedente come essendo più alto di quello del suo vecchio alloggio. La corte considerò che il risarcimento dato al richiedente era equo perché l'appartamento nuovo, con un'area di superficie totale di 123 sq. metro, era più grande dell'alloggio del richiedente ed aveva un valore di mercato più alto. Perciò, la corte considerò che la rivendicazione del richiedente in riguardo di danno patrimoniale, mentre chiedendo pagamento del valore di mercato di alloggio suo per contanti, era anche non comprovato.
28. La corte procedè poi respingere la rivendicazione del richiedente per danno non-patrimoniale, mentre trovando che il richiedente non era riuscito a dimostrare che lui aveva subito qualsiasi danno morale.
3. Ricorsi
29. Il richiedente fece appello contro la sentenza di 4 novembre 2010, mentre sollevando, inter alia, gli argomenti seguenti:
(un) benché la corte di prima -istanza avesse basato la sua decisione sul locale che l'alloggio del richiedente era stato espropriato per le necessità pubbliche, non rivolse il fatto che questo “l'espropriazione” non si era attenuto coi requisiti applicabili della Costituzione e le disposizioni attinenti del Codice civile (in particolare, Articoli 157.9 e 207 del Codice civile);
(b) la privazione de facto di proprietà era stata illegale come là non era stato nessun ordine di espropriazione emesso in conformità con la procedura specificata con legge; in particolare, le ragioni per l'espropriazione data con gli imputati negli atti non incorsero sotto qualsiasi dei motivi legali per espropriazione specificata con la legge e c'era stato nessun ordine di espropriazione emesso col Gabinetto di Ministri come richiesto con la legge; in simile circostanze, il richiedente era stato privato arbitrariamente della sua proprietà;
(c) la corte di prima -istanza si era appellata erroneamente su varie disposizioni dell'Alloggio Codice vecchio del 1982 che era stato più in vigore al tempo dell'interferenza (il che, secondo il richiedente era successo a dicembre 2009, al tempo della demolizione dell'alloggio); e
(d) la parte della sentenza riguardo al proscioglimento della sua rivendicazione all'area di terra era illegale, come il diritto di proprietà sulle aree di terra sotto possedute privatamente alloggi erano stati accordati ai loro rispettivi proprietari con le regolamentazioni approvate col Decreto Presidenziale di 10 gennaio 1997 (vedere paragrafo 58 sotto); perciò, lui era il proprietario legale dell'area di terra con virtù della sua proprietà dell'alloggio, anche se lui non aveva registrato formalmente i suoi diritti di proprietà su sé.
30. Nelle sue osservazioni alla Corte d'appello di Baku, il NDEA notò fra le altre cose che, perché il richiedente aveva rifiutato di accettare l'appartamento di cinque- stanze proposto a lui come risarcimento, il NDEA l'aveva emesso con ricevute di occupazione per due altri appartamenti (un appartamento di una -stanza ed un appartamento di quattro- stanze) nello stesso di recente costruì edificio. Per ragioni inspiegate, queste due ricevute di occupazione erano comunque, sia 29 settembre 2009 datato, lo stesso giorno come la data di emissione della ricevuta per l'appartamento di cinque -stanze che era stato proposto originalmente (vedere divide in paragrafi 13 e 23 sopra).
31. Nella sua sentenza di 18 marzo 2011 la Corte d'appello di Baku essenzialmente ripetè la Corte distrettuale di Narimanov sta ragionando e sostenne che la sentenza di corte di 4 novembre 2010, con l'eccezione della parte della sentenza che respinge la rivendicazione del richiedente in riguardo di danno patrimoniale. In che parte, la Corte d'appello di Baku annullò la sentenza ed ordinò che il richiedente sia dato i due appartamenti nuovi su Di mattina Strada di Cuma (l'appartamento di uno-stanza e l’appartamento di quattro-stanze, invece del solo appartamento di cinque-stanze offerto per primo) come “il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale”, ed istruì il NDEA a trattare con le formalità di trasferire gli appartamenti al richiedente.
32. Il richiedente depositò un ricorso su questioni di diritto, mentre reiterando i punti del suo ricorso precedente ed elaborando inoltre su loro. In particolare, lui dibattè siccome segue:
(un) benché la sua rivendicazione specificamente cercasse solamente di stabilire l'illegalità della distruzione di alloggio suo all'interno del significato della legge applicabile, così come garantire pagamento del risarcimento valutario per che azione illegale, le corti avevano ignorato la sua rivendicazione e non erano riuscite a valutare la legalità dell'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà; invece, loro l'avevano costretto ad accettare come “il risarcimento” gli appartamenti dati a lui con gli imputati (prima l'appartamento di cinque-stanze, poi l'una-stanza ed appartamenti di quattro-stanze) che lui aveva rifiutò ripetutamente e legalmente di accettare come risarcimento legale;
(b) l'interferenza con la sua proprietà aveva avuto luogo a dicembre 2009 e perciò l'Alloggio Codice del 1982 non era applicabile alla sua situazione; in qualsiasi l'evento, anche le disposizioni di che Codice citò con le corti era stato usato malamente, siccome quelle disposizioni concernerono alloggio in “l'alloggio Statale e pubblico procura” e non possedette privatamente alloggi ed appartamenti;
(il c) le corti avevano usato malamente anche la decisione del Corte Plenum Supremo di 14 febbraio 2003, perché che decisione riguardava le autorità esecutive e locali ' e municipi la competenza di ' in riguardo di edifici costruito su aree di terra occupate senza auorizzazione; nella causa del richiedente, la terra che comprende il recinto allegata all'alloggio era legalmente comunque, la sua per usare con virtù della sua proprietà dell'alloggio; inoltre, lui era stato concesso per acquisire proprietà privata della terra esente da spese in conformità con la legislazione applicabile;
(d) le corti l'affidamento di ' su un “rapporto competente” presentò col NDEA era inaccettabile, come che documento non era stato scritto con un esperto qualificato ma con una persona priva dei requisiti necessari senza credenziali attinenti, non fu basato su standard di valutazione di proprietà attinenti, cifre arbitrarie ed usate ed errori numerosi e contenuti;
(e) sotto la legislazione attinente, proprietà privatamente posseduta potrebbe essere alienata legalmente in favore dello Stato con modo di (i) l'espropriazione per le necessità di Stato, soggetto a pagamento precedente del risarcimento come richiesto con Articolo 29 § IV della Costituzione (vedere paragrafo 36 sotto) e nella conformità con Articolo 157.9 del Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 52 sotto); o (l'ii) acquisto della proprietà dello Stato, col beneplacito del proprietario nella conformità con Articoli 203.3.3 e 207 del Codice civile (vedere divide in paragrafi 54-55 sotto) ed Articolo 31 dell'Alloggio del 2009 Programma (vedere divide in paragrafi 49-50 sotto); o (l'iii) le altre specifiche situazioni previdero per in Articolo 203.3 del Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 54 sotto); comunque, nessuna delle procedure sopra si era stato attenuto con e le corti erano andate a vuoto a prevedere qualsiasi valutazione legale o che riguarda i fatti in quel riguardo a;
(f) l'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà era stata anche in violazione di, inter alia, Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
33. Il richiedente insistè che lui fosse stato privato illegalmente di alloggio suo e che, nonostante i suoi rifiuti coerenti e legali per accettare come risarcimento qualsiasi appartamenti nuovi che lui non ha voluto, le corti più basse essenzialmente l'avevano costretto ad accettare questo risarcimento illegale.
34. 8 luglio 2011 la Corte Suprema sostenne la sentenza della Corte d'appello di Baku di 18 marzo 2011, mentre reiterando che sentenza sta ragionando. La decisione della Corte Suprema non rivolse qualsiasi degli argomenti del richiedente in dettaglio.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. La Costituzione del 1995
35. Articolo 13 § io della Costituzione prevedo siccome segue:
“Proprietà nella Repubblica di Azerbaijan è inviolabile e è protetta dallo Stato.”
36. Articolo che 29 § IV della Costituzione offre siccome segue:
“Nessuno sarà privato di suo o la sua proprietà senza una decisione di corte. La confisca dei beni totale non è permessa. L'alienazione della proprietà per le necessità Statali può essere permessa solamente soggetto a risarcimento precedente ed equo che corrisponde al suo valore.”
B. L'Alloggio Codice del 1982, in vigore sino a 1 ottobre 2009
37. Articolo 4 definito il “finanziamento di alloggio” come tutti i locali residenziali localizzati in edifici residenziali ed altri situati nell'Azerbaijan SSR. Il “finanziamento di alloggio Statale” locali così residenziali ed inclusi posseduti con lo Stato. Il “finanziamento di alloggio pubblico” incluso i locali residenziali posseduti con fattorie di collettivo e le altre organizzazioni cooperative, e quelle organizzazioni le unioni di ', sindacati e le altre associazioni di pubblico. Locali residenziali posseduti con cooperative di costruzione formate il “la costruzione finanziamento di alloggio cooperativo.” L'emendamento di 1 novembre 1994 introdusse una definizione nuova per il “finanziamento di alloggio privato” che alloggi inclusi ed appartamenti in individui ' proprietà privata.
38. Articolo 10 § 4 purché che nessuno potrebbe essere sfrattato da suo o la sua abitazione e che il diritto per usare l'abitazione di uno non poteva essere restretto, eccetto per motivi e sotto la procedura specificata con legge.
39. Articoli 28 a 50 erano parte di Capitolo 1 di Volume 3 del Codice, accolse “l'Allocazione dello spazio di vita in alloggi che appartengono al finanziamento di alloggio Statale o pubblico” che purché i cittadini dell'Azerbaijan SSR che era in bisogno di migliore alloggio con un diritto per essere assegnato alloggio nuovo in edifici residenziali che appartengono al finanziamento di alloggio Statale o pubblico, ed espose fuori gli articoli attinenti e procedure.
40. In particolare, Articolo 40 § 1 set il “quota spaziale e vivente” nell'Azerbaijan SSR a 12 sq. metro per persona.
41. L’ Articolo 41 specificò che abitazioni assegnarono a cittadini dovrebbe essere ben equipaggiato in conformità con gli standard dell'accordo dove loro furono localizzati e dovrebbero soddisfare l'igiene attinente e requisiti tecnici. Abitazioni sarebbero assegnate in conformità con la quota spaziale e vivente definita in Articolo 40 § 1, ma con un'area di superficie non meno che che deciso nella conformità con gli articoli esposti col soviet di Ministri dell'Azerbaijan SSR.
42. Articoli 51 a 99 erano parte di Capitolo 2 di Volume 3 del Codice, ammise “l’utilizzo di spazio vivente in alloggi che appartengono al finanziamento di alloggio Statale o pubblico” che regolò inter alia, i diritti ed obblighi di inquilini nell'usare l'alloggio assegnato, così come le procedure per lo sfratto di inquilini e la disposizione di alloggio nuovo nell'evento di sfratto.
43. In particolare, nella conformità con Articolo 89, a sfratto da abitazioni localizzate in edifici residenziali che appartengono al finanziamento di alloggio Statale o pubblico fu concesso solamente, per motivi specificò con legge e sulla base di una procedura di corte. Sfratto sotto una procedura amministrativa che è con ordine di un accusatore, fu concesso solamente in riguardo di persone che avevano stabilito nelle loro abitazioni di loro proprio accordo in una maniera non autorizzata o persone che vivono in case a rischio di crollare. A persone sfrattate sarebbero fornite un'altra abitazione.
44. Articolo 90 § 1 purché che cittadini potrebbero essere sfrattati da edifici che appartengono al finanziamento di alloggio Statale o pubblico a condizione che loro furono offerti con un'altra abitazione ben equipaggiata se, inter l'alia, l'alloggio dove la loro abitazione fu localizzata sarebbe distrutto.
45. Nella conformità con Articolo 91, dove un edificio residenziale sarebbe distrutto in collegamento con l'alienazione della terra per Stato o le necessità pubbliche o dove l'edificio (o un'abitazione in che costruendo) sarebbe trasformato in locali non-residenziali, cittadini sfrattarono da che edificio residenziale (o indulgendo) sarebbe dato un'altra abitazione ben equipaggiata con lo Statale od organizzazione cooperativa o l'altra organizzazione pubblica alle quali fu assegnata l'area di terra o a che l'edificio residenziale (o indulgendo) fu trasferito. In cause dove un edificio residenziale fu distrutto per altri fini, un'abitazione ben equipaggiata e nuova potrebbe essere offerta col comitato esecutivo del soviet locale dei sostituti di persone.
46. Articolo 94 § 1 purché che l'abitazione nuova assegnò in collegamento con lo sfratto dall'abitazione precedente dovrebbe soddisfare i requisiti di Articoli 41 e 42 dell'Alloggio Programmano e non potevano essere più piccoli dell'abitazione precedente.
47. Articolo 96 § 1 purché che l'abitazione nuova assegnò in collegamento con lo sfratto dovrebbe soddisfare l'igiene attinente e requisiti tecnici e dovrebbe essere localizzata nello stesso accordo come l'abitazione precedente.
48. Nella conformità con Articolo 135, dove un alloggio possedette con un cittadino fu distrutto dovendo all'alienazione dell'area di terra per Stato o le necessità pubbliche che cittadino ed i suoi membri di famiglia, così come le altre persone che vivono permanentemente nell'alloggio, sarebbe previsto con un'abitazione in una cosa di edificio residenziale al finanziamento di alloggio Statale o pubblico o, se il proprietario così desiderò, sia pagato il valore dell'alloggio distrutto e qualsiasi le dépendance.
C. L'Alloggio Codice del 2009, in vigore da 1 ottobre 2009, ed il decreto presidenziale ed attinente sulla sua attuazione
49. Articolo 31 dell'Alloggio del 2009 Programma previde che, nel collegamento con l'espropriazione di terra per le necessità di Stato, alloggio privatamente posseduto localizzò su che terra potrebbe essere alienata dal proprietario con modo di acquisto Statale. La procedura di acquisto fu condotta con l'autorità esecutiva ed attinente (il Gabinetto di Ministri) e richiesto, inter l'alia, un Gabinetto di Ministri la decisione di ' sull'acquisto (preso concomitantemente con la decisione sull'espropriazione della terra), registrazione di che decisione nel registro di proprietà Statale, notificazione della decisione al proprietario dopo la registrazione ed almeno un anno in anticipo dell'acquisto progettato, ed un accordo reciproco col proprietario riguardo al prezzo di acquisto, il pagamento di varie spese dislocamento-relative, l'orario di pagamento e gli altri termini. Per un periodo di un anno dopo notificazione della decisione al proprietario, la proprietà non poteva essere acquistata senza il beneplacito del proprietario. Nell'evento che il proprietario trattenne il suo beneplacito oltre che periodo o non fu d'accordo col prezzo o gli altri termini dell'acquisto, il Gabinetto di Ministri potrebbe fare domanda ad una corte che richiede la decisione della controversia o un ordine di acquisto obbligatorio, ma non più tardi che due anni dalla data di notificazione della decisione sull'acquisto al proprietario.
50. Decreto presidenziale N.ro 153 del 2009 distribuzione di 27 agosto coi vari aspetti di attuazione dell'Alloggio Codice del 2009, come in vigore al tempo di materiale, designò il Gabinetto di Ministri come “l'autorità esecutiva ed attinente” assegnò ad in Articolo 31 dell'Alloggio Codice del 2009.
51. Dopo gli eventi nella causa presente, il testo di Articolo 31 fu corretto nel collegamento con l'adozione della Legge sull'Espropriazione di Terra per le Stato Necessità di 20 aprile 2010, col testo originale nella sua interezza che è cancellata ed un riferimento generale alla Legge sull'Espropriazione di Terra per essere di Necessità di Stato inserito. Che Legge regola nel più grande dettaglio la procedura per l'acquisto con lo Stato di proprietà privata.
D. Il Codice civile del 2000 ed il decreto presidenziale ed attinente sulla sua attuazione
52. Articolo 157.9 del Codice civile, come applicabile di fronte a 30 giugno 2004, purché:
“Proprietà privata può essere alienata con lo Stato se richiesto per le necessità di Stato o le necessità pubbliche solamente nelle cause permesse con legge e soggetto a pagamento precedente del risarcimento in un importo che corrisponde al suo valore di mercato.”
Il testo di Articolo 157.9 fu corretto successivamente con Legge N.ro 677-IIQD 1 giugno 2004 che entrò in vigore 30 giugno 2004 per leggere siccome segue:
“Proprietà privata può essere alienata con lo Stato se richiesto per le necessità di Stato o le necessità pubbliche solamente nelle cause permesse con legge per i fini di costruire strade o l'altra comunicazione fiancheggia, mentre delimitando la striscia di confine Statale o mezzi di difesa che costruisce, con una decisione dell'autorità Statale ed attinente [il Gabinetto di Ministri], e soggetto a pagamento precedente del risarcimento in un importo che corrisponde al suo valore di mercato.”
Facendo seguito ad Articolo VIII di Legge N.ro 315-IIIQD 17 aprile 2007 che entrò in vigore 31 agosto 2007 le parole “o le necessità pubbliche” fu cancellato dal testo di Articolo 157.9 del Codice civile.
Dopo gli eventi nella causa presente, facendo seguito a Legge N.ro 332-IVQD 20 aprile 2012 che entrò in vigore 6 giugno 2012 il testo fu corretto inoltre per leggere siccome segue:
“Proprietà privata può essere alienata con lo Stato se richiesto per le necessità di Stato solamente nelle cause previste per con la Legge della Repubblica di Azerbaijan sull'Espropriazione di Terra per le Stato Necessità, per i fini di costruendo ed installare strade o l'altra comunicazione fiancheggia, assicurando la protezione affidabile del confine Statale all'interno della striscia di confine, costruendo difesa e mezzi di sicurezza, o costruendo installazioni di estrazione-industria dell'importanza Statale.”
53. Decreto presidenziale N.ro 386 del 2000 distribuzione di 25 agosto coi vari aspetti di attuazione del Codice civile del 2000, corretto con Decreto Presidenziale N.ro 78 17 giugno 2004 e come in vigore al tempo di materiale, designò il Gabinetto di Ministri come “l'autorità Statale ed attinente” assegnò ad in Articolo 157.9 del Codice civile.
54. Articolo 203.3 del Codice civile prevede siccome segue:
“203.3. La forzata privazione di proprietà non è permessa, a parte le misure seguenti prese per motivi purché per con legge:
203.3.1. la confisca di proprietà per le responsabilità;
203.3.2. cessione dei beni che, con legge, non può appartenere ad una persona determinata;
203.3.3. l'alienazione di patrimonio immobiliare nel collegamento con l'acquisto della terra;
203.3.4. acquisto dei beni culturali e male sostenuti;
203.3.5. domanda [cessione dei beni nel collegamento con catastrofi naturale, incidenti tecnologici, epidemie e le altre emergenze];
203.3.6. sequestro.
...
203.5. La cessione dei beni posseduta con individui e soggetti giuridici per Stato o le necessità pubbliche sarà eseguita in conformità con paragrafo IV di Articolo 29 della Costituzione della Repubblica di Azerbaijan.”
55. Articolo 207 del Codice civile previde siccome segue:
“Dove è impossibile per alienare un'area di terra per le necessità di Stato senza terminare i diritti di proprietà su edifici, strutture o l'altro patrimonio immobiliare localizzò sulla terra, lo Stato può acquistare la proprietà.”
56. Articolo 243.1 del Codice civile prevede che il proprietario di patrimonio immobiliare localizzò su un'area di terra posseduta con una terza parte ha su un diritto di uso la parte dell'area su che suo o la sua proprietà è localizzata.
E. La legislazione terra-relativa nazionale ed attinente
57. Nella conformità con Articolo 9 della Legge del 1996 su Riforma agraria, aree di terra sotto alloggi residenziali e privati, così come famiglia disegna ed i vari tipi di giardini che sono stati usando legalmente con cittadini (vedere anche, in questo collegamento, divida in paragrafi 56 sopra), è trasferito da proprietà Statale negli occupanti ' proprietà privata esente da spese sotto la procedura specificata con legge.
58. Clausola 1 delle Regolamentazioni sull'acquisizione con cittadini di terra che è usata legalmente con loro (recinti allegarono ad alloggi residenziali e privati, famiglia disegna, privato, collettivo e giardini cooperativi e giardini maneggiati con le società orticole e Statali), approvò con Grado Presidenziale N.ro 534 10 gennaio 1997, prevede che aree di terra che è usata legalmente o affittò con cittadini, come aree di terra sotto possedette privatamente alloggi ed i recinti allegarono a simile alloggi, sarà trasferito nei cittadini la proprietà di ' esente da spese, con le dimensioni delle aree attinenti che corrispondono a quelli che sono usati affittate legalmente o legalmente. Clausole 2 a 6 prevedono per la procedura per privatising simile aree di terra e registrando diritti di proprietà per essere iniziato con gli individui riguardò. Clausola 7 prevede che diritti di proprietà sull'area di terra sorgono dalla data della sua registrazione nella cancelleria di proprietà Statale in conformità con la procedura specificata con legge.
Decisione di F. del Plenum della Corte Suprema di 14 febbraio 2003 sulla richiesta con le corti di legislazione terra-relativa
59. In paragrafo 6 della decisione, gli stati di Plenum di Corte Supremi che, nella conformità con la Terra e Codici civili, registrazione Statale di diritti su aree di terra nel catasto di terra Statale ed il registro di terra Statale è obbligatorio. Dove un'area di terra è occupata senza il documento attinente che conferisce un diritto di proprietà, simile occupazione è considerata come accosciarsi (occupazione non autorizzata).
60. In paragrafo 15, il Plenum istruisce le corti che loro hanno giurisdizione per decidere su diritti di proprietà su costruzioni non autorizzate su aree privatamente possedute di terra. D'altra parte il “il fato” di costruzioni non autorizzate su terra accosciata è determinato con l'autorità esecutiva ed attinente o municipio a che la terra in oggetto appartiene.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
61. Il richiedente si lamentò che l'interferenza con la sua proprietà era stata illegale ed ingiustificata. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
62. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il Governo
63. Il Governo presentò che l'alloggio del richiedente era stato “espropriò con le autorità Statali per le necessità pubbliche in conformità col [BCEA] ordine di 14 maggio 2004.” Questo ordine fu basato sul Piano dello Sviluppo del Generale della Città di Baku. L'alloggio del richiedente e gli altri edifici localizzarono nell'area in oggetto “era come bassifondi” e come simile minò la comparizione della città (il Governo presentò delle fotografie dell'alloggio del richiedente che lo mostra in una condizione cadente). L'alloggio del richiedente fu distrutto a settembre 2009.
64. Il Governo presentò che l'interferenza era stata in conformità con le disposizioni legali ed effettive applicabile al tempo dell'interferenza che aveva avuto luogo in 15 maggio 2004 la data sulla quale era stato emesso l'ordine di BCEA. Su che data, il richiedente non aveva qualsiasi diritto all'area di terra sotto l'alloggio. L'alloggio stesso non era nella proprietà privata del richiedente a che calcola uno. Perciò, le disposizioni dell'Alloggio del 1982 Programmano riguardo ad abitazioni che appartengono all'alloggio Statale e pubblico procura che era in vigore al tempo di materiale era applicabile nella causa presente. Il Governo dibatté che, d'altra parte “tutte le disposizioni legali assegnarono a col richiedente [era venuto] in vigore dopo che data [15 maggio 2004] e perciò [non poteva] sia fatto domanda nella causa presente.”
65. Il Governo sostenne che, quando “espropriando” l'alloggio del richiedente, le autorità locali avevano agito in conformità con Articoli 40, 41 90, 91 94 e 96 dell'Alloggio del 1982 Programmano e che tutti i requisiti di quelle disposizioni si erano stati attenuti con. Il Governo riassunse inoltre il ragionamento contenuto nel nazionale corteggia le sentenze di ', mentre notando che il richiedente era stato dato il risarcimento equo per alloggio suo in conformità con le disposizioni dell'Alloggio Codice del 1982. Come per la terra, il Governo sostenne, che il richiedente non era riuscito a provare, o di fronte alle corti nazionali o nelle sue osservazioni di fronte alla Corte che lui aveva qualsiasi diritto a sé.
66. Infine, il Governo dibatté che l'interferenza non aveva imposto un carico individuale ed eccessivo sul richiedente e che un equilibrio ragionevole era stato previsto fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo perseguì. La distruzione dell'alloggio era stata il risultato di lavori riferito a pianificazione urbana ed il suo scopo era stato migliorare la comparizione della città con “distruggendo i bassifondi” quale era stato costruito una volta con residenti loro.
(b) Il richiedente
67. Il richiedente sostenne che il suo alloggio era stato distrutto a dicembre 2009 che dovrebbe essere considerato come la data dell'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà per i fini di determinare la legge di espropriazione applicabile al tempo di materiale. I BCEA ordinano di 14 maggio 2004 non costituisca l'interferenza effettiva, siccome chiesto col Governo, perché il BCEA non aveva nessuna competenza per espropriare proprietà privata e perché lui non era stato informato anche di questo ordine sino a dopo che lui aveva depositato un'azione con le corti nazionali a dicembre 2009.
68. Il richiedente notò che il Piano dello Sviluppo del Generale della Città di Baku, adottò con Decisione N.ro 182 del Consiglio di Ministri dell'Azerbaijan SSR in 18 maggio 1987, fu progettato per dissimulare il periodo a 2005. Comunque, questo piano non era stato seguito per un numero di anni prima di che, siccome si erano impegnate le autorità un numero di sviluppo urbano proietta che non era stato previsto nel piano. In qualsiasi l'evento, l'esistenza del Piano dello Sviluppo del Generale non poteva giustificare le autorità ' che agisce in violazione della Costituzione e le altre leggi su proprietà.
69. Il richiedente non fu d'accordo con la dichiarazione del Governo che il suo alloggio era sembrato un “bassofondo.” Lui notò che le fotografie dell'alloggio presentarono col Governo era stato preso dopo la demolizione dell'alloggio aveva cominciato. Inoltre, se il NDEA avesse creduto che l'alloggio era in condizione povera, avrebbe dovuto depositare una richiesta con una corte che chiede un ordine che costringe il proprietario a ripararlo all'interno di un termine ragionevole.
70. Il richiedente sostenne che, oltre all'alloggio stesso, l'area di terra che appartiene anche all'alloggio costituì, suo “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. In questo riguardo a, lui si riferì ad Articolo 243.1 del Codice civile, Articolo 9 della Legge su Riforma agraria e le Regolamentazioni sull'acquisizione con cittadini di terra che è usata legalmente con loro (vedere divide in paragrafi 56-58 sopra) che conferì su lui il diritto per usare la terra ed acquisire proprietà di sé esente da spese.
71. Come ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo, il richiedente reiterò i suoi argomenti resi di fronte alle autorità nazionali (vedere divide in paragrafi 29 e 32 sopra). In particolare, lui notò che le disposizioni dell'Alloggio Codice vecchio del 1982 si appellarono su con le corti nazionali ed il Governo non era applicabile nella sua causa. Lui reiterò che, nonostante i suoi ricorsi ripetuti, le corti nazionali ed il Governo rimasero silenziosi sulla materia della legislazione applicabile, incluso le disposizioni della Costituzione, il Codice civile, l'Alloggio Codice nuovo, i decreti presidenziali ed attinenti e gli altri atti legali.
72. Il richiedente presentò che, lui non era stato offerto mai inoltre, il risarcimento valutario e precedente in conformità con gli articoli legali ed applicabili riguardo all'espropriazione di patrimonio immobiliare e terra. Invece, lui era stato costretto per trasferirsi in un condominio di “alloggi” di appartamenti costruito sul luogo di un cimitero trasferito che era il risarcimento né legale né equivalente per l'alloggio privato con un recinto dove lui aveva vissuto tutta la sua vita. In questo collegamento, lui non fu d'accordo anche col “rapporto competente” sul valore di mercato del suo alloggio e gli appartamenti nuovi presentato col NDEA di fronte alla corte nazionale. Secondo lui, che documento era stato scritto con una persona priva dei requisiti necessari e non era stato sottoposto a qualsiasi scrutinio significativo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Se l'alloggio e la terra in oggetto costituì il richiedente “le proprietà”
73. La Corte reitera che il concetto di “le proprietà” nella prima parte di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato alla proprietà di beni di materiale e è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale. Nello stesso modo come beni di materiale, i certi altri diritti ed interessi che costituiscono i beni può essere riguardato anche come “diritti di proprietà” e così come “le proprietà” per i fini di questa disposizione (vedere Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 1999 II). Il concetto di “le proprietà” non è limitato a “proprietà esistenti” ma può coprire anche beni, incluso rivendicazioni in riguardo del quale può dibattere il richiedente che lui o lei hanno almeno un ragionevole e “l'aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà. Un “l'aspettativa” è “legittimo” se è basato su una disposizione legislativa o un atto legale che nasce sull'interesse di proprietà in oggetto. In ogni causa il problema che ha bisogno di essere esaminato è se le circostanze della causa, considerato nell'insieme, conferì sul titolo di richiedente ad un interesse effettivo protegguto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Saghinadze ed Altri c. la Georgia, n. 18768/05, § 103, 27 maggio 2010 con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
74. È incontrastato che l'alloggio del richiedente era nella sua proprietà privata da 8 ottobre 2005 ed era stato nella sua proprietà incontestata prima quel la data. Questo fatto fu confermato con le corti nazionali e non è stato contestato mai al livello nazionale.
75. Come per l'area di terra che appartiene all'alloggio, con un'area di superficie totale di 257 sq. metro, il Governo affermò che il richiedente non era riuscito a provare che lui aveva qualsiasi diritto alla terra, mentre il richiedente chiese che costituì parte di suo “le proprietà” insieme con l'alloggio.
76. La Corte nota che sotto un edificio non è allegato automaticamente per intitolare all'edificio stesso sotto il titolo di ordinamento giuridico di Azerbaijani all'area di terra. Nelle altre parole, un proprietario di patrimonio immobiliare non può possedere necessariamente la terra sulla quale è localizzata la proprietà. Così, un individuo può avere un edificio nella sua proprietà mentre la terra rimane in Stato o proprietà municipale. Comunque, nella conformità con Articolo 243.1 del Codice civile, diritto nazionale automaticamente le concessioni un diritto di uso su un'area di terra posseduta con un'altra persona al proprietario di patrimonio immobiliare localizzato sulla terra (vedere paragrafo 56 sopra). Inoltre, individui che sono “utenti legali” di terra Statale sotto alloggi residenziali e privati, e di qualsiasi recinti ed aree di famiglia allegarono a quegli alloggi, abbia diritto ad acquisire proprietà privata della terra esente da spese. Se loro dovessero esercitare questo diritto, il loro diritto di proprietà alla terra sorge dalla data della sua registrazione Statale (vedere divide in paragrafi 57-58 sopra per le disposizioni attinenti della Legge del 1996 su Riforma agraria e le 1997 Regolamentazioni sull'acquisizione con cittadini di terra che è usata legalmente con loro).
77. È vero che il richiedente non aveva fatto domanda mai per registrazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà sull'area di terra occupata con alloggio suo ed il cortile allegò a sé. Lui non aveva formalmente, perciò, titolo di proprietà alla terra al tempo della demolizione dell'alloggio. Nella conformità con la legislazione applicabile, il richiedente era comunque, un “utente legale” della terra in oggetto con virtù della sua proprietà dell'alloggio. Inoltre, lui aveva un'aspettativa legittima, mentre derivando dalla legge nazionale, di essere in grado acquisire proprietà della terra esente da spese. Di conseguenza, come il richiedente aveva un interesse di proprietà riservato e sufficiente nella terra per sé qualificare come di 8 ottobre 2005 all'ultimo, un “la proprietà.”
78. Avendo riguardo ad al sopra, i costatazione di Corte che sia l'alloggio e l'area di terra in oggetto costituì il richiedente “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(b) Ottemperanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
79. L’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 contiene tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, questi articoli non sono distaccati: il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e perciò saranno costruiti nella luce del principio posata in giù nel primo articolo (vedere, per esempio, Kozacolu ?c. la Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03, § 48, 19 febbraio 2009, e Vistiš ?e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 93 25 ottobre 2012).
80. La Corte nota che nella causa presente era interferenza con le proprietà del richiedente, siccome loro furono presi con lo Stato ed il suo alloggio fu demolito. Questa interferenza corrispose un “la privazione di proprietà” all'interno del significato della seconda frase di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
81. Essere compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 una misura di espropriazione deve adempiere le tre condizioni: deve essere eseguito “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge” che esclude qualsiasi azione arbitraria da parte delle autorità nazionali, deve essere “nell'interesse pubblico”, e deve prevedere un equilibrio equo fra i diritti del proprietario e gli interessi della comunità.
82. Come alla prima condizione, la Corte reitera, che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo di che Articolo autorizza la privazione di proprietà “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge.” Inoltre, l'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è una nozione inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Iatridis, citato sopra, § 58; Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 79 ECHR 2000 XII; e Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 147 ECHR 2004 V).
83. Le parti nella causa presente non stata d'accordo come al tempo quando l'interferenza aveva avuto luogo, un fattore che, nella loro prospettiva, era importante per determinare il diritto nazionale come stette in piedi ed era applicabile al tempo di materiale. In particolare, il Governo affermò che l'interferenza aveva avuto luogo al tempo dell'emissione dell'ordine di BCEA di 14 maggio 2004, mentre il richiedente chiese che c'era successo in dicembre 2009, al tempo della distruzione dell'alloggio. La Corte tratterà con questa questione in corso dovuto come parte della sua analisi sotto.
84. La Corte nota anche che le parti non furono d'accordo come al tempismo della distruzione dell'alloggio, col dibattere Statale che era successo a settembre 2009. Comunque, siccome il Governo andò a vuoto a presentare qualsiasi prova in appoggio di questa contesa, la Corte accetta le osservazioni ripetute del richiedente, rese costantemente di fronte alle corti nazionali e la Corte che l'alloggio è stato demolito pienamente a dicembre 2009.
85. Come agli argomenti del Governo riguardo alla legalità delle misure presa con le autorità, la Corte lo trova difficile accettare la loro contesa che l'alloggio del richiedente era legalmente “espropriò per le necessità pubbliche in conformità con l'ordine di BCEA di 14 maggio 2004”, per un numero di ragioni specificato sotto.
86. All'inizio, i costatazione di Corte che dichiarazione stessa per stare fuorviando. Nota che i BCEA ordinano di 14 maggio 2004 era stato emesso su un anno di fronte al richiedente acquisì proprietà privata dell'alloggio. 8 ottobre 2005 il certificato di proprietà fu emesso al richiedente col BCEA stesso (più precisamente, l'Inventario Tecnico e Proprietà Diritti Registrazione Settore del BCEA; vedere paragrafo 7 sopra). In simile circostanze è difficile vedere come, al tempo di emissione sua, i BCEA ordinano di 14 maggio 2004 in modo appropriato potrebbe essere descritto come un atto “espropriando” una proprietà che non era ancora nella proprietà del richiedente.
87. In qualsiasi l'evento, in finora come questo ordine fu usato successivamente per giustificare la distruzione dell'alloggio, è necessario per determinare se potrebbe essere considerato come una base legale per interferire con la proprietà privata del richiedente dopo che lui acquisì diritti di proprietà incontrastati su sé 8 ottobre 2005.
88. Avendo riguardo ad al testo dell'ordine di 14 maggio 2004, la Corte nota, che era un strumento il cui effetto fu limitato ad assegnando terra ad un costruttore privato sotto contratto d'affitto ed autorizzando il costruttore a preparare un disegno di progetto di sviluppo. Come notato sopra, questo ordine non fu notificato mai formalmente al richiedente, come un residente dell'area, prima della distruzione effettiva dell'alloggio. L'ordine o non contenne disposizioni relativo all'alienazione di proprietà privata o assegnare a qualsiasi decisioni cominciate con riguardo ad al ristabilimento di residenti dell'area, se loro vissero in possedette privatamente o alloggi Statali. Infatti, l'ordine affermò esplicitamente che “sé [formò] la base solamente per preparare il disegno di progetto” e per la documentazione attinente per essere ottenuto con lo sviluppatore di progetto. In simile circostanze, e nell'assenza di qualsiasi decisioni formali e susseguenti del BCEA o qualsiasi l'altra autorità Statale in riguardo dell'espropriazione degli alloggi privati colpì, la Corte trova che i BCEA ordinano di 14 maggio 2004, da solo non può essere associato ad espressamente ad un strumento legale che autorizza l'alienazione di qualsiasi possedette privatamente proprietà localizzò nell'area in oggetto.
89. Inoltre, la Corte non accetta la contesa del Governo che il “l'espropriazione” procedura era stata eseguita legalmente in conformità con un numero di disposizioni dell'Alloggio Codice vecchio del 1982. In questo collegamento, la Corte si confà col richiedente che quelle disposizioni erano irrilevanti o inapplicabili. In particolare, Articolo 10 § 4 dell'Alloggio Codice del 1982 era una disposizione di un carattere generale che non ha prescritto qualsiasi le specifiche cause di interferenza lecita con proprietà o diritti di alloggio. Articolo 40 § 1 dello stesso Codice riguardò un “quota spaziale e vivente” in Stato o possedette pubblicamente alloggio ed era irrilevante nel contesto di alloggio privatamente posseduto. Articoli 41, 89 90 § 1, 91 94 § 1 e 96 § 1 interessato lo sfratto e dislocamento di residenti di alloggi che appartengono al “Stato o finanziamento di alloggio pubblico” ed era perciò inapplicabile ad alloggi privatamente posseduti. Articolo 135 era la disposizione sola dell'Alloggio Codice vecchio del 1982 menzionata con le corti nazionali che concernerono alloggio privatamente posseduto; trattò soltanto comunque, in termini generali col requisito per il risarcimento per essere pagato ai proprietari nell'evento dell'espropriazione (sembra anche che questa disposizione fu sostituita più tardi con altro, specialis della legge, legislazione sul risarcimento per l'espropriazione). Né Articolo 135 né qualsiasi delle altre disposizioni summenzionate posate in giù una procedura per l'espropriazione di proprietà privata o designò qualsiasi autorità Statale come essendo competente per condurre tale procedura. Nessuna delle disposizioni sopra la competenza assegnata legalmente in autorità esecutive e locali come il BCEA o NDEA per espropriare proprietà privata o sfrattare proprietari privati dalle loro case senza una decisione di corte.
90. Segue che, anche se potrebbe essere dibattuto che le disposizioni dell'Alloggio del 1982 Programmano che fu citato avrebbe potuto offrire della base per le azioni del BCEA ed il NDEA al tempo quando il richiedente non era ancora il proprietario della proprietà, questa non era più la causa dopo che lui acquisì diritti di proprietà incontrastati sulla proprietà in oggetto 8 ottobre 2005.
91. Come a paragrafi 6 e 15 della decisione del Plenum della Corte Suprema di 14 febbraio 2003 (vedere divide in paragrafi 59-60 sopra), anche citò con le corti nazionali, loro sembrano similmente essere inapplicabili alla situazione del richiedente, siccome loro concernono costruzioni non autorizzate su possedettero privatamente o si accosciarono terra e non concerne edifici come i quali sono in proprietà privata certificati con un certificato di proprietà valido e registrato come simile nel registro Statale di patrimonio immobiliare.
92. Inoltre, nonostante la specifica richiesta della Corte in questo riguardo, sia il Governo e le corti nazionali andarono a vuoto a specificare qualsiasi disposizione legale e nazionale che designa espressamente il BCEA come l'autorità o uno delle autorità che hanno il potere per prendere decisioni sull'espropriazione di proprietà privatamente posseduta. La Corte è stata anche incapace per identificare qualsiasi legislazione così nazionale di suo proprio accordo. Segue che il BCEA non aveva la competenza per espropriare proprietà privata.
93. Di conseguenza, i BCEA ordinano di 14 maggio 2004 non poteva essere considerato come una base legale per espropriare la proprietà del richiedente.
94. Avendo riguardo ad al sopra, i costatazione di Corte che non è stato dimostrato che, prima della distruzione dell'alloggio del richiedente a dicembre 2009, là esistè qualsiasi ordine di espropriazione legale preso con un'autorità Statale competente fare così. In simile circostanze, l'interferenza effettiva con le proprietà del richiedente ebbe luogo a dicembre 2009 nella forma della privazione de facto di proprietà.
95. La Corte ha avuto riguardo ad all'osservazione del richiedente che, al tempo dell'interferenza, la procedura per l'espropriazione di proprietà privata fu regolata con le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione, il Codice civile e l'Alloggio Codice del 2009, così come i decreti presidenziali ed attinenti su attuazione di quelle disposizioni (vedere divide in paragrafi 35-36 e 49-56 sopra). Con l'eccezione dell'Alloggio Codice del 2009 che entrò in vigore 1 ottobre 2009 tutti che quegli atti legali erano in vigore da anni di fronte all'interferenza occorsa. La Corte si confà col richiedente che quegli atti legali sembrarono costituire la legge applicabile facendo seguito a che l'espropriazione della proprietà del richiedente sarebbe dovuta essere portata fuori.
96. La Corte nota in particolare che quegli atti legali, inter l'alia, designò il Gabinetto di Ministri come l'autorità competente decidere sull'espropriazione ed acquisto di Stato di proprietà privata, specificò i motivi e le condizioni sulla base della quale fu concessa l'espropriazione, specificò la procedura per iniziare l'espropriazione ed acquisto di Stato, pagamento precedente e richiesto del risarcimento valutario per il valore di mercato della proprietà espropriata o acquistò e le spese di dislocamento incorso in specificò la procedura per notificazione del proprietario e la procedura per registrazione e trasferimento del titolo alla proprietà, e così su.
97. Comunque, al giorno d'oggi la causa la privazione della proprietà del richiedente non fu eseguita in ottemperanza con qualsiasi delle condizioni sopra specificate con legge. La Corte nota anche che le corti nazionali si frenarono dall'esaminare l'applicabilità di quegli atti legali nonostante le richieste ripetute del richiedente in quel riguardo a. Mentre il nazionale corteggia sentenze di ' si concentrate quasi esclusivamente sulle disposizioni legali ed inapplicabili dell'Alloggio Codice vecchio del 1982 riguardo al dislocamento di persone che risiedono in alloggio Statale, loro contennero nessuna valutazione effettiva della legalità della privazione di proprietà privata eseguita col BCEA ed il NDEA nella causa presente, nonostante il fatto che questa questione costituì la croce dell'azione civile iniziata col richiedente.
98. Infine, la Corte nota che, il richiedente fu offerto ricevute di occupazione per due appartamenti in un edificio recentemente costruito come risarcimento nell'assenza di una decisione di espropriazione formale presa in ottemperanza con le condizioni previste per col diritto nazionale applicabile, per l'alloggio distrutto. Questo risarcimento fu offerto inizialmente informalmente col NDEA nell'assenza di una decisione di espropriazione legale, e più tardi sanzionò con le corti nazionali con riferimento alle disposizioni summenzionate dell'Alloggio Codice del 1982. Mentre può essere aperto a discussione se una ricevuta di occupazione per un appartamento Statale può essere considerata come risarcimento adeguato o equivalente per la perdita di un alloggio privatamente posseduto con un'area di terra, i costatazione di Corte che, fin dalle disposizioni dell'Alloggio Codice del 1982 esaminate sopra di non era applicabile nel contesto della causa presente qualsiasi il risarcimento offrì sulla base di quelle disposizioni legali non poteva essere o legale.
99. Per le ragioni sopra, la Corte conclude, che l'interferenza nella causa presente non fu portata fuori in ottemperanza con “le condizioni previdero per con legge.” Il richiedente fu privato arbitrariamente delle sue proprietà e forzato accettare risarcimento illegale che è stato determinato in una maniera arbitraria. Questa conclusione lo fa non necessario accertare se un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere, per esempio, Iatridis, citato sopra, § 62).
100. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLI 6, 8 E 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
101. Il richiedente si lamentò Articolo 6 della Convenzione sotto che le corti nazionali avevano consegnato sentenze non ragionate non riuscendo a verificare l'ottemperanza dell'interferenza con la legislazione nazionale ed applicabile, appellandosi invece su atti legali ed inapplicabili ed irrilevanti, ed essenzialmente tentando di legittimare le azioni esecutive illegali delle autorità. Articolo che 6 § 1 offre siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...”
Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre che la demolizione illegale di alloggio suo corrispose ad una violazione del suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione che prevede siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
Il richiedente si lamentò sotto infine, Articolo 13 della Convenzione, in concomitanza con le azioni di reclamo sopra e l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, che lui non era stato riconosciuto una via di ricorso che offre protezione effettiva contro le violazioni dei suoi diritti. Articolo 13 prevede siccome segue:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
102. Il Governo contestò gli argomenti del richiedente, mentre appellandosi principalmente sulla sostanza delle loro osservazioni rese in riguardo dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, e sostenne che l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente per rispettare per la sua casa era stata legale e necessaria in una società democratica ed aveva intrapreso lo scopo di “il miglioramento della comparizione della città” quale, nella prospettiva del Governo era negli interessi del benessere economico del paese. Loro dibatterono che i procedimenti civili e nazionali erano stati equi e che loro avevano costituito una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva.
103. Il richiedente reiterò le sue azioni di reclamo, mentre riferendosi soprattutto anche alle sue osservazioni rese in riguardo dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
104. La Corte nota che queste azioni di reclamo sono collegate all'esaminato sopra e devono essere dichiarate perciò similmente ammissibile.
105. Comunque, avendo riguardo ad alla sentenza relativo ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere divide in paragrafi 99-100 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario per esaminare anche se, in questa causa, sono state violazioni di Articoli 6, 8 e 13 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Iatridis citato sopra, § 69, e Minasyan e Semerjyan c. l'Armenia, n. 27651/05, § 82 23 giugno 2009).
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
106. Il richiedente si lamentò che la presa illegale e la demolizione di alloggio suo, accompagnate con pressione e minacce con ufficiali statali avevano corrisposto a mal-trattamento sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione. Lui si lamentò inoltre che il suo sfratto dal suo alloggio ed il forzato allontanamento all'appartamento nuovo dato a lui contro la sua volontà era stato in violazione del suo diritto alla libertà di circolazione sotto Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 ed aveva corrisposto anche ad una violazione di Articolo 18 della Convenzione.
107. Nella luce di tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come le questioni si lamentò di è all'interno della sua competenza, i costatazione di Corte che loro non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e le libertà espose fuori nella Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli. Segue che questa parte della richiesta è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
108. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
109. Il richiedente chiese un totale di 550,000 Azerbaijani manats nuovi (AZN) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale, comprendendo:
(un) AZN 541,500 come risarcimento per l'alloggio e l'area di terra, comprendendo: (i) AZN 170,000 per l'alloggio; (l'ii) una somma nella serie fra AZN 230,000 ed AZN 255,000 per l'area di terra, e (l'iii) un importo non specificato per essere aggiunto agli importi sopra come rettifica per l'inflazione durante gli anni 2010 a 2013; e
(b) AZN 8,500 per le spese mediche che lui era incorso in in collegamento con trattamento per una condizione di cuore che lui disse era stato aggravato col fatto che dal molti anni lui aveva vivere in un blocco di appartamenti, invece di un alloggio con un cortile.
110. Lui disse anche AZN 20,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale ed AZN 7,150 in riguardo di costi e spese.
111. Il Governo contestò le rivendicazioni in riguardo del valore dell'alloggio e l'area di terra, mentre dibattendo che loro furono esagerati e basato su un'opinione competente e nulla. Il Governo dibattè che il valore dell'alloggio e l'area di terra molto era più basso, specificamente AZN 43,146 per l'alloggio ed AZN 55,000 o AZN 41,500 per l'area di terra che dipende su, se era in proprietà privata o in proprietà legale sotto il diritto di uso. Il Governo chiese che in qualsiasi l'evento, il richiedente non poteva chiedere qualsiasi danni in riguardo dell'area di terra, perché era Statale ed il richiedente non aveva titolo a sé. Il Governo dibattè inoltre che il danno allegato incorse in in collegamento con trattamento medico non aveva collegamento causale alle violazioni allegato. Il Governo contestò anche infine, le rivendicazioni in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale e costa e spese e dibattè che loro erano eccessivi e non comprovati.
112. La Corte considera che la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione. È perciò necessario per riservare la questione, dovuto riguardo ad essere aveva alla possibilità di un accordo fra lo Stato rispondente ed il richiedente (l'Articolo 75 §§ 1 e 4 degli Articoli di Corte).
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto Articoli 6, 8 e 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibili;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare le azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6, 8 e 13 della Convenzione;

4. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione, e di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione per intero;
(b) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere per fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 29 gennaio 2015, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.