Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BÉLÁNÉ NAGY v. HUNGARY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41

NUMERO: 53080/13/2015
STATO: Ungheria
DATA: 10/02/2015
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage Pecuniary damage Just satisfaction)



SECOND SECTION








CASE OF BÉLÁNÉ NAGY v. HUNGARY

(Application no. 53080/13)







JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG

10 February 2015





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.



In the case of Béláné Nagy v. Hungary,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
I??l Karaka?, President,
András Sajó,
Nebojša Vu?ini?,
Helen Keller,
Egidijus K?ris,
Robert Spano,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 6 January 2015,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 53080/13) against Hungary lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Hungarian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 12 August 2013.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Budapest. The Hungarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr Z. Tallódi, Agent, Ministry of Public Administration and Justice.
3. The applicant alleged that she had lost her livelihood, only guaranteed by a disability allowance, as a result of the changes in legislation applied by the authorities without equity, although her health had never improved. She relied on Article 6 of the Convention.
4. On 21 January 2014 the application was communicated to the Government.
5. On 27 August 2014 legal aid was granted to the applicant.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1959 and lives in Baktalórántháza.
7. In 2001 the applicant’s loss of capacity to work was assessed to be 67 per cent as of 1 April 2001, and she was granted a disability pension (see paragraph 18 below). This assessment was maintained in 2003, 2006 and 2007.
8. Pursuant to a modification of the applicable methodology but apparently without any substantial change in her health, the level of the applicant’s disability was changed to 40 per cent on 1 December 2009. Without envisaging her rehabilitation, the assessment panel scheduled the next check-up of her medical status for November 2012.
As a consequence of her 40 per cent level of disability, her entitlement to the disability pension was withdrawn as of 1 February 2010.
The applicant challenged this decision in court, but the Nyíregyháza Labour Court dismissed her action on 1 April 2011, notwithstanding an expert opinion stating that the applicant’s condition had not improved since 2007. The applicant was obliged to reimburse the amounts received after 1 February 2010.
9. In 2011 the applicant requested another assessment of her disability. In September 2011 the first-instance authority assessed it at 45 per cent, scheduling the next assessment for September 2014. The second-instance authority changed this score to 50 per cent, with a reassessment due in March 2015. Such a level would have entitled her to disability pension, had her rehabilitation not been possible (see paragraph 19 below). However, this time the assessment envisaged the applicant’s rehabilitation in a time-frame of 36 months, during which time she was to receive rehabilitation allowance.
10. As of 1 January 2012, a new law on disability allowances (Act no. CXCI of 2011) entered into force. It introduced additional applicability criteria (see paragraph 20 below). Notably, instead of fulfilling the service period required by the former legislation, the disabled person must have at least 1,095 days covered by social security in the five years preceding the submission of his or her request. Persons who do not meet this requirement may nevertheless qualify if they had no interruption of social cover for more than 30 days throughout their career, or if they were in receipt of a disability pension on 31 December 2011.
11. In February 2012 the applicant submitted another request for disability allowance. Her condition was assessed in April 2012, leading to the finding of 50 per cent disability. On 5 June 2012 her request was dismissed because she did not have the requisite period of social cover. Rehabilitation was not envisaged. The next assessment was scheduled for April 2014.
12. On 2 August 2012 the applicant submitted a fresh request for disability pension under the new law on disability allowances and underwent another assessment in which the level of her disability was again established at 50 per cent. Rehabilitation was not envisaged.
13. In principle, such a level of disability would entitle the applicant to a disability pension under the new system. However, since her disability pension had been terminated in February 2010 (that is, she was not in receipt of a disability pension on 31 December 2011) and, moreover, she was not in a position to accumulate the requisite number of days covered by social security or to demonstrate an uninterrupted social cover, she was not eligible, under any title, for a disability allowance under the new system. Instead of the requisite 1,095 days covered by social security, the applicant had only 947.
14. Accordingly, the applicant’s disability pension request was refused both by the competent administrative authorities (on 23 November 2012 and 27 February 2013) and by the Nyíregyháza Administrative and Labour Court, on 20 June 2013.
15. As of 1 January 2014, the impugned legislative criteria have been amended with a view to extending the eligibility for disability allowance to those who have accumulated either 2,555 days covered by social security in ten years or 3,650 days in fifteen years. However, the applicant could not meet these criteria either.
16. It appears that currently the applicant lives on aid.
17. Since 2013 the Constitutional Court has examined a number of complaints attacking in essence the same new rules on disability entitlements (decision nos. 3227/2013, 3156/2013 and 3235/2014). The complainants in those procedures raised their constitutional concerns after the final and binding domestic judgments, without applying to the Kúria (Supreme Court) in review proceedings. Although these motions were eventually rejected as inadmissible for other reasons, the Constitutional Court did not consider that, for their constitutional complaints to be entertained, those complainants were required to have approached the Kúria beforehand.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW
18. The relevant provisions of Act no. LXXXI of 1997 on Social Security Pension , as in force until 31 December 2011, provided:
Section 4 (1) c)
“[Under the terms of this law] disability pension [means]: pension to be disbursed in case of disability, on condition that the requisite service time has been accumulated.”
Section 23 (1)
“Disability pension is due to a person who:
(a) has suffered 67 per cent loss of capacity to work due to health problems, physical or mental impairments, without any perspective of amelioration during the following year... [and]
(b) has accumulated the necessary service time [a function of the age, as outlined in the law] [and]
(c) does not work regularly or earns considerably less than before having become disabled.”
19. Concerning disability pensions to be granted after 31 December 2007, the same Act, as in force between 12 March and 31 December 2011, provided as follows:
Section 36/A
“(1) Disability pension shall be due to a person who:
a) suffered [at least 79 per cent loss of capacity to work, or the same between 50 and 79 per cent if rehabilitation is not feasible], and
b) accumulated the service time required in respect of his age, and
c) [does not have an income or earns considerably less than before], and
d) does not receive sick pay or disability sick pay.”
20. Act no. CXCI of 2011 on the Benefits Granted to Persons with Reduced Work Capacity, in so far as relevant and as in force between 26 July 2012 and 31 December 2013, provided as follows:
Section 2
“(1) A person whose health status has been found to be 60 per cent or less, in the rehabilitation authority’s complex reassessment (henceforth: persons with reduced work capacity) and who:
a) has been covered for a minimum 1,095 days by the social security under section 5 of [the Social Security Act] in the five years preceding the submission of their request, and
b) is not been engaged in any money-earning activities and
c) is not receiving any regular cash allowance
shall be eligible for allowances granted to persons with reduced work capacity.
(2) By derogation from subsection (1) (a), persons
a) who became covered by the social security within 180 days from the termination of their schooling and whose social security cover was not interrupted for any period exceeding 30 days before the submission of their request, or
b) who received on 31 December 2011 disability pension, accident disability pension, rehabilitation allowance or social allowance for persons with health impairment
shall be eligible for the benefits granted to persons with reduced work capacity irrespective of the duration of the period covered with social security.
(3) The 1,095-day-long insurance period shall include:
a) the period of sick pay, accident sick pay, pregnancy and confinement benefit, child care benefit and jobseeker benefit;
b) the period of disability pension, accident disability pension, rehabilitation allowance, social allowance for persons with health impairment;
c) the service time accumulated under an agreement concluded under section 34 of [the Social Security Act] with a view to accumulating service time and income that generate pension entitlement; provided that the agreement was concluded by 31 December 2011.”
Section 3
“(1) Subject to the rehabilitation authority’s rehabilitation proposal made in the framework of the complex reassessment, the allowance to be granted for a person with reduced work capacity shall be either:
a) rehabilitation allowance, or
b) disability allowance.”
Section 5
“(1) Persons with reduced work capacity shall be entitled to disability allowance where rehabilitation is not recommended.”
21. The Constitutional Court examined Act no. CXCI of 2011 in decision no. 40/2012. (XII.6.) AB. It recalled that its jurisprudence differentiated between allowances acquired by compulsory contribution to the social security scheme on the one hand, and social allowances not constituting “purchased rights” on the other hand. The former allowances (e.g. old-age pension or pension for surviving spouse) enjoyed property-like constitutional protection because of their inherent insurance element. As regards the latter, guarantees flowing from the requirements of the rule of law (i.e. protection of legitimate expectations, proper time for preparation) should be observed as criteria of constitutionality – instead of requirements related to the protection of property. In the case-law of the Constitutional Court, protection of legitimate expectations (or, in other words, protection of acquired rights) meant the application of the requirement of due time for preparation, ensuing also from the principle of legal security of already acquired titles. In the absence of an already acquired title, the Constitutional Court might only verify whether the time allowed by the legislation was sufficient for the individuals to become aware of its content. In fact, it was the difference in the solidity of the basis of expectation which was question in the respective situations.
22. The decision contains in particular the following passages:
“30. ... The Constitutional Court has examined modifications to laws and regulations relating to disability pensions in several decisions. Decision no. 321/B/1996 AB categorises disability pensions partly as an allowance prompting protection of property and partly as a social service provision. As stated in the decision, the law ‘provides care under the constitutional principle of social security for individuals who before reaching the old age pension age have lost their ability to work by reason of disability or disability due to accident. ... Prior to reaching the official retirement age, the disability pension is a special benefit granted to individuals based on their disability. Upon reaching pensionable age, individuals who are ... incapable of work ... are not entitled to this special benefit, because on termination of their employment, they are eligible to receive an old age pension based on their age.’
31. Decision no. 1129/B/2008 AB states that disability pension falls under the category of personal retirement benefits, though their ‘purchased right’ element is only apparent inasmuch as ‘its sum is greater after a longer length of service, or is equal or close to the old age pension. Otherwise the principle of solidarity is predominant, as the disabled individual, who would not be eligible for an old age pension based on his age or length of service, is able to receive pension benefits from the point at which disability is determined.’ ...
32. In the Constitutional Court’s interpretation, laws giving title to disability pensions do not constitute subjective constitutional rights, but are mixed social security and social service benefits, available – subject to set conditions – to individuals under the retirement age suffering from ill health, who, due to their disability, have a reduced capacity to work and are in need of financial assistance because of the loss of income.”
23. The relevant provisions of Convention no. 102 of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) on Social Security (Minimum Standards), adopted on 28 June 1952, read as follows:
Part IX – Invalidity benefit
Article 53
“Each Member for which this Part of this Convention is in force shall secure to the persons protected the provision of invalidity benefit in accordance with the following Articles of this Part.”
Article 54
“The contingency covered shall include inability to engage in any gainful activity, to an extent prescribed, which inability is likely to be permanent or persists after the exhaustion of sickness benefit.”
Article 55
“The persons protected shall comprise--
(a) prescribed classes of employees, constituting not less than 50 per cent of all employees; or
(b) prescribed classes of the economically active population, constituting not less than 20 per cent of all residents; or
(c) all residents whose means during the contingency do not exceed limits prescribed in such a manner as to comply with the requirements of Article 67; or
(d) where a declaration made in virtue of Article 3 is in force, prescribed classes of employees, constituting not less than 50 per cent of all employees in industrial workplaces employing 20 persons or more.”
Article 56
“The benefit shall be a periodical payment calculated as follows:
(a) where classes of employees or classes of the economically active population are protected, in such a manner as to comply either with the requirements of Article 65 or with the requirements of Article 66;
(b) where all residents whose means during the contingency do not exceed prescribed limits are protected, in such a manner as to comply with the requirements of Article 67.”
Article 57
“1. The benefit specified in Article 56 shall, in a contingency covered, be secured at least--
(a) to a person protected who has completed, prior to the contingency, in accordance with prescribed rules, a qualifying period which may be 15 years of contribution or employment, or 10 years of residence; or
(b) where, in principle, all economically active persons are protected, to a person protected who has completed a qualifying period of three years of contribution and in respect of whom, while he was of working age, the prescribed yearly average number of contributions has been paid.
2. Where the benefit referred to in paragraph 1 is conditional upon a minimum period of contribution or employment, a reduced benefit shall be secured at least--
(a) to a person protected who has completed, prior to the contingency, in accordance with prescribed rules, a qualifying period of five years of contribution or employment; or
(b) where, in principle, all economically active persons are protected, to a person protected who has completed a qualifying period of three years of contribution and in respect of whom, while he was of working age, half the yearly average number of contributions prescribed in accordance with subparagraph (b) of paragraph 1 of this Article has been paid.
3. The requirements of paragraph 1 of this Article shall be deemed to be satisfied where a benefit calculated in conformity with the requirements of Part XI but at a percentage of ten points lower than shown in the Schedule appended to that Part for the standard beneficiary concerned is secured at least to a person protected who has completed, in accordance with prescribed rules, five years of contribution, employment or residence.
4. A proportional reduction of the percentage indicated in the Schedule appended to Part XI may be effected where the qualifying period for the pension corresponding to the reduced percentage exceeds five years of contribution or employment but is less than 15 years of contribution or employment; a reduced pension shall be payable in conformity with paragraph 2 of this Article.”
Article 58
“The benefit specified in Articles 56 and 57 shall be granted throughout the contingency or until an old-age benefit becomes payable.”
24. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), endorsed by the Member States of the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2001, provides in its relevant part as follows:
Annex 6
Ethical guidelines for the use of ICF, Social use of ICF information
“(10) ICF, and all information derived from its use, should not be employed to deny established rights or otherwise restrict legitimate entitlements to benefits for individuals or groups.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 OF THE CONVENTION
25. The applicant complained that she had lost her livelihood, previously secured by the disability pension, because under the new system, in place as of 2012, she was no longer entitled to such an allowance, although her health was as bad as ever, and this as a consequence of the amended legislation containing conditions she could not possibly fulfil. She relied on Article 6 of the Convention.
The Court considers that this complaint falls to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
26. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
27. The Government argued that the application should be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies because the applicant had not filed a petition for review against either of the judgments of 1 April 2011 or 20 June 2013, an effective remedy to exhaust in administrative litigation.
They further submitted that the application had been introduced out of time, the six-month time-limit to be counted from the 2011 judgment originally withdrawing the applicant’s entitlement. In their view, neither the enactment of the new law nor the ensuing re-assessments interrupted the running of this time-limit.
28. The applicant argued that a review before the Supreme Court, later renamed as Kúria, whose scope was statutorily limited to points of law, would have been futile in either procedure, because she was objectively unable to meet the criteria contained in the law. Moreover, her grievance was of a continuing character or, alternatively and more importantly, to be counted from the second judgment reflecting the 2012 legislation, reasons for which the six-month rule must be seen as respected.
29. The Court recalls that a petition for review before the Kúria is normally a remedy to be exhausted in civil, including administrative, litigations (see Béla Szabó v. Hungary, no. 37470/06, 9 December 2008). However, the exhaustion rule must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism. Indeed, the rule of exhaustion is neither absolute nor capable of being applied automatically; in reviewing whether it has been observed it is essential to have regard to the particular circumstances of each individual case (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 69, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996?IV). Under Article 35 § 1, normal recourse should be had by an applicant to remedies which are available and sufficient to afford redress in respect of the breaches alleged. The existence of the remedies in question must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness. There is no obligation to have recourse to remedies which are inadequate or ineffective (see Akdivar, cited above, §§ 66, 67).
30. In the present case, the Court observes that the subject matter of the first litigation was the degree of disability as established under a new statutory methodology. That of the second case – that is, the issue actually complained of – was the question whether or not the volume of the applicant’s past contributions to the social security scheme was sufficient for the purposes of the applicable regime of disability care. For the Court, the domestic courts did no more in either case than apply the statutory rules to the applicant’s situation, without any particular interpretation of the law or assessment of the evidence. Since, in the Court’s understanding, a review before the Kúria is limited to points of law (an assertion of the applicant not disputed by the Government), it is satisfied that a review motion to challenge the rules themselves would have been without any reasonable prospect of success. Therefore, in the particular circumstances of the present case, this legal avenue would have been ineffective and therefore futile, and its non-pursuit cannot be reproached to the applicant. Consequently, the application cannot be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
31. Notwithstanding the arguably continuous character of the applicant’s legitimate expectation to receive disability care (see the Merits chapter and in particular paragraph 45 below), the Court notes, as regards the first litigation, that the final domestic decision in that case on the fulfilment of the medical eligibility criteria applicable at that time was given on 1 April 2011, that is, more than six months prior to the date of introduction of the application (12 August 2013). The Court is therefore prevented, pursuant to Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, from examining that procedure.
Concerning the second case, it was on 20 June 2013 that, by a final and binding judicial decision, the applicant was denied eligibility for disability pension under the 2012 rules, for lack of sufficient period of social cover. The application, to the extent that it concerns the applicant’s grievance finding its source in that decision, cannot therefore be rejected for non-compliance with the six-month rule.
32. The Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Arguments of the parties
33. The applicant submitted that the removal of her disability pension by means of consecutive amendments of the relevant eligibility rules culminating in the 2012 situation, but without any amelioration in her health, constituted an unjustified interference with her Convention rights. In her view, the interference did not pursue any identifiable legitimate aim and imposed on her an excessive individual burden, taking into account that the termination of the disability pension divested the applicant of her means of subsistence.
34. The Government were of the opinion that the applicant had neither a possession nor a legitimate expectation for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In their view, she had ceased to be entitled to the disability pension already under the former rules and, by the time of the entry into force of the new legislation, had no “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Nor could she claim to have a legitimate expectation, for want of meeting the relevant eligibility criteria under the new scheme.
2. The Court’s assessment
a. General principles
35. The principles which apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are equally relevant when it comes to social and welfare benefits. In particular, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not create a right to acquire property (see Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 48, Series A no. 70). Nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, for example, Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004 IX). Indeed, the right to an old-age pension or any social benefit in a particular amount is not included as such among the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Convention (see, for example, Aunola v. Finland (dec.), no. 30517/96, 15 March 2001).
36. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 places no restriction on the Contracting State’s freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security scheme, or to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under any such scheme. If, however, a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit – whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see, in the context of Article 14 read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 54, ECHR 2005 X). For the Court, the latter principle allows for a particular interpretation in the context of disability care, which is a welfare benefit of a special character. Since the making of contributions to a pension fund may, in certain circumstances, create a property right and such a right may be affected by the manner in which the fund is distributed (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, quoted above, § 39), the Court considers that if the benefit, which had been granted on the basis of the legislation in force and which had been generated by the making of appropriate contributions to the scheme and the satisfaction of the requirements of the legislation in force during one’s active employment, was removed – notably by a retrospective amendment to the contribution rules – such a measure will require a convincing justification for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as long as the other key requirement, namely a deteriorated health status, is in place.
37. In the modern democratic State many individuals are, for all or part of their lives, completely dependent for survival on social security and welfare benefits. Many domestic legal systems recognise that such individuals require a degree of certainty and security, and provide for benefits to be paid – subject to the fulfilment of the conditions of eligibility – as of right. Where an individual has an assertable right under domestic law to a welfare benefit, the importance of that interest should also be reflected by holding Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be applicable (see, among other authorities, Stec, cited above, § 51; Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 39, 15 September 2009).
38. The Court has accepted the possibility of reductions in social security entitlements in certain circumstances. In particular, the Court has noted the significance which the passage of time can have for the legal existence and character of social insurance benefits. This applies both to amendments to legislation, which may be adopted in response to societal changes and evolving views on the categories of persons who need social assistance, and also to the evolution of individual situations (see Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 67, 8 December 2009, and further case-law references cited therein). However, where the amount of a benefit is reduced or discontinued, this may constitute interference with possessions which requires to be justified (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40; and Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009).
39. An essential condition for interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful.
Moreover, any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 27265/95, § 85, 17 October 2002; and Wieczorek v. Poland, cited above, § 59).
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 also requires that any interference be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, §§ 81-94, ECHR 2005-VI). The requisite fair balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52).
b. Application of those principles to the present case
40. The applicant was, as of 2001, entitled to receive a disability pension because she met all the statutory conditions (see paragraph 7 above). Under the rules in force at that time, one of the conditions of eligibility for disability pension was the accumulation of the requisite service period (see paragraph 18 above).
41. It is true that she subsequently lost her pension (see paragraph 8 above) because, under a new methodology of assessment, her health was no longer considered sufficiently impaired to qualify her for the pension. The Court notes at this juncture that this was due to a change in the applicable methods rather than to an actual improvement in her health.
42. The Court observes that, as of January 2012, the disability pension system was replaced by an allowance system, which contained new criteria of eligibility. When in 2012 the applicant applied for the allowance which replaced the pension, she was found ineligible, not because she did not have the requisite disability condition, but because of the insufficient period of social cover – and this irrespective of the volume of her past contributions to the social security system, previously recognised, in terms of service time, as sufficient (see paragraphs 11, 13 and 14 above).
43. For the Court, these changes in the applicant’s status under the regulations on disability pension/allowance must be examined from the perspective of the inherent features of such schemes. It is noteworthy in this connection that the Constitutional Court found that allowances acquired by compulsory contributions to the social security scheme may partly be seen as “purchased rights” (see paragraphs 21 and 22 above); in particular, that court categorised disability pensions “partly as an allowance prompting protection of property and partly as a social service provision”. In the Constitutional Court’s view, the guarantees flowing from requirements of the rule of law, namely the protection of legitimate expectations, apply to social allowances as well.
Largely sharing the views of the Constitutional Court, the Court is therefore satisfied that the disability pension/allowance is an assertable right to a welfare benefit recognised under the domestic law, and therefore Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable (see paragraph 37 above). Indeed, being a special element of the pension system, the disability pension/allowance is nothing less than a security, guaranteed by virtue of societal solidarity, that where a person has made the requisite contributions to the scheme, for example by paying payroll burdens over a certain period of time, he or she should be entitled to an allowance, if a serious deterioration of health, resulting in inability to perform gainful activities, so requires.
44. In the particular case, the applicant had made such contributions to the social security scheme as were required during the time of her employment. The resultant legitimate expectation to receive disability care was recognised and honoured by the authorities when the contingency occurred, and she was granted a disability pension in 2001. She continued to enjoy that “possession” until 2010. Her health situation appears to have remained materially unchanged throughout this and the ensuing period, and the various disability degrees attributed to this condition were only the consequence of successive changes in the methodology.
45. For the Court, the existence of the applicant’s continued, recognised legitimate expectation to receive disability care – if her health so requires and even after the withdrawal of the pension in 2010 – is well demonstrated by the fact that she, as a person who had satisfied the requirement of contributions, was subject to ensuing periodic reviews (in September 2011, as well as in April and August 2012, with reassessment scheduled for 2014 and 2015).
46. Although it has not been ratified by Hungary or the majority of the Council of Europe Member States, the Court nevertheless finds noteworthy Article 57 § 1(b) of the ILO Convention on Social Security (see in paragraph 23 above), according to which a person protected who has completed a qualifying period of three years of contribution and in respect of whom, while he or she was of working age, the prescribed yearly average number of contributions has been paid is considered to be eligible for benefits.
47. In these circumstances, the Court is satisfied that, once meeting the administrative requirement of the disability pension scheme as in force at the first material point in time (that is, in 2001), the applicant obtained, for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, a formal recognition of her legitimate expectation to receive a disability pension/allowance as and when her medical condition would so necessitate. This expectation originates in the law in force during her employment and at the time of the original acquisition of disability pension rights. Given the statutory provisions on eligibility, this recognised legitimate expectation is of a nature more concrete than a mere hope as it was based on legal provisions (compare and contrast Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 39794/98, § 73, ECHR 2002 VII).
48. That recognised legitimate expectation and the proprietary interests generated by the legislation of a Contracting State in force at the time of becoming eligible (see Stec, cited above, § 54) cannot be considered extinguished by the fact that, in a new methodology of assessment, the applicant’s disability was scored down to 40 per cent in December 2009 (see paragraph 8 above), apparently without material change in her condition. For the Court, the crux of the matter is that during her employment, the applicant had contributed to the social security system as was required by the law, which fact alone prompted the social solidarity-based obligation on the State’s side to provide disability care, should a contingency occur. By granting disability pension in 2001, the authorities implicitly recognised that she satisfied the relevant criteria. Between 2001 and 2010 the applicant enjoyed the resultant possession of disability pension, and when her disability was considered less serious, this possession was replaced with the recognised legitimate expectation of continued care, should the circumstances again so require.
Irrespective of the loss of the pension in 2010, the Court is therefore of the view that the expectation of the applicant, as a contributor to the social security scheme who once satisfied the condition of eligibility, is legitimate and continuous in its legal nature.
It should be recalled that “if any distinction can still be said to exist in the case-law between contributory and non-contributory benefits for the purposes of the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, there is no ground to justify the continued drawing of such a distinction” (see Stec, cited above, § 53). In the Court’s view, this consideration cannot be regarded as doing away with any protection previously afforded to the contributory schemes, in excess to the one due to non-contributory ones. In any case, the Court notes that the disability pension scheme in question included elements of a contributory character, as held by the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 21, 22 and 43 above).
49. This right of the applicant was then interfered with by the authorities, when in 2012 she was denied disability care on the strength of insufficient contributions made in the past, although her medical condition was again deemed sufficiently impaired. It must be stressed again that these contributions, originally formulated as service time, were once adequate for that purpose, and the new requirement, expressed in terms of duration of social security cover, was introduced only later, at a time when the applicant was virtually no longer able to meet it.
50. It was not in dispute between the parties that this interference was prescribed by law and the Court sees no reason to hold otherwise. Indeed, the denial of disability allowance was precisely due to a change in the law (see, mutatis mutandis, Laki?evi? and Others v. Montenegro and Serbia, nos. 27458/06, 37205/06, 37207/06 and 33604/07, § 70, 13 December 2011).
51. As regards public or general interest, the Court accepts that the impugned legislation pursued the legitimate aim of the society’s economic well-being.
52. As regards the question of proportionality, the State obviously has a certain margin of appreciation in regulating citizens’ access to disability benefits, notably by requiring a certain volume of contributions to the scheme as well as a statutory minimum level of disability. These elements are susceptible to evolution in the light of societal changes, development of the labour market and progress of medical science, including options of rehabilitation.
53. However, the liberty States enjoy in this field cannot go as far as depriving this entitlement, once granted, of its very essence. Moreover, the requirements of the rule of law must be observed, and a retrospective disregard of acquired rights and legitimate expectations, as is the case with social security contributions, must be avoided when passing measures of social reforms. As to the question whether the legitimate expectation to receive disability care entails a right not to have the eligibility conditions changed, the Court notes, by analogy, the Ethical guidelines of the WHO’s document on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health which should not be employed to deny established rights or otherwise restrict legitimate entitlements to benefits for individuals (see paragraph 24 above). The rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Amuur v. France, 25 June 1996, § 50, Reports 1996 III). This consideration entails, in the context of the present case, a State obligation to secure, on the basis of societal solidarity, a certain income for those whose working capacity fell below the statutorily set level, provided that they have made sufficient contributions to the scheme – and this without prejudice to the general principle ubiquitous in the Court’s case-law, according to which Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not create a right to acquire property, nor does it place any restriction on the Contracting State’s freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security scheme, or to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under any such scheme (see Stec, § 54, quoted above in paragraph 36).
The Court would add at this juncture that, as matter of the rule of law, the principle impossibilium nulla obligatio est is of particular relevance in the present case where the applicant was ex post reproached for not having made in the past sufficient contributions as determined by the new legislation – a condition she could not possibly meet at that point in time.
54. In the present case, when the applicant was forced to apply for the pension for the first time, she had already fulfilled the then relevant administrative requirement and was granted a pension.
Despite her essentially unchanged health status, years later she was excluded from the benefit, since the ailments she had were no longer considered substantial enough for the continuation of the pension.
Once her disability score was subsequently raised again, this could not result in granting a pension or allowance, because the intervening new administrative criterion was effectively unattainable in the applicant’s particular case.
55. Eventually, the applicant was wholly denied the social security entitlements which would have been otherwise due to her in view of her ill-health. It is noteworthy from the perspective of proportionality that she was totally divested of her pension/allowance, due to a new condition of eligibility instead of being obliged to endure a reasonable reduction, commensurate with the proportion of her accumulated social security cover, that is, 947 days instead of 1,095 (see, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 45; Wieczorek, cited above, § 67; Maggio and Others v. Italy, nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, § 62, 31 May 2011; Banfield v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 6223/04, 18 October 2005; and Laki?evi? and Others, cited above, § 72).
56. The Court considers that this course of events amounts to a drastic change in the conditions of the applicant’s access to disability benefits which she was unable to foresee or pre-empt, in that her legitimate expectation of receiving disability pension, if in need and on the strength of the previously paid payroll burdens, was completely removed; and she was never in a position to rectify her situation.
57. Having regard to the above considerations, the Court finds that the applicant was made to bear an excessive and disproportionate individual burden. Consequently, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
58. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
59. The applicant claimed 9,834 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary and EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage. The former figure should correspond to the aggregate value of disability pension undisbursed in the material period.
60. The Government contested these claims.
61. The Court considers it appropriate to award EUR 5,000 in respect of pecuniary damage (having regard to the fact that the violation found only relates to the period after 1 January 2012) and, on the basis of equity, EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
62. The applicant also claimed EUR 6,240 for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court. This sum corresponds to 38.6 hours of legal work, charged at an hourly rate of EUR 150, and 9 hours of paralegal work, charged at an hourly rate of EUR 50, to be billed by her lawyer.
63. The Government contested this claim.
64. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 5,000 covering costs under all heads, from which amount EUR 850 – the sum which has been awarded to the applicant under the Council of Europe’s legal-aid scheme – must be deducted.
C. Default interest
65. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT,
1. Declares, by a majority, the application admissible;

2. Holds, by four votes to three, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention;

3. Holds, by four votes to three,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 4,150 (four thousand one hundred and fifty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

4. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 10 February 2015, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith I??l Karaka?
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judges Keller, Spano and Kjølbro is annexed to this judgment.
A.I.K.
S.H.N.
JOINT DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES KELLER, SPANO AND KJØLBRO
I.
1. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention has never, before today, been interpreted by this Court as obliging member States to provide persons with the right to social security benefits, in the form of disability pensions, independently of their having an assertable right to such a pension under domestic law. The majority have thus expanded the scope of the right to property under the Convention in a manner that is flatly inconsistent with this Court’s case-law and the object and purpose of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. As the right to property under the European Convention on Human Rights is not an autonomous repository for economic and social rights not granted by the member States, we respectfully dissent.
II.
2. We will start by recapitulating the case-law of the Court in this area.
3. As explained in the Grand Chamber’s admissibility decision in Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom ((dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 50, ECHR 2005 X):
“The Court’s approach to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 should reflect the reality of the way in which welfare provision is currently organised within the member States of the Council of Europe. It is clear that within those States, and within most individual States, there exists a wide range of social security benefits designed to confer entitlements which arise as of right. Benefits are funded in a large variety of ways: some are paid for by contributions to a specific fund; some depend on a claimant’s contribution record; many are paid for out of general taxation on the basis of a statutorily defined status ... Given the variety of funding methods, and the interlocking nature of benefits under most welfare systems, it appears increasingly artificial to hold that only benefits financed by contributions to a specific fund fall within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Moreover, to exclude benefits paid for out of general taxation would be to disregard the fact that many claimants under this latter type of system also contribute to its financing, through the payment of tax.”
4. As the Grand Chamber went on to observe (ibid., § 51, emphasis added):
“In the modern, democratic State, many individuals are, for all or part of their lives, completely dependent for survival on social security and welfare benefits. Many domestic legal systems recognise that such individuals require a degree of certainty and security, and provide for benefits to be paid – subject to the fulfilment of the conditions of eligibility – as of right. Where an individual has an assertable right under domestic law to a welfare benefit, the importance of that interest should also be reflected by holding Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be applicable.”
5. However, the Grand Chamber cautiously introduced an important caveat in this regard by stating (ibid., §§ 54-55, emphasis added) that:
“It must, nonetheless, be emphasised that the principles ... which apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, are equally relevant when it comes to welfare benefits. In particular, the Article does not create a right to acquire property. It places no restriction on the Contracting State’s freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security scheme, or to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under any such scheme ... . If, however, a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit – whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements ...”
In relation to cases concerning a complaint under Article 14, in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, to the effect that the applicant had been denied all or part of a particular benefit on a discriminatory ground covered by Article 14, the Grand Chamber concluded:
“the relevant test is whether, but for the condition of entitlement about which the applicant complains, he or she would have had a right, enforceable under domestic law, to receive the benefit in question ... Although Protocol No. 1 does not include the right to receive a social security payment of any kind, if a State does decide to create a benefits scheme, it must do so in a manner which is compatible with Article 14.”
6. Thus, it follows clearly from Stec and Others (cited above), as confirmed by the Grand Chamber in Andrejeva v. Latvia ([GC], no. 55707/00, § 77, ECHR 2009), and again more recently in Stummer v. Austria ([GC], no. 37452/02, § 82, ECHR 2011), that the Convention itself does not provide a right to become the owner of property, a right to receive any pension or other social security benefits, or a right to social security benefits of a particular amount. We observe, however, that Stec and Others (cited above) was limited to the question whether the welfare benefit concerned by the complaint fell within the “ambit” of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for the purposes of Article 14. But the Court has subsequently applied a similar test of applicability to complaints inviting it to find an independent violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, thus examining whether the withdrawal of social security and welfare benefits was in conformity with the requirements of legality and proportionality under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for example, Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 67, 8 December 2009, and Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 39, 15 September 2009). In such cases the Court has maintained its constant position that such a claim of an unjustified interference with a right in the field of welfare rights will not be considered to fall under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 if the applicant cannot demonstrate, as an absolute threshold issue, that he or she had, at the time of the interference, an “assertable right” under domestic law. Consequently, as most recently confirmed once again by the Court in Richardson v. the United Kingdom ((dec.) no. 26252/08, 10 April 2012, § 17), where “the person concerned does not satisfy, or ceases to satisfy, the legal conditions laid down in domestic law for the grant of any particular form of benefits or pension, there is no interference with the rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1” (emphasis added); the Court referred to the cases of Bellet, Huertas and Vialatte v. France, (dec.) no. 40832/98, 27 April 1999, and Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009.
III.
7. It is undisputed in the present case, and the majority acknowledge as much (see paragraphs 41-42 of the judgment), that the applicant had no assertable right under domestic law to the disability pension she requested in February and August 2012, the rejection of which subsequently formed the basis of her claim that was ultimately dismissed by the Administrative and Labour Court on 20 June 2013. More than two years had thus passed since her right to a disability pension had been withdrawn and the judicial proceedings, in which the applicant challenged that withdrawal, had come to an end on 1 April 2011. Therefore, her application to the Court, as regards those proceedings, was correctly dismissed by the Court as inadmissible ratione temporis under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (see paragraph 31 of the judgment).
This irrefutable legal fact should, in our view, have been the end of the matter, as the existence of an arguable claim under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, in the field of welfare benefits, is firmly conditioned on the existence of a right to such benefits under domestic law, as we have explained in paragraphs 2-6 above. In other words, the Convention does not provide for a right to a disability pension independently of national law.
8. The majority attempt to circumvent this limitation of the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the field of social and welfare rights by intro-ducing, for the first time, the notion that an applicant, having once had a right to a disability pension under domestic law, indefinitely retains a “legitimate expectation to receive a disability pension/allowance as and when her medical condition would so necessitate” (see paragraph 47 of the judgment). Although it is clear that the applicant lost any assertable right to a disability pension in 2010, the majority thus nevertheless conclude that the “expectation of the applicant, as a contributor to the social security scheme who once satisfied the condition of eligibility, is legitimate and continuous in its legal nature” (see paragraph 48, in fine, of the judgment).
9. Firstly, we note, with respect, that the majority refrain from openly recognising that this approach entails a completely novel understanding of the concept of “legitimate expectations” under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 never before seen in this Court’s case-law and certainly not in the field of social and welfare rights. The majority thus purport to “apply” the general principles of the Court’s case-law, as reiterated in paragraphs 35-39 of the judgment, the correct application of which could not possibly have led to the result arrived at by the majority.
10. Secondly, we would point out that the Court has previously held that the autonomous concept of “possessions” under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is not limited to “existing possessions”, but may also cover assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a reasonable and “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right (see, among other authorities, Önery?ld?z v. Turkey, no. 48939/99, § 124, ECHR 2004-XII). Thus, for there to be any possibility for an applicant to have an arguable right under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, on the basis of a “legitimate expectation”, that expectation must be based on some normative legal source at domestic level that can reasonably confer a property right on him or her. It goes without saying that a legitimate expectation to a property right does not arise where the person in question cannot possibly be the recipient of such a right in national law in the light of its nature and legal origins. As the Grand Chamber stated unequivocally in Kopecký v. Slovenia ([GC], 44912/98, § 50, ECHR 2004 IX), “no legitimate expectation [under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1] can be said to arise where there is a dispute as to the correct interpretation and application of domestic law and the applicant’s submissions are subsequently rejected by the national courts” (see also Anheuser-Busch Inc v. Portugal, [GC], no. 73049/01, § 65, ECHR 2007 I).
11. Consequently, the majority’s reasoning raises the following crucial question: what is the normative legal source of the “continuous” legitimate expectation that the majority consider the applicant to have? It is undisputed that it is not to be found in the domestic law of Hungary. Again, the applicant had no right to the pension in question in 2012. The existence of such a right was unambiguously rejected by the national courts. Therefore, as Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not create a right to acquire property and, more importantly, places no restriction on the Contracting State’s freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security scheme, it is self-evident that in 2012, two years after she lost her domestic right to the disability pension, the applicant could not possibly have had a legitimate expectation under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of retaining an autonomous right that was non-existent within the confines of the right to property under the Convention. Again, as the Court stated as a general principle just over three years ago in Richardson (cited above, § 17), where the person concerned does not satisfy, or “ceases to satisfy”, the legal conditions laid down in domestic law for the grant of any particular form of benefits or pension, there is no interference with the rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
12. The majority seem to be influenced by the notion that the applicant contributed to the pension scheme in question during the time she was employed (see paragraphs 48-49 of the judgment). However, this issue is irrelevant for the purposes of the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the context of the present case. In any event, the applicant has not argued, nor demon¬strated in any way before this Court, that the contributory scheme in question was in the form of compulsory contributions, for example to a pension fund or a social insurance scheme, that created a direct link between the level of contributions and the benefits awarded. Therefore, the applicant did not, at any given moment, have an identifiable and claimable share in a particular fund for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, or so-called “purchased rights” within the meaning of the Convention (see, for example, Müller v. Austria, no. 5849/72, Commission decision of 1 October 1975, Decisions and Reports (DR) 3, p. 25; G v. Austria, no. 10094/82, Commission decision of 14 May 1984, DR 38, p. 84; and De Kleine Staarman v. the Netherlands, no. 10503/83, Commission decision of 16 May 1985, DR 42, p. 162).
13. Therefore, the question whether or not the applicant contributed to some extent to the public pension scheme in question, and had her contributory record taken into account when assessing whether she had a right to the disability pension in 2001, has no bearing on the issue of the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 when, in 2012, she clearly had no right to such a pension under the new domestic scheme introduced by Act no. CXCI (see paragraph 10 of the judgment). This understanding of the applicability of the right to property under the Convention follows directly from Stec and Others (cited above), which made redundant, in principle, the distinction between contributory or non-contributory pension schemes in the member States for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In both situations, the applicant must demonstrate that he or she had an assertable right under domestic law for Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to apply. That is simply not the case for the present applicant.
IV.
14. In conclusion, the applicant might have had an arguable claim under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention when her disability pension was withdrawn in 2010, as finally decided by the Hungarian courts in 2011. However, the Court does not have temporal jurisdiction to decide that issue. The majority cannot remedy this situation by inventing a substantive right to a disability pension under the Convention, where none exists, with unforeseen consequences for the social security and welfare systems of the 47 member States of the Council of Europe.

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo della proprietà) danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale danno Patrimoniale soddisfazione Equa)



SECONDA SEZIONE








CAUSA BÉLÁNÉ NAGY C. UNGHERIA

(Richiesta n. 53080/13)







SENTENZA



STRASBOURG

10 febbraio 2015





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.



Nella causa di Béláné Nagy c. l'Ungheria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Il ?Karaka, ?Presidente
András Sajó,
Nebojša Vuini?,
Helen Keller,
Egidijus Kris?,
Robert Spano,
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 6 gennaio 2015,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 53080/13) contro l'Ungheria depositò con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino ungherese, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 12 agosto 2013.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Budapest. Il Governo ungherese (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col Sig. Z. Tallódi, Agente, Ministero di Amministrazione pubblica e la Giustizia.
3. Il richiedente addusse che lei aveva perso il suo sostentamento, solamente garantì con un assegno di invalidità, come un risultato dei cambi in legislazione fatta domanda con le autorità senza l'equità benché la sua salute non aveva migliorato mai. Lei si appellò su Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
4. 21 gennaio 2014 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
5. Sul 2014 patrocinio gratuito di 27 agosto fu accordato al richiedente.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1959 e vive in Baktalórántháza.
7. Nel 2001 la perdita del richiedente di veste di lavorare fu valutata per essere 67 per cento come di 1 aprile 2001, e lei fu accordata una pensione di invalidità (vedere paragrafo 18 sotto). Questa valutazione fu sostenuta in 2003, 2006 e 2007.
8. Facendo seguito ad una modifica della metodologia applicabile ma apparentemente senza qualsiasi cambio sostanziale nella sua salute, il livello dell'invalidità del richiedente fu cambiato a 40 per cento 1 dicembre 2009. Senza prevedere la sua riabilitazione, il pannello di valutazione elencò il prossimo controllo del suo status medico per novembre 2012.
Come una conseguenza di lei 40 per livello di cento dell'invalidità, il suo diritto alla pensione di invalidità fu ritirato come di 1 febbraio 2010.
Il richiedente impugnò questa decisione in corte, ma il Nyíregyháza Labour Corte respinse la sua azione 1 aprile 2011, nonostante un'opinione competente che afferma che la condizione del richiedente non migliorava dal 2007. Il richiedente fu obbligato per rimborsare gli importi ricevuti dopo 1 febbraio 2010.
9. Nel 2011 il richiedente richiese un'altra valutazione della sua invalidità. A settembre 2011 l'autorità di primo-istanza lo valutò a 45 per cento, elencando la prossima valutazione per settembre 2014. L'autorità di secondo-istanza cambiò questo risultato a 50 per cento, con una rivalutazione dovuto a marzo 2015. Tale livello l'avrebbe data un titolo ad a pensione di invalidità, aveva la sua riabilitazione non stato possibile (vedere paragrafo 19 sotto). Comunque, questa volta la valutazione previde la riabilitazione del richiedente in una tempo-cornice di 36 mesi durante che il tempo lei era ricevere assegno di riabilitazione.
10. Come di 1 gennaio 2012, una legge nuova su assegni di invalidità (l'Atto n. CXCI di 2011) entrò in vigore. Introdusse criterio di applicabilità supplementare (vedere paragrafo 20 sotto). Invece di adempiere al periodo di servizio richiesto con la legislazione precedente, l'invalido deve avere almeno notevolmente, 1,095 giorni coprirono con previdenza sociale nei cinque anni che precedono l'osservazione di suo o la sua richiesta. Persone che non soddisfano questo requisito possono qualificare ciononostante se loro non avessero nessuna interruzione di coperta sociale per più di 30 giorni in tutta carriera loro, o se loro fossero in ricevuta di una pensione di invalidità 31 dicembre 2011.
11. A febbraio 2012 il richiedente presentò un'altra richiesta per assegno di invalidità. La sua condizione fu valutata ad aprile 2012, mentre conducendo alla sentenza di 50 per l'invalidità di cento. 5 giugno 2012 la sua richiesta fu respinta perché lei non aveva il periodo richiesto di coperta sociale. Riabilitazione non fu prevista. La prossima valutazione fu elencata per aprile 2014.
12. 2 agosto 2012 il richiedente presentò una richiesta nuova per pensione di invalidità sotto la legge nuova su assegni di invalidità e subì un'altra valutazione nella quale il livello della sua invalidità fu stabilito di nuovo a 50 per cento. Riabilitazione non fu prevista.
13. In principio, tale livello dell'invalidità darebbe un titolo al richiedente ad una pensione di invalidità sotto il sistema nuovo. Comunque, poiché la sua pensione di invalidità era stata terminata a febbraio 2010 (quel è, lei non era in ricevuta di una pensione di invalidità 31 dicembre 2011) e, inoltre, lei non era in una posizione per accumulare il numero richiesto di giorni coperto con previdenza sociale o lei non era eleggibile per dimostrare una coperta sociale ed ininterrotta, sotto qualsiasi titolo, per un assegno di invalidità sotto il sistema nuovo. Invece dei 1,095 giorni richiesti coperti con previdenza sociale, il richiedente aveva solamente 947.
14. Di conseguenza, la richiesta di pensione di invalidità del richiedente fu rifiutata sia con le autorità amministrative e competenti (il 2012 e 27 febbraio 2013 di 23 novembre) e col Nyíregyháza Administrative ed Opera Corte, 20 giugno 2013.
15. Come di 1 gennaio 2014, il criterio legislativo e contestato è stato corretto con una prospettiva a prolungando l'eleggibilità per assegno di invalidità a quelli che hanno accumulato uno 2,555 giorni coprì con previdenza sociale in dieci anni o 3,650 giorni in quindici anni. Il richiedente non poteva soddisfare o comunque, questi criterio.
16. Sembra che attualmente il richiedente vive su aiuto.
17. Dal 2013 la Corte Costituzionale esamina un numero di azioni di reclamo che attaccano in essenza gli stessi articoli nuovi su diritti di invalidità (la decisione N. 3227/2013, 3156/2013 e 3235/2014). I reclamanti in quelle procedure sollevarono le loro preoccupazioni costituzionali dopo il definitivo e legando sentenze nazionali, senza fare domanda al Kúria (Corte Suprema) in procedimenti di revisione. Benché queste istanze fossero respinte infine come inammissibile per altre ragioni, la Corte Costituzionale non considerò che, per le loro azioni di reclamo costituzionali quelli reclamanti furono costretti ad essersi avvicinati in anticipo al Kúria per essere accolto.
II. ATTINENTE NAZIONALE E DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE
18. Le disposizioni attinenti di Atto n. LXXXI di 1997 su Social Security Pensione, come in vigore sino a 31 dicembre 2011, purché:
Sezione 4 (1) il c)
“[Sotto i termini di questa legge] pensione di invalidità [vuole dire]: assegni una pensione ad essere sborsato in causa dell'invalidità, a condizione che il tempo di servizio richiesto è stato accumulato.”
Sezione 23 (1)
“Pensione di invalidità è dovuta ad una persona che:
(a) ha sofferto di 67 per perdita di cento di veste di lavorare dovuto a problemi di salute, danneggiamenti fisici o mentali senza qualsiasi prospettiva del miglioramento durante l'anno seguente... [e]
(b) ha accumulato il tempo di servizio necessario [una funzione dell'età, siccome delineato nella legge] [e]
(il c) non lavori regolarmente o guadagni notevolmente meno che di fronte a stato stato disabilitato.”
19. Pensioni di invalidità che riguardano per essere accordato dopo 31 dicembre 2007, lo stesso Atto come in vigore fra 12 marzo e 31 dicembre 2011, purché siccome segue:
Sezione 36/A
“(1) pensione di invalidità sarà dovuta ad una persona che:
un) subì [almeno 79 per perdita di cento di veste di lavorare, o lo stesso fra 50 e 79 per cento se riabilitazione non è fattibile], e
b) accumulò il tempo di servizio richiesto in riguardo della sua età, e
c) [non abbia un reddito o guadagni notevolmente meno che prima], e
d) non riceva ammalato paghi o l'invalidità ammalato paghi.”
20. Atto n. CXCI di 2011 sui Benefici Accordati a Persone con Lavoro Veste Ridotto, in finora come attinente e come in vigore fra il 2012 e 31 dicembre 2013 di 26 luglio, purché siccome segue:
Sezione 2
“(1) una persona il cui status di salute è stato trovato essere 60 per cento o meno, nella rivalutazione complessa dell'autorità di riabilitazione (d'ora innanzi: persone con veste di lavoro ridotto) e che:
un) è stato sostituito un minimi 1,095 giorni con la previdenza sociale sotto sezione 5 di [il Social Security Atto] nei cinque anni che precedono l'osservazione della loro richiesta, e
b) non si è impegnò in qualsiasi soldi-guadagnando le attività e
c) non sta ricevendo qualsiasi assegno in contanti e regolare
sarà eleggibile per assegni accordati a persone con veste di lavoro ridotto.
(2) con derogazione da sottosezione (1) (un), persone
un) chi fu coperto con la previdenza sociale entro 180 giorni dalla conclusione della loro istruzione e di chi coperta di previdenza sociale non fu interrotto per qualsiasi periodo che eccede 30 giorni di fronte all'osservazione della loro richiesta, o
b) chi ricevette sul 2011 pensione di invalidità di 31 dicembre, pensione di invalidità di incidente, assegno di riabilitazione o assegno sociale per persone con danneggiamento di salute
sarà eleggibile per i benefici accordati a persone con veste di lavoro ridotto irrispettoso della durata del periodo coperta con previdenza sociale.
(3) il periodo di assicurazione 1,095-giorno-lungo includerà:
un) il periodo di ammalato paghi, incidente ammalato paghi, gravidanza e beneficio di confino, beneficio di cura di figlio e beneficio di jobseeker;
b) il periodo di pensione di invalidità, pensione di invalidità di incidente, assegno di riabilitazione assegno sociale per persone con danneggiamento di salute;
c) il tempo di servizio accumulò sotto un accordo concluso sotto sezione 34 di [il Social Security Atto] con una prospettiva ad accumulando tempo di servizio e reddito che generano diritto di pensione; purché che l'accordo fu concluso in 31 dicembre 2011.”
Sezione 3
“(1) soggetto alla proposta di riabilitazione dell'autorità di riabilitazione resa nella struttura della rivalutazione complessa, l'assegno per essere accordato per una persona con veste di lavoro ridotto sarà uno:
un) assegno di riabilitazione, o
b) assegno di invalidità.”
Sezione 5
“(1) persone con veste di lavoro ridotto saranno concesse ad assegno di invalidità dove riabilitazione non è raccomandata.”
21. La Corte Costituzionale esaminò Atto n. CXCI di 2011 in decisione n. 40/2012. (XII.6.) AB. Ricordò che la sua giurisprudenza rese differente fra assegni acquisiti con contributo obbligatorio allo schema di previdenza sociale sulla mano del una, ed assegni sociali che non costituiscono “acquistò diritti” sull'altra mano. Gli assegni precedenti (e.g. pensione di anzianità o assegna una pensione a per coniuge superstite) godè proprietà-come protezione costituzionale a causa del loro elemento di assicurazione inerente. Come riguardi il secondo, garantisce fluendo dai requisiti dell'articolo di legge (cioé. protezione delle aspettative legittime, tempo corretto per preparazione) dovrebbe essere osservato come criterio della costituzionalità-invece di requisiti riferiti alla protezione di proprietà. Nella causa-legge della Corte Costituzionale, protezione delle aspettative legittime (o, nelle altre parole, protezione di diritti acquisiti) intese la richiesta del requisito di tempo dovuto per preparazione, mentre conseguendo anche dal principio della sicurezza legale di titoli già acquisiti. Nell'assenza di un titolo già acquisito, la Corte Costituzionale verificherebbe solamente, se il tempo concedè con la legislazione era sufficiente per gli individui per divenire consapevole del suo contenuto. Infatti, era la differenza nella solidità della base di aspettativa che era questione nelle rispettive situazioni.
22. La decisione contiene in particolare i passaggi seguenti:
“30. ... La Corte Costituzionale ha esaminato modifiche a leggi e regolamentazioni relativo a pensioni di invalidità in molte decisioni. Decisione n. 321/B/1996 Ab categorizza l'invalidità assegna una pensione ad in parte come un assegno che incita protezione di proprietà ed in parte come una disposizione di servizio sociale. Come affermato nella decisione, la legge che ‘offre cura sotto il principio costituzionale della previdenza sociale per individui che prima di giungere all'età di pensione della maturità hanno perso la loro capacità di lavorare con ragione dell'invalidità o l'invalidità a causa di incidente. ... Prima di giungendo all'età di pensionamento ufficiale, la pensione di invalidità è un beneficio speciale accordato ad individui basati sulla loro invalidità. Al giungo ad età pensionabile, individui che sono... incapace di lavoro... non è concesso a questo beneficio speciale, perché su conclusione del loro lavoro, loro sono eleggibili per ricevere una pensione della maturità basata sulla loro età. '
31. Decisione n. 1129/B/2008 stati di Ab che pensione di invalidità incorre sotto la categoria di pensionamento personale trae profitto, sebbene il loro ‘acquistò elemento di ' corretto è solamente evidente poiché ‘la sua somma è più grande dopo una lunghezza più lunga di servizio, o è uguale o vicino alla pensione della maturità. Altrimenti il principio della solidarietà è predominante, come l'individuo disabile che non sarebbe eleggibile per una pensione della maturità basato sulla sua età o lunghezza di servizio, è in grado ricevere benefici di pensione dal punto al quale è determinata l'invalidità. '...
32. Nell'interpretazione della Corte Costituzionale, leggi che danno titolo a pensioni di invalidità non costituiscono diritti costituzionali soggettivi, ma è mescolato previdenza sociale e benefici di servizio sociali, disponibile-soggetto alle condizioni di set-ad individui sotto l'età di pensionamento che patisce salute mal che, a causa della loro invalidità, abbia una veste ridotto di lavorare e è in bisogno di assistenza finanziaria a causa della perdita di utili.”
23. Le disposizioni attinenti di Convenzione n. 102 dell'Internazionale Operano Organizzazione (ILO) su Social Security (i Minimi Standard), adottò 28 giugno 1952, legga siccome segue:
Parte IX-beneficio di Invalidamento
Articolo 53
“Ogni Membro per il quale questa Parte di questa Convenzione è in vigore garantirà alle persone protette dalla disposizione di beneficio di invalidamento in conformità con gli Articoli seguenti di questa Parte.”
Articolo 54
“La previdenza coperta includerà l'incapacità per impegnare in qualsiasi l'attività lucrativa, ad una misura prescritta che è probabile che l'incapacità sia permanente o persiste dopo l'esaurimento di indennità di malattia.”
Articolo 55
“Le persone protette comprenderanno--
(un) prescrisse classi di impiegati, mentre non costituendo meno che 50 per cento di tutti gli impiegati; o
(b) prescrisse classi della popolazione economicamente attiva, mentre non costituendo meno che 20 per cento di tutti i residenti; o
(il c) tutti i residenti cui vogliono dire durante la previdenza non eccedono limiti prescritti in tale maniera come attenersi coi requisiti di Articolo 67; o
(d) dove una dichiarazione rese nella virtù di Articolo 3 è in vigore, classi prescritte di impiegati non costituendo meno che 50 per cento di tutti gli impiegati in posti di lavoro industriali che assumono 20 persone o più.”
Articolo 56
“Il beneficio sarà un pagamento periodico calcolato siccome segue:
(un) dove classifica di impiegati o classi della popolazione economicamente attiva è protegguto, in tale maniera come o attenersi coi requisiti di Articolo 65 o coi requisiti di Articolo 66;
(b) dove tutti i residenti cui vogliono dire durante la previdenza non eccedono limiti prescritti sono protegguti, in tale maniera come attenersi coi requisiti di Articolo 67.”
Articolo 57
“1. Il beneficio specificato in Articolo 56 può, in una previdenza coperta, sia garantito almeno--
(un) ad una persona protetta chi ha completato, prima della previdenza, in conformità con articoli prescritti un periodo qualificativo che può essere 15 anni di contributo o lavoro, o 10 anni di residenza; o
(b) dove, in principio, persone del tutto economicamente attive sono proteggute, ad una persona protetta chi ha completato un periodo qualificativo di tre anni di contributo ed in riguardo di chi, mentre lui era di lavorare età, il numero di media annuale e prescritto di contributi è stato pagato.
2. Dove il beneficio assegnò ad in paragrafo 1 è condizionale su un minimo periodo di contributo o lavoro, un beneficio ridotto sarà garantito almeno--
(a) ad una persona protetta chi ha completato, prima della previdenza, in conformità con articoli prescritti un periodo qualificativo di cinque anni di contributo o lavoro; o
(b) dove, in principio, persone del tutto economicamente attive sono proteggute, ad una persona protetta chi ha completato un periodo qualificativo di tre anni di contributo ed in riguardo di chi, mentre lui era di lavorare età, mezzo il numero medio ed annuale di contributi prescrisse in conformità con subparagrafo (b) di paragrafo 1 di questo Articolo è stato pagato.
3. I requisiti di paragrafo 1 di questo Articolo saranno ritenuti per essere soddisfatti dove un beneficio calcolò in conformità ai requisiti di Parte XI ma ad una percentuale di dieci punti abbassi che mostrato nell'Orario appeso a che Parte per il beneficiario standard riguardato è garantita almeno ad una persona protetta chi ha completato, nella conformità con articoli prescritti, cinque anni di contributo, lavoro o residenza.
4. Una riduzione proporzionale della percentuale indicò nell'Orario appeso a Parte che XI possono essere effettuati dove il periodo qualificativo per la pensione che corrisponde alla percentuale ridotto eccede cinque anni di contributo o lavoro ma è meno che 15 anni di contributo o lavoro; una pensione ridotto sarà pagabile in conformità a paragrafo 2 di questo Articolo.”
Articolo 58
“Il beneficio specificò in Articoli 56 e 57 saranno accordati in tutta la previdenza o finché un beneficio di anzianittà diviene pagabile.”
24. La Classificazione Internazionale del Funzionamento, Disabilità e Salute (ICF), girò col Membro Stati dell'Organizzazione della Salute del Mondo (WHO) nel 2001, prevede nella sua parte attinente siccome segue:
Annetta 6
Orientamenti etici per l'uso di ICF, uso Sociale delle informazioni di ICF
“(10) ICF, e tutte le informazioni derivarono dal suo uso, non dovrebbe avere un lavoro negare diritti stabiliti o altrimenti restringere diritti legittimi a benefici per individui o gruppi.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
25. Il richiedente si lamentò che lei aveva perso il suo sostentamento, prima garantito con la pensione di invalidità perché sotto il sistema nuovo, in posto come di 2012, lei non fu concessa più a tale assegno, benché la sua salute era come cattivo come mai, e questo come una conseguenza della legislazione corretta che contiene le condizioni lei non poteva adempiere possibilmente. Lei si appellò su Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo incorre essere esaminata sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che quale legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
26. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
27. Il Governo dibatté che la richiesta dovrebbe essere respinta per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali perché il richiedente non aveva registrato un ricorso per revisione contro entrambe le sentenze del 2011 o 20 giugno 2013 di 1 aprile, una via di ricorso effettiva per esaurire in causa amministrativa.
Loro presentarono inoltre che la richiesta era stata introdotta fuori termini, il tempo-limite di sei-mese per essere contato dalla sentenza del 2011 che ritira originalmente il diritto del richiedente. Nella loro prospettiva, la promulgazione della legge nuova né le re-valutazioni che conseguono né interruppe la gestione di questo tempo-limite.
28. Il richiedente dibatté che una revisione di fronte alla Corte Suprema, più tardi cambiò il nome come Kúria la cui sfera fu limitata statutariamente a questioni di diritto, sarebbe stato futile in entrambi procedura, perché lei non era obiettivamente capace di soddisfare il criterio contenuto nella legge. Inoltre, il suo danno era di un carattere che continua o, alternativamente e più importante, essere contato dalla seconda sentenza che riflette la legislazione del 2012, ragioni per le quali deve essere visto l'articolo di sei-mese siccome rispettato.
29. I richiami di Corte che un ricorso per revisione di fronte al Kúria è una via di ricorso per essere esaurito in civile normalmente, incluso amministrativo, le cause (vedere Béla Szabó c. l'Ungheria, n. 37470/06, 9 dicembre 2008). Comunque, l'articolo di esaurimento deve essere fatto domanda con del grado della flessibilità e senza il formalismo eccessivo. Effettivamente, l'articolo dell'esaurimento è né assoluto né capace di essere fatto domanda automaticamente; nel fare una rassegna se è stato osservato è essenziale per avere riguardo ad alle particolari circostanze di ogni causa individuale (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, § 69 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996IV?). Sotto l'Articolo 35 § 1, ricorso normale dovrebbe essere avuto con un richiedente a via di ricorso che sono disponibili e sufficiente per riconoscere compensazione in riguardo delle violazioni addotte. L'esistenza delle via di ricorso in oggetto non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicuro in teoria ma in pratica, fallendo a loro mancherà quale l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia. Non c'è nessun obbligo per avere ricorso a via di ricorso che sono inadeguate o inefficaci (vedere Akdivar, citato sopra, §§ 66, 67).
30. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte osserva che l'argomento della prima causa era il grado dell'invalidità come stabilito sotto una metodologia legale e nuova. Che della seconda causa-quel è, il problema davvero si lamentò di-era la questione se o non il volume dei contributi passati del richiedente allo schema di previdenza sociale era sufficiente per i fini del regime applicabile di cura di invalidità. Per la Corte, le corti nazionali facevano nessuno più in ambo i casi che faccia domanda gli articoli legali alla situazione del richiedente senza qualsiasi la particolare interpretazione della legge o valutazione della prova. Da allora, nella Corte sta capendo, una revisione prima che il Kúria è limitato a questioni di diritto (un'asserzione del richiedente non contestata col Governo), si soddisfa che un'istanza di revisione per impugnare gli articoli loro sarebbe stata senza qualsiasi prospettiva ragionevole del successo. Nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente, questo viale legale sarebbe stato perciò, inefficace e perciò futile, e la sua non-ricerca non può essere rimproverata al richiedente. Di conseguenza, la richiesta non può essere respinta per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
31. Nonostante il discutibilmente carattere continuo dell'aspettativa legittima del richiedente per ricevere cura di invalidità (vedere il capitolo di Meriti e nel particolare paragrafo 45 sotto), la Corte nota, come riguardi la prima causa che la definitivo decisione nazionale in che causa sull'adempimento del criterio di eleggibilità medico applicabile a che tempo fu dato 1 aprile 2011, quel è, più di sei mesi prima della data di introduzione della richiesta (12 agosto 2013). La Corte è ostacolata perciò, facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, dall'esaminare quel la procedura.
Riguardo alla seconda causa, era 20 giugno 2013 che, entro un definitivo e legando decisione giudiziale, il richiedente fu negato l'eleggibilità per pensione di invalidità sotto i 2012 articoli, per mancanza di periodo sufficiente di coperta sociale. La richiesta, alla misura che concerne il danno del richiedente che trova la sua fonte in che decisione, non può essere respinto perciò per inadempienza con l'articolo di sei -mesi.
32. La Corte nota che la richiesta non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Argomenti delle parti
33. Il richiedente presentò che l'allontanamento della sua pensione di invalidità con vuole dire di emendamenti consecutivi degli articoli di eleggibilità attinenti che terminano nella situazione del 2012, ma senza qualsiasi il miglioramento nella sua salute, costituì un'interferenza ingiustificata coi suoi diritti di Convenzione. Nella sua prospettiva, l'interferenza non perseguì, qualsiasi scopo legittimo ed identificabile ed impose su lei un carico individuale ed eccessivo, mentre prende in considerazione che la conclusione della pensione di invalidità spossessò il richiedente di lei vuole dire di esistenza.
34. Il Governo sia dell'opinione che il richiedente aveva né una proprietà né un'aspettativa legittima, per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Nella loro prospettiva, lei aveva cessato essere concessa alla pensione di invalidità già sotto gli articoli precedenti e, col tempo dell'entrata in vigore della legislazione nuova, aveva nessuno “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Né poteva lei rivendicazione per avere un'aspettativa legittima, per mancanza di soddisfare il criterio di eleggibilità attinente sotto lo schema nuovo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
a. Principi Generali
35. I principi che fanno domanda in cause sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo generalmente N.ro 1 è ugualmente attinente quando viene a sociale e benefici di welfare. In particolare, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non crea un diritto per acquisire proprietà (vedere il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 48 la Serie Un n. 70). Né garantisce, come così qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, per esempio, Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39 ECHR 2004 IX). Effettivamente, il diritto ad una pensione di anzianità o come qualsiasi beneficio sociale in un particolare importo non è incluso simile fra i diritti e le libertà garantite con la Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Aunola c. la Finlandia (il dec.), n. 30517/96, 15 marzo 2001).
36. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 posti nessuna restrizione sulla libertà dello Stato Contraente per decidere se avere in posto o no qualsiasi forma di schema di previdenza sociale, o scegliere il tipo o importo di benefici per prevedere sotto qualsiasi simile schema. Comunque, se un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di un beneficio di welfare-se condizionale o non sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione che genera un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo deve essere considerata N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere, nel contesto di Articolo 14 lettura in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 54 ECHR 2005 X). Per la Corte, il principio secondo lascia spazio ad una particolare interpretazione nel contesto di cura di invalidità che è un beneficio di welfare di un carattere speciale. Fin dalla creazione di contributi ad un fondo pensioni, nelle certe circostanze, crei un diritto di proprietà e tale diritto può essere colpito con la maniera nella quale è distribuito il finanziamento (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citato sopra, § 39), la Corte considera che se il beneficio che era stato accordato sulla base della legislazione vigente e quale fosse stato generato con la creazione di contributi appropriati allo schema e la soddisfazione dei requisiti della legislazione vigente durante il lavoro attivo di uno, fu rimosso-notevolmente con un emendamento retrospettivo al contributo decide-tale misura richiederà una giustificazione convincente per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, lungo come l'altro requisito di chiave vale a dire un status di salute deteriorato, è a posto.
37. Nello Stato democratico e moderno molti individui sono, per tutti o parte di vite loro, completamente dipendente per sopravvivenza sulla previdenza sociale e benefici di welfare. Molti ordinamenti giuridici nazionali riconoscono che simile individui richiedono un grado della certezza e la sicurezza, e prevede per benefici per essere pagato-soggetto all'adempimento delle condizioni dell'eleggibilità-di pieno diritto. Dove un individuo ha un diritto rivendicabile sotto diritto nazionale ad un beneficio di welfare, l'importanza di che interesse dovrebbe essere riflesso anche con sostenendo Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per essere applicabile (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Stec, citato sopra, § 51; Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 39 15 settembre 2009).
38. La Corte ha accettato la possibilità di riduzioni in diritti di previdenza sociale nelle certe circostanze. In particolare, la Corte ha notato il significato che il passaggio di tempo può avere per l'esistenza legale e carattere di benefici di assicurazione sociali. Questo fa domanda sia ad emendamenti a legislazione che può essere adottata in risposta a cambi di società e prospettive che evolvono sulle categorie di persone che hanno bisogno di assistenza sociale ed anche all'evoluzione di situazioni individuali (vedere Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 67, 8 dicembre 2009, e gli ulteriori riferimenti di causa-legge citati therein). Comunque, dove l'importo di un beneficio è ridotto o è cessato, questo può costituire interferenza con proprietà che costringono ad essere giustificate (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citato sopra, § 40; e Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71 28 aprile 2009).
39. Una condizione essenziale per interferenza per essere ritenuto compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale.
Inoltre qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà si può giustificare solamente se notifica un pubblico legittimo (o generale) l'interesse. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 27265/95, § 85 17 ottobre 2002; e Wieczorek c. la Polonia, citato sopra, § 59).
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede anche che qualsiasi interferenza è ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, §§ 81-94 ECHR 2005-VI). L'equilibrio equo e richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardò sopporta un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 la Serie Un n. 52).
b. La richiesta di quelli principi alla causa presente
40. Il richiedente era, come di 2001, concedè ricevere una pensione di invalidità perché lei soddisfece tutte le condizioni legali (vedere paragrafo 7 sopra). Sotto gli articoli in vigore a che tempo, una delle condizioni dell'eleggibilità per pensione di invalidità era l'accumulazione del periodo di servizio richiesto (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra).
41. È vero che lei perse successivamente la sua pensione (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra) perché, sotto una metodologia nuova di valutazione, la sua salute non fu considerata più sufficientemente danneggiato per qualificarla per la pensione. La Corte nota a questa connessione che questo era dovuto ad un cambio nei metodi applicabili piuttosto che ad un miglioramento effettivo nella sua salute.
42. La Corte osserva che, come di gennaio 2012, il sistema di pensione di invalidità fu sostituito con un sistema di assegno che contenne criterio nuovo dell'eleggibilità. Quando nel 2012 il richiedente fece domanda per l'assegno che sostituì la pensione, lei stata trovata ineleggibile, non perché lei non aveva la condizione di invalidità richiesta, ma a causa del periodo insufficiente di coperta sociale-e questo irrispettoso del volume di contributi passati suoi al sistema di previdenza sociale, prima riconobbe, in termini di tempo di servizio, come sufficiente (vedere divide in paragrafi 11, 13 e 14 sopra).
43. Per la Corte, questi cambi nello status del richiedente sotto le regolamentazioni su pension/allowance di invalidità devono essere esaminati dalla prospettiva delle caratteristiche inerenti di simile schemi. È notevole in questo collegamento che la Corte Costituzionale ha fondato che assegni acquisirono con contributi obbligatori allo schema di previdenza sociale può essere visto in parte come “acquistò diritti” (vedere divide in paragrafi 21 e 22 sopra); in particolare, che corte categorizzò l'invalidità assegna una pensione a “in parte come un assegno che incita protezione di proprietà ed in parte come una disposizione di servizio sociale.” Nella prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale, le garanzie che fluiscono da requisiti dell'articolo di legge, vale a dire la protezione delle aspettative legittime fanno domanda come bene ad assegni sociali.
Dividendo grandemente le prospettive della Corte Costituzionale, la Corte si soddisfa perciò che il pensione/assegno di invalidità è un diritto rivendicabile ad un beneficio di welfare riconosciuto sotto il diritto nazionale, e perciò Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra). Effettivamente, essendo un elemento speciale del sistema di pensione, il pensione/asegno di invalidità non è nulla meno che una sicurezza, garantì con virtù della solidarietà di società che dove una persona ha fatto i contributi richiesti allo schema, per esempio con pagando libro paga un certo periodo di tempo opprime su, lui o lei dovrebbe essere concesso ad un assegno, se un deterioramento serio di salute, dando luogo ad incapacità per compiere le attività lucrative così richiede.
44. Nella particolare causa, il richiedente aveva fatto simile contributi allo schema di previdenza sociale siccome fu richiesto durante il tempo del suo lavoro. L'aspettativa legittima e risultante per ricevere cura di invalidità fu riconosciuta ed onorò con le autorità quando accadde la previdenza, e lei fu accordata una pensione di invalidità nel 2001. Lei continuò a godere che “la proprietà” sino a 2010. La sua situazione di salute sembra essere rimasta materialmente immutato in tutto questo ed il periodo che consegue, ed i vari gradi di invalidità attribuirono a questa condizione era solamente la conseguenza di cambi successivi nella metodologia.
45. Per la Corte, l'esistenza del richiedente ha continuato, l'aspettativa legittima e riconosciuta per ricevere cura di invalidità-se la sua salute così richiede ed uguaglia dopo il ritiro della pensione nel 2010-è dimostrato bene col fatto che lei, come una persona che aveva soddisfatto il requisito di contributi era soggetto a conseguendo revisioni periodiche (a settembre 2011, così come in aprile ed agosto 2012, con rivalutazione elencata per 2014 e 2015).
46. Benché non sia stato ratificato con Ungheria o la maggioranza del Consiglio di Membro di Europa Stati, la Corte trova ciononostante Articolo notevole 57 § 1(b) della Convenzione di ILO su Social Security (vedere in paragrafo 23 sopra) secondo che una persona proteggè chi ha completato un periodo qualificativo di tre anni di contributo ed in riguardo di chi, mentre lui o lei erano di lavorare età, il numero di media annuale e prescritto di contributi è stato pagato si considera che sia eleggibile per benefici.
47. In queste circostanze, la Corte è soddisfatta, che, soddisfacendo una volta il requisito amministrativo dello schema di pensione di invalidità come in vigore al primo punto di materiale in tempo (quel è, nel 2001), il richiedente ottenne, per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, un riconoscimento formale della sua aspettativa legittima per ricevere un pensione/assegno di invalidità come e quando la sua condizione medica renderebbe necessario così. Questa aspettativa nasce da nel diritto vigente durante il suo lavoro ed al tempo dell'acquisizione originale di diritti di pensione di invalidità. Dato le disposizioni legali su eleggibilità, questo riconobbe l'aspettativa legittima è di una natura più concreto di una speranza mera come sé fu basato su disposizioni legali (compari e contrasto Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. la Repubblica ceca (il dec.), n. 39794/98, § 73 ECHR 2002 VII).
48. Quel riconobbe l'aspettativa legittima e gli interessi di proprietà riservati generati con la legislazione di un Stato Contraente in vigore al tempo di divenire eleggibile (vedere Stec, citato sopra, § 54) non può essere considerato estinto col fatto che, l'invalidità del richiedente fu segnata in giù a 40 per cento a dicembre 2009 in una metodologia nuova di valutazione, (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra), apparentemente senza cambio di materiale nella sua condizione. Per la Corte, la croce della questione è, che durante il suo lavoro, il richiedente aveva contribuito al sistema di previdenza sociale siccome fu richiesto con la legge che fatto incitò l'obbligo solidarietà-basato e sociale sul lato dello Stato per offrire cura di invalidità da solo, se dovesse accadere una previdenza. Accordando pensione di invalidità nel 2001, le autorità riconobbero implicitamente, che lei soddisfece il criterio attinente. Fra il 2001 ed il 2010 il richiedente godè la proprietà risultante di pensione di invalidità, e quando la sua invalidità fu considerata meno seria, questa proprietà fu sostituita con l'aspettativa legittima e riconosciuta di cura continuata, debba di nuovo le circostanze così richiede.
Irrispettoso della perdita della pensione nel 2010, la Corte è perciò della prospettiva che l'aspettativa del richiedente, come un sottoscrittore allo schema di previdenza sociale che una volta soddisfece la condizione dell'eleggibilità è legittima e continua nella sua natura legale.
Dovrebbe essere ricordato che “se qualsiasi ancora si può dire che distinzione esista nella causa-legge fra benefici contribuente e non contribuenti per i fini dell'applicabilità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo, N.ro 1, c'è nessuno base giustificare il disegnare continuato di tale distinzione” (vedere Stec, citato sopra, § 53). Nella prospettiva della Corte, questa considerazione non può essere riguardata, siccome facendo via con qualsiasi protezione prima riconobbe agli schemi contribuente, in eccesso a quell'a causa di uni non contribuenti. In qualsiasi la causa, la Corte nota che lo schema di pensione di invalidità in oggetto elementi inclusi di un carattere contribuente, siccome sostenuto con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 21, 22 e 43 sopra).
49. Questo diritto del richiedente fu interferito poi con con le autorità, quando nel 2012 lei fu negata cura di invalidità sulla forza di contributi insufficienti resa di passato, benché la sua condizione medica fosse ritenuta di nuovo sufficientemente danneggiato. Si deve sottolineare di nuovo che questi contributi, originalmente formulati come tempo di servizio erano una volta adeguati per che fine, ed il requisito nuovo, espresso in termini della durata di coperta di previdenza sociale fu introdotto solamente più tardi, ad un tempo quando il richiedente era virtualmente più in grado soddisfarlo.
50. Non era in controversia fra le parti che questa interferenza è stata prescritta con legge e la Corte non vede nessuna ragione di sostenere altrimenti. Il rifiuto di assegno di invalidità era precisamente effettivamente, a causa di un cambio nella legge (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Lakievi ?ed Altri c. Montenegro e Serbia, N. 27458/06, 37205/06 37207/06 e 33604/07, § 70 13 dicembre 2011).
51. Come riguardi interesse pubblico o generale, la Corte accetta che la legislazione contestata intraprese lo scopo legittimo del benessere economico della società.
52. Come riguardi la questione della proporzionalità, lo Stato ha evidentemente un certo margine della valutazione in cittadini che regola l'accesso di ' all'invalidità trae profitto, notevolmente con richiedendo un certo volume di contributi allo schema così come un minimo livello legale dell'invalidità. Questi elementi sono suscettibili all'evoluzione nella luce di cambi di società, sviluppo dell'operi mercato e progresso di scienza medica, incluso scelte di riabilitazione.
53. Comunque, la libertà Stati godono in questo campo non può andare come lontano siccome spogliando questo diritto, una volta concesso, della sua molta essenza. Inoltre, i requisiti dell'articolo di legge devono essere osservati, ed una noncuranza retrospettiva di diritti acquisiti e le aspettative legittime, siccome è la causa con contributi di previdenza sociale, deve essere evitato quando misure passeggere di riforme sociali. Come alla questione se l'aspettativa legittima per ricevere cura di invalidità comporta un diritto per non avere le condizioni di eleggibilità cambiato, la Corte nota, con analogia, gli orientamenti Etici del Chi è documento sulla Classificazione Internazionale di Funzionare, l'Invalidità e Salute che non dovrebbero avere un lavoro negare diritti stabiliti o altrimenti restringere diritti legittimi a benefici per individui (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). L'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Amuur c. la Francia, 25 giugno 1996, § 50 le Relazioni 1996 III). Questa considerazione comporta, nel contesto della causa presente, un obbligo Statale per garantire, sulla base della solidarietà di società un certo reddito per quelli cui lavorando pelle di veste sotto il livello statutariamente esposto, purché che loro hanno fatto contributi sufficienti allo schema-e questo senza pregiudizio al principio generale onnipresente nella causa-legge della Corte secondo che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non crea un diritto per acquisire proprietà, né mette qualsiasi restrizione sulla libertà dello Stato Contraente per decidere se avere in posto o no qualsiasi forma di schema di previdenza sociale, o scegliere il tipo o importo di benefici per prevedere sotto qualsiasi simile schema (vedere Stec, § 54 citato sopra in paragrafo 36).
La Corte aggiungerebbe a questa connessione che, come questione dell'articolo di legge, il principio impossibilium nulla obligatio est è di particolare attinenza nella causa presente dove era il richiedente ex posto rimproverato per non avere reso nei contributi sufficienti e passati come determinato con la legislazione nuova-una condizione alla quale lei non poteva incontrare possibilmente che punto in tempo.
54. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, quando il richiedente fu costretto per fare domanda per la pensione per la prima volta, lei già aveva adempiuto il poi requisito amministrativo ed attinente e fu accordato una pensione.
Nonostante lei status di salute essenzialmente immutato, anni lei fu esclusa più tardi dal beneficio, fin dalle indisposizioni che lei aveva fu considerato più sostanziale abbastanza per la continuazione della pensione.
Il suo risultato di invalidità fu sollevato successivamente una volta di nuovo, questo non poteva dare luogo all'accordare una pensione o assegno, perché il criterio amministrativo nuovo che interviene era efficacemente irraggiungibile nella particolare causa del richiedente.
55. Il richiedente fu negato completamente infine, i diritti di previdenza sociale che sarebbero stati altrimenti a causa di lei in prospettiva del suo cattiva salute. È notevole dalla prospettiva della proporzionalità che lei era totalmente spossessata del suo pension/allowance, a causa di una condizione nuova dell'eleggibilità invece di essere obbligato per sopportare una riduzione ragionevole, commisurato con la proporzione di lei coperta di previdenza sociale che è accumulò 947 giorni invece di 1,095 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson citato sopra, § 45; Wieczorek, citato sopra, § 67; Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia, N. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08 54486/08 e 56001/08, § 62 31 maggio 2011; Banfield c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 6223/04, 18 ottobre 2005; e Lakievi ?ed Altri, citato sopra, § 72).
56. La Corte considera che questo corso di importi di eventi ad un cambio drastico nelle condizioni dell'accesso del richiedente all'invalidità trae profitto che lei era incapace prevedere o acquistare per prelazione, in che la sua aspettativa legittima di ricevere pensione di invalidità, se in bisogno e sulla forza del prima libro paga pagato opprime, fu rimosso completamente; e lei non era mai in una posizione per rettificare la sua situazione.
57. Avendo riguardo ad alle considerazioni sopra, i costatazione di Corte che il richiedente è stato reso per sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo e sproporzionato. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
58. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
59. Il richiedente chiese 9,834 euro (EUR) in riguardo di patrimoniale ed EUR 5,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. La cifra precedente dovrebbe corrispondere al valore globale non retribuito di pensione di invalidità di periodo di materiale.
60. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni.
61. La Corte lo considera appropriato assegnare EUR 5,000 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale (avendo riguardo ad al fatto che la violazione fondò solamente riferisce al periodo dopo 1 gennaio 2012) e, sulla base dell'equità, EUR 5,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
Costi di B. e spese
62. Il richiedente chiese anche EUR 6,240 per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alla Corte. Questa somma corrisponde a 38.6 ore di lavoro legale, aggredite un tasso orario di EUR 150 e 9 ore di lavoro di paralegali, aggredite un tasso orario di EUR 50, essere accreditato col suo avvocato.
63. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
64. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare 5,000 costi di copertura la somma di EUR sotto tutti i capi da che l'importo EUR 850-la somma che è stata assegnata al richiedente sotto il Consiglio dello schema di legale-aiuto dell'Europa-deve essere dedotto.
Interesse di mora di C.
65. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE,
1. Dichiara, con una maggioranza, la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene, con quattro voti a tre, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene, con quattro voti a tre,
(a) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, essere convertito nella valuta dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(iii) EUR 4,150 (quattro mila cento e cinquanta euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

4. Respinge, all’unanimità, il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 10 febbraio 2015, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Il ?Karaka?
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudici Keller, Spano e Kjølbro è annesso a questa sentenza.
A.I.K.
S.H.N.
CONGIUNZIONE DELL’ OPINIONE DISSIDENTE DEI GIUDICI KELLER, SPANO E KJØLBRO
I.
1. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non ha mai, fino ad ad oggi, stato interpretato con questa Corte come membro affabile Stati fornire a persone il diritto alla previdenza sociale trae profitto, nella forma di pensioni di invalidità, indipendentemente del loro avere un diritto rivendicabile a tale pensione sotto diritto nazionale. La maggioranza ha espanso così la sfera del diritto a proprietà sotto la Convenzione in una maniera che è piattamente incoerente con la causa-legge di questa Corte e l'oggetto e fine di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Come il diritto a proprietà sotto la Convenzione europea su Diritti umani un ricettacolo autonomo non è per diritti economici e sociali non accordato col membro Stati, noi dissentiamo rispettosamente.
II.
2. Noi cominceremo con ricapitolare la causa-legge della Corte in questa area.
3. Siccome spiegato nella decisione di ammissibilità della Grande Camera in Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito ((il dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 50 ECHR 2005 X):
“L'approccio della Corte ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 dovrebbe riflettere la realtà del modo nella quale disposizione di welfare è organizzata attualmente all'interno del membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa. È chiaro che all'interno di quelli gli Stati, ed all'interno di più Stati individuali, là esiste una serie ampia di benefici di previdenza sociale progettò per conferire diritti che sorgono di pieno diritto. Benefici sono procurati in una grande varietà di modi: alcuni sono pagati per con contributi ad un specifico finanziamento; alcuni dipendono dal documento di contributo di un rivendicatore; molti sono pagati per di tassazione generale sulla base di un statutariamente status definito... Dato la varietà di procurare metodi, e la natura che collega di benefici sotto più sistemi di welfare, sembra in modo crescente artificiale sostenere che solamente benefici finanziarono con contributi ad un specifico finanziamento incorra all'interno della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Inoltre, escludere benefici pagati per di tassazione generale sarebbe trascurare il fatto che molti rivendicatori sotto questo tipo secondo di sistema contribuiscono anche al suo finanziamento, per il pagamento di tassa.”
4. Siccome la Grande Camera seguì ad osservare (l'ibid., § 51, enfasi aggiunse):
“Nel moderno, democratico Statale, molti individui sono, per tutti o parte di vite loro, completamente dipendente per sopravvivenza sulla previdenza sociale e benefici di welfare. Molti ordinamenti giuridici nazionali riconoscono che simile individui richiedono un grado della certezza e la sicurezza, e prevede per benefici per essere pagato-soggetto all'adempimento delle condizioni dell'eleggibilità-di pieno diritto. Dove un individuo ha un diritto rivendicabile sotto diritto nazionale ad un beneficio di welfare, l'importanza di che interesse dovrebbe essere riflesso anche con sostenendo Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per essere applicabile.”
5. La Grande Camera introdusse cautamente comunque, un importante caveat in questo riguardo a con affermando (l'ibid., §§ 54-55, enfasi aggiunse) quel:
“Deve, nondimeno, sia enfatizzato che i principi... quali fanno domanda in cause sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo generalmente N.ro 1, è ugualmente attinente quando viene a benefici di welfare. In particolare, l'Articolo non crea un diritto per acquisire proprietà. Non mette restrizione sulla libertà dello Stato Contraente per decidere se avere in posto o no qualsiasi forma di schema di previdenza sociale, o scegliere il tipo o importo di benefici per prevedere sotto qualsiasi simile schema... . Comunque, se un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di un beneficio di welfare-se condizionale o non sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione che genera un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo deve essere considerata N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti...”
In relazione a cause riguardo ad un'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14, in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, all'effetto che il richiedente era stato negato tutti o parte di un particolare beneficio su una base discriminatoria coprì con Articolo 14, la Grande Camera concluse:
“la prova attinente è se, ma per la condizione di diritto della quale il richiedente si lamenta, lui o lei avrebbe avuto un diritto, esecutivo sotto diritto nazionale, ricevere il beneficio in oggetto... Benché Protocollo N.ro 1 non include il diritto per ricevere un pagamento di previdenza sociale di qualsiasi il genere, se un Stato decide di creare un schema di benefici, deve fare così in una maniera che è compatibile con Articolo 14.”
6. Chiaramente segue così, da Stec ed Altri (citò sopra), come confermato con la Grande Camera in Andrejeva c. la Lettonia ([GC], n. 55707/00, § 77 ECHR 2009), e di nuovo più recentemente in Stummer c. l'Austria ([GC], n. 37452/02, § 82 ECHR 2011), che la Convenzione stessa non offre un diritto per divenire il proprietario di proprietà, un diritto per ricevere qualsiasi la pensione o l'altra previdenza sociale trae profitto, o un diritto alla previdenza sociale trae profitto di un particolare importo. Comunque, noi osserviamo che Stec ed Altri (citò sopra) fu limitato alla questione se il beneficio di welfare riguardò con la pelle di azione di reclamo entro il “l'ambito” di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per i fini di Articolo 14. Ma la Corte ha fatto domanda successivamente una prova simile dell'applicabilità ad azioni di reclamo che l'invitano a trovare una violazione indipendente di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, esaminando così se il ritiro della previdenza sociale e benefici di welfare era in conformità ai requisiti della legalità e la proporzionalità sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, per esempio, Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 67, 8 dicembre 2009, e Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 39 15 settembre 2009). In simile cause la Corte ha mantenuto la sua posizione continua che non si considererà che tale rivendicazione di un'interferenza ingiustificata con un diritto nel campo di diritti di welfare incorra Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto, N.ro 1 se il richiedente non può dimostrare, come un problema di soglia assoluto che lui o lei avevano, al tempo dell'interferenza un “diritto rivendicabile” sotto diritto nazionale. Di conseguenza, come più recentemente ancora una volta confermò con la Corte in Richardson c. il Regno Unito ( dec.) n. 26252/08, 10 aprile 2012 § 17), dove “la persona riguardata non soddisfa, o cessa soddisfare, le condizioni legali posarono in giù in diritto nazionale per la concessione di qualsiasi la particolare forma di benefici o assegna una pensione a, non c'è interferenza coi diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1” (enfasi aggiunse); la Corte si riferì alle cause di Bellet, Huertas e Vialatte c. la Francia, (il dec.) n. 40832/98, 27 aprile 1999, e Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71, 28 aprile 2009.
III.
7. È incontrastato nella causa presente, e la maggioranza ammette come molto (vedere divide in paragrafi 41-42 della sentenza), che il richiedente non aveva diritto rivendicabile sotto diritto nazionale alla pensione di invalidità lei richiese in febbraio ed agosto 2012, il rifiuto di che successivamente formò la base della sua rivendicazione che è stata respinta ultimamente con l'Amministrativo ed Opera Corte 20 giugno 2013. Più di due anni erano passati così fin da diritto suo ad una pensione di invalidità era stato ritirato ed i procedimenti giudiziali nei quali impugnò il richiedente che ritiro, aveva finito 1 aprile 2011. Perciò, la sua richiesta alla Corte, come riguarda quelli procedimenti, fu respinto correttamente con la Corte come ratione temporis inammissibile sotto Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 31 della sentenza).
Questo fatto legale ed irrefutabile deve, nella nostra prospettiva, è stato la fine della questione, come l'esistenza di una rivendicazione difendibile sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, nel campo di benefici di welfare è condizionato fermamente sull'esistenza di un diritto a simile benefici sotto diritto nazionale, siccome noi abbiamo spiegato in paragrafi 2-6 sopra. Nelle altre parole, la Convenzione non prevede indipendentemente per un diritto ad una pensione di invalidità di legge nazionale.
8. La maggioranza tenta di circonvenire questa limitazione della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nel campo di sociale e diritti di welfare con intro-ducing, per la prima volta la nozione che un richiedente, avendo avuto una volta un diritto ad una pensione di invalidità sotto diritto nazionale trattiene indefinitamente un “l'aspettativa legittima per ricevere un pension/allowance di invalidità come e quando la sua condizione medica renderebbe necessario così” (vedere paragrafo 47 della sentenza). Benché sia chiaro che il richiedente perse qualsiasi diritto rivendicabile ad una pensione di invalidità nel 2010, la maggioranza conclude così ciononostante che il “l'aspettativa del richiedente, come un sottoscrittore allo schema di previdenza sociale che una volta soddisfece la condizione dell'eleggibilità è legittima e continua nella sua natura legale” (vedere paragrafo 48, in multa della sentenza).
9. In primo luogo, noi notiamo, a riguardo del ritornello della maggioranza per cui apertamente il riconoscimento di questo approccio comporta una nuova comprensione del concetto di “aspettative legittime” sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 mai visto prima nella giurisprudenza di questa Corte e certamente non nel campo di sociale e diritti di welfare. La maggioranza così il senso a “faccia domanda” i principi generali della causa-legge della Corte, siccome reiterato in paragrafi 35-39 della sentenza, la richiesta corretta di che non poteva condurre possibilmente al risultato arrivò a con la maggioranza.
10. In secondo luogo, noi indicheremmo che la Corte prima ha sostenuto che il concetto autonomo di “le proprietà” sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non è limitato “proprietà esistenti”, ma può coprire anche beni, incluso rivendicazioni in riguardo del quale può dibattere il richiedente che lui o lei hanno almeno un ragionevole e “l'aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Öneryldz ?c. la Turchia, n. 48939/99, § 124 ECHR 2004-XII). Così, per là per essere qualsiasi possibilità per un richiedente di avere un diritto difendibile sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, sulla base di un “l'aspettativa legittima”, che l'aspettativa deve essere basata su della fonte legale e normativa a livello nazionale che può conferire ragionevolmente un diritto di proprietà su lui o lei. Va senza dire che un'aspettativa legittima ad un diritto di proprietà non sorge dove la persona in oggetto non può essere possibilmente il destinatario di tale diritto in legge nazionale nella luce della sua natura ed origini legali. Siccome la Grande Camera affermò inequivocabilmente in Kopecký c. la Slovenia ([GC], 44912/98, § 50 ECHR 2004 IX), “nessuna aspettativa legittima [sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1] si può dire che sorga, dove c'è una controversia come all'interpretazione corretta e la richiesta di diritto nazionale e le osservazioni del richiedente è respinto successivamente con le corti nazionali” (vedere anche Anheuser-Busch Inc c. il Portogallo, [GC], n. 73049/01, § 65 ECHR 2007 io).
11. Di conseguenza, la maggioranza sta discutendo aumenti la questione cruciale e seguente: di cosa è la fonte legale e normativa il “continuo” l'aspettativa legittima che la maggioranza considera il richiedente per avere? È incontrastato che non sarà trovato nel diritto nazionale dell'Ungheria. Di nuovo, il richiedente aveva nessuno diritto alla pensione in oggetto nel 2012. L'esistenza di tale diritto fu respinta inequivocabilmente con le corti nazionali. Perciò, come Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non crea un diritto per acquisire proprietà e, più importante, posti nessuna restrizione sulla libertà dello Stato Contraente per decidere se avere in posto o no qualsiasi forma di schema di previdenza sociale, è ovvio che nel 2012, due anni dopo che lei perse il suo diritto nazionale alla pensione di invalidità, il richiedente non poteva avere possibilmente un'aspettativa legittima sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 di trattenere un diritto autonomo che era non-esistente all'interno dei confini del diritto a proprietà sotto la Convenzione. Di nuovo, siccome la Corte affermò come un principio generale equo più di tre anni fa in Richardson (citò sopra, § 17), dove la persona riguardata non soddisfa, o “cessa soddisfare”, le condizioni legali posarono in giù in diritto nazionale per la concessione di qualsiasi la particolare forma di benefici o assegna una pensione a, non c'è interferenza coi diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
12. La maggioranza sembra essere influenzata con la nozione che il richiedente ha contribuito allo schema di pensione in oggetto durante il tempo lei ebbe un lavoro (vedere divide in paragrafi 48-49 della sentenza). Comunque, questo problema è irrilevante per i fini dell'applicabilità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nel contesto della causa presente. In qualsiasi l'evento, il richiedente non ha dibattuto, né demon¬strated in qualsiasi modo di fronte a questa Corte che lo schema contribuente in oggetto era nella forma di contributi obbligatori, per esempio ad un fondo pensioni o un piano assicurativo sociale che hanno creato un collegamento diretto fra il livello di contributi ed i benefici assegnato. Perciò, il richiedente non faceva a qualsiasi momento determinato, abbia una quota identificabile e rivendicabile in un particolare finanziamento per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, o così definito “acquistò diritti” all'interno del significato della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Müller c. l'Austria, n. 5849/72, decisione di Commissione di 1 ottobre 1975, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 3, p. 25; il G c. l'Austria, n. 10094/82, decisione di Commissione di 14 maggio 1984, DR 38, p. 84; e De Kleine Staarman c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 10503/83, decisione di Commissione di 16 maggio 1985, DR 42, p. 162).
13. Perciò, la questione se o non il richiedente contribuì a della misura allo schema di pensione pubblico in questione, ed aveva il suo documento contribuente preso in considerazione quando valutando se lei aveva un diritto alla pensione di invalidità nel 2001, non ha nascendo sul problema dell'applicabilità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 quando, nel 2012, lei chiaramente aveva, nessuno diritto a tale pensione sotto lo schema nazionale e nuovo introdotto con Atto n. CXCI (vedere paragrafo 10 della sentenza). Questa comprensione dell'applicabilità del diritto a proprietà sotto la Convenzione segue direttamente da Stec ed Altri (citò sopra) che rese ridondante in principio, la distinzione fra schemi di pensione contribuente o non contribuenti nel membro Stati per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. In ambo le situazioni, il richiedente deve dimostrare, che lui o lei avevano un diritto rivendicabile sotto diritto nazionale per Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per fare domanda. Quel non è semplicemente la causa per il richiedente presente.
IV.
14. In conclusione, il richiedente avrebbe avuto una rivendicazione difendibile sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione quando la sua pensione di invalidità fu ritirata nel 2010, come infine decise con le corti ungheresi nel 2011. Comunque, la Corte non ha giurisdizione temporale per decidere quel il problema. La maggioranza non può rimediare a questa situazione con inventando un diritto effettivo ad una pensione di invalidità sotto la Convenzione, dove nessuno esiste, con conseguenze impreviste per la previdenza sociale e sistemi di welfare del membro del 47 Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 26/03/2020.