Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF STATILEO v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 12027/10/2014
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 10/07/2014
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Preliminary objection dismissed (Article 35-1 - Exhaustion of domestic remedies) Preliminary objection dismissed (Article 35-3-b - No significant disadvantage) Remainder inadmissible Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property) Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award



FIRST SECTION







CASE OF STATILEO v. CROATIA

(Application no. 12027/10)










JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

10 July 2014






This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Statileo v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Khanlar Hajiyev, President,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse,
Dmitry Dedov, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 17 June 2014,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 12027/10) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 27 January 2010.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, an advocate practising in Split. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that his inability to charge adequate rent for the lease of his flat had been in violation of his property rights.
4. On 28 June 2011 the application was communicated to the Government.
5. By a letter of 6 December 2011 the applicant’s representative informed the Court that the applicant had died on 6 February 2011 and that his statutory heir Mr Boris Filičić wished to pursue the application (see paragraphs 88-89 below).
6. Ksenija Turković, the judge elected in respect of Croatia, withdrew from sitting in the case (Rule 28 of the Rules of Court). The Government accordingly appointed Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, the judge elected in respect of Monaco, to sit in her place (Article 26 § 4 of the Convention and Rule 29).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
7. The applicant was born in 1952 and lived in Split.
8. He was the owner of a flat in Split with a surface area of 66.76 square metres.
9. On 17 October 1955 a certain Ms P.A. was, on the basis of the Decree on Administration of Residential Buildings of 1953 (see paragraph 24 below), awarded the right to live in the flat and moved in together with her mother and her cousin I.T. (born in 1948) whom her parents had entrusted to P.A.’s care in 1951. This right was by the entry into force of the Housing Act of 1959 transformed into the specially protected tenancy (stanarsko pravo, see paragraphs 24-30 below about the specially protected tenancy in the former Yugoslavia).
10. P.A. and I.T. lived together in the applicant’s flat until P.A. moved out in 1973. I.T. continued to live there with her husband and her son, Ig.T. (born in 1972). I.T.’s husband died in 1998.
11. On 5 November 1996 the Lease of Flats Act entered into force. It abolished the legal concept of the specially protected tenancy and provided that the holders of such tenancies in respect of, inter alia, privately owned flats were to become “protected lessees” (zaštićeni najmoprimci, see paragraphs 31 and 40 below). Under the Act such lessees are subject to a number of protective measures, such as the duty of landlords to contract a lease of indefinite duration, payment of protected rent (zaštićena najamnina), the amount of which is set by the Government and significantly lower than the market rent; and better protection against termination of the lease.
A. Civil proceedings
12. The applicant refused to conclude a lease contract with I.T. stipulating the protected rent pursuant to section 31(1) of the Lease of Flats Act (see 40 below). On 16 May 1997 I.T. brought a civil action against him in the Split Municipal Court (Općinski sud u Splitu), relying on section 33(3) of the same Act (see paragraph 43 below), with a view to obtaining a judgment in lieu of such a contract.
13. Shortly afterwards in 1997 the applicant brought a civil action in the same court seeking to obtain a judgment ordering I.T. and her son to vacate the flat in question. He argued that she had not been “a child without parents” and thus could not have been considered a member of P.A.’s household within the meaning of section 9(4) of the 1974 Housing Act or section 12(1) of the 1985 Housing Act (see respectively paragraphs 28 and 29 below). Consequently, she could not have taken over the specially protected tenancy after P.A. had moved out of the flat in 1973, and thus had not had any title to use it.
14. The two proceedings were subsequently joined.
15. By a judgment of 2 September 2002 the Split Municipal Court found in favour of I.T. and her son in part. It ordered the applicant to conclude with I.T. a lease contract stipulating protected rent in the amount of 102.14 Croatian kunas (HRK) – approximately 14 euros (EUR) at the time – per month within fifteen days; otherwise the judgment would substitute such a contract. Since the existence of a specially protected tenancy was a necessary precondition for acquiring the status of a protected lessee under the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 11 above) the court had first to determine, as a preliminary issue, whether I.T. had become the holder of the specially protected tenancy after P.A. had moved out of the flat in 1973. The court held that, unlike the subsequent legislation relied on by the applicant, the legislation in force at the material time, namely the Housing Act of 1962, had not defined who could have been considered a member of the household of a holder of a specially protected tenancy (see paragraph 27 below). Thus, given that I.T. had been in foster care by P.A. and lived with her in the flat in question, she could have been considered as a member of her household and therefore could, after P.A. had moved out of the flat in 1973, taken over the specially protected tenancy from her and become the holder thereof. Consequently, when in November 1996 the Lease of Flats Act entered into force, I.T. had, as the holder of the specially protected tenancy, become a protected lessee by the operation of law and was entitled to conclude a lease contract stipulating protected rent with the applicant (see paragraphs 39-40 below). While the court ruled that I.T.’s son could be listed in the lease contract as a member of her household, it also held that her daughter-in-law and her grandson could not because they had not moved into the flat until after the entry into force of the Lease of Flats Act, when specially protected tenancies could no longer be obtained.
16. On 28 June 2006 the Požega County Court (Županijski sud u Požegi) dismissed an appeal by the applicant and upheld the first-instance judgment, which thereby became final.
17. The applicant then lodged a complaint with the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) alleging violations of his right to equality before the law, his right to a fair hearing and his right of ownership under the Constitution (see paragraph 23 below).
18. On 17 September 2009 the Constitutional Court dismissed the applicant’s constitutional complaint and served its decision on his representative on 2 November 2009.
B. The protected rent
19. According to the information submitted by the parties, the monthly protected rent for the applicant’s flat changed as follows, in line with the increase in the construction price index (see paragraphs 52 and 85 below):

Period The amount of the protected rent

HRK EUR
(average exchange rate in the relevant period)
1 December 1997 – 31 October 2005 102.14 13.36
1 November 2005 – 8 May 2008 157.62 21.48
9 May 2008 – 4 September 2012 174.48 23.66
5 September 2012 – onwards 180.25 23.76

20. It appears from the documents submitted by the Government that the applicant refused to receive the protected rent for the flat and that I.T. therefore had to deposit it with a court.
21. According to the parties the condominium fee paid into the common reserve fund (see paragraph 67 below) by the owner of the flat – the applicant and later his heir – for maintenance etc., was set at HRK 102.81 on 1 January 1998 and has not been changed since.
22. The Government also submitted information from the tax authorities according to which the applicant had never declared any income from renting out the flat. On the other hand, the applicant’s heir did so in his tax returns for 2011 and 2012 where he also asked for a tax deduction on account of costs corresponding to the amount of the condominium fee paid (see paragraphs 67-70 below). The Government did not specify what tax rate was applied.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Constitution
23. The relevant provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 56/90 with subsequent amendments) read as follows:
Article 14(2)
“Everyone shall be equal before the law.”
Article 29(1)
“In the determination of his rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him or her, everyone is entitled to a fair hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial court established by law.”
Article 48
“The right of ownership shall be guaranteed.
Ownership entails obligations. Owners and users of property shall contribute to the general welfare.”
B. Legislation governing specially protected tenancy
24. The “right to a flat”, entitling its holder to permanent and unrestricted use of a flat for living purposes, was introduced into the legal system of the former Yugoslavia in 1953 by the Decree on Administration of Residential Buildings (Uredba o upravljanju stambenim zgradama) of 1953. The Housing Act (Zakon o stambenim odnosima) of 1959 was the first legislative act that introduced the legal concept of the “specially protected tenancy” (stanarsko pravo). Once awarded, it entitled its holder and the members of his or her household to permanent (lifelong) and unrestricted use of a particular flat for living purposes against the payment of a nominal fee covering only maintenance costs and depreciation. The holder of a specially protected tenancy could also sub-let a part of the flat to someone else, participate in the administration of the building in which the flat was located, exchange it for another flat (in agreement with the provider of the flat) and, exceptionally, use part of it for business purposes. In legal theory and judicial practice the specially protected tenancy was described as a right sui generis. Such tenancy could be terminated only in judicial proceedings and on limited grounds, the most important one being failure by the holder to use the flat for living for a continuous period of at least six months without justified reason.
25. Until the entry into force of the Housing Act of 1974, specially protected tenancies could be awarded in respect of both socially and privately owned flats. However, in the large majority of cases they were awarded in respect of flats in “social ownership” (društveno vlasništvo) – a type of ownership which did not exist in other socialist countries but was particularly highly developed in the former Yugoslavia. According to the official doctrine, property in social ownership had no owner, the role of public authorities in respect of such property being confined to management. With the Housing Act of 1974 it was no longer possible to award specially protected tenancies in respect of flats in private ownership. However, the pre-existing specially protected tenancies in respect of such flats were preserved.
26. The legal relationship between the providers of flats (public authorities which nominally controlled and were allocating socially-owned flats, or owners of privately-owned flats) and holders of specially protected tenancies were regulated by successive Housing Acts of 1959, 1962, 1974 and 1985. Those acts provided, inter alia, that when a holder of a specially protected tenancy died or moved out of the flat the tenancy was transferred by the operation of law (ipso jure) to the members of his or her household, even though in such cases the housing administration could seek eviction of those using the flat if it considered that none of them satisfied the conditions for obtaining that tenancy. Thus, specially protected tenancies could be passed on, as of right, from generation to generation.
27. The Housing Act of 1962 did not define who could be considered a member of the household of a holder of a specially protected tenancy. It did, however, define, in section 12(1), who could be considered the occupant of a flat:
“(1) The occupants of a flat within the meaning of this Act are: the holder of the specially protected tenancy, members of his or her household who live together with him or her, and persons who are no longer members of his or her household but still live in the same flat.”
28. The Housing Act of 1974 in its section 9(4) defined household members of a holder of a specially protected tenancy as:
“... persons who live together with him or her and form an economic unit, [including] spouses, blood relatives in the direct line and their spouses, stepchildren and adoptees, children without parents taken into foster care, stepfather and stepmother, adoptive parents, brothers and sisters and dependants, a cohabitee ...”
29. The Housing Act of 1985 in its section 12(1) defined household members of a holder of a specially protected tenancy in the following terms:
“Under this Act members of the household of a holder of a specially protected tenancy are his or her spouse and persons who have lived with him or her in the past two years, including: blood relatives in the direct line and their spouses, brothers and sisters, stepchildren and adoptees, children without parents taken into foster care, stepfather and stepmother, adoptive parents and dependants, a cohabitee ...”
30. The Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act of 1991 entitled holders of specially protected tenancies and, with their permission, the members of their household, to purchase the flats in respect of which they held such tenancy under favourable conditions. In that way a large majority of specially protected tenancies were transformed into the right of ownership of former tenants. However, holders of specially protected tenancies in respect of privately-owned flats or socially-owned flats which flats had passed into social ownership by means of confiscation (rather than nationalisation) had no right to purchase the flats in respect of which they held such tenancy. They, together with those holders of specially protected tenancies who had, but did not avail themselves of, the right to purchase the flats, became the so-called protected lessees with the entry into force of the Lease of Flats Act on 6 November 1996 (see paragraph 11 above and paragraphs 39-40 below).
C. The Lease of Flats Act
1. Relevant provisions
31. The Lease of Flats Act (Zakon o najmu stanova, Official Gazette no. 91/1996 of 28 October 1996), which entered into force on 5 November 1996, regulates the legal relationship between landlord and lessee with regard to the lease of flats.
(a) Provisions relating to ordinary lease
32. Section 5 provides that a contract for lease of a flat should specify, inter alia, the types of charges payable in connection with living in the flat and the way they should be paid, and contain clauses on the maintenance of the flat.
33. According to section 6 the rent paid for the use of a flat may be either the protected rent or freely negotiated rent (that is, the market rent).
34. Section 7, which provides for the protected rent as one of the most important elements of the status of a protected lessee, reads as follows:
Section 7
“(1) Protected rent is set on the basis of the standards and criteria set forth by the Government of the Republic of Croatia [that is, by the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent].
(2) The standards and criteria referred to in paragraph 1 of this section shall be set depending on the conveniences and living (usable) space of a flat, the maintenance costs of the communal areas and installations of the building [where the flat is located], as well as on the purchasing power [i.e. income] of the lessee’s household.
(3) Protected rent cannot be lower than the amount necessary to cover the costs of regular maintenance of the residential building [in which the flat is located], which is determined by special legislation.”
35. Section 13 states that the landlord has to maintain the flat he or she rents out in a habitable condition, in accordance with the lease contract.
36. Section 14(3) provides that the lessee has to notify the landlord of any required repairs in the flat and the communal premises of the building in which it is located, the costs of which must be borne by the landlord.
37. Pursuant to section 19 a landlord may terminate a lease in the following cases:
- if the lessee does not pay the rent or charges;
- if the lessee sublets the flat or part of it without permission from the landlord;
- if the lessee or other tenants in the flat disturb other tenants in the building;
- if another person, not named in the lease contract, lives in the flat for longer than thirty days without permission from the landlord, except where that person is the spouse, child or parent of the lessee or of the other legal tenants in the flat, or a dependant of the lessee or a person in respect of whom the lessee is a dependant;
- if the lessee or other legal tenants use the flat for purposes other than as living accommodation.
38. Section 21 reads as follows:
“Apart from the grounds stipulated in section 19 of this Act, the landlord may terminate a lease of indefinite duration if he or she intends to move into the flat or install his or her children, parents or dependants in it.”
(b) Provisions relating to protected lease
39. Transitional provisions (sections 30-49) of the Lease of Flats Act establish a special category of lessees (“protected lessees” – zaštićeni najmoprimci), namely, those who were previously holders of specially protected tenancies in respect of privately owned flats or those who did not purchase their flats under the Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act. Such lessees are subject to a number of protective measures, such as the obligation of landlords to contract a lease of indefinite duration; payment of protected rent (zaštićena najamnina), the amount of which is set by the Government; and a limited list of grounds for termination of the lease. The provisions of the Lease of Flats Act relating to ordinary lease apply to protected lease unless the provisions relating to protected lease provide otherwise.
40. By section 30 of the Act the still existing specially protected tenancies (see paragraph 30 above) were abolished and holders of such tenancies became protected lessees as of its coming into force.
41. Section 31(1) provides that the owner of the flat and the former holder of a specially protected tenancy in respect of the same flat shall enter into a lease contract of indefinite duration where the lessee shall have the right to protected rent. Section 31(2) states that the protected lessee does not have the right to protected rent if he or she runs a business in a part of the flat or owns a habitable house or flat.
42. According to section 33(2) the lessee has to submit a request for the conclusion of a lease contract stipulating protected rent to the landlord within six months from the Act’s entry into force or from the day on which the decision determining the right of that person to use the flat becomes final.
43. Section 33(3) states that if the landlord does not enter or refuses to enter into a lease contract stipulating protected rent within three months of the receipt of the lessee’s request, the lessee can bring an action in the competent court with a view to obtaining a judgment in lieu of the lease contract.
44. It follows from section 35 that the protected lessee must pay the landlord, in addition to the protected rent, the utilities fees and other charges levied in connection with living in the flat (running costs), if they have so agreed.
45. Section 36 reads as follows:
“If, owing to amendments to the legislation referred to in section 7 of this Act, the level of the protected rent changes, the lessee is bound to pay that [revised] rent on the basis of the calculation provided by the landlord without any modification of the [lease] contract.”
46. Section 37(1) provides that persons who, at the time of the Act’s entry into force, had the legal status of a member of the holder of the protected tenant’s household, acquired under the provisions of the 1985 Housing Act (see paragraph 29 above), must be entered into the lease contract.
47. Section 38 states as follows:
“(1) In the event of the death of a protected lessee or when the protected lessee abandons the flat, the rights and duties of the protected lessee stipulated in the lease contract shall pass to [one of] the person[s] indicated in the lease contract, subject to their agreement.
(2) In the event of a dispute, the landlord shall designate the lessee.
(3) The person referred to in paragraph 1 of this section shall [make a] request [to] the landlord to conclude a lease contract [stipulating protected rent] within sixty days from the change of circumstances [referred to in paragraph 1 of this section].
(4) The landlord shall conclude with the person referred to in paragraph 1 of this section a contract for lease of the flat of indefinite duration, stipulating the rights and duties of a protected lessee.”
48. The grounds for termination by a landlord of the lease of a flat to a protected lessee are set out in section 40 of the Lease of Flats Act, which reads as follows:
“(1) Apart from the grounds stipulated in section 19 of this Act, a landlord may terminate the lease of a flat to a protected lessee, on the grounds:
- provided for in section 21(1) of this Act,
- if he or she does not have other accommodation for himself or herself and for his or her family, and is [either] entitled to permanent social assistance on the basis of the special legislation or is over sixty years of age.
(2) [Invalidated by the Constitutional Court as unconstitutional by a decision of 31 March 1998.]
(3) In the case referred to in paragraph 1, second sub-paragraph, of this section the local government ... shall provide the protected lessee with another suitable flat [in the use of which he or she shall retain] the rights and obligations of a protected lessee.
(4) The landlord or the local government in the cases referred to in paragraphs 2 and 3 of this section are not bound to provide the protected lessee with another suitable flat if he or she owns a suitable habitable flat in the territory of the township or municipality where the flat in which he or she lives is located.
(5) ...”
49. By a decision of 31 March 1998 the Constitutional Court invalidated as unconstitutional (see paragraph 57 below), inter alia, paragraph 2 of section 40 which provided that in the case referred to in paragraph 1, first sub-paragraph, of that section the landlord could terminate the protected lease only if he or she had provided the protected lessee with another habitable flat under housing conditions that were not less favourable for the lessee. After that decision by the Constitutional Court, the Supreme Court, in decision Rev-486/02-2, Gzz-74/02 of 21 February 2007, specified that a landlord who intends to move into his or her own flat or install his or her children, parents or dependants therein is entitled to terminate the lease contract of a flat to a protected lessee (or to refuse to enter into a lease contract) only if (a) the landlord does not have other accommodation for himself or herself and for his or her family, and is either entitled to permanent social assistance or is over sixty years of age; or (b) the lessee owns a suitable habitable flat in the same municipality or township where the flat in which he or she lives is located.
50. Section 41 defines the notion of a “suitable flat”, referred to in paragraphs 3 and 4 of section 40, as a flat located in the same township or municipality, which complies in terms of its size with the “one person one room” principle and which does not have a greater number of rooms than the flat the protected lessee has to move out of.
2. Related subordinate legislation
(a) The Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent
51. The Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent (Uredba o uvjetima i mjerilima za utvrđivanje zaštićene najamnine, Official Gazette nos. 40/97 and 117/05), which entered into force on 16 April 1997, is the subordinate legislation referred to in section 7(1) of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 34 above).
52. Section 3 contains the mathematical formula for calculating protected rent. The formula takes into account: (a) the usable floor area of the flat; (b) the construction price index (as of 1 November 2005 when the Amendments to the Decree entered into force); (c) the number of points given to the flat in its valuation record (which depend on the building materials, the state of the carpentry and plumbing, the state of the water, gas, heating and electric installations and telecommunication outlets, the finishing of the floors and walls, the floor on which the flat is located, the existence of an elevator, etc.); (d) the location coefficient (which depends on the location of the flat and demographic trends); and (e) the usability coefficient (which depends of the usable floor area of the flat and the number of tenants living in it).
53. Section 9 provides for the possibility of reducing the amount of the protected rent calculated in accordance with the formula contained in section 3 in cases where the average monthly income per member of the household in the previous year was less than half the average monthly income in the Republic of Croatia for the same year.
54. Section 10 states that the amount of the protected rent reduced in accordance with section 9 cannot be lower than a certain minimum amount calculated using the formula provided in that section.
55. According to section 11(1) the monthly amount of the protected rent in respect of a specific flat shall be calculated by the landlord once a year. Section 11(2) provides that the landlord may ask the relevant department of the local authority charged with housing affairs to calculate the amount of the protected rent for the flat he or she is renting out.
(b) The Decision on the determination of the level of freely negotiated rent
56. The Government of Croatia’s Decision on the determination of the level of freely negotiated rent (Odluka o utvrđivanju slobodno ugovorene najamnine, Official Gazette no. 120/00) of 15 November 2000, sets the level of rent for flats owned by the State. It is to be noted that this rent is not protected rent but “freely negotiated rent” within the meaning of section 6 of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 33 above). Nevertheless, because such flats are generally awarded to socially vulnerable tenants, it is a non-profit or low-profit rent and is thus considerably lower than the market rent. In particular, the Decision provides that the amount of freely negotiated rent to be paid by lessees in State-owned flats shall correspond to two times the amount of the monthly condominium fee paid into the common reserve fund of the building where the flat is located (see paragraph 67 below). It also provides that the amount of freely negotiated rent paid by protected lessees not entitled to protected rent for the reasons set out in section 31(2) of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 41 above) shall be set at HRK 15 per square metre.
3. The Constitutional Court’s case-law
57. Following numerous petitions for (abstract) constitutional review (prijedlog za ocjenu ustavnosti), by decision no. U-I-762/1996 of 31 March 1998 (Official Gazette 48/98 of 6 April 1998) the Constitutional Court invalidated four provisions of the Lease of Flats Act, including section 40(2), as unconstitutional (see paragraph 49 above). In its decision it also rejected a number of those petitions and thereby refused to review the constitutionality of another thirteen provisions of the same Act, including section 7 (see paragraph 34 above), as well as of the entire Act itself.
58. By decision no. U-I-533/2000 of 24 May 2000 (Official Gazette 56/00 of 6 June 2000) the Constitutional Court rejected a petition for (abstract) constitutional review and thus refused to review the constitutionality of eight provisions of the Lease of Flats Act, including section 7 (see paragraph 34 above), as well as of the entire Act itself.
59. By decision no. U-II-1218/2000 of 22 November 2000 the Constitutional Court rejected a petition for (abstract) constitutional review and thus refused to review the constitutionality of the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent (see paragraphs 51-55 above).
D. The Obligations Act
60. Several provisions of the Obligations Act (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Official Gazette, nos. 35/2005 and 41/2008), which entered into force on 1 January 2006, govern lease contracts.
61. Section 551 states that the provisions of the Obligations Act on lease contracts apply, as subsidiary rules, to leases governed by special legislation.
62. Section 553(1) provides that the lessor has to make the property available to the lessee and maintain it in a condition suitable for the agreed use.
63. Section 554 reads as follows:
Maintenance of the property and public levies
Section 554
“(1) In order to maintain the property in a condition suitable for the agreed use, the lessor is bound to carry out the required repairs in due time and at his own expense, and the lessee is bound to allow the lessor to do so.
(2) The lessor is bound to reimburse any costs the lessee has incurred by carrying out repairs, either because they were urgent or because the lessor, having been informed thereof, did not carry them out in due time.
(3) The costs of minor repairs and the costs of regular use of the property [i.e. running costs] shall be borne by the lessee.
(4) The lessee is bound to notify the lessor of the required repairs without delay; otherwise he or she shall be liable for the resultant damage.
(5) All taxes and public levies in connection with the leased property shall be borne by the lessor.”
E. The Property Act
64. Sections 66-99 of the Ownership and Other Rights In Rem Act (Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Official Gazette no. 91/96 with subsequent amendments), which entered into force on 1 January 1997 (“the Property Act”), regulates condominium (vlasništvo posebnih dijelova nekretnine, etažno vlasništvo). This is a form of (co-)ownership of a multi-unit building where there is separate and distinct ownership of individual units (such as flats or business premises) and co-ownership of communal areas of the building (such as entrances, staircases, hallways, the roof, heating system, elevators, etc.) and of the land under it.
65. Section 84(1) provides that a co-owner in a condominium is bound to maintain, at his or her own expense, the individual unit (for example, a flat) he or she owns individually and has to bear all public levies in connection with that unit.
66. Section 84(3) states that if a lessee of an individual unit (for example, a tenant) is bound to pay for the utilities linked with its use, the owner of that unit shall guarantee to the utility provider that they will be paid.
67. According to section 89(1) and (2) the costs of maintenance of and improvements to a condominium are incumbent upon all co-owners in proportion to their share in the condominium. Co-owners must set up a common reserve fund (zajednička pričuva) into which they have to pay a condominium fee (doprinos za zajedničku pričuvu).
F. Legislation on personal income tax
68. The 2004 Personal Income Tax Act (Zakon o porezu na dohodak, Official Gazette no. 177/04 with subsequent amendments) entered into force on 1 January 2005. Section 8 sets the personal income tax rates at 12%, 25% or 40%, depending on the level of taxable income.
69. Section 27(1) and (2) provide that taxable income from property and pecuniary rights includes, inter alia, the difference between receipts (takings) on account of rent and leases and the costs incurred by the taxpayer in connection with those receipts, where only costs up to 30% of the amount received can be deducted.
70. Similar provisions were contained in section 23(1) and (2) of the 2000 Personal Income Tax Act (Official Gazette no. 127/00 with subsequent amendments), which was in force between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2003, and sections 30(1) and 32(1) of the 1993 Personal Income Tax Act (Official Gazette no. 109/93 with subsequent amendments), which was in force between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2000. Tax rates, depending on taxable income, were 20% and 35% under the 1993 Personal Income Tax Act, and 15%, 25% and 35% and, as of 1 January 2003, also 45% under the 2000 Personal Income Tax Act.
III. OTHER RELEVANT DOCUMENTS
A. Bills to amend the Lease of Flats Act
1. Draft Amendments of 12 December 2002 to the Lease of Flats Act
71. On 12 December 2002 the Government of Croatia adopted draft amendments to the Lease of Flats Act and presented them to Parliament for first reading. Parliament deliberated on the draft amendments on 29 January 2003 and agreed to them. The bill contained a proposal to amend, inter alia, section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act, that is, the provision on protected rent (see paragraph 34 above).
72. The general part of the explanatory report to those Draft Amendments reads as follows:
“The current level of protected rent is, in principle, not sufficient to cover even the costs of maintenance of the communal areas and installations of a building, which costs are incumbent upon flat owners. Therefore, it is evident that, in principle, the [condominium fee] is higher than the protected rent. It follows that owners even have to pay the difference between the rent obtained and [the condominium fee]. In addition, under the applicable legislation flat owners [who are] natural persons are also liable to pay income tax on the [income derived from] the lease of [their] flats.
Therefore, the lowest [level of] protected rent should be regulated so that ... [it is] linked with the regular maintenance costs of the building. The criterion of purchasing power [i.e. income] should be separated from the level of the rent and linked instead with the social welfare system, which provides for a ‘housing allowance’ ...
In particular, in developed rental housing systems one of the basic principles applied, even under the system of non-profit or low-profit rents, and [those involving] privileged and protected groups of tenants including socially vulnerable persons, is that the rent must cover the minimum costs of maintenance of the immovable property (of [both] the building and the flat) and that so-called vulnerable groups ... are provided for by the social welfare system.”
73. The special part of the explanatory report to section 1 of the Draft Amendments, which amends section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act, reads:
“... Today’s level of protected rent is generally between the lowest monthly amount of 1.53 and around 2 [Croatian] kunas per square metre of flat. It is estimated that the rent is usually set at the lowest amount.
It is also proposed that the protected rent [in any one case] should not be lower than the amount paid by the owner of the flat [i.e. the condominium fee] into the common reserve fund for the maintenance of the communal premises and installations of the building [where the flat is located], increased by 20%. That increase is [proposed] because the owner of a flat [i.e. a landlord] [who is a natural person] is bound by the applicable legislation to declare the contract of lease of the flat, [more specifically], the income from that lease, to the tax authorities. [The proposed increase] would therefore cover the costs incurred by the owner as a result of his obligation to maintain the building (but not the flat) and the tax [levied] on ... [the income from] that lease.”
2. The Final Draft Amendments of 3 July 2003 to the Lease of Flats Act
74. On 3 July 2003 the Government of Croatia adopted the final version of the abovementioned draft amendments and presented them to the Croatian Parliament for second reading. The final version also contained a proposal to amend section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act and estimated that at that time around 7,000 privately-owned flats in Croatia were subject to the protected lease scheme. This final version of the draft amendments was placed on Parliament’s agenda for the session held between 24 September and 17 October 2003. However, Parliament did not have the opportunity to deliberate or vote on that draft before its dissolution on account of the forthcoming scheduled parliamentary elections.
75. The general part of the explanatory report to the Final Draft Amendments reads as follows:
“The current level of protected rent is, in principle, not sufficient to cover even the costs of maintenance of a building, which costs are incumbent upon flat owners. The lowest level of protected rent is currently set at 1.53 [Croatian] kunas per square metre of a flat. However, over a period of five years of charging that rent it has been established that the costs related to the maintenance of communal areas and installations in buildings considerably [exceed it]. Consequently, flat owners have to ... pay ... the difference [between the rent obtained and] the amount required for the maintenance of the communal areas and installations of the building [i.e. the condominium fee]. In addition, under the applicable tax legislation ... flat owners with protected lessees living in their flats are also liable to pay income tax on the ... [income derived from] that lease, from which they in fact do not make [any] net profit but only incur additional costs.
It is therefore necessary to regulate the criteria for setting the level of protected rent [so that it covers] the costs of maintenance of the immovable property in question. Since the level of protected rent is very low (for a flat of some 60 square metres the average protected rent is around 100 [Croatian] kunas per month) it is proposed to secure [its payment in cases where] the [impecunious] tenant is unable to pay it through the social welfare system, which, within the current legislative framework, provides for a ‘housing allowance’ ....”
76. The special part of the explanatory report to the Final Draft Amendments relating to section 1 of the Draft, amending section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act, reads as follows:
“... Today’s level of protected rent is generally between the lowest monthly amount of 1.53 and around 2 [Croatian] kunas per square metre of a flat. It is estimated that rent is usually set at the lowest amount, which in principle does not even cover the costs of the maintenance of the communal areas of the building [in which the flat is located].
Paragraph 3 ... currently provides that protected rent cannot be lower than the amount necessary to cover the costs of regular maintenance of the residential building [i.e. the condominium fee], determined by special legislation. However, since that amount is not [actually] specified by any special legislation, it is proposed that it be specified in the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent.”
3. Draft Amendments of November 2013 to the Lease of Flats Act
77. In November 2013 the relevant Ministry prepared draft amendments to the Lease of Flats Act and on 6 December 2013 opened a public debate on the draft, which lasted until 6 February 2014. This draft also proposes that section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act be amended but estimates that currently no more than 2,600 privately-owned flats in Croatia are subject to the protected lease scheme.
78. Those Draft Amendments contain a proposal to amend section 40 of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 48 above) so that a landlord who intends to move into his or her own flat or install his or her children, parents or dependants therein would be entitled to terminate the lease contract of a flat to a protected lessee without any conditions. In that situation the local government would have to provide the protected lessee with another suitable flat for the use of which he or she would be paying protected rent. As regards protected rent, the Draft Amendments contain a proposal to the effect that its level should be such to cover the costs of maintenance of the building in which the flat is located (see paragraph 67 above) and enable the landlords to derive at least some profit from renting out their flats. The Draft Amendments also envisage gradual increase in the level of protected rent so that it would in ten years of their entry into force reach the level of freely negotiated rent. Lastly, the Draft Amendments provide for State and local government subsidies that would enable protected lessees to buy (another) flat under favourable conditions and thereby meet their housing needs.
79. The general part of the explanatory report to the Draft Amendments, reads as follows:
“The current level of protected rent is, in principle, not sufficient to cover even the costs of maintenance of a building, which are incumbent upon flat owners. The lowest level of protected rent is currently set at 2.7 [Croatian] kunas per square metre of a flat. However, over many years of charging that rent it has been established that the costs related to the maintenance of communal areas and installations in buildings considerably [exceed it]. Consequently, flat owners have to ... pay ... the difference [between the rent obtained and] the amount required for the maintenance of the communal areas and installations of the building [i.e. the condominium fee]. In addition, under the applicable tax legislation ... flat owners with protected lessees living in their flats are also liable to pay income tax on the ... [income derived from] that lease, from which they do not make [any] profit but only incur additional costs.
...
As regards protected rent, it is proposed that the criteria for setting that rent be defined so that it covers the costs of regular maintenance of the immovable property.
The proposed method of calculation would increase the level of protected rent (...) so that it [would not only] cover the costs of regular maintenance of the immovable property [but that] the flat owners would receive a portion of it as a compensation for renting out the flat. ...
A gradual increase in the [level of protected] rent is also envisaged, so that after ten years it would reach the level of freely negotiated rent.
...
Under the proposed new solution, according to which protected rent would be set so that it covers the costs, flat owners would no longer have to secure additional funds in order to meet their obligations concerning regular maintenance of the communal areas of the building.”
80. The special part of the explanatory report to the Draft Amendments relating to section 1 of the Draft, amending of section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act, reads as follows:
“... Today’s level of protected rent is generally between the lowest monthly amount of 2.7 and around 3.8 [Croatian] kunas per square metre of a flat. It is estimated that rent is usually set at the lowest amount, which in principle does not even cover the costs of the maintenance of the communal areas of the building [in which the flat is located].”
B. Ombudsman’s reports
81. The relevant part of the 2007 Annual Report of the Croatian Ombudsman (Izvješće o radu pučkog pravobranitelja za 2007. godinu) reads as follows:
“... the systemic question of controlled rent (protected rent), that is, [whether it strikes] a fair balance between the interests of landlords in covering losses incurred in connection with the maintenance of their flats and the general interest in providing flats to tenants under the same conditions ... they had [enjoyed] as holders of specially protected tenancies was also raised before the Ombudsman.
The level of protected rent, which is set in accordance with the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent, does not enable landlords to comply with their obligation to carry out costly maintenance work. Therefore, [the landlords] consider that the setting of the [level of] protected rent (controlled rent) without any possibility of raising it in view of the value and/or repair costs of a flat [means that] they have been forced to bear an excessive and disproportionate burden.
Although the application of the restrictions is justified and proportionate to the aim pursued in the general interest (the protection of tenants, a socially sensitive issue), [the setting of] the level of [protected] rent below the maintenance costs [has meant that] a fair distribution of the social and financial burden involved in the reform of housing legislation has not been achieved. A protection mechanism, that is, ... a legal avenue for [obtaining] compensation for losses (for example, through subsidies to the owners for maintenance costs [or] subsidies to the tenants for rent) has not been provided.
In the domestic legal system it is necessary to ensure, in a timely manner and [using] appropriate measures, [that there are] mechanisms [in place] for maintaining a fair balance between the interests of landlords (including their right to derive profit from their property) and the general interest, that is, the protection of tenants, so that an excessive burden and/or housing conditions that are more onerous than those they have enjoyed so far are not imposed on them. Otherwise, in the event that legal protection is sought outside the domestic legal system, the Republic of Croatia may be put in a situation where it has to pay compensation (European Court of Human Rights, Pilot judgment of the Grand Chamber of 19 June 2006, Hutten-Czapska v. Poland).”
82. The relevant part of the 2012 Annual Report of the Croatian Ombudsman (Izvješće o radu pučkog pravobranitelja za 2012. godinu) reads as follows:
“Protected rent is paid by former holders of specially protected tenancies of flats in private ownership and those who did not purchase a flat on the basis of the Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act. Protected rent does not cover the maintenance costs of the flats borne by the owners (landlords). This balance has been further undermined by the fact that protected rent completely excludes the right of owners to derive profit from their property. It is therefore necessary to provide mechanisms in the domestic legal system for achieving and maintaining a fair balance between the interests of owners, who are forced to bear an excessive burden, and the interests of tenants, who wish to maintain their current housing conditions.”
83. In the same Annual Report the Ombudsman presented, as an example, the case of a landlord who lodged a complaint with the Ombudsman’s Office:
“The complainant [a landlord] from Z. complains about the fact that the protected rent paid by the tenant does not even cover the basic costs he has [to bear] for the maintenance of the flat. The level of [the condominium fee], that is, the funds intended to cover the expected costs of maintenance and improvement of the building [in which the flat is located], has doubled. He further states that he, as a 78 year-old pensioner, [is thus forced to] co-finance the housing of a working-age tenant who is 39 years old.
Measures taken: The complainant was advised to set a [revised] amount of protected rent for the tenant. The Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent provides that the monthly amount of protected rent in respect of a specific flat shall be calculated by the landlord once a year (section 11). [The complainant] may also ask the competent authority of the Township of Z. to calculate the amount of the protected rent. Otherwise, that is, if the tenant does not accept the offer to amend the contract, [the complainant] may seek the amendment of the part of the lease contract concerning the level of the protected rent by bringing a civil action [with a view to obtaining a judgment specifying a different amount of rent].
An increase in rent cannot be based on an increase in [the condominium fee], because [that fee] is not included in the formula for the calculation of protected rent. Rather, it is [based on] a change in value of the elements [included] in [that] formula ...: the construction price index (6,000 [Croatian] kunas per square metre of usable surface of the flat), the average net monthly salary in the Republic of Croatia, the number of household members and the average monthly net income per member of the household in the past year.”
84. In her 2013 Annual Report (Izvješće o radu pučke pravobraniteljice za 2013. godinu) the Ombudsman criticised the gradual increase in the level of protected rent envisaged by the Draft Amendments of November 2013 to the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 78 above) in the following terms:
“... the proposed ... ten-year period in which the protected rent should reach the level of freely negotiated rent for the owners means restriction of their right of ownership contrary to the Constitution which guarantees the right of ownership and provides that property may be taken or restricted in the interest of the Republic of Croatia [only] against payment of compensation for its market value.”
C. Construction price indexes
85. The construction price (etalonska cijena građenja) per square metre in Croatian kunas (HRK) and in euros (EUR), which is one of the factors taken into account in the calculation of protected rent (see paragraph 52 above), has changed as follows:

Period HRK EUR
1 June 1995 – 2 January 2002 3,400.00 NA
3 January 2002 – 18 November 2003 5,156.60 700
19 November 2003 – 5 June 2005 5,307.83 700
6 June 2005 – 8 May 2008 5,246.62 700
9 May 2008 – 9 June 2009 5,808.00 792.41
10 June 2009 – 4 September 2012 5,808.00 NA
5 September 2012 onwards 6,000.00 NA
D. Information on the average monthly salary and average monthly pension in Croatia
86. According to reports issued by of the State Bureau of Statistics (Državni zavod za statistiku) the average monthly salary in HRK in Croatia between 1997 and 2012 was as follows:

Year Amount in HRK
1997 2,377
1998 2,681
1999 3,055
2000 3,326
2001 3,541
2002 3,720
2003 3,940
2004 4,173
2005 4,376
2006 4,603
2007 4,841
2008 5,178
2009 5,311
2010 5,343
2011 5,441
2012 5,478

87. According to statistical information provided by the Croatian Pension Fund (Hrvatski zavod za mirovinsko osiguranje) the average monthly pension (in HRK) in Croatia between 1999 and 2012 was as follows:
Year Amount in HRK
1999 1,309.43
2000 1,382.48
2001 1,591.96
2002 1,647.67
2003 1,702.24
2004 1,758.12
2005 1,829.27
2006 1,875.68
2007 1,933.83
2008 2,059.52
2009 2,156.83
2010 2,165.30
2011 2,156.83
2012 2,165.65
THE LAW
I. AS TO WHETHER THE APPLICANT’S HEIR CAN PURSUE THE APPLICATION
88. In his letter to the Court of 6 December 2011 the applicant’s representative informed the Court that the applicant had died on 6 February 2011 and that his statutory heir, Mr Boris Filičić, was “ready to replace him in this matter” (see paragraph 5 above). He submitted a decision issued by a notary public of 15 July 2011 declaring Mr Filičić the applicant’s sole heir.
89. The Court considers that in so doing the applicant’s heir expressed the wish to pursue the application. The Government did not contest this.
90. Having regard to its case-law on the subject (see, for example, Malhous v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 33071/96, ECHR 2000 XII), and given that the applicant’s heir inherited the flat in question and thereby became its owner, the Court holds that he has standing to continue the present proceedings in the applicant’s stead. However, the Court’s examination is limited to the question of whether or not the complaints as originally submitted by Mr Statileo, who remains the applicant, disclose a violation of the Convention (see Malhous, cited above).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
91. The applicant complained that he had been unable to regain possession of his flat or charge the market rent for its lease. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
92. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
93. The Government argued that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies and that he had not suffered a significant disadvantage.
1. Non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
94. The Government first argued that the applicant had never complained before the domestic authorities about the allegedly inadequate level of the protected rent for which he was entitled to rent out his flat. The protected rent was set pursuant to the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent (see paragraphs 51-55 above). The applicant could have challenged such subordinate legislation by filing a petition for (abstract) constitutional review. However, he had not done so.
95. The applicant’s heir replied that the issue of the constitutionality of section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act and the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of the protected rent had already been brought to the attention of the Constitutional Court, which had rejected all petitions for their constitutional review as unfounded (see paragraphs 57-59 above).
96. The Court considers it understandable that the applicant did not raise the issue of the inadequate level of the protected rent in the civil proceedings referred to (see paragraphs 12-18 above). He requested the eviction of the tenant from his flat, whereas the tenant sought the conclusion of a lease contract stipulating protected rent. Therefore, only after those proceedings had ended in his disfavour, and the domestic courts had ruled that the tenant was entitled to conclude a lease contract stipulating protected rent with the applicant, could he complain that the protected rent was inadequate. As to the Government’s argument that the applicant should have filed a petition for constitutional review to contest the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent, it is sufficient to note that the Constitutional Court had already twice rejected petitions to review section 7 of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraphs 57-58 above), that is, a provision on which the Decree is based, and once a petition to review the Decree itself (see paragraph 59 above). In these circumstances, leaving aside the question of whether a petition for constitutional review could be considered a remedy to be exhausted for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, the Court finds that the applicant was not in the present case required to file such a petition in order to comply with the requirements of that Article. It follows that the Government’s objection as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
2. Whether the applicant suffered a significant disadvantage
97. The Government further submitted that the complaint was inadmissible because the applicant had not suffered a significant disadvantage within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (b) of the Convention. They explained that the imposition of the protected lease in respect of the applicant’s flat under the Lease of Flats Act had actually been more advantageous for the applicant than the earlier regime of the specially protected tenancy under the 1985 Housing Act. In particular, under the Lease of Flats Act the applicant, as a landlord, could terminate the lease of the protected lessee under more favourable conditions than those that had applied to the termination of a specially protected tenancy under the 1962, 1974 and 1985 Housing Acts. Likewise, under the Lease of Flats Act the applicant was, as a landlord, entitled to receive the protected rent from the protected lessee, whereas under the 1985 Housing Act he had not been entitled to any rent whatsoever.
98. The applicant’s heir replied that in a situation where the applicant would have been able to repossess his flat had the domestic courts ruled in his favour, and where the protected rent was twenty-five times lower than the market rent (see paragraph 114 below), it could hardly be argued that he had not suffered a significant disadvantage.
99. The Court considers that, in order to determine whether the applicant suffered a significant disadvantage, his situation resulting from the alleged violation cannot be compared to the situation that existed before the alleged breach, as the Government suggested. Rather, it should be compared to the situation the applicant would have been in if he had succeeded with his civil action and evicted the tenant, or one where he would have been able to rent out his flat under market conditions. For the Court it is evident that such a situation would have been significantly more advantageous for him. Thus, it cannot be said that he did not suffer a significant disadvantage as a result of the alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The Government’s objection concerning the alleged lack of a significant disadvantage must therefore be rejected.
3. Conclusion
100. The Court further notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It also notes, having regard to the foregoing, that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The arguments of the parties
(a) The Government
101. The Government argued that the judgment of the Split Municipal Court of 2 September 2002 had not constituted an interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, because the judgment in question had been of a declaratory nature only. The domestic courts had found that I.T. had become the holder of the specially protected tenancy of the applicant’s flat in 1973, when P.A. had moved out of the flat (see paragraph 15 above). On the basis of that status I.T. had, on 5 November 1996, when the Lease of Flats Act entered into force (see paragraphs 11 and 31 above), become the protected lessee ex lege (see paragraph 40 above). Therefore, the Government pointed out, I.T. had acquired the status of the holder of the specially protected tenancy and subsequently the status of a protected lessee before Croatia ratified the Convention on 5 November 1997. Thus the impugned judgment had merely reiterated the already existing restrictions on the applicant’s ownership of the flat.
102. The Government further submitted that, if the Court were to find that there had been an interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions in the present case, that interference had been lawful and necessary to control the use of property in the general interest. It had also been proportional as it had achieved a fair balance between the general interest of the community and the protection of the applicant’s property rights.
103. In particular, I.T. had acquired the status of protected lessee in respect of the applicant’s flat on the basis of section 30 of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 40 above), which provision was compatible with the Croatian Constitution (see paragraphs 57-58 above). That provision, as well as the other transitional provisions of that Act introducing the protected lease scheme, was clear, specific and therefore foreseeable for the applicant. Those provisions were also in the general interest of the community, as their aim was to ease the negative consequences of the transition from the Socialist social and economic system to a democratic system and market economy, which had necessarily entailed the abandonment of the Socialist concept of the specially protected tenancy.
104. As regards the proportionality of the interference, the Government first reiterated that laws controlling the use of property were especially common in the field of housing, which in modern societies was a central concern of social and economic policies, in the implementation of which the States had a wide margin of appreciation both with regard to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures of control and with regard to their implementation. The Court had itself indicated that it would respect the legislature’s judgment as to what was in the general interest unless that judgment was manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Spadea and Scalabrino v. Italy, 28 September 1995, § 29, Series A no. 315 B; and Mellacher and Others v. Austria, 19 December 1989, § 45, Series A no. 169). The same applied necessarily, if not a fortiori, to such radical social changes as those occurring in Central and Eastern Europe during the transition from the Socialist regime to a democratic state (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 91, ECHR 2005 VI).
105. Applying these principles to the present case, the Government argued that the transitional provisions of the Lease of Flats Act struck a socially acceptable and fair balance between the competing interests of, on the one hand, the owners (landlords) of flats previously let under specially protected tenancies who wished to regain greater control over their properties, and, on the other hand, the interests of the former holders of specially protected tenancies in respect of privately owned flats who wanted to continue living in their homes. The protected lease scheme, introduced by those provisions, represented a comprehensive solution to that issue.
106. Under that arrangement landlords, who during the Socialist regime had been forced to give up their flats to be used by others, had for a certain period of time remained subject to limitations on their right of ownership such as, notably, the inability to regain direct possession of their flats. Those restrictions were an expression of constitutionally permitted limitations on ownership, which, according to the Constitution, entailed duties and obliged owners to contribute to the general welfare (see paragraph 23 above). For their part, the tenants were not allowed to use the flats commercially or enjoy the status of protected lessees in cases where they were no longer in need of housing.
107. Moreover, the landlords’ position under the transitional provisions of the Lease of Flats Act was more favourable than their position under the previous legislation enacted during the Socialist period (see paragraphs 24 and 25 above). Firstly, it had been uncertain for how long and in respect of which persons landlords, whose flats had been subject to the regime of the specially protected tenancy, would have to tolerate the restrictions on their right of ownership. Under the current system the landlords were certain that their right of ownership was restricted only in respect of those tenants (protected lessees) who had lived in their flat as holders of specially protected tenancies and members of their households on the day of the entry into force of the Lease of Flats Act, and only as long as those tenants continued using the flat. There was no possibility for persons who had become members of the protected lessee’s household after that date or for any other persons to acquire the status of the protected lessee.
108. Furthermore, section 40 of the Lease of Flats Act specified that landlords could terminate a protected lease on grounds enumerated in section 19 of the Act (see paragraphs 37 and 48 above). A landlord could also terminate a protected lease if he or she intended to move into the flat (see paragraph 38 and 48 above). As regards the financial benefits which a landlord derived from the protected lease, the Government pointed out that the protected rent had to cover at least the costs of maintenance of the flat and could be higher, whilst under the previous system the rent had only fully covered the costs of maintenance. Therefore, each restriction imposed on landlords had conditions under which it could be removed.
109. All these considerations applied to the applicant, who, in addition to the flat in question, owned another flat which he had himself used for living purposes. On the other hand, neither I.T., who had been living in the flat since 1955, nor the members of her household had had any other accommodation. It was therefore evident that in the present case the application of the relevant provisions of the Lease of Flats Act had not disturbed the fair balance between the general interest of providing housing for I.T. and her family and the applicant’s right of ownership. Thus it could not be argued that he had had to bear an excessive individual burden. On the contrary, any attempt to evict I.T. from the applicant’s flat would have constituted a violation of her right to respect for her home, guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention.
110. The Government also emphasised that the applicant could have taken legal action under the 1962 Housing Act (see paragraph 27 above), and sought I.T.’s eviction as early as 1973, when P.A. had moved out of his flat (see paragraph 10 above). However, he had done so only after I.T. had instituted proceedings to have her status as protected lessee certified by a court judgment, that is, only in reaction to her suit (see paragraphs 12-13 above). That, in the Government’s view, meant he had not considered her living in his flat to be a burden.
111. In view of the above, the Government concluded that there had been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in the present case.
112. In reply to the Court’s request for information on the average monthly market rent for flats in the town of Split since November 1997, the Government furnished information according to which the monthly market rent for renting out flats in the vicinity of that of the applicant ranged, in the period between January 2004 and December 2011, from HRK 1,000 to HRK 5,104.40 depending on the size and the state of repair of the flat and the duration of the lease. The data submitted referred to four flats and read as follows:

Size in square metres Monthly rent in HRK Monthly rent
in EUR Duration of the lease
75.79 3,643.00 498.73 1 December 2009 – 31 July 2010
NA
(one-room flat 1,451.00 192.55 1 January 2006 – 31 December 2011
68.20 5,104.40 694.71 1 July 2009 – 31 August 2009
60 1,000.00 130.50 from 1 January 2004 onwards
(b) The applicant’s heir
113. The applicant’s heir submitted that the domestic courts had refused to evict I.T. from the applicant’s flat because they had mistakenly viewed her as “a child without parents taken into foster care” within the meaning of section 9(4) of the 1974 Housing Act (see paragraph 28 above) and section 12(1) of the 1985 Housing Act (see paragraph 29 above), even though she had not been parentless when she had moved into the flat with her cousin P.A. in 1955 (see paragraph 9 above). Therefore, contrary to the Government’s argument, the interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions had not followed from the pre-ratification legislation itself but from the domestic courts’ erroneous interpretation of that legislation, that is, from the contested judgment.
114. Even though the applicant had formally been the owner of the flat in question, the level of the monthly protected rent, which ranged between 102.14 and 174.48 Croatian kunas (HRK), that is, between some 14 and 24 euros (EUR), would not have been sufficient to cover even the monthly electricity bills and other costs related to the flat where the applicant had lived, let alone the costs of maintenance of the flat he was bound to cover as a landlord under section 13 of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraph 35 above). Those costs reduced the already low protected rent the applicant had been entitled to receive, which was in any case twenty-five times lower than the market rent. In support of his argument, the applicant’s heir submitted an advertisement from the Internet dated 6 December 2011 offering for rent a furnished flat in Split of a similar size (63 square metres) and 450 metres away from the flat in question, for 2,631 Croatian kunas (HRK) per month, that is, HRK 41.76 per square metre.
115. Lastly, the applicant’s heir argued that the protected lease scheme provided for in the Lease of Flats Act had placed on the applicant as a landlord an excessive individual burden as he could not use the flat, rent it to a third person of his own choice and under market conditions, sell it at the market price, or in any way influence the duration of the lease. In particular, the Lease of Flats Act permitted not only I.T. to continue living in the flat and pay the protected rent indefinitely, but also recognised the same right in respect of her son, Ig.T., born in 1972 (see paragraphs 15 and 46-47 above). As a consequence, the applicant had been unable to use his flat during his lifetime. The applicant’s heir, born in 1943, would most likely not be able to do so either.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether there was an interference with the applicant’s peaceful enjoyment of his “possessions”
116. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among many other authorities, Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 157, ECHR 2006 VIII).
117. In the Court’s view, there was indisputably an interference with the applicant’s property rights in the present case as the protected lease entails a number of restrictions that prevent landlords from exercising their right to use their property. In particular, landlords are unable to exercise that right in terms of physical possession, as the flat remains indefinitely occupied by the tenants, and their rights in respect of letting the flat, including the right to receive the market rent for it and to terminate the lease, are substantially affected by a number of statutory limitations (see paragraphs 125-129 below). However, landlords are not deprived of their title, continue to receive rent, and are free to sell their flats, albeit subject to the terms of the lease. Bearing that in mind, and having regard to its case-law on the matter (see, for example, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 160-161; Edwards v. Malta, no. 17647/04, § 59, 24 October 2006; and Srpska pravoslavna Opština na Rijeci v. Croatia (dec.), no. 38312/02, 18 May 2006), the Court considers that the interference in question constitutes a measure amounting to the control of use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
118. The Court must further examine whether the interference was justified, that is, whether it was provided for by law, was in the general interest and was proportional.
(b) Whether the interference was justified
(i) Whether the interference was “provided for by law”
119. In examining whether the interference with the applicant’s property rights was justified, the Court is first required to determine whether it can be regarded as lawful for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
120. In this respect the Court reiterates that its power to review compliance with domestic law is limited (see, among other authorities, Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (no. 2), 19 February 1998, § 57, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998 I). It is in the first place for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law, even in those fields where the Convention “incorporates” the rules of that law, since the national authorities are, in the nature of things, particularly qualified to settle the issues arising in this connection (see Pavlinović and Tonić v. Croatia (dec.), no. 17124/05 and 17126/05, 3 September 2009). This is particularly true when, as in this instance, the case turns upon difficult questions of interpretation of domestic law (see Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 83, ECHR 2007 I). Consequently, it is not the Court’s task in the present case to determine whether under the domestic law I.T. satisfied the statutory requirements to be granted the status of a protected lessee in respect of the applicant’s flat or to examine whether the domestic courts misinterpreted the relevant domestic law by holding that she did. Rather, the Court’s task is to verify whether the restrictions on the applicant’s right of ownership of the flat, inherent in a contract of lease stipulating protected rent (see paragraph 117 above), may be regarded as justified under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraphs 121-145 below).
121. The Court notes that the legal basis for that interference was the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraphs 31-50 above) and the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent (see paragraphs 51-55 above). Therefore, the interference was provided for by law, as required by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(ii) Whether the interference was “in accordance with the general interest”
122. The Court accepts that the legislation applied in this case pursues an aim in the general interest, namely, the social protection of tenants, and that it thus aims to promote the economic well-being of the country and the protection of the rights of others (see Srpska pravoslavna Opština na Rijeci, cited above).
(iii) Proportionality of the interference
123. The Court must examine in particular whether an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions strikes the requisite fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, and whether it imposes a disproportionate and excessive burden on the applicant (see, inter alia, Jahn, cited above, § 93).
124. The Court observes that the Lease of Flats Act was enacted with a view to reforming the housing sector in Croatia during the country’s transition to the free-market system. Its transitional provisions (see sections 30 to 49 referred to in paragraphs 39-50 above) regulating the “protected lease” imposed, ex lege, a landlord-tenant relationship on the owner of a flat in respect of which the tenant previously held a “specially protected tenancy”. Those provisions maintained a number of restrictions on the rights of landlords with former holders of specially protected tenancies living in their flats. These restrictions are, for the most part, comparable to those which existed under the housing laws introduced under the Socialist regime (see paragraphs 24 and 26 above).
125. Specifically, under the transitional provisions of the Lease of Flats Act, every specially protected tenancy that had been awarded in respect of a privately owned flat was transformed into a contractual lease of indefinite duration (see paragraphs 11 and 39-40 above). While this can be seen as creating a quasi-lease agreement between a landlord and a lessee, landlords have little or no influence on the choice of the lessee or the essential elements of such an agreement (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 196; Ghigo v. Malta, no. 31122/05, § 74, 26 September 2006; and Edwards, cited above, § 73).
126. This applies not only to the duration of the contract but also to the conditions for its termination. Not only is it not open to those landlords to repossess their flats solely on the basis of their wish to make other use of them (see, mutatis mutandis, Edwards, cited above, § 73) but their right to terminate the lease on the basis of their own need for accommodation or that of their relatives or because the protected lessee owns alternative accommodation and thus does not need protection against the termination of the lease (see, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci v. Malta, no. 47045/06, § 61, 15 September 2009), is considerably restricted.
127. In particular, under section 40 of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraphs 48-49 above) a landlord who intends to move into the flat or install his children, parents or dependants in it is entitled to terminate the contract for lease of a flat to a protected lessee only if (1) the landlord does not have other accommodation for himself or herself and for his or her family, and is either entitled to permanent social assistance or is over sixty years of age, or (2) the lessee owns a suitable habitable flat in the same municipality or township.
128. Consequently, the protected lease scheme lacks adequate procedural safeguards aimed at achieving a balance between the interests of protected lessees and those of landlords (see, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci, loc. cit.). Those rules, combined with the statutory right of those who were members of the lessee’s household at the time the Lease of Flats Act entered into force to succeed to the status of the protected lessee (see paragraphs 46-47 above) has left little or no possibility for landlords to regain possession of their flats as the likelihood of protected lessees leaving flats voluntarily is generally remote (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 196, and Amato Gauci, loc. cit.).
129. The other duties of landlords, potentially involving considerable expense on their part, are set out in section 13 of the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraphs 35 above) and section 89(1) and (2) of the Property Act (see paragraph 67 above), which oblige them to maintain the flat in a condition fit for habitation and pay a condominium fee into the common reserve fund set up to cover the costs of regular maintenance of the residential building in which the flat is located. At the same time, their right to derive profit from leasing their flats is subject to statutory restrictions (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 197). In particular, pursuant to section 7(1) of the Lease of Flats Act, the landlords have no power to fix the rent freely (see paragraph 34 above) as the protected rent for each flat has been calculated according to the formula provided in the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent (see paragraphs 51-55 above). As acknowledged by the Government of Croatia in its attempts to pass amendments to the Lease of Flats Act (see paragraphs 71-80 above) and confirmed by the Ombudsman’s findings (see paragraphs 81-83 above), protected rent calculated according to that formula has often been lower than the condominium fee and thus insufficient to cover even the costs of maintenance of the communal areas and installations of the building in which flats are located, let alone the costs of maintenance of the flats themselves. What is more, protected rent is, in the authorities own admission, generally set at the lowest amount (see paragraphs 73, 76 and 80 above). The resulting shortfall has therefore been covered by the landlords (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 198).
130. The Court is particularly struck by the fact that even though section 7(2) of the Lease of Flats Act provides that the level of the protected rent depends, inter alia, on the income of the lessee’s household (see paragraph 34 above), that criterion, according to section 9 of the Decree on the standards and criteria for the determination of protected rent, operates only to the benefit of the lessee (see paragraph 53 above) allowing him to reduce the amount of the protected rent even further. This has sometimes resulted in paradoxical situations, such as the one described by the Ombudsman in his 2012 Annual Report (see paragraph 83 above), where elderly and impecunious landlords have in fact been subsidising the housing of working-age salaried lessees. The paradox is even greater taking into account the fact that between 1998 and 2012 the construction price index, as the only element of the formula for calculating the level of the protected rent allowing for upward adjustments, rose by 82% (see paragraph 85 above) whereas the average monthly salary in the same period rose by 134% and the average monthly pension by 65% (see paragraphs 86-87 above).
131. The situation of landlords has been further compounded by their obligation to pay personal income tax on the amount of rent received (from which they can deduct a maximum of 30% on account of costs incurred, see paragraphs 68-70 above). Moreover, the practical exclusion of landlords’ rights to freely dispose of their flats which results from restrictive provisions on the termination of leases (see paragraphs 48-49 and 126 above), has caused a depreciation in the market value of their flats (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, loc. cit.).
132. Lastly, the Court notes that no statutory time-limit was applied to the protected lease scheme or any of the restrictions on the rights of landlords it entailed. Having regard to the above-mentioned statutory right of the members of a lessee’s household to succeed to his or her status as a protected lessee (see paragraphs 46-47 and 128 above), this means that those restrictions could in many cases last for two or sometimes even three generations. As mentioned by the applicant’s heir, he, like the applicant himself, would most likely not be able to use his flat in his lifetime (see paragraph 115 above).
133. Turning to the applicant’s individual situation, the Court first notes that in 1955 the Communist authorities had awarded the specially protected tenancy of the applicant’s flat to P.A. (see paragraph 9 above), which tenancy passed to I.T. when in 1973 P.A. moved out of the flat (see paragraph 10 above). The entry into force of the Lease of Flats Act on 5 November 1996 created a quasi-lease agreement (see paragraphs 11, 40 and 125 above) between the applicant as the landlord and I.T. as the lessee. However, the Convention did not enter into force in respect of Croatia until a year later, on 5 November 1997. It follows that even though for some fifty-five years the applicant had little or no possibility to repossess his flat or charge the market rent for it, the period susceptible to the Court’s scrutiny began only on 6 November 1997, the day after the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Croatia, and ended with the applicant’s death on 6 February 2011 (see paragraphs 5 and 88 above). It thus lasted more than thirteen years.
134. The Court further notes that the applicant refused to enter into a lease contract with I.T. stipulating the protected rent (see paragraph 12 above) and that such a contract was eventually imposed on him by the Split Municipal Court’s judgment of 2 September 2002 (see paragraph 15 above). Moreover, as the documents submitted by the Government seem to suggest, the applicant refused to receive the protected rent for his flat even after the adoption of that judgment (see paragraph 20 above). However, this fact could not be held against him if the Court were eventually to find that in the aforementioned period of about thirteen years (see the preceding paragraph) the rent he was entitled to receive was so low and inadequate that, together with the other restrictions (see paragraphs 126-127 above) on his ownership, it amounted to a continuing violation of his property rights (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, 209).
135. The Court observes that in those thirteen years the applicant was entitled to receive monthly rent for the flat in question amounting to HRK 102.14 (approximately EUR 13.36) in the period between 5 November 1997 and 31 October 2005, HRK 157.62 (approximately EUR 21.48) between 1 November 2005 and 8 May 2008, and HRK 174.48 (approximately EUR 23.66) between 9 May 2008 and his death on 6 February 2011 (see paragraph 19 above). At the same time, throughout those thirteen years the applicant had to pay a monthly condominium fee of HRK 102.81 (approximately EUR 13.55, see paragraph 21 above).
136. This means that before 1 November 2005 the applicant would not have made any profit from the flat whereas after that date the net monthly income (profit) he could have obtained from the flat was HRK 54.81, that is, EUR 7.93 (in the period between 1 November 2005 and 8 May 2008) and 71.67 HRK, that is, EUR 10.11 (in the period between 9 May 2008 and 6 February 2011).
137. The Court further notes that neither the applicant nor his heir claimed that the applicant had incurred any costs other than the condominium fee in connection with the flat in question, such as, for example, costs related to the maintenance of the flat itself which, under the relevant law, landlords were required to bear (see paragraphs 35 and 129 above). It also considers it only natural that, since he had refused to receive the protected rent for his flat (see paragraphs 20 and 134 above), he never declared any income from renting it to the tax authorities (see paragraph 22 above).
138. However, even assuming that the applicant, besides the condominium fee, did not have to cover any other costs in relation to his flat and did not pay personal income tax on the amount of the rent he was entitled to receive, the Court cannot but note that the sums in issue – ranging between zero and about ten euros per month (see paragraph 136 above) – are extremely low and could hardly be seen as fair compensation for the use of the applicant’s flat (see, mutatis mutandis, Ghigo, cited above, § 74; Edwards, cited above, § 75; and Saliba and Others v. Malta, no. 20287/10, § 66, 22 November 2011). The Court is not convinced that the interests of the applicant as a landlord, including his entitlement to derive profits from his property (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 239), were met by such extremely low returns (see, mutatis mutandis, Ghigo, loc. cit.; Edwards, loc. cit.; and Saliba, loc. cit.).
139. What is more, that amount of rent contrasts starkly with the market rent the applicant could have obtained for his flat (see Amato Gauci, cited above, § 62). In particular, the Court notes that the applicant’s heir submitted evidence to the effect that the protected rent for the flat in question was twenty-five times lower than the market rent (see paragraph 114 above). The Government, for their part, have not contested that and the information they submitted does not appear to suggest otherwise (see paragraph 112 above). In these circumstances it cannot but be concluded that the amount of the protected rent the applicant was entitled to receive was manifestly disproportionate to the market rent (see, mutatis mutandis, Saliba and Others, cited above, § 65).
140. The Court has stated on many occasions that in spheres such as housing, States necessarily enjoy a wide margin of appreciation not only in regard to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures for control of individual property but also to the choice of the measures and their implementation. State control over levels of rent is one such measure and its application may often cause significant reductions in the amount of rent chargeable (see, for example, Mellacher and Others, cited above, § 45; Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 223; and Edwards, cited above, § 76).
141. The Court also recognises that the Croatian authorities, in the context of the fundamental reform of the country’s political, legal and economic system during the transition from the Socialist regime to a democratic state, faced an exceptionally difficult exercise in having to balance the rights of landlords and the protected lessees who had occupied the flats for a long time. It had, on the one hand, to ensure the protection of the property rights of the former and, on the other, to respect the social rights of the latter, who were often vulnerable individuals (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 225, and Radovici and Stănescu v. Romania, nos. 68479/01, 71351/01 and 71352/01, § 88, ECHR 2006 XIII (extracts)).
142. Nevertheless, that margin, however considerable, is not unlimited and its exercise, even in the context of the most complex reform of the State, cannot entail consequences which are at variance with the Convention standards (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 223). The general interest of the community in such situations calls for a fair distribution of the social and financial burden involved, which cannot be placed on one particular social group, however important the interests of the other group or the community as a whole (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 225, and Radovici and Stănescu, loc. cit.). In particular, the exercise of State discretion in such situations may not lead to results which are manifestly unreasonable, such as amounts of rent allowing only a minimal profit (see Amato Gauci, cited above, § 62).
143. Having regard to: (a) primarily, the small amount of protected rent the applicant was entitled to receive and the statutory financial burdens imposed on him as a landlord, which meant he was able to obtain only a minimal profit from renting out his flat (see paragraphs 129 and 135-136 above); (b) the fact that the applicant’s flat was occupied for some fifty-five years, of which more than thirteen years passed after the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Croatia, and that he was unable to recover possession of it or rent it out at market conditions in his lifetime (see paragraphs 132-133 above); and in view of (c) the above-mentioned restrictions on landlords’ rights in respect of the termination of protected leases and the absence of adequate procedural safeguards for achieving a balance between the competing interests of landlords and protected lessees (see paragraphs 126-128 above), the Court discerns no demands of general interest (see paragraph 122 above) capable of justifying such comprehensive restrictions on the applicant’s property rights and finds that in the present case there was not a fair distribution of the social and financial burden resulting from the reform of the housing sector. Rather, a disproportionate and excessive individual burden was placed on the applicant as a landlord, as he was required to bear most of the social and financial costs of providing housing for I.T. and her family (see, mutatis mutandis, Lindheim and Others v. Norway, nos. 13221/08 and 2139/10, §§ 129 and 134, 12 June 2012; Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 224-225; Edwards, cited above, § 78, Ghigo, cited above, § 78; Amato Gauci, cited above, § 63; and Saliba, cited above, § 67). It follows that the Croatian authorities in the instant case, notwithstanding their wide margin of appreciation (see paragraphs 141-142 above), failed to strike the requisite fair balance between the general interests of the community and the protection of the applicant’s property rights (see, mutatis mutandis, Edwards, loc. cit.; Amato Gauci, loc. cit.; and Lindheim, cited above, § 134).
144. This conclusion is not called into question by the Government’s argument that the protected lease scheme introduced by the transitional provisions of the Lease of Flats Act restricted the applicant’s property rights to a lesser extent than the earlier regime of the specially protected tenancy (see paragraph 107 above), because from the ratification date onwards all of the State’s acts and omissions must conform to the Convention (see Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 81, ECHR 2006 III).
145. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
146. The applicant also complained that the above-mentioned civil proceedings had been unfair, in particular on account of the way in which the domestic courts had assessed the evidence. He relied on Article 6 § 1, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
147. In the light of all the material in its possession, the Court notes that there is no evidence to suggest that the courts lacked impartiality or that the proceedings were otherwise unfair.
148. It follows that this complaint is inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention as manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 thereof.
IV. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
149. Lastly, the applicant invoked Articles 13 and 14 of the Convention, without substantiating those complaints.
150. In the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court considers that the present case does not disclose any appearance of a violation of either of the above-mentioned Articles of the Convention.
151. It follows that these complaints are inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention as manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 thereof.
V. ARTICLES 41 AND 46 OF THE CONVENTION
A. Application of Article 41 of the Convention
152. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
1. Damage
(a) The parties’ submissions
153. The applicant’s heir claimed 11,110 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage. He explained that this amount corresponded to the monthly market rent of EUR 100 for the applicant’s flat in the period between 2 September 2002, that is, the day of the adoption of the Split Municipal Court’s judgment (see paragraph 15 above), and 6 December 2011, that is, the day he submitted the claim for just satisfaction. The applicant’s heir also claimed EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
154. The Government contested these claims.
(b) The Court’s assessment
(i) Pecuniary damage
155. The Court considers that the applicant must have suffered pecuniary damage as a result of his inability to charge the adequate rent for his flat in the period between 5 November 1997 (the date of the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Croatia) and his death on 6 February 2011 (see, for example and mutatis mutandis, Edwards v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 17647/04, §§ 18-22, 17 July 2008). However, given that when making the claim for just satisfaction the applicant’s heir sought compensation for pecuniary damage only for the period following the adoption of the Split Municipal Court’s judgment of 2 September 2002, the Court can award him such compensation only for the period between that date and the date of the applicant’s death, that is, from 2 September 2002 until 6 February 2011.
156. Having regard to the general interest pursued by the interference with the applicant’s property rights in the present case (see paragraph 122 above), the Court further reiterates that when enacting housing legislation the States parties to the Convention are entitled to reduce the rent to a level below the market value, as the legislature can reasonably decide as a matter of policy that charging the market rent is unacceptable from the point of view of social justice (see Mellacher and Others, cited above, § 56). Therefore, such measures designed to achieve greater social justice may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see, for example, Edwards (just satisfaction), cited above, § 20).
157. Lastly, the Court also finds it appropriate to deduct the amount of the protected rent the applicant was entitled to receive (paragraphs 19 and 135 above) in the period for which the compensation is to be awarded (see paragraph 155 above), that is, for the period between 2 September 2002 and 6 February 2011 (see Edwards (just satisfaction), cited above, § 22). That is so because the compensation for pecuniary damage sustained by the applicant in the instant case should cover the difference between the rent the applicant was entitled under the domestic legislation, which the Court found to be inadequate, and the adequate rent. It thus cannot comprise the amount of the protected rent the applicant would in any event be entitled to receive. Otherwise I.T. as the protected lessee who has been living in the applicant’s flat would be unduly discharged from her obligation to pay the rent in that period, which in that case would have to unjustifiably be borne by the State.
158. In the light of the foregoing, and in order to determine the adequate rent in the present case, the Court has made an estimate, taking into account in particular the information submitted by the parties on the market rent for comparable flats in the relevant period (which information does not substantially differ, see paragraph 139 above) and the protected rent the applicant was entitled to receive in the same period for renting out his flat (see paragraph 135 above). The Court considers it reasonable to award the applicant’s heir EUR 8,200 on account of pecuniary damage.
(ii) Non-pecuniary damage
159. The Court also finds that the applicant must have sustained non-pecuniary damage (see, for example, Edwards (just satisfaction), cited above, § 37). Ruling on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant’s heir (see, mutatis mutandis, Dolneanu v. Moldova, no. 17211/03, § 58, 13 November 2007) under that head EUR 1,500, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
2. Costs and expenses
160. The applicant’s heir claimed EUR 1,122 for the costs and expenses incurred by the applicant before the domestic courts. He also claimed an unspecified sum for “all procedural costs related to the representation before the Court”.
161. The Government contested these claims.
162. As regards the claim for the costs and expenses the applicant incurred before the domestic courts, the Court notes, having regard to its above findings (see paragraphs 120 and 147-148 above), that the costs claimed were not incurred in order to seek, through the domestic legal order, prevention or redress of the violation found by the Court (see, for example, Frommelt v. Liechtenstein, no. 49158/99, §§ 43-44, 24 June 2004). It therefore rejects the claim for costs and expenses under this head.
163. As regards the claim for costs and expenses incurred before it, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 850.
3. Default interest
164. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
B. Article 46 of the Convention
165. Whilst in finding a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in the present instance the Court has primarily focused on the particular circumstances of the applicant’s case, it adds by way of a general observation that the problem underlying that violation concerns the legislation itself and that its findings extend beyond the sole interests of the applicant in the instant case (see paragraph 77 above). This is therefore a case where the Court considers that the respondent State should take appropriate legislative and/or other general measures to secure a rather delicate balance between the interests of landlords, including their entitlement to derive profit from their property, and the general interest of the community – including the availability of sufficient accommodation for the less well-off – in accordance with the principles of the protection of property rights under the Convention (see, Edwards (just satisfaction), cited above, § 33). In this connection the Court has noted that legislative reform is currently under way (see paragraphs 77-80 above). It is not for the Court to specify how the rights of landlords and lessees (see paragraph 168 above) should be balanced against each other. The Court has already identified the main shortcomings in the current legislation, namely, the inadequate level of protected rent in view of statutory financial burdens imposed on landlords, restrictive conditions for the termination of protected lease, and the absence of any temporal limitation to the protected lease scheme (see paragraphs 124-132 above). Subject to monitoring by the Committee of Ministers the State remains free to choose the means by which it will discharge its obligations under Article 46 arising from the execution of the Court’s judgment, (see, mutatis mutandis, Lindheim, cited above, § 137).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint concerning the right to property admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant’s heir, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Croatian kunas at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 8,200 (eight thousand two hundred euros) in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 1,500 (one thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 850 (eight hundred and fifty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to applicant’s heir, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s heir’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 10 July 2014, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Khanlar Hajiyev
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Eccezione preliminare respinta(Articolo 35-1 - Esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali) eccezione Preliminare respinta (Articolo 35-3-b - Nessun svantaggio significativo) Resto inammissibile - Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 dell’ Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (Articolo 1 parà. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo della proprietà Articolo 1 par. 2 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controllo dell'uso della proprietà) danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - assegnazione



PRIMA LA SEZIONE







CAUSA STATILEO C. CROATIA

(Richiesta n. 12027/10)










SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

10 luglio 2014






Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Statileo c. Croatia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Khanlar Hajiyev, Presidente
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse,
Dmitry Dedov, giudici
ed André Wampach, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato 17 giugno 2014,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 12027/10) contro la Repubblica di Croatia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino croato, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 27 gennaio 2010.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un difensore che pratica in Divisione. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che la sua incapacità per accusare affitto adeguato per il contratto d'affitto del suo appartamento era stata in violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà.
4. 28 giugno 2011 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo.
5. Con una lettera di 6 dicembre 2011 il rappresentante del richiedente informò la Corte che il richiedente era morto 6 febbraio 2011 e che il suo erede legale il Sig. Boris Filii ćdesiderò intraprendere la richiesta (veda divide in paragrafi 88-89 sotto).
6. Ksenija Turković, il giudice elesse in riguardo di Croatia, ritirò dal riunirsi nella causa (Articolo 28 degli Articoli di Corte). Il Governo nominò di conseguenza Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, il giudice elesse in riguardo del Monaco, riunirsi nel suo posto (l'Articolo 26 § 4 della Convenzione e Decide 29).
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
7. Il richiedente nacque nel 1952 e visse in Divisione.
8. Lui era il proprietario di un appartamento in Divisione con un'area di superficie di 66.76 metri di piazza.
9. 17 ottobre 1955 un certo Sig.ra P.A. era, sulla base del Decreto su Amministrazione di Edifici Residenziali di 1953 (veda paragrafo 24 sotto), assegnò il diritto per vivere nell'appartamento e si mosse insieme in con sua madre ed il suo cugino I.T. (nato nel 1948) chi i suoi genitori avevano affidato a P.A. ' s curano nel 1951. Questo diritto era con l'entrata in vigore dell'Alloggio Atto di 1959 trasformato nell'affitto specialmente protetto (stanarsko pravo, veda divide in paragrafi 24-30 sotto dell'affitto specialmente protetto nell'Iugoslavia precedente).
10. P.A. ed I.T. vissuto insieme nell'appartamento del richiedente sino a P.A. si mosso fuori nel 1973. I.T. continuato a vivere con suo marito e suo figlio là, Ig.T. (nato nel 1972). I.T. ' che marito di s è morto nel 1998.
11. 5 novembre 1996 il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto entrò in vigore. Abolì il concetto legale dell'affitto specialmente protetto e purché che i possessori di simile affitti in riguardo di, inter l'alia, appartamenti privatamente posseduti erano divenire “affittuari protetti” (zaštieni ćnajmoprimci, veda divide in paragrafi 31 e 40 sotto). Sotto l'Atto simile affittuari sono soggetto ad un numero di misure protettive, come il dovere di padroni di casa di contrarre un contratto d'affitto della durata indefinita pagamento di affitto protetto (zaštiena najamnina), l'importo di che è esposto col Governo e significativamente abbassa che il mercato affittò; e la migliore protezione contro conclusione del contratto d'affitto.
A. procedimenti Civili
12. Il richiedente rifiutò di concludere un contratto di contratto d'affitto con I.T. stipulando l'affitto protetto facendo seguito a sezione 31(1) del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda 40 sotto). Sul 1997 I.T di 16 maggio. portato un'azione civile contro lui nella Divisione Corte Municipale (ćsud di Opinski u Splitu), appellandosi su sezione 33(3) dello stesso Atto (veda paragrafo 43 sotto), con una prospettiva ad ottenendo una sentenza al posto di tale contratto.
13. Brevemente dopo nel 1997 il richiedente portò un'azione civile nella stessa corte che cerca di ottenere una sentenza che ordina I.T. e suo figlio per sgombrare l'appartamento in oggetto. Lui dibattè che lei non era stata “un figlio senza genitori” e così non poteva essere considerato un membro di P.A. ' famiglia di s all'interno del significato di sezione 9(4) dell'Alloggio Atto del 1974 o sezione 12(1) dell'Alloggio Atto del 1985 (veda rispettivamente divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 sotto). Di conseguenza, lei non poteva prendere l'affitto specialmente protetto dopo P.A. si era mosso fuori dell'appartamento nel 1973, e così non aveva avuto qualsiasi titolo per usarlo.
14. I due procedimenti furono congiunti successivamente.
15. Con una sentenza di 2 settembre 2002 la Divisione che Corte Municipale trovata in favore di I.T. e suo figlio in parte. Ordinò che il richiedente concludesse con I.T. un contratto di contratto d'affitto che stipula affitto protetto nell'importo di 102.14 kunas croati (HRK)-approssimativamente 14 euros (EUR) al tempo-per mese entro quindici giorni; altrimenti la sentenza sostituirebbe tale contratto. Fin dall'esistenza di un affitto specialmente protetto un requisito indispensabile necessario era per acquisire lo status di un affittuario protetto sotto il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 11 sopra) la corte aveva determinare, come una questione pregiudiziale prima se I.T. era divenuto il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto dopo P.A. si era mosso fuori dell'appartamento nel 1973. La corte contenne che, diversamente da legislazione susseguente si appellata su col richiedente, la legislazione vigente al tempo di materiale vale a dire l'Alloggio Atto di 1962, non aveva definito chi sarebbe potuto essere considerato un membro della famiglia di un possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto (veda paragrafo 27 sotto). Così, determinato quel I.T. era stato in cura adottiva con P.A. e visse con lei nell'appartamento in oggetto, lei sarebbe potuta essere considerata come un membro della sua famiglia e perciò sarebbe potuta essere potuta, dopo P.A. si era mosso fuori dell'appartamento nel 1973, aveva preso l'affitto specialmente protetto da lei ed era divenuto al riguardo il possessore. Di conseguenza, quando a novembre 1996 il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto entrò in vigore, I.T. aveva, come il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto, divenga un affittuario protetto con l'operazione di legge e fu concesso per concludere un contratto di contratto d'affitto che stipula affitto protetto col richiedente (veda divide in paragrafi 39-40 sotto). Mentre la corte decise che I.T. ' che figlio di s potrebbe essere elencato nel contratto di contratto d'affitto come un membro della sua famiglia, contenne anche che la sua nuora e suo nipote non potevano perché loro non erano passati all'appartamento sino a dopo l'entrata in vigore del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, quando affitti specialmente protetti non potrebbero essere ottenuti più.
16. 28 giugno 2006 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Požega (sud di Županijski u Požegi) respinse un ricorso col richiedente e sostenne la sentenza di primo-istanza che con ciò divenne definitivo.
17. Il richiedente presentò poi un reclamo con la Corte Costituzionale (sud di Ustavni Republike Hrvatske) adducendo violazioni del suo diritto all'uguaglianza di fronte alla legge, il suo diritto ad un'udienza corretta ed il suo diritto di proprietà sotto la Costituzione (veda paragrafo 23 sotto).
18. 17 settembre 2009 la Corte Costituzionale respinse l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente e notificò la sua decisione sul suo rappresentante 2 novembre 2009.
B. L'affitto protetto
19. Secondo le informazioni presentate con le parti, l'affitto protetto e mensile per l'appartamento del richiedente cambiato siccome segue, in linea con l'aumento nell'indice dei prezzi di costruzione (veda divide in paragrafi 52 e 85 sotto):

Periodo L'importo dell'affitto protetto

HRK EUR
(cambio medio di periodo attinente)
1 dicembre 1997-31 ottobre 2005 102.14 13.36
1 novembre 2005-8 maggio 2008 157.62 21.48
9 maggio 2008-4 settembre 2012 174.48 23.66
5 settembre 2012-l'onwards 180.25 23.76

20. Sembra dai documenti presentati col Governo che il richiedente ha rifiutato di ricevere l'affitto protetto per l'appartamento e quel I.T. doveva perciò depositarlo con una corte.
21. Secondo le parti la parcella di condominio pagò nel finanziamento di riserva comune (veda paragrafo 67 sotto) col proprietario dell'appartamento-il richiedente e più tardi il suo erede-per mantenimento ecc., sia esposto a HRK 102.81 1 gennaio 1998 e non è cambiato da allora.
22. Il Governo presentò anche informazioni dalle autorità fiscali secondo le quali non aveva dichiarato mai il richiedente qualsiasi reddito dall'affittare fuori l'appartamento. D'altra parte l'erede del richiedente faceva così nella sua dichiarazione dei redditi per 2011 e 2012 dove lui chiese anche una deduzione di tassa su conto di costi che corrispondono all'importo della parcella di condominio pagato (veda divide in paragrafi 67-70 sotto). Il Governo non specificò che aliquota d'imposta fu fatta domanda.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. La Costituzione
23. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione della Repubblica di Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 56/90 con emendamenti susseguenti) legga siccome segue:
Articolo 14(2)
“Ognuno sarà uguale di fronte alla legge.”
Articolo 29(1)
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti ed obblighi o di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro lui o lei, ognuno è concesso ad un'udienza corretta all'interno di un termine ragionevole con una corte indipendente ed imparziale stabilita con legge.”
Articolo 48
“Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito.
Proprietà comporta obblighi. Proprietari ed utenti di proprietà contribuiranno al welfare generale.”
Legislazione di B. che governa affitto specialmente protetto
24. Il “diritto ad un appartamento”, dando un titolo al suo possessore ad uso permanente e senza restrizioni di un appartamento per fini viventi, fu introdotto nell'ordinamento giuridico dell'Iugoslavia precedente nel 1953 col Decreto su Amministrazione di Edifici Residenziali (Uredba o upravljanju stambenim zgradama) di 1953. L'Alloggio Atto (Zakon odnosima di stambenim di o) di 1959 il primo atto legislativo del quale ha introdotto il concetto legale era il “affitto specialmente protetto” (stanarsko pravo). Una volta assegnò, diede un titolo al suo possessore ed i membri di suo o la sua famiglia a permanente (di tutta la vita) ed uso senza restrizioni di un particolare appartamento per fini viventi contro il pagamento di una parcella nominale che copre solamente spese di manutenzione ed il deprezzamento. Il possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto potrebbe supplire-affittare anche una parte dell'appartamento a qualcuno altro, partecipi nell'amministrazione dell'edificio nella quale l'appartamento fu localizzato, lo scambi per un altro piatto (in conformità col provveditore dell'appartamento) e, insolitamente, parte di uso di sé per scopi commerciali. In teoria legale e pratica giudiziale l'affitto specialmente protetto fu descritto come un sui generis corretto. Simile affitto potrebbe essere terminato solamente in procedimenti giudiziali e su motivi limitati, il più importante un insuccesso che è col possessore per usare l'appartamento per avere vissuto per un periodo continuo di almeno sei mesi senza ragione allineato.
25. Sino all'entrata in vigore dell'Alloggio Atto di 1974, affitti specialmente protetti potrebbero essere assegnati in riguardo di sia possedette socialmente e privatamente appartamenti. Nella grande maggioranza di cause loro furono assegnati comunque, in riguardo di appartamenti in “proprietà sociale” (društveno vlasništvo)-un tipo di proprietà che non esistè negli altri paesi socialisti ma sviluppò particolarmente estremamente nell'Iugoslavia precedente. Secondo la dottrina ufficiale, proprietà in proprietà sociale non aveva nessun proprietario, il ruolo di autorità pubbliche in riguardo di simile proprietà che è confinata a gestione. Con l'Alloggio Atto di 1974 non era più possibile assegnare affitti specialmente protetti in riguardo di appartamenti in proprietà privata. Comunque, gli affitti specialmente protetti che preesistono in riguardo di simile appartamenti furono preservati.
26. La relazione legale fra i provveditori di appartamenti (autorità pubbliche che nominalmente controllato e stava assegnando appartamenti socialmente-posseduti, o proprietari di appartamenti privatamente-posseduti) e possessori di affitti specialmente protetti furono regolati con Alloggio Atti successivi di 1959, 1962, 1974 e 1985. Quegli atti previdero, inter l'alia che quando un possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto morì o si mosse fuori dell'appartamento l'affitto fu trasferito con l'operazione di legge (ipso jure) ai membri di suo o la sua famiglia, anche se in simile cause l'amministrazione di alloggio potesse chiedere sfratto di quelli che usa l'appartamento se considerasse che nessuno di loro soddisfece le condizioni per ottenere quel l'affitto. Così, affitti specialmente protetti potrebbero essere passati su, di pieno diritto, da generazione a generazione.
27. L'Alloggio Atto di 1962 non definì chi potrebbe essere considerato un membro della famiglia di un possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto. Comunque, definì, in sezione 12(1) che potrebbe essere considerato l'occupante di un appartamento:
“(1) gli occupanti di un appartamento all'interno del significato di questo Atto sono: il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto, membri di suo o la sua famiglia che vive insieme con lui o lei, e persone di che sono più membri suo o la sua famiglia ma ancora vive nello stesso appartamento.”
28. L'Alloggio Atto di 1974 nella sua sezione 9(4) membri di famiglia definito di un possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto come:
“... persone che vivono insieme con lui o lei e formano un'unità economica, [incluso] consorti, parenti di sangue nella linea diretta ed i loro consorti, figliastri ed adoptees figli senza genitori presi in cura adottiva, patrigno e matrigna, genitori adottivi, fratelli e sorelle e persone a carico, un cohabitee...”
29. L'Alloggio Atto di 1985 nella sua sezione 12(1) membri di famiglia definito di un possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto nei termini seguenti:
“Sotto questi membri di Atto della famiglia di un possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto è suo o il suo consorte e persone che hanno vissuto con lui o lei di due anni passati, incluso: parenti di sangue nella linea diretta ed i loro consorti, fratelli e sorelle, figliastri ed adoptees, figli senza genitori presi in cura adottiva, patrigno e matrigna, genitori adottivi e persone a carico, un cohabitee...”
30. Gli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante) Atto di 1991 possessori concessi di affitti specialmente protetti e, col loro permesso, i membri della loro famiglia, acquistare gli appartamenti in riguardo del quale loro contennero simile affitto sotto le condizioni favorevoli. In così una grande maggioranza di affitti specialmente protetti fu trasformato nel diritto di proprietà di inquilini precedenti. Comunque, possessori di affitti specialmente protetti in riguardo di appartamenti privatamente-posseduti o socialmente-possedette appartamenti coi quali appartamenti erano passati in proprietà sociale vuole dire del sequestro (piuttosto che nationalisation) aveva nessuno diritto acquistare gli appartamenti in riguardo del quale loro contennero simile affitto. Loro, insieme con quelli possessori di affitti specialmente protetti che avevano ma non si giovò a di, il diritto per acquistare gli appartamenti, divenne i così definiti affittuari protetti con l'entrata in vigore del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto 6 novembre 1996 (veda paragrafo 11 sopra e divide in paragrafi 39-40 sotto).
C. Il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto
1. Disposizioni attinenti
31. Il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (Zakon stanova di najmu di o, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 91/1996 28 ottobre 1996) che entrò in vigore 5 novembre 1996 regola la relazione legale fra padrone di casa ed affittuario con riguardo ad al contratto d'affitto di appartamenti.
(un) Approvvigiona relativo a contratto d'affitto ordinario
32. Sezione 5 prevede che un contratto per contratto d'affitto di un appartamento dovrebbe specificare, inter l'alia, i tipi di accuse pagabile nel collegamento col vivendo nell'appartamento ed il modo loro dovrebbero essere pagati, e contiene clausole sul mantenimento dell'appartamento.
33. Secondo sezione 6 l'affitto pagato per l'uso di un appartamento può essere o l'affitto protetto o affitto liberamente negoziato, (quel è, il mercato affittò).
34. Sezione 7 che prevede per l'affitto protetto come uno dei più importanti elementi dello status di un affittuario protetto legge siccome segue:
Sezione 7
“(1) affitto protetto è esposto sulla base degli standard e criterio esposta col Governo della Repubblica di Croatia [quel è, col Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto].
(2) gli standard e criterio assegnati ad in paragrafo 1 di questa sezione saranno esposti dipendendo dalle convenienze e vivendo (usabile) spazio di un appartamento, le spese di manutenzione delle aree comunali ed installazioni dell'edificio [dove l'appartamento è localizzato], così come sul potere d'acquisto [cioé. reddito] della famiglia dell'affittuario.
(3) affitto protetto non può essere più basso dell'importo necessario coprire i costi di mantenimento regolare dell'edificio residenziale [in che è localizzato l'appartamento] che è determinato con legislazione speciale.”
35. Sezione 13 stati che il padrone di casa deve mantenere l'appartamento che lui o lei affittano fuori in una condizione abitabile, in conformità col contratto di contratto d'affitto.
36. Sezione 14(3) prevede che l'affittuario deve notificare il padrone di casa di qualsiasi richiesto ripara nell'appartamento ed i locali comunali dell'edificio nei quali è localizzato, i costi di che deve essere sopportato col padrone di casa.
37. Facendo seguito a sezione 19 un padrone di casa può terminare un contratto d'affitto nelle cause seguenti:
- se l'affittuario non paga l'affitto o accuse;
- se l'affittuario subaffitta l'appartamento o parte di sé senza permesso dal padrone di casa;
- se l'affittuario o gli altri inquilini nell'appartamento disturbano gli altri inquilini nell'edificio;
- se un'altra persona, non chiamata nel contratto di contratto d'affitto vive nell'appartamento per più lungo di trenta giorni senza permesso dal padrone di casa, eccetto dove che persona è il consorte, figlio o genitrice dell'affittuario o degli altri inquilini legali nell'appartamento, o una persona a carico dell'affittuario o una persona in riguardo di chi l'affittuario è una persona a carico;
- se l'affittuario o gli altri inquilini legali usano l'appartamento per fini altro che come alloggio vivente.
38. Sezione 21 letture siccome segue:
“Separatamente dai motivi convenuti in sezione 19 di questo Atto, il padrone di casa può terminare un contratto d'affitto della durata indefinita se lui o lei intendono di passare all'appartamento o installare suo o i suoi figli, genitori o persone a carico in sé.”
(b) Approvvigiona relativo a contratto d'affitto protetto
39. Disposizioni di transizione (sezioni 30-49) del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto stabilisca una categoria speciale di affittuari (“affittuari protetti”-zaštieni ćnajmoprimci), vale a dire, quelli che prima erano possessori di affitti specialmente protetti in riguardo di appartamenti privatamente posseduti o quelli che non acquistarono i loro appartamenti sotto gli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante) l'Atto. Simile affittuari sono soggetto ad un numero di misure protettive, come l'obbligo di padroni di casa per contrarre un contratto d'affitto della durata indefinita; pagamento di affitto protetto (zaštiena najamnina), l'importo di che è esposto col Governo; ed un ruolo limitato dei motivi per conclusione del contratto d'affitto. Le disposizioni del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto relativo a contratto d'affitto ordinario fanno domanda a contratto d'affitto protetto a meno che le disposizioni relativo a contratto d'affitto protetto prevedono altrimenti.
40. Con sezione 30 dell'Atto gli affitti specialmente protetti ed ancora esistendo (veda paragrafo 30 sopra) fu abolito e possessori di simile affitti furono protegguti affittuari come del suo arrivo in vigore.
41. Sezione 31(1) prevede che il proprietario dell'appartamento ed il possessore precedente di un affitto specialmente protetto in riguardo dello stesso appartamento entrerà in un contratto di contratto d'affitto della durata indefinita dove l'affittuario avrà il diritto ad affitto protetto. Sezione 31(2) gli stati che l'affittuario protetto non ha il diritto ad affitto protetto se lui o lei corrono un affari in una parte dell'appartamento o possiedono un alloggio abitabile o appartamento.
42. Secondo sezione 33(2) l'affittuario deve presentare una richiesta per la conclusione di un contratto di contratto d'affitto che stipula affitto protetto al padrone di casa entro sei mesi dall'entrata dell'Atto in vigore o dal giorno su che la decisione che determina il diritto di che persona per usare l'appartamento diviene definitivo.
43. Sezione 33(3) gli stati che se il padrone di casa non entra o rifiuta di entrare in un contratto di contratto d'affitto che stipula affitto protetto entro tre mesi della ricevuta della richiesta dell'affittuario, l'affittuario può portare un'azione nella corte competente con una prospettiva ad ottenendo una sentenza al posto del contratto di contratto d'affitto.
44. Segue da sezione 35 che l'affittuario protetto deve pagare il padrone di casa, oltre all'affitto protetto le parcelle di utilità e le altre accuse imposero in collegamento col vivendo nell'appartamento (costi in marcia), se loro hanno concordato così.
45. Sezione 36 letture siccome segue:
“Se, dovendo che ad emendamenti alla legislazione, assegnò ad in sezione 7 di questo Atto, il livello dei cambi di affitto protetti l'affittuario è legato per pagare che [riveduto] affitto sulla base del calcolo prevista col padrone di casa senza qualsiasi la modifica del [il contratto d'affitto] contraente.”
46. Sezione 37(1) prevede che persone che, al tempo dell'entrata dell'Atto in vigore, aveva la condizione giuridica di un membro del possessore della famiglia dell'inquilino protetto, acquisì sotto le disposizioni dell'Alloggio del 1985 Agisca (veda paragrafo 29 sopra), deve essere entrato nel contratto di contratto d'affitto.
47. Sezione 38 stati siccome segue:
“(1) nell'evento della morte di un affittuario protetto o quando l'affittuario protetto abbandona l'appartamento, i diritti ed i doveri dell'affittuario protetto convenuti nel contratto di contratto d'affitto passeranno [uno di] il person[s] indicò nel contratto di contratto d'affitto, soggetto al loro accordo.
(2) nell'evento di una controversia, il padrone di casa designerà l'affittuario.
(3) la persona assegnata ad in paragrafo 1 di questa sezione può [renda un] la richiesta [a] il padrone di casa per concludere un contratto di contratto d'affitto [stipulando affitto protetto] entro sessanta giorni dal cambio di circostanze [assegnò ad in paragrafo 1 di questa sezione].
(4) il padrone di casa concluderà con la persona assegnata ad in paragrafo 1 di questa sezione un contratto per contratto d'affitto dell'appartamento della durata indefinita, stipulando i diritti ed i doveri di un affittuario protetto.”
48. I motivi per conclusione con un padrone di casa del contratto d'affitto di un appartamento ad un affittuario protetto sono esposti fuori in sezione 40 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto che legge siccome segue:
“(1) separatamente dai motivi convenuti in sezione 19 di questo Atto, un padrone di casa può terminare il contratto d'affitto di un appartamento ad un affittuario protetto, per motivi:
- purché per in sezione 21(1) di questo Atto,
- se lui o lei non hanno l'altro alloggio per lui o lei e per suo o la sua famiglia, e è [uno] concedè ad assistenza sociale e permanente sulla base della legislazione speciale o è più di sessanta anni maggiorenne.
(2) [invalidò con la Corte Costituzionale come incostituzionale con una decisione di 31 marzo 1998.]
(3) nella causa assegnata ad in paragrafo 1, seconda supplire-paragrafo di questa sezione il governo locale... fornirà all'affittuario protetto un altro appartamento appropriato [nell'uso del quale lui o lei tratterranno] i diritti ed obblighi di un affittuario protetto.
(4) il padrone di casa o il governo locale nelle cause assegnate ad in paragrafi 2 e 3 di questa sezione non sono legati per fornire all'affittuario protetto un altro appartamento appropriato se lui o lei possiedono un appartamento abitabile ed appropriato nel territorio del distretto amministrativo o municipio dove l'appartamento dove lui o lei vivono è localizzato.
(5)...”
49. Con una decisione di 31 marzo 1998 la Corte Costituzionale invalidò come incostituzionale (veda paragrafo 57 sotto), inter l'alia, divida in paragrafi 2 di sezione 40 quale purché che nella causa assegnata ad in paragrafo 1, prima la supplire-paragrafo di che sezione il padrone di casa potrebbe terminare solamente il contratto d'affitto protetto se lui o lei avessero fornito all'affittuario protetto un altro appartamento abitabile sotto condizioni di alloggio che non erano meno favorevoli per l'affittuario. Dopo che decisione della Corte Costituzionale, la Corte Suprema, in decisione Entusiasmare-486/02-2, Gzz-74/02 di 21 febbraio 2007, specificò che un padrone di casa che intende di muoversi in suo o il suo proprio appartamento o installa suo o i suoi figli, genitori o therein delle persone a carico è concesso per terminare il contratto di contratto d'affitto di un appartamento ad un affittuario protetto (o rifiutare di entrare in un contratto di contratto d'affitto) solamente se (un) il padrone di casa non ha l'altro alloggio per lui o lei e per suo o la sua famiglia, ed o è concesso ad assistenza sociale e permanente o è più di sessanta anni maggiorenne; o (b) l'affittuario possiede un appartamento abitabile ed appropriato nello stesso municipio o distretto amministrativo dove l'appartamento dove lui o lei vivono è localizzato.
50. Sezione 41 definisce la nozione di un “appartamento appropriato”, assegnò ad in paragrafi 3 e 4 di sezione 40, siccome un appartamento localizzò nello stesso distretto amministrativo o municipio coi quali si attengono in termini della sua taglia il “una persona una stanza” il principio e quale non ha un più grande numero di stanze che l'appartamento l'affittuario protetto deve muoversi fuori di.
2. Legislazione subordinata e riferita
(un) Il Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto
51. Il Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto (Uredba o uvjetima i mjerilima za utvrivanje đzaštiene ćnajamnine, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 40/97 e 117/05) che entrò in vigore 16 aprile 1997 è la legislazione subordinata assegnata ad in sezione 7(1) del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 34 sopra).
52. Sezione 3 contiene la formula matematica per calcolare affitto protetto. La formula prende in considerazione: (un) l'area di pavimento usabile dell'appartamento; (b) l'indice dei prezzi di costruzione (come di 1 novembre 2005 quando gli Emendamenti al Decreto entrato in vigore); (il c) il numero di punti dato all'appartamento nel suo documento di valutazione (quali dipendono dai materiali di edificio, lo stato della falegnameria e piombando, lo stato dell'acqua, benzina, riscaldamento ed installazioni elettriche e sbocchi di telecomunicazione, la finitura dei pavimenti e muri il pavimento sul quale è localizzato l'appartamento, l'esistenza di un elevatore ecc.); (d) il coefficiente di ubicazione (quale dipende dall'ubicazione dei trend piatti e demografici); e (e) il coefficiente di utilizzabilità (quale dipende dell'area di pavimento usabile dell'appartamento ed il numero di inquilini che vivono in sé).
53. Sezione 9 prevede per la possibilità di ridurre l'importo dell'affitto protetto calcolata in conformità con la formula contenuta in sezione 3 in cause dove era meno il reddito mensile e medio per membro della famiglia di anno precedente che mezzo il reddito mensile e medio nella Repubblica di Croatia per lo stesso anno.
54. Sezione che 10 stati che l'importo dell'affitto protetto ha ridotto in conformità con sezione 9 non possono essere più basso che un certo minimo importo calcolò usando la formula prevista in quel la sezione.
55. Secondo sezione 11(1) l'importo mensile dell'affitto protetto in riguardo di un specifico appartamento sarà calcolato una volta col padrone di casa per anno. Sezione 11(2) prevede che il padrone di casa può chiedere al reparto attinente dell'autorità locale accusato con affari di alloggio per calcolare l'importo dell'affitto protetto per l'appartamento fuori il quale lui o lei stanno affittando.
(b) La Decisione sulla determinazione del livello di affitto liberamente negoziato
56. Il Governo della Decisione di Croatia sulla determinazione del livello di affitto liberamente negoziato (Odluka o utvrivanju đslobodno ugovorene najamnine, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 120/00) di 15 novembre 2000, espone il livello di affitto per appartamenti posseduti con lo Stato. Si noterà che questo affitto non è protegguto affitto ma “negoziò liberamente affitto” all'interno del significato di sezione 6 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 33 sopra). Ciononostante, perché simile appartamenti sono assegnati ad inquilini socialmente vulnerabile generalmente, è un senza scopo di lucro o basso-profitto affittò e è abbassi così notevolmente che l'affitto di mercato. In particolare, la Decisione prevede che l'importo di affitto liberamente negoziato per essere pagato con affittuari in appartamenti Statali corrisponderà a due volte l'importo della parcella di condominio mensile pagato nel finanziamento di riserva comune dell'edificio dove l'appartamento è localizzato (veda paragrafo 67 sotto). Prevede anche che l'importo di affitto liberamente negoziato pagò con affittuari protetti non concessi ad affitto protetto per le ragioni esposte fuori in sezione 31(2) del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 41 sopra) sarà esposto a HRK 15 per metro quadrato.
3. La causa-legge della Corte Costituzionale
57. Ricorsi numerosi che seguono per (astratto) revisione costituzionale (prijedlog za ocjenu ustavnosti), con decisione n. U-io-762/1996 di 31 marzo 1998 (Ufficiale Pubblica 48/98 6 aprile 1998) la Corte Costituzionale invalidò quattro disposizioni del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, incluso sezione 40(2), come incostituzionale (veda paragrafo 49 sopra). Nella sua decisione respinse anche un numero di quelli ricorsi e con ciò rifiutò di fare una rassegna la costituzionalità di un'altra tredici disposizioni dello stesso Atto, incluso sezione 7 (veda paragrafo 34 sopra), così come dell'Atto intero stesso.
58. Con decisione n. U-io-533/2000 di 24 maggio 2000 (Ufficiale Pubblica 56/00 6 giugno 2000) la Corte Costituzionale respinse un ricorso per (astratto) revisione costituzionale e così rifiutò di fare una rassegna la costituzionalità di otto disposizioni del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, incluso sezione 7 (veda paragrafo 34 sopra), così come dell'Atto intero stesso.
59. Con decisione n. U-II-1218/2000 di 22 novembre 2000 la Corte Costituzionale respinse un ricorso per (astratto) revisione costituzionale e così rifiutò di fare una rassegna la costituzionalità del Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto (veda divide in paragrafi 51-55 sopra).
D. L'Obblighi Atto
60. Molte disposizioni degli Obblighi Agiscono (Zakon odnosima di obveznim di o, Ufficiale Pubblica, N. 35/2005 e 41/2008) che entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2006 governi contratti di contratto d'affitto.
61. Sezione 551 stati che le disposizioni degli Obblighi Agiscono su contratti di contratto d'affitto faccia domanda, siccome articoli di assistente, a contratti d'affitto governati con legislazione speciale.
62. Sezione 553(1) prevede che il locatore ha fare la proprietà disponibile all'affittuario e mantenerlo in una condizione appropriato per l'uso convenuto.
63. Sezione 554 letture siccome segue:
Mantenimento della proprietà ed imposte di pubblico
Sezione 554
“(1) per mantenere la proprietà in una condizione appropriato per l'uso convenuto il locatore è legato per eseguire il richiesto ripara in tempo dovuto ed alla sua propria spesa, e l'affittuario è legato per permettere il locatore di fare così.
(2) il locatore è legato rimborsare qualsiasi costa l'affittuario è incorso in con eseguendo ripara, uno perché loro erano urgenti o perché il locatore, stato stato informato al riguardo, non li esegua in tempo dovuto.
(3) i costi di minore ripara ed i costi di uso regolare della proprietà [cioé. costi in marcia] sarà sopportato con l'affittuario.
(4) l'affittuario è legato per notificare il locatore del richiesto ripara senza ritardo; altrimenti lui o lei saranno responsabili per il danno risultante.
(5) tutte le tasse ed imposte di pubblico nel collegamento con la proprietà affittata saranno sopportate col locatore.”
E. Il Proprietà Atto
64. Sezioni 66-99 della Proprietà e gli Altri Diritti In Rem Act (Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 91/96 con emendamenti susseguenti) che entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 1997 (“il Proprietà Atto”), regola condominio (vlasništvo posebnih dijelova nekretnine, etažno vlasništvo). Questa è una forma di (il co -) proprietà di una multi-unità che costruisce dove c'è proprietà separata e distinta di unità individuali (come appartamenti o affari premette) e la comproprietà di aree comunali dell'edificio (come ingressi, scale, atri, il tetto scaldando sistema, elevatori ecc.) e della terra sotto sé.
65. Sezione 84(1) prevede che un coproprietario in un condominio è legato per sostenere, a suo o la sua propria spesa, l'unità individuale (per esempio, un appartamento) lui o lei possiedono individualmente e devono sopportare tutte le imposte pubbliche in collegamento con quel l'unità.
66. Sezione 84(3) gli stati che se un affittuario di un'unità individuale (per esempio, un inquilino) è legato per pagare per le utilità collegò col suo uso, il proprietario di che unità garantirà al provveditore di utilità che loro saranno pagati.
67. Secondo sezione 89(1) e (2) i costi di mantenimento di e miglioramenti ad un condominio sono in carica su tutti i coproprietari in proporzione alla loro quota nel condominio. Coproprietari devono preparare un finanziamento di riserva comune (zajednika čpriuva) in che loro devono pagare una parcella di condominio (doprinos za zajedniku priuvu).
Legislazione di F. su imposta sul reddito personale
68. Il Personale del 2004 Imposta sul reddito Atto (Zakon o porezu na dohodak, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 177/04 con emendamenti susseguenti) entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2005. Sezione 8 set che l'imposta sul reddito personale tassa a 12%, 25% o 40%, dipendendo dal livello di reddito imponibile.
69. Sezione 27(1) e (2) preveda che reddito imponibile da proprietà e diritti patrimoniali includono, inter l'alia, la differenza fra ricevute (le prese) su conto di affitto e contratti d'affitto ed i costi incorso in col contribuente in collegamento con quelle ricevute, dove solamente costa su a 30% dell'importo ricevuto può essere dedotto.
70. Disposizioni simili furono contenute in sezione 23(1) e (2) del Personale del 2000 Imposta sul reddito Atto (Ufficiale Pubblica n. 127/00 con emendamenti susseguenti) che era in vigore fra il 2001 e 31 dicembre 2003 di 1 gennaio e sezioni 30(1) e 32(1) del Personale del 1993 Imposta sul reddito Atto (Ufficiale Pubblica n. 109/93 con emendamenti susseguenti) che era in vigore fra il 1994 e 31 dicembre 2000 di 1 gennaio. Aliquote d'imposta, mentre dipendendo da reddito imponibile, era 20% e 35% sotto il Personale del 1993 Imposta sul reddito Atto, e 15%, 25% e 35% e, come di 1 gennaio 2003, anche 45% sotto il Personale del 2000 Imposta sul reddito Atto.
III. ALTRI DOCUMENTI ATTINENTI
A. Bills per correggere il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto
1. Rediga Emendamenti di 12 dicembre 2002 al Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto
71. 12 dicembre 2002 il Governo di Croatia adottò emendamenti di bozza al Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto e li presentò a Parlamento per prima lettura. Parlamento deliberò sugli emendamenti di bozza 29 gennaio 2003 e convenuto a loro. Il conto contenne una proposta per correggere, inter l'alia, sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto che è la disposizione su affitto protetto (veda paragrafo 34 sopra).
72. La parte generale del rapporto esplicativo a quelli Redige letture di Emendamenti siccome segue:
“Il livello corrente di affitto protetto è, in principio, non coprire anche i costi di mantenimento delle aree comunali ed installazioni di un edificio che costi sono in carica su proprietari piatti. Perciò, è evidente che, in principio, il [parcella di condominio] è più alto dell'affitto protetto. Segue che proprietari uguagliano debba pagare la differenza fra l'affitto ottenuto e [la parcella di condominio]. In oltre, sotto la legislazione applicabile proprietari piatti [chi sono] persone fisiche sono anche responsabili per pagare imposta sul reddito sul [reddito derivò da] il contratto d'affitto di [loro] gli appartamenti.
Perciò, il più basso [il livello di] affitto protetto dovrebbe essere regolato così che... [è] collegò con le spese di manutenzione regolari dell'edificio. Il criterio del potere d'acquisto [cioé. reddito] dovrebbe essere separato dal livello dell'affitto e dovrebbe essere collegato invece col sistema di benessere sociale che prevede per un assegno di alloggio di ‘'...
In particolare, in alloggio di noleggio sviluppato sistemi uno dei principi di base fecero domanda, addirittura sotto il sistema di senza scopo di lucro o affitti di basso-profitto, e [quelli che coinvolgono] gruppi privilegiati e protetti di inquilini incluso persone socialmente vulnerabile, è che l'affitto deve coprire i minimi costi di mantenimento del patrimonio immobiliare (di [sia] l'edificio e l'appartamento) e che così definiti gruppi vulnerabile... è previsto per col sistema di benessere sociale.”
73. La parte speciale del rapporto esplicativo a sezione 1 dei Bozza Emendamenti che le ammende sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, letture:
“... Il livello di oggi di affitto protetto è fra l'importo mensile e più basso di 1.53 generalmente e circa il 2 [croato] kunas per metro di piazza di appartamento. Si valuta che l'affitto è esposto all'importo più basso di solito.
È proposto anche che l'affitto protetto [in qualsiasi una causa] non dovrebbe essere più basso che l'importo pagato col proprietario dell'appartamento [cioé. la parcella di condominio] nel finanziamento di riserva comune per il mantenimento dei locali comunali ed installazioni dell'edificio [dove l'appartamento è localizzato], aumentò entro 20%. Che aumento è [propose] perché il proprietario di un appartamento [cioé. un padrone di casa] [chi è una persona fisica] è legato con la legislazione applicabile per dichiarare il contratto di contratto d'affitto dell'appartamento, [più specificamente], il reddito da che contratto d'affitto, alle autorità fiscali. [L'aumento proposto] coprirebbe perciò i costi incorsi in col proprietario come un risultato del suo obbligo per mantenere l'edificio (ma non l'appartamento) e la tassa [impose] su... [il reddito da] che contratto d'affitto.”
2. I Definitivo Bozza Emendamenti di 3 luglio 2003 al Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto
74. 3 luglio 2003 il Governo di Croatia adottò la definitivo versione degli emendamenti di bozza di abovementioned e li presentò al Parlamento croato per seconda lettura. La definitivo versione contenne anche una proposta per correggere sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto e valutò che a che tempo circa il 7,000 appartamenti privatamente-posseduti in Croatia erano soggetto allo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto. Questa definitivo versione degli emendamenti di bozza fu messa sull'agenda di Parlamento per la sessione sostenuta fra 24 settembre e 17 ottobre 2003. Comunque, Parlamento non aveva l'opportunità di deliberare o votare su che redige prima la sua risoluzione su conto delle elezioni parlamentari programmato ed imminenti.
75. La parte generale del rapporto esplicativo alle Definitivo letture di Emendamenti di Bozza siccome segue:
“Il livello corrente di affitto protetto è, in principio, non coprire anche i costi di mantenimento di un edificio che costi sono in carica su proprietari piatti. Il livello più basso di affitto protetto è esposto attualmente a 1.53 [croato] kunas per metro di piazza di un appartamento. Comunque, su un periodo di cinque anni di accusare che affitto che è stato stabilito che i costi riferirono notevolmente al mantenimento di aree comunali ed installazioni in edifici [l'ecceda]. Di conseguenza, proprietari piatti hanno... paghi... la differenza [fra l'affitto ottenuto e] l'importo richiese per il mantenimento delle aree comunali ed installazioni dell'edificio [cioé. la parcella di condominio]. In oltre, sotto la legislazione di tassa applicabile... proprietari piatti con affittuari protetti che vivono nei loro appartamenti sono anche responsabili per pagare imposta sul reddito sul... [reddito derivò da] che contratto d'affitto da che loro infatti non renda [qualsiasi] profitto netto ma solamente incorre in spese extra.
È perciò necessario per regolare il criterio per esporre il livello di affitto protetto [così che copre] i costi di mantenimento del patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto. Fin dal livello di affitto protetto è molto basso (per un appartamento di alcuni 60 metri di piazza l'affitto protetto e medio è circa il 100 [croato] kunas per mese) è proposto di garantire [il suo pagamento in cause dove] il [privo di denaro] inquilino non è capace di pagarlo per il sistema di benessere sociale che, all'interno della struttura legislativa e corrente, prevede per un assegno di alloggio di ‘'....”
76. La parte speciale del rapporto esplicativo ai Definitivo Bozza Emendamenti relativo a sezione 1 della Bozza, mentre correggendo sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, legge siccome segue:
“... Il livello di oggi di affitto protetto è fra l'importo mensile e più basso di 1.53 generalmente e circa il 2 [croato] kunas per metro di piazza di un appartamento. Si valuta che affitto è esposto all'importo più basso che in principio non copre anche i costi del mantenimento delle aree comunali dell'edificio di solito [in che è localizzato l'appartamento].
Divida in paragrafi 3... attualmente prevede che affitto protetto non può essere più basso dell'importo necessario coprire i costi di mantenimento regolare dell'edificio residenziale [cioé. la parcella di condominio], determinò con legislazione speciale. Comunque, poiché che importo non è [davvero] specificò con qualsiasi legislazione speciale, si propone che sia specificato nel Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto.”
3. Rediga Emendamenti di novembre 2013 al Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto
77. A novembre 2013 il Ministero attinente preparò emendamenti di bozza al Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto e 6 dicembre 2013 aprì un dibattito pubblico sulla bozza che durò sino a 6 febbraio 2014. Questa bozza propone anche che sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto sia corretta ma stime che attualmente non più di 2,600 appartamenti privatamente-posseduti in Croatia sono soggetto allo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto.
78. Quelli Redigono Emendamenti contiene una proposta per correggere sezione 40 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 48 sopra) così che un padrone di casa che intende di muoversi in suo o il suo proprio appartamento o installa suo o i suoi figli, genitori o therein delle persone a carico sarebbero concessi per terminare il contratto di contratto d'affitto di un appartamento ad un affittuario protetto senza qualsiasi le condizioni. In che situazione il governo locale dovrebbe fornire all'affittuario protetto un altro appartamento appropriato per l'uso del quale lui o lei starebbero pagando affitto protetto. Siccome riguardi proteggerono affitto, i Bozza Emendamenti contengono una proposta all'effetto che il suo livello dovrebbe essere simile coprire i costi di mantenimento dell'edificio nel quale l'appartamento è localizzato (veda paragrafo 67 sopra) ed abilita i padroni di casa per dedurre almeno del profitto dall'affittare fuori i loro appartamenti. I Bozza Emendamenti prevedono anche aumento graduale nel livello di affitto protetto così che può in dieci anni della loro entrata in portata di vigore il livello di affitto liberamente negoziato. Infine, i Bozza Emendamenti prevedono per Stato e sussidi di governo locale che abiliterebbero affittuari protetti per comprare (un altro) spiani le condizioni favorevoli sotto e con ciò soddisfi le loro necessità di alloggio.
79. La parte generale del rapporto esplicativo ai Bozza Emendamenti, legge siccome segue:
“Il livello corrente di affitto protetto è, in principio, non coprire anche i costi di mantenimento di un edificio che è in carica su proprietari piatti. Il livello più basso di affitto protetto è esposto attualmente a 2.7 [croato] kunas per metro di piazza di un appartamento. Comunque, durante il corso di molti anni di accusare che affitto che è stato stabilito che i costi riferirono notevolmente al mantenimento di aree comunali ed installazioni in edifici [l'ecceda]. Di conseguenza, proprietari piatti hanno... paghi... la differenza [fra l'affitto ottenuto e] l'importo richiese per il mantenimento delle aree comunali ed installazioni dell'edificio [cioé. la parcella di condominio]. In oltre, sotto la legislazione di tassa applicabile... proprietari piatti con affittuari protetti che vivono nei loro appartamenti sono anche responsabili per pagare imposta sul reddito sul... [reddito derivò da] che contratto d'affitto dal quale loro non rendono [qualsiasi] il profitto ma solamente incorre in spese extra.
...
Siccome riguardi proteggerono affitto, è proposto che il criterio per esporre che affitto sia definito così che copre i costi di mantenimento regolare del patrimonio immobiliare.
Il metodo proposto del calcolo aumenterebbe il livello di affitto protetto (...) così che sé [non solo] copra i costi di mantenimento regolare del patrimonio immobiliare [ma che] i proprietari piatti riceverebbero una porzione di sé come un risarcimento per affittare fuori l'appartamento. ...
Un aumento graduale nel [il livello di protetto] affitto è previsto anche, così che dopo che dieci anni giungerebbe al livello di affitto liberamente negoziato.
...
Sotto la soluzione nuova e proposta secondo la quale sarebbe esposto affitto protetto così che copre i costi, proprietari piatti dovrebbero garantire più finanziamenti supplementari per soddisfare i loro obblighi che concernono mantenimento regolare delle aree comunali dell'edificio.”
80. La parte speciale del rapporto esplicativo ai Bozza Emendamenti relativo a sezione 1 della Bozza, mentre correggendo di sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, legge siccome segue:
“... Il livello di oggi di affitto protetto è fra l'importo mensile e più basso di 2.7 generalmente e circa il 3.8 [croato] kunas per metro di piazza di un appartamento. Si valuta che affitto è esposto all'importo più basso che in principio non copre anche i costi del mantenimento delle aree comunali dell'edificio di solito [in che è localizzato l'appartamento].”
I rapporti di Difensore civile di B.
81. La parte attinente della Relazione annuale del 2007 del Difensore civile croato (Izvješe ćo radu pukog čpravobranitelja za 2007. godinu) legge siccome segue:
“... la questione sistematica di affitto controllato (affitto protetto), quel è, [se prevede] un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi di padroni di casa in perdite coprenti incorse in in collegamento col mantenimento dei loro appartamenti e l'interesse generale nell'offrire appartamenti ad inquilini sotto le stesse condizioni... loro avevano [godè] come possessori di affitti specialmente protetti fu sollevato anche di fronte al Difensore civile.
Il livello di affitto protetto che è esposto in conformità col Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto non abilita padroni di casa per attenersi col loro obbligo per eseguire lavoro di mantenimento costoso. Perciò, [i padroni di casa] consideri che il setting del [il livello di] affitto protetto (affitto controllato) senza qualsiasi possibilità di sollevarlo in prospettiva dell'and/or di valore ripara costi di un appartamento [vuole dire che] loro sono stati costretti per sopportare un carico eccessivo e sproporzionato.
Benché la richiesta delle restrizioni è giustificata e proporziona allo scopo perseguito nell'interesse generale (la protezione di inquilini, un problema socialmente sensibile), [il setting di] il livello di [protetto] affitti sotto le spese di manutenzione [ha voluto dire che] una distribuzione equa del sociale e carico finanziario coinvolta nella riforma di legislazione di alloggio non è stata realizzata. Un meccanismo di protezione che è... un viale legale per [ottenendo] il risarcimento per perdite (per esempio, per sussidi ai proprietari per spese di manutenzione [o] sussidi agli inquilini per affitto) non è stato previsto.
Nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale è necessario per assicurare, in una maniera opportuna e [usando] misure appropriate, [che c'è] i meccanismi [in posto] per mantenere un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi di padroni di casa (incluso il loro diritto per dedurre profitto dalla loro proprietà) e l'interesse generale che è la protezione di inquilini, così che un carico and/or alloggio condizioni eccessive che sono più onerose di quelli delle quali loro hanno goduto finora non sono imposte su loro. Nell'evento che tutela giuridica è chiesta fuori dell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale, la Repubblica di Croatia può essere fissata altrimenti, in una situazione dove deve pagare il risarcimento (Corte europea di Diritti umani, sentenza di Pilota della Grande Camera di 19 giugno 2006 Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia).”
82. La parte attinente della Relazione annuale del 2012 del Difensore civile croato (Izvješe ćo radu pukog čpravobranitelja za 2012. godinu) legge siccome segue:
“Affitto protetto è pagato con possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti di appartamenti in proprietà privata e quelli che non acquistarono un appartamento sulla base degli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante) l'Atto. Affitto protetto non copre le spese di manutenzione degli appartamenti sopportate coi proprietari (i padroni di casa). Questo equilibrio è stato minato inoltre col fatto che protetto affitti completamente esclude il diritto di proprietari per dedurre profitto dalla loro proprietà. È perciò necessario per offrire meccanismi nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale per realizzando e mantenere un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi di proprietari che sono costretti per sopportare un carico eccessivo e gli interessi di inquilini che desiderano mantenere il loro alloggio corrente condizionano.”
83. Nella stessa Relazione annuale il Difensore civile presentò, per esempio, la causa di un padrone di casa che presentò un reclamo con l'Ufficio del Difensore civile:
“Il reclamante [un padrone di casa] da Z. si lamenta del fatto che l'affitto protetto pagò con l'inquilino non copra anche i costi di base lui ha [nascere] per il mantenimento dell'appartamento. Il livello di [la parcella di condominio], quel è, i finanziamenti intesero di coprire gli aspettati costi di mantenimento e miglioramento dell'edificio [in che è localizzato l'appartamento], ha raddoppiato. Lui ulteriore afferma che lui, come un anno-vecchio del 78 pensionato [è costretto così a] la co-finanza l'alloggio di un inquilino di lavorare-età che è 39 anni vecchio.
Misure prese: Il reclamante fu consigliato di esporre un [riveduto] importo di affitto protetto per l'inquilino. Il Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto prevede che l'importo mensile di affitto protetto in riguardo di un specifico appartamento sarà calcolato una volta col padrone di casa per anno (sezione 11). [Il reclamante] può chiedere anche all'autorità competente del Distretto amministrativo di Z. di calcolare l'importo dell'affitto protetto. Altrimenti, quel è, se l'inquilino non accetta l'offerta per correggere il contratto, [il reclamante] può chiedere l'emendamento della parte del contratto di contratto d'affitto riguardo al livello dell'affitto protetto con portando un'azione civile [con una prospettiva ad ottenendo una sentenza che specifica un importo diverso di affitto].
Un aumento in affitto non può essere basato su un aumento in [la parcella di condominio], perché [che parcella] non è incluso nella formula per il calcolo di affitto protetto. Piuttosto, è [basato su] un cambio in valore degli elementi [incluso] in [che] la formula...: l'indice dei prezzi di costruzione (6,000 [croato] kunas per metro di piazza di superficie usabile dell'appartamento), la rete media salario mensile nella Repubblica di Croatia, il numero di membri di famiglia ed il reddito netto mensile e medio per membro della famiglia di anno passato.”
84. Nella sua Relazione annuale del 2013 (Izvješe ćo radu vomitano čpravobraniteljice za 2013. godinu) il Difensore civile criticò l'aumento graduale nel livello di affitto protetto previsto coi Bozza Emendamenti di novembre 2013 al Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 78 sopra) nei termini seguenti:
“... i proposero... periodo di dieci-anno durante il quale l'affitto protetto dovrebbe giungere al livello di affitto liberamente negoziato per i proprietari intende restrizione del loro contrario di diritto di proprietà alla Costituzione che garantisce il diritto di proprietà e prevede che proprietà può essere presa o può essere restretta nell'interesse della Repubblica di Croatia [solamente] contro pagamento del risarcimento per il suo valore di mercato.”
Indici dei prezzi di Costruzione di C.
85. Il prezzo di costruzione (graenja di cijena di etalonskađ) per metro di piazza in kunas croato (HRK) ed in euros (EUR) che è uno dei fattori preso in considerazione nel calcolo di affitto protetto (veda paragrafo 52 sopra), è cambiato siccome segue:

Periodo HRK EUR
1 giugno 1995-2 gennaio 2002 3,400.00 NA
3 gennaio 2002-18 novembre 2003 5,156.60 700
19 novembre 2003-5 giugno 2005 5,307.83 700
6 giugno 2005-8 maggio 2008 5,246.62 700
9 maggio 2008-9 giugno 2009 5,808.00 792.41
10 giugno 2009-4 settembre 2012 5,808.00 NA
Il 2012 onwards di 5 settembre 6,000.00 NA
Informazioni di D. sul salario mensile e medio e media pensione mensile in Croatia
86. Secondo rapporti emessi con della Scrivania Statale di Statistiche (Državni zavod za statistiku) il salario mensile e medio in HRK in Croatia fra il 1997 ed il 2012 era siccome segue:

Anno Corrisponda in HRK
1997 2,377
1998 2,681
1999 3,055
2000 3,326
2001 3,541
2002 3,720
2003 3,940
2004 4,173
2005 4,376
2006 4,603
2007 4,841
2008 5,178
2009 5,311
2010 5,343
2011 5,441
2012 5,478

87. Secondo informazioni statistiche previste col Pensione Fondo croato (Hrvatski zavod za mirovinsko osiguranje) la pensione mensile e media (in HRK) in Croatia fra il 1999 ed il 2012 era siccome segue:
Anno Corrisponda in HRK
1999 1,309.43
2000 1,382.48
2001 1,591.96
2002 1,647.67
2003 1,702.24
2004 1,758.12
2005 1,829.27
2006 1,875.68
2007 1,933.83
2008 2,059.52
2009 2,156.83
2010 2,165.30
2011 2,156.83
2012 2,165.65
LA LEGGE
IO. COME A SE L'EREDE DI IL RICHIEDENTE PUÃ’ INTRAPRENDERE LA RICHIESTA
88. Nella sua lettera alla Corte di 6 dicembre 2011 il rappresentante del richiedente informò la Corte che il richiedente era morto 6 febbraio 2011 e che il suo erede legale, il Sig. Boris Filii ćera “pronto sostituirlo in questa questione” (veda paragrafo 5 sopra). Lui presentò una decisione emessa con un notaio pubblico di 15 luglio 2011 che dichiara il Sig. Filii il richiedente risuoli erede.
89. La Corte considera che nel fare così l'erede del richiedente espresso il desiderio per intraprendere la richiesta. Il Governo non contestò questo.
90. Avendo riguardo ad alla sua causa-legge sulla materia (veda, per esempio, Malhous c. la Repubblica ceca (il dec.) [GC], n. 33071/96, ECHR 2000 XII), e determinato che l'erede del richiedente ereditò l'appartamento in oggetto e con ciò divenne il suo proprietario, la Corte sostiene che lui ha sostenendo continuare i procedimenti presenti nel posto del richiedente. Comunque, l'esame della Corte è limitato alla questione di se o non le azioni di reclamo come originalmente presentò col Sig. Statileo che rimane il richiedente riveli una violazione della Convenzione (veda Malhous, citato sopra).
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1 A La Convenzione
91. Il richiedente si lamentò che lui non era stato capace di riguadagnare proprietà del suo appartamento o accusare il mercato affitti per il suo contratto d'affitto. Lui si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
92. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
Ammissibilità di A.
93. Il Governo dibattè che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali e che lui non aveva sofferto di un svantaggio significativo.
1. La non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali
94. Il Governo prima dibattè che il richiedente non si era lamentato mai prima le autorità nazionali del presumibilmente livello inadeguato dell'affitto protetto per il quale lui fu concesso per affittare fuori il suo appartamento. L'affitto protetto fu esposto facendo seguito al Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto (veda divide in paragrafi 51-55 sopra). Il richiedente avrebbe potuto impugnare simile legislazione subordinata con registrando un ricorso per (astratto) revisione costituzionale. Comunque, lui non aveva fatto così.
95. L'erede del richiedente rispose che il problema della costituzionalità di sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto ed il Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione dell'affitto protetto già era stato portato all'attenzione della Corte Costituzionale che aveva respinto tutti i ricorsi per la loro revisione costituzionale come infondato (veda divide in paragrafi 57-59 sopra).
96. La Corte lo considera comprensibile che il richiedente non sollevò il problema del livello inadeguato dell'affitto protetto nei procedimenti civili assegnati a (veda divide in paragrafi 12-18 sopra). Lui richiese lo sfratto dell'inquilino dal suo appartamento, mentre l'inquilino chiese la conclusione di un contratto di contratto d'affitto che stipula affitto protetto. Perciò, solamente dopo che quelli procedimenti avevano terminato nel suo disfavour, e le corti nazionali avevano deciso che l'inquilino fu concesso per concludere un contratto di contratto d'affitto che stipula affitto protetto col richiedente, poteva lui si lamenta che l'affitto protetto era inadeguato. Come all'argomento del Governo che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto registrare un ricorso per revisione costituzionale per contestare il Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto, è sufficiente per notare che la Corte Costituzionale aveva già due volte ricorsi respinti per fare una rassegna sezione 7 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 57-58 sopra), quel è, una disposizione sulla quale è basato il Decreto, ed una volta un ricorso per fare una rassegna il Decreto stesso (veda paragrafo 59 sopra). In queste circostanze, lasciando a parte la questione di se un ricorso per revisione costituzionale potrebbe essere considerato una via di ricorso per essere esaurito per i fini di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, i costatazione di Corte che il richiedente non era nella causa presente costrinse a registrare tale ricorso per attenersi coi requisiti di quel l'Articolo. Segue che l'eccezione del Governo come all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinto.
2. Se il richiedente soffrì di un svantaggio significativo
97. Il Governo presentò inoltre che l'azione di reclamo era inammissibile perché il richiedente non aveva sofferto di un svantaggio significativo all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (b) della Convenzione. Loro spiegarono che l'imposizione del contratto d'affitto protetto in riguardo dell'appartamento del richiedente sotto il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto era stata davvero più vantaggiosa per il richiedente che il più primo regime dell'affitto specialmente protetto sotto l'Alloggio Atto del 1985. In particolare, sotto il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto il richiedente, come un padrone di casa potrebbe terminare il contratto d'affitto dell'affittuario protetto sotto le condizioni più favorevoli che quelli che avevano fatto domanda alla conclusione di un affitto specialmente protetto sotto i 1962, 1974 e 1985 Alloggio Atti. Sotto il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto il richiedente era similmente, come un padrone di casa, concedè ricevere l'affitto protetto dall'affittuario protetto, mentre sotto l'Alloggio Atto del 1985 gli non era stato concesso a qualsiasi affittò qualsiasi.
98. L'erede del richiedente rispose che in una situazione dove sarebbe stato in grado riacquistare il suo appartamento avuto le corti nazionali decise nel suo favore il richiedente, e dove era l'affitto protetto venticinqui volte abbassano che il mercato affittò (veda paragrafo 114 sotto), non si potrebbe dibattere proprio che lui non aveva sofferto di un svantaggio significativo.
99. La Corte considera che per determinare se il richiedente soffrì di un svantaggio significativo, la sua situazione che è il risultato della violazione allegato non può essere comparata alla situazione che è esistita di fronte alla violazione allegato, siccome suggerì il Governo. Piuttosto, dovrebbe essere comparato alla situazione il richiedente sarebbe stato in se lui era successo con la sua azione civile ed aveva sfrattato l'inquilino, o uno dove sarebbe stato in grado affittare fuori il suo appartamento sotto le condizioni di mercato lui. Per la Corte è evidente che tale situazione sarebbe stata significativamente più vantaggiosa per lui. Così, non si può dire che lui non soffrì di un svantaggio significativo come un risultato della violazione allegato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. L'eccezione del Governo riguardo alla mancanza allegato di un svantaggio significativo deve essere respinta perciò.
3. Conclusione
100. La Corte nota inoltre che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota anche, mentre avendo riguardo ad al precedente, che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
(un) Il Governo
101. Il Governo dibattè che la sentenza della Divisione Corte Municipale di 2 settembre 2002 non aveva costituito un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, perché la sentenza in oggetto era stato solamente di una natura dichiaratoria. Le corti nazionali avevano trovato quel I.T. era divenuto il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto dell'appartamento del richiedente nel 1973, quando P.A. si era mosso fuori dell'appartamento (veda paragrafo 15 sopra). Sulla base di quel lo status I.T. aveva, 5 novembre 1996, quando il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto entrò in vigore (veda divide in paragrafi 11 e 31 sopra), divenga l'affittuario protetto ex il lege (veda paragrafo 40 sopra). Perciò, il Governo indicò, I.T. aveva acquisito lo status del possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto e successivamente lo status di un affittuario protetto prima che Croatia ratificò la Convenzione 5 novembre 1997. Così la sentenza contestata aveva reiterato soltanto le restrizioni già esistenti sulla proprietà del richiedente dell'appartamento.
102. Il Governo presentò inoltre che, se la Corte fosse trovare che c'era stata un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà nella causa presente, che interferenza era stata legale e necessaria per controllare l'uso di proprietà nell'interesse generale. Era stato anche proporzionale come sé aveva realizzato un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale della comunità e la protezione dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente.
103. In particolare, I.T. aveva acquisito lo status di affittuario protetto in riguardo dell'appartamento del richiedente sulla base di sezione 30 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 40 sopra) che disposizione era compatibile con la Costituzione croata (veda divide in paragrafi 57-58 sopra). Che disposizione, così come le altre disposizioni di transizione di che Atto che introduce lo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto, era chiaro, specifico e perciò prevedibile per il richiedente. Quelle disposizioni erano anche nell'interesse generale della comunità, siccome il loro scopo era alleviare le conseguenze negative della transizione dal Socialista sistema sociale ed economico ad un sistema democratico ed economia di mercato che necessariamente avevano comportato l'abbandono del concetto Socialista dell'affitto specialmente protetto.
104. Come riguardi la proporzionalità dell'interferenza, il Governo prima reiterò che controllare di leggi l'uso di proprietà sia specialmente comune nel campo di alloggio che in società moderne era una preoccupazione centrale di politiche sociali ed economiche, nell'attuazione della quale gli Stati avevano un margine ampio della valutazione sia con riguardo ad all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure di controllo e con riguardo ad alla loro attuazione. La Corte si aveva indicato che avrebbe rispettato la sentenza della legislatura come a che che era nell'interesse generale a meno che che sentenza era manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (veda Spadea e Scalabrino c. l'Italia, 28 settembre 1995, § 29 la Serie Un n. 315 B; e Mellacher ed Altri c. l'Austria, 19 dicembre 1989, § 45 la Serie Un n. 169). Gli stessi necessariamente fecero domanda, se non un fortiori, a cambi sociali e così integrali come quegli accadendo in Europa Centrale ed Orientale durante la transizione dal regime Socialista ad un stato democratico (veda Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 91 ECHR 2005 VI).
105. Facendo domanda questi principi alla causa presente, il Governo dibattè che le disposizioni di transizione del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto previdero un socialmente accettabile e correttamente bilancia fra gli interessi che competono di, sulla mano del una, i proprietari (i padroni di casa) di appartamenti prima affitti affitti specialmente protetti che desiderarono riguadagnare sul più grande controllo le loro proprietà sotto, e, d'altra parte gli interessi dei possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti in riguardo di appartamenti privatamente posseduti che vollero continuare vivere nelle loro case. Lo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto, introdotto con quelle disposizioni rappresentò una soluzione comprensiva a quel il problema.
106. Sotto che padroni di casa di disposizione che durante il regime Socialista erano stati costretti per abbandonare i loro appartamenti per essere usati con altri, aveva per un certo periodo di tempo rimasto soggetto a limitazioni sul loro diritto di proprietà come, notevolmente l'incapacità per riguadagnare proprietà diretta dei loro appartamenti. Quelle restrizioni erano un'espressione di limitazioni costituzionalmente permesse su proprietà che, secondo la Costituzione, i doveri comportati ed obbligò proprietari a contribuire al welfare generale (veda paragrafo 23 sopra). Per la loro parte, agli inquilini non fu permesso di usare commercialmente gli appartamenti o godere lo status di affittuari protetti in cause dove non erano più in bisogno di alloggio loro.
107. Inoltre, i padroni di casa ' posiziona sotto le disposizioni di transizione del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto era più favorevole della loro posizione sotto la legislazione precedente decretata durante il periodo Socialista (veda divide in paragrafi 24 e 25 sopra). In primo luogo, era stato incerto per quanto tempo ed in riguardo di che padroni di casa di persone i cui appartamenti erano stati soggetto al regime dell'affitto specialmente protetto, dovrebbe tollerare le restrizioni sul loro diritto di proprietà. Sotto il sistema corrente i padroni di casa erano sicuro che il loro diritto di proprietà fu restretto solamente in riguardo di quegli inquilini (affittuari protetti) chi aveva vissuto nel loro appartamento come possessori di affitti specialmente protetti e membri delle loro famiglie nel giorno dell'entrata in vigore del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, e solamente come lungo come quegli inquilini continuarono usare l'appartamento. Non c'era possibilità per persone dopo che erano divenute membri della famiglia dell'affittuario protetto che data o per qualsiasi le altre persone per acquisire lo status dell'affittuario protetto.
108. Inoltre, sezione 40 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto specificò che padroni di casa potessero terminare un contratto d'affitto protetto su motivi enumerati in sezione 19 dell'Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 37 e 48 sopra). Un padrone di casa potrebbe terminare anche un contratto d'affitto protetto se lui o lei intendessero di passare all'appartamento (veda paragrafo 38 e 48 sopra). Come riguardi i benefici finanziari che un padrone di casa derivò dal contratto d'affitto protetto, il Governo indicò che l'affitto protetto doveva coprire almeno i costi di mantenimento dell'appartamento e potrebbe essere più alto, mentre sotto il sistema precedente l'affitto aveva solamente completamente coperto i costi di mantenimento. Perciò, ogni restrizione imposta su padroni di casa aveva condizioni sotto le quali potrebbe essere rimosso.
109. Tutti queste considerazioni fecero domanda al richiedente che, oltre all'appartamento in oggetto, possedette un altro appartamento che lui si aveva usato per fini viventi. D'altra parte né I.T. che abitava nell'appartamento dal 1955 né i membri della sua famiglia avevano avuto qualsiasi l'altro alloggio. Era perciò evidente che nella causa presente la richiesta delle disposizioni attinenti del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto non aveva disturbato l'equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale di offrire alloggio per I.T. e la sua famiglia ed il diritto di proprietà del richiedente. Così non si poteva dibattere che lui aveva dovuto sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo. Sul contrario qualsiasi tenta di sfrattare I.T. dall'appartamento del richiedente avrebbe costituito una violazione del suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa, garantito con Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
110. Il Governo enfatizzò anche che il richiedente avesse potuto intentare causa legale sotto l'Alloggio Atto del 1962 (veda paragrafo 27 sopra), e chiese I.T. ' sfratto di s come presto come 1973, quando P.A. si era mosso fuori del suo appartamento (veda paragrafo 10 sopra). Lui aveva fatto così solamente comunque, dopo I.T. aveva avviato procedimenti per avere il suo status come affittuario protegguto certificò solamente con una sentenza di corte che è in reazione al suo abito (veda divide in paragrafi 12-13 sopra). Che, nella prospettiva del Governo, volle dire lui non l'aveva considerata vivendo nel suo appartamento per essere un carico.
111. In prospettiva del sopra, il Governo concluse, che non c'era stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nella causa presente.
112. In replica alla richiesta della Corte per informazioni sul mercato mensile e medio affittata per appartamenti nella città di Divisione fin da novembre 1997, le informazioni ammobiliate e Statali secondo le quali il mercato mensile affittò per affittare fuori appartamenti nel vicinato di che del richiedente variato, nel periodo fra gennaio 2004 e dicembre 2011, da HRK 1,000 a HRK 5,104.40 che dipende dalla taglia e lo stato di ripari dell'appartamento e la durata del contratto d'affitto. I dati presentati assegnato a quattro appartamenti e lesse siccome segue:

Metta in ordine di grandezza in metri di piazza Ogni mese affitti in HRK Affitto mensile
in EUR La durata del contratto d'affitto
75.79 3,643.00 498.73 1 dicembre 2009-31 luglio 2010
NA
(appartamento di uno-stanza 1,451.00 192.55 1 gennaio 2006-31 dicembre 2011
68.20 5,104.40 694.71 1 luglio 2009-31 agosto 2009
60 1,000.00 130.50 dal 2004 onwards di 1 gennaio
(b) l'erede di Il richiedente
113. L'erede del richiedente presentò che le corti nazionali avevano rifiutato di sfrattare I.T. dall'appartamento del richiedente perché loro l'avevano vista sbagliatamente come “un figlio senza genitori presi in cura adottiva” all'interno del significato di sezione 9(4) dell'Alloggio Atto del 1974 (veda paragrafo 28 sopra) e sezione 12(1) dell'Alloggio Atto del 1985 (veda paragrafo 29 sopra), anche se lei non era stata parentless quando lei era passata all'appartamento col suo cugino P.A. nel 1955 (veda paragrafo 9 sopra). Perciò, contrari all'argomento del Governo, l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà non aveva seguito dalla legislazione di pre-ratifica stessa ma dal nazionale corteggia ' interpretazione erronea di che legislazione che è dalla sentenza contestata.
114. Anche se il richiedente era stato formalmente il proprietario dell'appartamento in oggetto, il livello dell'affitto protetto e mensile che variò fra 102.14 e 174.48 kunas croati (HRK), quel è, fra dei 14 e 24 euros (EUR), non sarebbe stato sufficiente per coprire anche l'elettricità mensile conti e gli altri costi riferiti all'appartamento dove il richiedente aveva vissuto, affitti i costi di mantenimento dell'appartamento da solo lui fu legato per coprire come un padrone di casa sotto sezione 13 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda paragrafo 35 sopra). Quelli costi ridussero l'affitto protegguto e già basso il richiedente era stato dato un titolo a ricevere che era in qualsiasi la causa venticinqui volte abbassano che l'affitto di mercato. L'erede del richiedente presentato un annuncio pubblicitario dall'Internet datò il 2011 offerta di 6 dicembre per affitto un appartamento ammobiliato in Divisione di una taglia simile in appoggio del suo argomento, (63 metri di piazza) e 450 metri via dall'appartamento in oggetto, per 2,631 kunas croati (HRK) per mese che è HRK 41.76 per metro quadrato.
115. Infine, l'erede del richiedente dibattè che lo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto previde per nel Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto aveva messo sul richiedente come un padrone di casa un carico individuale ed eccessivo siccome lui non potesse usare l'appartamento, l'affitti ad un terza persona di sua propria scelta e sotto le condizioni di mercato, lo venda al prezzo di mercato, o in qualsiasi l'influenza di modo la durata del contratto d'affitto. In particolare, il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto non solo permise I.T. continuare vivere nell'appartamento e pagare indefinitamente l'affitto protetto, ma anche riconobbe lo stesso diritto in riguardo di suo figlio, Ig.T., nato nel 1972 (veda divide in paragrafi 15 e 46-47 sopra). Come una conseguenza, il richiedente non era stato capace di usare il suo appartamento durante la sua vita. L'erede del richiedente, nato nel 1943 può più probabile non sia in grado così o fare.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Se c'era un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo del richiedente di suo “le proprietà”
116. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, inter alia, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono distinti nel senso di essere distaccato. Il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò nella luce del principio generale enunciata nel primo articolo (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, § 157 ECHR 2006 VIII).
117. C'era indiscutibilmente un'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente nella causa presente come il contratto d'affitto protetto nella prospettiva della Corte, comporta un numero di restrizioni che impediscono a padroni di casa dell'esercitare il loro diritto per usare la loro proprietà. In particolare, padroni di casa sono incapaci per esercitare che diritto in termini di proprietà fisica, siccome i resti piatti occuparono indefinitamente con gli inquilini, ed i loro diritti in riguardo di affittare l'appartamento, incluso il diritto per ricevere il mercato affittato per sé e terminare il contratto d'affitto, è colpito sostanzialmente con un numero di limitazioni legali (veda divide in paragrafi 125-129 sotto). Comunque, padroni di casa non sono privati del loro titolo, continuano a ricevere affitto, e sono libero per vendere i loro appartamenti, benché soggetto ai termini del contratto d'affitto. Nascendo che in mente, ed avendo riguardo ad alla sua causa-legge sulla questione (veda, per esempio, Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, §§ 160-161; Edwards c. il Malta, n. 17647/04, § 59 24 ottobre 2006; ed il pravoslavna di Srpska il na di Opština Rijeci c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 38312/02, 18 maggio 2006), la Corte considera che l'interferenza in oggetto costituisce una misura che corrisponde al controllo di uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
118. La Corte deve esaminare inoltre se l'interferenza fu giustificata, che è, se fu offerto per con legge, era nell'interesse generale ed era proporzionale.
(b) Se l'interferenza fu giustificata
(i) Se l'interferenza era “purché per con legge”
119. Nell'esaminare se l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente fu giustificata, la Corte è costretta a determinare prima se può essere riguardato come legale per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
120. In questo riguardo la Corte reitera che il suo potere per fare una rassegna ottemperanza con diritto nazionale è limitato (veda, fra le altre autorità, Allan Jacobsson c. la Svezia (n. 2), 19 febbraio 1998, § 57 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998 io). È nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti, interpretare e fare domanda diritto nazionale anche in quelli campi dove la Convenzione “incorpora” gli articoli di che legge, poiché le autorità nazionali sono, nella natura di cose, particolarmente qualificato stabilire i problemi che sorgono in questo collegamento (veda Pavlinovi će Toni c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 17124/05 e 17126/05, 3 settembre 2009). Questo è particolarmente vero quando, come in questa istanza, la causa gira su questioni difficili di interpretazione di diritto nazionale (veda Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 83 ECHR 2007 io). Di conseguenza, non è il compito della Corte nella causa presente per determinare se sotto il diritto nazionale I.T. soddisfatto i requisiti legali per essere accordato lo status di un affittuario protetto in riguardo dell'appartamento del richiedente o esaminare se le corti nazionali interpretarono male il diritto nazionale attinente con sostenendo che lei faceva. Piuttosto, il compito della Corte deve verificare se le restrizioni sul diritto di proprietà del richiedente dell'appartamento, inerente in un contratto di contratto d'affitto che stipula affitto protetto (veda paragrafo 117 sopra), può essere riguardato come giustificato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda divide in paragrafi 121-145 sotto).
121. La Corte nota che la base legale per che interferenza era il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 31-50 sopra) ed il Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto (veda divide in paragrafi 51-55 sopra). Perciò, l'interferenza fu offerta per con legge, come richiesto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(l'ii) Se l'interferenza era “nella conformità con l'interesse generale”
122. La Corte accetta che la legislazione fece domanda in questa causa intraprende un scopo nell'interesse generale, vale a dire la protezione sociale di inquilini, e che mira così a promuovere il benessere economico del paese e la protezione dei diritti di altri (veda il pravoslavna di Srpska il na di Opština Rijeci, citato sopra).
(l'iii) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
123. La Corte deve esaminare in particolare se un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di scioperi di proprietà l'equilibrio equo e richiesto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, e se impone un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo sul richiedente (veda, inter alia, Jahn citato sopra, § 93).
124. La Corte osserva che il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto fu decretato con una prospettiva a riformando il settore di alloggio in Croatia durante la transizione del paese al sistema di libero-mercato. Le sue disposizioni di transizione (veda sezioni 30 a 49 assegnati ad in paragrafi 39-50 sopra) regolando il “contratto d'affitto protetto” impose, ex il lege, una relazione di padrone di casa-inquilino sul proprietario di un appartamento in riguardo del quale l'inquilino prima sostenne un “affitto specialmente protetto.” Quelle disposizioni mantennero un numero di restrizioni sui diritti di padroni di casa con possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti che vivono nei loro appartamenti. In gran parte, queste restrizioni sono comparabili a quelli che esisterono sotto le leggi di alloggio introdotti sotto il regime Socialista (veda divide in paragrafi 24 e 26 sopra).
125. Sotto le disposizioni di transizione del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, ogni affitto specialmente protetto che era stato assegnato in riguardo di un appartamento privatamente posseduto specificamente fu trasformato, in un contratto d'affitto contrattuale della durata indefinita (veda divide in paragrafi 11 e 39-40 sopra). Mentre questo può essere visto siccome creando un accordo di quasi-contratto d'affitto fra un padrone di casa ed un affittuario, padroni di casa hanno poco o nessuna influenza sulla scelta dell'affittuario o gli elementi essenziali di tale accordo (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, § 196; Ghigo c. il Malta, n. 31122/05, § 74 26 settembre 2006; ed Edwards, citato sopra, § 73).
126. Questo non solo fa domanda alla durata del contratto ma anche alle condizioni per la sua conclusione. Non solo è sé non aperto a quelli padroni di casa riacquistare solamente i loro appartamenti sulla base del loro desiderio per avvalersi l'altro di loro (veda, mutatis mutandis, Edwards citato sopra, § 73) ma il loro diritto per terminare il contratto d'affitto sulla base di loro proprio bisogno per alloggio o che dei loro parenti o perché l'affittuario protetto possiede alloggio alternativo e così non ha bisogno di protezione contro la conclusione del contratto d'affitto (veda, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci c. il Malta, n. 47045/06, § 61 15 settembre 2009), è restretto notevolmente.
127. In particolare, sotto sezione 40 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 48-49 sopra) un padrone di casa che intende di passare all'appartamento o installare i suoi figli, genitori o persone a carico in sé è concesso per terminare solamente il contratto per contratto d'affitto di un appartamento ad un affittuario protetto se (1) il padrone di casa non ha l'altro alloggio per lui o lei e per suo o la sua famiglia, ed o è concesso ad assistenza sociale e permanente o è più di sessanta anni maggiorenne, o (2) l'affittuario possiede un appartamento abitabile ed appropriato nello stesso municipio o distretto amministrativo.
128. Allo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto mancano di conseguenza, salvaguardie procedurali ed adeguate mirate a realizzando un equilibrio fra gli interessi di affittuari protetti e quelli di padroni di casa (veda, mutatis mutandis, Amato Gauci, loc. cit.). Quegli articoli, combinò col diritto legale di quelli che erano membri della famiglia dell'affittuario al tempo il Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto entrato in vigore per succedere allo status dell'affittuario protetto (veda divide in paragrafi 46-47 sopra) ha lasciato poco o nessuna possibilità per padroni di casa di riguadagnare proprietà dei loro appartamenti come la probabilità di affittuari protetti che lasciano volontariamente appartamenti è generalmente remota (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, § 196, ed Amato Gauci, loc. cit.).
129. Gli altri doveri di padroni di casa, mentre comportando potenzialmente spesa considerevole da parte loro, sia esposto fuori in sezione 13 del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 35 sopra) e sezione 89(1) e (2) del Proprietà Atto (veda paragrafo 67 sopra) che li obbliga a mantenere l'appartamento in un adattamento di condizione per l'abitazione e pagare una parcella di condominio nel finanziamento di riserva comune esponga su per coprire i costi di mantenimento regolare dell'edificio residenziale nel quale l'appartamento è localizzato. Allo stesso tempo, il loro diritto per dedurre profitto dall'affittare i loro appartamenti è soggetto a restrizioni legali (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, § 197). In particolare, facendo seguito a sezione 7(1) del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto, i padroni di casa non hanno nessun potere per fissare liberamente l'affitto (veda paragrafo 34 sopra) come l'affitto protetto per ogni appartamento è stato calcolato secondo la formula prevista nel Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto (veda divide in paragrafi 51-55 sopra). Siccome ammesso col Governo di Croatia nei suoi tentativi di passare emendamenti al Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto (veda divide in paragrafi 71-80 sopra) e confermò con le sentenze del Difensore civile (veda divide in paragrafi 81-83 sopra), affitto protetto calcolò secondo che formula è stata spesso più bassa della parcella di condominio e così insufficiente coprire anche i costi di mantenimento delle aree comunali ed installazioni dell'edificio nelle quali appartamenti sono localizzati, affitti i costi di mantenimento degli appartamenti loro da solo. Che che è più, affitto protetto è, nelle autorità la propria ammissione, generalmente esponga all'importo più basso (veda divide in paragrafi 73, 76 e 80 sopra). L'ammanco risultante è stato coperto perciò coi padroni di casa (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, § 198).
130. La Corte è prevista particolarmente col fatto che anche se sezione 7(2) del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto prevede che il livello dell'affitto protetto dipende, inter l'alia, sul reddito della famiglia dell'affittuario (veda paragrafo 34 sopra), che criterio, secondo sezione 9 del Decreto sugli standard e criterio per la determinazione di affitto protetto, opera solamente al beneficio dell'affittuario (veda paragrafo 53 sopra) concedendogli ridurre anche inoltre l'importo dell'affitto protetto. Questo ha dato luogo a situazioni paradossali qualche volta, come il descritto col Difensore civile nella sua Relazione annuale del 2012 (veda paragrafo 83 sopra), dove padroni di casa anziani e privo di denaro hanno infatti stato subsidising l'alloggio della lavorare-età stipendiò affittuari. Il paradosso è anche la più grande presa in conto il fatto che fra il 1998 ed il 2012 l'indice dei prezzi di costruzione, come l'elemento solo della formula per calcolare il livello dell'affitto protetto che lascia spazio a rettifiche dirette verso l'alto colorò di rosa entro 82% (veda paragrafo 85 sopra) mentre il salario mensile e medio di stesso periodo colorò di rosa con 134% e la pensione mensile e media entro 65% (veda divide in paragrafi 86-87 sopra).
131. La situazione di padroni di casa è stata combinata inoltre col loro obbligo per pagare imposta sul reddito personale sull'importo di affitto ricevette (da che loro possono dedurre un massimo di 30% su conto di costi incorse in, veda divide in paragrafi 68-70 sopra). Inoltre, l'esclusione pratica di padroni di casa i diritti di ' per sbarazzarsi liberamente dei loro appartamenti che sono il risultato di disposizioni restrittive sulla conclusione di contratti d'affitto (veda divide in paragrafi 48-49 e 126 sopra), ha provocato un deprezzamento nel valore di mercato dei loro appartamenti (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, loc. cit.).
132. Infine, la Corte nota che nessun tempo-limite legale fu fatto domanda allo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto o qualsiasi delle restrizioni sui diritti di padroni di casa comportò. Avendo riguardo ad al diritto legale e summenzionato dei membri della famiglia di un affittuario per succedere a suo o il suo status come un affittuario protetto (veda divide in paragrafi 46-47 e 128 sopra), questo vuole dire che quelle restrizioni potevano in molte cause duri per due o qualche volta anche tre generazioni. Siccome menzionato con l'erede del richiedente, lui, come il richiedente stesso può più probabile non sia in grado usare il suo appartamento nella sua vita (veda paragrafo 115 sopra).
133. Rivolgendosi alla situazione individuale del richiedente, la Corte prima nota che nel 1955 le autorità Comuniste avevano assegnato l'affitto specialmente protetto dell'appartamento del richiedente a P.A. (veda paragrafo 9 sopra) che affitto passò ad I.T. quando in 1973 P.A. si mosso fuori dell'appartamento (veda paragrafo 10 sopra). L'entrata in vigore del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto 5 novembre 1996 creò un accordo di quasi-contratto d'affitto (veda divide in paragrafi 11, 40 e 125 sopra) fra il richiedente come il padrone di casa ed I.T. come l'affittuario. La Convenzione non entrò un anno più tardi comunque, in vigore in riguardo di Croatia sino a, 5 novembre 1997. Segue che anche se per dei cinquanta-cinque anni il richiedente aveva poco o nessuna possibilità di riacquistare il suo appartamento o accusare il mercato affittò per sé, il periodo suscettibile allo scrutinio della Corte cominciò solamente 6 novembre 1997, il giorno dopo l'entrata in vigore della Convenzione in riguardo di Croatia, e terminò con la morte del richiedente 6 febbraio 2011 (veda divide in paragrafi 5 e 88 sopra). Durò così più di tredici anni.
134. La Corte nota inoltre che il richiedente rifiutò di entrare in un contratto di contratto d'affitto con I.T. stipulando l'affitto protetto (veda paragrafo 12 sopra) e che tale contratto fu imposto infine su lui con la Divisione la sentenza di Corte Municipale di 2 settembre 2002 (veda paragrafo 15 sopra). Inoltre, siccome i documenti presentarono col Governo sembri suggerire, il richiedente rifiutò di ricevere anche l'affitto protetto per il suo appartamento dopo l'adozione di che sentenza (veda paragrafo 20 sopra). Comunque, questo fatto non poteva essere contenuto contro lui se la Corte dovesse trovare infine che nel periodo summenzionato di approssimativamente tredici anni (veda il paragrafo precedente) l'affitto lui fu concesso per ricevere era così basso ed inadeguato che, insieme con le altre restrizioni (veda divide in paragrafi 126-127 sopra) sulla sua proprietà, corrispose ad una violazione che continua dei suoi diritti di proprietà (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, 209).
135. La Corte osserva che in quelli tredici anni il richiedente fu concesso per ricevere affitto mensile per l'appartamento in oggetto corrispondendo a HRK 102.14 (verso EUR 13.36) nel periodo fra il 1997 e 31 ottobre 2005 di 5 novembre, HRK 157.62 (verso EUR 21.48) fra il 2005 e 8 maggio 2008 di 1 novembre, e HRK 174.48 (verso EUR 23.66) fra 9 maggio 2008 e la sua morte 6 febbraio 2011 (veda paragrafo 19 sopra). In tutto quelli tredici anni il richiedente doveva pagare una parcella di condominio mensile di HRK 102.81 allo stesso tempo, (verso EUR 13.55, veda paragrafo 21 sopra).
136. Questo vuole dire che prima 1 novembre 2005 il richiedente non avrebbe reso qualsiasi profitto dall'appartamento mentre dopo che data il reddito mensile e netto (il profitto) lui avrebbe potuto ottenere dall'appartamento era HRK 54.81, quel è, EUR 7.93 (nel periodo fra il 2005 e 8 maggio 2008 di 1 novembre) e 71.67 HRK che sono EUR 10.11 (nel periodo fra il 2008 e 6 febbraio 2011 di 9 maggio).
137. La Corte nota inoltre che né il richiedente né il suo erede, chiesero che il richiedente era incorso in qualsiasi costa altro che la parcella di condominio nel collegamento con l'appartamento in oggetto, come, per esempio, costi riferirono al mantenimento dell'appartamento stesso quale, sotto la legge attinente padroni di casa furono costretti a nascere (veda divide in paragrafi 35 e 129 sopra). Lo considera anche solamente naturale che, poiché lui aveva rifiutato di ricevere l'affitto protetto per il suo appartamento (veda divide in paragrafi 20 e 134 sopra), lui non dichiarò mai qualsiasi reddito dall'affittarlo alle autorità fiscali (veda paragrafo 22 sopra).
138. Comunque, presumendo anche che il richiedente, inoltre la parcella di condominio non doveva coprire qualsiasi gli altri costi in relazione al suo appartamento e non pagò imposta sul reddito personale sull'importo dell'affitto lui fu concesso per ricevere, la Corte non può ma nota che le somme in problema-variando fra zero ed approssimativamente dieci euros per mese (veda paragrafo 136 sopra)-è estremamente basso e non potrebbe essere considerato proprio il risarcimento equo per l'uso dell'appartamento del richiedente (veda, mutatis mutandis, Ghigo citato sopra, § 74; Edwards, citato sopra, § 75; e Saliba ed Altri c. il Malta, n. 20287/10, § 66 22 novembre 2011). La Corte non è convinta che gli interessi del richiedente come un padrone di casa, incluso il suo diritto per dedurre profitti dalla sua proprietà (veda Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 239), fu incontrato con simile estremamente minimo ritorna (veda, mutatis mutandis, Ghigo, loc. cit.; Edwards, loc. cit.; e Saliba, loc. cit.).
139. Che che è più, che importo di contrasti di affitto rigidamente col mercato affittato il richiedente avrebbe potuto ottenere per appartamento suo (veda Amato Gauci, citato sopra, § 62). In particolare, la Corte nota che l'erede del richiedente presentò prova all'effetto che l'affitto protetto per l'appartamento in oggetto era venticinqui volte abbassano che il mercato affittò (veda paragrafo 114 sopra). Il Governo, per la loro parte non ha contestato che e le informazioni che loro hanno presentato non sembrano suggerire altrimenti (veda paragrafo 112 sopra). In queste circostanze non può ma sia concluso che l'importo dell'affitto protetto il richiedente fu concesso per ricevere era manifestamente sproporzionato al mercato affittato (veda, mutatis mutandis, Saliba ed Altri, citato sopra, § 65).
140. La Corte ha affermato su molte occasioni che in sfere come alloggio, Stati necessariamente godono non solo un margine ampio della valutazione in riguardo ad all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure per controllo di proprietà individuale ma anche alla scelta delle misure e la loro attuazione. Controllo statale su livelli di affitto sono uno simile misura e la sua richiesta può provocare riduzioni spesso significative nell'importo di affitto addebitabile (veda, per esempio, Mellacher ed Altri, citato sopra, § 45; Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 223; ed Edwards, citato sopra, § 76).
141. La Corte riconosce anche che le autorità croate, nel contesto della riforma fondamentale del sistema politico, legale ed economico del paese durante la transizione dal regime Socialista ad un stato democratico, affrontò un esercizio insolitamente difficile nel dovere bilanciare i diritti di padroni di casa e gli affittuari protetti che avevano occupato per molto tempo gli appartamenti. Aveva, sulla mano del una, assicurare la protezione dei diritti di proprietà del precedente e, sull'altro, rispettare i diritti sociali del secondo che era individui spesso vulnerabile (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, § 225, e Radovici e Stnescu ăc. la Romania, N. 68479/01, 71351/01 e 71352/01, § 88 ECHR 2006 XIII (gli estratti)).
142. Ciononostante, che margine, comunque considerevole, non è illimitato ed il suo esercizio, anche nel contesto della riforma più complessa dello Stato non può comportare conseguenze che sono a variazione con gli standard di Convenzione (veda Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 223). L'interesse generale della comunità in simile chiamate di situazioni per una distribuzione equa del sociale e carico finanziario coinvolta che non può essere messo su un particolare gruppo sociale comunque importante gli interessi dell'altro gruppo o la comunità nell'insieme (veda Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 225, e Radovici e Stnescu, ăloc. cit.). In particolare, l'esercizio della discrezione Statale in simile situazioni non può condurre a risultati che sono manifestamente irragionevoli, come importi di affitto che concede solamente un minimo profitto (veda Amato Gauci, citato sopra, § 62).
143. Avendo riguardo ad a: (un) primariamente, la piccola quantità di affitto protetto il richiedente fu concesso per ricevere ed i carichi finanziari e legali imposero su lui come un padrone di casa che volle dire lui era in grado ottenere solamente un minimo profitto dall'affittare fuori appartamento suo (veda divide in paragrafi 129 e 135-136 sopra); (b) il fatto che l'appartamento del richiedente fu occupato per dei cinquanta-cinque anni di che più che tredici anni passarono dopo l'entrata in vigore della Convenzione in riguardo di Croatia, e che lui non era capace di recuperare proprietà di sé o affittarlo fuori alle condizioni di mercato in vita sua (veda divide in paragrafi 132-133 sopra); ed in prospettiva di (il c) le restrizioni summenzionate su padroni di casa i diritti di ' in riguardo della conclusione di contratti d'affitto protetti e l'assenza delle salvaguardie procedurali ed adeguate per realizzare un equilibrio fra gli interessi che competono di padroni di casa ed affittuari protetti (veda divide in paragrafi 126-128 sopra), la Corte non discerne nessuno richieste di interesse generale (veda paragrafo 122 sopra) capace di giustificare restrizioni così comprensive sui diritti di proprietà del richiedente e costatazione che nella causa presente non era una distribuzione equa del sociale e carico finanziario che sono il risultato della riforma del settore di alloggio. Piuttosto, un carico individuale e sproporzionato ed eccessivo fu messo sul richiedente come un padrone di casa, siccome lui fu costretto a sopportare la maggior parte dei sociali e costi finanziari di offrire alloggio per I.T. e la sua famiglia (veda, mutatis mutandis, Lindheim ed Altri c. la Norvegia, N. 13221/08 e 2139/10, §§ 129 e 134, 12 giugno 2012; Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, §§ 224-225; Edwards, citato sopra, § 78, Ghigo citato sopra, § 78; Amato Gauci, citato sopra, § 63; e Saliba, citato sopra, § 67). Segue che le autorità croate nella causa presente, nonostante il loro margine ampio della valutazione (veda divide in paragrafi 141-142 sopra), non riuscì a prevedere l'equilibrio equo e richiesto fra gli interessi generali della comunità e la protezione dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente (veda, mutatis mutandis, Edwards, loc. cit.; Amato Gauci, loc. cit.; e Lindheim, citato sopra, § 134).
144. Questa conclusione non è chiamata in questione con l'argomento del Governo che lo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto ha introdotto con le disposizioni di transizione del Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti Atto restrinse i diritti di proprietà del richiedente ad una minore misura che il più primo regime dell'affitto specialmente protetto (veda paragrafo 107 sopra), perché dall'onwards di data di ratifica tutti l'atti di Stato ed omissioni devono adattare alla Convenzione (veda Blei ćc. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 81 ECHR 2006 III).
145. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DI LA CONVENZIONE
146. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che i procedimenti civili e summenzionati erano stati ingiusti, in particolare su conto del modo nel quale le corti nazionali avevano valutato la prova. Lui si appellò su Articolo 6 § 1 che leggono siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...”
147. Nella luce di tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, la Corte nota, che non c'è nessuna prova da suggerire che alle corti mancò l'imparzialità o che i procedimenti erano altrimenti ingiusti.
148. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è inammissibile sotto Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione come manifestamente mal-fondò e deve essere respinto facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 4 al riguardo.
IV. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ALLEGATO DI LA CONVENZIONE
149. Infine, il richiedente invocò Articoli 13 e 14 della Convenzione, senza provare quelle azioni di reclamo.
150. Nella luce di tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come le questioni si lamentò di è all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte considera che la causa presente non rivela qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione di entrambi gli Articoli summenzionati della Convenzione.
151. Segue che queste azioni di reclamo sono inammissibili sotto Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione come manifestamente mal-fondò e deve essere respinto facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 4 al riguardo.
C. gli Articoli 41 E 46 Di La Convenzione
La Richiesta di A. di Articolo 41 della Convenzione
152. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
1. Danno
(un) Le parti le osservazioni di '
153. L'erede del richiedente chiese 11,110 euros (EUR) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale. Lui spiegò che questo importo corrispose al mercato mensile affittato di EUR 100 per l'appartamento del richiedente di periodo fra 2 settembre 2002, quel è, il giorno dell'adozione della Divisione la sentenza di Corte Municipale (veda paragrafo 15 sopra), e 6 dicembre 2011, quel è, il giorno che lui ha presentato la rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa. L'erede del richiedente chiese anche EUR 5,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
154. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
(i) danno Patrimoniale
155. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha dovuto soffrire di danno patrimoniale come un risultato della sua incapacità per accusare l'affitto adeguato per il suo appartamento di periodo fra 5 novembre 1997 (la data dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione in riguardo di Croatia) e la sua morte 6 febbraio 2011 (veda, per esempio e mutatis mutandis, Edwards c. il Malta (soddisfazione equa), n. 17647/04, §§ 18-22 17 luglio 2008). Comunque, determinato che quando costituendo la rivendicazione la soddisfazione equa l'erede del richiedente chiese solamente il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale per il periodo che fa seguire la sentenza di Corte Municipale di 2 settembre 2002 l'adozione della Divisione, la Corte può assegnargli solamente simile risarcimento per il periodo fra che data e la data della morte del richiedente che è da 2 settembre 2002 sino a 6 febbraio 2011.
156. Avendo riguardo ad all'interesse generale perseguito con l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente nella causa presente (veda paragrafo 122 sopra), la Corte reitera inoltre che quando decretando legislazione di alloggio gli Stati festeggia alla Convenzione è concesso per ridurre l'affitto ad un livello sotto il valore di mercato, siccome la legislatura può decidere ragionevolmente come una questione di politica che accusare l'affitto di mercato è inaccettabile dal punto di vista della giustizia sociale (veda Mellacher ed Altri, citato sopra, § 56). Simile misure progettate per realizzare la più grande giustizia sociale possono richiedere meno perciò, che rimborso del pieno valore di mercato (veda, per esempio, Edwards (soddisfazione equa), citato sopra, § 20).
157. La Corte lo trova anche infine, appropriato dedurre l'importo dell'affitto protetto il richiedente fu concesso per ricevere (divide in paragrafi 19 e 135 sopra) nel periodo per il quale sarà assegnato il risarcimento (veda paragrafo 155 sopra), quel è, per il periodo fra il 2002 e 6 febbraio 2011 di 2 settembre (veda Edwards (soddisfazione equa), citato sopra, § 22). Quel è così perché il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale subito col richiedente nella causa presente dovrebbe coprire la differenza fra l'affitto che il richiedente è stato concesso sotto la legislazione nazionale che la Corte fondò essere inadeguata, e l'affitto adeguato. Non può comprendere così l'importo dell'affitto protetto il richiedente in qualsiasi evento sia concesso per ricevere. Altrimenti I.T. come l'affittuario protetto che sta vivendo nell'appartamento del richiedente sarebbe assolto impropriamente dal suo obbligo per pagare l'affitto in che periodo che in che causa dovrebbe essere sopportata ingiustificabilmente con lo Stato.
158. Nella luce del precedente, e per determinare l'affitto adeguato nella causa presente la Corte ha fatto una stima, mentre prendendo in considerazione in particolare le informazioni presentò con le parti sul mercato affittato per appartamenti comparabili di periodo attinente (quale informazioni non differiscono sostanzialmente, veda paragrafo 139 sopra) e l'affitto protetto il richiedente fu concesso per ricevere di stesso periodo per affittare fuori il suo appartamento (veda paragrafo 135 sopra). La Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare EUR 8,200 l'erede del richiedente su conto di danno patrimoniale.
(l'ii) danno Non-patrimoniale
159. La Corte anche i costatazione che il richiedente ha dovuto subire danno non-patrimoniale (veda, per esempio, Edwards (soddisfazione equa), citato sopra, § 37). Decidendo su una base equa, la Corte assegna l'erede del richiedente (veda, mutatis mutandis, Dolneanu c. la Moldavia, n. 17211/03, § 58 13 novembre 2007) sotto che capo EUR 1,500, più qualsiasi tassa sulla quale può essere addebitabile quel l'importo.
2. Costi e spese
160. L'erede del richiedente chiese EUR 1,122 per i costi e spese incorse in col richiedente di fronte alle corti nazionali. Lui disse anche una somma non specificata per “tutti i costi procedurali riferirono alla rappresentanza di fronte alla Corte.”
161. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni.
162. Come riguardi la rivendicazione per i costi e spese il richiedente incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali, la Corte nota, mentre avendo riguardo ad alle sue sentenze sopra (veda divide in paragrafi 120 e 147-148 sopra), che i costi chiesti non furono incorsi in per per chiedere, per l'ordine legale e nazionale, prevenzione o compensazione della violazione trovate con la Corte (veda, per esempio, Frommelt c. il Liechtenstein, n. 49158/99, §§ 43-44 24 giugno 2004). Respinge perciò la rivendicazione per costi e spese sotto questo capo.
163. Come riguardi la rivendicazione per costi e spese incorse in di fronte a sé, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 850.
3. Interesse di mora
164. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
B. Articolo 46 della Convenzione
165. Mentre nel trovare una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nell'istanza presente la Corte si è concentrata primariamente sulle particolari circostanze della causa del richiedente, aggiunge con modo di un'osservazione generale che il problema che è posto sotto a che violazione concerne la legislazione stessa e che le sue sentenze prolungano oltre il risuoli interessi del richiedente nella causa presente (veda paragrafo 77 sopra). Questa è perciò una causa dove la Corte considera che lo Stato rispondente dovrebbe prendere and/or legislativi ed appropriati le altre misure generali per garantire un piuttosto equilibrio delicato fra gli interessi di padroni di casa, incluso il loro diritto per dedurre profitto dalla loro proprietà, e l'interesse generale della comunità-incluso la disponibilità di alloggio sufficiente per il meno benestante-nella conformità coi principi della protezione di diritti di proprietà sotto la Convenzione (veda, Edwards (soddisfazione equa), citato sopra, § 33). In questo collegamento la Corte ha notato che riforma legislativa è attualmente in corso (veda divide in paragrafi 77-80 sopra). Non è per la Corte per specificare come i diritti di padroni di casa ed affittuari (veda paragrafo 168 sopra) dovrebbe essere bilanciato contro l'un l'altro. La Corte già ha identificato i difetti principali nella legislazione corrente, vale a dire il livello inadeguato di affitto protetto in prospettiva di carichi finanziari e legali imposta su padroni di casa, condizioni restrittive per la conclusione di contratto d'affitto protetto e l'assenza di qualsiasi limitazione temporale allo schema di contratto d'affitto protetto (veda divide in paragrafi 124-132 sopra). Soggetto ad esaminando col Comitato di Ministri i resti Statali libero scegliere i mezzi con che assolverà i suoi obblighi sotto Articolo 46 che sorge dall'esecuzione della sentenza della Corte, (veda, mutatis mutandis, Lindheim citato sopra, § 137).
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto a proprietà ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

3. Sostiene
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare l'erede del richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, essere convertito in kunas croato al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 8,200 (otto mila duecento euros) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 1,500 (milli cinquecento euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'iii) EUR 850 (ottocento e cinquanta euros), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere l'erede di richiedente a carico di, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

4. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione dell'erede del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 10 luglio 2014, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
André Wampach Khanlar Hajiyev
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.