Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BERGER-KRALL AND OTHERS v. SLOVENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, 34, 35, 06, 08, P1-1

NUMERO: 14717/04/2014
STATO: Slovenia
DATA: 12/06/2014
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible
Remainder inadmissible (Article 34 - Victim) No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) No violation of Article 8 - Right to respect for private and family life (Article 8-1 - Respect for home)
No violation of Article 14+P1-1 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property
Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)
No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings
Article 6-1 - Civil rights and obligations)
No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Constitutional proceedings Article 6-1 - Access to court)



FORMER FIFTH SECTION







CASE OF BERGER-KRALL AND OTHERS v. SLOVENIA

(Application no. 14717/04)



JUDGMENT







STRASBOURG

12 June 2014







This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Berger-Krall and Others v. Slovenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Former Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Mark Villiger, President,
Angelika Nußberger,
Boštjan M. Zupančič,
Ganna Yudkivska,
André Potocki,
Paul Lemmens,
Aleš Pejchal, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 28 May 2013, 18 February and 13 May 2014,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the last mentioned date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 14717/04) against the Republic of Slovenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by ten Slovenian nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 15 March 2004.
2. The applicants were represented by the OMISSIS, practising in Grosuplje. The Slovenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr B. Tratar, State Attorney General.
3. The applicants alleged that the Housing Reform had deprived them of their possessions and homes, that they had been discriminated against vis-à-vis other categories of tenants, that they did not have access to a court to challenge the alleged infringement of their rights and that they did not have at their disposal any effective legal remedy.
4. By a decision of 28 May 2013, the Court declared the application admissible.
5. The applicants and the Government each filed further written observations (Rule 59 § 1 of the Rules of Court) on the merits. In addition, third-party comments were received from the International Union of Tenants, which had been given leave by the President to intervene in the written procedure (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants’ names and dates of birth are listed in annex 2. They are members of the Association of Tenants of Slovenia (Združenje najemnikov Slovenije).
A. Relevant background
1. Socially-owned flats and “specially protected tenancy” in the former Socialist Republic of Slovenia
7. In the former Socialist Republic of Slovenia, socially-owned dwellings represented a significant part of the housing stock (230,000 housing units). Approximately one-third of the Slovenian population lived in such housing units at the time. According to the doctrine of “social ownership” (družbena lastnina) introduced into the Yugoslav system in the 1950s, such dwellings were owned by the community, the role of public bodies being confined to management.
8. After the Second World War, private dwellings and other premises passed into State ownership through legislation on nationalisation. At the same time, dwellings were built or purchased by socially-owned enterprises or other public bodies. In both cases the latter allocated them to their employees and other entitled persons, who became holders of a “specially protected tenancy” or “occupancy right” (stanovanjska pravica – hereinafter translated either as “specially protected tenancy”, as suggested by the applicants, or as “occupancy right”, as indicated by the Government) under Article 206 of the then Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia and the existing legislation. The right to a socially-owned dwelling guaranteed the citizen “the permanent use of the dwelling for his personal housing needs as well as for the needs of his family”. The Housing Act 1982 (hereinafter referred to also as the “ZSR”) provided that once allocated by an administrative decision followed by a contract, a specially protected tenancy entitled the holder to permanent, lifelong and uninterrupted use of the flat against the payment of a fee covering maintenance costs and depreciation. The fee (or rent) was determined on the basis of the construction price of dwellings and the requirements of simple replacement of dwellings, and in accordance with the standards and norms for the maintenance and management of socially-owned dwellings.
9. The Government pointed out that the occupancy right conferred the right to use the socially-owned dwelling only for the purpose of satisfying one’s personal and family housing needs. Its rationale was the economical and efficient use of housing space, meaning that each family should have at its disposal as much space as it needed, and no more. The occupancy relationship could be terminated and another, more appropriate dwelling allocated in the event of a reduction of the number of users of the dwelling (Section 59 of the ZSR). In the Government’s view, this proved that the occupancy right was associated with personal and family needs, and not with a particular dwelling. The concept of family needs was variable and depended on the number of family members. No more than one dwelling could be used at the same time and no one could move into the dwelling without the prior approval of the holder of the occupancy right. The latter was given management entitlements, such as the right and duty to participate in the management of the socially-owned housing. Holders of occupancy rights could exchange dwellings and make alterations to the dwelling, its furnishings and appliances only with the prior written approval of the housing administration (Section 29 of the ZSR).
10. The applicants challenged the Government’s allegation that the specially protected tenancy permitted use of the dwellings for housing purposes only. They observed that the holder of the occupancy right could use the dwelling without restrictions for himself and for the members of his family, did not need any consent to enlarge the number of family members, could use part of the dwelling for business activities and could sublease part of it for an agreed rent. He could modernise the dwelling with the agreement of the housing organisation managing the building; if such agreement was denied – which in practice almost never occurred – he could demand substitution of consent in legal proceedings. The dwellings in question could be sold only to holders of occupancy rights, who could – with few very specific exceptions – exchange their dwellings. Any sales to third persons were null and void.
11. In legal theory and judicial practice the specially protected tenancy was described as a right sui generis. On 26 November 1998 the Constitutional Court delivered a decision (Up-29/98) in which it considered that under the legislation of the former Socialist Republic of Slovenia, the specially protected tenancy enjoyed stronger protection than a purely contractual tenancy right. The legal relationship was not limited in time and was linked not only to the holder of the right, but also to persons living with him. It concluded that, because of the very limited volume of transactions involving socially-owned dwellings, the specially protected tenancy had been more akin to a property right than to a tenancy right.
12. When a holder of a specially protected tenancy died, his or her rights were transferred to the surviving spouse or long term partner (who held the specially protected tenancy jointly) or to a registered member of the family household who was also using the flat. According to the applicants, this also applied if they moved out or divorced. Thus, specially protected tenancies could be passed on from generation to generation.
13. In the Government’s opinion, however, this was not a succession of the occupancy right but rather a specifically regulated transfer of it to one of the users of the dwelling. In this respect, the spouse and long term partner enjoyed a privileged status. Special provisions applied in the event of divorce (Section 17 of the ZSR), and if it considered that none of the users of the dwelling met the conditions for obtaining the occupancy right after the death of the previous holder, the housing administration could request the said users to vacate the premises (Section 18 of the ZSR).
14. The occupancy right could be cancelled only on limited grounds (Sections 56, 58 and 61 of the ZSR), the most important of which was failure by the holder to use the flat for his or her own housing needs for a continuous period of at least six months without good reason (such as military service, medical treatment, or temporary work elsewhere in the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (the “SFRY”) or abroad; see Section 19 of the ZSR). In this case, the users of the dwelling who had been living together with the holder of the occupancy right for a minimum of two years had the same rights as they would have had if the holder had died. Other grounds were inappropriate and detrimental behaviour, failure to pay the fee, full sublease, use of the dwelling by a person other than the holder of the occupancy right and possession of an unoccupied flat suitable for residence. Although inspections were to be carried out to ensure compliance with these requirements, the specially protected tenancy was rarely, if ever, cancelled on these grounds (see Đokić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 6518/04, § 6, 27 May 2010). In this connection, the applicants pointed out that it was true that in theory holders of a specially protected tenancy could be moved to a substitute dwelling if the dwelling they were occupying was too large for them and the other users with regard to social standards (see the Government’s submissions in paragraph 9 above). However, according to the applicants, this possibility was in practice never used and there was no case-law on the matter.
15. All employed citizens were required to pay a special monthly housing contribution (approximately 4.5 to 6 per cent of their monthly income) to the Joint Housing Fund. The funds thus obtained were used to build and maintain socially-owned flats. The Housing Fund granted benefits (allocation of a flat under specially protected tenancy, or loan to purchase, construct or renovate a dwelling) on the basis of the principles of mutuality and solidarity with those in need. All socially-owned dwellings were part of the Joint Housing Fund and administered by State institutions, municipalities, social enterprises and other legal entities governed by public law.
16. Before Slovenia became independent, the applicants or their legal predecessors acquired specially protected tenancies in socially-owned dwellings which had been expropriated under the legislation on nationalisation. Under the legislation in force prior to 1991, no difference in specially protected tenancy conditions was made between tenants of State-constructed dwellings and tenants of nationalised dwellings.
17. On 25 June 1991 the Republic of Slovenia declared its independence. Among the first reforms enacted were the Housing Act 1991 (Stanovanjski zakon) and the Denationalisation Act 1991 (Zakon o denacionalizaciji), aimed at redressing the wrongs committed after the Second World War. The new Constitution of the Republic of Slovenia (Section 33) guaranteed the right of private ownership.
2. The Housing Act 1991
18. The Housing Act 1991 (hereinafter referred to also as the “SZ”) provided for the transformation and privatisation of socially-owned dwellings. The Joint Housing Fund (see paragraph 15 above) was dissolved and, with few exceptions, the socially-owned dwellings were transferred ex lege into State ownership or into that of local communities or the National Pension Fund. Those dwellings which had become socially-owned property after having been expropriated from private owners were transferred into the ownership of the municipalities (Section 113).
19. The specially protected tenancy was replaced ex lege with a normal lease contract (Section 141). The previous holders of specially protected tenancies or, in the event of their death, their family members living in the flats, were given the possibility of renting the flats for an indefinite period and for a non-profit rent (which covered maintenance, management of the flat and capital costs – Section 147) or of purchasing them on favourable terms, paying an administratively defined price which was calculated on the basis of a discount of 30% (in the event of payment in instalments) or 60% (in the event of one-off payment) off the estimated value (Sections 117-124).
20. According to the applicants, in practice this meant a price of 5-10% of the real market value of the dwelling payable in instalments over 20 years or 5% of that value payable within 60 days. The right to purchase on favourable terms could be transferred inter vivos or mortis causa to close family members. However, previous holders of specially protected tenancy in flats which had been expropriated could only purchase them on favourable terms if the owners agreed to sell them within one year from the restitution of the dwelling (Sections 117 and 125). In that case the 30 or 60 per cent discount (Sections 117 and 119) was offered by the owner, who would then be reimbursed by the municipality.
21. It follows from the above that all previous holders of specially protected tenancies were given the possibility of taking out new leases (to be signed within six months from the entry into force of the Housing Act 1991). However, the applicants contended that these new leases were less advantageous than the specially protected tenancy. In particular, tenants no longer had secured tenancy of their homes since the owners could move them to other adequate flats without any particular justification (Section 54). There were now nine grounds on which tenants could be evicted for misconduct, compared with three previously. The fault-based grounds for termination of the lease were (Section 53 of the SZ):
“- if the tenant and any person living with him uses the dwelling counter to the law or the terms of the lease;
- if, by the way they use the dwelling, the tenant or any person living with him causes major damage to the dwelling or to common areas, parts, facilities and installations of a multi-dwelling building;
- if the tenant fails twice in succession or for two out of the last twelve months to pay rent or costs payable in addition to rent within the time-limit specified in the lease;
- if the tenant or any person living with him, by their manner of using the dwelling, frequently or seriously disturbs other residents in their peaceful use of the dwelling;
- if the tenant makes changes to the dwelling and fixtures without the prior consent of the owner;
- if, in addition to the tenant, a person who is not named in the lease contract uses the dwelling for more than thirty days without the owner’s knowledge;
- if the tenant leases out the dwelling without the agreement of the owner or charges a subtenant a higher rent;
- if the tenant does not allow access to the dwelling in cases [specified by law];
- if the tenant or any other person who uses the dwelling engages in a prohibited activity there, or a permitted activity in an unlawful manner.”
22. However, before terminating the lease the owner had to give prior written notice to the tenant who was allegedly violating its provisions; no termination was allowed if the inability to pay the rent in full and to entirely fulfil other obligations was due to the social distress of the tenant and the other persons using the dwelling.
23. Without the owner’s permission, tenants could not sublet a flat, renovate it or decorate it. Nor could they bring new people into the flat (Section 53). The owner could renovate the flat at any time and enter it twice a year (Section 44). The tenant could not freely transfer the lease to another family member or exchange the flat. After the death of the original tenant, only the spouse or a person having lived with the tenant in a permanent relationship, or an immediate family member living in the flat, had the right to take over the lease (Section 56). The tenant had to pay the legally regulated non-profit rent (Section 63), which, unlike the fee (see paragraph 8 above), not only covered maintenance costs and depreciation, but also included a sum to offset capital costs and management of the dwelling.
3. The Denationalisation Act 1991
24. The Denationalisation Act 1991 (hereinafter referred to also as the “ZDen”) regulated the denationalisation of property which had previously passed into State ownership through legislation on agrarian reform, nationalisation, confiscation or other forms of expropriation of privately owned properties. Previous owners or their heirs (hereinafter referred to as “previous owners”) were entitled (until 7 December 1993) to claim restitution of the expropriated property. Wherever possible, the property itself was to be returned in natura, including dwellings which had been let under the specially protected tenancy scheme. Where such restitution was not possible, claimants were entitled to substitute property and/or compensation (Section 2).
25. The restitution of dwellings occupied by a tenant did not affect the leases concluded in the meantime, which remained in force (see Section 125 of the SZ and Section 24 of the ZDen).
26. The applicants pointed out that after the enactment of the housing reform, a number of former holders of specially protected tenancies in previously expropriated flats filed requests to purchase the flats. The deadline for filing such requests expired before that for “previous owners” to file restitution claims. Only when it became clear in individual cases (especially in 1994) that denationalisation proceedings had been initiated, were the former holders of specially protected tenancies informed that their requests to purchase had been rejected.
(a) The denationalisation proceedings
27. Holders of occupancy rights had no part in the denationalisation proceedings to determine the ownership of the property, which meant that they were not notified when a request was filed for the restitution of the dwelling they were occupying. According to the data submitted by the applicants, 37,000 restitution requests had been filed and in the period until the end of 1999 a yearly average of 2,000 to 5,000 decisions had been rendered, which meant a total of approximately 29,000 decisions, out of which only approximately 24,000 became final. Until 1999 approximately 18% of decisions were for restitution in the form of compensation, 27% for restitution of ownership of free dwellings, 44% for restitution of ownership of occupied dwellings and 8% were refusals or rejections of the requests. This meant that by the end of 1999 a substantial portion of denationalisation procedures had not been completed. Initially in such procedures the property was returned to the pre-war owners; however, in the vast majority of cases those owners had passed away, which meant that in order to identify the “previous owners” a complex and time-consuming inheritance procedure was necessary.
28. The Government pointed out that tenants were not party to the denationalisation proceedings because restitution did not affect the tenancy relationship and did not prejudice the tenants’ rights or benefits which had a direct basis in law. Moreover, the existence of a tenancy relationship did not affect the decision on denationalisation and restitution (see Constitutional Court decision no. Up-237/97, point 5). However, tenants could participate if they demonstrated a legal interest, notably an interest in recovering their investments. In this regard, the status of party to the denationalisation proceedings was recognised in respect of: (a) any person who, before 7 December 1991 (date of entry into force of the ZDen), had invested in nationalised real estate, whenever and insofar as the proceedings might lead to a ruling on that person’s rights deriving from the investments concerned, and (b) the entities liable for restitution, which in the case of former socially-owned dwellings usually meant municipalities (Section 60 of the ZDen).
(b) Reimbursement of investments
29. The principle of restitution in natura applied also in cases in which the value of the property had increased. Former holders of the occupancy right who had invested in the dwelling could only claim compensation under the law, but not acquire ownership of the dwelling by virtue of such investments. In particular, the occupant could claim total recovery of costs on the condition that the investments had been made prior to 7 December 1991 and that they constituted major maintenance investments and not simple routine maintenance. Upon a judicial action introduced by the tenant, the competent court would appoint a construction expert to assess the value of the property at the time of nationalisation and its value at the time of its restitution; a tenant who could provide evidence of the investments made (they were not required to provide evidence that the community of residents had consented to the investments) could then obtain the difference between the two values of the property (Section 25 of the ZDen). In cases in which a final decision on restitution had already been adopted, a claim for recovery of investments could be filed within one year from the entry into force of the 1998 Act amending the ZDen.
30. The applicants observed that in the event of an increase in the value of the property due to the investments made by the tenant, Section 25 of the ZDen gave three options to the “previous owners”: (a) to request compensation instead of restitution in natura; (b) to request part ownership of the dwelling; (c) to recover the full property and reimburse the tenant. As a rule, the tenants’ requests for reimbursement were examined in sets of proceedings initiated after the denationalisation proceedings, often after the year 2005. However, according to the applicants, the evaluation of the dwellings according to the relevant domestic rules was totally unrealistic, which made the evaluation of the increased value due to new investments unrealistic also. Moreover, only those investments which had increased the value of the dwelling – and not those which had kept the value of the property at the same level since its expropriation – were taken into account. The time-limit for reimbursement of investments was ten years and the parties could reach a friendly settlement on these matters. “Previous owners” frequently made the reimbursement conditional upon the tenants vacating the premises. In the applicants’ opinion, these rules did not guarantee former holders of occupancy rights a fair possibility of recovering the real value of their investments.
4. The 1994 amendments to the Housing Act and the three “models of substitute privatisation”
31. In the following years, the SZ and the ZDen, as well as the legal acts implementing them, underwent numerous amendments, which on some occasions were more favourable to the tenants, and on others to the “previous owners”.
32. The 1994 amendments to the Housing Act 1991, enacted on 6 April 1994, were more in favour of the tenants. Former holders of a specially protected tenancy who occupied previously expropriated flats which had not been returned to “previous owners” (because no request for restitution had been filed, or the request had been rejected) were allowed to purchase the flats they were occupying (amended Sections 117 and 123).
33. The amended Section 125 further provided that where the dwelling had been returned to the “previous owner”, if he agreed to sell he was eligible for an additional financial reward from public funds (this was the so-called “first model” of substitute privatisation).
34. If the “previous owner” declined to sell the dwelling and the tenant decided, within two years from the restitution, to move out and purchase a flat or construct a house, and if the “previous owner” so agreed, he would pay the tenant compensation amounting to 30 per cent of the value of the dwelling. If, however, the “previous owner” refused this solution, the tenant was entitled to claim the same amount from the entity liable for restitution, which was usually a municipality (see paragraph 28 above). The tenant was entitled to further compensation amounting to 50 per cent of the value, in thirds, from the municipality, the Slovenian Compensation Fund and the Development Fund of the Republic of Slovenia. In addition, the tenant also had the right to a State loan under certain conditions. This was the so-called “second model” for settling the housing issue.
35. The 1994 amendments also introduced a so-called “third model”, where a tenant to whom the “previous owner” was not prepared to sell the dwelling could purchase a comparable substitute flat on favourable terms from the municipality if he decided not to purchase another flat or construct a house (amended Section 125). Under this model, the applicants were in the same position as previous holders of specially protected tenancies in State-constructed dwellings who could not purchase the dwelling they had occupied because of practical and legal obstacles.
36. The applicants noted that the right to purchase established by the amended Section 125 of the SZ was legally directly applicable and was not subjected either to preclusive time-limits or to a statute of limitations. It was a permanent legal option, to be realised on the basis of a unilateral request by the former holder of the specially protected tenancy (Supreme Court decision of 14 January 2010, no. II Ips 370/2007).
37. However, the “third model” was repealed on 25 November 1999 by the Constitutional Court (decision U-I-268/96), which considered that the additional financial burden had unduly restricted the municipalities’ newly acquired ownership rights over dwellings which had previously been socially owned. In the Constitutional Court’s opinion, this restriction could not be justified by the tendency of the legislature to ensure that the previous protected tenants of denationalised dwellings enjoyed a position resembling as closely as possible that of other tenants, in particular with regard to the possibility of purchasing a flat.
38. On 21 March 1996 the Constitutional Court delivered a decision (U-I-119/94) concerning the pre-emption right of tenants having contracts of unlimited duration (Section 18), such as the previous holders of specially protected tenancies. It held that that pre-emption right, already provided for by the previous legislation, did not interfere with the property rights in respect of dwellings subject to original privatisation under the SZ and the ZDen, since the property right had not yet been established at the time of the entry into force of those acts. However, where property rights had been acquired by other means, the pre-emption right interfered with the right of property and was unconstitutional. The dissenting opinion of Judge Lojze Ude was appended to the Constitutional Court decision.
5. The Housing Act 2003 and further developments
39. Subsequent amendments to the Housing Act 1991, and the new Housing Act enacted in 2003 (hereinafter referred to also as the “SZ-1”), were more favourable to the “previous owners”, who were authorised to raise the non-profit rent by up to 37% in order to cover maintenance costs and other expenses. That increase in the non-profit rent was to be applied only to leases taken out after the amendments entered into force (22 March 2000). However, on 20 February 2003 the Constitutional Court (decision no. U-I-303/00-12) declared this limitation unconstitutional as being discriminatory. It underlined that protecting the status of former occupancy right holders did not mean that the non-profit rent could not change, and that eliminating the discrepancy in the previous system (under which rents did not cover the real cost of the use of a dwelling) could not be deemed to be an inadmissible interference with the terms of the lease contracts. The protection of acquired rights and the principle of non-retroactivity did not protect tenants from increases in rent. The increase in the non-profit rent was thus extended to all the leases that predated the enactment of the 2000 amendments.
40. The Housing Act 2003 increased from nine to thirteen the number of fault-based grounds on which tenants could be evicted from their homes (unauthorised persons living in the flat, violation of the house rules, tenant’s absence in excess of three months, ownership of another suitable dwelling, either by the tenant or by his or her partner – Section 103). However, tenants could avoid termination of the lease by proving that the problem was not their fault or that it had not been possible for them to rectify the problem within the given time-limit (Section 112(6)). The “previous owner” could also move the tenant to another adequate flat (defined in Section 10 as a flat satisfying the housing needs of the tenant and his immediate family members living with him or her) at any time and without any reason; however, this could be done to the same tenant only once and the removal costs were borne by the “previous owner” (Section 106). In respect of the transferability of the lease after the tenant’s death, a request to take the lease over had to be filed within 90 days (Section 109). For this purpose, a relative up to the second generation who had lived in economic community with the former holder of the occupancy right for more than two years on the day of entry into force of the Housing Act was considered to be an “immediate family member” (Section 180). The tenant had a pre-emption right if the flat was for sale.
41. Furthermore, rent subsidies (up to 80% of the non-profit rent) were available to tenants in the event of financial difficulties; socially disadvantaged people could also apply to the municipalities to obtain another non-profit rental dwelling or a temporary solution for their housing needs (Sections 104 and 121). The 2009 Housing Act Amendment introduced Sections 121a and 121b, which provided for the possibility, for people who were paying market rents and had unsuccessfully applied for the allocation of a non-profit rental dwelling, to obtain subsidies (amounting to the difference between the market and non-profit rents). These provisions were aimed at compensating the shortage of non-profit dwellings.
42. The 2003 Housing Act also introduced a “new model” of so-called “substitute privatisation” for former occupancy right holders. Within five years after the enactment of the Act or after the decision on denationalisation had become final, they could exercise their right to purchase another dwelling or to build a house, thus becoming entitled to special compensation (up to 74% of the price of the dwelling – Section 173) and to a subsidised loan for the remaining amount. Entitlement to and level of compensation were determined by the Ministry responsible for housing matters. Tenants who decided to buy another dwelling or build a house were obliged to vacate their rented accommodation no later than one year after receiving the compensation.
43. Furthermore, tenants who did not wish or could not afford to buy a flat could apply to rent a non-profit dwelling (Section 174). The latter was defined as a dwelling rented out by the municipality, the State or a public housing fund or non-profit organisation, allocated on the basis of a public call for applications (Section 87). Under this procedure “tenants of a dwelling expropriated under nationalisation regulations and returned to the previous owner” were awarded a rather high number of points (190), which, according to the Government, offered them good prospects of being given priority and actually being declared eligible. Lease agreements for non-profit dwellings would be concluded for an unlimited period (Section 90).
6. Statistical data
44. According to information available on the Internet, in 1991 there were some 11,000 housing units eligible for return to “previous owners”. Some 6,300 housing units were returned to ownership in full title, while some 4,700 were returned to “previous owners” while still occupied by tenants who previously had specially protected tenancies. According to the Government, in 2012 some 2,780 such tenants had managed to solve their housing situation by substitute privatisation, that is, by purchasing or building a substitute dwelling with the help of a financial incentive from the State. A further 288 tenants had lodged requests and proceedings were still pending at the time of submission of the Government’s observations. An estimated 1,500 tenants would eventually continue to live in the flats they had previously occupied as holders of specially protected tenancies.
45. The applicants emphasised that at the beginning of the housing reform, out of approximately 650,000 housing units in Slovenia 230,000 were socially-owned dwellings housing approximately one-third of the Slovenian population under specially protected tenancies (see paragraph 7 above). At the time the legislation did not distinguish between expropriated dwellings and other socially-owned dwellings (see paragraph 16 above) and, in general, individuals acquiring occupancy rights did not even know which source the dwelling came from. This was especially true for those who had acquired occupancy rights several decades after the expropriation. The great majority of holders of occupancy rights who had been given the opportunity to purchase the dwellings on favourable terms had availed themselves of this possibility; only a few of them had stayed in the flats on a contractual basis. However, as explained in paragraph 20 above, the possibility to purchase without the “previous owners’” consent was not given to those who were living in previously expropriated dwellings subject to denationalisation (approximately 4,700 properties, covering 2% of all specially protected tenants). According to the available estimates, in February 2009 approximately 1,500 families (most likely those who could not afford to buy a dwelling) had continued to lease their denationalised dwellings, while approximately 3,200 families had vacated the premises and found a solution to their housing needs elsewhere. According to the applicants, for the former category of families relations with the “previous owners” had often been burdened with judicial and personal conflicts. “Previous owners” applied constant pressure through, inter alia, illegal evictions, rent increases or simply poor building maintenance.
7. The Slovenian Ombudsman
46. Since 1995, in his regular annual reports the Slovenian Ombudsman has illustrated the difficulties facing tenants in denationalised flats. In his Special Report of 8 January 2002 on the Situation of Tenants in Denationalised Flats he also made a number of proposals designed to remedy the situation: feasible models for substitute privatisation (greater financial incentives to solve the housing issue, for both tenants and “previous owners”), protection of the duration of leases and definition of the non-profit rent, legal mechanisms for the protection of tenants’ rights, such as free legal aid, improved implementation of the right to pre-empt, realistic evaluation of tenants’ investments for the refurbishment of the dwellings.
B. The Association’s undertakings
1. The “petition”
47. On 3 February 1998 the Association of Tenants (hereinafter, “the Association”), lodged a “petition” with several State authorities, including the National Assembly, the President of the Republic and the Government. It challenged the Housing Act 1991 and the Denationalisation Act 1991, on the ground that they deprived the Association’s members of their specially protected tenancy rights in a manner incompatible with the Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia, which was still in force at the time when the two acts were passed in 1991. Instead of the privileged specially protected tenancy, which in the Association’s view was in many respects equal to a property right, tenants were granted leases with a temporary non-profit rent. Moreover, once the dwelling had been taken over by a “previous owner”, that contract became an ordinary lease contract. This effectively deprived the tenants of their property and home. In 1991 approximately 45,000 individuals (previous holders of specially protected tenancies and their families), living in 13,000 flats, were concerned by these measures. They considered themselves victims of the transition, in the same manner as “previous owners” whose property had been taken away under the previous regime.
48. The Association also complained that its members were not given all the rights and benefits that other former specially protected tenancy holders enjoyed, such as the right to purchase the dwelling and to have a permanent lease with a non-profit rent. It argued that tenants who – like all its members – were living in dwellings once expropriated, could not purchase their homes, which were subject to restitution to the “previous owners”, whereas all other previous beneficiaries of specially protected tenancies had that possibility. In addition, “previous owners” of flats returned in denationalisation proceedings were selling them to third parties but not to the tenants, who were facing eviction proceedings. In the Association’s view, the restitution of the dwellings to the “previous owners” deprived the tenants of the right to purchase them and resulted in differential treatment between the two groups of tenants on no reasonable ground.
49. The offending legislation allegedly also failed to provide for proper compensation for the money the tenants had invested in the maintenance and improvement of the dwellings. Moreover, the Association complained that its members did not have locus standi in the denationalisation proceedings which were to rule on the ownership of “their” dwellings. It also criticised the constant increases in the non-profit rent, which in its view was approaching levels comparable to the rents charged on the free market. The Association concluded that privatisation and restitution of previously expropriated dwellings should be achieved by paying compensation to the “previous owners” of the dwellings rather than returning their property, as recommended by Resolution 1096 of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (see paragraphs 87-89 below). It requested that an independent expert commission be set up, that the SZ and the ZDen be amended, that the restitution of property as such be stayed and that the National Housing Programme be supplemented.
50. On 2 April 1998 the Government adopted a decision concerning the petition, with an accompanying opinion. The Government did not agree that tenants were the victims of transition. Regarding the right of previous holders of specially protected tenancies to purchase the dwellings, different factual circumstances had to be taken into account. While in some cases the dwellings had been built with State funds, in other cases they had been expropriated from private owners. These “previous owners” might also claim restitution of, and therefore property rights over the dwellings. This meant that they had priority over the former holders of specially protected tenancy rights. In conclusion, as far as the purchase of dwellings was concerned, the two categories of previous holders of specially protected tenancies were not in a comparable position.
51. On the other hand, with respect to other rights and benefits the tenants had been put on an equal footing with all those previous holders of specially protected tenancies who decided not to purchase their dwellings but to rent them on favourable terms. They were all granted the right to rent the dwellings for an indefinite period for a non-profit rent, even after the “previous owner” took over the flat. This had been upheld by the Constitutional Court.
52. The Government also disputed the objection that the impugned legislation did not take into account the investments the tenants had put into the dwellings. They referred to the relevant provisions of the SZ, which granted former specially protected tenancy holders the right to compensation. The Government pointed out that the needs and expectations of the tenants had to be reconciled with those of the “previous owners” of the dwellings, as well as with the limited financial capacities of the State to provide them with housing on favourable terms. They further acknowledged that the tenants, especially elderly people, encountered certain difficulties in their new situation (pressure to move out or to pay a higher rent), but such circumstances had no foundation in the existing legislation. The Government supported the establishment of an expert commission with representatives of both tenants and “previous owners”. It appears that no other authority took a position with respect to the petition.
2. The administrative proceedings
53. On 8 May 1998 the Association instituted proceedings against the Government with the Ljubljana Administrative Court, for not initiating the necessary amendments to the SZ and the ZDen. In their view, the legislation in question breached the tenants’ rights under the Constitution and the European Convention on Human Rights, and disregarded Resolution 1096 of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe. In particular, the Association repeated the complaints from its petition that the dwellings should not be returned as such, that the tenants had only a limited right to purchase the dwellings, that they did not have locus standi in the denationalisation proceedings and that their investments in the dwellings had not been taken into account.
54. On 3 March 1999 the Administrative Court rejected the complaints, holding that the Government’s decision and the accompanying opinion did not qualify under Section 1 of the Administrative Disputes Act, as then in force, as an individual act or an action infringing the individual’s constitutional rights.
55. On 6 April 1999 the Association appealed to the Supreme Court.
56. On 20 September 2001 the Supreme Court dismissed the appeal and upheld the Administrative Court’s decision of 3 March 1999.
57. On 8 March 2002 the Association lodged a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court, challenging the Supreme Court’s decision. It repeated the arguments from the petition and the subsequent court proceedings, and argued in particular that the legislation in issue deprived the tenants of their property and homes.
58. On 11 February 2004 the Constitutional Court rejected the complaint. It upheld the decisions of the Administrative Court and the Supreme Court that the relevant governmental decision and the accompanying opinion could not be challenged in administrative proceedings. In the Constitutional Court’s view, they merely reflected the Government’s policy position with respect to the petition lodged, and were therefore not subject to court review.
3. The Constitutional Initiative (Ustavna pobuda)
59. On 8 March 2002, at the same time as the constitutional complaint (see paragraph 57 above), the Association, representing a group of previous specially protected tenancy holders, also lodged a constitutional initiative for review of the constitutionality of the SZ, the ZDen, the Administrative Disputes Act 1997 and the relevant judicial practice, and their compatibility with international law binding on Slovenia.
60. On 25 September 2003 the Constitutional Court dismissed the constitutional initiative (decision U-I-172/02-40). It acknowledged that the Association, relying on a number of court proceedings initiated by its members, had a legal interest in challenging the existing legislation since it directly interfered with their rights, interests and legal position, but it ruled that the Constitutional Court did not have jurisdiction to examine the compatibility of the disputed legislation with the provisions of the Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia, which was no longer in force.
61. Relying on the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights, the Constitutional Court went on to say that in any event the specially protected tenancy could not be interpreted as an absolute right to property under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, guaranteeing the acquisition of a particular dwelling. Nor could it be said that the claimants’ right to a home had been breached under Article 8 of the Convention, since they could remain in the dwellings, with a contract of unlimited duration and for a non-profit rent. In addition, after the tenant’s death, the right of a spouse or a person having lived with the tenant in a permanent relationship, or an immediate family member living in the flat, to take over the tenancy was also guaranteed (Section 56 of SZ).
62. The Constitutional Court had held in its previous decisions that the specially protected tenancy from the former system was a right to be protected by the rule of law. However, in the new system, this right encountered other rights. In transposing the system of specially protected tenancy relations into lease relations, the legislator could not fulfil all the expectations arising from the former socio-economic and political system, which was founded on social property, and not on private property. The rights from the former system could not have remained unchanged and untouched.
63. The State had undergone political and social changes, including the transformation of social property into private property. The challenged legislation and the transformation of specially protected tenancy into simple tenancy rights should therefore be understood as part of these changes. Tenants’ rights were now limited by the rights of the “previous owners” of the dwellings.
64. In particular, the tenants’ right to purchase now competed with the property rights of the “previous owners” of the dwellings. In this conflict of rights, priority was given to the property rights of the “previous owners”. With this argument the Constitutional Court also dismissed the objection that tenants who could not purchase their dwellings because they were subject to restitution to the “previous owners” were discriminated against in comparison with all other tenants, who had the right to buy their dwellings. It held that the factual circumstances of the two groups of tenants were profoundly different. While the rights of one group of tenants had to be reconciled with the rights of the “previous owners” of the dwellings, no such limitation on the rights of the other group of tenants was necessary. The tenants also had a pre-emption right in the event that the “previous owner” decided to sell the dwelling, which could be entered in the land register and was weaker only than the pre-emption right of a co-owner (Section 176 of the SZ-1).
65. As for other rights and benefits, including the right to a non-profit rent, the Constitutional Court considered that all the previous holders of occupancy rights had been placed on an equal footing, regardless of the origin of their dwellings. These rights, in turn, were comparable to the level of protection granted to tenants in other States. General allegations that the legislative definition of the non-profit rent was inappropriate were not sufficient to warrant constitutional review.
66. The Constitutional Court also dismissed the complaint that the tenants did not have locus standi in the denationalisation proceedings. Inasmuch as the proceedings were decisive for tenants’ rights, tenants did have locus standi. In particular, this concerned the tenants’ right to compensation for any money invested in the dwelling, which could be claimed from the “previous owner”. On the other hand, on the basis of such financial investments, the tenants did not acquire a property right or a claim to the property itself in the denationalisation proceedings.
67. As to the restitution to the “previous owners” of expropriated dwellings in which tenants were living, the Constitutional Court had already ruled that the relevant provisions of the ZDen were not contrary to the Constitution. Furthermore, the “previous owners” were not free to enter into any lease agreements with the tenants; they merely took over the existing leases the tenants had signed with the municipalities. Finally, the Constitutional Court dismissed the Association’s allegations that Section 1 of the Administrative Disputes Act as then in force was unclear and contrary to the Constitution.
C. Other relevant domestic proceedings
68. On 21 April 2005 the Supreme Court deliberated in a case, brought by applicant no. 6 (Mr Primož Kuret), concerning the right of a family member to demand a new non-profit lease after the tenant of the denationalised flat in question had died. The Supreme Court reversed the case-law and decided that users of denationalised flats could not demand the continuation of a non-profit lease following the demise of the tenant; in the Court’s view, they were entitled only to a lease, and the “previous owner” should be free to determine the amount of the rent without any limitations.
69. Subsequently, a close family member of a deceased former holder of occupancy rights filed a petition for a review of the constitutionality of this new case-law, and a constitutional complaint. In a decision of 7 October 2009 (no. U-I-128/08, Up-933/08), the Constitutional court held that it was unconstitutional to interpret Article 56 of the SZ (see paragraph 23 above) in such a manner that, after the death of the holder of a protected tenancy, the “previous owner” was obliged to lease it to the family members of the deceased for a non-profit rent. It thus confirmed the 2005 decision of the Supreme Court. However, the Constitutional Court did clarify that the spouse or the long term partner of a deceased tenant at the time of the enactment of the SZ was entitled to continue the lease at a non-profit rent.
70. The applicants observed that this case-law allowed “previous owners” to fix an unreasonably high rent, thereby preventing the family members of the deceased tenant (other than the spouse or the long term partner) from continuing the lease. They alleged that from 2009 onwards a mortis causa transferability of the right to lease had de facto been eliminated.
D. Individual situations of the applicants
71. As the file contained no specific examples of individual situations, in September 2008 the Court requested the applicants to submit factual information in respect of the amount of the original rent in 1991 and that of the present non-profit rent, the surface area of the flat, its state of repair and its current market value, as well as a chronological overview of the increases in rent and in the statutory minimum wage.
72. In their reply of 9 November 2008, the applicants gave evidence that they were all original former holders of specially protected tenancies or their legal successors.
73. They stated that the first significant increase (of 100%) in the non-profit rent took place in 1995. At that time, its ceiling annual amount was still 2.9% of the value of the dwelling. Further gradual changes were introduced by the 2000 amendments to the SZ (rent increase of 31%), by the Constitutional Court’s decision and by the SZ-1 (rent increase of 23%). The ceiling amount for the annual non-profit rent was currently 4.69% of the value of the dwelling. They stated that a further rent increase of 43% was foreseen in different municipalities. The non-profit rent paid at the time by the tenants equalled 434.5% of the non-profit rent fixed in 1992.
74. However, the applicants stated that factual information provided by them showed that the non-profit rent in Ljubljana and Maribor was still relatively affordable, as it was below the market rent (see annex 1 – “Table summarising the situation of the individual applicants”). The situation was allegedly different in the countryside, but no concrete information was provided. In certain cases there was no historical data as the documentation no longer existed because of the lapse of time and because the tenants had moved.
75. In 2008, the average market price of property per square metre in Ljubljana city centre ranged between 2,000 and 3,000 euros (EUR) and in Maribor it was between EUR 1,000 and 2,000 per square metre. As to the statutory minimum wage, in 1991 it amounted to 6,000 Slovenian tolars (SIT, nominally EUR 25.03). In August 2003 it was SIT 110,380 (nominally EUR 460.6) and in July 2008 EUR 566.53.
76. The applicants also stated that they had made significant financial investments in the renovation and refurbishment of the dwellings.
77. Five applicants (Mr Kuret, Ms Berglez, Ms Bertoncelj, Mr Milič and Ms Jerančič) had been forced to move out. Mr Kuret was the only applicant who pursued the legal avenues up to the Constitutional Court. His constitutional complaint was dismissed on 6 July 2006 for lack of legal interest, as he had reached a settlement with the “previous owner” on 17 March 2006 (see annex 1 – “Table summarising the situation of the individual applicants”).
78. The other applicants, who still occupied the dwellings, were allegedly under pressure, either through court proceedings or through correspondence with the lawyers representing the “previous owners”. They complained about various forms of chicanery and intimidation. All the applicants had had to seek legal advice.
E. The method of calculation of the non-profit rent
79. The parties also gave details as to the method of calculating the non-profit rent which was introduced by the SZ. Its level might be agreed upon by the parties to the lease contract, but they had to apply the method provided for by the law and not exceed the maximum permitted level of non-profit rent. This was always a percentage (2.9% for dwellings more than 25 years old) of the administrative value of the flat, which was determined by the housing authorities according to the following formula:
Value of the dwelling = number of points x value of the point x usable area x effect of size of the dwelling (corrective factor)
80. The rent for dwellings for which tenancy agreements were concluded with the former holders of occupancy rights could not exceed the rent level charged for dwellings more than 25 years old. The values of the point and the correction factor for surface measurements had always been determined by primary or secondary legislation and as such amended several times. As a general rule, the non-profit rent for newly constructed or renovated flats, of better quality and better equipped, was higher than for older, less well-maintained flats. The non-profit rent was also determined in the light of the state of repair at the time the dwelling was allocated to the tenant, that is, before any investment was made.
81. The Government pointed out that the non-profit rent was a cost-based rent covering the economic costs of a dwelling. It did not include taxes to be paid by the “previous owner” and was meant to cover:
- the depreciation of the dwelling (to enable the owner to replace a run-down dwelling after a certain number of years – initially 200, then 60);
- the cost of the capital invested;
- the management of the dwelling;
- investment and routine maintenance.
82. Under the 1991 rules, for previous holders of occupancy rights the annual non-profit rent could not exceed 2.9% of the value of the dwelling. The rules were revised in 1995 for ordinary tenants, bringing the percentage to 3.8% for dwellings constructed after 1991. From March 2000 until December 2004, the percentage was 3.81% for dwellings more than sixty years old and 5.08% for dwellings less than sixty years old. For former holders of occupancy rights or persons with whom the “previous owner” was obliged to conclude a lease contract under Section 56 of the SZ (see paragraph 23 above) the percentage could not exceed 3.81%.
83. The Government observed that the new calculation method had been applied progressively over a span of five years; thus, according to them, for tenants of denationalised dwellings the rent, in real terms, had decreased from 2.9% in 2000 to 2.54% in 2004.
84. The Housing Act 2003 brought the value of the maximum permitted annual non-profit rent up to 4.68% of that of the dwelling, and this notwithstanding the fact that a study ordered by the Ministry responsible for the Environment and Spatial Planning had shown that a rent covering all costs of the use of the dwelling should amount to at least 5.63%. A progressive increase in rents was scheduled up to 31 December 2006 (see Section 181 of the SZ-1 and the Government Decree on the method for calculating rents in non-profit dwellings). As a result, for dwellings less than sixty years old, the non-profit rent was immediately decreased by 8%, from 5.08% to 4.68%; for dwellings more than sixty years old (which were the majority), it increased by 21.80%, from 3.81% to 4.68%; lastly, in the approximately 2,500 denationalised dwellings it increased by 84.20%, from 2.54% to 4.68%. On 1 January 2007, the annual non-profit rent in all buildings amounted to 4.68% of the value of the dwelling. It did not increase any more after that date.
85. The Government also emphasised that the value of the “housing point”, which was based on the annual average price per square metre of constructed non-profit dwellings divided by 320 (average number of points for newly constructed non-profit dwellings), increased from 1.88 German Marks (DEM) in 1991 to DEM 3.75 in August 1996. Non-profit rents increased no further in real terms, but they did increase in relation to the DEM. For dwellings rented after the implementation of the new calculation method introduced in 2000 the value of the point was fixed at DEM 5.39 (and later at EUR 2.63). Each dwelling was given a certain number of points which would take into account the time and quality of construction, the type and quality of joinery elements, floorings, walls, fitted installations, the type and availability of common areas, thermal and acoustic insulation and any negative impacts on the use of the dwelling.
86. According to the SZ-1 (Section 118(8) and (9)) the location of the dwelling could also affect its value. The effect of the location on the level of the non-profit rent could be determined by each municipality and might amount to a maximum of 30% of the rent; however, at the time of the Government’s observations, only two municipalities (Nova Gorica and Mengeš) had adopted provisions in this respect; this meant that in all other municipalities, the location of the building did not affect the rent.
II. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTS
A. Resolution 1096 (1996) of the Parliamentary Assembly
87. On 27 June 1996 the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe adopted Resolution 1096 on measures to dismantle the heritage of former communist totalitarian systems. In the resolution, the Parliamentary Assembly confirmed that in the transition of the former communist totalitarian systems into democratic systems, the principles of subsidiarity, freedom of choice, equality of opportunity, economic pluralism and transparency of decision-making should play a role. Some of the principles which were mentioned in the resolution as means of achieving these goals were the separation of powers, freedom of the media, protection of private property and the development of civil society. The Parliamentary Assembly also considered that the key to peaceful coexistence and a successful transition process lay in striking the delicate balance of providing justice without seeking revenge.
88. The Parliamentary Assembly advised that property, including that of the churches, which was illegally or unjustly seized by the State, nationalised, confiscated or otherwise expropriated during the reign of communist totalitarian systems in principle be restored to its “previous owners” in integrum, if that was possible without violating the rights of current owners who acquired the property in good faith, or the rights of tenants who rented the dwelling in good faith, and without harming the progress of democratic reforms. In cases where this was not possible, just satisfaction should be awarded. Claims and conflicts relating to individual cases of property restitution should be decided by the courts.
89. The Parliamentary Assembly also recommended that the authorities of the countries concerned verify that their laws, regulations and procedures complied with the principles contained in the Resolution, and revise them if necessary. This would, in the view of the Parliamentary Assembly, help to avoid complaints about these procedures being lodged with the control mechanisms of the Council of Europe under the European Convention on Human Rights, the Committee of Ministers’ monitoring procedure, or the Assembly’s monitoring procedure under Order No. 508 (1995) on the honouring of obligations and commitments by member States.
B. Policy Guidelines on Access to Housing for Disadvantaged Categories of Persons, adopted by the European Committee for Social Cohesion
90. On 14-16 November 2001 the European Committee for Social Cohesion (the “ECSC”) adopted the Policy Guidelines on Access to Housing for Disadvantaged Categories of Persons, prepared by the Group of Specialists on Access to Housing. In the guidelines the ECSC reaffirmed the significance of housing and the corresponding responsibilities of national governments, as recognised in a number of international documents such as the European Social Charter, the UN Habitat Agenda and the Declaration on cities and other human settlements in the new millennium adopted by the UN General Assembly. The ECSC established that according to these documents the Council of Europe member States should ensure affordable housing to disadvantaged categories of persons, by creating an appropriate legal framework for housing markets with regard to property rights, security of tenure and consumer protection. The policies adopted should expand the supply of affordable housing and provide better legal security of tenure and non-discriminatory access to housing for all.
91. In paragraph 15, the ECSC also stated:
“In countries that have privatised considerable parts of their public housing stock in recent years, appropriate housing policy measures should be introduced which counteract undesirable consequences of housing privatisation and restitution for disadvantaged categories of persons. For example, in countries with a high rate of “poor owner-occupiers”, more emphasis should be given to a general housing allowance system and to public support for the renewal of housing units, for the benefit of both owners and tenants in restituted dwellings.”
92. The ECSC defined the term “disadvantaged categories of persons” as denoting all persons or groups of persons who are disadvantaged on the housing market for economic, social, psychological and/or other reasons and who consequently require appropriate assistance to facilitate their access to housing.
C. The 2003 Report of the Commissioner for Human Rights on his visit to Slovenia
93. On 15 October 2003 the Commissioner for Human Rights, Mr Alvaro Gil-Robles, issued a Report on his visit to Slovenia in May 2003, in which, among other topics, he addressed the situation of tenants living in former socially-owned dwellings which were eventually returned to the “previous owners”. He likened the position of tenants who lost their privileged specially protected tenancy to the position of landlords who acquired the ownership of such dwellings but not the use of them. He observed that, in contrast to the majority of other holders of specially protected tenancy, the tenants in denationalised dwellings did not have the advantage of being entitled to purchase the flats they lived in, and he acknowledged the fear of many of them, now already elderly, that they would not be able to afford possible rent increases in the future.
94. Concerning the landlords, however, he noted that they could not really take possession of the dwellings either. They took over ownership of the property with a number of obligations vis-à-vis the tenants, whom they had not themselves selected and for whom they had to maintain the social character of the rent charged. Thus, the “previous owners” were not supposed to make any substantial profit from their property, nor could they terminate the tenancy agreement without complying with a number of specific conditions. He also pointed out that the fact that the landlords had finally recovered their expropriated dwellings was fair and could not be contested as such.
95. The Commissioner thus established that “there can be neither winners nor losers in this situation, because both sides may be considered disadvantaged,” and concluded his report by recommending that the legislator consider a new amendment to the legislation “to settle the problems facing one side while also protecting the interests of the other.”
D. Collective complaint No. 53/2008, European Federation of National Organisations Working with the Homeless (FEANTSA) v. Slovenia
96. Following its ratification, the Revised European Social Charter became a part of the Slovenian legal order as from 11 April 1999. In September 2008 the international non-governmental organisation FEANTSA (European Federation of National Organisations Working with the Homeless) filed a collective complaint (no. 53/2008) with the European Committee of Social Rights. It alleged that tenants of flats denationalised at the end of the socialist regime had suffered a loss of their title to property, an increase in the price of accommodation and a reduction of the possibilities of acquiring adequate accommodation.
97. In a decision on the merits, of 8 September 2009, the European Committee of Social Rights concluded that Slovenia was violating the right to housing of former holders of occupancy rights under Article 31 §§ 1 (promotion of access to housing of an adequate standard) and 3 (accessibility of price of housing to those without adequate resources), Article 16 (right of the family to social, legal and economic protection) and Article E (prohibition of discrimination) of the Revised European Social Charter.
98. The Committee held that prior to SZ the right of tenants of non-profit flats in Slovenia to adequate housing was clearly protected by law. The rules introduced by SZ (allowing former holders of occupancy rights to purchase, at an advantageous price, the flats in which they were living, and whose ownership had been transferred, on a transitional basis, to public entities) were also deemed to ensure sufficient legal security in the occupation of the dwellings. The Committee considered, however, as regards former tenants of flats that had been returned to the “previous owners”, that the combination of insufficient measures for the acquisition of or access to a substitute flat, the evolution of the rules on occupancy and the increase in rents, were likely to place a significant number of households in a very precarious position, and to prevent them from effectively exercising their right to housing.
99. Moreover, Slovenia had failed to show that the affordability ratio of the poorest applicants for housing was compatible with their level of income. Former holders of occupancy rights, in particular elderly persons, had been deprived of the opportunity to purchase the flat they lived in, or another one, on advantageous terms, and of the opportunity to remain in the flat, or move to and occupy another flat, in return for a reasonable rent.
100. Lastly, the treatment accorded to former holders of occupancy rights in respect of flats acquired by the State through nationalisation or expropriation, and returned to the “previous owners”, was manifestly discriminatory in relation to the treatment accorded to tenants of flats that were transferred to public ownership by other means. The Committee observed that there was no evidence of any difference in the situation of the two categories of tenants, and that the original distinction between the forms of public ownership in question was in no way imputable to them and had no bearing on the nature of their own relationship with the public owner or administrator.
101. On the basis of the decision of the European Committee of Social Rights on the merits, on 15 June 2011 the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe adopted Resolution CM/ResChS(2011)7, welcoming the measures already taken by the Slovenian authorities and their commitment to bring the situation into conformity with the Social Charter. The Committee of Ministers looked forward to Slovenia reporting, in its next report concerning the relevant provisions of the European Social Charter, that the situation had been brought into full conformity.
102. The applicants alleged that in spite of the above decision and resolution, no substantial step had been taken to positively regulate their situation.
E. Agreement on Succession Issues
103. The Agreement on Succession Issues was the culmination of nearly ten years of intermittent negotiations under the auspices of the International Conference on the former Yugoslavia and the High Representative (appointed pursuant to Annex 10 to the Dayton Peace Agreement). It entered into force between Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the then Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, “The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” and Slovenia on 2 June 2004 (see Đokić, cited above, § 43). Article 6 of Annex G, concerning specially protected tenancy, reads as follows:
“Domestic legislation of each successor State concerning dwelling rights (‘stanarsko pravo/ stanovanjska pravica/ станарско право’) shall be applied equally to persons who were citizens of the SFRY and who had such rights, without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
III. RELEVANT ELEMENTS OF COMPARATIVE LAW
104. After declaring the application admissible, the Court invited the parties to submit additional information on how the housing reform undertaken in other former socialist countries has dealt with the issue of protecting the rights of holders of occupancy rights over denationalised dwellings. The information provided by the parties may be summarised as follows.
105. The applicants emphasised that specially protected tenancy was a sui generis right which was known and enforced only in the SFRY, and not in other former socialist states of Central and Eastern Europe. After the collapse of the SFRY a housing reform was enacted not only in Slovenia but also in Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. All these States abolished social ownership of social dwellings and specially protected tenancy rights; however, in Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina the latter had been transformed into ownership through a right to purchase under favourable terms (regulated price in the amount of 10 to 20 per cent of the market value, possibility to pay in instalments). In particular, former holders of occupancy rights were able to purchase the dwellings in which they were living, while “previous owners” were guaranteed the payment of just compensation for the loss of their properties. In Bosnia and Herzegovina an exception to the right to purchase was provided for as far as dwellings of former religious entities were concerned; however, former holders of specially protected tenancy in respect of these particular dwellings could buy a substitute flat instead. According to the information available to the applicants, in no other former SFRY Republic than Slovenia was discrimination in the enjoyment of the right to purchase provided for when the dwelling had been expropriated by the State through nationalisation or confiscation.
106. The Government first observed that even if it had introduced the notion of “social ownership” into its legal system, the SFRY did not completely banish private property. Private ownership of residential units was allowed but limited to a certain size of living space. Due to amendments to the Constitution, in 1971 the power to pass laws in the housing field was transferred from the Federal State to the constituent republics. The Government submitted the following information concerning former SFRY republics other than Slovenia.
107. In Bosnia and Herzegovina social ownership was transformed into state ownership during the 1992-95 war. After 1998, pre-war occupants were allowed to claim repossession of the apartments which they had left during the war and to purchase them on favourable terms. Moreover, occupancy right holders were entitled to purchase the apartments they lived in, with the exception of privately-owned dwellings. The relevant legislation initially indicated that the apartments subject to restitution would be regulated by special provisions on restitution. However, this rule was later amended, and occupancy right holders were given the right to purchase the apartments they were occupying even when the latter had been nationalised or confiscated. The “previous owners” were to be granted comparable apartments or an equivalent amount of money or other advantages or rights. If they did not purchase the flats, occupancy right holders became lessees. Restitution in natura of expropriated property never took place in Bosnia and Herzegovina. A similar situation existed in the Republika Srpska, where all occupancy right holders were allowed to purchase the apartments they lived in, with the exception of the privately-owned ones. When the latter were returned to their owners, the occupancy right holders had the right to buy another comparable flat.
108. In Croatia, occupancy right holders were allowed to purchase the apartments they lived in under favourable conditions. However, this did not apply to privately owned apartments. In 1997 the Croatian legislator decided that apartments expropriated by way of nationalisation on which occupancy rights existed could not be returned in natura to “previous owners”, who would only receive financial compensation; they could therefore be purchased by the occupancy right holders. A different rule applied to confiscated apartments, which were subject to restitution in natura, with the consequence that occupancy right holders would become lessees and would be given a pre-emption right should the “previous owner” decide to sell. All occupancy right holders who did not or could not purchase were entitled to a protected lease.
109. In Serbia, occupancy right holders and their household members could file a purchase request for the apartments they occupied, irrespective of whether the latter had been nationalised or acquired through solidarity and mutual housing funds. If the apartment was not bought before the end of 1995, the occupants would become lessees, but would retain the possibility to purchase. This possibility was excluded ab initio for privately-owned apartments. The occupancy right holders of these flats would become lessees and could be evicted only if the owner provided them with alternative accommodation; the municipalities were obliged to secure alternative accommodation for this category of tenants by 31 December 2000. Serbia adopted a law providing for restitution of expropriated real estate in kind, similar to the Slovenian one, only in 2011. However, this only concerned properties which had not meanwhile been purchased by former holders of occupancy rights.
110. In 1995, Montenegro provided for the transformation of occupancy rights into private ownership through the purchase of the flats. However, this did not apply to apartments in private ownership or which had been previously expropriated. A law on restitution in kind to “previous owners” was adopted in 2004; it provided that within a period of ten years from its entry into force the Republic of Montenegro had to provide holders of occupancy rights over dwellings returned in natura with a corresponding apartment which they could purchase under the same conditions as applied to the purchase of apartments in social ownership. This right was not conferred on occupancy right holders who owned another flat.
111. As far as other former Central and Eastern European countries are concerned, the Government noted that in Poland people living in flats returned to “previous owners” were not entitled to buy a substitute or equivalent dwelling. The municipalities could provide a flat to persons in a particularly difficult individual or economic situation. Protected tenants, that is to say people who had been allocated a dwelling on the basis of administrative decisions, were given contractual leases concluded for an indefinite period at a controlled rent; they were protected against eviction. There was a possibility, under advantageous conditions, to buy flats which had been built by a co-operative, taking into account, inter alia, the contributions the buyer had paid as a member of the co-operative.
112. Hungary did not provide for the restitution in kind of expropriated dwellings; “previous owners” could only receive partial compensation the amount of which depended on the country’s economic capacity.
113. In Slovakia in 1992 occupancy rights were transformed into a lease. Holders of occupancy rights over flats acquired through solidarity and housing co-operatives could acquire ownership of the premises concerned on special terms. By way of contrast, it was not possible to purchase a flat returned to its “previous owner”; however, the occupancy right holder had the possibility to acquire a substitute flat from the municipality if he or she had received notice of termination of the lease and did not own another flat or any other real estate. The lessee was not obliged to vacate the premises until the municipality had assigned him or her a substitute flat. The rent was regulated by law, but as of 2011 “previous owners” were allowed to raise it by 20 per cent per year.
114. In the Czech Republic, occupancy rights were transformed ex lege into traditional tenancies. If the owner of the flat (that is, the State or the “previous owner”) decided to terminate the lease, the tenant had the right to a substitute flat provided by the owner, but did not have the right to buy the flat in which he or she was living. If the State was the owner and decided to sell the flat, only the former holder of occupancy rights could buy it. However, in May 1994 this exclusive right to buy was replaced by a simple pre-emption right. An enforceable right to buy existed only in relation to flats owned by a co-operative association, as the latter was obliged, at the tenant’s request, to sell the dwelling concerned.
115. In Estonia, all dwellings occupied under lease agreements were subject to privatisation, with the exception of flats returned to “previous owners”. The price of the sale could be paid in vouchers and public capital bonds. In the event of restitution to “previous owners”, tenants had an automatic right to a lease contract (first for a duration of three years and then for five years) and enjoyed pre-emption rights. If they agreed to vacate the premises, these tenants were entitled to be allocated a new dwelling or could apply for a loan or grant from the State for resettlement or to purchase a dwelling.
116. After the reunification of Germany plots of land in the territory of the former Democratic Republic of Germany had been returned to “previous owners”; however, restitution was excluded for those plots in respect of which a third party had in good faith acquired a right of use from the State prior to 1990 and had built a house. For these plots, the “previous owners” would only receive financial compensation, which would cover only a certain percentage of the market-value of the property. German Federal Law provided for strong social protection of the tenant: fixed-term leases and termination of the lease by the landlord were permissible only in limited cases and the agreed rent could be raised only up to the level of the “local comparative rent”. Even stronger protection was afforded to tenants in the new German Länder (in particular, the amount of the rent was regulated by law, and for a certain period of time landlords could not terminate tenancies when they needed the premises for their own personal use). Given the high level of protection afforded to tenants, it was felt that in the new German Länder there was no need to offer substitute housing to the tenants.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
117. The applicants complained that they had been deprived of their specially protected tenancy without receiving adequate compensation.
They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
118. In its decision of 28 May 2013 on the admissibility of the application (paragraph 184), the Court considered that the question of the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was linked to the substance of the applicants’ complaint and decided to join it to the merits.
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The Government
119. The Government objected that the applicants’ complaint was incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as the right of an occupant to reside in a real estate unit he or she did not own could not constitute a “possession” (they referred to J.L.S. v. Spain (dec.), no. 41917/98, ECHR 1999-V; Kozlovs v. Latvia (dec.), no. 50835/00, 23 November 2000; Kovalenok v. Latvia (dec.), no. 54264/00, 15 February 2001; H.F. v. Slovakia (dec.), no. 54797/00, 9 December 2003; Bunjevac v. Slovenia (dec.), no. 48775/09, 19 January 2006; and Gaćeša v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43389/02, 1 April 2008; and also Durini v. Italy, no. 19217/91, Commission’s decision of 12 January 1994).
120. The Government argued that the applicants’ (unrealistic) expectation that dwellings constructed before the Second World War with private funds (and not with social resources) and nationalised under the socialist system would not be returned to their “previous owners” was based on a misinterpretation of the nature of the occupancy right. They pointed out that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 should apply only to a person’s existing possessions. The occupancy right did not confer ownership rights and the dwellings had been allocated to the applicants for “management” and permanent use. In compliance with the social order then in force, they had to recognise the authority of the “indirect possessor” of the so-called “socially-owned property” (which according to the then applicable principles of real-property law was jointly owned by the people of Slovenia). The possession of the dwelling was linked to the duration of the occupancy relationship, but was not based on a permanent and inalienable right to ownership or another right in rem. This was demonstrated, inter alia, by the fact that for a certain period of time the occupancy right could even be allocated in respect of privately owned flats.
121. Even though it might be difficult to compare anachronistic concepts of socially-owned property with traditional property in a democratic society, it was clear that the occupancy right was, mutatis mutandis, more akin to a tenancy. According to the Commentary to the former legislation, it was a special set of “management” entitlements, on the basis of which the holder had the right to use the socially-owned dwelling for the purpose of satisfying personal and family housing needs. It was not associated with a particular dwelling but rather with the holder’s personal housing needs and those of his family: should these needs change (for instance because the number of users decreased), the occupancy relationship could be terminated provided that another dwelling that suited the altered circumstances was allocated to the holder of the occupancy right. Moreover, the occupancy relationship could be terminated if the holder had not been using the dwelling, had fully sublet it or if the dwelling was occupied by a third party.
122. The holder had to pay the “socially agreed price in the form of rent”; the occupancy right was not transferable (except in cases provided for by law) and could not be inherited. Regulated transition was possible to one of the users of the dwelling: the heir of a tenant who at the time of the latter’s death was living in the same flat might enter into the same tenancy relationship with the owner. The holder of the occupancy right could not dispose of the dwelling (with the exception of an exchange of socially-owned dwellings) and was not allowed to make alterations without the prior approval of the community of tenants. The occupancy relationship could be terminated for fault-based reasons which were very similar to the grounds for terminating any tenancy relationship.
123. In the light of the above, the Government argued that the occupancy right was comparable to a tenancy relationship, albeit concluded for an indefinite period. The applicants merely had the right to reside in a dwelling which was not owned by them; this right was considered neither a property right nor any other real right, but was in essence an obligation, established or terminated according to the provisions of the law on obligations. The Constitutional Court’s decision no. Up-29/98, to which the applicants referred (see paragraph 11 above), was an isolated one and could not constitute “case-law”; moreover, it should be understood in the context of the peculiar status of the complainant in that case, who had suffered harm because of the actions of the municipal authority, which had encumbered an asset that was subject to a ban on trade.
124. The Government further observed that the possibility of purchasing the dwelling, provided for in the SZ, did not apply to socially-owned dwellings which had become public property by way of nationalisation, as they were subject to the obligation of restitution. That possibility did not constitute an entitlement arising from the former occupancy right, and was introduced only later (with the “third model”) for flats other than those occupied by the applicants, as a method of privatisation (and not, as wrongly argued by the applicants, as a kind of compensation for the withdrawal of the occupancy right). Moreover, the right to purchase the dwelling should be differentiated from the pre-emption right guaranteed to any occupancy right holder, which depended upon the “previous owner’s” free decision to sell the property. Thus, the applicants had no enforceable right to purchase the flats in which they were living and had no legitimate expectation to acquire ownership of them. In any event, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 did not guarantee the right to acquire property (see Sorić v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43447/98, 16 March 2000; Slivenko and Others v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II; and Kopeckỳ v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX).
125. It was true that the “third model” provided for the option of purchasing another dwelling; however, this model had been abrogated in November 1999 (see paragraph 37 above). As none of the applicants had applied to purchase a dwelling under this model, it could not be argued that they had an enforceable claim in this regard.
126. The applicants’ claims for recovery of investments (see Article 25 of the ZDen) could not be considered “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 unless there was a “legitimate expectation” based on a regulation or a final judgment. The mere hope that such claims might be granted could not bring Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 into play. The Government had never denied the rights of those applicants who had obtained a final favourable decision in this regard. In any event, entitlement to recover investments could not be the basis for the establishment of ownership of the dwellings.
127. As far as applicant no. 2 (Mrs Berglez) was concerned, the Government observed that she had applied to sign a lease contract out of time; her conditional claim had therefore lapsed as a result of her failure to comply with a statutory regulation and could not, for this reason also, be considered a “possession”.
128. The case of Mago and Others relied on by the applicants (see paragraph 130 below) could not be compared with the present one as, unlike Slovenian law, the Dayton Peace Agreement had established that all occupancy right holders in Bosnia and Herzegovina were entitled to return to the homes they had lived in before the war. It was true that under the former regime a socially-owned dwelling could be sold only to its occupancy right holder; however, this was not an entitlement deriving from the occupancy right, but a measure aimed at the preservation of the value of socially-owned property used for housing, and sale was permissible only under certain conditions and at the price determined by a certified valuator.
(b) The applicants
129. The applicants pointed out that the “specially protected tenancy”, which they had acquired in good faith, implied the exclusive right to live in the dwelling for an indefinite period, the right to transmit it inter vivos or mortis causa to family members who lived with the tenant concerned, and the exclusive right to purchase the dwelling. It thus had all the essential characteristics of a right of ownership and the only thing missing was the title of owner. It was not based on a precarious contract but on a constitutionally protected civil right of a permanent nature, which could be terminated only in legally regulated extreme cases, connected to the fact that in the former social order all individuals were meant to have access to goods according to their needs. Therefore, the specially protected tenancy constituted a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
130. In any event, according to the Court’s case-law, even a legitimate expectation to lease could be regarded as a possession (Stretch v. the United Kingdom, no. 44277/98, § 32, 24 June 2003). The Court had also held that the cancellation of a specially protected tenancy amounted to a deprivation of possession (Mago and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 12959/05, 19724/05, 47860/06, 8367/08, 9872/09 and 11706/09, §§ 77-78 and 95, 3 May 2012).
131. Furthermore, it should be kept in mind that at the time of Slovenia’s ratification of the Convention and until the end of 1999, all former holders of specially protected tenancies had the right, not subjected to time limitations, to purchase a dwelling on very favourable terms, either the one they were occupying or, under the “third model”, another comparable flat. In the applicants’ view, this right also constituted a “possession”, as it guaranteed the possibility to acquire ownership of a dwelling upon payment of a minimum financial contribution (5 to 10% of the market value of the property – see paragraph 20 above). Its exercise depended upon a unilateral request by the former holder of the occupancy right, and in most cases the tenants had to wait until the end of the denationalisation proceedings merely to establish whether the right to purchase was to be exercised on the existing dwelling or on a substitute dwelling.
132. The applicants underlined that the Court had considered as a “possession” the right of former holders of specially protected tenancies in another Republic of the SFRY to purchase a dwelling (Brezovec v. Croatia, no. 13488/07, § 45, 29 March 2011). The present case, concerning a right to purchase with no temporal limitation, was to be distinguished from that of Gaćeša v. Croatia, cited by the Government (see paragraph 119 above), where the law clearly fixed a time-limit for exercising the said right and the applicant had missed it. In Slovenia, the so-called “third model” had been repealed by the Constitutional Court without any prior announcement or warning.
133. Contrary to the Government’s allegations, the right to purchase was not just a legal privilege but also a means of compensating for the forceful deprivation of the specially protected tenancy, which was the form the legal title to housing took at that time. This was clear from the nature of the specially protected tenancy, in so far as only its holder – and not other users of the dwelling – was granted the right to purchase, and that right was recognised also in respect of a substitute dwelling. In this connection, the applicants pointed out that the Court had already classified as a “possession” an existing legal right to just compensation for deprivation of property taken prior to the ratification of the Convention (Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 133, ECHR 2004-V).
(c) The third-party intervener
134. The International Union of Tenants (hereinafter, the “IUT”), a non-governmental organisation whose headquarters are located in Stockholm, argued that a right to tenancy constituted a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (Larkos v. Cyprus ([GC] no. 29515/95, ECHR 1999-I). Even more so the “specially protected tenancy”, which assured a high level of legal protection to the applicants and their families.
2. The Court’s assessment
135. The Court does not consider it necessary to examine the Government’s objection of incompatibility ratione materiae since it has come to the conclusion that, even assuming Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be applicable, the requirements of this provision were not violated (see, mutatis mutandis and in the ambit of Article 6 of the Convention, Ashingdane v. the United Kingdom, 28 May 1985, § 54, Series A no. 93).
B. The substance of the applicants’ complaint
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
(i) Scope of the complaint
136. In their application, the applicants alleged that the respondent Government had never stated any reasonable grounds or public interest that justified depriving them of their specially protected tenancy. The only reason given had been the transition from the previous socialist system to a market economy. In the applicants’ view, only the “previous owners” had benefited from these changes, and conferring a private benefit on a private party could not be in the public interest as defined by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
137. In their observations in reply, however, the applicants stated that it was not, as such, the abolition of the specially protected tenancy and/or the restitution of the dwellings to the “previous owners” that they held against Slovenia. Still, a number of actions and omissions imputable to the State during the period of implementation of the reforms had, in their opinion, violated their Convention rights and created a situation which was unbearable both for the previous holders of occupancy rights and for the “previous owners”. The result of the denationalisation was a purely formal restitution of the dwellings: “previous owners” were obliged to lease them out for a non-profit rent at least until the death of the former holder of the specially protected tenancy and could, in principle, remove the tenant only by offering substitute rented accommodation.
138. The legislation which existed from 1994 until 1999, contemplating the “third model”, was “more sensible and ... in accordance with the Convention”. However, this model had been withdrawn before the majority of former holders of specially protected tenancies could benefit from it, and from that time onwards the State had failed to ensure the required fair balance. The applicants referred to the dissenting opinion of Judge Lojze Ude appended to the Constitutional Court’s decision of 25 November 1999 (see paragraph 38 above). Since the end of 1999 former holders of occupancy rights living in denationalised dwellings had been left without any suitable compensation for the loss of their specially protected tenancy rights, while at the same time “previous owners” could not fully enjoy their restituted dwellings.
(ii) Whether there was an interference with possessions
139. Citing the case of Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria (nos. 43278/98 and others, § 161, 15 March 2007), the applicants alleged that the question whether their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had been interfered with should be examined in the light of the multitude of measures adopted “from 1991 to at least the end of 1999 and possibly also until today”.
(iii) Whether the interference was lawful
140. The applicants first alleged that, regard being had to the fact that the previous Constitution was still in force at the moment of the enactment of the SZ, depriving them of their specially protected tenancy had been unlawful. However, in their observations in reply they specified that they would not persist in this claim, as the facts in issue occurred in 1991, before the Convention was ratified by Slovenia.
141. The applicants argued instead that the interference with their possessions had not been lawful on other grounds. They noted that at the time of the Constitutional Court’s decision repealing the “third model” (November 1999 – see paragraph 37 above), Slovenia had already ratified the Revised European Social Charter, making it fully part of its domestic legal order. In its decision of 8 September 2009 (see paragraphs 97-100 above), the European Social Committee had found that the “combination of insufficient measures for the acquisition of or access to a substitute flat, the evolution of the rules on occupancy and the increase in rents” were contrary to Article 31 § 1 of the Charter and that the discrimination between former holders of occupancy rights in the right to purchase was incompatible with Article E. It followed that the Constitutional Court’s decision had violated a binding ratified international instrument.
(iv) Whether the interference was in the general interest
142. The applicants did not contest that the abolition of the specially protected tenancy and the restitution of nationalised property might have been regarded as pursuing a legitimate aim and as being in the general interest. They considered, however, that the same could not be said of the absence of compensation for the loss of their occupancy rights and for the abolition of the right to purchase.
143. By repealing the “third model”, the Constitutional Court had acted against the public interest. This model was meant to balance the interests of the former holders of occupancy rights and the “previous owners” on one side and those of the municipalities on the other side. It had somehow compensated for the fact that for dwellings expropriated through nationalisation or confiscation after the Second World War, the right of “previous owners” to restitution was given precedence over the right of former holders of specially protected tenancies to purchase on favourable terms. It was the only model that represented an actual right to purchase a dwelling and was possible to use even in the event of restitution and despite the “previous owner’s” reluctance to sell.
144. The Constitutional Court had repealed the “third model” suddenly, without any warning or transition period in which former holders of specially protected tenancy might exercise the right to purchase. It did so merely because the “third model” interfered with the property rights of the municipalities, without taking into account the intention behind the legislation, the interests of the private actors involved and the fact that the municipalities had acquired the socially-owned dwellings free of charge via the enactment of the SZ.
(v) Proportionality of the interference
145. The applicants recalled that in the restitution process the State was not supposed to create disproportionate new wrongs while trying to attenuate old injuries. The legislation should make it possible to take into account the particular circumstances of each case, avoiding putting a disproportionate burden on persons who had acquired possessions in good faith (see Pincová and Pinc v. the Czech Republic, no. 36548/97, § 58, 5 February 2003, and Velikovi and Others, cited above, § 178). In the present case, the disproportion lay in the repeal of the tenant’s right to purchase under the “third model”. From the year 2000 onwards the two alternatives available to the applicants (namely, continuing to lease the existing dwelling or moving out of it and obtaining a financial incentive) were neither a suitable compensation for the loss of the specially protected tenancy nor a comparable alternative to the right to purchase. In this connection, the applicants submitted the following arguments.
(α) Specially protected tenancy
146. The applicants argued that the specially protected tenancy was the strongest civil right over a socially-owned dwelling. It was a sui-generis right comparable to ownership, and the exclusive right to purchase precluded everybody else from acquiring ownership of the same dwelling. The specialised literature cited by the Government, stating that the protected tenancy was a non-property right, should not be understood in a negative sense but in the sense that it represented more than a property right, as it also comprised some managerial entitlements. In any event, the Government’s allegations did not take due account of the reasoning followed by the Constitutional Court in its decision Up-29/98 (see paragraph 11 above).
147. It was true, as pointed out by the Government, that specially protected tenancies existed only over socially-owned dwellings; indeed, specially protected tenancy and private ownership were mutually exclusive. The former was a permanent right which could cease to exist only in exceptional situations defined by law (see paragraph 14 above), which could be divided into fault-based grounds (damage, disturbance to other residents, failure to pay the fee) and grounds of needlessness, reflecting the general principle that no-one should have more property than they needed (failure to live in the dwelling for more than six months, total sublet of the dwelling, ownership of another suitable empty dwelling).
148. Under the previous system, dwellings could be sold only to specially protected tenancy holders (see paragraph 10 in fine above); this situation changed dramatically with the housing reform, as former holders of occupancy rights were only given a pre-emptive right; if the tenant refused to pay the “previous owner’s” asking price the dwelling could be sold on the free market.
(β) Leases
149. By contrast, the right to continue the lease entailed an essential degradation of the status enjoyed by the applicants under the specially protected tenancy. For the majority of holders of occupancy rights a new leasing relationship (even for an indefinite period) was only a temporary solution until they could purchase a dwelling. However, they had to postpone the realisation of their right to purchase, as in most cases they had to wait for the conclusion of a denationalisation procedure to find out whether the dwelling was being returned to a “previous owner”; they then had to wait for that “previous owner” to say whether he consented to a favourable sale as per the “first model” of substitute privatisation; if not, they could opt for the so-called “third model”. In practice, therefore, until the end of 1999 (when it was repealed by the Constitutional Court – see paragraph 37 above) the latter model was used to good effect only in few cases. After it was repealed the right to lease became a permanent solution, allowing tenants to remain in the dwellings they were occupying.
150. The right to lease was weaker than the specially protected tenancy in that: (a) only persons named in the lease contract were allowed to reside with the tenant; (b) tenants could not engage in commercial activities in the dwelling or sublet it without the “previous owner’s” consent; (c) tenants had to pay a rent (rather than a simple fee) which, even if it was a non-profit rent, had risen considerably (more than 600%) since 1991 and not only covered maintenance but was also meant to provide a profit to the “previous owner”; according to the Constitutional Court’s decision of 20 February 2003 (paragraph 39 above), the new method of calculation of the non-profit rent was to be applied retroactively; (d) tenants could not exchange dwellings; (e) the exclusive right to purchase was replaced by a simple pre-emption right (paragraphs 40 in fine and 64 above); (f) in the event of eviction or death of the original tenant, the right to lease at a non-profit rent was not transferrable to family members other than the spouse or long term partner (paragraphs 68-70 above); (g) the right to use the dwelling was no longer a constitutionally and legally protected right, but merely an ordinary contractual right; (h) it could be terminated at any moment by the “previous owner” if he found the tenant another suitable dwelling (paragraph 40 above); (i) new fault-based and needlessness-based grounds for eviction were introduced, including ownership of another dwelling (Section 103 of the Housing Act 2003, paragraph 40 above), regardless of whether the latter was empty or “real” (in the sense that it was not just a holiday home) and moving entailed a substantial deterioration of the tenant’s living conditions (all these things were guaranteed under the former legislation). The applicants considered that it was irrational, in 2003, to introduce ownership of another dwelling as a ground for eviction, as this would be consistent with the principles of socialism but not with those of a free market economy. Moreover, if a tenant moved to his own dwelling, the rest of his or her family could not stay in the original dwelling.
151. It was true that the SZ-1 regulated the right of tenants to modernise the dwelling and defined situations in which the “previous owner” could not deny his or her consent to do so; however, a similar right, while not regulated by law, had also been recognised by legal doctrine and case-law with regard to holders of occupancy rights. And in any event, under the previous regulation modernisation without the required consent was not a ground for eviction, while it was so under the new rules.
(γ) The “second model” of substitute privatisation
152. In his report of 8 January 2002 (paragraph 46 above) the Ombudsman stated that former holders of specially protected tenancy in denationalised dwellings were victims of systematic violations of human rights, and suggested suitable solutions (higher payments to former holders of occupancy rights, or incentives for the “previous owners” to sell). Even though the Ombudsman’s report was formally examined and accepted by the National Assembly, the suggestions it contained were not implemented in the SZ-1, which completely abolished the concept of the right of former specially protected tenancy holders to purchase an existing or substitute dwelling in accordance with the “first and third models” of substitute privatisation. Instead, the 2003 legislation focused on the “second model” (paragraph 34 above), which had rarely been used and which allowed the tenant to receive financial compensation if he or she decided to move out of the dwelling and purchase another flat on the free market or to build a house.
153. However, according to the SZ-1, in such cases the State contribution amounted only to 15-20% of the market value of the dwelling the tenant was leaving. This meant that in order to acquire a comparable property, he or she had to pay approximately 80-85% of its value. By contrast, the right to purchase under the “third model” allowed former specially protected tenancy holders to accede to ownership by paying approximately 5-10% of the value of the dwelling in instalments over a span of twenty years. It was true that under the “second model”, the tenant could apply for a loan from the Housing Fund for the remaining sum to be paid. However, according to the applicants only people who would be eligible for ordinary bank loans could obtain such loans, and the interest rate on them was even worse than on commercial bank loans.
154. The abolition of the “third model” effectively forced a majority of former holders of occupancy rights to buy dwellings on the free market (which were worse than the dwellings they were leaving in terms of surface, construction and location) by dint of great sacrifices and in numerous cases with the help of their family members. In any event, the proportionality issue to be assessed in the present case was not whether former holders of occupancy rights managed, in one way or another, to have a roof over their heads, but rather whether there was fair compensation for the loss of their rights. The European Committee of Social Rights had found that a disproportionate burden had been put on them, and the applicants asked the Court to reach the same conclusion.
155. Lastly, the applicants claimed that many of them had invested substantial amounts in the maintenance and refurbishment of the dwellings, which had initially been poorly maintained, thereby considerably increasing the value of the flats; yet ownership rights had nevertheless been restored to the “previous owners”.
(b) The Government
(i) Whether there was interference with possessions
156. The Government argued that the adoption of the SZ did not in any way change the legal status of the applicants, as their occupancy rights were transformed into a tenancy for an indefinite period, with protection against arbitrary eviction by the “previous owner”. The lease could not be terminated if rent was not paid for reasons of financial hardship, there was a possibility of obtaining a subsidised rent and moving to another suitable non-profit dwelling, the lease was transferrable to the tenant’s heirs and the “previous owner” was obliged to maintain the dwelling in good repair, thereby ensuring a reasonable standard of living. The only essential difference with the previous system was that while under the former social ownership regime the owner was not really identifiable – a fact which might have led the applicants to consider themselves as the “owners” of the dwellings –, in the market economy dwellings had identifiable owners. In the Government’s view, this fact alone could not amount to an interference with the rights guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
157. In this connection, the Government also noted that the holders of occupancy rights were granted leases at non-profit rent levels irrespective of their financial situation. In the past twenty years such rents had increased, but the standard of living in general had radically changed and the non-profit rents paid by the applicants were nothing like free-market rents. Had the “previous owners” not received a sum to cover their costs, their obligation to maintain the flats in good repair would have constituted a disproportionate burden (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 198, ECHR 2006-VIII).
158. With regard to individual applicants, the Government made the following observations.
159. At the date of entry into force of the SZ, applicant no. 6 (Mr Kuret) was not the holder of the occupancy right but merely one of the legal users of the dwelling to which his father held the right. At that time, as an immediate family member, he did not even have the right to a tenancy relationship. Therefore, in the Government’s opinion, the provisions of the SZ had not had any direct effect on his legal situation. Moreover, applicant no. 6 had concluded a friendly settlement “of all mutual relations”, in which he explicitly withdrew any further claims against the “previous owner” of the dwelling, and therefore also the possibility to appeal against the Supreme Court judgment of 21 April 2005 (no. II Ips 98/2004 – see paragraph 68 above). He had thus forfeited any victim status he might have had.
160. The same applied to applicant no. 2 (Mrs Berglez), who had not lodged a request to purchase the dwelling she was living in or any other suitable dwelling. She had refused to sign a lease and thus lived in the dwelling without the necessary legal title. In the Government’s opinion, she was in no position to claim that her legal status had deteriorated because of the action taken by the Republic of Slovenia.
161. The Government also pointed out that, by analogy with the former legislation of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia, the SZ had established that where a former holder of occupancy rights no longer needed housing protection (because he owned another dwelling or because of other circumstances), the “previous owner” of the dwelling in which he was living was not obliged to sign a lease contract. This was notably the case for applicants nos. 2 (Mrs Berglez), 7 (Mr Logar), 9 (Mr Milič) and 10 (Mrs Zalar), who had resolved their housing needs by purchasing another dwelling. The Government argued that under these circumstances, they could not be considered victims of the alleged violations.
162. The Government also pointed out the following:
- The spouse of applicant no. 1 (Mrs Cornelia Berger-Krall) owned a vineyard cottage and a house of 91 square metres (m²) suitable for habitation;
- Applicant no. 2 (Mrs Berglez) had received a grant of EUR 38,752.08 and a soft loan of EUR 28,774.92; she had purchased a dwelling in Maribor;
- Applicant no. 7 (Mr Logar) had received a grant of EUR 53,276.42 and a soft loan of EUR 89,223.57; he had purchased an 82 m² dwelling;
- Applicant no. 8 (Mrs Marguč), together with her husband, owned a 64 m² house in a prestigious location by the sea in Piran, which was suitable for habitation;
- Applicant no. 9 (Mr Milič) had received a grant of EUR 45,975.98 and a soft loan of EUR 21,524.02, and had purchased a 75 m² dwelling;
- Applicant no. 10 (Mrs Zalar) had received a grant of EUR 32,262.99 and a soft loan of EUR 72,737.02; she had purchased two dwellings, one measuring 84 m² and the other 148 m².
163. Moreover, in their observations of 5 June 2012 the applicants had stated that they had never explicitly or implicitly claimed that they did not have sufficient means of subsistence or that they had no property and were therefore entitled to social benefits or subsidised rent. In the Government’s opinion, this statement was an admission that being unable to continue the tenancy at a non-profit rent did not constitute a threat to the family lives of any of the applicants, and that the increases in the non-profit rent did not violate their Convention rights. As a close family member could not purchase the dwelling unless he or she obtained the written consent of the former occupancy right holder, applicant no. 6 (Mr Primož Kuret), who had not obtained such consent, could not be considered a victim from this point of view, as he was not a member of a protected category.
(ii) General remarks
164. The Government observed that under the previous regime housing policy had mainly been addressed in a spirit of social policy and protection of the standard of living, and thus had a destabilising impact on economic and social development trends. A dwelling was considered as a social, not an economic entity. The introduction of market relations in the housing economy meant eliminating anachronistic legislative solutions, such as occupancy rights. At the same time, the Government had to provide an appropriate transitional regime in accordance with the principle of trust in the law (which should not be understood to mean that the legislation must remain unchanged). As the Constitutional Court rightly pointed out, in the new legal system the occupancy right encountered other rights and a fair balance had to be struck between them.
165. As explained in paragraph 156 above, the legal status of former occupancy right holders remained, in substance, untouched. They maintained the pre-emption right to which they had been entitled under the previous system. Inspections could be made by the national housing inspectorate, which, in the event of poor maintenance of the dwelling, could order that the defect be remedied at the “previous owner’s” expense. The tenant had the right to obtain compensation for damage suffered due to poor maintenance and reimbursement of excessively high rent. He or she could also demand that the level of rent be checked by a competent body. This degree of protection was not extended, however, to users who under the previous system did not have occupancy rights or had lost them.
166. As to the tenant’s obligations, he or she had to use the dwelling in accordance with the terms of the lease, to allow the “previous owner” access to the premises (no more than twice a year), and could not change the dwelling layout or install fittings and appliances without the prior written agreement of the “previous owner”. These were basically the same obligations as under the previous regime. However, under that regime failure to respect them resulted in liability for damages, while under the new rules unauthorised changes to the dwelling were grounds for termination of the lease (unless the tenant removed the modifications upon written request by the “previous owner”). When moving out, the tenant was entitled to reimbursement of the non-depreciated part of any useful investment in the dwelling he had made with the consent of the “previous owner”. With such written consent he or she could also sublet part of the dwelling.
167. With ninety days’ notice, the tenant could at any time unilaterally terminate the lease contract without any justification; the “previous owner” could do so only upon providing the tenant with another suitable dwelling.
168. As to the new fault-based grounds for termination of the lease (paragraph 21 above), they were imposed by the nature of the civil-law relationship and the protection of the other contractual party. Tenants in social distress who could not pay the rent in full were entitled to help from a municipal administrative body, which would pay the “previous owner” the difference in the rent or give the tenant the possibility of renting a socially-owned dwelling. The right to subsidised rent (Sections 26-31 of the Social Assistance Act) was implemented by the social work centres and the method for calculating it was modified in 2005. The cash benefits (including the subsidised rent) could not exceed the legal minimum wage.
169. According to Section 56 of the SZ, when a tenant died the “previous owner” was obliged to sign a lease agreement with the surviving spouse or long term partner or with one of the immediate family members indicated in the lease contract (paragraph 23 above). As the Constitutional Court had pointed out (paragraph 69 above), the transfer of the tenancy to another family member ensured the social function of the dwelling. However, a distinction was to be made between the spouse and/or long term partner on the one hand and the other immediate family members on the other: while the purpose of marriage (or long-term partnership) was to permanently live together, the same could not be said of relations with other family members such as children and parents. Had the latter been allowed to continue the tenancy relationship ad infinitum under the same conditions as the former holder of occupancy rights, the balance between the protection of property and the pursuit of its social function would have been upset. In particular, had the family members continued to benefit from the non-profit rent, the “previous owner” would have been prevented from obtaining income from his property, an element which is of special importance in the market economy system. Protection of family members could have been achieved by other means, such as allowances and loans or opportunities to rent other non-profit dwellings.
170. The non-profit rent (paragraph 19 above) was not an encroachment on the property right of the “previous owner”, but a regulation of the method of enjoyment of the property and a form of protection of the legal situation of former holders of occupancy rights. In assessing it, the financial situation of the tenant was not relevant, whereas the protection of his or her legal status, originating from the former regulation, was a factor to be taken into account. The Government referred to the part of their observations describing the method of calculation of the non-profit rent (paragraphs 79-86 above).
171. The Government also pointed out that the SZ-1 maintained the principle of protection of the status of former holders of occupancy rights. It introduced the right of the tenant to require the “previous owner” to provide another suitable dwelling or demand a relative reduction in rent for the time during which the dwelling could not be used normally. If renovation work required the tenant’s temporary removal, the “previous owner” was obliged to provide substitute premises and to pay the costs of the move. Moreover, the SZ-1 laid down the conditions under which the “previous owner” could not refuse consent to alterations by the tenant (Section 97), introduced the tenant’s right to a refund of the non-depreciated part of any useful and necessary investments made (Section 98) and stipulated that the “previous owner” could not request the tenant’s removal before having reimbursed the investments the tenant had made in the dwelling (Section 112(2)). As to the fact that ownership of other real estate was a ground for termination of the tenancy, the Government considered that it would be disproportionate to burden the landlord with a tenancy relationship for an indefinite period and a non-profit rent where the tenant had other suitable accommodation at his or her disposal.
(iii) Proportionality of the interference
172. The Government argued that they enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation in reforming the country’s political and economic system. Restitution of dwellings to the “previous owners” was meant to correct the injustices committed in the post-war period and excluded the right of the occupancy right holder to acquire ownership of the same dwelling. The reforms had a legal basis in the SZ and ZDen, as well as in Amendment XCIX to the Constitution, which provided for the transformation of socially-owned property into public and other forms of property to be regulated by law. The occupancy right, a typical element of the former socialist system based on a planned economy and socially-owned property, could not continue to exist in a market economy.
173. The re-establishment of the ownership rights of “previous owners” of nationalised property and the redress of wrongs suffered by them was a legitimate aim in a democratic society based on the rule of law and respect for human rights. The national legislator had struck a fair balance between competing rights: ownership of dwellings could not be acquired by the holders of occupancy rights against the will of the “previous owner”, but the latter’s right of property was restricted by the obligation to enter into a lease contract for an unlimited period. Moreover, it should be taken into account that the right to purchase the dwelling was never one of the entitlements constituting the occupancy right under the previous system. Occupancy right holders had only a pre-emption right at a price determined by a certified valuator; they could not force or request the purchase.
174. The right to apply to purchase the dwelling bestowed on holders of occupancy rights in buildings acquired with solidarity and mutual housing funds was not meant to be just satisfaction for the withdrawal of the occupancy right, but a measure enabling privatisation and transition from the social-ownership system to a system of private ownership with known owners. The applicants did not have this option as the dwellings in which they were living had not been acquired with mutual funds, but had been coercively nationalised. The legislator had substantial reasons for regulating the situation of these dwellings differently.
175. Furthermore, should the “previous owner” not consent to sell the dwelling, tenants in the applicants’ situation could solve their housing problem by buying a dwelling or building a house on the favourable terms (financial compensation in the amount of a percentage of the dwelling’s value and a loan) provided for in Article 125 of the SZ, under the “second model” of substitute privatisation (paragraph 34 above).
176. As to the decision of the European Committee of Social Rights (see paragraphs 97-100 above), it should be emphasised that the obligations resulting from Article 31 of the European Social Charter are obligations of effort and not obligations of result. Moreover, in order to comply with the obligations arising from the said decision, in October 2011 Slovenia had adopted the Rules amending the Rules on the allocation of non-profit dwellings and was in the process of preparing a National Housing Programme, which would be a long-term housing policy for the coming ten-year period and would confer on the Housing Council the role of advising the Government and monitoring the implementation of the reforms.
177. As far as the abolition of the “third model” was concerned, the Government observed that the Constitutional Court’s decision was founded on the actual and modest financial capabilities of the municipalities. The latter could offer few dwellings for substitute purchase; indeed, in October 1993 there were only 531 vacant dwellings in the whole of Slovenia, and in former municipalities in Ljubljana they numbered 172. It was the duty of the municipalities to make a certain number of public dwellings available to socially weaker and endangered citizens, so they were obliged to give them to people in more urgent social need than the former occupancy right holders in denationalised dwellings. In any event, the financial incentives afforded by Slovenia to solve housing problems constituted adequate “compensation” for any possible encroachment on the occupancy right. It could also be argued that because of the financial participation of the State in the purchase of another dwelling, such compensation was not necessary.
(c) The third-party intervener
178. The IUT considered that in the process of housing transition and reform Slovenia had excessively interfered with the rights of specially protected tenancy holders, withdrawing the minimum legal protection assured to tenants in other European countries. According to the IUT, the applicants had been deprived of their specially protected tenancy status without any suitable compensation. The new tenancy rights given to them by the housing reform laws were of a lesser quality. This degradation of their position was not proportionate and justified under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether there was an interference with possessions
179. The Court first recalls that in its decision of 28 May 2013 on the admissibility of the application (paragraph 149), it considered that insofar as the Government referred to the particular circumstances of individual applicants (notably, their entitlement to occupy the flats they lived in, their ownership of other real estate, their financial situation and/or the financial grants received by them – see paragraphs 159-163 above), these issues were relevant considerations to assess whether there was interference with the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 8 of the Convention and, in the affirmative, whether this interference was proportionate and necessary in a democratic society.
180. It is to be noted in this connection that the applicants have specified that their complaints are not directed against the abolition of the specially protected tenancy and/or the restitution of the dwellings to the “previous owners” per se (see paragraphs 137 and 142 above), but rather against the alleged insufficient protection of the category of former holders of occupancy rights in denationalised flats and against the repeal of the “third model” of substitute privatisation. In their opinion, the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 did not depend upon a direct or potential individual risk of eviction, but on the effects the general legal framework of the housing reform had on their situation. This distinguishes this complaint from the one raised under the same provision in the case of Liepājnieks v. Latvia ((dec.), no. 37586/06, §§ 88-89, 2 November 2010), which was essentially based on the loss of a dwelling without compensation and which was declared inadmissible by the Court because the applicant had chosen to vacate the premises of his own accord and to move into the property of his spouse.
181. That being so, the Court considers that the housing reform and the repeal of the “third model” of substitute privatisation have interfered with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions since the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Slovenia (28 June 1994). The replacement of the specially protected tenancy with normal leases restricted the applicants’ rights in several respects. They were no longer able to enjoy the protection which the previous legislation afforded to holders of occupancy rights, namely the possibility of using the premises for an indefinite period in exchange for the payment of a fee, protection against eviction, the right to transmit the lease to family members other than spouses or long-term partners and the possibility of subletting, renovating or decorating the flat without the owner’s permission. Moreover, the fee was replaced by a higher non-profit rent, and the obligation to tolerate visits of the “previous owners”, and new grounds for eviction were introduced. It is also to be noted that the Constitutional Court’s decision repealing the “third model” of substitute privatisation (see paragraph 37 above) deprived the applicants of the possibility, provided for by the 1994 amendments to the Housing Act 1991, of purchasing a substitute flat on favourable terms from the municipalities. The applicants thus lost an enforceable right to acquire property at a price significantly lower than the market price, a fact that has adversely affected their substantive interests protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
182. The applicants’ financial situation and/or their ownership of other real estate could not change these conclusions, but are relevant factors in evaluating the proportionality of the interference. The Court has also examined the Government’s allegations concerning applicants nos. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez) and 6 (Mr Primož Kuret – see paragraphs 159, 160 and 163 above). It observes that the fact that Mrs Berglez allegedly refused to sign a lease contract with the “previous owners” did not, as such, affect her status as a previous holder of occupancy rights. As to Mr Kuret, even if he was not the holder of the occupancy rights, but only one of the legal users of the dwelling, the Court is of the opinion that his status as legitimate heir of the previous specially protected tenant would in principle have entitled him to have the protected tenancy transferred to him upon the demise of his father. Under these circumstances, the Court concludes that the Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 rights of applicants nos. 2 and 6 were also interfered with.
183. The Court refers to its established case-law on the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the manner in which the three rules contained in that provision are to be applied (see, among many other authorities, Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 44, ECHR 2002 IV, and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 52, ECHR 2007-III).
184. In line with that case-law, the Court considers that the interferences described above fall to be considered under the so-called third rule, relating to the State’s right “to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest” set out in the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Almeida Ferreira and Melo Ferreira v. Portugal, no. 41696/07, § 26, 21 December 2010).
185. It remains to be ascertained whether this interference complied with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) Whether the interference was justified
(i) Whether the interference was “lawful”
186. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws” (see OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos v. Russia, no. 14902/04, § 559, 20 September 2011). Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Capital Bank AD v. Bulgaria, no. 49429/99, § 133, ECHR 2005-XII (extracts), and The former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 79, ECHR 2000-XII).
187. In the present case, it is not disputed between the parties that the suppression of the specially protected tenancies and their replacement with normal lease contracts had a legal basis in domestic law, as it was provided for by the Housing Act 1991 (see paragraphs 18-23 above) and subsequent amendments to it (see paragraphs 31-43). As to the decision to repeal the “third model” of substitute privatisation, it was adopted by the Constitutional Court in a procedure prescribed by law (see paragraph 37 above).
188. The applicants, however, argued that the interference with their possessions was not lawful as at the time of the adoption of that decision (25 November 1999), Slovenia had already ratified the Revised European Social Charter, thereby incorporating it into its domestic legal order, and in 2009 the European Social Committee had found that the repeal of the “third model” was contrary to Article 31 § 1 and to Article E of the Charter (see paragraph 141 above). The Government replied that the obligations resulting from the European Social Charter were obligations of effort and not of result (see paragraph 176 above).
189. The Court recalls that in defining the meaning of terms and notions in the text of the Convention, it has on several occasions taken into account elements of international law other than the Convention, such as the European Social Charter, and the interpretation of such elements by competent organs (see, for instance, Demir and Baykara v. Turkey [GC], no. 34503/97, §§ 74-86, ECHR 2008-..). However, when requiring that a measure be “lawful”, the Convention essentially refers back to national law and states the obligation to conform to the substantive and procedural rules thereof (see, for instance and in the ambit of Article 5 § 1 of the Convention, Olymbiou v. Turkey, no. 16091/90, § 85, 27 October 2009).
190. It is also worth noting that in its decision of 8 September 2009 (see paragraphs 97-100 above), the European Committee of Social Rights emphasised that it was “clear from the actual wording of Article 31 [of the Revised Social Charter] that it cannot be interpreted as imposing on States an obligation to achieve results” and that for the situation to be in conformity with the Revised Social Charter, States Parties should, in particular, “adopt the necessary legal, financial and operational means of ensuring steady progress towards the goals laid down in the Charter” (see paragraphs 28 and 29 of the decision in question). The obligations arising from Article 31 being obligations of means and the European Committee not being vested with the power of annulling the impugned national legislation and case-law, the latter was still valid and binding in the Slovenian legal order after the adoption of the decision of 8 September 2009.
191. In the light of the above, the Court considers that the measures complained of were “lawful” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(ii) Whether the interference was “in accordance with the general interest”
192. The Court recalls that because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures to be applied in the sphere of the exercise of the right of property (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 165). The notion of “general interest” is necessarily extensive (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 166). The Court finds it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies, especially in the context of a change of political and economic regime, should be a wide one, and will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is “in the general interest” unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see, inter alia, Zvolský and Zvolská v. the Czech Republic, no. 46129/99, § 67-68 and 72, ECHR 2002-IX; Kopecký, cited above, § 35; Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 113, ECHR 2005-VI; and Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 59, 8 December 2009; see also, mutatis mutandis, The former King of Greece and Others, cited above, § 87, and Kozacioğlu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, § 53, 19 February 2009).
193. It is a matter of common knowledge that the political transition in the post-communist countries has involved numerous complex, far-reaching and controversial reforms which necessarily had to be spread over time. The dismantling of the communist heritage has been gradual, with each country having its own, sometimes slow, way of ensuring that past injustices are put right. Even though following the collapse of the totalitarian regimes those countries faced similar problems, there is, and there can be, no common pattern for the restructuring of their political, legal or social systems. Nor can any specific time-frame or speed for completing this process be fixed. Indeed, in assessing whether in a given country, considering its unique historical and political experience, “the general interest” requires the adoption of specific de-communisation measures in order to ensure greater social justice or the stability of democracy, the national legislature empowered with direct democratic legitimation is better placed than the Court (see, mutatis mutandis, Cichopek and 1,627 other applications v. Poland (dec.), nos. 15189/10 and others, §§ 143, 14 May 2013).
194. In the present case, the Court sees no reason to depart from the national authorities’ assessment that the interference in issue pursued legitimate aims, namely the promotion of social, political and economic reforms, the removal of relics of the country’s communist past in the social and economic spheres and the protection of the rights of “previous owners”. It also notes that the applicants themselves did not contest that the abolition of the specially protected tenancy and the restitution of nationalised property might have been regarded as pursuing a legitimate aim and as being in the general interest (see paragraph 142 above).
195. As to the Constitutional Court’s decision repealing the “third model” of substitute privatisation, it was justified by the need to avoid putting an additional financial burden on the municipalities’ newly acquired ownership rights over dwellings which had previously been socially owned (see paragraph 37 above). It was thus aimed at ensuring the financial well-being of local communities, a goal which falls within the notion of “general interest”.
(iii) Whether the interference was proportionate
196. It remains to be ascertained whether in implementing these reforms the State managed to strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individuals’ fundamental rights (see J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd, cited above, § 53).
(α) General principles
197. In respect of interferences which fall under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, there must exist a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see, among many other authorities, Zehentner v. Austria, no. 20082/02, § 72, 16 July 2009). Thus the balance to be maintained between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of fundamental rights is upset if the person concerned has had to bear a “disproportionate burden” (see, among many other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52; The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 December 1994, §§ 70-71, Series A no. 301-A; Brumărescu v. Romania, no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999-VII; Moskal, cited above, § 52; and Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 83, ECHR 2010-..).
198. Moreover, the principle of “good governance” requires that where an issue in the general interest is at stake it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in an appropriate manner and with utmost consistency (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 105, CEDH 2000-I; Megadat.com S.r.l. v. Moldova, no. 21151/04, § 72, 8 April 2008; and Moskal, cited above, § 51).
199. Where a measure controlling the use of property is in issue, the lack of compensation is a factor to be taken into consideration in determining whether a fair balance has been achieved, but is not of itself sufficient to constitute a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Anonymos Touristiki Etairia Xenodocheia Kritis v. Greece, no. 35332/05, § 45, 21 February 2008, and Depalle, cited above, § 91).
200. A reform of the housing system in the context of the gradual transition from State-controlled rent to a fully negotiated contractual rent during the fundamental reform of the country following the collapse of the communist regime was examined by the Court in Hutten-Czapska v. Poland (cited above, §§ 194-225), a case brought by a landlady complaining about the poor amount of the rent she was receiving under the State rent-control scheme. The Court held that the scheme was not compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 when, for purely mathematical reasons, it made it impossible for landlords to receive an income from rent or at least recover their maintenance costs. Moreover, the Polish reform provided for various restrictions on landlords’ rights in respect of the termination of leases, the statutory financial burdens imposed on them and the absence of any legal ways and means making it possible for them either to offset or to mitigate the losses incurred in connection with the maintenance of property or to have the necessary repairs subsidised by the State in justified cases (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 223-224).
201. In the case of Lindheim and Others v. Norway (nos. 13221/08 and 2139/10, 12 June 2012) the Court found that the limitations imposed by law on the level of the annual rent landowners could demand from ground lease holders (less than 0.25% of the plots’ alleged market value) and the indefinite extension of the ground lease contracts had infringed the landowners’ right of property. The Court held that albeit pursuing the legitimate aim of protecting lease holders lacking financial means and of implementing a social policy in the field of housing, the measures in issue had failed to strike a fair balance between the interests of the lessors, on the one hand, and those of the lessees, on the other hand. Notably, the level of rent was particularly low and could be adjusted only on the basis of changes in the consumer price index (thus excluding the possibility of taking into account the value of the land as a relevant factor) and the lease contracts were extended for an indefinite duration. In these circumstances, the social and financial burden involved was placed solely on the applicant lessors (see Lindheim and Others, cited above, §§ 75-78, 96-100 and 119-136).
202. The Court is of the opinion that the cases of Hutten-Czapska and Lindheim are the mirror image of the present case, in which the tenants alleged, inter alia, that the increase in rent to which they were subjected as a consequence of the housing reform was excessive. In adjudicating the merits of their complaint, the Court will have regard, among other factors, to one of the main principles expressed in Hutten-Czapska, namely that in balancing the exceptionally difficult and socially sensitive issues involved in reconciling the conflicting interests of landlords and tenants the State should ensure a “fair distribution of the social and financial burden involved in the transformation and reform of the country’s housing supply” (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 225). In Hutten-Czapska and in Lindheim, the Polish and Norwegian States violated this principle because they placed this burden almost exclusively on one particular social group, the landlords. The Court will examine whether in the present case a similar burden was placed on the tenants. In considering whether this is the case, the Court must keep in mind the particular context in which the issue arises, namely that of a reform of the housing system, which cannot but be, at least in part, the expression of society’s concern for the social protection of tenants (see Velosa Barreto v. Portugal, 21 November 1995, § 16, Series A no. 334, and Almeida Ferreira and Melo Ferreira, cited above, §§ 29 and 32; see also, mutatis mutandis and in the context of a social security scheme, Goudswaard-Van der Lans v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 75255/01, ECHR 2005 XI, and Wieczorek, cited above, § 64).
203. It is to be noted, in particular, that the Court has considered justified and proportionate several measures aimed at protecting vulnerable tenants. They included legislation entailing rent reductions (see Mellacher and Others v. Austria, 19 December 1989, § 57, Series A no. 169), a temporary suspension of the eviction of some categories of tenants (see Spadea and Scalabrino v. Italy, 28 September 1995, § 41, Series A no. 315 B) and different restrictions on the landlord’s right to terminate the lease (see Velosa Barreto, cited above, §§ 26 and 29-30, where this right was conditional on the landlord needing the premises for his or her own accommodation; Almeida Ferreira and Melo Ferreira, cited above, §§ 32-36, where the lease could not be terminated if the tenant had occupied the premises for 20 or more years; see also Crux Bixirão v. Portugal, no. 24098/94, Commission’s decision of 28 February 1996, unpublished, where the Commission found that the impossibility of terminating a rent contract when the tenant was 65 years old or older was not incompatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1).
204. As the Court stated in the case of James and Others v. the United Kingdom (21 February 1986, § 47, Series A no. 98), “[e]liminating what are judged to be social injustices is an example of the functions of a democratic legislature. More especially, modern societies consider housing of the population to be a prime social need, the regulation of which cannot entirely be left to the play of market forces. The margin of appreciation is wide enough to cover legislation aimed at securing greater social justice in the sphere of people’s homes, even where such legislation interferes with existing contractual relations between private parties and confers no direct benefit on the State or the community at large.”
(β) Application of these principles to the present case
205. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that as a result of the housing reform, in their quality of former holders of occupancy rights in denationalised dwellings the applicants had to face a general degradation of the legal protection they enjoyed in the housing field. In particular, they had to pay a non-profit rent whose amount increased over the years up to levels which some of the applicants alleged they could hardly afford, and they had no possibility of transmitting the right to live in the dwelling to family members other than the spouse or long term partner. As new fault-based grounds for eviction had been introduced, the applicants faced a higher risk of eviction and had to tolerate visits from the “previous owners”, as well as the pressures sometimes exerted by the latter in order to recover the dwellings. Furthermore, they could be moved by the landlord to another adequate flat at any time and without any reason (see paragraph 40 above).
206. The Court can accept, however, that these were somehow unavoidable consequences of the legislature’s decision to provide for a possibility of restitution in natura of dwellings which had been nationalised after the Second World War. The presence of a “previous owner” meant that his or her rights had to be secured, and this could not but result in a corresponding restriction of the rights of the persons occupying the dwellings. As pointed out by the Government (see paragraph 169 above), fixing an excessively low ceiling for rent or imposing the continuation of the lease with the tenants’ descendants, and thus for a potentially endless period of time, would have been hard to reconcile with the property rights of “previous owners” acquired through the denationalisation proceedings (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above).
207. Furthermore, the Court observes that the obligations arising from the lease contracts “previous owners” had to sign with the applicants were in substance similar to the normal and traditional duties that tenants have vis-à-vis landlords. This is true, in particular, of the obligation not to cause major damage to the dwelling, not to disturb other residents, not to perform prohibited activities in the flat, not to change the dwelling and fixtures, not to sublet and not to allow new people to use the dwelling without the prior consent of the owner (see paragraph 21 above). The Court considers that the fact that such obligations were imposed on the applicants in the process of transition into a market economy cannot, as such, be contrary to the Convention or its Protocols.
208. In addition to that, it is worth noting that the applicants enjoyed and continue to enjoy, more than 22 years after the enactment of the Housing Act 1991, special protection which goes beyond that usually afforded to tenants’ rights. In particular, the lease contracts were concluded for an indefinite period (see paragraph 19 above) and were transmissible, also for an indefinite period, to the spouse or long term partner of the tenant (see paragraph 69 above). The latter did not have to pay a full market rent, but only an administratively-determined non-profit rent, meant to cover only the depreciation, management and routine maintenance of the dwelling and the cost of the capital invested (see paragraphs 79-86 above). It is shown by the data submitted by the Government (see paragraph 239 below), and not contested by the applicants, that they were paying sums comprised between EUR 49.16 and EUR 280.78 per month and that in spite of a market rental price of between EUR 6 and EUR 11 per square metre, the applicants were charged between EUR 1.13 and EUR 3.33 per square metre. The Court concludes that the non-profit rent imposed on the applicants was significantly lower than the rents charged on the free market, and that the fact that they still enjoyed such favourable terms more than 22 years after the enactment of the housing reform shows that the transition to a market economy was conducted in a reasonable and progressive manner. Moreover, none of the applicants has shown that the level of the non-profit rent was excessive in relation to his or her income.
209. It is true that in April 1994 former holders of specially protected tenancy in denationalised dwellings were given the possibility of purchasing a substitute dwelling from the municipalities under very favourable financial terms under the so-called “third model” of substitute privatisation (see paragraph 35 above) and that this possibility was abolished by the Constitutional Court in November 1999 (see paragraph 37 above). However, the Court notes that, as underlined by the Government (see paragraph 125 above) and not contested by the applicants, none of the latter filed a valid and complete request to purchase a substitute dwelling during the five years and seven months which elapsed before the Constitutional Court’s decision. It is true that for applicants nos. 1 and 10, this failure might be explained by the length of the denationalisation and inheritance proceedings (see paragraphs 223 and 232 above); this, however, does not apply to the other applicants who, in the Court’s opinion, have not provided any convincing explanation capable of justifying their omission.
210. Moreover, it cannot be overlooked that the domestic legal system was contemplating several measures other than the “third model” aimed at protecting vulnerable tenants. In particular, the first and second models of substitute privatisation were contemplating, respectively, a public financial reward for “previous owners” willing to sell their flats to former holders of occupancy rights (see paragraph 33 above) and compensation of up to 80 per cent of the administrative value of the dwelling for tenants who agreed to move out and purchase a flat or build a house (see paragraph 34 above). In addition to that, rent subsidies (up to 80 per cent of the non-profit rent) were available to tenants in financial difficulties, socially disadvantaged people could apply to obtain another non-profit rental dwelling (see paragraph 41 above) and special compensation (up to 74 per cent of the administrative value of the dwelling) and a subsidised loan were available to tenants who exercised their right to purchase another dwelling or build a house (see paragraph 42 above). Some of the applicants did obtain non-refundable sums and soft loans under these schemes (see paragraphs 241-251 below).
(c) Conclusion
211. In the light of the above, the Court considers that in balancing the exceptionally difficult and socially sensitive issues involved in reconciling the conflicting interests of “previous owners” and tenants, the respondent State has ensured a distribution of the social and financial burden involved in the housing reform which has not exceeded its margin of appreciation.
212. Accordingly, even assuming it to be applicable to the facts of the present case, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has not been violated.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
213. The applicants alleged that they had been deprived of their homes in breach of Article 8 of the Convention.
This provision reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
(a) General remarks
214. The applicants basically relied on the same reasons put forward under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They argued that by losing their specially protected tenancy, they had been deprived not only of their property but also of their homes. The changes in the leases had further restricted their rights and the new entitlements of the “previous owners” had jeopardised their situation, especially as the non-profit rent had been rising to levels that many of them could hardly afford, exposing them to the risk of eviction for overdue rent. They complained about various forms of chicanery, intimidation and lawsuits on the part of the “previous owners”.
215. The applicants noted that both in 1991 (beginning of the housing reform) and in 1994 (date of Slovenia’s ratification of the Convention) the denationalised dwellings in which they resided constituted their “homes” and the homes of their families. When they and their families had moved into the dwellings and formed a home there, they had done so in good faith and trusting in the permanence and the transferability mortis causa of the occupancy right. At the time of Slovenia’s ratification of the Convention, the specially protected tenancy had already been transformed into a lease; however, this lease was transferable after death to family members, with a fixed ceiling of non-profit rent. “Previous owners” could terminate the lease only on regulated fault-based grounds. This legislation properly protected the Article 8 rights of the applicants and their families.
216. However, the subsequent evolution of the rules on occupancy and the increase in rents forced former holders of occupancy rights either to leave their existing homes or to stay there under worse terms. Indeed, their situation had significantly worsened in the following respects: (a) since 1996, “previous owners” could terminate the lease and evict the tenant if they provided him or her with another suitable dwelling (see paragraph 40 above); (b) since 1995 the structure and ceiling of the non-profit rent had changed in such a manner that it had risen to more than 600% of its initial value and every authority now had the power to arbitrarily raise the ceiling; (c) in 2003 new grounds for eviction had been added, including the ownership of another suitable dwelling, irrespective of whether it was empty and whether moving would entail a fundamental deterioration of the residents’ status (see paragraph 40 above); (d) since 2005 mortis causa transferability of the lease to family members had de facto been excluded (see paragraphs 68-70 above); (e) the “previous owner” was given the right to enter the dwelling twice a year and refusal of entry became a ground for eviction (see paragraph 23 above); (f) in general, there was an essentially limited possibility of freely founding a family home in existing housing, there were limitations on the possibility of using and arranging the dwelling in conformity with one’s own needs and wishes, and a threat of eviction was established, causing permanent distress. The applicants argued that the guarantees afforded by Article 8 should not be understood as only covering the right to a dwelling, but as protecting the status of an individual in his or her existing home.
217. The leasing relationship imposed by the State was unbearable not only for the former holders of occupancy rights but also for the “previous owners”, who were limited in their disposal of the returned real estate. This created personal and judicial disputes as “previous owners” massively and understandably used all legal possibilities to evict the former holders of occupancy rights and their families. Under these circumstances, the latter tried to solve their housing problem by moving out of their existing dwellings. The situation had become so unbearable that moving became a lesser evil than staying in the dwelling.
218. The case of Sorić v. Croatia, cited by the Government (paragraph 233 below), was different from the present case in that it concerned a tenant of a private dwelling who had been a tenant ab initio (and not a former holder of specially protected tenancy). The Court had held that even if eviction had not been executed, the threat of eviction was a measure relevant within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention (Larkos, cited above, § 28). The same should apply to all actions imputable to the State that effectively limited the protection and free use of an existing home.
219. The applicants considered that the interference with their right to respect for their home was not lawful, for the same reasons put forward under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (paragraph 141 above).
220. The Government essentially argued that the measures complained of were aimed at protecting the “previous owners”. The applicants could accept that this was a legitimate aim. However, they alleged that the measures in issue were not “necessary in a democratic society”. In this connection, they recalled that when a “home” was established lawfully, this factor would weigh against the legitimacy of requiring the individual to move. Moreover, removal of an applicant from his or her home was more serious where no suitable alternative existed; the more suitable the alternative accommodation, the less serious the interference with the existing accommodation. The evaluation of the suitability of the alternative accommodation would also involve consideration of the particular needs of the person concerned (see Coster v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 24876/94, §§ 116-118, 18 January 2001).
221. In the present case, there was no “pressing social need” to reduce the legal protection of former holders of specially protected tenancy. In its case-law, the Court accepted a number of limitations of landlords’ rights which were aimed at ensuring the social protection of tenants. Slovenia, on the other hand, had enacted a number of measures in order to provide “previous owners” with stronger protection than was required under the Convention. Moreover, the interferences complained of were not proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued (the protection of the “previous owners”), especially after the abolition of the “third model”.
(b) Remarks concerning the individual applicants
222. The applicants provided the following details, in particular, about their individual situations.
223. Applicant no. 1 (Mrs Cornelia Berger-Krall) had been unable to reach an agreement on the reimbursement of investments with the “previous owners”; an administrative authority had awarded her a little less than EUR 5,000 in this respect. As the denationalisation proceedings were still pending in November 1999, she had not been able to benefit from the “third model”; having no means to buy another dwelling on the free market, she had decided to stay in her existing dwelling on a contractual lease.
224. Applicant no. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez) considered that the Government’s observations on her case were, in substance, a copy of the arguments and allegations made before the domestic courts by the “previous owners”. She had inherited a specially protected tenancy from her late mother in 1991. The denationalisation decision of the Municipality of Maribor of 16 April 1993 stated, inter alia, that the “previous owners” had to conclude a lease contract with her. They never did so, but continued to charge rent. When applicant no. 2 was evicted in 2000, her lawyer had filed a lawsuit to have a lease contract drawn up; this legal action was dismissed as it had been filed against a “previous owner” who had died some months earlier. A new lawsuit was rejected in 2011 as time-barred and because applicant no. 2 had meanwhile received public financial assistance. Contrary to what the Government and the “previous owners” asserted, Mrs Berglez had never refused to sign a lease and the allegations of wrongful behaviour on her part (keeping flammable material, endangering other residents of the building, lack of maintenance of the flat) had never been proven. The Slovenian courts themselves had found that the forceful eviction of the applicant was an arbitrary and unlawful action. It was not true that the applicant had given false information to the Court. Mrs Berglez had inherited agricultural land of negligible value (approximately EUR 15,000) from her parents. Since her eviction in 2000, she had been living on the verge of poverty, moving to different flats rented on the free market and student rooms. Eleven years later the agricultural land she had inherited had been classified as building land, its value had shot up and Mrs Berglez had been able to sell it and buy a 65 m² flat in Maribor, which was worse and smaller than her previous home.
225. Because of the chicanery of the “previous owners”, in 1999 applicant no. 3 (Mrs Ivanka Bertoncelj) had decided to leave her dwelling and take advantage of the “third model”; however, this model had been repealed and Mrs Bertoncelj, who had no financial means, could not afford to purchase another dwelling on the free market. She had reached an agreement with the “previous owners” only to obtain reimbursement of her investments. Applicant no. 3 had gone through severe emotional distress and needed psychiatric help. Because of the pressures exerted on her, she had left her dwelling and settled in a flat that her daughter had purchased.
226. Applicant no. 4 (Mrs Slavica Jerančič) stressed that, as pointed out by the Government, the requests she was receiving from the “previous owners” lacked any foundation under national law; she had nevertheless been a victim of everyday chicanery and pressure which had led her to seek psychiatric help, and had finally decided to move out of her dwelling. The apartment in Kamnik of which she owned half was worse than her previous home; it was significantly smaller and was located in a totally new environment in a different town. Because of her age and the change of environment, Mrs Jerančič had started suffering from depression; she had tried to commit suicide and had been hospitalised for four months in a psychiatric clinic. Subsequently, from 2008 onwards, a friend who was aware of her problems had offered her the use of an empty flat in Ljubljana free of charge.
227. Applicant no. 5 (Mrs Ema Kugler) had not had any problems with the “previous owners” and had not seen any need to leave her dwelling. It was only the selling of her home to new owners that had triggered a number of disputes, while at the same time the “third model” had been abrogated. She had obtained the reimbursement of investments in the administratively determined amount of EUR 3,000.
228. Applicant no. 6 (Mr Primož Kuret) was not the original holder of the specially protected tenancy. The original holder was his late father, Mr Niko Kuret, who died on 25 January 1995 and with whom the applicant had been living. Until 2005 the right to purchase a returned dwelling and the right to a lease had been transferable mortis causa to close family members. After the death of his father, applicant no. 6 had wanted to remain in the premises and had accordingly insisted on signing a lease contract. At the end of 1999 he learned that the “third model” had been repealed and that he could no longer purchase a substitute dwelling on favourable conditions. However, after two favourable judgments, in 2005 the Supreme Court had reversed the existing case-law and decided that users of denationalised flats could not demand the continuation of a non-profit lease following the demise of the tenant (paragraph 68 above). This meant that Mr Niko Kuret’s family had unjustifiably used the dwelling for more than ten years and that the “previous owners” could require them to pay a market rent for that period (a claim which would amount to at least DEM 150,000 plus interest). If such a request had been filed, the applicant and his wife – who had two dependent children – would have gone bankrupt. In 2009 the Constitutional Court confirmed the new case-law of the Supreme Court, to the detriment of the applicant (paragraph 69 above). Under the circumstances, Mr Kuret chose the lesser evil of a friendly settlement with the “previous owner”. He vacated the premises and, being unable to afford a dwelling in the capital, he moved out of Ljubljana.
229. Applicant no. 7 (Mr Drago Logar) had been unable to contact the “previous owners”, and therefore had not known whether they wished to sell the dwelling. For this reason, he had been unable to take advantage of the “third model” before the end of 1999. After 2006 it became clear that the “previous owners” did not intend to sell and that they wished to evict Mr Logar. After a few years of dispute, the “previous owners” offered Mr Logar the reimbursement of his investments plus interest provided that he moved out of the dwelling. Mr Logar accepted this proposal and obtained a public financial contribution under the so-called “second model” of substitute privatisation.
230. Applicant no. 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč) owned a flat in Piran, which was a holiday house. She explained that by a judgment of the Ljubljana District Court of 12 May 2009 (upheld by a higher court on 6 January 2010), she had been ordered to vacate the premises she was occupying in Ljubljana. Execution proceedings had started in the summer of 2010 and since then Mrs Marguč had been living in constant fear of being evicted from her home. Should this happen, she would have to choose between homelessness and moving to the flat in Piran, which would mean losing her job. She had needed psychiatric help.
231. Applicant no. 9 (Mr Dušan Milič) had been unable to benefit from the “third model” because the denationalisation proceedings concerning his dwelling had been pending until 2005. He had decided to move out two years later and to solve his housing problem elsewhere. Notwithstanding some savings and loans from acquaintances and relatives, Mr Milič could not afford to pay a substantial part of the purchase price of his new dwelling and had therefore not been able to enter it in the land register.
232. Applicant no. 10 (Mrs Dolores Zalar) had been unable to take advantage of the “third model” because until 1999 it had not been clear who the “previous owners” were (inheritance proceedings concerning the deceased denationalisation owners were still pending) and whether they wished to sell the dwelling. Subsequently, she had agreed with the “previous owners” that she would vacate the premises and that they would pay her EUR 50,000 for her investments. By severely sacrificing her own savings, obtaining a loan from a commercial bank (on more favourable terms than the State loan) and with the financial help of her daughter, Mrs Zalar had solved her housing problem by buying a property outside Ljubljana. This property was not composed of two separate residential buildings (as wrongly stated by the Government – paragraph 251 below), but of one building only, for which the total floor space and the internal surface had been recorded separately.
2. The Government
(a) General remarks
233. The Government stressed that Article 8 of the Convention did not include the right to buy a home, but only protected a person’s right to respect for his or her present home (see Sorić, decision cited above). As the SZ protected the legal status of former holders of occupancy rights, by guaranteeing them tenancy for an indefinite period and a non-profit rent, the applicants’ direct possession of the dwellings was not in any way disturbed by the impugned provisions. As the Constitutional Court pointed out, the holders of occupancy rights and their spouses and close family members had the right to continue to live in denationalised dwellings in conditions comparable to those in other European countries (paragraph 65 above).
234. For the applicants the SZ maintained all the entitlements provided for under the previous arrangement. The continuation of the non-profit tenancy by close family members of the former holder of the occupancy right was excluded (paragraph 69 above) as it would have placed an excessive burden on the “previous owners”. Ownership of another dwelling had also been a ground for termination of the lease under the previous regulation and it would have been disproportionate to impose a protected tenancy and a non-profit rent where the tenant had other suitable accommodation at his or her disposal.
235. Under the laws of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia there was no guarantee that the holder of the occupancy right would have been able to live in the same dwelling permanently or that the occupancy relationship would remain unchanged. Under Article 106 of SZ-1 (paragraph 40 above) the protection of the tenant was greater, as the “previous owner” could terminate the lease without justifiable reasons only once with the same tenant, and was obliged to provide him or her with another suitable dwelling. The legal notions of “suitable dwelling” and “justifiable reason” were meant to strike a fair balance between the general interest on the one hand and the protection of the tenant’s and “previous owner’s” rights on the other.
236. In response to the applicants’ submissions about the non-profit rent covering not only the actual rent plus maintenance costs on the dwelling but also the reimbursement of capital costs, thus allowing the “previous owners” to make a profit, and about the changes in the formula for calculating the non-profit rent to their detriment, the Government recalled the method for calculating the non-profit rent (paragraphs 79-86 above) and underlined that, as pointed out by the Constitutional Court, the national legislation was not supposed to guarantee the permanence and stability of non-profit rents. The dwelling’s value was determined administratively, which meant independently from its market value and, thanks to the legislative formula for calculating it, the non-profit rent had effectively remained unchanged throughout the relevant period. It did not guarantee a profit for the “previous owner”, but covered the cost of any loan or capital the “previous owner” invested in the renovation of the dwelling.
237. The Government objected that the applicants’ allegation of a 700% increase in the non-profit rent was incorrect. Even if it was true that the “point value” had increased, it should not be overlooked that the value of the point depended on the average cost of construction and the estimated average cost of serviced land, thus taking into account the movement of prices in the market. Otherwise, the non-profit rent would have had no connection with maintenance costs, which would then have had to be borne by the “previous owners”. As in the last twenty years economic standards, prices and salary levels had changed, it would be unrealistic to expect the non-profit rent to remain unchanged. Non-profit rents had increased from 1.88% of the value of the dwelling in 1990 to a maximum of 4.68% of the value of the dwelling by 2012. This increase represented a 148% increase in rents. As salaries had also increased, in 1990 the rent for an average two-room dwelling amounted to 7.30% of the average salary, while in 2012 it was 14.70% of it. This meant that rents had only increased by about 100% in real terms (and not by 700%). Furthermore, non-profit rents were substantially lower than market rents.
238. In view of the above, the Government considered that any purported interference with the applicants’ right to respect for their homes had been in accordance with the law, pursued a legitimate aim and was necessary in a democratic society. In fact, a fair balance had been struck between the applicants’ rights under Article 8 of the Convention and the rights of the “previous owners”, protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) Remarks concerning the situation of individual applicants
239. According to the Government’s data, the current non-profit rents paid by the applicants (or which the applicants would be paying had they continued to live in the dwellings) were the following:
- Applicant no. 1 (Mrs Cornelia Berger-Krall): EUR 178.73 (EUR 1.73 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 10 per m²);
- Applicant no. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez): EUR 204.09 (EUR 1.93 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 6 per m²);
- Applicant no. 3 (Mrs Ivanka Bertoncelj): EUR 132.83 (EUR 1.17 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 10 per m²);
- Applicant no. 4 (Mrs Slavica Jerančič): EUR 161.61 (EUR 1.42 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 11 per m²);
- Applicant no. 5 (Mrs Ema Kugler): EUR 49.16 (EUR 1.13 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 11 per m²);
- Applicant no. 6 (Mr Primož Kuret): EUR 149.12 (EUR 1.75 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 10 per m²);
- Applicant no. 7 (Mr Drago Logar): EUR 280.78 (EUR 1.87 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 11 per m²);
- Applicant no. 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč): EUR 154.85 (EUR 1.32 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 10 per m²);
- Applicant no. 9 (Mr Dušan Milič): EUR 229.67 (EUR 3.33 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 10 per m²);
- Applicant no. 10 (Mrs Dolores Zalar): EUR 170.93 (EUR 1.41 per m²; estimated market rent: EUR 11 per m²).
240. Former holders of occupancy rights who found themselves in financial difficulty could apply for rent subsidies or the allocation of another non-profit dwelling; however, none of the applicants had applied for such benefits and none of them – with the exception of applicant no. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez) – had ever been recipients of welfare benefits. If they considered that their non-profit rent had not been calculated in accordance with the law, the applicants could have requested a review of its level and – if need be – a reduction of the rent and the repayment of overpaid rent.
241. The Government further observed that it was not established that applicant no. 1 (Mrs Cornelia Berger-Krall) had ever requested the “previous owners” to remedy defects in the dwelling. Moreover, she had failed to institute judicial proceedings requesting the “previous owners” to carry out maintenance work (Section 92 of SZ) in order to make the dwelling suitable for normal use. In a decision of 29 November 2010 the Ljubljana Court had ordered the said “previous owners” to pay applicant no. 1 compensation for the investments she had made in the dwelling. Lastly, the husband of applicant no. 1 was the owner of a vineyard cottage and the co-owner of a 91 m² residential building. As a family member of applicant no. 1 owned property suitable for occupation, the applicant was no longer entitled to “protected tenant” status.
242. In response to the allegation of applicant no. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez) that on 8 September 2000 the “previous owners” had broken into her dwelling and emptied it while she was away, the Government noted that the “previous owners” had an interim eviction order to carry out urgent maintenance work requested by the Environment and Spatial Planning Inspectorate. Applicant no. 2 was using the dwelling in a way that was putting other residents in the building at risk, notably by keeping flammable materials in the attic. Mrs Berglez, who according to the Government had on several occasions been offered the keys of the place where her furniture was being held, had lodged an action for trespassing; in 2007 the Maribor Higher Court upheld her claim and on 25 August 2008 the Maribor Local Court issued an enforcement order which at the time of introduction of the application had not yet been complied with, as the “previous owners” had objected that in 2000 applicant no. 2 did not have any right to be living in the dwelling. Applicant no. 2 alleged that because of the behaviour of the “previous owners”, since September 2000 she had been forced to rent alternative accommodation, a fact which had placed her in financial difficulties. The Government could confirm that applicant no. 2 had never concluded a lease contract with the provisional public owner and had thus never become a protected tenant; her use of the dwelling had been unlawful or not based on a legal title. The two actions filed by Mrs Berglez to force the “previous owners” to sign a lease contract had failed on procedural grounds and because applicant no. 2 had purchased a two-room dwelling in Maribor in the meantime (on 26 November 2010) and had thus resolved her housing issue. The Government further noted that applicant no. 2 had been receiving welfare benefits, that she had inherited a large estate from her father, that on 16 May 2011 she had obtained the non-refundable sum of EUR 38,752.08 and that she had been granted a soft loan of EUR 28,774.92 by the National Housing Fund, which she did not use to buy the two-room dwelling in Maribor.
243. In their observations of 13 July 2012, the Government provided additional information concerning the circumstances of applicant no. 2. They noted that she had purchased a dwelling worth EUR 65,000; as she had received only EUR 38,752.08 from the State, it could be deduced that the land she had inherited had been sold for more than its estimated value (EUR 15,000). Three of the plots were building sites; therefore, the applicant’s allegation that the inherited property consisted only of agricultural land of the poorest quality was false. The new dwelling was acquired on 26 November 2006, while the State financial support was not transferred to the applicant’s account until 16 May 2011. As Mrs Berglez did not indicate that she had obtained a loan, it could be inferred that she had sufficient financial means to purchase the dwelling. Finally, it was worth noting that in 1993 the manager of the building had started proceedings against applicant no. 2 for non-payment of rent between April and September 1992, which was a ground for terminating the tenancy relationship.
244. The Government further responded as follows to the allegations of applicants nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. Applicant no. 3 (Mrs Ivanka Bertoncelj) alleged that the dwelling had been completely renovated by her husband three times, in 1958, 1969 and 1984. The “previous owner” had allegedly exerted pressure on applicant no. 3 – through her lawyer and by hiring detectives – to get her to move out of the dwelling, and had refused to authorise repairs. The “previous owner” had eventually filed a lawsuit against applicant no. 3, which was rejected on formal grounds (the “previous owners” had already sold the dwelling and therefore had lost legal interest in the case). The new owners subsequently requested the termination of the lease, claiming that they needed the dwelling for their son and his family. These proceedings ended with a court settlement in 2005. Applicant no. 3 vacated the premises and waived all her claims for the recovery of investments; in exchange, she received compensation in the amount of EUR 100,000. Mrs Bertoncelj allegedly later discovered that she had been deceived by the buyers: the dwelling was not for use by their son, but had been connected to their own flat. The Government observed that Mrs Bertoncelj had never started proceedings with a view to having maintenance work done and normal living conditions restored in the dwelling, nor had she introduced an action for trespassing or obstructive conduct. Lastly, applicant no. 3 had never received any welfare benefits and had failed to apply for a subsidised non-profit rent.
245. Applicant no. 4 (Mrs Slavica Jerančič) alleged that the dwelling needed renovation and that the new owner who had bought the property was inspecting the dwelling twice a year, had asked her to pay a normal rent and to put certain deficiencies right and had threatened her with lawsuits. The pressure exerted by the owner was such that Mrs Jerančič had eventually vacated the premises. The Government observed that tenants in denationalised dwellings were protected by the legislation from payment of an excessive rent and that alleged inadequate use of the dwelling did not constitute a ground for termination of the lease. In any event, no such lawsuits had been filed by the owner against applicant no. 4. The applicant was the co-owner of an 83 m² dwelling in Kamnik built in 2006 and suitable for living in. Finally, applicant no. 4 had never received any welfare benefits and had failed to apply for a subsidised non-profit rent; she had never submitted a claim for the reimbursement of investments made in the dwelling.
246. Applicant no. 5 (Mrs Ema Kugler) complained about the poor condition of the dwelling and about the conduct of a new owner who had bought part of the building in 1999 and started construction work and asked Mrs Kugler to move out. The Government observed that in its decision of 14 January 2002 the Environment and Spatial Planning Inspectorate noted that Mrs Kugler had failed to prove her eligibility to use some common areas in which the work had been done. Moreover, the applicant had not lodged an action for trespassing against the owner, or an action to put an end to the disturbances allegedly caused by the work. The work had ended, at the latest, by the middle of 2003, which was more than six months before the introduction of the application before the Court (15 March 2004). Two lawsuits lodged by the owner to force applicant no. 5 to vacate the premises (on the basis of the invalidity of the lease agreement, non-payment of the rent and the housing needs of the owner) were unsuccessful. These proceedings lasted respectively one year and five months and two years and two months at two levels of jurisdiction. Lastly, applicant no. 5 had never received any welfare benefits and had failed to apply for a subsidised non-profit rent; the “previous owners” had had to pay her compensation for the investments made in the dwelling.
247. Applicant no. 6 (Mr Primož Kuret) had filed an action against the “previous owner” of the dwelling to secure a lease for a non-profit rent. The Supreme Court dismissed the action, considering that the rent should be a normal market rent (paragraph 68 above). On 17 March 2006 Mr Kuret struck an agreement with the “previous owner”; however, the increased rent and the legal costs had allegedly become unbearable, and applicant no. 6 and his family had left the building in July 2006. The Government argued that applicant no. 6 had lost his victim status by entering into an agreement with the “previous owner” which explicitly and conclusively settled all the issues between them (paragraph 77 above). Moreover, applicant no. 6 had never received any welfare benefits and had failed to request a subsidised non-profit rent.
248. Applicant no. 7 (Mr Drago Logar) alleged that he had completely renovated the dwelling; in June 1994, he was informed that the dwelling had been returned to “previous owners”. From that date until 2006 he had no contact with the “previous owners” and the bills for payment of the non-profit rent stopped coming. As a result, he stopped paying the rent but continued to carry out ordinary maintenance of the dwelling. In April 2006 the “previous owners” asked applicant no. 7 to vacate the dwelling, but no such claim was registered in the Ljubljana District Court. The Government observed that Mr Logar never requested to purchase a substitute dwelling; he never applied for subsidies for non-profit rent, but on 27 October 2011 he received the non-refundable sum of EUR 53,276.42, and he was granted a soft loan of EUR 89,223.57 by the National Housing Fund. Without using this loan, Mr Logar purchased a dwelling of 82 m² in Ljubljana. Finally, by a decision of 7 March 2011, the Ljubljana Administrative Unit ordered the “previous owners” to pay the applicant compensation for the investments in the dwelling.
249. Applicant no. 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč) and her husband bought a holiday home of about 50 m² in Piran. The “previous owner” of the dwelling she was occupying in Ljubljana then started proceedings for the termination of the lease, on the ground that Mrs Marguč possessed another adequate dwelling. Applicant no. 8 challenged this action, alleging that the holiday home had no heating and no thermal insulation, and was therefore not adequate for living during the winter season. The first-instance court allowed the claim of the “previous owner” and rescinded the lease; it held, in particular, that the Piran home’s shortcomings were the result of Mrs Marguč’s subjective decisions and could easily be overcome by installing insulation and heating. The first-instance court also took into account the fact that the applicant and her husband were employed and that the home in Piran was above-standard property by reason of its elite location. The proceedings were currently pending before the Supreme Court. Applicant no. 8 had never received any financial assistance and had not applied for a subsidised non-profit rent; she had submitted a claim for the reimbursement of investments in the dwelling, but had failed to follow it up.
250. Applicant no. 9 (Mr Dušan Milič) had failed to substantiate his allegations of “daily harassment” by the “previous owners” of the dwelling. Moreover, he was unsuccessful in his claim that the building in which he was living had been built in 1987 and therefore could not have been confiscated from the legal predecessor: it appeared from the Ljubljana Local Court’s judgment of 11 June 2002 that the building in question, confiscated in 1949, had only been renovated – and not newly built – in 1987. The “previous owners” were also ordered to pay SIT 400,000 (approximately EUR 1,670) to applicant no. 9, representing the revaluation of the 20% participation paid by Mr Milič for the acquisition of the occupancy right. Lastly, on 28 June 2007 he had obtained the non-refundable sum of EUR 45,975.98.
251. Applicant no. 10 (Mrs Dolores Zalar) had failed to establish that she had filed two actions against the “previous owners”: one for failure to maintain the dwelling and the other for the establishment of her right to continue to reside there (this latter action was not necessary, as the change in ownership had no effect on her rights as a tenant). Having paid the non-profit rent to the custodian of the denationalised property, applicant no. 10 could easily have defended herself against further potential financial claims from the “previous owners”. At Mrs Zalar’s request, the Environment and Spatial Planning Inspectorate ordered the “previous owners” to replace the windows of the dwelling. Applicant no. 10 could have used the same procedure to solve the problems of poor maintenance of the chimney and the roof. She had never applied for subsidies for non-profit rent, but on 27 October 2011 she had received the non-refundable sum of EUR 32,262.99 and was granted a soft loan of EUR 72,737.02 by the National Housing Fund. Without using this loan, Mrs Zalar had purchased two pieces of residential property (one measuring 84 m² and the other 148 m²); she had also filed a claim for the recovery of the investments in the dwelling she was occupying, but had later withdrawn it.
3. The third-party intervener
252. The IUT observed that the applicants should have enjoyed protection under Article 8 of the Convention. However, they had been deprived of their rights in relation to existing housing in a way which was incompatible with that provision.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. The applicants’ victim status
253. In its decision of 28 May 2013 on the admissibility of the application (paragraph 263), the Court specified that at the merits stage it would address the question of whether those applicants who voluntarily vacated the premises could still claim to be “victims”, under Article 34 of the Convention, of the facts complained of under Article 8 of the Convention.
254. In this connection, the Court reiterates that once an eviction order has been issued it amounts to an interference with the right to respect for the home, irrespective of whether it has yet been executed (see Ćosić v. Croatia, no. 28261/06, § 18, 15 January 2009, and Gladysheva v. Russia, no. 7097/10, § 91, 6 December 2011; see also, mutatis mutandis, Stanková v. Slovakia, no. 7205/02, § 57, 9 October 2007). By way of contrast, an applicant who moved out of the apartment without any steps having been taken with a view to evicting him or her cannot claim to be a victim of an alleged breach of his or her right to respect for the home (see, mutatis mutandis, Liepājnieks, decision cited above, §§ 88 and 109).
255. In the present case, according to the information submitted by the applicants and the Government (see paragraphs 225, 226, 229, 231, 232, 244, 245, 248 and 251 above), five applicants, namely nos. 3 (Mrs Ivanka Bertoncelj), 4 (Mrs Slavica Jerančič), 7 (Mr Drago Logar), 9 (Mr Dušan Milič) and 10 (Mrs Dolores Zalar) voluntarily vacated the premises before any eviction order was issued. Under these circumstances, and notwithstanding their allegations that pressure had been exerted by the “previous owners”, the Court considers that these applicants lack victim status within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention.
256. By contrast, applicant no. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez) was evicted in 2000 (see paragraph 224 above) and an eviction order was issued against applicant no. 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč) in May 2009 (see paragraphs 230 and 249 above). These applicants can therefore claim to be “victims” of the alleged violation of their right to respect for their homes. The same applies to applicant no. 6 (Mr Primož Kuret); although no formal eviction order seems to have been issued against him, he decided to vacate the flat he was occupying in Ljubljana only when the judgment given by the Supreme Court made it clear that he was not entitled to continue the lease contract signed by his late father and thus had no title to occupy the premises (see paragraphs 228 and 247 above).
257. According to the information available to the Court (see paragraphs 223 and 246 above), the two remaining applicants, nos. 1 (Mrs Cornelia Berger-Krall) and 5 (Mrs Ema Kugler), are still occupying their dwellings on the basis of a contractual lease. No eviction order has been issued against them and they essentially confined themselves to alleging a “risk of eviction”.
258. The Court reiterates that Article 34 of the Convention “requires that an individual applicant should claim to have been actually affected by the violation he or she alleges. It does not institute for individuals a kind of actio popularis for the interpretation of the Convention; it does not permit individuals to complain against a law in abstracto simply because they feel it contravenes the Convention. In principle, it does not suffice for an individual applicant to claim that the mere existence of a law violates his rights under the Convention; it is necessary that the law should have been applied to his detriment” (see Klass and Others v. Germany, 6 September 1978, § 33, Series A no. 28). This principle also applies to decisions that are allegedly contrary to the Convention (see Fairfield v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 24790/04, ECHR 2005-VI). Moreover, the exercise of the right of individual petition cannot be used to prevent a potential violation of the Convention: in theory, the Court cannot examine a violation other than a posteriori, once that violation has occurred. It is only in highly exceptional circumstances that an applicant may nevertheless claim to be a victim of a violation of the Convention owing to the risk of a future violation (see, for instance, Association for European Integration and Human Rights and Ekimdzhiev v. Bulgaria, no. 62540/00, §§ 58-62, 28 June 2007, and Noël Narvii Tauira and 18 Others v. France, application no. 28204/95, Commission decision of 4 December 1995, Decisions and Reports (DR) 83-B, p. 112).
259. In the present case, in the absence of any formal decision from a public body ordering the eviction of applicants nos. 1 and 5, the Court considers that a purely hypothetical and future risk that such a decision may be adopted is not sufficient to confer victim status on the said applicants within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention. In this connection, it is also worth noting that according to the information submitted by the Government (see paragraph 246 above) and not contested by the applicants, the two lawsuits lodged by the “previous owner” to evict Mrs Kugler were unsuccessful.
260. In the light of the above, the Court considers that the complaints of applicants nos. 1 (Mrs Cornelia Berger-Krall), 3 (Mrs Ivanka Bertoncelj), 4 (Mrs Slavica Jerančič), 5 (Mrs Ema Kugler), 7 (Mr Drago Logar), 9 (Mr Dušan Milič) and 10 (Mrs Dolores Zalar) are incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
261. It remains to be ascertained whether the Article 8 rights of the remaining applicants (nos. 2, 6 and 8 – Mrs Ljudmila Berglez, Mr Primož Kuret and Mrs Dunja Marguč) have been violated in the present case.
2. Whether there was interference with the right to respect for the home
262. The Court recalls that in its decision of 28 May 2013 on the admissibility of the application (paragraph 149), it considered that in so far as the Government referred to the particular circumstances of individual applicants (notably, their entitlement to occupy the flats they live in, their ownership of other real estate, their financial situation and/or the financial grants received by them – see paragraphs 242, 243, 247 and 249 above), these issues were relevant considerations in assessing whether there was interference with the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 8 of the Convention and, in the affirmative, whether this interference was proportionate and necessary in a democratic society.
263. The Court first notes that disputes have arisen as to the entitlement of applicants nos. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez) and 6 (Mr Primož Kuret) to occupy the premises. In the case of Mrs Berglez, no formal lease agreement was signed with the “previous owners”; the parties disagree as to the reasons for this (see paragraphs 224 and 242 above). In any event, the Court observes that Mrs Berglez obtained a specially protected tenancy from her late mother in 1991 and that she continued to live in the dwelling and to pay rent until 2000, when she was evicted (see paragraph 224 above). It was only some ten years later that, allegedly because of the increase in value of land she had inherited, she was able to purchase a 65 m² flat in Maribor (see paragraphs 224 and 243 above). Under these circumstances, the Court considers that the eviction order interfered with her right to respect for her home.
264. As to Mr Kuret, even after his late father’s demise on 25 January 1995 he had continued to reside in the flat in respect of which his father had held a specially protected tenancy (see paragraph 228 above). Until 2005 the existing case-law allowed the transferability mortis causa of occupancy rights to cohabiting close family members (see paragraphs 68 and 228 above). The Court is accordingly of the opinion that the applicant had a legitimate expectation of signing a lease agreement with the “previous owners”. Not until April 2005, when that expectation was frustrated by a reversal of case-law (see paragraph 68 above), did Mr Kuret – also in order to avoid the risk of being asked to pay arrears of rent at the free-market rate – envisage reaching a friendly settlement with the “previous owner” and resolve his housing needs by moving out of Ljubljana (see paragraph 228 in fine, above). Under these circumstances, the Court is of the opinion that the decision of the Supreme Court of 21 April 2005 interfered with Mr Kuret’s right to respect for his home.
265. Lastly, an eviction order was issued against applicant no. 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč) because she owned another adequate dwelling in Piran (see paragraphs 230 and 249 above). Even though, according to the information available to the Court, the said order has not yet been enforced, its execution would oblige Mrs Marguč to vacate the premises in which she has been living for several years and to move outside the city where she works. The issuing of the order has therefore interfered with her right to respect for her home.
266. As to the assets and financial situation of applicants nos. 2, 6 and 8, the Court is of the opinion that these elements should be taken into account in the evaluation of the proportionality of the interference.
3. Whether the interference was justified
(a) Whether the interference was lawful and pursued legitimate aims
267. Interference with the right to respect for the home would be contrary to Article 8 of the Convention, unless it was in accordance with the law, pursued one or more legitimate aims and was “necessary in a democratic society”. As far as the first two requirements are concerned, the Court cannot but reiterate the conclusions reached under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention, notably that the suppression of the specially protected tenancies and their replacement with normal lease contracts had a valid legal basis in domestic law (see paragraph 191 above) and that the interference with the applicants’ rights pursued a legitimate aim, namely the protection of the rights of others (see paragraphs 194 above).
(b) Whether the interference was “necessary in a democratic society”
268. In assessing whether the interference was “necessary in a democratic society”, the Court will have to examine whether it answered a “pressing social need” and, in particular, whether it was proportionate to the legitimate aims pursued. It has previously held that the margin of appreciation in housing matters is narrower when it comes to the rights guaranteed by Article 8 compared with those in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, regard being had to the central importance of Article 8 to the individual’s identity, self-determination, physical and moral integrity, maintenance of relationships with others and settled and secure place in the community (see Connors v. the United Kingdom, no. 66746/01, §§ 81–84, 27 May 2004; Orlić v. Croatia, no. 48833/07, §§ 63-70, 21 June 2011; and Gladysheva, cited above, § 93).
269. It must be recalled that the requirement of necessity in a democratic society under paragraph 2 of Article 8 raises a question of procedure as well as one of substance. The Court set out the relevant principles in assessing the necessity of an interference with the right to respect for the “home” in the case of Connors (cited above, §§ 81-83) which concerned summary possession proceedings. The relevant passage reads as follows:
“81. An interference will be considered ‘necessary in a democratic society’ for a legitimate aim if it answers a ‘pressing social need’ and, in particular, if it is proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued. While it is for the national authorities to make the initial assessment of necessity, the final evaluation as to whether the reasons cited for the interference are relevant and sufficient remains subject to review by the Court for conformity with the requirements of the Convention ...
82. In this regard, a margin of appreciation must, inevitably, be left to the national authorities, who by reason of their direct and continuous contact with the vital forces of their countries are in principle better placed than an international court to evaluate local needs and conditions. This margin will vary according to the nature of the Convention right in issue, its importance for the individual and the nature of the activities restricted, as well as the nature of the aim pursued by the restrictions. The margin will tend to be narrower where the right at stake is crucial to the individual’s effective enjoyment of intimate or key rights ... On the other hand, in spheres involving the application of social or economic policies, there is authority that the margin of appreciation is wide, as in the planning context where the Court has found that ‘[i]n so far as the exercise of discretion involving a multitude of local factors is inherent in the choice and implementation of planning policies, the national authorities in principle enjoy a wide margin of appreciation’ ... The Court has also stated that in spheres such as housing, which play a central role in the welfare and economic policies of modern societies, it will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is in the general interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation ... It may be noted however that this was in the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, not Article 8 which concerns rights of central importance to the individual’s identity, self-determination, physical and moral integrity, maintenance of relationships with others and a settled and secure place in the community ... Where general social and economic policy considerations have arisen in the context of Article 8 itself, the scope of the margin of appreciation depends on the context of the case, with particular significance attaching to the extent of the intrusion into the personal sphere of the applicant ...
83. The procedural safeguards available to the individual will be especially material in determining whether the respondent State has, when fixing the regulatory framework, remained within its margin of appreciation. In particular, the Court must examine whether the decision-making process leading to measures of interference was fair and such as to afford due respect to the interests safeguarded to the individual by Article 8 ...”
270. In the case of Ćosić (cited above, §§ 21-23), the Court reiterated that a person at risk of losing his or her home should in principle be able to have the proportionality and reasonableness of the measure determined by an independent tribunal in the light of the relevant principles under Article 8 of the Convention, notwithstanding that, under domestic law, his or her right of occupation had come to an end (see also McCann v. the United Kingdom, no. 19009/04, § 50, 13 May 2008). It subsequently concluded that the applicant in the Ćosić case was not afforded such an opportunity, as the national courts had confined themselves to finding that occupation by the applicant was without legal basis, without making any further analysis as to the proportionality of the measure to be applied against her (see also Paulić v. Croatia, no. 3572/06, 22 October 2009). The Court reached similar conclusions in the case of Gladysheva (cited above, §§ 94-97), in which the domestic authorities made no analysis of the proportionality of the applicant’s eviction from the flat they declared to be State-owned and made it clear that they would not contribute to the solution of her housing needs.
271. By contrast, in the case of Galović v. Croatia ((dec.), no. 54388/09, 5 March 2013) the Court rejected a claim under Article 8 brought by a former holder of a specially protected tenancy who had been evicted from the dwelling by the owner. The Court underlined that the applicant’s son and daughter-in-law – with whom she lived in the flat in issue – had a 120 m2 house and a 74 m2 flat respectively and could therefore meet her and their own housing needs much easier than the owner of the flat could meet the housing needs of his two adults sons, with whom he and his wife lived in a 65.82 m2 flat.
272. The considerations which led the Court to find that the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had not been violated allow it to reach the same conclusion under Article 8 of the Convention in respect of applicants nos. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez), 6 (Mr Primož Kuret) and 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč) (see, mutatis mutandis, Zeno and Others v. Italy, no. 1772/06, 27 April 2010). It observes, in particular, that the applicants were afforded the possibility of concluding leases of an indefinite duration, transmitting them to their spouses or long term partners and occupying the premises for a non-profit rent. As noted above, the data submitted by the Government, and not contested by the applicants, show that these rents were significantly lower than free-market rents and none of the applicants has submitted evidence showing that they could not afford the rent. In any event, public subsidies were available under domestic law for socially or financially disadvantaged tenants (see paragraph 41 above).
273. As to the fault-based grounds for eviction introduced by the Housing Act 1991 (see paragraph 21 above), they were essentially similar to those traditionally contained in lease agreements in other Member States and cannot, as such, be considered incompatible with Article 8 of the Convention. It is true that the Housing Act 2003 introduced a new ground for eviction – namely ownership of another suitable dwelling – and the possibility for the “previous owner” to move the tenant to another adequate flat at any time and without any reason. The Court considers, however, that these legislative measures were justified in view of the special, reinforced protection which was afforded to persons in the applicants’ situation and the corresponding limitations placed on the rights of the “previous owners”. Upon obtaining restitution of the property, the latter were obliged to enter into a permanent, lifelong agreement with a tenant they did not choose and in exchange for a particularly low rent. It was therefore not disproportionate to offer them the possibility of moving the tenant to another adequate flat. In this regard, the Court notes that the removal costs were borne by the “previous owner” and that the same tenant could be made to move only once (see paragraph 40 above). Moreover, as the rules governing the lease agreement were aimed at protecting vulnerable tenants, it was not arbitrary to provide for the possibility of eviction when, as in the case of Mrs Marguč, ownership of another suitable dwelling showed that a given tenant was not in a situation of social or financial distress and that his or her housing needs could be satisfied elsewhere without limiting the “previous owner’s” property rights. In any event, as noted above, the Court has already considered compatible with Article 8 an eviction order justified by the fact that members of the tenant’s household owned other real estate (see Galović, decision cited above).
274. The same considerations apply to the change of case-law by which, to the detriment of Mr Kuret, the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court excluded the transmissibility of the right to a lease for a non-profit rent mortis causa to close family members (see paragraphs 68 and 69). The Court considers that the new rule resulting from the decisions of the Slovenian judicial authorities was aimed at ensuring a fair balance between the protection of the rights of the tenants on the one hand and those of the “previous owners” on the other. In particular, the latter’s ability to obtain any profit from their real estate would have been frustrated for a significant and potentially excessive length of time had they been prevented from imposing market rents not only on the former holder of the specially protected tenancy, but also, after his or her demise, on his or her close family members (see also the similar arguments developed by the Court under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in paragraph 206 above).
275. As to the procedural guarantees enjoyed by the applicants, it is not contested that they had a possibility of challenging any eviction order before the competent domestic courts, which had jurisdiction over all related questions of fact and law. This is particularly relevant to the case of Mrs Berglez, in which the domestic courts were able to assess whether she was performing prohibited activities in the dwelling (see paragraphs 224 and 242 above) and whether the failure to sign a lease agreement was her fault or that of the “previous owners”. The same applies to any possible act of intimidation and chicanery on the part of a “previous owner” against a former protected tenant.
(c) Conclusion
276. In the light of the above, the Court considers that the interference with the right of applicants nos. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez), 6 (Mr Primož Kuret) and 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč) to respect for their home was “necessary in a democratic society” within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 8 of the Convention. There has therefore been no violation of this provision.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION, TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
277. The applicants alleged that they had been discriminated against vis-à-vis bona fide buyers of nationalised dwellings and other previous holders of specially protected tenancies. They relied on Article 14 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
278. The applicants argued that, as tenants of nationalised flats, they had been deprived of the right to purchase their dwellings, unlike all those previous holders of specially protected tenancies who had been living in dwellings not subject to restitution. In addition, even though they had a right akin to a property right, they were treated differently from bona fide buyers of nationalised dwellings, who could not be compelled to restitute their properties.
279. Moreover, unlike other previous holders of specially protected tenancies, the applicants could no longer purchase a substitute dwelling because of practical and legal obstacles. They complained about the Constitutional Court’s decision of 25 November 1999 repealing the “third model” of substitute privatisation (see paragraph 37 above).
280. The applicants reiterated their submissions according to which the specially protected tenancy and the right to purchase under the “third model” were “possessions” (of which they had been deprived) within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraphs 129-133 above). Article 14 of the Convention was therefore applicable in conjunction with that provision.
281. Under the “third model”, in force at the time of Slovenia’s ratification of the Convention, the difference between specially protected tenancy holders occupying dwellings acquired by social solidarity means and those who, like the applicants, lived in denationalised dwellings lay not in whether they had a right to purchase, but in whether they were able to realise that right over an existing dwelling or over a substitute dwelling. It was only with the abolition of the “third model” in November 1999 that the holders of occupancy rights in denationalised dwellings, unlike other specially protected tenancy holders, were deprived of the right to purchase.
282. In the applicants’ view, this difference in treatment had no objective and reasonable justification. They observed that all holders of occupancy rights had been deprived of their specially protected tenancy and that this deprivation required compensation, irrespective of whether the dwelling had been acquired by social solidarity means or had once been expropriated. Indeed, both kinds of dwellings were equally socially-owned property. Moreover, the right to purchase under the “third model” was not connected to the existing dwelling: it could also be exercised over another (substitute) dwelling. In the applicants’ view, this proved that the essence of the right to purchase did not derive from the dwelling itself and from its characteristics, but from the status of holder of a specially protected tenancy. The right to purchase continued to exist if the dwellings were not denationalised.
283. The applicants also believed, for the same reasons enumerated under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraphs 142-144 above), that the difference in treatment complained of did not pursue a legitimate aim in the public interest. The Constitutional Court’s reasoning could only be understood to mean that former specially protected tenancy holders residing in denationalised dwellings were less worthy than other former holders of occupancy rights. As persons in the applicants’ situation had to bear an excessive burden, there had not been a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. After the repeal of the “third model”, the burden of the denationalisation process was no longer carried by the State or the municipalities.
284. The applicants lastly emphasised that the European Committee of Social Rights had found a violation of the discrimination clause (Article E) contained in the Revised European Social Charter (see paragraphs 97 and 100 above).
2. The Government
285. The Government first maintained that, as the applicants’ claims were incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraphs 119-128 above), Article 14 of the Convention was not applicable. This concerned, in particular, the right to purchase a dwelling, as the right to acquire property was not guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
286. They further observed that with regard to the privatisation of dwellings the SZ rightly established two legal regimes: one for socially-owned dwellings acquired through solidarity and mutual housing funds and one for socially-owned dwellings that became general national property through nationalisation. The latter category included formerly privately-owned housing units, in respect of which the right of a denationalisation claimant excluded the right of the occupancy right holder to acquire the same property in kind. Only for the first category of dwellings was it possible to confer on the occupancy right holders a right of pre-emption, which was the right to purchase the property at a discount amounting to 30 per cent of its value, less the amount of own participation still not refunded and the value of own investments, which were reflected in the increased value of the dwelling. 90 per cent of that price could be paid in monthly instalments over a period of twenty years. In the event of a one-off payment within sixty days of the signing of the purchase contract, the buyer was entitled to a discount amounting to 60 per cent of the value of the property (see paragraph 19 above).
287. For denationalised dwellings, the holders of occupancy rights could acquire property on these terms only with the agreement of the “previous owners”. To regulate matters otherwise would have been tantamount to nationalising the properties anew. If they could not obtain the “previous owner’s” agreement, the occupants had the option to obtain a payment amounting to 30 per cent of the value of the property and a loan if they agreed to vacate the premises within two years from the restitution of the dwelling to the denationalisation claimant (see paragraph 34 above). In addition to that, the “third model” (see paragraph 35 above) had introduced the possibility of purchasing a comparable substitute flat on favourable terms from the municipality. Former occupancy right holders were unable to purchase dwellings owned by the Pension and Disability Insurance Community, as these dwellings had been built to cater for the housing needs of retired people.
288. According to the Constitutional Court, the right to denationalisation was an entitlement, based on the constitutional right to private property. The existence of a “previous owner” was an objective and reasonable justification for a difference in treatment of the holder of occupancy rights as far as the purchase of the dwelling was concerned. No discrimination between different categories of holders of occupancy rights existed with regard to the possibility of continuing the tenancy. The Government underlined that unequal treatment of unequal situations in proportion with their inequality could not amount to a violation of Article 14 of the Convention. As the circumstances of all former occupancy right holders were not equal, it was impossible to treat them in the same manner.
3. The third-party intervener
289. The IUT considered that the applicants had been discriminated against vis-à-vis other specially protected tenancy holders. While the latter had been given the right to purchase existing or substitute dwellings on favourable terms, this means of compensation had subsequently been repealed for the applicants.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Applicability of Article 14 of the Convention
290. In its decision of 28 May 2013 on the admissibility of the application (paragraph 277), the Court considered that the question of the applicability of Article 14 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was linked to the substance of the applicants’ complaint, and decided to join it to the merits.
291. As the Court has consistently held, Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. Although the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of those provisions – and to this extent it is autonomous – there can be no room for its application unless the facts in issue fall within the ambit of one or more of the latter (see, among many other authorities, Van Raalte v. the Netherlands, 21 February 1997, § 33, Reports 1997-I; Petrovic v. Austria, 27 March 1998, § 22, Reports 1998-II; and Zarb Adami v. Malta, no. 17209/02, § 42, ECHR 2006-VIII).
292. In the present case, the Court considered that it was not necessary to examine whether Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was applicable to the situation complained of (see paragraph 135 above). Accordingly, it will proceed on the assumption that also Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable, as in any event the requirements of this provision were not violated.
2. Compliance with Article 14 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) General principles
293. The Court has established in its case-law that only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14 (see Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen and Pedersen v. Denmark, 7 December 1976, § 56, Series A no. 23). Moreover, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (see D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007-IV, and Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 60, ECHR 2008).
294. Such a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. The Contracting State enjoys a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment (Burden, cited above, § 60). The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject-matter and the background (see OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos, cited above, § 613). A wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the public interest on social or economic grounds, and the Court will generally respect the legislature’s policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom, [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 52, ECHR 2006-VI, and Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 61, ECHR 2010).
295. Article 14 does not prohibit Contracting Parties from treating groups differently in order to correct “factual inequalities” between them. Indeed, in certain circumstances a failure to attempt to correct inequality through different treatment may, without an objective and reasonable justification, give rise to a breach of that Article (see Thlimmenos v. Greece [GC], no. 34369/97, § 44, ECHR 2000-IV, and Sejdić and Finci v. Bosnia and Herzegovina [GC], nos. 27996/06 and 34836/06, § 44, ECHR 2009-...). The Court has also accepted that a general policy or measure that has disproportionately prejudicial effects on a particular group may be considered discriminatory notwithstanding that it is not specifically aimed at that group, and that discrimination potentially contrary to the Convention may result from a de facto situation (see D.H. and Others, cited above, §§ 175 and 196, and the authorities cited therein).
296. Lastly, as to the burden of proof in relation to Article 14 of the Convention, the Court has held that once the applicant has shown a difference in treatment, it is for the Government to show that it was justified (see D.H. and Others, cited above, § 177).
(b) Application of these principles to the present case
(i) Whether there has been a difference in treatment between persons in similar situations
297. The applicants compare themselves with two other categories of persons: previous holders of specially protected tenancy who were occupying dwellings not subject to restitution, and bona fide buyers of nationalised dwellings (see paragraph 277 above). However, the Court cannot share the applicants’ opinion that they were in a relevantly similar situation vis-à-vis bone fide buyers, as the position of a protected tenant cannot be equated to that of persons who obtained a legal title of ownership of a dwelling.
298. In contrast, the situation of the applicants was analogous to that of protected tenants occupying dwellings not subject to denationalisation and restitution: both categories of persons had been granted occupancy rights by the authorities of the former Socialist Republic of Slovenia and were occupying the flats by virtue of the same formal title and under the same legal conditions. However, only the protected tenants of State-constructed dwellings were given the enforceable right to purchase them on significantly favourable terms by paying a price amounting to approximately 5-10 per cent of the market value of the property. As the dwellings the applicants were occupying were previously expropriated flats, the applicants had the possibility to buy them at a 30 or 60 per cent discount only if, within one year from the restitution of the dwelling, the “previous owner” agreed to sell (see paragraphs 19 and 20 above).
299. There has therefore been a difference in treatment between two groups – protected tenants of denationalised dwellings and protected tenants of other dwellings – which, with respect to their right to occupy the flats they lived in, were in a similar situation.
(ii) Whether there was objective and reasonable justification
300. The Government argued that the difference in treatment depended on the existence of a “previous owner”, whose rights needed to be protected and who could not be forced to sell the property he or she had obtained through restitution (see paragraphs 287 and 288 above). The Court accepts that obliging the “previous owner” to sell would have rendered theoretical and illusory the principle of restitution in natura of expropriated real estate and could have been perceived as a de facto new expropriation (see, mutatis mutandis, Strunjak and Others v. Croatia (dec.), no. 46934/99, 5 October 2000).
301. The Court thus considers that the need to protect the rights of the “previous owners” was a valid reason for not conferring on the applicants the enforceable right to purchase on favourable terms the dwellings they were occupying. The difference in treatment complained of therefore had an objective and reasonable justification (see, mutatis mutandis, Strunjak and Others v. Croatia ((dec.), no. 46934/99, 5 October 2000).
302. The Court further notes that other schemes providing public financial support were available to the applicants to allow them to accede to ownership of real estate. Notably, according to the “first model” of substitute privatisation, the “previous owner” was incentivised to agree to the sale of the denationalised dwelling by the possibility of receiving an additional financial reward from public funds (paragraph 33 above), while according to the “second model”, a tenant who decided to move out and to purchase a flat or construct a house was entitled to compensation amounting to 50 per cent of the value of the dwelling (further compensation of 30 per cent was to be paid by the “previous owner” – see paragraph 34 above). A right to purchase a comparable substitute flat on favourable terms from the municipalities was introduced by the “third model” (see paragraph 35 above). It is true that this last model was later repealed by the Constitutional Court in order to avoid putting an excessive financial burden on the municipalities (see paragraph 37 above); however, the 2003 Housing Act introduced a “new model” of substitute privatisation, according to which former occupancy right holders who agreed to vacate their rented accommodation and decided to buy another dwelling or to build a house were entitled to special compensation (up to 74 per cent of the price of the dwelling) and to a subsidised loan (see paragraph 42 above).
303. Under these circumstances, the Court considers that the State took significant steps to provide the applicants with a fair possibility of access to real-estate ownership and to compensate them, insofar as practicable, for the disadvantage created by the objective fact of the existence of a “previous owner”.
(iii) Conclusion
304. Accordingly, even assuming it to be applicable to the facts of the present case, Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has not been violated.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
305. The applicants maintained that since the most important changes in the housing policy had been introduced by statute, they did not have sufficient access to a court to challenge the alleged infringements of their rights. Moreover, they had been excluded from the denationalisation proceedings.
They relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which, insofar as relevant, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
306. The applicants underlined that the only legal avenue open to them had been the “petition” and the subsequent constitutional complaint, and the constitutional initiative lodged by the Association on behalf of its members. After the decision of the Constitutional Court dismissing their initiative, the applicants had had no prospect of success with their individual complaints.
307. The applicants also complained about their exclusion from the denationalisation proceedings, which concerned the ownership of the dwellings they had been living in. The outcome of these proceedings had been decisive for their “civil rights”, as they would have been entitled to purchase the dwellings if they had not been returned to the persons who claimed to have been their owners before the nationalisation.
308. In the denationalisation proceedings, the administrative courts had to verify the existence of the legal grounds allowing restitution, and in the absence of these grounds the claimant’s request would be rejected. These proceedings were decisive not only for the civil rights of the denationalisation claimant but also for those of the former specially protected tenancy holder residing in the dwelling. Under the “third model”, the outcome of the denationalisation proceedings would determine whether the tenant could exercise the right to purchase the existing or a substitute dwelling. After the abolition of that model, their outcome would determine whether the tenant had a right to purchase at all.
309. This right to acquire ownership of a dwelling on extremely favourable financial terms was without doubt a “civil” right within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. The fact that an economic interest lay behind this right could not change that conclusion, as every property right was, in essence, an economic interest. Former holders of specially protected tenancies therefore had a right to participate in the denationalisation proceedings in order to be apprised of, and comment on, all evidence adduced or observations filed, with a view to influencing the court’s decision. The applicants were not required to indicate, in the international proceedings, what kind of arguments and proof they could have put forward in the denationalisation proceedings had they been given a chance to take part in them.
2. The Government
310. The Government first maintained that the applicants’ complaint was incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, as the denationalisation proceedings did not involve a dispute concerning their “civil rights and obligations” (Ulyanov v. Ukraine (dec.), no. 16472/04, 5 October 2010). They emphasised that former holders of occupancy rights could not be parties in the denationalisation proceedings unless they proved that they had a legal interest in them, that is, either a claim for the repayment of investments or an ownership right (see Article 60 of the ZDen and paragraph 28 above). The applicants had failed to prove the probable existence of such a legal interest. The restitution of nationalised property to denationalisation claimants did not in any way affect the legal status of the applicants or their direct entitlements based on the law.
311. Moreover, the applicants could not have prevented the restitution of the dwellings to their “previous owners”, as the mere existence of a tenancy could not be an obstacle to restitution of nationalised property. Therefore, the applicants could not have realised their wish to purchase the dwellings by participating in the denationalisation proceedings, which were not directly decisive for their “civil rights”.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Applicability of Article 6 § 1 to the denationalisation proceedings
312. In its decision of 28 May 2013 on the admissibility of the application (paragraph 286), the Court considered that the question of the applicability of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention to the denationalisation proceedings was linked to the substance of the applicants’ complaint and decided to join it to the merits. The Court should therefore ascertain whether the civil limb of this provision applies to the alleged impossibility for the applicants to participate in the denationalisation proceedings. In this connection, it notes that, as pointed out by the Government, no such impossibility existed where the previous holder of occupancy rights had a claim for the recovery of investments made in the dwelling (see paragraphs 28, 66 and 310 above). It must therefore be determined whether, in the absence of such a claim, the denationalisation proceedings were determinant for any of the applicants’ “rights” within the meaning of Article 6.
313. The Court reiterates that for Article 6 § 1 in its “civil” limb to be applicable, there must be a dispute (“contestation” in the French text) over a “right” which can be said, at least on arguable grounds, to be recognised under domestic law, irrespective of whether it is protected under the Convention. The dispute must be genuine and serious; it may relate not only to the actual existence of a right but also to its scope and the manner of its exercise; and, finally, the result of the proceedings must be directly decisive for the right in question, mere tenuous connections or remote consequences not being sufficient to bring Article 6 § 1 into play (see, among other authorities, Micallef v. Malta [GC], no. 17056/06, § 74, 15 October 2009).
314. Article 6 § 1 does not guarantee any particular content for (civil) “rights and obligations” in the substantive law of the Contracting States: the Court may not create by way of interpretation of Article 6 § 1 a substantive right which has no legal basis in the State concerned (see, for example, Fayed v. the United Kingdom, 21 September 1994, § 65, Series A no. 294 B, and Roche v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 32555/96, § 119, ECHR 2005 X). The starting-point must be the provisions of the relevant domestic law and their interpretation by the domestic courts (see Masson and Van Zon v. the Netherlands, 28 September 1995, § 49, Series A no. 327-A, and Roche, cited above, § 120). This Court would need strong reasons to differ from the conclusions reached by the superior national courts by finding, contrary to their view, that there was arguably a right recognised by domestic law (ibid.).
315. In carrying out this assessment, it is necessary to look beyond the appearances and the language used and to concentrate on the realities of the situation (see Van Droogenbroeck v. Belgium, 24 June 1982, § 38, Series A no. 50; Roche, cited above, § 121; and Boulois v. Luxembourg [GC], no. 37575/04, § 92, 3 April 2012).
316. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that the object of the denationalisation proceedings was to determine the ownership of the property subject to restitution (see paragraph 27 above). The applicants did not allege that they had an arguable claim for restitution. Therefore, in the Court’s opinion, the outcome of the proceedings was not directly decisive for their potential property rights. It was also not decisive for their right to occupy the dwelling, as denationalisation and restitution could not affect the tenancy relationship (see paragraph 28 above), and the “previous owners” were obliged to rent the flats for an indefinite period and for a non-profit rent to previous holders of occupancy rights (see paragraph 19 above).
317. It is true that in the event of rejection of the denationalisation claimants’ request for restitution, the former holders of specially protected tenancies would have had the possibility of purchasing the dwellings they were occupying on favourable terms (see paragraph 308 above). However, the Court considers that this was a mere remote consequence of the denationalisation proceedings not sufficient to bring Article 6 § 1 into play.
318. In view of all the foregoing considerations, the Court cannot consider that the result of the denationalisation proceedings was directly decisive for the applicants’ civil rights. Accordingly, it concludes, like the Government, that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention is not applicable.
319. It follows that the Government’s objection should be allowed. There has therefore been no breach of Article 6 § 1 with regard to the denationalisation proceedings.
2. Access to a court to challenge the housing reform
320. It remains to be ascertained whether the applicants had sufficient access to a court to challenge the infringements of their rights allegedly brought about by the housing reform.
321. The Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his or her civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal (see Golder v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1975, § 36, Series A no. 18). This “right to a court”, of which the right of access is an aspect, may be relied on by anyone who considers on arguable grounds that an interference with the exercise of his or her civil rights is unlawful and complains that no possibility was afforded to submit that claim to a court meeting the requirements of Article 6 § 1 (see, inter alia, Roche, cited above, § 117, and Salontaji-Drobnjak v. Serbia, no. 36500/05, § 132, 13 October 2009). The degree of access afforded by the national legislation must be sufficient to secure the individual’s right to a court, having regard to the principle of the rule of law in a democratic society. For the right of access to be effective, an individual must have a clear, practical opportunity to challenge an act that is an interference with his rights (see Bellet v. France, 4 December 1995, § 36, Series A no. 333-B).
322. The Court recalls, however, that Article 6 § 1 does not guarantee a right of bringing constitutional proceedings (see Mladenic v. Croatia (dec.), no. 48485/99, 14 June 2001). Moreover, in the ambit of Article 13, the Court has stated that the Convention does not go so far as to guarantee a remedy allowing a Contracting State’s laws as such to be challenged before a national authority on the ground of being contrary to the Convention or to equivalent domestic legal norms (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 85, Series A no. 98, and Litgow and Others v. the United Kingdom, 8 July 1986, § 206, Series A no. 102).
323. In any event, the Court considers that in the circumstances of the present case, such a remedy was accessible to the applicants, who alleged that the overall framework of the housing reform had adversely affected their rights. In the Court’s view, nothing prevented the applicants, in their quality of former holders of specially protected tenancy in denationalised dwellings, from asking the Constitutional Court to review the constitutionality of the SZ, the ZDen and of the relevant judicial practice.
324. This is sufficient for the Court to conclude that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
325. The applicants complained that they did not have at their disposal any effective legal remedies to challenge the alleged violation of their substantive Convention rights.
They relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
326. The Government challenged this claim. They noted that with regard to all the alleged violations the applicants had had an effective national legal remedy at their disposal (the constitutional initiative review), which they had exhausted. Moreover, they could have availed themselves of civil remedies adapted to their individual circumstances.
327. The Court reiterates that where the right claimed is a civil right, the role of Article 6 § 1 in relation to Article 13 is that of a lex specialis, the requirements of Article 13 being absorbed by those of Article 6 § 1 (see, among other authorities, the British-American Tobacco Company Ltd v. the Netherlands, 20 November 1995, § 89, Series A no. 331, and Brualla Gómez de la Torre v. Spain, 19 December 1997, § 41, Reports 1997 VIII). Consequently, it is unnecessary to rule separately on the complaint.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Holds, by six votes to one, that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

2. Holds, unanimously, that applicants nos. 1 (Mrs Cornelia Berger-Krall), 3 (Mrs Ivanka Bertoncelj), 4 (Mrs Slavica Jerančič), 5 (Mrs Ema Kugler), 7 (Mr Drago Logar), 9 (Mr Dušan Milič) and 10 (Mrs Dolores Zalar) cannot claim to be “victims”, for the purposes of Article 34 of the Convention, of the alleged violation of Article 8 of the Convention;

3. Holds, unanimously, that there has been no violation of Article 8 of the Convention in respect of applicants nos. 2 (Mrs Ljudmila Berglez), 6 (Mr Primož Kuret) and 8 (Mrs Dunja Marguč);

4. Holds, unanimously, that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

5. Holds, unanimously, that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in respect of the denationalisation proceedings;

6. Holds, unanimously, that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in respect of the applicants’ allegedly insufficient access to a court to challenge the housing reform;

7. Holds, unanimously, that it is unnecessary to determine whether there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 12 June 2014, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Mark Villiger
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following separate opinions are annexed to this judgment:
(a) concurring opinion of Judge Yudkivska;
(b) partly dissenting opinion of Judge Zupančič.
M.V.
C.W.

CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE YUDKIVSKA
I voted together with the majority in favour of finding that in the present case there had been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, and I can, in principle, agree with the balancing exercise undertaken in paragraphs 205-211, in which the Chamber found that the alleged interference was proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued, in view of the wide margin of appreciation granted to the State in matters of social justice.
I do not, however, share the majority’s position, as set out in paragraph 135 of the judgment, that it was not necessary to examine the Government’s objection of incompatibility ratione materiae since, even assuming Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be applicable, the requirements of this provision were not violated. The same line was taken by the Chamber in the case of Blečić v. Croatia (no. 59532/00, § 73, 29 July 2004). In my view, the issue of the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is crucial in this type of case and does not deserve to be circumvented. The present case, given its considerable importance not only for the respondent State but also for the Convention system, calls for clarification of the approach to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in social policy matters.
In my view, in the circumstances of the present case the applicants as former holders of socially protected tenancies neither had property in the form of a “possession” nor any “legitimate expectation” of acquiring it, and their complaint thus falls outside the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
It is the Court’s well-established case-law that the right to any social benefit is not included as such among the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Convention (see Shpakovskiy v. Russia, no. 41307/02, § 32, 7 July 2005), and the right to live in a particular property not owned by the applicant does not as such constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Kovalenok v. Latvia (dec.), no. 54264/00, 15 February 2001). On the other hand, the Court has an extensive body of case-law in respect of former Soviet Union countries in which it has held that socially protected tenancies amounted to property rights precisely because the legislation enacted after the fall of the communist regime provided for the unconditional privatisation of apartments or houses occupied under such tenancies (see Malinovskiy v. Russia, no. 41302/02, ECHR 2005-VII, and Panchenko v. Ukraine, no. 10911/05, 10 December 2009). As the States in question did not pass any relevant denationalisation or restitution laws, there was no conflict with the interests of holders of socially protected tenancies.
In the cases of Malinovskiy v. Russia and Shpakovskiy v. Russia (both cited above) the domestic court’s judgment obliged the municipality to provide the applicant with an apartment under a socially protected tenancy. The Court noted that under the terms of these “social tenancy agreements”, in accordance with the applicable legislation, “the applicant would have had a right to possess and make use of the flat and to privatise it” (see Malinovskiy, cited above, § 44). Thus, the Court held that from the date of the domestic court’s judgment the applicant had an established “legitimate expectation” of acquiring a pecuniary asset. Accordingly, the applicant’s claim to a “social tenancy agreement” “was sufficiently established to constitute a ‘possession’ falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1” given that this agreement provided the applicant with a clear possibility of acquiring the property (ibid., § 46).
The Court also followed this approach in the case of Ivan Panchenko v. Ukraine (cited above), which likewise concerned the enforcement of a judgment granting the applicant a “housing warrant” for a municipal apartment, but not ownership. According to the Court, in this case “the crucial issue” was whether the applicant had a “legitimate expectation” of acquiring the disputed apartment as his private property. Having regard to the relevant domestic legislation, which provided in such circumstances for privatisation free of charge prior to 1 January 2007, the Court concluded that “for the purposes of the present case only ... at least before 1 January 2007” the applicant had a “legitimate expectation” of acquiring the apartment at issue as his private property (ibid., § 51).
The Court then distinguished the above-mentioned cases from the situation in the case of Babenko v. Ukraine ((dec.), no. 68726/10, 4 January 2012), in which a Second World War veteran had a right to be provided with a municipal apartment and was on a waiting list for that purpose. In this case the Court again reiterated that the right of an applicant to live in a particular property not owned by him or her did not as such constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. As regards the theoretical possibility of privatising the apartment in question, the Court stated: “in the absence of any comments in this respect from the applicants, the Court cannot conclude to what extent such possibility is tangible. Moreover, the Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee the right to acquire property.” Accordingly, the applicants had failed to show that they had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
It follows from the above-mentioned cases that a socially protected tenancy constitutes a “possession” as long as such a tenancy entails a reasonably practical possibility of acquiring an apartment (regardless of whether or not the person concerned is currently occupying the apartment), and to date the Court’s position appears to be quite clear in this regard (see also Mago and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 12959/05, 19724/05, 47860/06, 8367/08, 9872/09 and 11706/09, § 78, 3 May 2012, cited in the judgment).
The applicants in the present case did not have any such legitimate expectations.
In this respect the decision in the case of Trifunović v. Croatia ((dec.), no. 34162/06, 6 November 2008) is of particular relevance. In Croatia holders of specially protected tenancies were entitled to purchase their flats under favourable conditions. The applicant complained that she was not able to do so because her socially protected tenancy had been terminated. The Court dismissed this complaint as incompatible ratione materiae with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It reiterated that when examining alleged violations of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention on account of the termination of a specially protected tenancy in proceedings that had ended after Croatia’s ratification of the Convention, it did not have to determine whether a specially protected tenancy itself could be considered a “possession” protected by that Article. Rather, it had to examine whether the termination of that tenancy affected any of the rights derived from it – such as, for example, the right to purchase the flat under the Specially Protected Tenancies Act – and, more importantly, whether those derived rights could amount to a “possession” within the meaning of that provision. Having noted that “possessions” could be “existing possessions” or claims in respect of which an applicant could argue that he had at least a “legitimate expectation” that they would be realised, it concluded that since neither the applicant nor her husband had ever made a request to purchase the flat within the applicable time-limit, the applicant had no claim under domestic law to purchase the flat. Thus, she did not have a sufficient proprietary interest to constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see also Gaćeša v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43389/02, 1 April 2008).
In the present case all the models of substitute privatisation, including the third one, could not guarantee that the applicants would be able to purchase their apartments or substitute dwellings under favourable terms. As the Court has held, a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfilment of a statutory condition cannot be a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Slivenko v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II). Only a “genuine and enforceable claim” from which a “legitimate expectation” could arise falls within the scope of that Article (see Klaus and Yuri Kiladze v. Georgia, no. 7975/06, § 60, 2 February 2010). A claim which is not clearly defined because certain conditions cannot be fulfilled cannot be considered to amount to a legitimate expectation.
From this standpoint, it is clear that in Slovenia former holders of specially protected tenancies were not automatically considered to have a possession, but only if they satisfied the relevant requirements as set forth in the legislation entitling them to purchase the apartments they were occupying or to obtain financial compensation.
Thus, the “first model” could not create “legitimate expectations” according to the Court’s case-law, since the possibility of purchasing an apartment was conditional on the agreement of its previous owner (see paragraph 33 of the judgment).
The “second model” guaranteed compensation to a tenant who decided to move out and to purchase or construct another dwelling if a request to that end was submitted within two years of the restitution of the property (see paragraph 34); however, none of the applicants in the present case made use of this option.
As regards the “third model”, which provided former holders of specially protected tenancies with the possibility of purchasing a substitute dwelling from the municipality under favourable terms, it was abolished by the Constitutional Court in November 1999. In so far as the applicants can be understood to be invoking the “legitimate expectations” deriving from this model, they lodged their application with the Court in March 2004, that is, more than six months after this model ceased to exist.
Finally, a “new model” of substitute privatisation was provided for by the 2003 Housing Act and guaranteed special compensation for former holders of specially protected tenancies (up to 74% of the price for those who decided to purchase or build another dwelling – see paragraph 42 of the judgment). None of the applicants ever tried to make use of this possibility within the time-limit set.
Thus, it is clear that at the time the applications were lodged and thereafter, the applicants cannot be viewed as having had a proprietary interest or legitimate expectations protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention since they did not satisfy the requirements set forth in the national legislation enabling them to acquire ownership of a dwelling on favourable terms or to receive financial compensation. Consequently, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is not applicable and the complaint should have been rejected for being incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention and the Protocols thereto.
In view of the importance of the Government’s objection, I regret that the Court has missed an opportunity to clarify its case-law in this regard.
 
PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE ZUPANČIČ
To my regret, I cannot join the majority in their conclusion that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
In the first place, I consider this provision to be applicable in the present case (this question has been left open by the Court – see paragraph 135 of judgment). I recall that even though Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see Slivenko and Others v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II), the mere fact that a property right is subject to revocation in certain circumstances does not prevent it from being a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, at least until it is revoked (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 105, ECHR 2000-I, and Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, §§ 38 and 40, 15 September 2009). It is true that the right to live in a particular property not owned by the applicant does not as such constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Panchenko v. Ukraine, no. 10911/05, § 50, 10 December 2010); however, in the case of Saghinadze and Others v. Georgia (no. 18768/05, §§ 104-108, 27 May 2010), even in the absence of a registered property title, the Court has regarded as a “possession” the right to use a cottage, which was exercised in good faith and with the tolerance of the authorities for more than ten years.
As far as the more specific right to a “specially protected tenancy” in former socialist countries is concerned, the Court has held Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be inapplicable in two cases concerning restitution of flats (Gaćeša v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43389/02, 1 April 2008, and Trifunović v. Croatia (dec.), no. 34162/06, 6 November 2008), because occupancy right holders in Croatia had no longer been able to purchase their flats since 1 January 1996. The Court reached the opposite conclusion in Mago and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (nos. 12959/05, 19724/05, 47860/06, 8367/08, 9872/09 and 11706/09, §§ 75-78, 3 May 2012), noting that in Bosnia and Herzegovina all occupancy right holders were as a rule entitled to get back their pre-war flats and then purchase them under very favourable terms, and that unlike the Croatian authorities, those in Bosnia and Herzegovina had consistently held that occupancy rights constituted “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This provision was also deemed to be applicable in Brezovec v. Croatia (no. 13488/07, §§ 40-46, 29 March 2011), in which, in contrast to the Gaćeša case, the applicant had met the legal conditions for acquiring the right to purchase a flat (notably, he had submitted his request within the statutory time-limit and was the holder of the specially protected tenancy on the flat he wanted to buy – see also Panchenko, cited above, §§ 49-51, concerning enforcement of a judgment granting the applicant a “housing warrant” for a municipal flat). By contrast, no “possession” was found in respect of a Second World War veteran who was on a waiting list for a municipal flat (see Babenko v. Ukraine (dec.), no. 68726/10, 4 January 2012).
When applying the above principles to individual cases, the Court has examined whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicants title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for instance, Bozcaada Kimisis Teodoku Rum Ortodoks Kilisesi Vakfi v. Turkey, nos. 37639/03, 37655/03, 26736/04 and 42670/04, § 41, 3 March 2009; Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 62, ECHR 2010- ..; and Plalam S.P.A. v. Italy (merits), no. 16021/02, § 37, 18 May 2010).
Turning to the circumstances of the present case, I observe that previous holders of specially protected tenancies did not have a formal title of ownership of the dwellings they were occupying. At the same time the specially protected tenancy could not be described as a mere contractual right originating from a lease agreement. The holders of this right had the permanent, lifelong and uninterrupted use of the dwelling and could transmit it inter vivos or mortis causa to family members who lived with them. They did not pay a free market rent but a simple fee covering maintenance costs and depreciation (see paragraphs 8 and 12 of the judgment) and were given management entitlements, such as the right and duty to participate in the management of their socially-owned housing (see paragraph 9 of the judgment). Holders of occupancy rights had a pre-emption right at a price determined by a certified valuer (see paragraphs 38 and 128 of the judgment).
At the same time, I consider that some characteristics of the specially protected tenancy were hard to reconcile with the existence of a proprietary entitlement. In particular, in the event of a reduction of the number of users of the dwelling, the occupancy relationship could be terminated and another, more appropriate dwelling could be allocated to the holder of the right; alterations to the dwelling, its furnishings and appliances could be made only with the prior written approval of the housing administration (see paragraph 9 of the judgment); the occupancy right could be cancelled for protracted failure to use the flat without good reason and in cases of full sublease or possession of an unoccupied flat suitable for residence (see paragraph 14 of the judgment).
The sum of the above elements explains why in legal theory and judicial practice the specially protected tenancy was described as a right sui generis (see paragraph 11 of the judgment). At the same time, I cannot but attach a certain weight to the fact that in 1998 the Constitutional Court described the specially protected tenancy as more akin to a property right than to a tenancy right (see paragraph 11 of the judgment).
Moreover, even after the entry into force of the Housing Act 1991, former holders of occupancy rights were entitled to enter into lease agreements which provided for a reinforced protection of the tenant. The leases in question were concluded for an indefinite period and for a non-profit rent (covering maintenance, management of the flat and capital costs – see paragraph 19 of the judgment), and were transmissible mortis causa to the spouse or to a person having lived with the tenant in a long term relationship (see paragraphs 23 and 69 of the judgment). These elements militate for the permanent, lifelong nature of the lease and for its subtraction from the ordinary rules of the market economy.
Against this background, I attach particular importance to the fact that entering the lease as former holders of specially protected tenancy gave the applicants access to schemes providing public financial support for the purchase of real estate. Notably, according to the “first model” of substitute privatisation, the “previous owner” was incentivised to agree to the sale of the denationalised dwelling by the possibility of receiving an additional financial reward from public funds (paragraph 33 of the judgment), while according to the “second model”, a tenant who decided to move out and to purchase a flat or to construct a house was entitled to compensation amounting to 50 per cent of the value of the dwelling (further compensation of 30 per cent was to be paid by the “previous owner” – see paragraph 34 of the judgment). A right to purchase a comparable substitute flat on very favourable terms from the municipalities was introduced by the “third model” (see paragraph 35 of the judgment). It is true that this last model was later repealed by the Constitutional Court in order to avoid putting an excessive financial burden on the municipalities (see paragraph 37 of the judgment); however, the repeal of the “third model” is one of the reasons why the applicants consider that they have suffered a disproportionate interference with their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. Moreover, the 2003 Housing Act introduced a “new model” of substitute privatisation, according to which former occupancy right holders who agreed to vacate their rented accommodation and decided to buy another dwelling or to build a house were entitled to special compensation (up to 74% of the price of the dwelling) and to a subsidised loan (see paragraph 42 of the judgment).
In the light of all the above elements, I am of the opinion that the status of former holder of specially protected tenancy conferred rights which were stronger than those arising from a traditional lease agreement and was sufficiently connected to the entitlement to public financial contributions in the housing field to constitute a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. I therefore consider this provision to be applicable.
As to the merits of the applicants’ claim, I first recall the general principles set out in paragraphs 196-204 of the judgment. In applying these principles to the present case, my approach differs from that of the majority in the fact that I am of the opinion that in order to ensure a fair balance of the social and financial burden of the housing reform, persons in the applicants’ situation were entitled to some form of compensation for the sacrifice which had been imposed on them. In this connection, it is worth noting that the applicants had acquired the occupancy rights in good faith and in a lawful way and that, as individuals, they could not be considered responsible for the nationalisation process.
Moreover, I consider that even if it guarantees the right of property, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 cannot be interpreted to mean that the protection of real-estate owners is always legitimate when it is secured by sacrificing other relevant public interests, especially when the connection with a given property is remote. In the present case the “previous owners” had, for a significant lapse of time, lost any contact with the dwellings in issue and generations have passed. Their expectation of recovering ownership of the dwellings had been relatively low. Under these circumstances, the protection of the interests of the “previous owners” could not justify a total disregard for the applicants’ “possessions” and the lack of any adequate compensation in that regard (see, mutatis mutandis, the Court’s considerations in Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey [GC] (dec.), nos. 46113/99, 3843/02, 13751/02, 13466/03, 10200/04, 14163/04, 19993/04 and 21819/04, §§ 83-86, ECHR 2010-..).
The applicants considered that the “third model” of substitute privatisation could have afforded them fair compensation (see paragraph 138 of the judgment): they could decide to vacate the premises and thus cease to have their occupancy rights limited by the “previous owners’” rights and at the same time acquire full ownership of a substitute dwelling from the municipality on particularly favourable terms (see paragraph 35 of the judgment). I can share the applicants’ view: the limitation of their rights under the housing reform was to a certain extent fairly compensated by the possibility of access to ownership of another, comparable flat at an affordable price.
However, this model of substitute privatisation was repealed by the Constitutional Court on 25 November 1999 (see paragraph 37 of the judgment). It is not for the Court to examine whether the reasons adduced by the Constitutional Court were relevant and sufficient under domestic law; I confine myself to noting that the repeal of the “third model” created a vacuum in the domestic legal system and deprived the applicants and other persons in a relevantly similar vulnerable position of a substantial protection in the ambit of the housing reform.
It is true, as noted by the Government (see paragraph 125 of the judgment) and by the majority (see paragraph 209 of the judgment), that the “third model” was introduced in April 1994 and that none of the applicants filed a valid and complete request to purchase a substitute dwelling during the five years and seven months which elapsed before the Constitutional Court’s decision. However, I am of the opinion that this might be explained by the following factors. In the first place, the 1994 amendments to the Housing Act did not provide for any time-limit within which the right to purchase under the “third model” was to be exercised, thus giving the impression that the said right could be used at any time. Furthermore, one of the pre-conditions for benefitting from this model was that the “previous owner” was not prepared to sell the dwelling (see paragraph 35 of the judgment). It follows that a request for purchase from the municipality could be filed only when a “previous owner” had been identified and he or she had stated his or her wish not to sell the property. Now, the restitution to a “previous owner” was a process which could take several years, as it necessitated denationalisation proceedings which might be followed by inheritance proceedings in the event the original owner had meanwhile passed away. It is therefore not surprising that the applicants did not use their right to purchase within a time-span of little more than five years. I refer, on this point, to the details concerning the situation of individual applicants provided for by the parties (see paragraphs 222-232 and 239-251 of the judgment).
In the light of the above, I am of the opinion that the housing reform placed a significant burden on former holders of specially protected tenancy in denationalized dwellings, without providing for sufficient and effective measures aimed at protecting this vulnerable category of tenants. The fair distribution of the social and financial burden involved in the reform of the country’s housing supply was therefore upset. This brings me to the conclusion that the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 were violated.


ANNEX 1

OMISSIS


ANNEX 2


OMISSIS

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Resto inammissibile (Articolo 34 - Vittima) Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo della proprietà) Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 8 - Diritto al rispetto della vita privata e della di famiglia (Articolo 8-1 - Riguardo della casa)
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14+P1-1 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - Discriminazione) (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà Articolo 1 par. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo della proprietà)
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - diritti civili ed obblighi)
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Costituzionali Articolo 6-1 - Accesso ad un tribunale)



EX QUINTA SEZIONE







CAUSA BERGER-KRALL ED ALTRI C. SLOVENIA

(Richiesta n. 14717/04)



SENTENZA







STRASBOURG

12 giugno 2014







Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Berger-Krall ed Altri c. la Slovenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione Precedente), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Mark Villiger, Presidente
Angelika Nußberger,
Boštjan M. Zupanič,
Ganna Yudkivska,
André Potocki,
Paul Lemmens,
Aleš Pejchal, giudici
e Claudia Westerdiek, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato in 28 maggio 2013, 18 febbraio e 13 maggio 2014,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata sulla scorsa data menzionata:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 14717/04) contro la Repubblica della Slovenia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con dieci cittadini di sloveno, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 15 marzo 2004.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con l'OMISSIS, mentre praticando in Grosuplje. Il Governo di sloveno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. B. Tratar, Avvocato Statale General.
3. I richiedenti addussero che l'Alloggio Riforma li aveva spogliati delle loro proprietà e case che loro erano stati discriminati contro vis-à-vis le altre categorie di inquilini, che loro non avevano accesso ad una corte per impugnare la violazione allegato dei loro diritti e che loro non avevano alla loro disposizione qualsiasi via di ricorso legale ed effettiva.
4. Con una decisione di 28 maggio 2013, la Corte dichiarò la richiesta ammissibile.
5. I richiedenti ed il Governo ognuno registrò inoltre osservazioni scritto (l'Articolo 59 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte) sui meriti. In oltre, commenti di terzo-parte furono ricevuti dall'Unione Internazionale di Inquilini che era stato dato permesso col Presidente per intervenire nella procedura scritto (l'Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 44 § 3).
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti ' chiama e date di nascita sono elencate in annetta 2. Loro sono membri dell'Associazione di Inquilini della Slovenia (najemnikov di Združenje Slovenije).
A. sfondo Attinente
1. Appartamenti socialmente-posseduti e “affitto specialmente protetto” nella Repubblica Socialista e precedente della Slovenia
7. Nella Repubblica Socialista e precedente della Slovenia, abitazioni socialmente-possedute rappresentarono una parte significativa della scorta di alloggio (230,000 unità di alloggio). Approssimativamente un terzo della popolazione di sloveno vissero in simile unità di alloggio al tempo. Secondo la dottrina di “proprietà sociale” (družbena lastnina) introdusse nel sistema iugoslavo negli anni cinquanta, simile abitazioni furono possedute con la comunità, il ruolo di organi pubblici che sono confinati a gestione.
8. Dopo che la Seconda Mondo Guerra, abitazioni private e gli altri locali passarono in proprietà Statale per legislazione su nationalisation. Allo stesso tempo, abitazioni furono costruite, o acquistarono con imprese socialmente-possedute o gli altri organi pubblici. In ambo le cause i secondi li assegnarono ai loro impiegati e le altre persone concesse di che divennero possessori un “affitto specialmente protetto” o “diritto di occupazione” (stanovanjska pravica-in seguito o tradusse come “affitto specialmente protetto”, siccome suggerito coi richiedenti, o come “diritto di occupazione”, siccome indicato col Governo) sotto Articolo 206 del poi Costituzione della Repubblica Socialista di Slovenia e la legislazione esistente. Il diritto ad un'abitazione socialmente-posseduta garantì il cittadino “l'uso permanente dell'abitazione per il suo alloggio personale ha bisogno così come per le necessità della sua famiglia.” L'Alloggio Atto 1982 (in seguito assegnò anche a come il “ZSR”) purché che una volta assegnò con una decisione amministrativa seguita con un contratto, un affitto specialmente protetto diede un titolo al possessore ad uso permanente, di tutta la vita ed ininterrotto dell'appartamento contro il pagamento di una parcella spese di manutenzione coprenti ed il deprezzamento. La parcella (o affitto) fu determinato sulla base del prezzo di costruzione di abitazioni ed i requisiti di semplice sostituzione di abitazioni, e nella conformità con gli standard e norme per il mantenimento e gestione di abitazioni socialmente-possedute.
9. Il Governo indicò che il diritto di occupazione conferì il diritto per usare solamente l'abitazione socialmente-posseduta per il fine di soddisfare uno personale e le necessità di alloggio di famiglia. La sua base razionale era l'economico ed uso efficiente di spazio di alloggio, mentre volendo dire che ogni famiglia dovrebbe avere a disposizione sua tanto spazio quanto sé, e nessuno più. La relazione di occupazione potrebbe essere terminata ed un altro, abitazione più appropriata assegnò nell'evento di una riduzione del numero di utenti dell'abitazione (Sezione 59 dello ZSR). Nella prospettiva del Governo, questo provò, che il diritto di occupazione fu associato con personale e famiglia ha bisogno, e non con una particolare abitazione. Il concetto delle necessità di famiglia era variabile e dipese dal numero di membri di famiglia. Non più di un'abitazione potrebbe essere usata allo stesso tempo e nessuno potrebbe passare all'abitazione senza l'approvazione precedente del possessore del diritto di occupazione. Il secondo fu dato diritti di gestione, come il diritto ed il dovere di partecipare nella gestione dell'alloggio socialmente-posseduto. Possessori di diritti di occupazione potrebbero scambiare abitazioni e potrebbero fare solamente le modifiche all'abitazione, i suoi mobili ed apparecchi con l'approvazione scritto e precedente dell'amministrazione di alloggio (Sezione 29 dello ZSR).
10. I richiedenti impugnarono la dichiarazione del Governo che l'affitto specialmente protetto permise solamente uso delle abitazioni per fini di alloggio. Loro osservarono che il possessore del diritto di occupazione potesse usare l'abitazione senza restrizioni per lui e per i membri della sua famiglia, non abbia bisogno qualsiasi acconsente allargare il numero di membri di famiglia, potrebbe usare parte dell'abitazione per esercizi d'impresa e potrebbe subaffittare parte di sé per un affitto convenuto. Lui potrebbe modernizzare l'abitazione con l'accordo dell'organizzazione di alloggio che maneggia l'edificio; se simile accordo fosse negato-quale in pratica quasi mai non accaduta-lui potrebbe esigere sostituzione di beneplacito in procedimenti legali. Le abitazioni in oggetto potrebbe essere venduto solamente a possessori di diritti di occupazione che potevano-con le poche eccezioni molto specifiche-scambi le loro abitazioni. Qualsiasi vendite a terza persona erano privo di valore legale.
11. In teoria legale e pratica giudiziale l'affitto specialmente protetto fu descritto come un sui generis corretto. 26 novembre 1998 la Corte Costituzionale consegnò una decisione (Su-29/98) in che considerò che sotto la legislazione della Repubblica Socialista e precedente della Slovenia, l'affitto specialmente protetto godè protezione più forte che un puramente diritto di affitto contrattuale. La relazione legale non fu limitata in tempo e non solo fu collegata al possessore del diritto, ma anche a persone che vivono con lui. Concluse che, a causa del volume molto limitato di operazioni che comportano abitazioni socialmente-possedute, l'affitto specialmente protetto era stato più simile ad un diritto di proprietà che ad un diritto di affitto.
12. Quando un possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto morì, suo o i suoi diritti furono trasferiti al coniuge superstite o partner di scadenza lunga (chi contenne congiuntamente l'affitto specialmente protetto) o ad un membro registrato della famiglia di famiglia che stava usando anche l'appartamento. Secondo i richiedenti, questo fece domanda anche, se loro si mossero fuori o accordarono il divorzio a. Così, affitti specialmente protetti potrebbero essere passati su da generazione a generazione.
13. Nell'opinione del Governo, comunque questa non era una successione del diritto di occupazione ma piuttosto un trasferimento specificamente regolato di sé ad uno degli utenti dell'abitazione. In questo riguardo, il consorte e partner di scadenza lunga goderono un status privilegiato. Disposizioni speciali fecero domanda nell'evento di divorzio (Sezione 17 dello ZSR), e se considerasse che nessuni degli utenti dell'abitazione soddisfece le condizioni per subito dopo ottenere l'occupazione la morte del possessore precedente, l'amministrazione di alloggio potrebbe richiedere gli utenti detti per sgombrare i locali (Sezione 18 dello ZSR).
14. Il diritto di occupazione potrebbe essere annullato solamente su motivi limitati (Sezioni 56, 58 e 61 dello ZSR) il più importante di che era insuccesso col possessore per usare l'appartamento per suo o il suo proprio alloggio ha bisogno per un periodo continuo di almeno sei mesi senza la buon ragione (come servizio militare, trattamento medico, o lavoro provvisorio altrove nella Repubblica Federale Socialista e precedente dell'Iugoslavia (il “SFRY”) o all'estero; veda Sezione 19 dello ZSR). In questa causa, gli utenti dell'abitazione che stava vivendo insieme col possessore del diritto di occupazione per un minimo di due anni avevano gli stessi diritti siccome loro avrebbero avuto se il possessore fosse morto. Gli altri motivi erano comportamento improprio e dannoso, insuccesso per pagare la parcella, il pieno subaffitto uso dell'abitazione con una persona altro che il possessore del diritto di occupazione e proprietà di un appartamento non occupato appropriato per residenza. Benché ispezioni sarebbero eseguite per assicurare ottemperanza con questi requisiti, l'affitto specialmente protetto raramente era, se mai, annullò su questi motivi (veda Đoki ćc. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 6518/04, § 6 27 maggio 2010). In questo collegamento, i richiedenti indicarono, che era vero che in possessori di teoria di un affitto specialmente protetto potrebbe essere mossosi ad un'abitazione di sostituto se l'abitazione che loro stavano occupando fosse troppo grande per loro e gli altri utenti con riguardo ad a standard sociali (veda le osservazioni del Governo in paragrafo 9 sopra). Secondo i richiedenti, questa possibilità non era mai comunque, in pratica usata e non c'era causa-legge sulla questione.
15. Tutti i cittadini impiegato furono costretti a pagare un contributo di alloggio mensile e speciale (approssimativamente 4.5 a 6 per cento del loro reddito mensile) all'Alloggio Fondo Unito. I finanziamenti così ottenuti furono usati costruire e mantenere appartamenti socialmente-posseduti. L'Alloggio Fondo accordò benefici (l'allocazione di un appartamento sotto affitto specialmente protetto, o presta acquistare, costruisca o rinnovi un'abitazione) sulla base dei principi della mutualità e la solidarietà con quegli in bisogno. Tutti socialmente-possedettero abitazioni erano parte dell'Alloggio Fondo Unito ed amministrarono con istituzioni Statali, municipi, imprese sociali e le altre persone giuridiche governate con legge pubblica.
16. Prima che Slovenia divenne indipendente, i richiedenti o i loro legali predecessori acquisirono affitti specialmente protetti in abitazioni socialmente-possedute che erano state espropriate sotto la legislazione su nationalisation. Sotto la legislazione vigente prima di 1991, nessuna differenza in condizioni di affitto specialmente protette fu resa fra inquilini di abitazioni Stato-costruite ed inquilini di abitazioni nazionalizzate.
17. 25 giugno 1991 la Repubblica della Slovenia dichiarò la sua indipendenza. Fra le prime riforme decretate l'Alloggio sia Atto 1991 (zakon di Stanovanjski) ed il Denationalisation Act 1991 (Zakon o denacionalizaciji), mirò a compensando i mali commessi dopo la Seconda Mondo Guerra. La Costituzione nuova della Repubblica della Slovenia (Sezione 33) garantito il diritto di proprietà privata.
2. L'Alloggio Atto 1991
18. L'Alloggio Atto 1991 (in seguito assegnò anche a come il “SZ”) purché per la trasformazione e privatizzazione di abitazioni socialmente-possedute. L'Alloggio Fondo Unito (veda paragrafo 15 sopra) si fu sciolto e, con le poche eccezioni, le abitazioni socialmente-possedute furono trasferite, ex lege in proprietà Statale o in che delle comunità locali o il Pensione Fondo Nazionale. Quelle abitazioni dopo le quali erano state socialmente-possedute proprietà state state espropriate da proprietari privati fu trasferito nella proprietà dei municipi (Sezione 113).
19. L'affitto specialmente protetto fu sostituito ex lege con un contratto di contratto d'affitto normale (Sezione 141). I possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti o, nell'evento della loro morte, i loro membri di famiglia che vivono negli appartamenti, fu dato la possibilità di affittare gli appartamenti per un periodo indefinito e per un affitto senza scopo di lucro (quale mantenimento coperto, gestione dell'appartamento e capitale costa-Sezione 147) o di acquistarli su termini favorevoli, pagando un prezzo amministrativamente definito che fu calcolato sulla base di un sconto di 30% (nell'evento di pagamento in rate) o 60% (nell'evento di uno-via pagamento) via il valore di stima (Sezioni 117-124).
20. In pratica questo intese un prezzo di 5-10% del vero valore di mercato dell'abitazione pagabile in rate secondo i richiedenti, più di 20 anni o 5% di che valore pagabile entro 60 giorni. Il diritto per acquistare su termini favorevoli potrebbe essere trasferito inter vivos o mortis causa a membri di famiglia vicini. Comunque, possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto in appartamenti che erano stati espropriati potrebbero acquistarli solamente su termini favorevoli se i proprietari fossero d'accordo a venderli entro un anno dalla restituzione dell'abitazione (le Sezioni 117 e 125). In che causa i 30 o 60 per sconto di cento (le Sezioni 117 e 119) fu offerto col proprietario che sarebbe rimborsato poi col municipio.
21. Segue dal sopra che tutti i possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti furono dati la possibilità di prendere contratti d'affitto nuovi (essere firmato entro sei mesi dall'entrata in vigore dell'Alloggio Atto 1991). Comunque, i richiedenti contesero che questi contratti d'affitto nuovi erano meno vantaggiosi dell'affitto specialmente protetto. In particolare, inquilini non avevano garantito più affitto delle loro case poiché i proprietari potrebbero trasportarli agli altri appartamenti adeguati senza qualsiasi la particolare giustificazione (Sezione 54). C'erano ora nove motivi sui quali inquilini potrebbero essere sfrattati per cattiva condotta, prima comparati con tre. I motivi colpa-basati per conclusione del contratto d'affitto erano (Sezione 53 del SZ):
“- se l'inquilino e qualsiasi persona che vive con lui usa la cassa di abitazione alla legge o i termini del contratto d'affitto;
- se, a proposito loro usi l'abitazione, l'inquilino o qualsiasi persona che vive con lui cause danno notevole all'abitazione o ad aree comuni, parti, installazioni ed installazioni di un edificio di multi-abitazione;
- se l'inquilino fallisce due volte in successione o per due fuori dello scorso dodici mesi per pagare affitto o costa pagabile oltre ad affitto all'interno del tempo-limite specificato nel contratto d'affitto;
- se l'inquilino o qualsiasi persona che vive con lui, con la loro maniera di usare l'abitazione disturba gli altri residenti nel loro uso tranquillo dell'abitazione frequentemente o seriamente;
- se l'inquilino fa cambi all'abitazione ed apparecchiature senza il beneplacito precedente del proprietario;
- se, oltre all'inquilino, una persona che non è chiamata nel contratto d'affitto usi contraenti l'abitazione per più di trenta giorni senza la conoscenza del proprietario;
- se l'inquilino affitta fuori l'abitazione senza l'accordo del proprietario o accuse un subaffittuario un affitto più alto;
- se l'inquilino non concede accesso all'abitazione in cause [specificò con legge];
- se l'inquilino o qualsiasi l'altra persona che usa l'abitazione impegna in un'attività proibita là, o un'attività permessa in una maniera illegale.”
22. Prima di terminare il contratto d'affitto il proprietario dare avviso scritto all'inquilino che stava violando presumibilmente le sue disposizioni antecedente aveva comunque,; nessuna conclusione si concedè se l'incapacità per pagare l'affitto in pieno ed adempiere obblighi completamente altri fosse dovuta all'angoscia sociale dell'inquilino e le altre persone che usano l'abitazione.
23. Senza il permesso del proprietario, inquilini non potevano subaffittare un appartamento, potrebbero rinnovarlo o potrebbero decorarlo. Né loro potrebbero portare persone nuove nell'appartamento (Sezione 53). Il proprietario potrebbe rinnovare l'appartamento a qualsiasi il tempo e lo digita due volte per anno (Sezione 44). L'inquilino non poteva trasferire liberamente il contratto d'affitto ad un altro membro di famiglia o potrebbe scambiare l'appartamento. Dopo che la morte dell'inquilino originale, solamente il consorte o una persona che hanno vissuto con l'inquilino in una relazione permanente, o un membro di famiglia immediato che vive nell'appartamento, aveva diritto a prendere il contratto d'affitto (Sezione 56). L'inquilino doveva pagare l'affitto senza scopo di lucro e giuridicamente regolato (Sezione 63) che, diversamente da parcella (veda paragrafo 8 sopra), non solo spese di manutenzione coperte ed il deprezzamento, ma anche incluse una somma per compensare capitale costa e gestione dell'abitazione.
3. Il Denationalisation Act 1991
24. Il Denationalisation Act 1991 (in seguito assegnò anche a come il “ZDen”) regolò il denationalisation di proprietà che prima era passata in proprietà Statale per legislazione su riforma agraria, nationalisation, il sequestro o le altre forme dell'espropriazione di proprietà privatamente possedute. Proprietari precedenti o i loro eredi (in seguito assegnò a come “proprietari precedenti”) fu concesso (sino a 7 dicembre 1993) chiedere restituzione della proprietà espropriata. Dovunque possibile, la proprietà stessa sarebbe ritornata in natura, incluso abitazioni che erano state affittate sotto lo schema di affitto specialmente protetto. Dove non era possibile simile restituzione, rivendicatori furono concessi per sostituire il risarcimento di and/or di proprietà (Sezione 2).
25. La restituzione di abitazioni occupata con un inquilino non colpì i contratti d'affitto conclusi nel frattempo che rimase in vigore (veda Sezione 125 del SZ e Sezione 24 dello ZDen).
26. I richiedenti indicarono che dopo la promulgazione della riforma di alloggio, un numero di possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti in appartamenti prima espropriati registrati richiede di acquistare gli appartamenti. Il termine massimo per registrare simile richieste scadute prima che per “proprietari precedenti” registrare rivendicazioni di restituzione. Solamente quando divenne chiaro in cause individuali (specialmente nel 1994) che procedimenti di denationalisation erano stati iniziati, era i possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti informati che le loro richieste per acquistare erano state respinte.
(un) I procedimenti di denationalisation
27. Possessori di diritti di occupazione non avevano parte nei procedimenti di denationalisation per determinare la proprietà della proprietà che volle dire che loro non furono notificati quando una richiesta fu registrata per la restituzione dell'abitazione loro stavano occupando. Secondo i dati presentati coi richiedenti, 37,000 richieste di restituzione erano state registrate, e nel periodo sino alla fine di 1999 una media annuale di 2,000 a 5,000 decisioni era stata resa che intese un totale di approssimativamente 29,000 decisioni fuori di che solamente approssimativamente 24,000 divennero definitivo. Sino a 1999 18% di decisioni erano approssimativamente per restituzione nella forma del risarcimento, 27% per restituzione di proprietà di abitazioni gratis 44% per restituzione di proprietà di abitazioni occupate e 8% erano rifiuti o rifiuti delle richieste. Questo volle dire che con la fine di 1999 una porzione sostanziale di procedure di denationalisation non era stata completata. Inizialmente in simile procedure la proprietà fu ritornata ai primo della guerra proprietari; nella maggioranza enorme di cause quelli proprietari erano passati via comunque, che volle dire che per identificare il “proprietari precedenti” una procedura di eredità complessa e lunga era necessaria.
28. Il Governo indicò che inquilini non erano parte ai procedimenti di denationalisation perché restituzione non colpì la relazione di affitto e non faceva pregiudizio gli inquilini i diritti di ' o benefici che avevano una base diretta in legge. Inoltre, l'esistenza di una relazione di affitto non colpì la decisione su denationalisation e restituzione (veda decisione di Corte Costituzionale n. Su-237/97, aguzzi 5). Comunque, inquilini potrebbero partecipare se loro dimostrassero un interesse legale, notevolmente un interesse nel recuperare i loro investimenti. In questo riguardo a, lo status di parte ai procedimenti di denationalisation fu riconosciuto in riguardo di: (un) qualsiasi la persona che, di fronte a 7 dicembre 1991 (data di entrata in vigore dello ZDen), aveva investito in beni immobili nazionalizzato, ogni qualvolta e pertanto siccome è probabile che i procedimenti conducano ad una direttiva su che i diritti di persona che derivano dagli investimenti riguardarono, e (b) le entità responsabile per restituzione che nella causa di abitazioni socialmente-possedute e precedenti di solito intendeva municipi (Sezione 60 dello ZDen).
(b) Rimborso di investimenti
29. Il principio di restituzione in natura fatta domanda anche in cause nelle quali era aumentato il valore della proprietà. Possessori precedenti del diritto di occupazione che aveva investito nell'abitazione potrebbero chiedere solamente risarcimento sotto la legge, ma non acquisisce proprietà dell'abitazione con virtù di simile investimenti. In particolare, l'occupante potrebbe chiedere recupero delle spese processuali totale sulla condizione che gli investimenti erano stati resi prima di 7 dicembre 1991 e che loro costituirono investimenti di mantenimento notevoli e mantenimento di routine non semplice. Su un'azione giudiziale introdotta con l'inquilino, la corte competente nominerebbe un perito di costruzione per valutare il valore della proprietà al tempo di nationalisation ed il suo valore al tempo della sua restituzione; un inquilino che potrebbe offrire prova degli investimenti rese (loro non furono costretti ad offrire prova che la comunità di residenti aveva acconsentito agli investimenti) potrebbe ottenere poi la differenza fra i due valori della proprietà (Sezione 25 dello ZDen). In cause nelle quali già era stata adottata una definitivo decisione su restituzione, una rivendicazione per ricupero di investimenti potrebbe essere registrata entro un anno dall'entrata in vigore dell'Atto del 1998 che corregge lo ZDen.
30. I richiedenti osservarono che nell'evento di un aumento nel valore della proprietà a causa degli investimenti resi con l'inquilino, Sezione 25 dello ZDen diede tre scelte al “proprietari precedenti”: (un) richiedere il risarcimento invece di restituzione in natura; (b) richiedere comproprietà dell'abitazione; (il c) recuperare la piena proprietà e rimborsare l'inquilino. Come un articolo, gli inquilini che ' richiede per rimborso furono esaminati in set di procedimenti iniziati dopo i procedimenti di denationalisation, spesso dopo l'anno 2005. Secondo i richiedenti, la valutazione delle abitazioni secondo gli articoli nazionali ed attinenti era comunque, totalmente irreale che fece anche la valutazione del valore aumentato dovuta ad investimenti nuovi irreale. Inoltre, solamente quegli investimenti che avevano aumentato il valore dell'abitazione-e non quelli che avevano tenuto il valore della proprietà allo stesso livello fin dalla sua espropriazione-fu preso in considerazione. Il tempo-limite per rimborso di investimenti era dieci anni e le parti potrebbero giungere ad un regolamento amichevole su queste questioni. “Proprietari precedenti” frequentemente fece il rimborso condizionale sugli inquilini che sgombrano i locali. Nei richiedenti l'opinione di ', questi articoli non garantirono possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione una possibilità equa di recuperare il vero valore dei loro investimenti.
4. I 1994 emendamenti all'Alloggio Agiscono ed i tre “modelli di privatizzazione di sostituto”
31. Negli anni seguenti, i SZ e gli ZDen, così come gli atti legali che li implementano, subì emendamenti numerosi che su delle occasioni erano più favorevole agli inquilini, e su altri al “proprietari precedenti.”
32. I 1994 emendamenti all'Alloggio Agiscono 1991, decretò 6 aprile 1994, era più in favore degli inquilini. Possessori precedenti di un affitto specialmente protetto che occupò appartamenti prima espropriati ai quali non erano stati ritornati “proprietari precedenti” (perché nessuna richiesta per restituzione era stata registrata, o la richiesta era stata respinta) fu concesso per acquistare gli appartamenti loro stavano occupando (corresse Sezioni 117 e 123).
33. La Sezione 125 corretta inoltre purché che dove l'abitazione era stata ritornata il “proprietario precedente”, se lui fosse d'accordo a vendere lui era eleggibile per una ricompensa finanziaria e supplementare da finanziamenti pubblici (questo era il così definito “prima il modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto).
34. Se il “proprietario precedente” declinò vendere l'abitazione e l'inquilino decise, entro due anni dalla restituzione, muoversi fuori ed acquistare un appartamento o costruisce un alloggio, e se il “proprietario precedente” così convenuto, lui pagherebbe il risarcimento di inquilino che corrisponde a 30 per cento del valore dell'abitazione. Comunque, se il “proprietario precedente” rifiutò questa soluzione, l'inquilino fu concesso per chiedere lo stesso importo dall'entità responsabile per restituzione che era un municipio di solito (veda paragrafo 28 sopra). L'inquilino fu concesso ad ulteriore risarcimento che corrisponde a 50 per cento del valore, nel terzo, dal municipio, lo sloveno Risarcimento Fondo e lo Sviluppo Fondo della Repubblica della Slovenia. In oltre, l'inquilino aveva anche sotto il diritto ad un prestito Statale le certe condizioni. Questo era il così definito “secondo modello” per stabilire il problema di alloggio.
35. I 1994 emendamenti introdussero anche un così definito “terzo modello”, dove un inquilino a chi il “proprietario precedente” non era preparato per vendere l'abitazione potrebbe acquistare un appartamento di sostituto comparabile su termini favorevoli dal municipio se lui decidesse di non acquistare un altro piatto o costruisce un alloggio (corresse Sezione 125). Sotto questo modello, i richiedenti erano nella stessa posizione come possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti in abitazioni Stato-costruite che non potevano acquistare l'abitazione che loro avevano occupato a causa di ostacoli pratici e legali.
36. I richiedenti notarono che il diritto per acquistare stabilì con la Sezione 125 corretta del SZ era giuridicamente direttamente applicabile e non fu sottoposto o a tempo-limiti di preclusive o ad una prescrizione. Era una scelta legale e permanente, essere compreso sulla base di una richiesta unilaterale col possessore precedente dell'affitto specialmente protetto (decisione di Corte Suprema di 14 gennaio 2010, n. II Ips 370/2007).
37. Comunque, il “terzo modello” fu abrogato 25 novembre 1999 con la Corte Costituzionale (la decisione U-io-268/96) che considerato che il carico finanziario e supplementare aveva restretto impropriamente di recente i municipi ' diritti di proprietà acquisiti su abitazioni che prima erano state possedute socialmente. Nell'opinione della Corte Costituzionale, questa restrizione non poteva essere giustificata con la tendenza della legislatura ad assicurare che gli inquilini protetti e precedenti di abitazioni di denationalised goderono una posizione che assomiglia al più da vicino possibile che di altri inquilini, in particolare con riguardo ad alla possibilità di acquistare un appartamento.
38. 21 marzo 1996 la Corte Costituzionale consegnò una decisione (U-io-119/94) riguardo al diritto di pre-acquisto di inquilini che hanno contratti della durata illimitata (Sezione 18), come i possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti. Contenne che che diritto di pre-acquisto, già purché per con la legislazione precedente, non interferisca coi diritti di proprietà in riguardo di abitazioni soggetto a privatizzazione originale sotto il SZ e lo ZDen, poiché il diritto di proprietà non era stato stabilito ancora al tempo dell'entrata in vigore di quegli atti. Comunque, dove diritti di proprietà erano stati acquisiti con altro vuole dire, il diritto di pre-acquisto interferì col diritto di proprietà ed era incostituzionale. L'opinione che dissente di Giudice Lojze Ude fu appesa alla decisione di Corte Costituzionale.
5. L'Alloggio Atto 2003 e gli ulteriori sviluppi
39. Emendamenti susseguenti all'Alloggio Agiscono 1991, e l'Alloggio Atto nuovo decretò nel 2003 (in seguito assegnò anche a come il “SZ-1”), era più favorevole al “proprietari precedenti” che fu autorizzato per sollevare l'affitto senza scopo di lucro con su a 37% per coprire spese di manutenzione e le altre spese. Che aumento nell'affitto senza scopo di lucro sarebbe fatto domanda solamente a contratti d'affitto presi dopo che gli emendamenti entrarono in vigore (22 marzo 2000). Comunque, 20 febbraio 2003 la Corte Costituzionale (la decisione n. U-io-303/00-12) dichiarò questa limitazione incostituzionale come essendo discriminatorio. Sottolineò che proteggendo lo status di occupazione precedente possessori destri non vollero dire che l'affitto senza scopo di lucro non potesse cambiare, e che eliminando la discrepanza nel sistema precedente (sotto che affitti non coprirono il vero costo dell'uso di un'abitazione) non poteva essere ritenuto per essere un'interferenza inammissibile coi termini dei contratti di contratto d'affitto. La protezione di diritti acquisiti ed il principio della non-retroattività non proteggè inquilini da aumenti in affitto. L'aumento nell'affitto senza scopo di lucro fu prolungato così a tutti i contratti d'affitto che hanno predatato la promulgazione dei 2000 emendamenti.
40. L'Alloggio Atto 2003 aumentò da nove a tredici il numero di motivi colpa-basati sul quale inquilini potrebbero essere sfrattati dalle loro case (persone non autorizzate che vivono nell'appartamento, violazione dell'alloggio decide, l'assenza di inquilino in eccesso di tre mesi, proprietà di un'altra abitazione appropriata, o con l'inquilino o con suo o il suo partner-Sezione 103). Comunque, inquilini potrebbero evitare conclusione del contratto d'affitto con provando che il problema non era colpa loro o che non era stato possibile per loro per rettificare il problema all'interno del tempo-limite determinato (Sezione 112(6)). Il “proprietario precedente” potrebbe trasportare anche l'inquilino ad un altro appartamento adeguato (definito in Sezione 10 come un appartamento che soddisfa le necessità di alloggio dell'inquilino ed i suoi membri di famiglia immediati che vivono con lui o lei) a qualsiasi il tempo e senza qualsiasi la ragione; questo potrebbe essere fatto solamente comunque, una volta allo stesso inquilino ed i costi di allontanamento sopportarono col “proprietario precedente” (Sezione 106). In riguardo della trasferibilità del contratto d'affitto dopo la morte dell'inquilino, una richiesta per prendere sul contratto d'affitto doveva per essere registrato entro 90 giorni (Sezione 109). Per questo fine, un parente su alla seconda generazione che aveva vissuto in comunità economica col possessore precedente del diritto di occupazione per più di due anni nel giorno di entrata in vigore dell'Alloggio Atto era considerato che fosse un “membro di famiglia immediato” (Sezione 180). L'inquilino aveva un diritto di pre-acquisto se l'appartamento fosse per vendita.
41. Inoltre, sussidi di affitto (su a 80% dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro) era disponibile ad inquilini nell'evento delle difficoltà finanziarie; persone socialmente svantaggiate potrebbero fare domanda anche ai municipi per ottenere un altro noleggio senza scopo di lucro che indulge o una soluzione provvisoria per il loro alloggio ha bisogno (le Sezioni 104 e 121). L'Emendamento dell'Atto dell'Alloggio del 2009 introdusse Sezioni 121a e 121b che purché per la possibilità, per persone che stavano pagando mercato affitta ed inutilmente aveva fatto domanda per l'allocazione di un noleggio indulgere senza scopo di lucro, ottenere sussidi (corrispondendo alla differenza fra il mercato ed affitti senza scopo di lucro). Queste disposizioni che compensarono la scarsità di abitazioni senza scopo di lucro furono tirate.
42. L'Alloggio Atto del 2003 introdusse anche un “modello nuovo” di così definito “privatizzazione di sostituto” per occupazione precedente possessori corretti. Entro cinque anni dopo la promulgazione dell'Atto o dopo la decisione su denationalisation definitivo erano divenuti, loro potrebbero esercitare il loro diritto per acquistare un'altra abitazione o costruire un alloggio, così stato concesso al risarcimento speciale (su a 74% del prezzo dell'abitazione-Sezione 173) ed ad un prestito sovvenzionato per l'importo rimanente. Diritto ad e livello del risarcimento fu determinato col Ministero responsabile per le questioni di alloggio. Inquilini che decisero di comprare un'altra abitazione o costruire un alloggio furono obbligati per sgombrare il loro alloggio affittato nessuno più tardi che un anno dopo avere ricevuto il risarcimento.
43. Inoltre, inquilini che non desiderarono o non potevano permettersi di comprare un appartamento potrebbero fare domanda affittare un'abitazione senza scopo di lucro (Sezione 174). Il secondo fu definito come un'abitazione affittata fuori col municipio, lo Stato o un finanziamento di alloggio pubblico od organizzazione senza scopo di lucro, assegnò sulla base di una chiamata pubblica per le richieste (Sezione 87). Sotto questa procedura “inquilini di un'abitazione espropriarono sotto regolamentazioni di nationalisation e ritornarono al proprietario precedente” fu assegnato un piuttosto numero alto di punti (190) che, secondo il Governo, offrì loro le buone prospettive di essendo dato prioritario e davvero essere dichiarato eleggibile. Affitti accordi per abitazioni senza scopo di lucro sarebbe concluso per un periodo illimitato (Sezione 90).
6. Dati statistici
44. Secondo informazioni disponibile c'erano delle 11,000 unità di alloggio eleggibili per ritorno a nel 1991 sull'Internet, “proprietari precedenti.” Delle 6,300 unità di alloggio furono ritornate a proprietà nel pieno titolo, mentre alcuni 4,700 furono ritornati “proprietari precedenti” mentre ancora occupò con inquilini che prima avevano protegguto specialmente affitti. Secondo il Governo, nel 2012 dei 2,780 simile inquilini erano riusciti a risolvere la loro situazione di alloggio con privatizzazione di sostituto che è acquistando o costruendo un'abitazione di sostituto con l'aiuto di un incentivo finanziario dallo Stato. Un ulteriori 288 inquilini avevano depositato richieste e procedimenti ancora erano pendenti al tempo di osservazione delle osservazioni del Governo. Un valutò 1,500 inquilini continuerebbero infine a vivere negli appartamenti loro prima avevano occupato come possessori di affitti specialmente protetti.
45. I richiedenti enfatizzarono che all'inizio della riforma di alloggio, fuori di approssimativamente 650,000 unità di alloggio in Slovenia 230,000 furono socialmente-possedute alloggio di abitazioni approssimativamente un terzo della popolazione di sloveno sotto affitti specialmente protetti (veda paragrafo 7 sopra). Al tempo la legislazione non distinse fra abitazioni espropriate e le altre abitazioni socialmente-possedute (veda paragrafo 16 sopra) e, in generale, individui che acquisiscono diritti di occupazione non seppero anche quale fonte dalla quale l'abitazione è venuta. Questo era specialmente vero per quelli che avevano acquisito diritti di occupazione molte decadi dopo l'espropriazione. La grande maggioranza di possessori di diritti di occupazione che erano stati dati l'opportunità di acquistare le abitazioni su termini favorevoli si era giovata a di questa possibilità; solamente alcuni di loro aveva sospeso negli appartamenti su una base contrattuale. Comunque, siccome spiegato in paragrafo 20 sopra, la possibilità di acquistare senza il “proprietari precedenti '” beneplacito non fu dato a quelli che stavano vivendo in abitazioni prima espropriate soggetto a denationalisation (approssimativamente 4,700 proprietà, coprendo 2% di inquilini del tutto specialmente protetti). Secondo le stime disponibili, a febbraio 2009 approssimativamente 1,500 famiglie (più più probabilmente quelli che non potevano permettersi di comprare un'abitazione) aveva continuato ad affittare le loro abitazioni di denationalised, mentre approssimativamente 3,200 famiglie avevano sgombrato i locali ed avevano trovato una soluzione al loro alloggio ha bisogno altrove. Secondo i richiedenti, per la categoria precedente di relazioni di famiglie col “proprietari precedenti” era stato oppresso con conflitti giudiziali e personali spesso. “Proprietari precedenti” fece domanda pressione continua per, inter alia, sfratti illegali aumenti di affitto o semplicemente mantenimento di edificio povero.
7. Il Difensore civile di sloveno
46. Nelle sue relazioni annuali regolari il Difensore civile di sloveno ha illustrato le difficoltà che affrontano inquilini in appartamenti di denationalised fin da 1995. Nella sua Relazione Speciale di 8 gennaio 2002 sulla Situazione di Inquilini in Appartamenti di Denationalised lui rese anche un numero di proposte progettò per rimediare alla situazione: modelli fattibili per privatizzazione di sostituto (i più grandi incentivi finanziari di risolvere il problema di alloggio, per inquilini e “proprietari precedenti”), protezione della durata di contratti d'affitto e definizione dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro, meccanismi legali per la protezione di inquilini i diritti di ', come patrocinio gratuito gratis attuazione migliorata del diritto per acquistare per prelazione, valutazione realistica di inquilini gli investimenti di ' per la rimessa a nuovo delle abitazioni.
B. le imprese di L'Associazione
1. Il “il ricorso”
47. 3 febbraio 1998 l'Associazione di Inquilini (in seguito, “l'Associazione”), depositò un “il ricorso” con molte autorità Statali, incluso la Riunione Nazionale il Presidente della Repubblica ed il Governo. Impugnò l'Alloggio Atto 1991 ed il Denationalisation Act 1991, sulla base che loro spogliarono i membri dell'Associazione dei loro diritti di affitto specialmente protetti in una maniera incompatibile con la Costituzione della Repubblica Socialista di Slovenia che era ancora in vigore al tempo quando i due legge furono approvati nel 1991. Invece del privilegiato affitto specialmente protetto che nella prospettiva dell'Associazione era in molti riguardi uguaglia ad un diritto di proprietà, inquilini furono accordati contratti d'affitto con un affitto senza scopo di lucro e provvisorio. L'abitazione era stata presa una volta inoltre, finita con un “proprietario precedente”, che contratto divenne un contratto di contratto d'affitto ordinario. Questo spogliò efficacemente gli inquilini della loro proprietà e casa. Nel 1991 approssimativamente 45,000 individui (possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti e le loro famiglie), vivendo in 13,000 appartamenti, riguardò con queste misure. Loro si considerarono vittime della transizione, nella stessa maniera come “proprietari precedenti” di chi proprietà era stata portata via sotto il regime precedente.
48. L'Associazione si lamentò anche che i suoi membri non furono dati tutti i diritti e benefici che gli altri possessori di affitto specialmente protetti precedenti hanno goduto, come il diritto per acquistare l'abitazione ed avere un contratto d'affitto permanente con un affitto senza scopo di lucro. Dibattè che inquilini che-piaccia tutti i suoi membri-stava vivendo una volta in abitazioni espropriate, non poteva acquistare le loro case alle quali erano soggetto a restituzione il “proprietari precedenti”, mentre tutti gli altri beneficiari precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti avevano quel la possibilità. In oltre, “proprietari precedenti” di appartamenti ritornati in procedimenti di denationalisation stava vendendoli a terze parti ma non agli inquilini che stavano affrontando procedimenti di sfratto. Nella prospettiva dell'Associazione, la restituzione delle abitazioni al “proprietari precedenti” deprivato gli inquilini del diritto per acquistarli e diede luogo a trattamento differenziale fra i due gruppi di inquilini su nessuna base ragionevole.
49. La legislazione offensiva andò a vuoto presumibilmente anche a prevedere per il risarcimento corretto per i soldi gli inquilini aveva investito nel mantenimento e miglioramento delle abitazioni. Inoltre, l'Associazione si lamentò che i suoi membri non avevano standi della località nei procedimenti di denationalisation che erano decidere sulla proprietà di “loro” le abitazioni. Criticò anche gli aumenti continui nell'affitto senza scopo di lucro che nella sua prospettiva stava avvicinandosi a livelli comparabile agli affitti accusato sul mercato gratis. L'Associazione concluse che privatizzazione e restituzione di abitazioni prima espropriate dovrebbero essere realizzate con pagando il risarcimento al “proprietari precedenti” delle abitazioni piuttosto che restituendo la loro proprietà, come raccomandato con Decisione 1096 della Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa (veda divide in paragrafi 87-89 sotto). Richiese che un perpetrazione competente ed indipendente sia esposto su, che il SZ e lo ZDen siano corretti, che la restituzione di proprietà come simile sia sospeso e che l'Alloggio Nazionale Programme sia completato.
50. 2 aprile 1998 il Governo adottò una decisione riguardo al ricorso, con un'opinione accompagnante. Il Governo non concordò che inquilini erano le vittime di transizione. Acquistare le abitazioni, circostanze fattuale diverse dovevano essere prese in considerazione riguardo al diritto di possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti. Mentre in delle cause le abitazioni erano state costruite con finanziamenti di Stato, nelle altre cause loro erano stati espropriati da proprietari privati. Questi “proprietari precedenti” chiederebbe anche restituzione di, e perciò diritti di proprietà sulle abitazioni. Questo volle dire che loro avevano priorità sui possessori precedenti di diritti di affitto specialmente protetti. In conclusione, come lontano come l'acquisto di abitazioni riguardò, le due categorie di possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti non erano in una posizione comparabile.
51. D'altra parte riguardo agli altri diritti e benefici gli inquilini erano stati fissati su un appiglio uguale con tutti quelli possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti che decisero di non acquistare le loro abitazioni ma affittarli su termini favorevoli. Loro erano tutti accordarono il diritto per affittare le abitazioni per un periodo indefinito per un affitto senza scopo di lucro, anche dopo il “proprietario precedente” prese l'appartamento. Questo era stato sostenuto con la Corte Costituzionale.
52. Il Governo contestò anche l'eccezione che la legislazione contestata non prese in considerazione gli investimenti gli inquilini aveva fissato nelle abitazioni. Loro si riferirono alle disposizioni attinenti del SZ che accordò possessori di affitto specialmente protetti e precedenti il diritto al risarcimento. Il Governo indicò che le necessità e le aspettative degli inquilini dovevano essere riconciliate con quelli del “proprietari precedenti” delle abitazioni, così come con le vesti finanziarie e limitate dello Stato di offrirli con alloggio su termini favorevoli. Loro ammisero inoltre che gli inquilini, persone specialmente anziane le certe difficoltà incontrate nella loro situazione nuova (pressione per muoversi fuori o pagare un affitto più alto), ma simile circostanze non avevano fondamento nella legislazione esistente. Il Governo sostenne la costituzione di un perpetrazione competente con rappresentanti di inquilini e “proprietari precedenti.” Sembra che nessuna altra autorità prese una posizione riguardo al ricorso.
2. I procedimenti amministrativi
53. In 8 maggio 1998 l'Associazione avviò procedimenti contro il Governo con la Corte amministrativa di Ljubljana, per non iniziare gli emendamenti necessari al SZ e lo ZDen. Nella loro prospettiva, la legislazione in oggetto violò gli inquilini i diritti di ' sotto la Costituzione e la Convenzione europea su Diritti umani, e trascurò Decisione 1096 della Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa. In particolare, l'Associazione ripetè le azioni di reclamo dal suo ricorso come il quale le abitazioni non dovrebbero essere ritornate così, che gli inquilini avevano diritto ad acquistare le abitazioni, che loro non avevano standi della località nei procedimenti di denationalisation e che i loro investimenti nelle abitazioni non erano stati presi in considerazione.
54. 3 marzo 1999 la Corte amministrativa respinse le azioni di reclamo, mentre sostenendo che la decisione del Governo e l'opinione accompagnante non qualificarono sotto Sezione 1 del Controversie Atto Amministrativo, come poi in vigore, come un atto individuale o un'azione che infrange i diritti costituzionali dell'individuo.
55. 6 aprile 1999 l'Associazione piacque alla Corte Suprema.
56. 20 settembre 2001 la Corte Suprema respinse il ricorso e sostenne la decisione della Corte amministrativa di 3 marzo 1999.
57. 8 marzo 2002 l'Associazione presentò un reclamo costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale, mentre impugnando la decisione della Corte Suprema. Ripetè gli argomenti dal ricorso e gli atti susseguenti, e dibattè in particolare che la legislazione in problema spogliò gli inquilini della loro proprietà e case.
58. 11 febbraio 2004 la Corte Costituzionale respinse l'azione di reclamo. Sostenne le decisioni della Corte amministrativa e la Corte Suprema che la decisione governativa ed attinente e l'opinione accompagnante non poteva essere impugnata in procedimenti amministrativi. Nella prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale, loro rifletterono soltanto la posizione di politica del Governo riguardo al ricorso depositato, e non era perciò soggetto a revisione di corte.
3. L'Iniziativa Costituzionale (pobuda di Ustavna)
59. 8 marzo 2002, allo stesso tempo come l'azione di reclamo costituzionale (veda paragrafo 57 sopra), l'Associazione, rappresentando un gruppo di possessori di affitto specialmente protetti e precedenti depositò anche un'iniziativa costituzionale per revisione della costituzionalità del SZ, lo ZDen le Controversie Amministrative Atto 1997 e la pratica giudiziale ed attinente, e la loro compatibilità con diritto internazionale che lega sulla Slovenia.
60. 25 settembre 2003 la Corte Costituzionale respinse l'iniziativa costituzionale (la decisione U-io-172/02-40). Ammise che l'Associazione, appellandosi che su un numero di atti, iniziò coi suoi membri, aveva un interesse legale nell'impugnare la legislazione esistente poiché interferì direttamente coi loro diritti, interessi e posizione legale, ma sé decisero che la Corte Costituzionale non aveva giurisdizione per esaminare la compatibilità della legislazione contestata con le disposizioni della Costituzione della Repubblica Socialista di Slovenia che era più in vigore.
61. Appellandosi sulla causa-legge della Corte europea di Diritti umani, la Corte Costituzionale seguì a dire che in qualsiasi l'evento l'affitto specialmente protetto non poteva essere interpretato come un diritto assoluto a proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, garantendo l'acquisizione di una particolare abitazione. Né potrebbe essere detto che i rivendicatori il diritto di ' ad una casa era stato violato sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione, poiché loro potrebbero rimanere nelle abitazioni, con un contratto della durata illimitata e per un affitto senza scopo di lucro. In oltre, dopo la morte dell'inquilino, il diritto di un consorte o una persona che hanno vissuto con l'inquilino in una relazione permanente, o un membro di famiglia immediato che vive nell'appartamento, prendere l'affitto fu garantito anche (Sezione 56 di SZ).
62. La Corte Costituzionale aveva sostenuto nelle sue decisioni precedenti che l'affitto specialmente protetto dal sistema precedente era un diritto per essere protegguto con l'articolo di legge. Nel sistema nuovo, questo diritto incontrò comunque, gli altri diritti. Nel trasporre il sistema di relazioni di affitto specialmente protette in relazioni di contratto d'affitto, il legislatore non poteva adempiere tutte le aspettative che sorgono dal sistema socio-economico e politico precedente che fu fondato su proprietà sociale e non su proprietà privata. I diritti dal sistema precedente non potevano rimanere immutati ed intatto.
63. Lo Stato aveva subito cambi politici e sociali, incluso la trasformazione di proprietà sociale in proprietà privata. La legislazione impugnata e la trasformazione di affitto specialmente protetto nei semplici diritti di affitto dovrebbero essere capite perciò come parte di questi cambi. Inquilini i diritti di ' ora furono limitati coi diritti del “proprietari precedenti” delle abitazioni.
64. In particolare, gli inquilini il diritto di ' per ora acquistare competè coi diritti di proprietà del “proprietari precedenti” delle abitazioni. In questo conflitto di diritti, priorità fu data ai diritti di proprietà del “proprietari precedenti.” Con questo argomento la Corte Costituzionale respinse anche l'eccezione che inquilini che non potevano acquistare le loro abitazioni perché loro erano soggetto a restituzione al “proprietari precedenti” fu discriminato contro rispetto con tutti gli altri inquilini che avevano diritto a comprare le loro abitazioni. Contenne che le circostanze fattuale dei due gruppi di inquilini erano assolutamente diverse. Mentre i diritti di un gruppo di inquilini dovevano essere riconciliati coi diritti del “proprietari precedenti” delle abitazioni, nessuno simile limitazione sui diritti dell'altro gruppo di inquilini era necessaria. Gli inquilini avevano anche un diritto di pre-acquisto nell'evento che il “proprietario precedente” decise di vendere l'abitazione che potrebbe essere entrata nel registro di terra e potrebbe essere stata solamente più debole che il diritto di pre-acquisto di un coproprietario (Sezione 176 del SZ-1).
65. Come per gli altri diritti e benefici, incluso il diritto ad un affitto senza scopo di lucro la Corte Costituzionale considerò che tutti i possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione erano stati messi su un appiglio uguale, nonostante l'origine delle loro abitazioni. Questi diritti, a turno, era comparabile al livello di protezione accordato ad inquilini negli altri Stati. Dichiarazioni Generali che la definizione legislativa dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro era impropria non era sufficiente per garantire revisione costituzionale.
66. La Corte Costituzionale respinse anche l'azione di reclamo che gli inquilini non avevano standi della località nei procedimenti di denationalisation. Poiché i procedimenti erano decisivi per inquilini i diritti di ', inquilini avevano standi della località. In particolare, questo concernè gli inquilini il diritto di ' a risarcimento per qualsiasi soldi investì nell'abitazione dalla quale potrebbe essere chiesta il “proprietario precedente.” D'altra parte sulla base di investimenti così finanziari, gli inquilini non acquisirono un diritto di proprietà o una rivendicazione alla proprietà stessa nei procedimenti di denationalisation.
67. Come alla restituzione al “proprietari precedenti” di abitazioni espropriate nelle quali stavano vivendo inquilini, la Corte Costituzionale già aveva deciso, che le disposizioni attinenti dello ZDen non erano contrarie alla Costituzione. Inoltre, il “proprietari precedenti” non era libero per entrare in qualsiasi accordi di contratto d'affitto con gli inquilini; loro presero soltanto i contratti d'affitto esistenti gli inquilini aveva firmato coi municipi. Infine, la Corte Costituzionale respinse le dichiarazioni dell'Associazione che Sezione 1 del Controversie Atto Amministrativo come poi in vigore era poco chiaro e contraria alla Costituzione.
C. gli Altri procedimenti nazionali attinenti
68. 21 aprile 2005 la Corte Suprema deliberò in una causa, portò con richiedente n. 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret), riguardo al diritto di un membro di famiglia esigere un contratto d'affitto senza scopo di lucro e nuovo dopo l'inquilino dell'appartamento di denationalised in oggetto era morto. La Corte Suprema invertì la causa-legge e decise che utenti di appartamenti di denationalised non potessero esigere la continuazione di un contratto d'affitto senza scopo di lucro seguente la cessione dell'inquilino; nella prospettiva della Corte, loro furono concessi solamente ad un contratto d'affitto, ed il “proprietario precedente” dovrebbe essere libero per determinare l'importo dell'affitto senza qualsiasi le limitazioni.
69. Successivamente, un membro di famiglia vicino di un possessore precedente e deceduto di diritti di occupazione registrò un ricorso per una revisione della costituzionalità di questa causa-legge nuova, ed un'azione di reclamo costituzionale. In una decisione di 7 ottobre 2009 (n. U-io-128/08, Su-933/08), la corte Costituzionale contenne che era incostituzionale per interpretare Articolo 56 del SZ (veda paragrafo 23 sopra) in tale maniera che, dopo la morte del possessore di un affitto protetto, il “proprietario precedente” fu obbligato per affittarlo ai membri di famiglia del defunto per un affitto senza scopo di lucro. Confermò così la decisione del 2005 della Corte Suprema. Comunque, la Corte Costituzionale chiarificò che il consorte o il partner di scadenza lunga di un inquilino deceduto al tempo della promulgazione del SZ fu concesso per continuare il contratto d'affitto ad un affitto senza scopo di lucro.
70. I richiedenti osservarono che questa causa-legge concedè “proprietari precedenti” fissare un irragionevolmente affitto alto, ostacolando con ciò i membri di famiglia dell'inquilino deceduto (altro che il consorte o il partner di scadenza lunga) dal continuare il contratto d'affitto. Loro addussero che da 2009 onwards una trasferibilità di causa di mortis del diritto per affittare aveva de facto stato eliminato.
D. situazioni Individuali dei richiedenti
71. Siccome l'archivio non contenne nessuno specifici esempi di situazioni individuali, a settembre 2008 la Corte richiese i richiedenti per presentare informazioni che riguarda i fatti in riguardo dell'importo dell'affitto originale nel 1991 e che dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro e presente, l'area di superficie dell'appartamento, il suo stato di ripari ed il suo valore di mercato corrente, così come una veduta d'insieme cronologica degli aumenti in affitto e nel salario minimo legale.
72. Nella loro replica di 9 novembre 2008, i richiedenti diedero prova che loro erano possessori precedenti e del tutto originali di affitti specialmente protetti o i loro successori legali.
73. Loro affermarono che il primo aumento significativo (di 100%) nell'affitto senza scopo di lucro posto prese nel 1995. A che tempo, il suo soffitto importo annuale ancora era 2.9% del valore dell'abitazione. Gli ulteriori cambi graduali furono introdotti coi 2000 emendamenti al SZ (aumento di affitto di 31%), con la decisione della Corte Costituzionale e col SZ-1 (aumento di affitto di 23%). L'importo di soffitto per l'affitto senza scopo di lucro ed annuale era attualmente 4.69% del valore dell'abitazione. Loro affermarono che un ulteriore aumento di affitto di 43% fu previsto in municipi diversi. L'affitto senza scopo di lucro pagò al tempo con l'equalled degli inquilini che 434.5% dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro hanno fissato nel 1992.
74. Comunque, i richiedenti affermarono che informazioni che riguarda i fatti previdero con loro mostrò che l'affitto senza scopo di lucro in Ljubljana e Maribor ancora era relativamente economico, come sé era sotto il mercato affittato (veda annetta 1-“summarising di Tavolo la situazione dei richiedenti individuali”). La situazione era presumibilmente diversa nella campagna, ma nessuno informazioni concrete furono offerte. Nelle certe cause non era più dati storico come la documentazione esistita a causa del decorso del tempo e perché gli inquilini si erano mossi.
75. Nel 2008, il prezzo di mercato medio di proprietà per metro di piazza in Ljubljana centre urbani variarono fra 2,000 e 3,000 euros (EUR) ed in Maribor era fra EUR 1,000 e 2,000 per metro quadrato. Come nel 1991 corrispose a 6,000 tolars di sloveno al salario minimo legale, (si Riunisca, nominalmente EUR 25.03). Ad agosto 2003 era Sieda 110,380 (nominalmente EUR 460.6) ed a luglio 2008 EUR 566.53.
76. I richiedenti affermarono anche che loro avevano fatto investimenti finanziari e significativi nel rinnovamento e rimessa a nuovo delle abitazioni.
77. Cinque richiedenti (il Sig. Kuret, il Sig.ra Berglez, il Sig.ra Bertoncelj, il Sig. Mili čed il Sig.ra Jerani) era stato costretto per muoversi fuori. Il Sig. Kuret era il richiedente solo che intraprese i viali legali su alla Corte Costituzionale. La sua azione di reclamo costituzionale fu respinta 6 luglio 2006 per mancanza di interesse legale, siccome lui era giunto ad un accordo col “proprietario precedente” 17 marzo 2006 (veda annetta 1-“summarising di Tavolo la situazione dei richiedenti individuali”).
78. Gli altri richiedenti che ancora occuparono le abitazioni erano presumibilmente sotto pressione, o per atti o per corrispondenza con gli avvocati che rappresentano il “proprietari precedenti.” Loro si lamentarono delle varie forme della cavillosità e l'intimidazione. Tutti i richiedenti avevano dovuto chiedere consulenza legale.
E. Il metodo del calcolo dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro
79. Le parti diedero anche dettagli come al metodo di calcolare l'affitto senza scopo di lucro che fu introdotto col SZ. È probabile che il suo livello sia accettato su con le parti il contratto di contratto d'affitto, ma loro dovevano fare domanda il metodo previsto per con la legge e non eccedono il massimo permise livello di affitto senza scopo di lucro. Questa era una percentuale sempre (2.9% per abitazioni più che 25 anni vecchio) del valore amministrativo dell'appartamento che fu determinato con le autorità di alloggio secondo la formula seguente:
Valore dell'abitazione = numero di punti che x valutano del punto x area usabile x effettuano di taglia dell'abitazione (fattore correttivo)
80. L'affitto per abitazioni per il quale accordi di affitto furono conclusi coi possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione non poteva eccedere il livello di affitto accusato per abitazioni più che 25 anni vecchio. I valori del punto ed il fattore di correzione per misurazioni di superficie erano stati determinati con primario o legislazione secondaria sempre e come simile corresse molte volte. Come un articolo generale, l'affitto senza scopo di lucro per di recente costruì o rinnovò appartamenti, di migliore qualità e meglio equipaggiò, era più alto che per più vecchi, meno ben mantenuti appartamenti. L'affitto senza scopo di lucro fu determinato anche nella luce dello stato di ripari al tempo che l'abitazione è stata assegnata all'inquilino che è di fronte a qualsiasi investimento fu reso.
81. Il Governo indicò che l'affitto senza scopo di lucro era una copertura di affitto basata sul prezzo i costi economici di un'abitazione. Non incluse tasse per essere pagato col “proprietario precedente” e fu voluto dire coprire:
- il deprezzamento dell'abitazione (abilitare il proprietario per sostituire un'abitazione in stato precario dopo un certo numero di anni-inizialmente 200, poi 60);
- il costo del capitale investì;
- la gestione dell'abitazione;
- investimento e mantenimento di routine.
82. Per possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione l'affitto senza scopo di lucro ed annuale non poteva eccedere 2.9% del valore dell'abitazione sotto i 1991 articoli. Gli articoli furono revisionati nel 1995 per inquilini ordinari, mentre portando la percentuale a 3.8% per abitazioni costruì dopo 1991. Da marzo 2000 sino a dicembre 2004, la percentuale era 3.81% per abitazioni più che sessanta anni vecchio e 5.08% per abitazioni meno che sessanta anni vecchio. Per possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione o persone con chi il “proprietario precedente” fu obbligato per concludere un contratto di contratto d'affitto sotto Sezione 56 del SZ (veda paragrafo 23 sopra) la percentuale non poteva eccedere 3.81%.
83. Il Governo osservò che il metodo di calcolo nuovo era stato fatto domanda progressivamente su una spanna di cinque anni; per inquilini di abitazioni di denationalised l'affitto, nei veri termini decresceva così, dal 2.9% nel 2000 a 2.54% nel 2004 secondo loro.
84. L'Alloggio che Atto 2003 ha portato del quale il valore del massimo ha permesso su affitto senza scopo di lucro ed annuale a 4.68% che dell'abitazione, e questo nonostante il fatto che un studio ordinò col Ministero responsabile per l'Ambiente e Pianificazione Spaziale aveva mostrato che una copertura di affitto che tutti i costi dell'uso dell'abitazione dovrebbero corrispondere ad almeno 5.63%. Un aumento progressivo in affitti fu elencato su a 31 dicembre 2006 (veda Sezione 181 del SZ-1 ed il Decreto Statale sul metodo per affitti calcolatori in abitazioni senza scopo di lucro). Di conseguenza, per abitazioni meno che sessanta anni vecchio, l'affitto senza scopo di lucro immediatamente fu decresciuto entro 8%, da 5.08% a 4.68%; per abitazioni più che sessanta anni vecchio (quale era la maggioranza), aumentò entro 21.80%, da 3.81% a 4.68%; infine, nelle approssimativamente 2,500 abitazioni di denationalised che ha aumentato entro 84.20%, da 2.54% a 4.68%. 1 gennaio 2007, l'affitto senza scopo di lucro ed annuale in tutti gli edifici corrisposti a 4.68% del valore dell'abitazione. Non aumentò qualsiasi più dopo quel la data.
85. Il Governo enfatizzò anche che il valore del “punto di alloggio” che fu basato sul prezzo di media annuale per metro di piazza di abitazioni senza scopo di lucro e costruite divise entro 320 (numero medio di punti per abitazioni senza scopo di lucro e di recente costruite), aumentò da 1.88 Marchi tedeschi (DEM) in 1991 a DEM 3.75 ad agosto 1996. Affitti senza scopo di lucro aumentarono nessuno ulteriore nei veri termini, ma loro aumentarono in relazione al DEM. Per abitazioni affittarono dopo che l'attuazione del metodo di calcolo nuovo introdusse nel 2000 il valore del punto fu fissato a DEM 5.39 (e più tardi ad EUR 2.63). Ogni abitazione fu data un certo numero di punti che prenderebbero in considerazione il tempo e qualità di costruzione, il tipo e qualità di elementi di falegnameria, pavimenti, muri, installazioni attrezzate, il tipo e la disponibilità di aree comuni, isolamento termale ed acustico e qualsiasi impatti negativi sull'uso dell'abitazione.
86. Secondo il SZ-1 (Sezione 118(8) e (9)) l'ubicazione dell'abitazione potrebbe colpire anche il suo valore. L'effetto dell'ubicazione sul livello dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro potrebbe essere determinato con ogni municipio e corrisponderebbe ad un massimo di 30% dell'affitto; comunque, al tempo delle osservazioni del Governo, solamente due municipi (la Nova Gorica e Mengeš) aveva adottato disposizioni in questo riguardo; questo volle dire che in tutti gli altri municipi, l'ubicazione dell'edificio non colpì l'affitto.
II. DOCUMENTI INTERNAZIONALI ED ATTINENTI
A. Decisione 1096 (1996) della Riunione Parlamentare
87. 27 giugno 1996 la Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa adottò Decisione 1096 su misure per smantellare l'eredità di sistemi totalitari comunisti e precedenti. Nella decisione, la Riunione Parlamentare confermò, che nella transizione dei sistemi totalitari comunisti e precedenti in sistemi democratici, i principi di sussidiarietà, libertà di scelta l'uguaglianza dell'opportunità, il pluralismo economico e trasparenza di decisionale dovrebbe avere un ruolo. Alcuni dei principi che furono menzionati nella decisione siccome vuole dire di realizzare queste mete era la separazione dei poteri, la libertà dei media, protezione di proprietà privata e lo sviluppo di società civile. La Riunione Parlamentare considerò anche che la chiave a coesistenza tranquilla ed una disposizione di elaborazione di transizione riuscita nel prevedere l'equilibrio delicato di offrire la giustizia senza chiedere vendetta.
88. La Riunione Parlamentare mise al corrente che proprietà, incluso che delle chiese che erano sequestrate illegalmente o ingiustamente con lo Stato, nazionalizzò, confiscò o altrimenti espropriò durante il regno di sistemi totalitari e comunisti in principio sia ripristinato a suo “proprietari precedenti” in integrum, se quel era possibile senza violare i diritti di proprietari correnti che acquisirono la proprietà in buon fede, o i diritti di inquilini che affittarono l'abitazione in buon fede, e senza danneggiare il progresso di riforme democratiche. In cause dove non era questo la possibile, equa soddisfazione dovrebbe essere assegnata. Rivendicazioni e conflitti relativo a cause individuali di restituzione di proprietà dovrebbero essere decisi con le corti.
89. La Riunione Parlamentare raccomandò anche che le autorità dei paesi riguardate verificano che le loro leggi, regolamentazioni e procedure si attennero coi principi contenuti nella Decisione, e li revisiona se necessario. Questo può, nella prospettiva della Riunione Parlamentare, aiuti ad evitare azioni di reclamo di queste procedure che sono depositate coi meccanismi di controllo del Consiglio dell'Europa sotto la Convenzione europea su Diritti umani, il Comitato di Ministri ' che esamina procedura, o la Riunione sta esaminando procedura sotto Ordine N.ro 508 (1995) sull'onorare di obblighi ed impegni con membro Stati.
B. Politica Orientamenti su Accesso ad Alloggio per Categorie Svantaggiate di Persone, adottò col Comitato europeo per Coesione Sociale
90. 14-16 novembre 2001 il Comitato europeo per Coesione Sociale (il “ECSC”) adottò i Politica Orientamenti su Accesso ad Alloggio per Categorie Svantaggiate di Persone, preparate col Gruppo di Specialisti su Accesso ad Alloggio. Negli orientamenti l'ECSC riaffermò il significato di alloggio e le responsabilità corrispondenti di governi nazionali, siccome riconosciuto in un numero di documenti internazionali come lo Statuto Sociale europeo, l'Agenda del Habitat dell'ONU e la Dichiarazione su città e le altre sistemazioni umane nel millennio nuovo adottato con la Riunione del Generale dell'ONU. L'ECSC stabilì che secondo questi documenti il Consiglio del membro di Europa Stati dovrebbero assicurare alloggio economico a categorie svantaggiate di persone, con creando una struttura legale ed appropriata per mercati di alloggio con riguardo ad a diritti di proprietà, la sicurezza di tenuta e tutela del consumatore. Le politiche adottate dovrebbero espandere l'approvvigionamento di alloggio economico e dovrebbero offrire meglio sicurezza legale di tenuta ed accesso non-discriminatorio ad alloggio per tutti.
91. In paragrafo 15, l'ECSC affermò anche,:
“In paesi che hanno privatizzato parti considerevoli del loro alloggio pubblico approvvigioni nei recenti anni, misure di politica di alloggio appropriate si dovrebbero introdurre quali contrattaccano conseguenze indesiderabili di privatizzazione di alloggio e restituzione per categorie svantaggiate di persone. Per esempio, in paesi con un tasso alto di “coltivatori diretti poveri”, più enfasi dovrebbe essere data ad un sistema di assegno di alloggio generale ed ad appoggio pubblico per il rinnovamento di unità di alloggio, per il beneficio di proprietari ed inquilini, in abitazioni restituite.”
92. L'ECSC definì il termine “categorie svantaggiate di persone” siccome denotando tutte le persone o gruppi di persone che sono svantaggiate sul mercato di alloggio per and/or economico, sociale, psicologico le altre ragioni e che di conseguenza costringono assistenza appropriata a facilitare il loro accesso ad alloggio.
C. La Relazione del 2003 del Commissario per Diritti umani sulla sua visita a Slovenia
93. 15 ottobre 2003 il Commissario per Diritti umani, il Sig. Alvaro Gil-Robles, emesso una Relazione sulla sua visita a Slovenia in maggio 2003 in che, fra gli altri temi, lui rivolse la situazione di inquilini che vivono in abitazioni socialmente-possedute e precedenti alle quali furono ritornate infine il “proprietari precedenti.” Lui comparò la posizione di inquilini che persero il loro affitto specialmente protetto e privilegiato alla posizione di padroni di casa che acquisirono la proprietà di simile abitazioni ma non l'uso di loro. Lui osservò che, in contrasto alla maggioranza di altri possessori di affitto specialmente protetto, gli inquilini in abitazioni di denationalised non avevano il vantaggio di essere concesso per acquistare gli appartamenti nel quale loro hanno vissuto, e lui diede credito alla paura di molti di loro, ora già anziano, che loro non sarebbero in grado riconoscere i possibili aumenti di affitto nel futuro.
94. Riguardo ai padroni di casa, comunque lui notò che loro realmente non potessero prendere o proprietà delle abitazioni. Loro presero proprietà della proprietà con un numero di vis-à-vis di obblighi gli inquilini che loro non si avevano selezionati e per che loro dovevano mantenere il carattere sociale dell'affitto accusò. Così, il “proprietari precedenti” non fu supposto per rendere qualsiasi profitto sostanziale dalla loro proprietà, né loro potrebbero terminare l'accordo di affitto senza attenersi con un numero delle specifiche condizioni. Lui indicò anche che il fatto che i padroni di casa infine avevano recuperato le loro abitazioni espropriate erano equo e non potevano essere contestati come così.
95. Il Commissario stabilì così che “ci possono essere né vincitori né perdenti, in questa situazione, perché entrambi gli i lati possono essere considerati svantaggiati,” e concluse il suo rapporto con raccomandando che il legislatore considera un emendamento nuovo alla legislazione “stabilire i problemi che affrontano un lato mentre proteggendo anche gli interessi dell'altro.”
D. azione di reclamo Collettiva N.ro 53/2008, Federazione europea di Organizzazioni Nazionali che Lavorano col Senzatetto (FEANTSA) c. la Slovenia
96. Seguendo la sua ratifica, lo Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto succedè ordine legale una parte degli sloveno come da 11 aprile 1999. A settembre 2008 l'organizzazione non-governativa ed internazionale FEANTSA (Federazione europea di Organizzazioni Nazionali che Lavorano col Senzatetto) registrò un'azione di reclamo collettiva (n. 53/2008) col Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali. Addusse che inquilini di denationalised degli appartamenti alla fine del regime socialista avevano sofferto di una perdita del loro titolo a proprietà, un aumento nel prezzo di alloggio ed una riduzione delle possibilità di acquisire alloggio adeguato.
97. In una decisione sui meriti, di 8 settembre 2009 il Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali concluse che Slovenia stava violando il diritto alla casa di possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione sotto Articolo 31 §§ 1 (promozione di accesso ad alloggio di un standard adeguato) e 3 (l'accessibilità di prezzo di alloggio a quelli senza risorse adeguate), Articolo 16 (diritto della famiglia a protezione sociale, legale ed economica) ed Articolo E (proibizione della discriminazione) dello Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto.
98. Il Comitato sostenne che prima di SZ il diritto di inquilini di appartamenti senza scopo di lucro in Slovenia ad alloggio adeguato chiaramente fu protegguto con legge. Gli articoli introdotti con SZ (permettendo possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione di acquistare, ad un prezzo vantaggioso gli appartamenti nei quali loro stavano vivendo, e di chi proprietà era stata trasferita, su una base di transizione, alle entità pubbliche) fu ritenuto anche per assicurare la sicurezza legale e sufficiente nell'occupazione delle abitazioni. Comunque, il Comitato considerò come riguardi inquilini precedenti di appartamenti al quali erano stati ritornati il “proprietari precedenti”, che la combinazione di misure insufficienti per l'acquisizione di o accesso ad un appartamento di sostituto, l'evoluzione degli articoli su occupazione e l'aumento in affitti, era probabile mettere un numero significativo di famiglie in una posizione molto precaria, ed impedirloro dall'esercitare efficacemente il loro diritto alla casa.
99. Inoltre, Slovenia era andata a vuoto a mostrare che il rapporto di affordability dei richiedenti più poveri per alloggio era compatibile col loro livello di reddito. Possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione, nelle particolari persone anziane erano stati privati dell'opportunità di acquistare l'appartamento nella quale loro hanno vissuto, o un altro uno, su termini vantaggiosi e dell'opportunità di rimanere nell'appartamento, o si muove ad ed occupa un altro appartamento, in ritorno per un affitto ragionevole.
100. Infine, il trattamento concedè a possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione in riguardo di appartamenti acquisito con lo Stato tramite nationalisation o l'espropriazione, e ritornò al “proprietari precedenti”, era manifestamente discriminatorio in relazione al trattamento concesso ad inquilini di appartamenti che sono stati trasferiti a proprietà pubblica con altro vuole dire. Il Comitato osservò che non c'era prova di qualsiasi la differenza nella situazione delle due categorie di inquilini, e che la distinzione originale fra le forme di proprietà pubblica in oggetto era in nessun modo imputabile a loro e non aveva nascendo sulla natura di loro propria relazione col proprietario pubblico o amministratore.
101. 15 giugno 2011 il Comitato di Ministri del Consiglio dell'Europa adottò Decisione CM/ResChS(2011)7 sulla base della decisione del Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali sui meriti, mentre già dando il benvenuto le misure prese con le autorità di sloveno ed il loro impegno per portare la situazione nella conformità con lo Statuto Sociale. Il Comitato di Ministri non vide l'ora di Slovenia riportare, nel suo prossimo rapporto riguardo alle disposizioni attinenti dello Statuto Sociale europeo che la situazione era stata portata nella piena conformità.
102. I richiedenti addussero che nonostante la decisione sopra e decisione, nessun passo sostanziale era stato preso regolare positivamente la loro situazione.
Accordo di E. su Successione Problemi
103. L'Accordo su Successione Problemi era il culmine di quasi dieci anni di negoziazioni intermittenti sotto gli auspici della Conferenza Internazionale sull'Iugoslavia precedente ed il Rappresentante Alto (nominò facendo seguito Annettere 10 al Dayton Pace Accordo). Entrò in vigore fra Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia il poi Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia, “La Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia” e Slovenia 2 giugno 2004 (veda Đokić, citato sopra, § 43). Articolo 6 di Annetta G, mentre concernendo affitto specialmente protetto, legge siccome segue:
“Legislazione nazionale di ogni successore Stato riguardo a diritti di abitazione (pravo di stanarsko di ‘/ stanovanjska pravica / о') sarà fatto domanda ugualmente a persone che erano cittadini del SFRY e che avevano simile diritti, senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
III. ELEMENTI ATTINENTI DI DIRITTO COMPARATO
104. Dopo avere dichiarato la richiesta ammissibile, la Corte invitò le parti a presentare informazioni supplementari su come la riforma di alloggio si impegnata negli altri paesi di socialista precedenti ha trattato col problema di proteggere i diritti di possessori di diritti di occupazione su abitazioni di denationalised. Le informazioni previste con le parti possono essere riassunte siccome segue.
105. I richiedenti enfatizzarono che affitto specialmente protetto era un diritto di generis di sui che fu conosciuto ed eseguì solamente nel SFRY, e non nell'altro socialista precedente afferma dell'Europa Centrale ed Orientale. Dopo il crollo del SFRY una riforma di alloggio non solo fu decretata in Slovenia ma anche in Croatia, Serbia e Bosnia e Herzegovina. Tutti questi Stati abolirono proprietà sociale di abitazioni sociali e diritti di affitto specialmente protetti; in Croatia, Serbia e Bosnia e Herzegovina i secondi erano stati trasformati comunque, in proprietà per un diritto per acquistare termini favorevoli sotto (regolò prezzo nell'importo di 10 a 20 per cento del valore di mercato, possibilità di pagare in rate). Nei particolari, precedenti possessori di diritti di occupazione era in grado acquistare le abitazioni nelle quali loro stavano vivendo, mentre “proprietari precedenti” fu garantito il pagamento del risarcimento equo per la perdita delle loro proprietà. In Bosnia e Herzegovina un'eccezione al diritto per acquistare fu offerta come lontano come le abitazioni per delle entità religiose e precedenti riguardò; possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto in riguardo di queste particolari abitazioni potrebbero comprare invece comunque, un appartamento di sostituto. Secondo le informazioni disponibile ai richiedenti, in nessuna altra Repubblica di SFRY precedente che Slovenia era la discriminazione nel godimento del diritto per acquistare previde per quando l'abitazione era stata espropriata con lo Stato tramite nationalisation o il sequestro.
106. Il Governo prima osservò che anche se aveva introdotto la nozione di “proprietà sociale” nel suo ordinamento giuridico, il SFRY non bandì proprietà completamente privata. Proprietà privata di unità residenziali fu concessa ma limitò ad una certa taglia di spazio vivente. Nel 1971 il potere per varare leggi nel campo di alloggio fu trasferito dallo Stato Federale alle repubbliche costituenti a causa di emendamenti alla Costituzione. Il Governo presentò le informazioni seguenti che concernono repubbliche di SFRY precedenti altre che la Slovenia.
107. In Bosnia e Herzegovina proprietà sociale fu trasformata in proprietà statale durante la guerra del 1992-95. Dopo 1998, ai primo della guerra occupanti fu permesso di chiedere riacquisto degli appartamenti che loro avevano lasciato durante la guerra ed acquistarli su termini favorevoli. Inoltre, occupazione possessori destri furono concessi per acquistare gli appartamenti loro vissero in, con l'eccezione di abitazioni privatamente-possedute. La legislazione attinente indicò inizialmente che gli appartamenti soggetto a restituzione sarebbero stati regolati con disposizioni speciali su restituzione. Questo articolo fu corretto più tardi comunque, ed occupazione possessori corretti furono dati il diritto per acquistare gli appartamenti loro stavano occupando anche quando i secondi erano stati nazionalizzati o erano stati confiscati. Il “proprietari precedenti” sarebbe accordato appartamenti comparabili o un importo equivalente di soldi o gli altri vantaggi o diritti. Se loro non acquistassero gli appartamenti, occupazione che possessori corretti sono divenuti affittuari. Restituzione in natura di proprietà espropriata non ebbe mai luogo in Bosnia e Herzegovina. Una situazione simile esistè nel Republika Srpska, dove ogni occupazione a possessori destri fu permesso per acquistare gli appartamenti loro vissero in, con l'eccezione degli uni privatamente-posseduti. Quando i secondi furono ritornati ai loro proprietari, l'occupazione possessori corretti avevano diritto a comprare un altro appartamento comparabile.
108. In Croatia, occupazione a possessori corretti fu permesso per acquistare gli appartamenti loro vissero in sotto le condizioni favorevoli. Comunque, questo non fece domanda ad appartamenti privatamente posseduti. Nel 1997 il legislatore croato decise che appartamenti espropriarono con modo di nationalisation sul quale diritti di occupazione esistiti non poteva essere ritornato in natura a “proprietari precedenti” che riceverebbe risarcimento solamente finanziario; loro potrebbero essere acquistati perciò con l'occupazione possessori destri. Un articolo diverso fece domanda ad appartamenti confiscati che erano soggetto a restituzione in natura con la conseguenza che l'occupazione possessori destri diverrebbero affittuari e sarebbero dati un diritto di pre-acquisto deve il “proprietario precedente” decida di vendere. Ogni occupazione che possessori corretti che non facevano o non potevano acquistare sono stati concessi ad un contratto d'affitto protetto.
109. In Serbia, occupazione possessori corretti ed i loro membri di famiglia potrebbero registrare una richiesta di approvvigionamento per gli appartamenti che loro hanno occupato, irrispettoso di se i secondi erano stati nazionalizzati o acquisito per la solidarietà e finanziamenti di alloggio reciproci. Se l'appartamento non fosse comprato di fronte alla fine di 1995, gli occupanti diverrebbero affittuari, ma tratterrebbe la possibilità di acquistare. Questa possibilità fu esclusa ab initio per appartamenti privatamente-posseduti. L'occupazione possessori destri di questi appartamenti diverrebbero affittuari e potrebbero essere sfrattati solamente se il proprietario li offrisse con alloggio alternativo; i municipi furono obbligati per garantire alloggio alternativo per questa categoria di inquilini in 31 dicembre 2000. Serbia adottò una legge che prevede per restituzione di beni immobili espropriato in natura, simile agli sloveno uno, solamente nel 2011. Questo concernè solamente comunque, proprietà che non erano state acquistate nel frattempo con possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione.
110. Nel 1995, Montenegro previde per la trasformazione di diritti di occupazione in proprietà privata per l'acquisto degli appartamenti. Comunque, questo non fece domanda ad appartamenti in proprietà privata o quale prima era stato espropriato. Una legge su restituzione in natura a “proprietari precedenti” fu adottato nel 2004; sé previde che entro un periodo di dieci anni dalla sua entrata in vigore la Repubblica del Montenegro doveva offrire possessori di diritti di occupazione su abitazioni ritornato in natura con un appartamento corrispondente che loro potrebbero acquistare sotto le stesse condizioni siccome fatto domanda all'acquisto di appartamenti in proprietà sociale. Questo diritto non fu conferito su occupazione possessori corretti che possedettero un altro appartamento.
111. Come lontano come gli altri paesi europei Centrali ed Orientali precedenti concernono, il Governo notò che in persone in Polonia che vivono in appartamenti ritornate a “proprietari precedenti” non fu concesso per comprare un sostituto o abitazione equivalente. I municipi potrebbero offrire un appartamento a persone in un individuo particolarmente difficile o situazione economica. Inquilini protetti che sono dire persone che erano state assegnate un'abitazione sulla base di decisioni amministrative furono dati contratti d'affitto contrattuali conclusi per un periodo indefinito ad un affitto controllato; loro furono protegguti contro sfratto. C'era una possibilità, sotto le condizioni vantaggiose comprare appartamenti coi quali erano stati costruiti un co-operativo, prendendo in considerazione, inter l'alia, i contributi l'acquirente aveva pagato come un membro del co-operativo.
112. Ungheria non previde per la restituzione in natura di abitazioni espropriate; “proprietari precedenti” potrebbe ricevere risarcimento solamente parziale l'importo di che dipese sulla veste economica del paese.
113. In Slovacchia in 1992 diritti di occupazione fu trasformato in un contratto d'affitto. Possessori di diritti di occupazione su appartamenti acquisiti per la solidarietà ed alloggio co-operatives potrebbe acquisire proprietà dei locali riguardata su termini speciali. Con modo di contrasto, non era possibile acquistare un appartamento ritornato a suo “proprietario precedente”; comunque, l'occupazione possessore destro aveva la possibilità di acquisire un appartamento di sostituto dal municipio se lui o lei avevano ricevuto avviso di conclusione del contratto d'affitto e non possedettero un altro appartamento o qualsiasi l'altro beni immobili. L'affittuario non fu obbligato per sgombrare i locali finché il municipio aveva assegnato loro lui o un appartamento di sostituto. L'affitto fu regolato con legge, ma come di 2011 “proprietari precedenti” fu concesso per sollevarlo entro 20 per cento per anno.
114. Nella Repubblica ceca, diritti di occupazione furono trasformati, ex lege in affitti tradizionali. Se il proprietario dell'appartamento (quel è, lo Stato o il “proprietario precedente”) decise di terminare il contratto d'affitto, l'inquilino aveva il diritto ad un appartamento di sostituto previsto col proprietario, ma non aveva diritto a comprare l'appartamento dove lui o lei stavano vivendo. Se lo Stato era il proprietario e decise di vendere l'appartamento, solamente il possessore precedente di diritti di occupazione potrebbe comprarlo. In maggio 1994 questo diritto di esclusiva per comprare fu sostituito comunque, con un semplice diritto di pre-acquisto. Un diritto esecutivo per comprare esistè solamente in relazione ad appartamenti posseduti con un'associazione co-operativa, come il secondo fu obbligato, alla richiesta dell'inquilino, vendere l'abitazione riguardata.
115. In Estonia, tutte le abitazioni occupate sotto accordi di contratto d'affitto erano soggetto a privatizzazione, con l'eccezione di appartamenti ritornata a “proprietari precedenti.” Il prezzo della vendita potrebbe essere pagato in ricevute ed obbligazioni di capitale pubbliche. Nell'evento di restituzione a “proprietari precedenti”, inquilini avevano un diritto automatico ad un contratto di contratto d'affitto (prima per una durata di tre anni e poi per cinque anni) e godè diritti di pre-acquisto. Se loro fossero d'accordo a sgombrare i locali, questi inquilini furono concessi per essere assegnati un'abitazione nuova o potrebbero fare domanda per un prestito o accorda dallo Stato per ristabilimento o acquistare un'abitazione.
116. Dopo la riunificazione di aree di Germania di terra nel territorio della Repubblica Democristiana e precedente della Germania era stato ritornato a “proprietari precedenti”; comunque, restituzione fu esclusa per quelle aree in riguardo del quale una terza parte aveva in buon fede acquisì un diritto di uso dallo Stato prima di 1990 ed aveva costruito un alloggio. Per queste aree, il “proprietari precedenti” riceverebbe risarcimento solamente finanziario che coprirebbe solamente una certa percentuale della mercato-valore della proprietà. Legge Federale tedesca previde per protezione sociale e forte dell'inquilino: contratti d'affitto di fisso-termine e conclusione del contratto d'affitto col padrone di casa erano solamente lecite in cause limitate e l'affitto convenuto potrebbe essere sollevato solamente su al livello del “affitto comparativo e locale.” Anche protezione più forte fu riconosciuta ad inquilini nel Länder tedesco e nuovo (in particolare, l'importo dell'affitto fu regolato con legge, e per un certo periodo di padroni di casa di tempo affitti non potevano terminare quando loro ebbero bisogno dei locali per il loro proprio uso personale). Dato il livello alto di protezione riconosciuto ad inquilini, si sentì che nel Länder tedesco e nuovo non era nessun bisogno di proporre alloggio di sostituto agli inquilini.
LA LEGGE
IO. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 1 DI PROTOCOLLO N. 1 A LA CONVENZIONE
117. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro erano stati privati del loro affitto specialmente protetto senza ricevere il risarcimento adeguato.
Loro si appellarono su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
L'Applicabilità di A. di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
118. Nella sua decisione di 28 maggio 2013 sull'ammissibilità della richiesta (paragrafo 184), la Corte considerò che la questione dell'applicabilità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 fu collegato alla sostanza dei richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' e decise di congiungerlo ai meriti.
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) Il Governo
119. Il Governo obiettò che i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' era ratione materiae incompatibile con le disposizioni di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, come il diritto di un occupante per risiedere in un'unità di beni immobili lui o lei non possedettero non poteva costituire un “la proprietà” (loro si riferirono a J.L.S. c. la Spagna (il dec.), n. 41917/98, il 1999-V di ECHR; Kozlovs c. la Lettonia (il dec.), n. 50835/00, 23 novembre 2000; Kovalenok c. la Lettonia (il dec.), n. 54264/00, 15 febbraio 2001; H.F. c. la Slovacchia (il dec.), n. 54797/00, 9 dicembre 2003; Bunjevac c. la Slovenia (il dec.), n. 48775/09, 19 gennaio 2006; e Gaeša ćc. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43389/02, 1 aprile 2008; ed anche Durini c. l'Italia, n. 19217/91, la decisione di Commissione di 12 gennaio 1994).
120. Il Governo dibattè che i richiedenti ' (irreale) aspettativa che abitazioni hanno costruito di fronte alla Seconda Mondo Guerra con finanziamenti privati (e non con risorse sociali) e nazionalizzò sotto il sistema socialista non sarebbe ritornato a loro “proprietari precedenti” fu basato su un malinteso della natura del diritto di occupazione. Loro indicarono che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 dovrebbe fare domanda solamente ad una persona sta esistendo proprietà. Il diritto di occupazione non conferì diritti di proprietà e le abitazioni erano state assegnate ai richiedenti per “la gestione” ed uso permanente. In ottemperanza con l'ordine sociale loro dovevano poi in vigore, riconoscere l'autorità del “possessore indiretto” del così definito “socialmente-possedette proprietà” (quale secondo il poi principi applicabili di legge di vero-proprietà furono posseduti congiuntamente con le persone della Slovenia). La proprietà dell'abitazione fu collegata alla durata della relazione di occupazione, ma non fu basato su un diritto permanente ed inalienabile a proprietà o un altro diritto in rem. Questo fu dimostrato, inter l'alia, col fatto che per un certo periodo di tempo il diritto di occupazione potrebbe essere assegnato anche in riguardo di appartamenti privatamente posseduti.
121. Anche se è probabile che sia difficile comparare concetti anacronistici di proprietà socialmente-posseduta con proprietà tradizionale in una società democratica, era chiaro che il diritto di occupazione era, mutatis mutandis, più simile ad un affitto. Secondo il Commentario alla legislazione precedente, era un set speciale di “la gestione” i diritti, sulla base della quale il possessore aveva diritto ad usare l'abitazione socialmente-posseduta per il fine di soddisfare personale e le necessità di alloggio di famiglia. Non fu associato con una particolare abitazione ma piuttosto con l'alloggio personale del possessore fu avuto bisogno e quelli della sua famiglia: se queste necessità dovessero cambiare (per istanza perché il numero di utenti decrebbe), la relazione di occupazione potrebbe essere terminata purché che un'altra abitazione che è andata bene le circostanze alterate fu assegnata al possessore del diritto di occupazione. Inoltre, la relazione di occupazione potrebbe essere terminata se il possessore non stesse usando l'abitazione, l'aveva subaffittato pienamente o se l'abitazione fosse occupata con una terza parte.
122. Il possessore doveva pagare il “disse di sì socialmente prezzo nella forma di affitto”; il diritto di occupazione non era trasferibile (eccetto in cause previste per con legge) e non poteva essere ereditato. Transizione regolata era possibile ad uno degli utenti dell'abitazione: l'erede di un inquilino che al tempo della morte seconda stava vivendo nella stessa forza piatta entra nella stessa relazione di affitto col proprietario. Il possessore del diritto di occupazione non poteva sbarazzarsi dell'abitazione (con l'eccezione di un cambio di abitazioni socialmente-possedute) e non fu concesso per fare le modifiche senza l'approvazione precedente della comunità di inquilini. La relazione di occupazione potrebbe essere terminata per ragioni colpa-basate che erano molto simili ai motivi per terminare qualsiasi relazione di affitto.
123. Nella luce del sopra, il Governo dibattè, che il diritto di occupazione era comparabile ad una relazione di affitto, benché concluse per un periodo indefinito. I richiedenti avevano diritto soltanto a risiedere in un'abitazione che non fu posseduta con loro; questo diritto né fu considerato un diritto di proprietà né qualsiasi l'altro vero diritto, ma era in essenza un obbligo, stabilì o terminò secondo le disposizioni di legge su obblighi. La decisione della Corte Costituzionale n. Su-29/98 a che assegnarono i richiedenti (veda paragrafo 11 sopra), era un isolato e non poteva costituire “la causa-legge”; inoltre, dovrebbe essere capito nel contesto dello status particolare del reclamante in che causa che aveva sofferto di danno a causa delle azioni dell'autorità municipale che aveva ingombrato un bene che era soggetto ad una proibizione su mestiere.
124. Il Governo osservò inoltre che la possibilità di acquistare l'abitazione, purché per nel SZ, non fece domanda ad abitazioni socialmente-possedute che erano divenute proprietà pubblica con modo di nationalisation, siccome loro erano soggetto all'obbligo di restituzione. Che possibilità non costituì un diritto che sorge dal diritto di occupazione precedente, e fu introdotto solamente più tardi (col “terzo modello”) per appartamenti altro che quegli occuparono coi richiedenti, come un metodo di privatizzazione (e non, come dibattè erroneamente coi richiedenti, come qualche genere del risarcimento per il ritiro del diritto di occupazione). Inoltre, il diritto per acquistare l'abitazione dovrebbe essere reso differente dal diritto di pre-acquisto garantito a qualsiasi l'occupazione possessore corretto sul quale dipese il “proprietario precedente” decisione gratis di vendere la proprietà. Così, i richiedenti avevano diritto ad acquistare gli appartamenti nei quali loro stavano vivendo e non avevano nessuna aspettativa legittima per acquisire proprietà di loro. In qualsiasi l'evento, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantì il diritto per acquisire proprietà (veda Sori ćc. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43447/98, 16 marzo 2000; Slivenko ed Altri c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II; e Kopeck ỳc. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX).
125. Era vero che il “terzo modello” purché per la scelta di acquistare un'altra abitazione; comunque, questo modello era stato abrogato a novembre 1999 (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). Come nessuni dei richiedenti aveva fatto domanda acquistare un'abitazione sotto questo modello, non si poteva dibattere che loro avevano una rivendicazione esecutiva in questo riguardo a.
126. I richiedenti ' chiede per ricupero di investimenti (veda Articolo 25 dello ZDen) non poteva essere considerato “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 a meno che c'era un “l'aspettativa legittima” basato su una regolamentazione o una definitivo sentenza. Il lago spera che è probabile che simile ricorsi siano ammessi non poteva portare Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in giochi. Il Governo non aveva negato mai i diritti di quelli richiedenti in che avevano ottenuto una definitivo decisione favorevole questo riguardo a. In qualsiasi l'evento, diritto per recuperare investimenti non poteva essere la base per la costituzione di proprietà delle abitazioni.
127. Come lontano come il richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Berglez) riguardò, il Governo osservò che lei aveva fatto domanda firmare fuori termini un contratto di contratto d'affitto; la sua rivendicazione condizionale era caduta perciò come un risultato della sua inosservanza con una regolamentazione legale e non aveva potuto, per questa ragione anche, sia considerato un “la proprietà.”
128. La causa di Mago ed Altri si appellò su coi richiedenti (veda paragrafo 130 sotto) non poteva essere comparato col presente come, diversamente da legge di sloveno, il Dayton Pace Accordo aveva stabilito che ogni occupazione possessori destri in Bosnia e Herzegovina furono concessi per ritornare alle case loro avevano vissuto in di fronte alla guerra. Era vero che sotto il regime precedente un'abitazione socialmente-posseduta potrebbe essere venduta solamente alla sua occupazione possessore destro; comunque, questo non era un diritto che deriva dal diritto di occupazione, ma una misura mirò alla conservazione del valore di proprietà socialmente-posseduta usata per alloggio, e vendita era solamente lecita sotto le certe condizioni ed al prezzo determinato con un stimatore munito di certificato.
(b) I richiedenti
129. I richiedenti indicarono che il “affitto specialmente protetto” che loro avevano acquisito in buon fede, implicò il diritto di esclusiva per vivere nell'abitazione per un periodo indefinito, il diritto per trasmetterlo inter vivos o mortis causa a membri di famiglia che vissero con l'inquilino riguardati, ed il diritto di esclusiva per acquistare l'abitazione. Aveva così tutte le caratteristiche essenziali di un diritto di proprietà ed il cosa perdere solo era il titolo di proprietario. Non fu basato su un contratto precario ma su un diritto civile costituzionalmente protetto di una natura permanente che potrebbe essere terminata solamente in cause estreme e giuridicamente regolate connesso al fatto che nell'ordine sociale e precedente tutti gli individui furono voluti dire avere accesso a beni secondo le loro necessità. Perciò, l'affitto specialmente protetto costituì un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
130. In qualsiasi evento, secondo la causa-legge della Corte anche un'aspettativa legittima per affittare potrebbe essere considerata una proprietà (Tenda c. il Regno Unito, n. 44277/98, § 32 24 giugno 2003). La Corte aveva sostenuto anche che l'annullamento di un affitto specialmente protetto corrispose ad una privazione di proprietà (Mago ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 12959/05, 19724/05, 47860/06 8367/08, 9872/09 e 11706/09 §§ 77-78 e 95, 3 maggio 2012).
131. Inoltre, dovrebbe essere ricordato che al tempo della ratifica della Slovenia della Convenzione e sino alla fine di 1999, tutti i possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti avevano il diritto, non sottopose calcolare limitazioni, acquistare un'abitazione su termini molto favorevoli o quello loro stavano occupando o, sotto il “terzo modello”, un altro appartamento comparabile. Nei richiedenti ' vede, questo diritto costituì anche un “la proprietà”, come sé la possibilità di acquisire proprietà di un'abitazione su pagamento di un minimo contributo finanziario garantì (5 a 10% del valore di mercato della proprietà-veda paragrafo 20 sopra). Il suo esercizio dipese su una richiesta unilaterale col possessore precedente del diritto di occupazione, ed in più cause gli inquilini dovevano aspettare soltanto sino alla fine dei procedimenti di denationalisation per stabilire se il diritto per acquistare sarebbe esercitato sull'abitazione esistente o su un'abitazione di sostituto.
132. I richiedenti sottolinearono che la Corte aveva considerato come un “la proprietà” il diritto di possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti in un'altra Repubblica del SFRY per acquistare un'abitazione (Brezovec c. Croatia, n. 13488/07, § 45 29 marzo 2011). La causa presente, riguardo ad un diritto per acquistare senza limitazione temporale, sarebbe distinto da che di Gaeša ćc. Croatia, citò col Governo (veda paragrafo 119 sopra), dove la legge chiaramente fissò un tempo-limite per esercitare il diritto detto ed il richiedente l'aveva fallito. In Slovenia, il così definito “terzo modello” era stato abrogato con la Corte Costituzionale senza qualsiasi annuncio precedente o avvertendo.
133. Contrari alle dichiarazioni del Governo, il diritto per acquistare non era equo un diritto legale ma anche un mezzi di compensare per la privazione forte dell'affitto specialmente protetto che era la forma il titolo legale ad alloggio presero a quel il tempo. Questo era chiaro dalla natura dell'affitto specialmente protetto, in finora come solamente suo possessore-ed utenti non altro dell'abitazione-fu accordato il diritto per acquistare, e che diritto fu riconosciuto anche in riguardo di un'abitazione di sostituto. In questo collegamento, i richiedenti indicarono, che la Corte già aveva classificato come un “la proprietà” un diritto esistente al risarcimento equo per la privazione di proprietà presa prima della ratifica della Convenzione (Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 133 il 2004-V di ECHR).
(il c) L'intervener della terzo-parte
134. L'Unione Internazionale di Inquilini (in seguito, il “IUT”), un'organizzazione non-governativa la cui sede centrale è localizzata a Stoccolma, dibattè che un diritto ad affitto costituito un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (Larkos c. la Cipro ([GC] n. 29515/95, ECHR 1999-io). Anche più così il “affitto specialmente protetto” che sicuro un livello alto di tutela giuridica ai richiedenti e le loro famiglie.
2. La valutazione della Corte
135. La Corte non lo considera necessario esaminare l'eccezione del Governo di materiae di ratione di incompatibilità poiché è venuto alla conclusione che, anche Articolo 1 presuntuoso di Protocollo N.ro 1 per essere applicabile, i requisiti di questa disposizione non furono violati (veda, mutatis mutandis e nell'ambito di Articolo 6 della Convenzione, Ashingdane c. il Regno Unito, 28 maggio 1985, § 54 la Serie Un n. 93).
B. La sostanza dei richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di '
1. Le parti le osservazioni di '
(un) I richiedenti
(i) Sfera dell'azione di reclamo
136. Nella loro richiesta, i richiedenti addussero, che il Governo rispondente non aveva affermato mai qualsiasi i motivi ragionevoli o interesse pubblico che hanno giustificato spogliandoli del loro affitto specialmente protetto. La ragione sola data era stata la transizione dal sistema socialista e precedente ad un'economia di mercato. Nei richiedenti ' vede, solamente il “proprietari precedenti” aveva tratto profitto da questi cambi, e conferire un beneficio privato su una parte privata non poteva essere nell'interesse pubblico come definito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
137. Nelle loro osservazioni in replica, comunque i richiedenti affermarono che non era, come così, l'abolizione dell'and/or dell'affitto specialmente protetto la restituzione delle abitazioni al “proprietari precedenti” che loro contennero contro la Slovenia. Ancora, un numero di azioni ed omissioni imputabile allo Stato durante il periodo di attuazione delle riforme avuto, nella loro opinione i loro diritti di Convenzione violarono e crearono una situazione che era insopportabile sia per i possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione e per il “proprietari precedenti.” Il risultato del denationalisation era un puramente restituzione formale delle abitazioni: “proprietari precedenti” fu obbligato per affittarli almeno fuori per un affitto senza scopo di lucro sino alla morte del possessore precedente dell'affitto specialmente protetto e poteva, in principio, rimuova solamente l'inquilino con offrendo sostituto affittato alloggio.
138. La legislazione che esistè da 1994 fino a 1999, mentre contemplando il “terzo modello”, era “più assennato e... nella conformità con la Convenzione.” Comunque, questo modello era stato ritirato di fronte alla maggioranza di possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti potrebbe trarre profitto da sé, e da allora onwards che lo Stato era andato a vuoto ad assicurare l'equilibrio equo e richiesto. I richiedenti si riferirono all'opinione che dissente di Giudice Lojze Ude appesa alla decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 25 novembre 1999 (veda paragrafo 38 sopra). Fin dalla fine di 1999 possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione che vivono in abitazioni di denationalised era stato lasciato senza qualsiasi il risarcimento appropriato per la perdita dei loro diritti di affitto specialmente protetti, mentre allo stesso tempo “proprietari precedenti” non poteva godere pienamente le loro abitazioni restituite.
(l'ii) Se c'era un'interferenza con proprietà
139. Citando la causa di Velikovi ed Altri c. la Bulgaria (N. 43278/98 ed altri, § 161 15 marzo 2007), i richiedenti addussero che la questione se i loro diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 era stato interferito con dovrebbe essere esaminato nella luce della moltitudine di misure adottata “da 1991 ad almeno la fine di 1999 e possibilmente anche sino ad oggi.”
(l'iii) Se l'interferenza era legale
140. I richiedenti prima addussero che, riguardo ad essere aveva al fatto che la Costituzione precedente era ancora in vigore al momento della promulgazione del SZ, spogliarli del loro affitto specialmente protetto era stato illegale. Nelle loro osservazioni in replica loro specificarono comunque, che loro non avrebbero persistito in questa rivendicazione, come i fatti in problema accaduto nel 1991 prima che la Convenzione fu ratificata con la Slovenia.
141. I richiedenti dibatterono invece che l'interferenza con le loro proprietà non era stata legale su altri motivi. Loro notarono che al tempo della decisione della Corte Costituzionale che abroga il “terzo modello” (novembre 1999-veda paragrafo 37 sopra), Slovenia già aveva ratificato lo Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto, mentre fabbricandogli pienamente parte del suo ordine legale e nazionale. Nella sua decisione di 8 settembre 2009 (veda divide in paragrafi 97-100 sopra), il Comitato Sociale europeo aveva trovato che il “combinazione di misure insufficienti per l'acquisizione di o accesso ad un appartamento di sostituto, l'evoluzione degli articoli su occupazione e l'aumento in affitti” era contrario ad Articolo 31 § 1 dello Statuto e che la discriminazione fra possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione nel diritto per acquistare era incompatibile con Articolo E. che ha seguito che la decisione della Corte Costituzionale aveva violato una rilegatura ratificò strumento internazionale.
(l'iv) Se l'interferenza era nell'interesse generale
142. I richiedenti non contestarono che era probabile che l'abolizione dell'affitto specialmente protetto e la restituzione di proprietà nazionalizzata fosse stata riguardata siccome intraprendendo un scopo legittimo e come essendo nell'interesse generale. Comunque, loro considerarono che gli stessi non potevano essere detti dell'assenza del risarcimento per la perdita dei loro diritti di occupazione e per l'abolizione del diritto per acquistare.
143. Con abrogando il “terzo modello”, la Corte Costituzionale aveva agito contro l'interesse pubblico. Questo modello fu voluto dire bilanciare gli interessi dei possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione ed il “proprietari precedenti” su un lato e quelli dei municipi sull'altro lato. Aveva compensato in qualche modo per il fatto che per abitazioni espropriarono tramite nationalisation o il sequestro dopo la Seconda Mondo Guerra, il diritto di “proprietari precedenti” a restituzione precedenza fu data sul diritto di possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti per acquistare su termini favorevoli. Era il modello solo che ha rappresentato un diritto effettivo per acquistare un'abitazione ed era possibile usare anche nell'evento di restituzione e nonostante il “proprietario precedente” la riluttanza per vendere.
144. La Corte Costituzionale aveva abrogato il “terzo modello” improvvisamente senza qualsiasi avvertendo o periodo di transizione durante il quale è probabile che possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto esercitino il diritto per acquistare. Faceva così soltanto perché il “terzo modello” interferì coi diritti di proprietà dei municipi, senza prendere in considerazione l'intenzione dietro alla legislazione gli interessi degli attori privati coinvolsero ed il fatto che i municipi avevano acquisito via esente da spese le abitazioni socialmente-possedute la promulgazione del SZ.
(v) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
145. I richiedenti ricordarono che nell'elaborazione di restituzione lo Stato non fu supposto per creare mali nuovi e sproporzionati mentre tentò di attenuare i vecchi danni. La legislazione dovrebbe rendere possibile sé prendere in considerazione le particolari circostanze di ogni causa, evitando mettere un carico sproporzionato su persone che avevano acquisito proprietà in buon fede (veda Pincová e Pinc c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 36548/97, § 58, 5 febbraio 2003, e Velikovi ed Altri, citato sopra, § 178). Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la sproporzione posò nell'abrogazione del diritto dell'inquilino per acquistare sotto il “terzo modello.” Dall'anno 2000 onwards le due alternative disponibile ai richiedenti (vale a dire, continuando ad affittare l'abitazione esistente o muovendosi fuori di sé ed ottenendo un incentivo finanziario) né era un risarcimento appropriato per la perdita dell'affitto specialmente protetto né un'alternativa comparabile al diritto acquistare. In questo collegamento, i richiedenti presentarono gli argomenti seguenti.
(α) Affitto specialmente protetto
146. I richiedenti dibatterono che l'affitto specialmente protetto era il diritto civile più forte su un'abitazione socialmente-posseduta. Era un diritto di sui-generis comparabile a proprietà, ed il diritto di esclusiva per acquistare precluse ognuno altro dall'acquisire proprietà della stessa abitazione. La letteratura specializzata citata col Governo, mentre afferma che l'affitto protetto era un diritto di non-proprietà, non dovrebbe essere capito in un senso negativo ma nel senso che rappresentò più di un diritto di proprietà, come sé anche il comprised dei diritti manageriali. In qualsiasi l'evento, le dichiarazioni del Governo non presero conto dovuto del ragionamento seguito con la Corte Costituzionale nella sua decisione Su-29/98 (veda paragrafo 11 sopra).
147. Era vero, come indicato col Governo che affitti specialmente protetti sono esistiti solamente su abitazioni socialmente-possedute; davvero, affitto specialmente protetto e proprietà privata erano mutuamente esclusive. Il precedente era un diritto permanente che potrebbe cessare esistere solamente in situazioni eccezionali definito con legge (veda paragrafo 14 sopra) che potrebbe essere diviso nei motivi colpa-basati (danno, disturbo agli altri residenti insuccesso per pagare la parcella) ed i motivi della superfluità, riflettendo il principio generale che nessuno-uno dovrebbe avere più proprietà che loro ebbero bisogno (insuccesso per vivere nell'abitazione per più di sei mesi, totale subaffittò dell'abitazione, proprietà di un'altra abitazione vuota ed appropriata).
148. Sotto il sistema precedente, abitazioni potrebbero essere vendute solamente a possessori di affitto specialmente protetti (veda paragrafo 10 in multa sopra); questa situazione cambiò drammaticamente con la riforma di alloggio, come possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione fu dato solamente un diritto di priorità; se l'inquilino rifiutasse di pagare il “proprietario precedente” prezzo richiesto che l'abitazione potrebbe essere venduta sul mercato gratis.
(β) I contratti d'affitto
149. Con contrasto, il diritto per continuare il contratto d'affitto comportato una degradazione essenziale dello status goduta coi richiedenti sotto l'affitto specialmente protetto. Per la maggioranza di possessori di diritti di occupazione una relazione di leasing nuova (anche per un periodo indefinito) era solamente una soluzione provvisoria finché loro potrebbero acquistare un'abitazione. Loro dovevano comunque, posticipare la realizzazione del loro diritto per acquistare, come in più cause loro dovevano aspettare la conclusione di una procedura di denationalisation per scoprire se l'abitazione era ritornata ad un “proprietario precedente”; loro dovevano aspettare poi per che “proprietario precedente” dire se lui acconsentì ad una vendita favorevole come per il “prima il modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto; se non, loro potessero optare per il così definiti “terzo modello.” In pratica, perciò sino alla fine di 1999 (quando fu abrogato con la Corte Costituzionale-veda paragrafo 37 sopra) il modello secondo fu usato solamente al buon effetto nelle poche cause. Dopo che fu abrogato il diritto per affittare divenne una soluzione permanente, mentre permise inquilini di rimanere nelle abitazioni loro stavano occupando.
150. Il diritto per affittare era più debole dell'affitto specialmente protetto in quel: (un) a solamente persone chiamate nel contratto di contratto d'affitto fu permesso per risiedere con l'inquilino; (b) inquilini non potevano prendere parte in attività commerciali nell'abitazione o potrebbero subaffittarlo senza il “proprietario precedente” il beneplacito; (il c) inquilini dovevano pagare un affitto (piuttosto che una semplice parcella) quale, anche se era un affitto senza scopo di lucro, era sorto notevolmente (più di 600%) fin da 1991 e non solo mantenimento coperto ma fu voluto dire anche offrire un profitto al “proprietario precedente”; secondo la decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 20 febbraio 2003 (paragrafo 39 sopra), il metodo nuovo del calcolo dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro sarebbe fatto domanda retroattivamente; (d) inquilini non potevano scambiare abitazioni; (e) il diritto di esclusiva per acquistare fu sostituito con un semplice diritto di pre-acquisto (divide in paragrafi 40 in multa e 64 sopra); (f) nell'evento di sfratto o morte dell'inquilino originale, il diritto per affittare ad un affitto senza scopo di lucro non era transferrable a membri di famiglia altro che il consorte o partner di scadenza lunga (divide in paragrafi 68-70 sopra); (il grammo) il diritto per usare l'abitazione non era più un proteggè costituzionalmente e giuridicamente diritto, ma soltanto un diritto contrattuale ed ordinario; (h) potrebbe essere terminato a qualsiasi il momento col “proprietario precedente” se lui trovasse l'inquilino un'altra abitazione appropriata (paragrafo 40 sopra); (i) i motivi colpa-basati e superfluità-basati nuovi per sfratto furono introdotti, incluso proprietà di un'altra abitazione (Sezione 103 dell'Alloggio Agisce 2003, divida in paragrafi 40 sopra), nonostante se il secondo era vuoto o “vero” (nel senso che non era equo una casa di festa) e muovendosi comportò un deterioramento sostanziale dell'inquilino sta vivendo le condizioni (tutti queste cose furono garantite sotto la legislazione precedente). I richiedenti considerarono che era irrazionale, nel 2003, introdurre proprietà di un'altra abitazione come una base per sfratto, come questo sarebbe coerente coi principi del socialismo ma non con quelli di un'economia di mercato gratis. Inoltre, se un inquilino si muovesse al suo proprio indulgendo, il resto di suo o la sua famiglia non poteva sospendere nell'abitazione originale.
151. Era vero che il SZ-1 regolò il diritto di inquilini per modernizzare l'abitazione e situazioni definito in che il “proprietario precedente” non poteva negare suo o suo acconsenta fare così; comunque, un diritto simile, mentre non regolò con legge, era stato riconosciuto anche con dottrina legale e causa-legge con riguardo ad a possessori di diritti di occupazione. Ed in qualsiasi l'evento, sotto il modernisation della regolamentazione precedente senza che il beneplacito richiesto non era una base per sfratto, mentre era così sotto gli articoli nuovi.
(γ) Il “secondo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto
152. Nel suo rapporto di 8 gennaio 2002 (paragrafo 46 sopra) il Difensore civile affermò che possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto in abitazioni di denationalised erano vittime di violazioni sistematiche di diritti umani, e suggerì soluzioni appropriate (pagamenti più alti a possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione, o incentivi per il “proprietari precedenti” vendere). Anche se il rapporto del Difensore civile fu esaminato formalmente ed accettò con la Riunione Nazionale, i suggerimenti che ha contenuto non furono implementati nel SZ-1 che completamente abolì il concetto del diritto di possessori di affitto specialmente protetti e precedenti per acquistare un esistendo o abitazione di sostituto in conformità col “prima e terzi modelli” di privatizzazione di sostituto. Invece, la legislazione del 2003 focalizzò sul “secondo modello” (paragrafo 34 sopra) che raramente era usato e quale permise l'inquilino di ricevere il risarcimento finanziario se lui o lei decidessero di muoversi fuori dell'abitazione ed acquistare un altro piatto sul mercato gratis o costruire un alloggio.
153. Secondo il SZ-1, il contributo Statale corrisposto solamente a 15-20% del valore di mercato dell'abitare l'inquilino stava lasciando comunque, in simile cause. Questo volle dire che per acquisire una proprietà comparabile lui o lei doveva pagare verso 80-85% del suo valore. Con contrasto, il diritto per acquistare sotto il “terzo modello” permise possessori di affitto specialmente protetti e precedenti di acconsentire a proprietà con pagando verso 5-10% del valore dell'abitazione in rate su una spanna di venti anni. Era vero che sotto il “secondo modello”, l'inquilino potrebbe fare domanda per un prestito dall'Alloggio Fondo per la somma rimanente per essere pagato. Secondo i richiedenti solamente persone che sarebbero eleggibili per prestiti di banca ordinari potrebbero ottenere comunque, simile prestiti, ed il tasso di interesse su loro era anche peggiore che su prestiti di banca commerciali.
154. L'abolizione del “terzo modello” costrinse efficacemente una maggioranza di possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione a comprare abitazioni sul mercato gratis (quale era peggiore delle abitazioni loro stavano lasciando in termini di superficie, costruzione ed ubicazione) a forza dei grandi sacrifici ed in cause numerose con l'aiuto dei loro membri di famiglia. In qualsiasi l'evento, il problema di proporzionalità per essere valutato nella causa presente non era se possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione maneggiarono, in un modo o un altro, avere su un tetto i loro capi ma piuttosto se c'era risarcimento equo per la perdita dei loro diritti. Il Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali aveva trovato che un carico sproporzionato era stato fissato su loro, ed i richiedenti chiesero alla Corte di giungere alla stessa conclusione.
155. Infine, i richiedenti affermarono che molti di loro avevano investito importi sostanziali nel mantenimento e rimessa a nuovo delle abitazioni che erano state sostenute inizialmente poveramente mentre aumentò notevolmente con ciò il valore degli appartamenti; ancora diritti di proprietà erano stati ripristinati ciononostante il “proprietari precedenti.”
(b) Il Governo
(i) Se c'era interferenza con proprietà
156. Il Governo dibattè che l'adozione del SZ non faceva in qualsiasi cambio di modo la condizione giuridica dei richiedenti, siccome i loro diritti di occupazione furono trasformati in un affitto per un periodo indefinito, con protezione contro sfratto arbitrario col “proprietario precedente.” Il contratto d'affitto non poteva essere terminato se affitto non fosse pagato per ragioni della fatica finanziaria, c'era una possibilità di ottenendo un affitto sovvenzionato e muoversi ad un'altra abitazione senza scopo di lucro ed appropriata, il contratto d'affitto era transferrable agli eredi dell'inquilino ed il “proprietario precedente” fu obbligato per mantenere l'abitazione in buono ripara, mentre assicurando con ciò un standard di vita ragionevole. La differenza essenziale e sola col sistema precedente era che mentre sotto il regime di proprietà sociale e precedente il proprietario non era veramente identificabile-un fatto che avrebbe condotto i richiedenti a considerarsi come il “i proprietari” delle abitazioni-, nelle abitazioni di economia di mercato proprietari identificabili avevano. Nella prospettiva del Governo, questo fatto non poteva corrispondere da solo ad un'interferenza coi diritti garantiti con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
157. In questo collegamento, il Governo notò anche, che i possessori di diritti di occupazione furono accordati contratti d'affitto a livelli di affitto senza scopo di lucro irrispettoso della loro situazione finanziaria. Di venti anni passati simile affitti erano aumentati, ma lo standard di vita in generale era cambiato radicalmente e gli affitti senza scopo di lucro pagarono coi richiedenti non era nulla come affitti di libero-mercato. Aveva il “proprietari precedenti” non ricevette una somma per coprire i loro costi, il loro obbligo per mantenere gli appartamenti in buono ripara avrebbe costituito un carico sproporzionato (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, § 198 ECHR 2006-VIII).
158. Con riguardo ad a richiedenti individuali, il Governo fece le osservazioni seguenti.
159. Alla data di entrata in vigore del SZ, richiedente n. 6 (il Sig. Kuret) non era il possessore del diritto di occupazione ma soltanto uno degli utenti legali dell'abitazione ai quali suo padre sostenne il diritto. A che tempo, come un membro di famiglia immediato lui non aveva anche il diritto ad una relazione di affitto. Nell'opinione del Governo, le disposizioni del SZ non avevano avuto perciò, qualsiasi effetto diretto sulla sua situazione legale. Inoltre, richiedente n. 6 avevano concluso un regolamento amichevole “di tutte le relazioni reciproche” in che lui ritirò esplicitamente qualsiasi le ulteriori rivendicazioni contro il “proprietario precedente” dell'abitazione, e perciò anche la possibilità di fare appello contro la sentenza di Corte Suprema di 21 aprile 2005 (n. II Ips 98/2004-veda paragrafo 68 sopra). Lui aveva confiscato così qualsiasi status di vittima che è probabile che lui avrebbe avuto.
160. Gli stessi fecero domanda a richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Berglez) che non aveva depositato una richiesta per acquistare l'abitazione lei stava vivendo in o qualsiasi l'altra abitazione appropriata. Lei aveva rifiutato di firmare un contratto d'affitto e così aveva vissuto nell'abitazione senza il titolo legale e necessario. Nell'opinione del Governo, lei era in nessuna posizione per chiedere che la sua condizione giuridica aveva deteriorato a causa dell'azione presa con la Repubblica della Slovenia.
161. Il Governo indicò anche che, con analogia con la legislazione precedente della Repubblica Socialista della Slovenia, il SZ aveva stabilito, che dove un possessore precedente di diritti di occupazione non ebbe bisogno più di protezione di alloggio (perché lui possedette un'altra abitazione o a causa delle altre circostanze), il “proprietario precedente” dell'abitazione dove lui stava vivendo firmare un contratto di contratto d'affitto non fu obbligato. Questa era la causa per richiedenti notevolmente N. 2 (il Sig.ra Berglez), 7 (il Sig. Logar), 9 (il Sig. Milič) e 10 (il Sig.ra Zalar) che aveva chiarito il loro alloggio ha bisogno con acquistare un'altra abitazione. Il Governo dibattè che sotto queste circostanze, loro non potevano essere considerati vittime delle violazioni allegato.
162. Il Governo indicò anche il seguente:
- Il consorte di richiedente n. 1 (il Sig.ra Cornelia Berger-Krall) possedette un cottage di vigneto ed un alloggio di 91 metri di piazza (il m²) appropriato per l'abitazione;
- Il richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Berglez) aveva ricevuto una concessione di EUR 38,752.08 ed un prestito molle di EUR 28,774.92; lei aveva acquistato un'abitazione in Maribor;
- Il richiedente n. 7 (il Sig. Logar) aveva ricevuto una concessione di EUR 53,276.42 ed un prestito molle di EUR 89,223.57; lui aveva acquistato un m² indulgendo del 82;
- Il richiedente n. 8 (il Sig.ra Marguč), insieme con suo marito, possedette un alloggio di m² del 64 in un'ubicazione prestigiosa col mare in Piran che era appropriato per l'abitazione;
- Il richiedente n. 9 (il Sig. Milič) aveva ricevuto una concessione di EUR 45,975.98 ed un prestito molle di EUR 21,524.02, ed aveva acquistato un m² indulgendo del 75;
- Il richiedente n. 10 (il Sig.ra Zalar) aveva ricevuto una concessione di EUR 32,262.99 ed un prestito molle di EUR 72,737.02; lei aveva acquistato due abitazioni, uno che misura 84 m² e gli altri 148 m².
163. Nelle loro osservazioni di 5 giugno 2012 i richiedenti avevano affermato inoltre, che loro non avevano mai chiesto esplicitamente o implicitamente che loro non avevano sufficienti vuole dire di esistenza o che loro non avevano proprietà e furono concessi perciò a benefici sociali o affitto sovvenzionato. Nell'opinione del Governo, questa dichiarazione era, un'ammissione che non essendo capace di continuare l'affitto ad un affitto senza scopo di lucro non ha costituito una minaccia alla famiglia vive di qualsiasi dei richiedenti, e che gli aumenti nell'affitto senza scopo di lucro non violarono i loro diritti di Convenzione. Siccome un membro di famiglia vicino non potesse acquistare l'abitazione a meno che lui o lei ottennero il beneplacito scritto dell'occupazione precedente possessore corretto, il richiedente n. 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret) che non aveva ottenuto simile beneplacito non poteva essere considerato una vittima da questo punto di vista, siccome lui non era un membro di una categoria protetta.
(l'ii) commenti di Generale
164. Il Governo osservò che sotto la politica di alloggio di regime precedente era stato rivolto principalmente in un spirito di politica sociale e protezione dello standard di vita, e così aveva un impatto di destabilising su trend di sviluppo economici e sociali. Un'abitazione fu considerata come un sociale, non un'entità economica. L'introduzione di relazioni di mercato nell'economia di alloggio intese eliminando soluzioni legislative ed anacronistiche, come diritti di occupazione. Allo stesso tempo, il Governo doveva fornire ad un regime di transizione ed appropriato in conformità il principio della fiducia nella legge (quale non dovrebbe essere capito per volere dire che la legislazione deve rimanere immutata). Come la Corte Costituzionale indicata esattamente, il diritto di occupazione incontrò nell'ordinamento giuridico nuovo gli altri diritti ed un equilibrio equo dovevano essere previsti fra loro.
165. Siccome spiegato in paragrafo 156 sopra, la condizione giuridica di occupazione precedente che possessori corretti sono rimasti, in sostanza intatto. Loro mantennero il diritto di pre-acquisto al quale loro erano stati concessi sotto il sistema precedente. Ispezioni potrebbero essere rese con l'inspectorate dell'alloggio nazionale che, nell'evento di mantenimento povero dell'abitazione, potrebbe ordinare che il difetto sia rimediato ad al “proprietario precedente” la spesa. L'inquilino avuto diritto ad ottenere il risarcimento per danno soffrì di quota a mantenimento povero e rimborso di affitto smodatamente alto. Lui o lei potrebbe richiedere anche che il livello di affitto sia controllato con un corpo competente. Questo grado di protezione non fu prolungato, comunque, ad utenti che sotto il sistema precedente non avevano diritti di occupazione o li aveva persi.
166. Come agli obblighi dell'inquilino, lui o lei doveva usare l'abitazione in conformità coi termini del contratto d'affitto, concedere il “proprietario precedente” accesso ai locali (nessuno più che due volte per anno), e non poteva cambiare la configurazione di abitazione o potrebbe installare adattamenti ed apparecchi senza l'accordo scritto e precedente del “proprietario precedente.” Questi erano fondamentalmente gli stessi obblighi come sotto il regime precedente. Comunque, sotto che insuccesso di regime per rispettarli diede luogo a responsabilità per danni, mentre sotto gli articoli nuovi cambi non autorizzati all'abitazione erano i motivi per conclusione del contratto d'affitto (a meno che l'inquilino rimosse le modifiche su richiesta scritto col “proprietario precedente”). Quando muovendosi fuori, l'inquilino fu concesso a rimborso della parte non-deprezzata di qualsiasi investimento utile nell'abitazione lui aveva reso col beneplacito del “proprietario precedente.” Con simile beneplacito scritto lui o lei potrebbero subaffittare anche parte dell'abitazione.
167. Col ' di novanta giorni noti, l'inquilino poteva a qualsiasi calcola unilateralmente termini il contratto di contratto d'affitto senza qualsiasi la giustificazione; il “proprietario precedente” potrebbe fare così solamente al fornisco all'inquilino un'altra abitazione appropriata.
168. Come ai motivi colpa-basati e nuovi per conclusione del contratto d'affitto (paragrafo 21 sopra), loro furono imposti con la natura della relazione di civile-legge e la protezione dell'altra parte contrattuale. Inquilini in angoscia sociale che non poteva pagare l'affitto in pieno furono concessi per aiutare da un corpo amministrativo e municipale che pagherebbe il “proprietario precedente” la differenza nell'affitto o dà l'inquilino la possibilità di affittare un'abitazione socialmente-posseduta. Il diritto ad affitto sovvenzionato (Sezioni 26-31 dell'Assistenza Sociale Agiscono) fu implementato coi centri di lavoro sociali ed il metodo per calcolarlo fu cambiato nel 2005. I benefici in contanti (incluso l'affitto sovvenzionato) non poteva eccedere il salario minimo legale.
169. Secondo Sezione 56 del SZ, quando un inquilino morì il “proprietario precedente” fu obbligato per firmare un accordo di contratto d'affitto col coniuge superstite o partner di scadenza lunga o con uno dei membri di famiglia immediati indicato nel contratto di contratto d'affitto (paragrafo 23 sopra). Siccome aveva indicato la Corte Costituzionale (paragrafo 69 sopra), il trasferimento dell'affitto ad un altro membro di famiglia assicurò la funzione sociale dell'abitazione. Comunque, una distinzione sarebbe resa fra il consorte and/or scadenza lunga partner sulla mano del un'e gli altri membri di famiglia immediati sull'altro: mentre il fine di matrimonio (o associazione a lungo termine) era vivere permanentemente insieme, gli stessi non potevano essere detti di relazioni con gli altri membri di famiglia come figli e genitori. Aveva il secondo stato concesso per continuare la relazione di affitto ad infinitum sotto le stesse condizioni come il possessore precedente di diritti di occupazione, l'equilibrio fra la protezione di proprietà e la ricerca della sua funzione sociale sarebbe stato sconvolto. In particolare, aveva i membri di famiglia continuato a trarre profitto dall'affitto senza scopo di lucro, il “proprietario precedente” sarebbe stato ostacolato da ottenere reddito dalla sua proprietà, un elemento che è dell'importanza speciale nel sistema di economia di mercato. Protezione di membri di famiglia sarebbe potuta essere realizzata con altro vuole dire, come assegni e prestiti o le opportunità di affittare le altre abitazioni senza scopo di lucro.
170. L'affitto senza scopo di lucro (paragrafo 19 sopra) non era un abuso sul diritto di proprietà del “proprietario precedente”, ma una regolamentazione del metodo di godimento della proprietà ed una forma di protezione della situazione legale di possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione. Nel valutarlo, la situazione finanziaria dell'inquilino non era attinente, mentre la protezione di suo o la sua condizione giuridica, mentre nascendo da dalla regolamentazione precedente, era un fattore per essere preso in considerazione. Il Governo si riferì alla parte delle loro osservazioni che descrivono il metodo del calcolo dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro (divide in paragrafi 79-86 sopra).
171. Il Governo indicò anche che il SZ-1 mantenne il principio di protezione dello status di possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione. Introdusse il diritto dell'inquilino per richiedere il “proprietario precedente” offrire un'altra abitazione appropriata o esigere una riduzione relativa in affitto per il tempo durante il quale non poteva essere usata normalmente l'abitazione. Se lavoro di rinnovamento richiedesse l'allontanamento provvisorio dell'inquilino, il “proprietario precedente” fu obbligato ad offrire locali di sostituto e pagare i costi della mossa. Inoltre, il SZ-1 posò in giù le condizioni sotto che il “proprietario precedente” non poteva rifiutare beneplacito alle modifiche con l'inquilino (Sezione 97), introdusse il diritto dell'inquilino ad un risarcimento della parte non-deprezzata di qualsiasi investimenti utili e necessari resero (Sezione 98) e convenne che il “proprietario precedente” non poteva richiedere l'allontanamento dell'inquilino prima di avere rimborsato gli investimenti l'inquilino aveva reso nell'abitazione (Sezione 112(2)). Come al fatto che proprietà di altro beni immobili era una base per conclusione dell'affitto, il Governo considerò che sarebbe stato sproporzionato per opprimere il padrone di casa con una relazione di affitto per un periodo indefinito ed un affitto senza scopo di lucro dove l'inquilino aveva l'altro alloggio appropriato a suo o la sua disposizione.
(l'iii) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
172. Il Governo dibattè che loro goderono un margine ampio della valutazione nel riformare il sistema politico ed economico del paese. Restituzione di abitazioni al “proprietari precedenti” fu voluto dire correggere le ingiustizie commesse di periodo dopoguerra ed escluse il diritto dell'occupazione possessore corretto per acquisire proprietà della stessa abitazione. Le riforme avevano una base legale nel SZ e ZDen, così come in Emendamento XCIX alla Costituzione che previde per la trasformazione di proprietà socialmente-posseduta in pubblico e le altre forme di proprietà per essere regolato con legge. Il diritto di occupazione, un elemento tipico del sistema socialista e precedente basò su un'economia progettata e socialmente-possedette proprietà, non poteva continuare ad esistere in un'economia di mercato.
173. Il ristabilimento dei diritti di proprietà di “proprietari precedenti” di proprietà nazionalizzata e la compensazione di mali subite con loro un scopo legittimo era in una società democratica basata sull'articolo di legge e rispetta per diritti umani. Il legislatore nazionale aveva previsto un equilibrio equo fra competendo diritti: proprietà di abitazioni non poteva essere acquisita coi possessori di diritti di occupazione contro la volontà del “proprietario precedente”, ma il diritto secondo di proprietà fu restretto con l'obbligo per entrare in un contratto di contratto d'affitto per un periodo illimitato. Inoltre, dovrebbe essere preso in considerazione che il diritto per acquistare l'abitazione non era mai uno dei diritti che costituiscono il diritto di occupazione sotto il sistema precedente. Occupazione possessori destri avevano solamente un diritto di pre-acquisto ad un prezzo determinato con un stimatore munito di certificato; loro non potevano costringere o potrebbero richiedere l'acquisto.
174. Il diritto per fare domanda acquistare l'abitazione diede su possessori di diritti di occupazione in edifici acquisiti con solidarietà e finanziamenti di alloggio reciproci non fu voluto dire essere la soddisfazione equa per il ritiro del diritto di occupazione, ma una misura privatizzazione abilitante e transizione dal sistema di sociale-proprietà ad un sistema di proprietà privata con proprietari noti. I richiedenti non avevano questa scelta come le abitazioni nelle quali loro stavano vivendo non era stato acquisito con fondo di investimento, ma era stato nazionalizzato coercitivamente. Il legislatore aveva ragioni sostanziali per regolare differentemente la situazione di queste abitazioni.
175. Inoltre, debba il “proprietario precedente” non acconsenta vendere l'abitazione, inquilini nei richiedenti la situazione di ' potrebbe risolvere il loro problema di alloggio con comprando un'abitazione o costruendo un alloggio sui termini favorevoli (il risarcimento finanziario nell'importo di una percentuale del valore dell'abitazione ed un prestito) purché per in Articolo 125 del SZ, sotto il “secondo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto (paragrafo 34 sopra).
176. Come alla decisione del Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali (veda divide in paragrafi 97-100 sopra), si dovrebbe enfatizzare che gli obblighi che sono il risultato di Articolo 31 dello Statuto Sociale europeo sono obblighi di sforzo e non obblighi di risultato. Ad ottobre 2011 Slovenia aveva adottato inoltre per attenersi con gli obblighi che sorgono dalla decisione detta, gli Articoli che correggono gli Articoli sull'allocazione di abitazioni senza scopo di lucro ed era stata nell'elaborazione di preparare Programme che sarebbe una politica di alloggio a lungo termine per il prossimo periodo di dieci-anno e conferirebbe sull'Alloggio Consiglio il ruolo di consigliando il Governo ed esaminare l'attuazione delle riforme un Alloggio Nazionale.
177. Come lontano come l'abolizione del “terzo modello” riguardò, il Governo osservò che la decisione della Corte Costituzionale fu fondata sugli effettivi e capacità finanziarie e modeste dei municipi. I secondi potrebbero offrire le poche abitazioni per acquisto di sostituto; ad ottobre 1993 erano davvero, solamente 531 abitazioni vacanti nell'intere della Slovenia, ed in municipi precedenti in Ljubljana loro numerarono 172. Era il dovere dei municipi di fare un certo numero di abitazioni pubbliche disponibile a cittadini socialmente più deboli ed in via d'estinzione, così loro furono obbligati per darli a persone in bisogno sociale e più urgente che l'occupazione precedente possessori corretti in abitazioni di denationalised. In qualsiasi l'evento, gli incentivi finanziari riconosciuti con la Slovenia per risolvere problemi di alloggio costituiti adeguato “il risarcimento” per qualsiasi il possibile abuso sul diritto di occupazione. Si potrebbe dibattere anche che a causa della partecipazione finanziaria dello Stato nell'acquisto di un'altra abitazione, simile risarcimento non era necessario.
(il c) L'intervener della terzo-parte
178. L'IUT considerò che nell'elaborazione di transizione di alloggio e riforma Slovenia aveva interferito smodatamente coi diritti di possessori di affitto specialmente protetti, mentre ritirò la minima tutela giuridica assicurata ad inquilini negli altri paesi europei. Secondo l'IUT, i richiedenti erano stati privati del loro status di affitto specialmente protetto senza qualsiasi il risarcimento appropriato. I diritti di affitto nuovi dati a loro con le leggi di riforma di alloggio erano di una minore qualità. Questa degradazione della loro posizione non era proporzionata e giustificò sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Se c'era un'interferenza con proprietà
179. La Corte prima i richiami che nella sua decisione di 28 maggio 2013 sull'ammissibilità della richiesta (paragrafo 149), considerò che pertanto siccome il Governo si riferì alle particolari circostanze di richiedenti individuali (notevolmente, il loro diritto per occupare gli appartamenti loro vissero in, la loro proprietà di altro beni immobili, il loro and/or della situazione finanziario le concessioni finanziarie ricevute con loro-veda divide in paragrafi 159-163 sopra), questi problemi erano le considerazioni attinenti da valutare se c'era interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ed Articolo 8 della Convenzione e, nell'affermativa, se questa interferenza era proporzionata e necessaria in una società democratica.
180. Sarà notato in questo collegamento che i richiedenti hanno specificato che le loro azioni di reclamo non sono dirette contro l'abolizione dell'and/or dell'affitto specialmente protetto la restituzione delle abitazioni al “proprietari precedenti” per se (veda divide in paragrafi 137 e 142 sopra), ma piuttosto contro la protezione insufficiente ed allegato della categoria di possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione in appartamenti di denationalised e contro l'abrogazione del “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto. Nella loro opinione, la violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non dipese su un rischio individuale e diretto o potenziale di sfratto, ma sugli effetti la struttura legale e generale della riforma di alloggio aveva sulla loro situazione. Questo distingue questa azione di reclamo dal sollevato sotto la stessa disposizione nella causa di Liepjnieks āc. la Lettonia ((il dec.), n. 37586/06, §§ 88-89 2 novembre 2010) che essenzialmente fu basato sulla perdita di un'abitazione senza il risarcimento e quale fu dichiarato inammissibile con la Corte perché il richiedente aveva scelto di sgombrare i locali di suo proprio accordo e passare alla proprietà del suo consorte.
181. Che essendo così, la Corte considera che la riforma di alloggio e l'abrogazione del “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto ha interferito coi richiedenti il diritto di ' al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà fin dall'entrata in vigore della Convenzione in riguardo della Slovenia (28 giugno 1994). La sostituzione dell'affitto specialmente protetto con contratti d'affitto normali restrinse i richiedenti i diritti di ' in molti riguardi. Loro non erano più in grado godere la protezione che la legislazione precedente riconobbe a possessori di diritti di occupazione, vale a dire la possibilità di usare i locali per un periodo indefinito in cambio per il pagamento di una parcella, protezione contro sfratto il diritto per trasmettere il contratto d'affitto a membri di famiglia altro che consorti o partner a lungo termine e la possibilità di subletting, rinnovando o decorando l'appartamento senza il permesso del proprietario. Inoltre, la parcella fu sostituita con un affitto senza scopo di lucro e più alto, e l'obbligo per tollerare visite del “proprietari precedenti”, ed i motivi nuovi per sfratto furono introdotti. Sarà notato anche che la decisione della Corte Costituzionale che abroga il “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto (veda paragrafo 37 sopra) deprivato i richiedenti della possibilità, purché per coi 1994 emendamenti all'Alloggio 1991, di acquistare un appartamento di sostituto su termini favorevoli dai municipi Agiscono. I richiedenti così persi un diritto esecutivo per acquisire significativamente proprietà ad un prezzo abbassano che il prezzo di mercato, un fatto che ha colpito avversamente i loro interessi effettivi protegguto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
182. I richiedenti ' and/or della situazione finanziario la loro proprietà di altro beni immobili non poteva cambiare queste conclusioni, ma è fattori attinenti nel valutare la proporzionalità dell'interferenza. La Corte ha esaminato anche le dichiarazioni del Governo riguardo a richiedenti N. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez) e 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret-veda divide in paragrafi 159, 160 e 163 sopra). Osserva che il fatto che il Sig.ra Berglez rifiutò presumibilmente di firmare un contratto di contratto d'affitto col “proprietari precedenti” non faceva, come così, colpisca il suo status come un possessore precedente di diritti di occupazione. Come al Sig. Kuret, anche se lui non era il possessore dei diritti di occupazione, ma solamente uno degli utenti legali dell'abitazione, la Corte è dell'opinione che il suo status come erede legittimo del precedente inquilino specialmente protetto può in principio l'ha dato un titolo a per avere l'affitto protetto trasferito a lui sulla cessione di suo padre. Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte conclude che l'Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 diritti di richiedenti N. 2 e 6 furono interferiti anche con.
183. La Corte si riferisce alla sua causa-legge stabilita sulla struttura di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e la maniera nelle quali i tre articoli contennero in che disposizione sarà fatta domanda (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Jokela c. la Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 44 ECHR 2002 IV, e J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) la Terra Ltd c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 52 ECHR 2007-III).
184. In linea con che causa-legge, la Corte considera che le interferenze descrissero sopra di incorra essere considerato sotto il così definito terzo articolo, relativo al diritto dello Stato “eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale” esponga fuori nel secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, mutatis mutandis, Almeida Ferreira e Melo Ferreira c. il Portogallo, n. 41696/07, § 26 21 dicembre 2010).
185. Rimane essere accertato se questa interferenza si attenne coi requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) Se l'interferenza fu giustificata
(i) Se l'interferenza era “legale”
186. La Corte reitera che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza solamente una privazione di proprietà “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso di proprietà con eseguendo “le leggi” (veda OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos c. la Russia, n. 14902/04, § 559 20 settembre 2011). Inoltre, l'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (veda Capitale Banca Ad c. la Bulgaria, n. 49429/99, § 133 ECHR 2005-XII (gli estratti), ed Il Re precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 79 ECHR 2000-XII).
187. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, non è contestato fra le parti che la soppressione degli affitti specialmente protetti e la loro sostituzione con contratti di contratto d'affitto normali aveva una base legale in diritto nazionale, come sé fu previsto per con l'Alloggio Atto 1991 (veda divide in paragrafi 18-23 sopra) ed emendamenti susseguenti a sé (veda divide in paragrafi 31-43). Come alla decisione per abrogare il “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto, fu adottato con la Corte Costituzionale in una procedura prescritta con legge (veda paragrafo 37 sopra).
188. Comunque, i richiedenti dibatterono che l'interferenza con le loro proprietà non era legale come al tempo dell'adozione di che decisione (25 novembre 1999), Slovenia già aveva ratificato lo Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto, mentre incorporandolo con ciò nel suo ordine legale e nazionale, e nel 2009 il Comitato Sociale europeo aveva trovato che l'abrogazione del “terzo modello” era contrario ad Articolo 31 § 1 ed ad Articolo E dello Statuto (veda paragrafo 141 sopra). Il Governo rispose che gli obblighi che sono il risultato dello Statuto Sociale europeo erano obblighi di sforzo e non di risultato (veda paragrafo 176 sopra).
189. I richiami di Corte che nel definire il significato di termini e nozioni nel testo della Convenzione, ha su molte occasioni prese in elementi di conto di diritto internazionale altro che la Convenzione, come lo Statuto Sociale europeo e l'interpretazione di simile elementi con organi competenti (veda, per istanza, Demir e Baykara c. la Turchia [GC], n. 34503/97, §§ 74-86 ECHR 2008 -..). Comunque, quando richiedendo che una misura è “legale”, la Convenzione essenzialmente si riferisce di nuovo a legge nazionale e stati l'obbligo per adattare al riguardo agli effettivi ed articoli procedurali (veda, per istanza e nell'ambito di Articolo 5 § 1 della Convenzione, Olymbiou c. la Turchia, n. 16091/90, § 85 27 ottobre 2009).
190. Vale anche che nella sua decisione di 8 settembre 2009 (veda divide in paragrafi 97-100 sopra), il Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali enfatizzò che era “chiaro dall'enunciazione effettiva di Articolo 31 [dello Statuto Sociale e Riveduto] che non può essere interpretato come imponendo sugli Stati un obbligo per realizzare risultati” e che per la situazione Parti di Stati deve essere in conformità allo Statuto Sociale e Riveduto, in particolare, “adotti il necessario legale, finanziario ed operativo vuole dire di assicurare consolidi progresso verso le mete posate in giù nello Statuto” (veda divide in paragrafi 28 e 29 della decisione in oggetto). Gli obblighi che sorgono da Articolo 31 obblighi di essere di vogliono dire ed il Comitato europeo che non è assegnato legalmente col potere di annullare la legislazione nazionale e contestata e causa-legge, il secondo ancora era valido e vincolante negli sloveno ordine legale dopo l'adozione della decisione di 8 settembre 2009.
191. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte considera, che le misure si lamentarono di era “legale” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(l'ii) Se l'interferenza era “nella conformità con l'interesse generale”
192. I richiami di Corte che a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure per essere fatto domanda nella sfera dell'esercizio del diritto di proprietà (veda Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 165). La nozione di “interesse generale” necessariamente è esteso (veda Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 166). La Corte lo trova naturale che il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche, specialmente nel contesto di un cambio di regime politico ed economico, dovrebbe essere un ampio, e rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che che è “nell'interesse generale” a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (veda, inter alia, Zvolský e Zvolská c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 46129/99, § 67-68 e 72, ECHR 2002-IX; Kopecký, citato sopra, § 35; Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 113 ECHR 2005-VI; e Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 59 8 dicembre 2009; veda anche, mutatis mutandis, Il Re precedente di Grecia ed Altri citato sopra, § 87, e Kozaciolu ğc. la Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03, § 53 19 febbraio 2009).
193. È una questione di conoscenza comune che la transizione politica nei paesi di posto-comunista ha comportato complesso numeroso, riforme di vasta portata e controverse che dovevano essere sparse col tempo necessariamente. Lo smantellare dell'eredità comunista è stato graduale, con ogni paese che ha suo proprio, qualche volta lento, modo di assicurare che le ingiustizie passate sono fissate corrette. Anche se facendo seguire quelli paesi il crollo dei regimi totalitari affrontò problemi simili, c'è, e ci può essere, nessun modello comune per la ristrutturazione dei loro sistemi politici, legali o sociali. Né può qualsiasi la specifica tempo-cornice o va a tutta velocita' per completare questa elaborazione sia fissato. Effettivamente, nel valutare se in un paese determinato, considerando la sua esperienza storica e politica unica, “l'interesse generale” richiede l'adozione di specifico de-communisation misure per assicurare la più grande giustizia sociale o la stabilità della democrazia, la legislatura nazionale conferita poteri con legittimazione democratica e diretta è messa meglio che la Corte (veda, mutatis mutandis, Cichopek e le 1,627 altre richieste c. la Polonia (il dec.), N. 15189/10 ed altri, §§ 143 14 maggio 2013).
194. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte non vede nessuna ragione di abbandonare dalle autorità nazionali la valutazione di ' che l'interferenza in problema intraprese scopi legittimi, vale a dire la promozione di riforme sociali, politiche ed economiche, l'allontanamento di reliquie del passato di comunista del paese nel sociale e sfere economiche e la protezione dei diritti di “proprietari precedenti.” Nota anche che i richiedenti stessi non contestarono che è probabile che l'abolizione dell'affitto specialmente protetto e la restituzione di proprietà nazionalizzata sarebbe stata riguardata siccome intraprendendo un scopo legittimo e come essendo nell'interesse generale (veda paragrafo 142 sopra).
195. Come alla decisione della Corte Costituzionale che abroga il “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto, fu giustificato col bisogno di evitare mettere di recente un carico finanziario e supplementare sui municipi ' diritti di proprietà acquisiti su abitazioni che prima erano state possedute socialmente (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). Fu puntato così contro di assicurando il benessere finanziario delle comunità locali, una meta della quale incorre all'interno della nozione “interesse generale.”
(l'iii) Se l'interferenza era proporzionata
196. Rimane essere accertato se nell'implementare queste riforme lo Stato prevedere maneggiò un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione degli individui i diritti essenziali di ' (veda J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) la Terra Ltd, citato sopra, § 53).
(α) Principi Generali
197. In riguardo di interferenze che incorrono il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1, là deve esistere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Zehentner c. l'Austria, n. 20082/02, § 72 16 luglio 2009). Così l'equilibrio per essere sostenuto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti di diritti essenziali si sconvolge se la persona riguardata ha dovuto nascere un “carico sproporzionato” (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 la Serie Un n. 52; I Conventi Santi c. la Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, §§ 70-71 la Serie Un n. 301-un; Brumrescu ăc. la Romania, n. 28342/95, § 78 ECHR 1999-VII; Moskal, citato sopra, § 52; e Depalle c. la Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 83 ECHR 2010 -..).
198. Inoltre, il principio di “il buon governo” richiede che dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale è in carica sulle autorità pubbliche per agire in una maniera appropriata e con la massima consistenza (veda Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 105 CEDH 2000-io; Megadat.com S.r.l. c. la Moldavia, n. 21151/04, § 72 8 aprile 2008; e Moskal, citato sopra, § 51).
199. Dove un controllare di misura che l'uso di proprietà è in problema, la mancanza del risarcimento è un fattore per essere presa nell'esame nel determinare se un equilibrio equo è stato realizzato, ma non è di sé sufficiente costituire una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Anonymos Touristiki Etairia Xenodocheia Kritis c. la Grecia, n. 35332/05, § 45, 21 febbraio 2008, e Depalle citato sopra, § 91).
200. Una riforma del sistema di alloggio nel contesto della transizione graduale da affitto Stato-controllato ad un affitto contrattuale e pienamente negoziato durante la riforma fondamentale del paese che segue il crollo del regime comunista fu esaminata con la Corte in Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia (citò sopra, §§ 194-225), una causa portata con una padrona che si lamenta dell'importo povero dell'affitto lei stava ricevendo sotto lo Statale affitto-controlli schema. La Corte sostenne che lo schema non era compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 quando, lo costituì impossibile padroni di casa ricevere un reddito da affitto o almeno recuperare le loro spese di manutenzione per ragioni puramente matematiche. Inoltre, la riforma polacca previde per varie restrizioni su padroni di casa i diritti di ' in riguardo della conclusione di contratti d'affitto, i carichi finanziari e legali imposero su loro e l'assenza di qualsiasi modi legali ed intende creazione sé possibile per loro o compensare o attenuare le perdite, incorse in in collegamento col mantenimento di proprietà o avere il necessario ripara sovvenzionato con lo Stato in cause allineato (veda Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, §§ 223-224).
201. Nella causa di Lindheim ed Altri c. la Norvegia (N. 13221/08 e 2139/10, 12 giugno 2012) la Corte fondò che le limitazioni imposero con legge sul livello dei possidenti di affitto annuali potrebbe richiedere da possessori di contratto d'affitto di base (meno che 0.25% delle aree ' addusse valore di mercato) e la proroga indefinita dei contratti di contratto d'affitto basi aveva infranto i possidenti il diritto di ' di proprietà. La Corte sostenne che benché intraprendendo lo scopo legittimo di proteggere possessori di contratto d'affitto che mancano finanziario vuole dire e di implementare una politica sociale nel campo di alloggio, le misure in problema erano andate a vuoto a prevedere un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi dei locatori, sulla mano del un'e quelli degli affittuari, sull'altra mano. Notevolmente, il livello di affitto era particolarmente basso e potrebbe essere aggiustato solamente sulla base di cambi nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo (escludendo così la possibilità di prendere in considerazione il valore della terra come un fattore attinente) ed i contratti di contratto d'affitto furono prolungati per una durata indefinita. In queste circostanze, il sociale e carico finanziario coinvolti furono messi solamente sui locatori di richiedente (veda Lindheim ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 75-78, 96-100 e 119-136).
202. La Corte è dell'opinione che le cause di Hutten-Czapska e Lindheim sono l'immagine di specchio della causa presente nella quale gli inquilini addussero, inter l'alia, che l'aumento in affitto al quale loro furono sottoposti come una conseguenza della riforma di alloggio era eccessivo. Nell'aggiudicare i meriti della loro azione di reclamo, la Corte avrà, riguardo a, fra gli altri fattori, ad uno dei principi principali espresso in Hutten-Czapska vale a dire che nel bilanciare gli insolitamente difficili e problemi socialmente sensibili coinvolti nel riconciliare gli interessi contraddittori di padroni di casa ed inquilini lo Stato dovrebbe assicurare un “la distribuzione equa del sociale e carico finanziario coinvolse nella trasformazione e riforma dell'approvvigionamento di alloggio del paese” (veda Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 225). In Hutten-Czapska ed in Lindheim, gli Stati polacchi e norvegesi violarono questo principio perché loro misero quasi esclusivamente questo carico su un particolare gruppo sociale, i padroni di casa. La Corte esaminerà se nella causa presente un carico simile fu messo sugli inquilini. Nel considerare se questa è la causa, la Corte deve ricordare il particolare contesto nel quale sorge il problema, vale a dire che di una riforma del sistema di alloggio che non può ma è, almeno in parte, l'espressione della preoccupazione di società per la protezione sociale di inquilini (veda Velosa Barreto c. il Portogallo, 21 novembre 1995, § 16 la Serie Un n. 334, ed Almeida Ferreira e Melo Ferreira, citato sopra, §§ 29 e 32; veda anche, mutatis mutandis e nel contesto di un schema di previdenza sociale, il der di Goudswaard-Van Lans c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 75255/01, ECHR 2005 XI, e Wieczorek, citato sopra, § 64).
203. Sarà notato, in particolare, che la Corte ha considerato allineato e ha proporzionato molte misure mirate a proteggendo inquilini vulnerabile. Loro inclusero legislazione che comporta riduzioni di affitto (veda Mellacher ed Altri c. l'Austria, 19 dicembre 1989, § 57 la Serie Un n. 169), una sospensione provvisoria dello sfratto di delle categorie di inquilini (veda Spadea e Scalabrino c. l'Italia, 28 settembre 1995, § 41 la Serie Un n. 315 B) e restrizioni diverse sul diritto del padrone di casa per terminare il contratto d'affitto (veda Velosa Barreto, citato sopra, §§ 26 e 29-30, dove era condizionale sul padrone di casa che ha bisogno dei locali per questo diritto suo o il suo proprio alloggio; Almeida Ferreira e Melo Ferreira, citato sopra, §§ 32-36, dove il contratto d'affitto non poteva essere terminato se l'inquilino occupasse i locali da 20 o più anni; veda anche Croce Bixirão c. il Portogallo, n. 24098/94, la decisione di Commissione di 28 febbraio 1996, inedito dove la Commissione fondò che l'impossibilità di terminare un contratto di affitto quando l'inquilino era 65 anni vecchio o più vecchio non era incompatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1).
204. Siccome la Corte affermò nella causa di James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (21 febbraio 1986, § 47 la Serie Un n. 98), “[l'e]liminating che che è judged per essere le ingiustizie sociali è un esempio delle funzioni di una legislatura democratica. Più specialmente, società moderne considerano che alloggio della popolazione sia un primo bisogno sociale, la regolamentazione di che non può essere lasciato completamente al giochi di vigori di mercato. Il margine della valutazione è ampio abbastanza per coprire legislazione mirata a garantendo la più grande giustizia sociale nella sfera delle case di persone, anche dove simile legislazione interferisce con l'esistendo relazioni contrattuali fra parti private e non conferisce beneficio diretto sullo Stato o la comunità a grande.”
(β) La richiesta di questi principi alla causa presente
205. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte nota che nella loro qualità di possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione in abitazioni di denationalised i richiedenti dovevano affrontare una degradazione generale della tutela giuridica come un risultato della riforma di alloggio, loro goderono nel campo di alloggio. In particolare, loro dovevano pagare un affitto senza scopo di lucro il cui importo aumentò sugli anni su a livelli che addussero alcuni dei richiedenti loro non potrebbero riconoscere proprio, e loro non avevano nessuna possibilità di trasmettere il diritto per vivere nell'abitazione a membri di famiglia altro che il consorte o partner di scadenza lunga. Come motivi colpa-basati e nuovi per sfratto era stato introdotto, i richiedenti affrontarono un rischio più alto di sfratto e dovevano tollerare visite dal “proprietari precedenti”, così come qualche volta le pressioni esercitarono col seconde per recuperare le abitazioni. Inoltre, loro potrebbero essere mossisi col padrone di casa ad un altro appartamento adeguato a qualsiasi il tempo e senza qualsiasi la ragione (veda paragrafo 40 sopra).
206. Comunque, la Corte può accettare che queste erano in qualche modo conseguenze inevitabili della decisione della legislatura per prevedere per una possibilità di restituzione in natura di abitazioni che erano state nazionalizzate dopo la Seconda Mondo Guerra. La presenza di un “proprietario precedente” volle dire che suo o i suoi diritti dovevano essere garantiti, e questo non poteva ma dà luogo ad una restrizione corrispondente dei diritti delle persone che occupano le abitazioni. Come indicato col Governo (veda paragrafo 169 sopra), fissando un smodatamente soffitto basso per affitto o imponendo la continuazione del contratto d'affitto con gli inquilini i discendenti di ', e così per un periodo potenzialmente senza fine di tempo, sarebbe stato duro riconciliare coi diritti di proprietà di “proprietari precedenti” acquisito per i procedimenti di denationalisation (veda, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra).
207. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che gli obblighi che sorgono dai contratti di contratto d'affitto “proprietari precedenti” doveva firmare coi richiedenti era in sostanza simile ai normali ed i doveri tradizionali che inquilini hanno padroni di casa di vis-à-vis. Questo è vero, in particolare, dell'obbligo per non provocare danno notevole all'abitazione, non disturbare gli altri residenti per non compiere le attività proibite nell'appartamento, non cambiare l'abitazione ed apparecchiature per non subaffittare e non permettere persone nuove di usare l'abitazione senza il beneplacito precedente del proprietario (veda paragrafo 21 sopra). La Corte considera che il fatto che simile obblighi furono imposti sui richiedenti nell'elaborazione di transizione in un'economia di mercato non, come così, sia contrario alla Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli.
208. Oltre a che, vale che i richiedenti goderono e continuano a godere, più di 22 anni dopo la promulgazione dell'Alloggio Atto 1991, protezione speciale oltre la quale va che di solito riconobbe ad inquilini i diritti di '. In particolare, i contratti di contratto d'affitto furono conclusi per un periodo indefinito (veda paragrafo 19 sopra) ed era trasmissibile, anche per un periodo indefinito, al consorte o partner di scadenza lunga dell'inquilino (veda paragrafo 69 sopra). I secondi non dovevano pagare un pieno affitto di mercato, ma solamente un affitto senza scopo di lucro ed amministrativamente-deciso, volle dire coprire solamente il deprezzamento, gestione e mantenimento di routine dell'abitazione ed il costo del capitale investiti (veda divide in paragrafi 79-86 sopra). È mostrato coi dati presentati col Governo (veda paragrafo 239 sotto), e non contestò coi richiedenti, che loro stavano pagando comprised delle somme fra EUR 49.16 ed EUR 280.78 per mese e che nonostante un prezzo di noleggio di mercato di fra EUR 6 ed EUR 11 per metro di piazza, i richiedenti furono accusati fra EUR 1.13 ed EUR 3.33 per metro quadrato. La Corte conclude che l'affitto senza scopo di lucro impose sui richiedenti era significativamente più basso che gli affitti accusarono sul mercato gratis, e che il fatto che loro ancora goderono così favorevoli chiama più di 22 anni dopo la promulgazione degli show di riforma di alloggio che la transizione ad un'economia di mercato è stata condotta in una maniera ragionevole e progressiva. Inoltre, nessuni dei richiedenti ha mostrato che il livello dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro era eccessivo in relazione a suo o il suo reddito.
209. È vero che ad aprile 1994 possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto in abitazioni di denationalised furono dati la possibilità di acquistare un'abitazione di sostituto dai municipi sotto termini finanziari e molto favorevoli sotto il così definito “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto (veda paragrafo 35 sopra) e che questa possibilità fu abolita con la Corte Costituzionale a novembre 1999 (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). Comunque, la Corte nota che, siccome sottolineato col Governo (veda paragrafo 125 sopra) e non contestò coi richiedenti, nessuno del secondo registrò una richiesta valida e completa per acquistare un'abitazione di sostituto durante i cinque anni e sette mesi che passarono prima la decisione della Corte Costituzionale. È vero che per richiedenti N. 1 e 10, è probabile che questo insuccesso sia spiegato con la lunghezza dei denationalisation e procedimenti di eredità (veda divide in paragrafi 223 e 232 sopra); questo, comunque non fa domanda agli altri richiedenti che, nell'opinione della Corte, non ha previsto qualsiasi chiarimento convincente capace di giustificare la loro omissione.
210. Inoltre, non si può trascurare che l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale stava contemplando molte misure altro che il “terzo modello” mirò a proteggendo inquilini vulnerabile. In particolare, i primo e secondo modelli di privatizzazione di sostituto stavano contemplando, rispettivamente, una ricompensa finanziaria e pubblica per “proprietari precedenti” venderà i loro appartamenti a possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione (veda paragrafo 33 sopra) ed il risarcimento di su a 80 per cento del valore amministrativo dell'abitazione per inquilini che furono d'accordo a muoversi fuori ed acquistare un appartamento o costruiscono un alloggio (veda paragrafo 34 sopra). Oltre a che, sussidi lacerati (su a 80 per cento dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro) era disponibile ad inquilini in difficoltà finanziarie, persone socialmente svantaggiate potrebbero fare domanda ottenere un altro noleggio senza scopo di lucro che indulge (veda paragrafo 41 sopra) ed il risarcimento speciale (su a 74 per cento del valore amministrativo dell'abitazione) ed un prestito sovvenzionato sia disponibile ad inquilini che esercitarono il loro diritto per acquistare un'altra abitazione o costruire un alloggio (veda paragrafo 42 sopra). Alcuni dei richiedenti ottennero somme non-risarcibili e prestiti molli questi schemi sotto (veda divide in paragrafi 241-251 sotto).
(il c) la Conclusione
211. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte considera, che nel bilanciare gli insolitamente difficili e problemi socialmente sensibili coinvolti nel riconciliare gli interessi contraddittori di “proprietari precedenti” ed inquilini, lo Stato rispondente ha assicurato una distribuzione del sociale e carico finanziario coinvolta nella riforma di alloggio che non ha ecceduto il suo margine della valutazione.
212. Di conseguenza, presumendolo anche per essere applicabile ai fatti della causa presente, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non è stato violato.
II. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 8 DI LA CONVENZIONE
213. I richiedenti addussero che loro erano stati privati delle loro case in violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
Questa disposizione legge siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto a rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia, la sua casa e la sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza con un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto come è in conformità con la legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione di disturbo o incrimina, per la protezione di salute o morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
1. I richiedenti
(un) commenti di Generale
214. I richiedenti fondamentalmente si appellati sulle stesse ragioni fissate spediscono sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro dibatterono che perdendo il loro affitto specialmente protetto, loro non solo erano stati privati della loro proprietà ma anche delle loro case. I cambi nei contratti d'affitto avevano restretto inoltre i loro diritti ed i diritti nuovi del “proprietari precedenti” aveva messo in pericolo la loro situazione, specialmente siccome l'affitto senza scopo di lucro stava sorgendo a livelli che molti di loro non potrebbero riconoscere proprio, mentre mettendoli in mostra al rischio di sfratto per affitto in ritardo. Loro si lamentarono delle varie forme della cavillosità, l'intimidazione e processi da parte del “proprietari precedenti.”
215. I richiedenti notarono che sia nel 1991 (cominciando della riforma di alloggio) e nel 1994 (data della ratifica della Slovenia della Convenzione) le abitazioni di denationalised nelle quali loro risieddero costituirono loro “le case” e le case delle loro famiglie. Quando loro e le loro famiglie erano passate alle abitazioni ed avevano formato una casa là, loro avevano fatto così in buon fede ed avendo fiducia nella permanenza e la causa di mortis di trasferibilità del diritto di occupazione. Al tempo della ratifica della Slovenia della Convenzione, l'affitto specialmente protetto già era stato trasformato in un contratto d'affitto; comunque, questo contratto d'affitto era trasferibile dopo morte a membri di famiglia, con un soffitto fisso di affitto senza scopo di lucro. “Proprietari precedenti” potrebbe terminare solamente il contratto d'affitto su motivi colpa-basati e regolati. Questa legislazione in modo appropriato proteggè l'Articolo 8 diritti dei richiedenti e le loro famiglie.
216. Comunque, l'evoluzione susseguente degli articoli su occupazione e l'aumento in affitti costrinse possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione ad o lasciare le loro case esistenti o sospendere sotto peggiori termini là. La loro situazione aveva peggiorato significativamente effettivamente, nei riguardi seguenti: (un) fin da 1996, “proprietari precedenti” potrebbe terminare il contratto d'affitto e sfratta l'inquilino se loro li offrissero lui o con un'altra abitazione appropriata (veda paragrafo 40 sopra); (b) dal 1995 la struttura e soffitto dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro cambiavano in tale maniera che ora era sorto a più di 600% del suo valore iniziale ed ogni autorità aveva il potere per sollevare arbitrariamente il soffitto; (il c) nel 2003 motivi nuovi per sfratto erano stati aggiunti, incluso la proprietà di un'altra abitazione appropriata, irrispettoso di se era vuoto e se muovendosi comporterebbe un deterioramento fondamentale dei residenti lo status di ' (veda paragrafo 40 sopra); (d) fin dalla 2005 trasferibilità di causa di mortis del contratto d'affitto a membri di famiglia avuti de facto stato escluso (veda divide in paragrafi 68-70 sopra); (e) il “proprietario precedente” fu dato il diritto per entrare due volte nell'abitazione per anno e rifiuto di entrata divenne una base per sfratto (veda paragrafo 23 sopra); (f) in generale, c'era una possibilità essenzialmente limitata di fondare liberamente una casa di famiglia in alloggio esistente, c'erano limitazioni sulla possibilità di usando e sistemare l'abitazione in conformità alle proprie necessità di uno e desideri, ed una minaccia di sfratto fu stabilita, mentre provocando l'angoscia permanente. I richiedenti dibatterono che le garanzie riconobbero con Articolo 8 non dovrebbe essere capito come coprendo solamente il diritto ad un'abitazione, ma siccome proteggendo lo status di un individuo in suo o la sua casa che esiste.
217. La relazione di leasing imposta con lo Stato non solo era insopportabile per i possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione ma anche per il “proprietari precedenti” che fu limitato nella loro disposizione del beni immobili ritornato. Questo creò controversie personali e giudiziali come “proprietari precedenti” massicciamente e comprensibilmente usò tutte le possibilità legali di sfrattare i possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione e le loro famiglie. Sotto queste circostanze, il secondo tentò di risolvere il loro problema di alloggio con muovendosi fuori delle loro abitazioni esistenti. La situazione era divenuta così insopportabile che muovendosi divenne un minore cattivo che sospendendo nell'abitazione.
218. La causa di Sori ćc. Croatia, citò col Governo (paragrafo 233 sotto), era diverso dalla causa presente in che concernè un inquilino di un'abitazione privata che era stata un ab initio di inquilino (e non un possessore precedente di affitto specialmente protetto). La Corte aveva sostenuto che anche se sfratto non era stato eseguito, la minaccia di sfratto era una misura attinente all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 della Convenzione (Larkos, citato sopra, § 28). Gli stessi dovrebbero fare domanda a tutte le azioni imputabile allo Stato che ha limitato efficacemente la protezione ed uso gratis di una casa esistente.
219. I richiedenti considerarono che l'interferenza col loro diritto per rispettare per la loro casa non era legale, per le stesse ragioni fissate spedisca sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (paragrafo 141 sopra).
220. Il Governo essenzialmente dibattè che le misure si lamentarono di fu mirato a proteggendo il “proprietari precedenti.” I richiedenti potrebbero accettare che questo era un scopo legittimo. Comunque, loro addussero che le misure in problema non erano “necessario in una società democratica.” In questo collegamento, loro ricordarono, che quando un “la casa” fu stabilito legalmente, questo fattore peserebbe contro la legittimità di costringere l'individuo a muoversi. Inoltre, l'allontanamento di un richiedente da suo o la sua casa era più seria dove nessuna alternativa appropriata esistè; il più appropriato l'alloggio alternativo, il meno serio l'interferenza con l'alloggio esistente. La valutazione dell'appropriatezza dell'alloggio alternativo comporterebbe anche la considerazione delle particolari necessità della persona riguardata (veda Coster c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 24876/94, §§ 116-118 18 gennaio 2001).
221. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, c'era nessuno “pigiando bisogno sociale” ridurre la tutela giuridica di possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto. Nella sua causa-legge, la Corte accettò diritti di ' che furono tirati assicurando la protezione sociale di inquilini un numero di limitazioni di padroni di casa. La Slovenia, d'altra parte aveva decretato un numero di misure per prevedere “proprietari precedenti” con protezione più forte che fu richiesto sotto la Convenzione. Inoltre, le interferenze si lamentarono di non era proporzionato allo scopo legittimo perseguito (la protezione del “proprietari precedenti”), specialmente dopo l'abolizione del “terzo modello.”
(b) Commenti riguardo ai richiedenti individuali
222. I richiedenti offrirono i dettagli seguenti, in particolare, delle loro situazioni individuali.
223. Richiedente n. 1 (il Sig.ra Cornelia Berger-Krall) non era stato capace di giungere ad un accordo sul rimborso di investimenti col “proprietari precedenti”; un'autorità amministrativa l'aveva assegnata un poco meno che EUR 5,000 in questo riguardo. Siccome i procedimenti di denationalisation ancora erano pendenti a novembre 1999, lei non era stata in grado trarre profitto dal “terzo modello”; non avendo nessuno mezzi di comprare un'altra abitazione sul mercato gratis, lei aveva deciso di sospendere nella sua abitazione esistente su un contratto d'affitto contrattuale.
224. Richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez) considerato che le osservazioni del Governo sulla sua causa erano, in sostanza, una copia degli argomenti e le dichiarazioni rese di fronte alle corti nazionali col “proprietari precedenti.” Lei aveva ereditato un affitto specialmente protetto da sua defunta madre nel 1991. La decisione di denationalisation del Municipio di Maribor di 16 aprile 1993 determinato, inter l'alia che il “proprietari precedenti” doveva concludere un contratto di contratto d'affitto con lei. Loro non facevano mai così, ma continuò ad accusare affitto. Quando richiedente n. 2 furono sfrattati nel 2000, il suo avvocato aveva registrato un processo per avere un contratto di contratto d'affitto steso; questa azione legale fu respinta come sé era stato registrato contro un “proprietario precedente” chi era morto dei mesi più primo. Un processo nuovo fu respinto nel 2011 come tempo-sbarrato e perché richiedente n. 2 avevano ricevuto nel frattempo assistenza finanziaria pubblica. Contrari a che che il Governo ed il “proprietari precedenti” asserì, il Sig.ra Berglez non aveva rifiutato mai di firmare un contratto d'affitto e le dichiarazioni di comportamento sbagliato da parte sua (tenendo materiale infiammabile, mettendo in pericolo gli altri residenti dell'edificio mancanza di mantenimento dell'appartamento) non era stato provato mai. Gli sloveno corteggiano loro avevano trovato che lo sfratto forte del richiedente era un'azione arbitraria ed illegale. Non era vero che il richiedente aveva dato informazioni false alla Corte. Il Sig.ra Berglez aveva ereditato terra agricola di valore trascurabile (verso EUR 15,000) dai suoi genitori. Fin dal suo sfratto nel 2000, lei stava vivendo sul limite di povertà, muovendosi che ad appartamenti diversi, affittò sul mercato gratis e stanze studentesche. Undici anni più tardi la terra agricola che lei aveva ereditato era stata classificata come costruendo terra, il suo valore aveva sparato su ed il Sig.ra Berglez era stato in grado venderlo e comprare un m² del 65 spiani in Maribor che era peggiore e più piccolo della sua casa precedente.
225. A causa della cavillosità del “proprietari precedenti”, in 1999 richiedente n. 3 (il Sig.ra Ivanka Bertoncelj) aveva deciso di lasciare la sua abitazione e prendere vantaggio del “terzo modello”; comunque, questo modello era stato abrogato ed il Sig.ra Bertoncelj che aveva nessuno finanziario vuole dire, non poteva permettersi di acquistare un'altra abitazione sul mercato gratis. Lei era giunta ad un accordo col “proprietari precedenti” solamente ottenere rimborso dei suoi investimenti. Richiedente n. 3 avevano superato angoscia emotiva e grave ed aiuto psichiatrico ed avuto bisogno. A causa delle pressioni esercitate su lei, lei aveva lasciato la sua abitazione ed aveva stabilito in un appartamento che sua figlia aveva acquistato.
226. Richiedente n. 4 (il Sig.ra Slavica Jeranič) sottolineò che, come indicato col Governo, le richieste lei stava ricevendo dal “proprietari precedenti” mancò qualsiasi fondamento sotto legge nazionale; lei era stata ciononostante una vittima della cavillosità di ogni giorno e pressione che l'avevano condotta a chiedere aiuto psichiatrico, ed infine aveva deciso di muoversi fuori della sua abitazione. L'appartamento in Kamnik del quale lei possedette metà era peggiore della sua casa precedente; era significativamente più piccolo e fu localizzato in un ambiente totalmente nuovo in una città diversa. A causa della sua età ed il cambio di ambiente, il Sig.ra Jerani aveva cominciato a patire depressione; lei aveva tentato di commettere suicidio ed era ricoverata in ospedale da quattro mesi in una clinica psichiatrica. Successivamente, un amico che era consapevole dei suoi problemi le aveva offerto l'uso di un appartamento vuoto in Ljubljana esente da spese da 2008 onwards.
227. Richiedente n. 5 (il Sig.ra Ema Kugler) non aveva avuto qualsiasi i problemi col “proprietari precedenti” e non aveva visto qualsiasi ha bisogno lasciare la sua abitazione. Era solamente la vendita della sua casa a proprietari nuovi che avevano provocato un numero di controversie, mentre allo stesso tempo il “terzo modello” era stato abrogato. Lei aveva ottenuto il rimborso di investimenti nell'importo amministrativamente determinato di EUR 3,000.
228. Richiedente n. 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret) non era il possessore originale dell'affitto specialmente protetto. Il possessore originale era suo defunto padre, il Sig. Niko Kuret che morì 25 gennaio 1995 e con chi il richiedente stava vivendo. Sino a 2005 il diritto per acquistare un'abitazione ritornata ed il diritto ad un contratto d'affitto era stato mortis cause trasferibili a membri di famiglia vicini. Dopo la morte di suo padre, richiedente n. 6 avevano voluto rimanere nei locali ed avevano insistito di conseguenza su firmare un contratto di contratto d'affitto. Alla fine di 1999 lui imparò che il “terzo modello” era stato abrogato e che lui non potesse acquistare più un'abitazione di sostituto su condizioni favorevoli. Nel 2005 la Corte Suprema aveva invertito comunque, la causa-legge esistente dopo due sentenze favorevoli, e decise che utenti di appartamenti di denationalised non potessero esigere la continuazione di un contratto d'affitto senza scopo di lucro seguente la cessione dell'inquilino (paragrafo 68 sopra). Questo volle dire che la famiglia del Sig. Niko Kuret usava ingiustificabilmente l'abitazione da più di dieci anni e che il “proprietari precedenti” potrebbe costringerli a pagare un affitto di mercato per che periodo (una rivendicazione che corrisponderebbe ad almeno DEM 150,000 più l'interesse). Se tale richiesta fosse stata registrata, il richiedente e sua moglie-chi aveva due figli dipendenti-sarebbe andato in bancarotta. Nel 2009 la Corte Costituzionale confermò la causa-legge nuova della Corte Suprema, al danno del richiedente (paragrafo 69 sopra). Il Sig. Kuret scelse i minore cattivo di un regolamento amichevole con sotto le circostanze, il “proprietario precedente.” Lui sgombrò i locali e, non essendo capace di riconoscere un'abitazione nel capitale, lui si mosse fuori di Ljubljana.
229. Richiedente n. 7 (il Sig. Drago Logar) era stato incapace per contattare il “proprietari precedenti”, e perciò non aveva saputo se loro desiderarono vendere l'abitazione. Per questa ragione, lui non era stato capace di prendere vantaggio del “terzo modello” di fronte alla fine di 1999. Dopo 2006 divenne chiaro che il “proprietari precedenti” non intenda di vendere e che loro desiderarono sfrattare il Sig. Logar. Dopo alcuni anni di controversia, il “proprietari precedenti” offrì il rimborso dei suoi investimenti il Sig. Logar più l'interesse previde che lui si mosse fuori dell'abitazione. Il Sig. Logar accettò questa proposta ed ottenne un contributo finanziario e pubblico sotto il così definito “secondo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto.
230. Richiedente n. 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč) possedette un appartamento in Piran che era un alloggio di festa. Lei spiegò che con una sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Ljubljana di 12 maggio 2009 (sostenne con una corte più alta 6 gennaio 2010), lei era stata ordinata per sgombrare i locali lei stava occupando in Ljubljana. Procedimenti di esecuzione avevano cominciato di estate di 2010 e da allora poi il Sig.ra Margu stava vivendo in paura continua di essere sfrattato dalla sua casa. Se dovesse accadere questo, lei dovrebbe scegliere fra homelessness e muovendosi all'appartamento in Piran che intenderebbe perdendo il suo lavoro. Lei aveva avuto bisogno di aiuto psichiatrico.
231. Richiedente n. 9 (il Sig. Dušan Milič) non era stato capace di trarre profitto dal “terzo modello” perché i procedimenti di denationalisation che concernono la sua abitazione erano stati pendenti fino a 2005. Lui aveva deciso di muoversi due anni più tardi fuori e risolvere altrove il suo problema di alloggio. Ciononostante dei risparmi e prestiti da conoscenze e parenti, il Sig. Mili non poteva permettersi di pagare una parte sostanziale del prezzo di acquisto della sua abitazione nuova e non era stato perciò in grado digitarlo nel registro di terra.
232. Richiedente n. 10 (il Sig.ra Dolores Zalar) non era stato capace di prendere vantaggio del “terzo modello” perché sino a 1999 non era stato chiaro chi il “proprietari precedenti” era (procedimenti di eredità riguardo ai proprietari di denationalisation deceduti ancora erano pendenti) e se loro desiderarono vendere l'abitazione. Successivamente, lei aveva concordato col “proprietari precedenti” che lei sgombrerebbe i locali e che loro pagherebbero il suo EUR 50,000 per i suoi investimenti. Sacrificando severamente i suoi propri risparmi, ottenendo un prestito da una banca commerciale (su termini più favorevoli che il prestito Statale) e con l'aiuto finanziario di sua figlia, il Sig.ra Zalar aveva risolto il suo problema di alloggio comprando una proprietà fuori di Ljubljana. Questa proprietà non fu composta di due edifici residenziali separati (come affermò erroneamente col Governo-paragrafo 251 sotto), ma di uno costruendo solamente per che lo spazio di pavimento totale e la superficie interna era stata registrata separatamente.
2. Il Governo
(un) commenti di Generale
233. Il Governo sottolineò che Articolo 8 della Convenzione non incluse il diritto per comprare una casa, ma solamente proteggè il diritto di una persona per rispettare per suo o la sua casa presente (veda Sorić, decisione citò sopra di). Siccome il SZ proteggè la condizione giuridica di possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione, con garantendoli affitto per un periodo indefinito ed un affitto senza scopo di lucro i richiedenti ' proprietà diretta delle abitazioni non era in qualsiasi modo disturbato con le disposizioni contestate. Siccome indicò la Corte Costituzionale, i possessori di diritti di occupazione ed i loro consorti e membri di famiglia vicini avevano diritto a continuare a vivere in abitazioni di denationalised in condizioni comparabile a quelli negli altri paesi europei (paragrafo 65 sopra).
234. Per i richiedenti il SZ mantenne tutti i diritti previsti per sotto la disposizione precedente. La continuazione dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro con membri di famiglia vicini del possessore precedente del diritto di occupazione fu esclusa (paragrafo 69 sopra) come sé avrebbe messo un carico eccessivo sul “proprietari precedenti.” Proprietà di un'altra abitazione era stata anche una base per conclusione del contratto d'affitto sotto la regolamentazione precedente e sarebbe stato sproporzionato per imporre un affitto protetto ed un affitto senza scopo di lucro dove l'inquilino aveva l'altro alloggio appropriato a suo o la sua disposizione.
235. Sotto le leggi della Repubblica Socialista della Slovenia non era garanzia che il possessore del diritto di occupazione sarebbe stato in grado vivere permanentemente nella stessa abitazione o che la relazione di occupazione rimarrebbe immutata. Sotto Articolo 106 di SZ-1 (paragrafo 40 sopra) la protezione dell'inquilino era più grande, come il “proprietario precedente” potrebbe terminare solamente una volta il contratto d'affitto senza ragioni giustificabili con lo stesso inquilino, e fu obbligato per offrirli lui o con un'altra abitazione appropriata. Le nozioni legali di “abitazione appropriata” e “ragione giustificabile” fu voluto dire prevedere un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale sulla mano del un'e la protezione dell'inquilino e “proprietario precedente” diritti sull'altro.
236. In risposta ai richiedenti le osservazioni di ' sulla copertura di affitto senza scopo di lucro non solo l'affitto effettivo più spese di manutenzione sull'abitazione ma anche il rimborso di costi di capitale, concedendo così il “proprietari precedenti” fare un profitto, e sui cambi nella formula per calcolare l'affitto senza scopo di lucro al loro danno, il Governo richiamò il metodo per calcolare l'affitto senza scopo di lucro (divide in paragrafi 79-86 sopra) e sottolineò che, come indicato con la Corte Costituzionale, la legislazione nazionale non fu supposta per garantire la permanenza e la stabilità di affitti senza scopo di lucro. Il valore dell'abitazione fu determinato amministrativamente che volle dire indipendentemente dal suo valore di mercato e, grazie alla formula legislativa per calcolarlo, l'affitto senza scopo di lucro era rimasto efficacemente immutato in tutto il periodo attinente. Non garantì un profitto per il “proprietario precedente”, ma coprì il costo di qualsiasi prestito o capitale il “proprietario precedente” investì nel rinnovamento dell'abitazione.
237. Il Governo obiettò che i richiedenti la dichiarazione di ' di un 700% aumento nell'affitto senza scopo di lucro era incorretta. Anche se era vero che il “valore di punto” era aumentato, non si dovrebbe trascurare che il valore del punto dipese dal costo medio di costruzione ed il costo medio e valutato di terra riparata, mentre prende così in considerazione il movimento di prezzi nel mercato. Altrimenti, l'affitto senza scopo di lucro non avrebbe avuto collegamento con spese di manutenzione che avrebbero dovuto essere sopportate poi col “proprietari precedenti.” Come negli scorsi lo standard economici di venti anni, prezzi e livelli di salario era cambiato, sarebbe irreale per aspettarsi che l'affitto senza scopo di lucro rimanere immutato. Affitti senza scopo di lucro aumentavano dal 1.88% del valore dell'abitazione nel 1990 ad un massimo di 4.68% del valore dell'abitazione entro 2012. Questo aumento rappresentò un 148% aumento in affitti. Siccome erano aumentati anche salari, nel 1990 l'affitto per un due-stanza indulgere medio corrispose a 7.30% del salario medio, mentre nel 2012 era 14.70% di sé. Questo volle dire che affitti avevano aumentato solamente entro approssimativamente 100% nei veri termini (e non entro 700%). Inoltre, affitti senza scopo di lucro erano sostanzialmente più bassi di affitti di mercato.
238. In prospettiva del sopra, il Governo considerò, che qualsiasi stabilì interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' rispettare per le loro case era stato in conformità con la legge, aveva intrapreso un scopo legittimo ed era stato necessario in una società democratica. Infatti, un equilibrio equo era stato previsto fra i richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed i diritti del “proprietari precedenti”, proteggè con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) Commenti riguardo alla situazione di richiedenti individuali
239. Secondo i dati del Governo, gli affitti senza scopo di lucro e correnti pagati coi richiedenti (o quale i richiedenti starebbero pagando li avuti continuato a vivere nelle abitazioni) era il seguente:
- Il richiedente n. 1 (il Sig.ra Cornelia Berger-Krall): EUR 178.73 (EUR 1.73 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 10 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez): EUR 204.09 (EUR 1.93 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 6 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 3 (il Sig.ra Ivanka Bertoncelj): EUR 132.83 (EUR 1.17 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 10 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 4 (il Sig.ra Slavica Jeranič): EUR 161.61 (EUR 1.42 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 11 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 5 (il Sig.ra Ema Kugler): EUR 49.16 (EUR 1.13 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 11 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret): EUR 149.12 (EUR 1.75 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 10 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 7 (il Sig. Drago Logar): EUR 280.78 (EUR 1.87 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 11 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč): EUR 154.85 (EUR 1.32 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 10 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 9 (il Sig. Dušan Milič): EUR 229.67 (EUR 3.33 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 10 per m²);
- Il richiedente n. 10 (il Sig.ra Dolores Zalar): EUR 170.93 (EUR 1.41 per m²; valutò affitto di mercato: EUR 11 per m²).
240. Possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione che si trovarono in difficoltà finanziaria potrebbero fare domanda per sussidi di affitto o l'allocazione di un'altra abitazione senza scopo di lucro; comunque, nessuni dei richiedenti aveva fatto domanda per simile benefici e nessuno di loro-con l'eccezione di richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez)-mai era stato destinatari di benefici di welfare. Se loro considerassero che il loro affitto senza scopo di lucro non era stato calcolato in conformità con la legge, i richiedenti avrebbero potuto richiedere una revisione del suo livello e-se bisogno è-una riduzione dell'affitto ed il rimborso di affitto di overpaid.
241. Il Governo osservò inoltre che non fu stabilito che richiedente n. 1 (il Sig.ra Cornelia Berger-Krall) mai aveva richiesto il “proprietari precedenti” rimediare a difetti nell'abitazione. Inoltre, lei non era riuscita ad avviare procedimenti giudiziali che richiedono il “proprietari precedenti” eseguire lavoro di mantenimento (Sezione 92 di SZ) per costituire l'abitazione appropriato uso normale. In una decisione di 29 novembre 2010 la Corte di Ljubljana aveva ordinato il detta “proprietari precedenti” pagare richiedente n. il 1 risarcimento per gli investimenti lei aveva reso nell'abitazione. Infine, il marito di richiedente n. 1 era il proprietario di un cottage di vigneto ed il coproprietario di un m² del 91 edificio residenziale. Come un membro di famiglia di richiedente n. 1 proprietà posseduta appropriato per occupazione, il richiedente non fu concesso più a “inquilino protetto” lo status.
242. In risposta alla dichiarazione di richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez) che 8 settembre 2000 il “proprietari precedenti” aveva irrotto nella sua abitazione e l'aveva vuotato mentre lei andava via, il Governo notò che il “proprietari precedenti” aveva un ordine di sfratto provvisorio per eseguire lavoro di mantenimento urgente richiese con l'Ambiente e Pianificazione Spaziale Inspectorate. Richiedente n. 2 stavano usando l'abitazione in un modo che stava mettendo gli altri residenti nell'edificio a rischio, notevolmente tenendo materiali infiammabili nell'attico. Il Sig.ra Berglez che secondo il Governo aveva su molte occasioni stato offerto le chiavi del posto dove la sua mobilia era contenuta, aveva depositato un'azione per andare oltre i limiti del lecito; nel 2007 il Maribor Corte più Alta sostenne la sua rivendicazione e 25 agosto 2008 il Maribor Corte Locale emise un ordine di esecuzione che al tempo di introduzione della richiesta non si era stato attenuto ancora con, come il “proprietari precedenti” aveva obiettato che in 2000 richiedente n. 2 non avevano qualsiasi diritto per stare vivendo nell'abitazione. Richiedente n. 2 allegato che a causa del comportamento del “proprietari precedenti”, da settembre 2000 lei era costretta ad affittare alloggio alternativo, un fatto che l'aveva messa in difficoltà finanziarie. Il Governo potrebbe confermare che richiedente n. 2 non avevano concluso mai un contratto di contratto d'affitto col proprietario pubblico e provvisorio ed erano divenuti così mai un inquilino protetto; il suo uso dell'abitazione era stato illegale o non basato su un titolo legale. Le due azioni registrate col Sig.ra Berglez per costringere il “proprietari precedenti” firmare un contratto di contratto d'affitto era andato a vuoto su motivi procedurali e perché richiedente n. 2 avevano acquistato una due-stanza che indulge nel frattempo in Maribor (26 novembre 2010) ed aveva chiarito così il suo problema di alloggio. Il Governo notò inoltre che richiedente n. 2 stavano ricevendo benefici di welfare, che lei aveva ereditato un grande appezzamento di terreno da suo padre che in 16 maggio 2011 lei aveva ottenuto la somma non-risarcibile di EUR 38,752.08 e che lei era stata accordata un prestito molle di EUR 28,774.92 con l'Alloggio Fondo Nazionale che lei non usò per comprare la due-stanza che indulge in Maribor.
243. Nelle loro osservazioni di 13 luglio 2012, il Governo offrì informazioni supplementari riguardo alle circostanze di richiedente n. 2. Loro notarono che lei aveva acquistato un valore di abitazione EUR 65,000; siccome lei aveva ricevuto solamente EUR 38,752.08 dallo Stato, si potrebbe dedurre che la terra che lei aveva ereditato era stata venduta per più del suo valore di stima (EUR 15,000). Tre delle aree stavano costruendo luoghi; perciò, la dichiarazione del richiedente che la proprietà ereditata è consistita solamente di terra agricola della qualità più povera era falsa. L'abitazione nuova fu acquisita 26 novembre 2006, mentre l'appoggio finanziario e Statale non fu trasferito al conto del richiedente sino a 16 maggio 2011. Come il Sig.ra Berglez non indichi che lei aveva ottenuto un prestito, potrebbe essere dedotto che lei aveva sufficiente finanziario vuole dire acquistare l'abitazione. Infine, valeva che nel 1993 il direttore dell'edificio aveva avviato procedimenti contro richiedente n. 2 per non-pagamento di affitto fra aprile e settembre 1992 che erano una base per terminare la relazione di affitto.
244. Il Governo rispose inoltre siccome segue alle dichiarazioni di richiedenti N. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 e 10. Richiedente n. 3 (il Sig.ra Ivanka Bertoncelj) allegato che l'abitazione era stata completamente rinnovata con suo marito tre volte, nel 1958 1969 e 1984. Il “proprietario precedente” aveva esercitato presumibilmente pressione su richiedente n. 3-per il suo avvocato e con assumendo detectivi-trovarla per muoversi fuori dell'abitazione, ed aveva rifiutato di autorizzare ripara. Il “proprietario precedente” aveva registrato infine un processo contro richiedente n. 3 che furono respinti su motivi formali (il “proprietari precedenti” già aveva venduto l'abitazione e perciò aveva perso interesse legale nella causa). I proprietari nuovi richiesero successivamente la conclusione del contratto d'affitto, mentre chiedendo che loro ebbero bisogno dell'abitazione per loro figlio e la sua famiglia. Questi procedimenti terminarono con un accordo di corte nel 2005. Richiedente n. 3 sgombrarono i locali e rinunciarono a tutte le sue rivendicazioni per il ricupero di investimenti; in cambio, lei ricevette il risarcimento nell'importo di EUR 100,000. Il Sig.ra Bertoncelj scoprì presumibilmente più tardi che lei era stata ingannata con gli acquirenti: l'abitazione non era per uso con loro figlio, ma era stato connesso al loro proprio appartamento. Il Governo osservò che il Sig.ra Bertoncelj non aveva avviato mai procedimenti con una prospettiva ad avendo lavoro di mantenimento fatto e le condizioni viventi e normali ripristinarono nell'abitazione, né lei aveva introdotto un'azione per andare oltre i limiti del lecito o condotta ostruttiva. Infine, richiedente n. 3 non avevano ricevuto mai qualsiasi welfare trae profitto e non era riuscito a fare domanda per un affitto senza scopo di lucro e sovvenzionato.
245. Richiedente n. 4 (il Sig.ra Slavica Jeranič) allegato che l'abitazione ebbe bisogno di rinnovamento e che il proprietario nuovo che aveva comprato la proprietà stava ispezionando due volte l'abitazione per anno, aveva chiesto a lei di pagare un affitto normale e certo diritto di deficienze fissato e l'aveva minacciata con processi. La pressione esercitata col proprietario era simile che il Sig.ra Jerani aveva sgombrato infine i locali. Il Governo osservò che inquilini in abitazioni di denationalised furono protegguti con la legislazione da pagamento di un affitto eccessivo e che uso inadeguato ed allegato dell'abitazione non costituì una base per conclusione del contratto d'affitto. In qualsiasi l'evento, nessuno simile processi erano stati registrati col proprietario contro richiedente n. 4. Il richiedente era il coproprietario di un m² del 83 che indulge in Kamnik integrato 2006 ed appropriato per vivere in. Infine, richiedente n. 4 non avevano ricevuto mai qualsiasi welfare trae profitto e non era riuscito a fare domanda per un affitto senza scopo di lucro e sovvenzionato; lei non aveva presentato mai una rivendicazione per il rimborso di investimenti reso nell'abitazione.
246. Richiedente n. 5 (il Sig.ra Ema Kugler) si lamentò della condizione povera dell'abitazione e della condotta di un proprietario nuovo che aveva comprato parte dell'edificio nel 1999 ed aveva avviato lavoro di costruzione ed aveva chiesto al Sig.ra Kugler di muoversi fuori. Il Governo osservò che nella sua decisione di 14 gennaio 2002 l'Ambiente e Pianificazione Spaziale che Inspectorate ha notato che il Sig.ra Kugler era andato a vuoto a provare che la sua eleggibilità usare delle area comuni nelle quali era stato fatto il lavoro. Inoltre, il richiedente non aveva depositato un'azione per andare oltre i limiti del lecito contro il proprietario, o un'azione per porre fine ai disturbi causò presumibilmente col lavoro. Il lavoro aveva terminato, all'ultimo, col medio di 2003 che erano più di sei mesi di fronte all'introduzione della richiesta di fronte alla Corte (15 marzo 2004). Due processi depositati col proprietario per costringere richiedente n. 5 per sgombrare i locali (sulla base dell'invalidamento dell'accordo di contratto d'affitto, non-pagamento dell'affitto e l'alloggio ha bisogno del proprietario) era senza successo. Questi procedimenti durarono rispettivamente un anno e cinque mesi e due anni e due mesi a due livelli di giurisdizione. Infine, richiedente n. 5 non avevano ricevuto mai qualsiasi welfare trae profitto e non era riuscito a fare domanda per un affitto senza scopo di lucro e sovvenzionato; il “proprietari precedenti” aveva dovuto pagare il suo risarcimento per gli investimenti reso nell'abitazione.
247. Richiedente n. 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret) aveva registrato un'azione contro il “proprietario precedente” dell'abitazione per garantire un contratto d'affitto per un affitto senza scopo di lucro. La Corte Suprema respinse l'azione, mentre considerando che l'affitto dovrebbe essere un mercato normale affittato (paragrafo 68 sopra). Sul 2006 Sig. Kuret di 17 marzo un accordo previde col “proprietario precedente”; l'affitto aumentato e le spese processuali erano divenute presumibilmente comunque, insopportabili, e richiedente n. 6 e la sua famiglia avevano lasciato l'edificio a luglio 2006. Il Governo dibattè che richiedente n. 6 avevano perso il suo status di vittima con entrando in un accordo col “proprietario precedente” quale stabilì esplicitamente e conclusivamente tutti i problemi fra loro (paragrafo 77 sopra). Inoltre, richiedente n. 6 non avevano ricevuto mai qualsiasi welfare trae profitto e non era riuscito a richiedere un affitto senza scopo di lucro e sovvenzionato.
248. Richiedente n. 7 (il Sig. Drago Logar) allegato che lui aveva rinnovato completamente l'abitazione; a giugno 1994 lui fu informato, che l'abitazione era stata ritornata “proprietari precedenti.” Da che data fino a 2006 lui non aveva contatto col “proprietari precedenti” ed i conti per pagamento dell'affitto senza scopo di lucro fermarono di venire. Di conseguenza, lui fermò di pagare l'affitto ma continuò ad eseguire mantenimento ordinario dell'abitazione. Ad aprile 2006 il “proprietari precedenti” chiese a richiedente n. 7 per sgombrare l'abitazione, ma nessuno simile rivendicazione fu registrata nella Corte distrettuale di Ljubljana. Il Governo osservò che il Sig. Logar non richiese mai di acquistare un'abitazione di sostituto; lui non fece domanda mai per sussidi per affitto senza scopo di lucro, ma 27 ottobre 2011 lui ricevette la somma non-risarcibile di EUR 53,276.42, e lui fu accordato un prestito molle di EUR 89,223.57 con l'Alloggio Fondo Nazionale. Senza usare questo prestito, il Sig. Logar acquistò un'abitazione di 82 m² in Ljubljana. Infine, con una decisione di 7 marzo 2011, il Ljubljana Unità Amministrativa ordinò il “proprietari precedenti” pagare il risarcimento di richiedente per gli investimenti nell'abitazione.
249. Richiedente n. 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč) e suo marito comprò una casa di festa di approssimativamente 50 m² in Piran. Il “proprietario precedente” dell'abitazione che lei stava occupando poi in Ljubljana procedimenti cominciarono per la conclusione del contratto d'affitto, sulla base che il Sig.ra Margu possedette un'altra abitazione adeguata. Richiedente n. 8 impugnarono questa azione, mentre adducendo che la casa di festa non aveva nessun riscaldamento e nessun isolamento termale, e non era perciò adeguato per avere vissuto durante la stagione di inverno. La corte di primo-istanza concedè la rivendicazione del “proprietario precedente” e rescisse il contratto d'affitto; contenne, in particolare, che i difetti della casa Piran erano il risultato delle decisioni soggettive dei Sig.ra Margu e potrebbero essere superati facilmente con installando isolamento e scaldando. La corte di primo-istanza prese anche in considerazione il fatto che il richiedente e suo marito ebbero un lavoro e che la casa in Piran era proprietà di sopra-standard con ragione della sua ubicazione di élite. I procedimenti erano attualmente pendenti di fronte alla Corte Suprema. Richiedente n. 8 non avevano ricevuto mai qualsiasi l'assistenza finanziaria e non aveva fatto domanda per un affitto senza scopo di lucro e sovvenzionato; lei aveva presentato una rivendicazione per il rimborso di investimenti nell'abitazione, ma non era riuscito a seguirlo su.
250. Richiedente n. 9 (il Sig. Dušan Milič) non era riuscito a provare le sue dichiarazioni di “molestia quotidiana” col “proprietari precedenti” dell'abitazione. Inoltre, lui era senza successo nella sua rivendicazione che l'edificio nel quale lui stava vivendo era stato costruito nel 1987 e perciò non poteva essere confiscato dal predecessore legale: sembrò dal Ljubljana la sentenza di Corte Locale di 11 giugno 2002 che l'edificio in oggetto, confiscò nel 1949, era stato rinnovato solamente-e non di recente costruì-nel 1987. Il “proprietari precedenti” fu ordinato anche per pagare Sieda 400,000 (verso EUR 1,670) a richiedente n. 9, rappresentando la rivalutazione della 20% partecipazione pagata col Sig. Mili per l'acquisizione del diritto di occupazione. 28 giugno 2007 lui aveva ottenuto infine, la somma non-risarcibile di EUR 45,975.98.
251. Richiedente n. 10 (il Sig.ra Dolores Zalar) non era riuscito a stabilire che lei aveva registrato due azioni contro il “proprietari precedenti”: uno per insuccesso per mantenere l'abitazione e l'altro per la costituzione del suo diritto per continuare a risiedere là (questa azione seconda non era necessaria, come il cambio in proprietà nessun effetto aveva sui suoi diritti come un inquilino). Avendo pagato l'affitto senza scopo di lucro al custode della proprietà di denationalised, richiedente n. 10 si sarebbero potuti difendere facilmente contro le ulteriori rivendicazioni finanziarie potenziali dal “proprietari precedenti.” Alla richiesta del Sig.ra Zalar, l'Ambiente e Pianificazione Spaziale Inspectorate ordinò il “proprietari precedenti” sostituire le finestre dell'abitazione. Richiedente n. 10 avrebbero potuto usare la stessa procedura per risolvere i problemi di mantenimento povero del camino ed il tetto. Lei non aveva fatto domanda mai per sussidi per affitto senza scopo di lucro, ma 27 ottobre 2011 lei aveva ricevuto la somma non-risarcibile di EUR 32,262.99 ed aveva accordato un prestito molle di EUR 72,737.02 con l'Alloggio Fondo Nazionale. Senza usare questo prestito, il Sig.ra Zalar aveva acquistato due pezzi di proprietà residenziale (uno che misura 84 m² e gli altri 148 m²); lei aveva registrato anche una rivendicazione per il ricupero degli investimenti nell'abitazione che lei stava occupando, ma l'aveva ritirato più tardi.
3. L'intervener della terzo-parte
252. L'IUT osservò che i richiedenti avrebbero dovuto godere protezione sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Comunque, loro erano stati privati dei loro diritti in relazione ad alloggio esistente in un modo col quale era incompatibile quel la disposizione.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. I richiedenti status di vittima di '
253. Nella sua decisione di 28 maggio 2013 sull'ammissibilità della richiesta (paragrafo 263), la Corte specificò che ai meriti l'insceni rivolgerebbe la questione di se quelli richiedenti che sgombrarono volontariamente i locali ancora potrebbero chiedere di essere “le vittime”, sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione, dei fatti si lamentò di sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
254. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che una volta un ordine di sfratto è stato emesso corrisponde ad un'interferenza col diritto per rispettare per la casa, irrispettoso di se è stato giustiziato ancora (veda Ćosi ćc. Croatia, n. 28261/06, § 18, 15 gennaio 2009, e Gladysheva c. la Russia, n. 7097/10, § 91 6 dicembre 2011; veda anche, mutatis mutandis, Stanková c. la Slovacchia, n. 7205/02, § 57 9 ottobre 2007). Con modo di contrasto, un richiedente che si mosse fuori dell'appartamento senza qualsiasi passi stati stati cominciati con una prospettiva a sfrattarlo o lei non può dire di essere una vittima di una violazione allegato di suo o il suo diritto per rispettare per la casa (veda, mutatis mutandis, Liepjnieks āsopra del quale decisione ha citato, §§ 88 e 109).
255. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, secondo le informazioni presentate coi richiedenti ed il Governo (veda divide in paragrafi 225, 226, 229 231, 232 244, 245 248 e 251 sopra), cinque richiedenti, vale a dire N. 3 (il Sig.ra Ivanka Bertoncelj), 4 (il Sig.ra Slavica Jeranič), 7 (il Sig. Drago Logar), 9 (il Sig. Dušan Mili) e 10 (il Sig.ra Dolores Zalar) sgombrò volontariamente i locali di fronte a qualsiasi ordine di sfratto fu emesso. Sotto queste circostanze, e ciononostante le loro dichiarazioni con le quali pressione era stata esercitata il “proprietari precedenti”, la Corte considera che questi richiedenti manca status di vittima all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione.
256. Con contrasto, richiedente n. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez) fu sfrattato nel 2000 (veda paragrafo 224 sopra) ed un ordine di sfratto fu emesso contro richiedente n. 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč) in maggio 2009 (veda divide in paragrafi 230 e 249 sopra). Questi richiedenti possono chiedere perciò di essere “le vittime” della violazione allegato del loro diritto per rispettare per le loro case. Lo stesso fa domanda a richiedente n. 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret); benché nessun ordine di sfratto formale sembri essere stato emesso contro lui, lui decise di sgombrare l'appartamento lui stava occupando solamente in Ljubljana quando la sentenza data con la Corte Suprema lo fece chiaro che lui non fu concesso per continuare il contratto di contratto d'affitto firmato con suo defunto padre e così non aveva nessun titolo per occupare i locali (veda divide in paragrafi 228 e 247 sopra).
257. Secondo le informazioni disponibile alla Corte (veda divide in paragrafi 223 e 246 sopra), i due richiedenti rimanenti, N. 1 (il Sig.ra Cornelia Berger-Krall) e 5 (il Sig.ra Ema Kugler), ancora sta occupando le loro abitazioni sulla base di un contratto d'affitto contrattuale. Nessun ordine di sfratto è stato emesso contro loro e loro essenzialmente si confinarono ad adducendo un “rischio di sfratto.”
258. La Corte reitera che Articolo 34 della Convenzione “richiede che un richiedente individuale dovrebbe chiedere di davvero essere stato colpito con la violazione lui o lei adducono. Non avvia per individui qualche genere di actio popularis per l'interpretazione della Convenzione; non permette individui per lamentarsi semplicemente contro una legge in abstracto perché loro sentono contravviene alla Convenzione. In principio, non basta per un richiedente individuale per chiedere che l'esistenza mera di una legge viola i suoi diritti sotto la Convenzione; è necessario che la legge sarebbe dovuta essere fatta domanda al suo danno” (veda Klass ed Altri c. la Germania, 6 settembre 1978, § 33 la Serie Un n. 28). Questo principio fa domanda anche a decisioni che sono presumibilmente contrarie alla Convenzione (veda Fairfield c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 24790/04, ECHR 2005-VI). Inoltre, l'esercizio del diritto di ricorso individuale non può essere usato per ostacolare una violazione potenziale della Convenzione: in teoria, la Corte non può esaminare una violazione altro che un posteriori, una volta che è accaduta violazione. È solamente in circostanze estremamente eccezionali che un richiedente può chiedere ciononostante di essere una vittima di una violazione della Convenzione che deve al rischio di una violazione futura (veda, per istanza, Associazione per l'Integrazione europea e Diritti umani ed Ekimdzhiev c. la Bulgaria, n. 62540/00, §§ 58-62, 28 giugno 2007, e Noël Narvii Tauira e 18 Altri c. la Francia, la richiesta n. 28204/95, decisione di Commissione di 4 dicembre 1995, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 83-B, p. 112).
259. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, nell'assenza di qualsiasi decisione formale da un organo pubblico che ordina lo sfratto di richiedenti N. 1 e 5, la Corte considera che un puramente rischio ipotetico e futuro che tale decisione può essere adottata non è sufficiente per conferire status di vittima sui richiedenti detti all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione. In questo collegamento, vale anche, che secondo le informazioni presentate col Governo (veda paragrafo 246 sopra) e non contestò coi richiedenti, i due processi depositati col “proprietario precedente” sfrattare il Sig.ra Kugler era senza successo.
260. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte considera, che le azioni di reclamo di richiedenti N. 1 (il Sig.ra Cornelia Berger-Krall), 3 (il Sig.ra Ivanka Bertoncelj), 4 (il Sig.ra Slavica Jeranič), 5 (il Sig.ra Ema Kugler), 7 (il Sig. Drago Logar), 9 (il Sig. Dušan Mili) e 10 (il Sig.ra Dolores Zalar) è ratione personae incompatibili con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) e deve essere respinto in conformità con Articolo 35 § 4.
261. Rimane essere accertato se l'Articolo 8 diritti dei richiedenti rimanenti (N. 2, 6 e 8-il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez, il Sig. Primož Kuret ed il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč) è stato violato nella causa presente.
2. Se c'era interferenza col diritto per rispettare per la casa
262. I richiami di Corte che nella sua decisione di 28 maggio 2013 sull'ammissibilità della richiesta (paragrafo 149), considerò che in finora come il Governo si riferito alle particolari circostanze di richiedenti individuali (notevolmente, il loro diritto per occupare gli appartamenti loro vivono in, la loro proprietà di altro beni immobili, il loro and/or della situazione finanziario le concessioni finanziarie ricevute con loro-veda divide in paragrafi 242, 243 247 e 249 sopra), questi problemi erano le considerazioni attinenti nel valutare se c'era interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ed Articolo 8 della Convenzione e, nell'affermativa, se questa interferenza era proporzionata e necessaria in una società democratica.
263. La Corte prima nota che controversie sono sorte come al diritto di richiedenti N. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez) e 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret) occupare i locali. Nella causa del Sig.ra Berglez, nessun accordo di contratto d'affitto formale fu firmato col “proprietari precedenti”; le parti non sono d'accordo come alle ragioni per questo (veda divide in paragrafi 224 e 242 sopra). In qualsiasi l'evento, la Corte osserva che il Sig.ra Berglez ottenne un affitto specialmente protetto da sua defunta madre nel 1991 e che lei continuò a vivere nell'abitazione e pagare affitto fino a 2000, quando lei fu sfrattata (veda paragrafo 224 sopra). Era dieci anni più tardi solamente alcuno che, presumibilmente a causa dell'aumento in valore di terra lei aveva ereditato, lei era in grado acquistare un m² del 65 spiani in Maribor (veda divide in paragrafi 224 e 243 sopra). Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte considera che l'ordine di sfratto interferì col suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa.
264. Come al Sig. Kuret, anche dopo che la cessione di suo defunto padre 25 gennaio 1995 lui aveva continuato a risiedere nell'appartamento in riguardo del quale suo padre aveva sostenuto un affitto specialmente protetto (veda paragrafo 228 sopra). Sino a 2005 la causa-legge esistente concedè la causa di mortis di trasferibilità di diritti di occupazione a coabitando membri di famiglia vicini (veda divide in paragrafi 68 e 228 sopra). La Corte è di conseguenza dell'opinione che il richiedente aveva un'aspettativa legittima di firmare un accordo di contratto d'affitto col “proprietari precedenti.” Non sino ad aprile 2005, quando che l'aspettativa fu frustrata con un'inversione di causa-legge (veda paragrafo 68 sopra), faceva il Sig. Kuret-anche per evitare il rischio di si chiedere a pagare arretrati di affitto al tasso di libero-mercato-preveda giungendo ad un regolamento amichevole col “proprietario precedente” e risolve il suo alloggio ha bisogno con muoversi fuori di Ljubljana (veda paragrafo 228 in multa, sopra). Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte è dell'opinione che la decisione della Corte Suprema di 21 aprile 2005 ha interferito col diritto del Sig. Kuret per rispettare per la sua casa.
265. Infine, un ordine di sfratto fu emesso contro richiedente n. 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč) perché lei possedette un'altra abitazione adeguata in Piran (veda divide in paragrafi 230 e 249 sopra). Anche se, secondo le informazioni disponibile alla Corte, l'ordine detto non è stato eseguito ancora, la sua esecuzione obbligherebbe il Sig.ra Margu a sgombrare i locali nei quali lei vive da molti anni e muoversi fuori della città dove lei lavora. L'uscita dell'ordine ha interferito perciò col suo diritto per rispettare per la sua casa.
266. Come ai beni e situazione finanziaria di richiedenti N. 2, 6 e 8 che la Corte è dell'opinione che questi elementi dovrebbero essere presi in considerazione nella valutazione della proporzionalità dell'interferenza.
3. Se l'interferenza fu giustificata
(un) Se l'interferenza era legale ed intraprese scopi legittimi
267. Interferenza col diritto per rispettare per la casa sarebbe contraria ad Articolo 8 della Convenzione, a meno che era in conformità con la legge, intraprese uno o scopi più legittimi ed era “necessario in una società democratica.” Come lontano come i primi due requisiti concernono, la Corte non può ma reitera le conclusioni giunsero ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 della Convenzione, notevolmente che la soppressione degli affitti specialmente protetti e la loro sostituzione con contratti di contratto d'affitto normali aveva una base legale e valida in diritto nazionale (veda paragrafo 191 sopra) e che l'interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' intrapresero un scopo legittimo, vale a dire la protezione dei diritti di altri (veda divide in paragrafi 194 sopra).
(b) Se l'interferenza era “necessario in una società democratica”
268. Nel valutare se l'interferenza era “necessario in una società democratica”, la Corte dovrà esaminare se rispose un “pigiando bisogno sociale” e, in particolare, se era proporzionato agli scopi legittimi perseguiti. Prima ha contenuto che il margine della valutazione in questioni di alloggio è narrower quando viene ai diritti garantiti con Articolo 8 comparato con quegli in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, riguardo ad essere aveva all'importanza centrale di Articolo 8 all'identità dell'individuo, autodeterminazione, integrità fisica e morale mantenimento di relazioni con altri e posto fisso e sicuro nella comunità (veda Connors c. il Regno Unito, n. 66746/01, §§ 81–84 27 maggio 2004; Orli ćc. Croatia, n. 48833/07, §§ 63-70 21 giugno 2011; e Gladysheva, citato sopra, § 93).
269. Deve essere ricordato che il requisito della necessità in una società democratica sotto paragrafo 2 di Articolo 8 aumenti una questione di procedura così come una di sostanza. La Corte espose fuori i principi attinenti nel valutare la necessità di un'interferenza col diritto per rispettare per il “la casa” nella causa di Connors (citò sopra, §§ 81-83) quale procedimenti di proprietà riassuntivi ed interessati. Il passaggio attinente legge siccome segue:
“81. Un'interferenza sarà considerata ‘necessario in una società democratica ' per un scopo legittimo se risponde ad un ‘che pigia bisogno sociale ' e, in particolare, se è proporzionato allo scopo legittimo perseguito. Mentre è per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale della necessità, la definitivo valutazione come a se le ragioni citarono per l'interferenza è resti attinenti e sufficienti soggetto a revisione con la Corte per la conformità coi requisiti della Convenzione...
82. In questo riguardo a, un margine della valutazione deve, inevitabilmente, sia lasciato alle autorità nazionali che con ragione del loro contatto diretto e continuo coi vigori vitali dei loro paesi è meglio in principio messo che una corte internazionale per valutare necessità locali e le condizioni. Questo margine varierà secondo la natura del diritto di Convenzione in problema, la sua importanza per l'individuo e la natura delle attività restrette così come la natura dello scopo perseguì con le restrizioni. Il margine tenderà ad essere narrower dove è cruciale al godimento effettivo dell'individuo di intimo il diritto in pericolo o diritti di chiave... C'è d'altra parte in sfere che comportano la richiesta di politiche sociali o economiche, autorità che il margine della valutazione è ampio, come nel contesto di pianificazione dove la Corte ha trovato che ‘[i]n è finora come l'esercizio di discrezione che comporta una moltitudine di fattori locali inerente nella scelta ed attuazione di progettare politiche, le autorità nazionali in principio godono un margine ampio della valutazione '... La Corte ha affermato anche che in sfere come alloggio che ha un ruolo centrale nel welfare e politiche economiche di società moderne rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che che è nell'interesse generale a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole... Si può notare comunque che questo era nel contesto di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, non Articolo 8 quale concerne diritti dell'importanza centrale all'identità dell'individuo, autodeterminazione, integrità fisica e morale mantenimento di relazioni con altri ed un posto fisso e sicuro nella comunità... Dove le considerazioni di politica sociali ed economiche generali sono sorte nel contesto di Articolo 8 stesso, la sfera del margine della valutazione dipende dal contesto della causa, col particolare significato che allega alla misura dell'intrusione nella sfera personale del richiedente...
83. Le salvaguardie procedurali disponibile all'individuo sarà materiale nel determinare specialmente se lo Stato rispondente ha, quando fissando la struttura regolatore, rimasto all'interno del suo margine della valutazione. In particolare, la Corte deve esaminare se l'elaborazione decisionale che conduce a misure di interferenza era equa e come riconoscere riguardo dovuto agli interessi salvaguardò all'individuo con Articolo 8...”
270. Nella causa di Ćosi ć(citò sopra, §§ 21-23), la Corte reiterò che una persona a rischio di perdere suo o la sua casa deve in principio sia in grado avere la proporzionalità e la ragionevolezza della misura determinato con un tribunale indipendente nella luce dei principi attinenti sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione, nonostante che, sotto diritto nazionale, suo o il suo diritto di occupazione aveva finito (veda anche McCann c. il Regno Unito, n. 19009/04, § 50 13 maggio 2008). Concluse successivamente che il richiedente nella causa di Ćosi non ćfu riconosciuto tale opportunità, siccome le corti nazionali si erano confinate a trovando che occupazione col richiedente era senza base legale, senza rendere qualsiasi l'ulteriore analisi come alla proporzionalità della misura per essere fatto domanda contro lei (veda anche Pauli c. Croatia, n. 3572/06, 22 ottobre 2009). La Corte giunse a conclusioni simili nella causa di Gladysheva (citò sopra, §§ 94-97) in che le autorità nazionali non fecero nessuna analisi della proporzionalità dello sfratto del richiedente dall'appartamento loro dichiararono essere Statali e lo fecero chiaro che loro non avrebbero contribuito alla soluzione delle sue necessità di alloggio.
271. Con contrasto, nella causa di Galovi ćc. Croatia ((il dec.), n. 54388/09, 5 marzo 2013) la Corte respinse una rivendicazione sotto Articolo 8 portato con un possessore precedente di un affitto specialmente protetto che era stato sfrattato dall'abitazione col proprietario. La Corte sottolineò che il figlio del richiedente e nuora-con chi lei visse nell'appartamento in problema-aveva un alloggio di m2 del 120 ed un 74 m2 spianano rispettivamente e potrebbero soddisfarla perciò ed il loro proprio alloggio molto ha bisogno più facile del proprietario dell'appartamento potrebbe soddisfare le necessità di alloggio dei suoi due figli di adulti, con chi lui e sua moglie vissero in un appartamento di m2 del 65.82.
272. Le considerazioni che condussero la Corte a trovare che i richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non era stato violato gli conceda giungere alla stessa conclusione sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione in riguardo di richiedenti N. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez), 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret) e 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč) (veda, mutatis mutandis, Zeno ed Altri c. l'Italia, n. 1772/06, 27 aprile 2010). Osserva, in particolare, che i richiedenti furono riconosciuti la possibilità di contratti d'affitto finali di una durata indefinita, mentre trasmettendoli ai loro consorti o partner di scadenza lunga ed occupando i locali per un affitto senza scopo di lucro. Come notato sopra, i dati presentati col Governo, e non contestò coi richiedenti, show che questi affitti erano significativamente più bassi di affitti di libero-mercato e nessuni dei richiedenti ha presentato prova che mostra che loro non potessero riconoscere l'affitto. In qualsiasi l'evento, sussidi pubblici erano socialmente disponibili sotto diritto nazionale per o inquilini finanziariamente svantaggiati (veda paragrafo 41 sopra).
273. Come ai motivi colpa-basati per sfratto introdotto con l'Alloggio Atto 1991 (veda paragrafo 21 sopra), loro erano tradizionalmente essenzialmente simili a quelli contenuti in accordi di contratto d'affitto nell'altro Membro Stati e non possono, come così, sia considerato incompatibile con Articolo 8 della Convenzione. È vero che l'Alloggio Atto 2003 introdusse una base nuova per sfratto-vale a dire proprietà di un'altra abitazione appropriata-e la possibilità per il “proprietario precedente” trasportare l'inquilino ad un altro appartamento adeguato a qualsiasi il tempo e senza qualsiasi la ragione. Comunque, la Corte considera che queste misure legislative furono giustificate in prospettiva dello speciale, protezione rinforzata che fu riconosciuta a persone nei richiedenti la situazione di ' e le limitazioni corrispondenti mise sui diritti del “proprietari precedenti.” All'ottengo restituzione della proprietà, i secondi furono obbligati per entrare in un accordo permanente, di tutta la vita con un inquilino, loro non scelsero ed in cambio per un affitto particolarmente basso. Non era perciò sproporzionato per offrirloro la possibilità di trasportare l'inquilino ad un altro appartamento adeguato. In questo riguardo a, la Corte nota che i costi di allontanamento sopportarono col “proprietario precedente” e che lo stesso inquilino potrebbe essere reso per muoversi solamente una volta (veda paragrafo 40 sopra). Inoltre, come gli articoli che governano l'accordo di contratto d'affitto fu mirato a proteggendo inquilini vulnerabile, non era arbitrario per prevedere per la possibilità di sfratto quando, come nella causa del Sig.ra Margu, čproprietà di un'altra abitazione appropriata mostrò, che un inquilino determinato non era in una situazione dell'angoscia sociale o finanziaria e che suo o le sue necessità di alloggio potrebbero essere soddisfatte altrove senza limitare il “proprietario precedente” diritti di proprietà. In qualsiasi l'evento, come notato sopra, la Corte già ha considerato compatibile con Articolo 8 un ordine di sfratto giustificato col fatto che membri della famiglia dell'inquilino possedettero l'altro beni immobili (veda Galović, decisione citò sopra di).
274. Le stesse considerazioni fanno domanda al cambio di causa-legge con che, la Corte Suprema e la Corte Costituzionale esclusero la trasmissibilità del diritto ad un contratto d'affitto per una causa di mortis di affitto senza scopo di lucro a membri di famiglia vicini al danno del Sig. Kuret, (veda divide in paragrafi 68 e 69). La Corte considera che l'articolo nuovo che è il risultato delle decisioni degli sloveno autorità giudiziali che assicurò un equilibrio equo fra la protezione dei diritti degli inquilini sulla mano del una fu tirato e quelli del “proprietari precedenti” sull'altro. In particolare, la capacità seconda di ottenere qualsiasi profitto dal loro beni immobili sarebbe stato frustrato per una lunghezza significativa e potenzialmente eccessiva di tempo li aveva non solo stato ostacolato da affitti di mercato imponenti sul possessore precedente dell'affitto specialmente protetto, ma anche, dopo suo o la sua cessione, su suo o i suoi membri di famiglia vicini (veda anche gli argomenti simili sviluppati con la Corte sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in paragrafo 206 sopra).
275. Come alle garanzie procedurali godute coi richiedenti, non è contestato, che loro avevano una possibilità di impugnare qualsiasi ordine di sfratto di fronte alle corti nazionali e competenti che avevano giurisdizione su tutte le questioni relative di fatto e diritto. Questo è particolarmente attinente alla causa del Sig.ra Berglez nella quale le corti nazionali erano in grado valutare se lei stava compiendo le attività proibite nell'abitazione (veda divide in paragrafi 224 e 242 sopra) e se l'insuccesso per firmare un accordo di contratto d'affitto era colpa sua o che del “proprietari precedenti.” Lo stesso fa domanda a qualsiasi il possibile atto dell'intimidazione e la cavillosità da parte di un “proprietario precedente” contro un inquilino protetto e precedente.
(il c) la Conclusione
276. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte considera, che l'interferenza col diritto di richiedenti N. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez), 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret) e 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč) rispettare per la loro casa era “necessario in una società democratica” all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione di questa disposizione.
III. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione, Preso In Concomitanza Con Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N. 1
277. I richiedenti addussero che loro erano stati discriminati contro vis-à-vis acquirenti in buona fede di abitazioni nazionalizzate e gli altri possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 14 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Articolo 14 della Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
1. I richiedenti
278. I richiedenti dibatterono che, come inquilini di appartamenti nazionalizzati, loro erano stati privati del diritto per acquistare le loro abitazioni, diversamente da tutti quelli possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti che non stavano vivendo in abitazioni soggetto a restituzione. In oltre, anche se loro avevano un diritto simile ad un diritto di proprietà, loro furono trattati differentemente da acquirenti in buona fede di abitazioni nazionalizzate che non potevano essere obbligate per restituire le loro proprietà.
279. Diversamente da altri possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti, i richiedenti potrebbero acquistare più inoltre, un'abitazione di sostituto a causa di ostacoli pratici e legali. Loro si lamentarono della decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 25 novembre 1999 che abroga il “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto (veda paragrafo 37 sopra).
280. I richiedenti reiterarono le loro osservazioni secondo che l'affitto specialmente protetto ed il diritto per acquistare sotto il “terzo modello” era “le proprietà” (di che loro era stato privato) all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda divide in paragrafi 129-133 sopra). Articolo 14 della Convenzione era perciò applicabile in concomitanza con quel la disposizione.
281. Sotto il “terzo modello”, in vigore al tempo della ratifica della Slovenia della Convenzione, la differenza fra possessori di affitto specialmente protetti che occupano abitazioni acquisiti con solidarietà sociale vuole dire, e quelli che, come i richiedenti, visse in abitazioni di denationalised non posi in se loro avevano diritto ad acquistare, ma in se loro erano in grado comprendere che diritto su un'abitazione esistente o su un'abitazione di sostituto. Era solamente con l'abolizione del “terzo modello” a novembre 1999 che i possessori di diritti di occupazione in abitazioni di denationalised, diversamente da altri possessori di affitto specialmente protetti furono privati del diritto per acquistare.
282. Nei richiedenti ' vede, questa differenza in trattamento non aveva giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole. Loro osservarono che tutti i possessori di diritti di occupazione erano stati privati del loro affitto specialmente protetto e che questa privazione richiese il risarcimento, irrispettoso di se l'abitazione era stata acquisita con solidarietà sociale vuole dire o era stato espropriato una volta. Ambo i generi di abitazioni furono socialmente-posseduti ugualmente effettivamente, proprietà. Inoltre, il diritto per acquistare sotto il “terzo modello” non fu connesso all'abitazione esistente: potrebbe essere esercitato anche su un altro (il sostituto) indulgendo. Nei richiedenti ' vede, questo provò che l'essenza del diritto per acquistare non derivò dall'abitazione stessa e dalle sue caratteristiche, ma dallo status di possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto. Il diritto per acquistare continuò ad esistere se le abitazioni non fossero denationalised.
283. I richiedenti crederono anche, per le stesse ragioni enumerate sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda divide in paragrafi 142-144 sopra), che la differenza in trattamento si lamentò di non intraprenda un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico. Il ragionamento della Corte Costituzionale potrebbe essere capito solamente per volere dire che possessori di affitto specialmente protetti e precedenti che risiedono in abitazioni di denationalised erano meno degni degli altri possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione. Come persone nei richiedenti la situazione di ' doveva sopportare un carico eccessivo, non c'era stata una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Dopo l'abrogazione del “terzo modello”, il carico dell'elaborazione di denationalisation non fu portato più con lo Stato o i municipi.
284. I richiedenti enfatizzarono infine che il Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali aveva trovato una violazione della clausola di discriminazione (l'Articolo E) contenne nello Statuto Sociale europeo e Riveduto (veda divide in paragrafi 97 e 100 sopra).
2. Il Governo
285. Il Governo prima sostenne che, siccome i richiedenti le rivendicazioni di ' erano ratione materiae incompatibili con le disposizioni di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda divide in paragrafi 119-128 sopra), Articolo 14 della Convenzione non era applicabile. Questo riguardò, in particolare, il diritto per acquistare un'abitazione, come il diritto acquisire proprietà non fu garantito con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
286. Loro osservarono inoltre che con riguardo ad alla privatizzazione di abitazioni il SZ stabilì esattamente due regimi legali: una per abitazioni socialmente-possedute acquisite per la solidarietà ed alloggio reciproco procura ed una per abitazioni socialmente-possedute che sono divenute proprietà nazionale e generale per nationalisation. La categoria seconda incluse unità di alloggio precedentemente privatamente-possedute, in riguardo del quale il diritto di un rivendicatore di denationalisation escluse il diritto dell'occupazione possessore corretto per acquisire la stessa proprietà in natura. Solamente per la prima categoria di abitazioni era sé possibile ancora conferire sull'occupazione possessori corretti un diritto di pre-acquisto che era il diritto per acquistare la proprietà che corrisponde sotto la pari a 30 per cento del suo valore meno l'importo di propria partecipazione non risarcì ed il valore di propri investimenti che furono riflessi nel valore aumentato dell'abitazione. 90 per cento di che prezzo potrebbe essere pagato in rate mensili su un periodo di venti anni. Nell'evento di un uno-via pagamento entro sessanta giorni della firma del contratto di acquisto, l'acquirente fu concesso ad un sconto che corrisponde a 60 per cento del valore della proprietà (veda paragrafo 19 sopra).
287. I possessori di diritti di occupazione potrebbero acquisire solamente proprietà su questi termini con l'accordo di per abitazioni di denationalised, il “proprietari precedenti.” Regolare altrimenti le questioni sarebbe stato di nuovo uguale a nationalising le proprietà. Se loro non potessero ottenere il “proprietario precedente” l'accordo, gli occupanti avevano la scelta per ottenere un pagamento che corrisponde a 30 per cento del valore della proprietà ed un prestito se loro fossero d'accordo a sgombrare i locali entro due anni dalla restituzione dell'abitazione al rivendicatore di denationalisation (veda paragrafo 34 sopra). Oltre a che, il “terzo modello” (veda paragrafo 35 sopra) aveva introdotto la possibilità di acquistare un appartamento di sostituto comparabile su termini favorevoli dal municipio. Occupazione precedente possessori destri non erano capaci di acquistare abitazioni possedute con la Pensione e la Comunità dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità, siccome queste abitazioni erano state costruite per approvvigionare per le necessità di alloggio di persone pensionate.
288. Secondo la Corte Costituzionale, il diritto a denationalisation era un diritto, basato sul diritto costituzionale a proprietà privata. L'esistenza di un “proprietario precedente” era come lontano come l'acquisto una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole per una differenza in trattamento del possessore di diritti di occupazione dell'abitazione riguardò. Nessuna discriminazione fra categorie diverse di possessori di diritti di occupazione esistite con riguardo ad alla possibilità di continuare l'affitto. Il Governo sottolineò che trattamento disuguale di situazioni disuguali in proporzione con la loro ineguaglianza non potesse corrispondere ad una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Come le circostanze di ogni occupazione precedente possessori corretti non erano uguali, era impossibile per trattarli nella stessa maniera.
3. L'intervener della terzo-parte
289. L'IUT considerò che i richiedenti erano stati discriminati contro vis-à-vis gli altri possessori di affitto specialmente protetti. Mentre i secondi erano stati dati il diritto per acquistare esistendo o abitazioni di sostituto su termini favorevoli, questo vuole dire del risarcimento era stato abrogato successivamente per i richiedenti.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. L'applicabilità di Articolo 14 della Convenzione
290. Nella sua decisione di 28 maggio 2013 sull'ammissibilità della richiesta (paragrafo 277), la Corte considerò che la questione dell'applicabilità di Articolo 14 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 fu collegato alla sostanza dei richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ', e decise di congiungerlo ai meriti.
291. Siccome ha sostenuto costantemente la Corte, l'Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. Benché la richiesta di Articolo 14 non presupponga una violazione di quelle disposizioni-ed a questa misura è autonomo-non ci può essere stanza per richiesta sua a meno che i fatti in problema incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di uno o più del secondo (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Van Raalte c. i Paesi Bassi, 21 febbraio 1997, § 33 le Relazioni 1997-io; Petrovic c. l'Austria, 27 marzo 1998, § 22 Relazioni 1998-II; e Zarb Adami c. il Malta, n. 17209/02, § 42 ECHR 2006-VIII).
292. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte considerò che non era necessario per esaminare se Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 era applicabile alla situazione si lamentò di (veda paragrafo 135 sopra). Di conseguenza, procederà sull'assunzione che anche Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile come in qualsiasi evento che i requisiti di questa disposizione non sono stati violati.
2. Ottemperanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
(un) principi di Generale
293. La Corte ha stabilito nella sua causa-legge che solamente differenzia in trattamento basata su una caratteristica identificabile, o “lo status”, è capace di corrispondere alla discriminazione all'interno del significato di Articolo 14 (veda Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen e Pedersen c. la Danimarca, 7 dicembre 1976, § 56 la Serie Un n. 23). Inoltre, in ordine per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo, o pertinentemente simile, situazioni (veda D.H. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007-IV, e Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 60 ECHR 2008).
294. Tale differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; nelle altre parole, se non intraprende un scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Lo Stato Contraente gode un margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifici un trattamento diverso (il Carico, citato sopra, § 60). La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, la materia-questione e lo sfondo (veda OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos, citato sopra, § 613). Ad un margine ampio è concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione di solito quando viene a misure generali della strategia economica o sociale. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è nell'interesse pubblico su motivi sociali o economici, e la Corte rispetterà la scelta di politica della legislatura generalmente a meno che è “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (veda Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 52, ECHR 2006-VI, e Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 61 ECHR 2010).
295. Articolo 14 non proibisce Parti Contraenti dal trattare differentemente gruppi per correggere “le ineguaglianze che riguarda i fatti” fra loro. Nelle certe circostanze un insuccesso per tentare di correggere l'ineguaglianza per trattamento diverso può effettivamente, senza una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole, aumento determinato ad una violazione di che Articolo (veda Thlimmenos c. la Grecia [GC], n. 34369/97, § 44, ECHR 2000-IV, e Sejdi će Finci c. Bosnia e Herzegovina [GC], N. 27996/06 e 34836/06, § 44 ECHR 2009 -...). La Corte ha accettato anche che una politica generale o misura che hanno sproporzionatamente effetti pregiudizievoli su un particolare gruppo può essere considerata discriminatoria nonostante che non è mirato specificamente a che gruppo, e che la discriminazione potenzialmente contrario alla Convenzione può essere il risultato di una situazione de facto (veda D.H. ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 175 e 196, e le autorità citate therein).
296. Infine, come all'onere della prova in relazione ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione, la Corte ha sostenuto, che una volta il richiedente ha mostrato una differenza in trattamento, è per il Governo per mostrare che fu giustificato (veda D.H. ed Altri, citato sopra, § 177).
(b) la Richiesta di questi principi alla causa presente
(i) Se c'è stata una differenza in trattamento fra persone in situazioni simili
297. I richiedenti si comparano con due altre categorie di persone: possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto che non stava occupando abitazioni soggetto a restituzione, ed acquirenti in buona fede di abitazioni nazionalizzate (veda paragrafo 277 sopra). Comunque, la Corte non può dividere i richiedenti opinione di ' nella quale loro erano un pertinentemente situazione vis-à-vis osso fide acquirenti simili, come la posizione di un inquilino protetto non può essere associato ad a che di persone che ottennero un titolo legale di proprietà di un'abitazione.
298. In contrasto, la situazione dei richiedenti era analoga a che di inquilini protetti che non occupano abitazioni soggetto a denationalisation e restituzione: ambo le categorie di persone erano state accordate diritti di occupazione con le autorità della Repubblica Socialista e precedente della Slovenia ed erano state occupando gli appartamenti con virtù dello stesso titolo formale e sotto le stesse condizioni legali. Comunque, solamente gli inquilini protetti di abitazioni Stato-costruite furono dati il diritto esecutivo per acquistarli su termini significativamente favorevoli con pagando un prezzo che corrisponde ad approssimativamente 5-10 per cento del valore di mercato della proprietà. Come le abitazioni che i richiedenti stavano occupando appartamenti prima furono espropriati, i richiedenti avevano la possibilità di comprarli solamente ad un 30 o 60 per sconto di cento se, entro un anno dalla restituzione dell'abitazione, il “proprietario precedente” fu d'accordo a vendere (veda divide in paragrafi 19 e 20 sopra).
299. C'è stata perciò una differenza in trattamento fra due gruppi-inquilini protetti di abitazioni di denationalised ed inquilini protetti di altre abitazioni-quale, riguardo al loro diritto per occupare gli appartamenti loro vissero in, era in una situazione simile.
(l'ii) Se c'era giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole
300. Il Governo dibattè che la differenza in trattamento dipeso dall'esistenza di un “proprietario precedente” i cui diritti ebbero bisogno essere protegguti e che non poteva essere costretto per vendere la proprietà lui o lei aveva ottenuto per restituzione (veda divide in paragrafi 287 e 288 sopra). La Corte accetta che obbligando il “proprietario precedente” vendere avrebbe reso teoretico ed illusorio il principio di restituzione in natura di beni immobili espropriato e sarebbe potuto essere percepito come un'espropriazione nuova e de facto (veda, mutatis mutandis, Strunjak ed Altri c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 46934/99, 5 ottobre 2000).
301. La Corte considera così che il bisogno di proteggere i diritti del “proprietari precedenti” era una ragione valida per non conferire sui richiedenti il diritto esecutivo per acquistare su termini favorevoli le abitazioni loro stavano occupando. La differenza in trattamento si lamentò perciò di aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole (veda, mutatis mutandis, Strunjak ed Altri c. Croatia ((il dec.), n. 46934/99, 5 ottobre 2000).
302. La Corte nota inoltre che gli altri schemi che offrono appoggio finanziario e pubblico erano disponibili ai richiedenti per concederloro acconsentire a proprietà di beni immobili. Notevolmente, secondo il “prima il modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto, il “proprietario precedente” fu incentivato per accettare la vendita del denationalised che indulge con la possibilità di ricevere una ricompensa finanziaria e supplementare da finanziamenti pubblici (paragrafo 33 sopra), mentre secondo il “secondo modello”, un inquilino che decise di muoversi fuori ed acquistare un appartamento o costruire un alloggio fu concesso a risarcimento che corrisponde a 50 per cento del valore dell'abitazione (l'ulteriore risarcimento di 30 per cento sarebbe pagato col “proprietario precedente”-veda paragrafo 34 sopra). Un diritto per acquistare un appartamento di sostituto comparabile su termini favorevoli dai municipi fu introdotto col “terzo modello” (veda paragrafo 35 sopra). È vero che questo scorso modello fu abrogato più tardi con la Corte Costituzionale per evitare mettere un carico finanziario ed eccessivo sui municipi (veda paragrafo 37 sopra); comunque, l'Alloggio Atto del 2003 introdusse un “modello nuovo” di privatizzazione di sostituto secondo che occupazione precedente possessori destri che furono d'accordo a sgombrare il loro alloggio affittato e decisero di comprare un'altra abitazione o costruire un alloggio furono concessi al risarcimento speciale (su a 74 per cento del prezzo dell'abitazione) ed ad un prestito sovvenzionato (veda paragrafo 42 sopra).
303. Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte considera che lo Stato prese passi significativi per fornire ai richiedenti una possibilità equa di accesso a proprietà di vero-appezzamento di terreno e compensarli, pertanto come praticabile, per lo svantaggio creò col fatto obiettivo dell'esistenza di un “proprietario precedente.”
(l'iii) la Conclusione
304. Di conseguenza, presumendolo anche per essere applicabile ai fatti della causa presente, Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non è stato violato.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DI LA CONVENZIONE
305. I richiedenti sostennero che fin dai più importanti cambi nella politica di alloggio era stato introdotto con statuto, loro non avevano accesso sufficiente ad una corte per impugnare le violazioni allegato dei loro diritti. Inoltre, loro erano stati esclusi dai procedimenti di denationalisation.
Loro si appellarono su Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, pertanto come attinente, legge siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
1. I richiedenti
306. I richiedenti sottolinearono che il viale legale e solo aperto a loro era stato il “il ricorso” e l'azione di reclamo costituzionale e susseguente, e l'iniziativa costituzionale depositò con l'Associazione in favore dei suoi membri. Dopo la decisione della Corte Costituzionale che respinge la loro iniziativa, i richiedenti non avevano avuto nessuna prospettiva del successo con le loro azioni di reclamo individuali.
307. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche della loro esclusione dai procedimenti di denationalisation che concernerono la proprietà delle abitazioni nei quali loro stavano vivendo. La conseguenza di questi procedimenti era stata decisiva per loro “i diritti civili”, siccome loro sarebbero stati concessi per acquistare le abitazioni se loro non fossero stati ritornati alle persone che chiesero di essere state i loro proprietari di fronte al nationalisation.
308. Nei procedimenti di denationalisation, le corti amministrative dovevano verificare l'esistenza dei motivi legali che concedono restituzione, e nell'assenza di questi motivi la richiesta del rivendicatore sarebbe respinta. Questi procedimenti non solo erano decisivi per i diritti civili del rivendicatore di denationalisation ma anche per quelli del precedente possessore di affitto specialmente protetto che risiede nell'abitazione. Sotto il “terzo modello”, la conseguenza dei procedimenti di denationalisation determinerebbe se l'inquilino potrebbe esercitare il diritto per acquistare l'esistente o un'abitazione di sostituto. Dopo l'abolizione di che modello, la loro conseguenza determinerebbe se l'inquilino aveva diritto ad acquistare affatto.
309. Questo diritto per acquisire proprietà di un'abitazione su termini finanziari ed estremamente favorevoli era senza dubbio un “civile” diritto all'interno del significato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Il fatto che un interesse economico posò dietro a questo diritto non poteva cambiare che conclusione, siccome era ogni diritto di proprietà, in essenza, un interesse economico. Possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti avevano diritto perciò a partecipare nei procedimenti di denationalisation per essere informato di, e fa commenti su, ogni prova addusse od osservazioni registrarono, con una prospettiva ad influenzando la decisione della corte. I richiedenti non furono richiesti di indicare, nei procedimenti internazionali che genere di argomenti e rende impermeabile loro avrebbero potuto fissare in avanti nei procedimenti di denationalisation li aveva stato dato un'opportunità di prendere parte in loro.
2. Il Governo
310. Il Governo prima sostenne che i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' era ratione materiae incompatibile con le disposizioni di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, siccome i procedimenti di denationalisation non comportarono una controversia che riguarda loro “diritti civili ed obblighi” (Ulyanov c. l'Ucraina (il dec.), n. 16472/04, 5 ottobre 2010). Loro enfatizzarono che possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione non potessero essere parti nei procedimenti di denationalisation a meno che loro provarono che loro avevano un interesse legale in loro, quel è, o una rivendicazione per il rimborso di investimenti o un diritto di proprietà (veda Articolo 60 dello ZDen e divida in paragrafi 28 sopra). I richiedenti non erano riusciti a provare l'esistenza probabile di tale interesse legale. La restituzione di proprietà nazionalizzata a rivendicatori di denationalisation non faceva in qualsiasi modo colpisce la condizione giuridica dei richiedenti o i loro diritti diretti basò sulla legge.
311. Inoltre, i richiedenti non potevano ostacolare la restituzione delle abitazioni a loro “proprietari precedenti”, come l'esistenza mera di un affitto un ostacolo non poteva essere a restituzione di proprietà nazionalizzata. Perciò, i richiedenti non potevano rendersi conto del loro desiderio per acquistare le abitazioni con partecipando nei procedimenti di denationalisation per i quali non erano direttamente decisivi loro “i diritti civili.”
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. L'applicabilità di Articolo 6 § 1 ai procedimenti di denationalisation
312. Nella sua decisione di 28 maggio 2013 sull'ammissibilità della richiesta (paragrafo 286), la Corte considerò che la questione dell'applicabilità di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ai procedimenti di denationalisation fu collegato alla sostanza dei richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' e decise di congiungerlo ai meriti. La Corte dovrebbe accertare perciò se il margine civile di questa disposizione fa domanda all'impossibilità allegato per i richiedenti per partecipare nei procedimenti di denationalisation. In questo collegamento, nota, che, come indicato col Governo, nessuno simile impossibilità esistè dove il possessore precedente di diritti di occupazione aveva una rivendicazione per il ricupero di investimenti reso nell'abitazione (veda divide in paragrafi 28, 66 e 310 sopra). Deve essere determinato perciò se, nell'assenza di tale rivendicazione, i procedimenti di denationalisation erano determinante per qualsiasi dei richiedenti ' “i diritti” all'interno del significato di Articolo 6.
313. La Corte reitera che per Articolo 6 § 1 in suo “civile” margine per essere applicabile, ci deve essere una controversia (“la contestazione” nel testo francese) su un “il diritto” quale può essere detto, almeno su motivi difendibili, essere riconosciuto sotto diritto nazionale, irrispettoso di se è protegguto sotto la Convenzione. La controversia deve essere genuina e seria; non solo può riferire all'esistenza effettiva di un diritto ma anche alla sua sfera e la maniera del suo esercizio; e, il risultato dei procedimenti deve essere direttamente infine, decisivo per il diritto in oggetto, i collegamenti tenui e meri o conseguenze remote che non sono sufficiente per apportare 6 § 1 Articolo giocano (veda, fra le altre autorità, Micallef c. il Malta [GC], n. 17056/06, § 74 15 ottobre 2009).
314. Articolo 6 § 1 non garantisce qualsiasi il particolare contenuto per (civile) “diritti ed obblighi” nel diritto sostanziale degli Stati Contraenti: la Corte non può creare con modo di interpretazione di Articolo 6 § 1 un diritto effettivo che non ha base legale nello Stato riguardato (veda, per esempio, Fayed c. il Regno Unito, 21 settembre 1994, § 65 la Serie Un n. 294 B, e Roche c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 32555/96, § 119 ECHR 2005 X). L'inizio-punto deve essere le disposizioni del diritto nazionale attinente e la loro interpretazione con le corti nazionali (veda Masson e Van Zon c. i Paesi Bassi, 28 settembre 1995, § 49 la Serie Un n. 327-un, e Roche, citato sopra, § 120). Questa Corte avrebbe bisogno di ragioni forti di differire dalle conclusioni giunte alle corti nazionali e superiori trovando, contrari alla loro prospettiva che c'era discutibilmente un diritto riconosciuta con diritto nazionale (l'ibid.).
315. Nell'eseguire questa valutazione, è necessario per guardare oltre le comparizioni e la lingua usò e concentrarsi sulle realtà della situazione (veda Van Droogenbroeck c. il Belgio, 24 giugno 1982, § 38 la Serie Un n. 50; Roche, citato sopra, § 121; e Boulois c. il Lussemburgo [GC], n. 37575/04, § 92 3 aprile 2012).
316. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte nota che l'oggetto dei procedimenti di denationalisation era determinare la proprietà della proprietà soggetto a restituzione (veda paragrafo 27 sopra). I richiedenti non addussero che loro avevano una rivendicazione difendibile per restituzione. Nell'opinione della Corte, la conseguenza dei procedimenti non era direttamente perciò, decisiva per i loro diritti di proprietà potenziali. Era neanche decisivo per il loro diritto per occupare l'abitazione, come denationalisation e restituzione la relazione di affitto non poteva colpire (veda paragrafo 28 sopra), ed il “proprietari precedenti” fu obbligato per affittare gli appartamenti per un periodo indefinito e per un affitto senza scopo di lucro a possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione (veda paragrafo 19 sopra).
317. È vero che nell'evento di rifiuto dei rivendicatori di denationalisation ' richiede per restituzione, i possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti avrebbero avuto la possibilità di acquistare le abitazioni loro stavano occupando su termini favorevoli (veda paragrafo 308 sopra). Comunque, la Corte considera che questa era una conseguenza remota e mera dei procedimenti di denationalisation per non apportare 6 § 1 Articolo giochi.
318. In prospettiva di tutte le considerazioni precedenti, la Corte non può considerare, che il risultato dei procedimenti di denationalisation era direttamente decisivo per i richiedenti i diritti civili di '. Di conseguenza, conclude, come il Governo che l'Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione non è applicabile.
319. Segue che l'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere concessa. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 con riguardo ad ai procedimenti di denationalisation.
2. Accesso ad una corte per impugnare la riforma di alloggio
320. Rimane essere accertato se i richiedenti avevano accesso sufficiente ad una corte per impugnare le violazioni dei loro diritti provocate presumibilmente con la riforma di alloggio.
321. La Corte reitera che Articolo 6 § 1 garantisce ad ognuno il diritto per avere qualsiasi la rivendicazione relativo a suo o i suoi diritti civili ed obblighi portarono di fronte ad una corte o tribunale (veda Golder c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1975, § 36 la Serie Un n. 18). Questo “diritto ad una corte” di che il diritto di accesso è un aspetto, può essere appellatosi su con chiunque che considera su motivi difendibili che un'interferenza con l'esercizio di suo o i suoi diritti civili sono illegali e si lamentano che nessuna possibilità si fu permessa di presentare che rivendicazione ad una riunione di corte i requisiti di Articolo 6 § 1 (veda, inter alia, Roche citato sopra, § 117, e Salontaji-Drobnjak c. Serbia, n. 36500/05, § 132 13 ottobre 2009). Il grado di accesso riconosciuto con la legislazione nazionale deve essere sufficiente per garantire il diritto dell'individuo ad una corte, mentre avendo riguardo ad al principio dell'articolo di legge in una società democratica. Essere effettivo, un individuo deve avere un'opportunità chiara, pratica di impugnare un atto che è un'interferenza coi suoi diritti per il diritto di accesso (veda Bellet c. la Francia, 4 dicembre 1995, § 36 la Serie Un n. 333-B).
322. Comunque, la Corte richiama che Articolo 6 § 1 non garantisce un diritto di portare procedimenti costituzionali (veda Mladenic c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 48485/99, 14 giugno 2001). Nell'ambito di Articolo 13, la Corte ha affermato inoltre, che la Convenzione non va finora come a garantire una via di ricorso che concede le leggi di un Stato Contraente come simile essere impugnato di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale sulla base di essere contrario alla Convenzione o a norme legali nazionali ed equivalenti (veda James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 85 la Serie Un n. 98, e Litgow ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 8 luglio 1986, § 206 la Serie Un n. 102).
323. In qualsiasi l'evento, la Corte considera che nelle circostanze della causa presente, tale via di ricorso era accessibile ai richiedenti che addussero che la struttura complessiva della riforma di alloggio aveva colpito avversamente i loro diritti. Nella prospettiva della Corte, nulla ostacolò i richiedenti, nella loro qualità di possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto in abitazioni di denationalised, dal chiedere alla Corte Costituzionale di fare una rassegna la costituzionalità del SZ lo ZDen e della pratica giudiziale ed attinente.
324. Questo è sufficiente per la Corte per concludere che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
C. Addusse Violazione Di Articolo 13 Di La Convenzione
325. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro non avevano alla loro disposizione qualsiasi via di ricorso legali ed effettive per impugnare la violazione allegato dei loro diritti di Convenzione effettivi.
Loro si appellarono su Articolo 13 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
326. Il Governo impugnò questa rivendicazione. Loro notarono che con riguardo ad a tutte le violazioni allegato i richiedenti avevano avuto una via di ricorso legale nazionale ed effettiva alla loro disposizione (la revisione iniziale e costituzionale) che loro avevano esaurito. Inoltre, loro si sarebbero potuti giovare a di via di ricorso civili adattate alle loro circostanze individuali.
327. La Corte reitera che dove è un diritto civile il diritto chiesto, il ruolo di Articolo 6 § 1 in relazione ad Articolo 13 è che di un specialis della legge, i requisiti di Articolo 13 che è assorbito con quelli di Articolo 6 § 1 (veda, fra le altre autorità, la Società di Tabacco britannico-americana Ltd c. i Paesi Bassi, 20 novembre 1995, § 89 la Serie Un n. 331, e Brualla la di de di Gómez Torre c. la Spagna, 19 dicembre 1997, § 41 le Relazioni 1997 VIII). Di conseguenza, è non necessario per decidere separatamente sull'azione di reclamo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Sostiene, con sei voti ad uno, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

2. Sostiene, unanimamente, che richiedenti N. 1 (il Sig.ra Cornelia Berger-Krall), 3 (il Sig.ra Ivanka Bertoncelj), 4 (il Sig.ra Slavica Jeranič), 5 (il Sig.ra Ema Kugler), 7 (il Sig. Drago Logar), 9 (il Sig. Dušan Mili) e 10 (il Sig.ra Dolores Zalar) non può chiedere di essere “le vittime”, per i fini di Articolo 34 della Convenzione, della violazione allegato di Articolo 8 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione in riguardo di richiedenti N. 2 (il Sig.ra Ljudmila Berglez), 6 (il Sig. Primož Kuret) e 8 (il Sig.ra Dunja Marguč);

4. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

5. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in riguardo dei procedimenti di denationalisation;

6. Sostiene, unanimamente, che non c'è stata presumibilmente nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in riguardo dei richiedenti ' accesso insufficiente ad una corte per impugnare la riforma di alloggio;

7. Sostiene, unanimamente, che è non necessario per determinare se c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 12 giugno 2014, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Mark Villiger
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, le opinioni separate e seguenti sono annesse a questa sentenza:
(un) opinione concordante di Giudice Yudkivska;
(b) dissentendo in parte opinione di Giudice Zupani.čč
M.V.
C.W.

OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DI GIUDICE YUDKIVSKA
Io votai insieme con la maggioranza in favore di trovare che nella causa presente non era stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, ed io posso, in principio, concorda con l'esercizio di bilanciamento si impegnato in paragrafi 205-211 nei quali fondò la Camera che l'interferenza allegato era proporzionata allo scopo legittimo perseguito, in prospettiva del margine ampio della valutazione accordata allo Stato nelle questioni della giustizia sociale.
Comunque, io non divido la posizione della maggioranza, come esposto fuori in paragrafo 135 della sentenza, che non era necessario per esaminare l'eccezione del Governo di materiae di ratione di incompatibilità poiché, anche Articolo 1 presuntuoso di Protocollo N.ro 1 per essere applicabile, i requisiti di questa disposizione non furono violati. La stessa linea fu presa con la Camera nella causa di Blei ćc. Croatia (n. 59532/00, § 73 29 luglio 2004). Nella mia prospettiva, il problema dell'applicabilità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è cruciale in questo tipo di causa e non merita di essere circonvenuto. La causa presente, non solo dato la sua importanza considerevole per lo Stato rispondente ma anche per il sistema di Convenzione, chiamate per la chiarificazione dell'approccio ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in questioni di politica sociali.
Nelle circostanze della causa presente i richiedenti come possessori precedenti di affitti socialmente protetti né avevano proprietà nella forma di nella mia prospettiva, un “la proprietà” né qualsiasi “l'aspettativa legittima” di acquisirlo, e la loro azione di reclamo incorre così fuori della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
È la causa-legge ben stabilita della Corte che il diritto a qualsiasi beneficio sociale non è incluso come simile fra i diritti e le libertà garantite con la Convenzione (veda Shpakovskiy c. la Russia, n. 41307/02, § 32 7 luglio 2005), ed il diritto per vivere in una particolare proprietà non possedette col richiedente non fa come simile costituisca un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Kovalenok c. la Lettonia (il dec.), n. 54264/00, 15 febbraio 2001). D'altra parte la Corte ha un corpo esteso di causa-legge in riguardo di paesi di Unione sovietici e precedenti nel quale ha contenuto che affitti socialmente protetti corrisposero precisamente a diritti di proprietà perché la legislazione decretò dopo l'incorra del regime comunista previsto per la privatizzazione incondizionata di appartamenti o alloggi occupata sotto simile affitti (veda Malinovskiy c. la Russia, n. 41302/02, ECHR 2005-VII, e Panchenko c. l'Ucraina, n. 10911/05, 10 dicembre 2009). Come gli Stati in oggetto non passi qualsiasi denationalisation attinenti o leggi di restituzione, non c'era conflitto con gli interessi di possessori di affitti socialmente protetti.
Nelle cause di Malinovskiy c. Russia e Shpakovskiy c. la Russia (sia citò sopra) la sentenza della corte nazionale obbligò il municipio a fornire al richiedente un appartamento sotto un affitto socialmente protetto. La Corte notò che sotto i termini di questi “accordi di affitto sociali”, nella conformità con la legislazione applicabile, “il richiedente avrebbe avuto diritto a possedere ed avvalersi dell'appartamento e privatizzarlo” (veda Malinovskiy, citato sopra, § 44). Così, la Corte sostenne che dalla data della sentenza della corte nazionale il richiedente aveva un stabilito “l'aspettativa legittima” di acquisire un bene patrimoniale. Di conseguenza, la rivendicazione del richiedente ad un “accordo di affitto sociale” “sufficientemente fu stabilito per costituire una proprietà di ‘' che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1” determinato che questo accordo fornì al richiedente una possibilità chiara di acquisire la proprietà (l'ibid., § 46).
La Corte seguì anche questo approccio nella causa di Ivan Panchenko c. l'Ucraina (citò sopra) che similmente riguardò l'esecuzione di una sentenza che accorda il richiedente un “garanzia di alloggio” per un appartamento municipale, ma non la proprietà. Secondo la Corte, in questa causa “il problema cruciale” era se il richiedente aveva un “l'aspettativa legittima” di acquisire l'appartamento contestato come la sua proprietà privata. Avendo riguardo ad alla legislazione nazionale ed attinente che previde in simile circostanze per privatizzazione esente da spese prima di 1 gennaio 2007 la Corte concluse che “per i fini della causa presente solamente... almeno di fronte a 1 gennaio 2007” il richiedente aveva un “l'aspettativa legittima” di acquisire l'appartamento in questione come la sua proprietà privata (l'ibid., § 51).
La Corte distinse poi le cause summenzionate dalla situazione nella causa di Babenko c. l'Ucraina ((il dec.), n. 68726/10, 4 gennaio 2012) in che un Secondo veterano di Guerra di Mondo aveva un diritto per essere previsto con un appartamento municipale ed era su una lista d'attesa per quel il fine. In questa causa la Corte reiterò di nuovo che il diritto di un richiedente per vivere in una particolare proprietà non possedette con lui o lei non faceva come simile costituisca un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Come riguardi la possibilità teoretica di privatising l'appartamento in oggetto, la Corte affermò: “nell'assenza di qualsiasi commenti in questo riguardo dai richiedenti, la Corte non può concludere a che misura simile possibilità è tangibile. Inoltre, la Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà.” Di conseguenza, i richiedenti non erano riusciti a mostrare che loro avevano un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Segue dalle cause summenzionate che un affitto socialmente protetto costituisce un “la proprietà” come lungo come tale affitto comporta un ragionevolmente possibilità pratica di acquisire un appartamento (nonostante se o non la persona riguardata sta occupando attualmente l'appartamento), e datare la posizione della Corte sembra essere piuttosto chiaro in questo riguardo a (veda anche Mago ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 12959/05, 19724/05, 47860/06 8367/08, 9872/09 e 11706/09 § 78, 3 maggio 2012 citò nella sentenza).
I richiedenti nella causa presente non avevano qualsiasi simile aspettative legittime.
In questo riguardo la decisione nella causa di Trifunovi ćc. Croatia ((il dec.), n. 34162/06, 6 novembre 2008) è di particolare attinenza. In possessori di Croatia di affitti specialmente protetti acquistare i loro appartamenti sotto le condizioni favorevoli fu concesso. Il richiedente si lamentò che lei non era in grado fare così perché lei affitto socialmente protetto era stato terminato. La Corte respinse questa azione di reclamo come ratione materiae incompatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Reiterò che quando esaminando violazioni allegato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione su conto della conclusione di un affitto specialmente protetto in procedimenti che avevano terminato dopo la ratifica di Croatia della Convenzione, non doveva determinare se un affitto specialmente protetto stesso potrebbe essere considerato un “la proprietà” proteggè con quel l'Articolo. Doveva piuttosto, esaminare se la conclusione di che affitto colpì qualsiasi dei diritti derivati da sé-come, per esempio, il diritto per acquistare l'appartamento sotto gli Affitti Specialmente Protetti Agisce,-e, più importantemente, se quelli diritti derivati potrebbero corrispondere un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di quel la disposizione. Avendo notato che “le proprietà” potrebbe essere “proprietà esistenti” o rivendicazioni in riguardo delle quali un richiedente potrebbe dibattere che lui aveva almeno un “l'aspettativa legittima” che di loro si sarebbero resi conto, concluse che fin dal richiedente né suo marito mai aveva fatto una richiesta per acquistare l'appartamento all'interno del tempo-limite applicabile, il richiedente non aveva rivendicazione sotto diritto nazionale per acquistare l'appartamento. Così, lei non aveva un interesse di proprietà riservato e sufficiente per costituire un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (veda anche Gaeša c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43389/02, 1 aprile 2008).
Al giorno d'oggi causa che tutti i modelli di privatizzazione di sostituto, incluso il terzo non potevano garantire che i richiedenti sarebbero in grado acquistare i loro appartamenti o abitazioni di sostituto sotto termini favorevoli. Siccome ha sostenuto la Corte, una rivendicazione condizionale che cade come un risultato del non-adempimento di una condizione legale non può essere un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Slivenko c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II). Solamente un “rivendicazione genuina ed esecutiva” da che un “l'aspettativa legittima” potrebbe sorgere incorre all'interno della sfera di che Articolo (veda Klaus e Yuri Kiladze c. la Georgia, n. 7975/06, § 60 2 febbraio 2010). Una rivendicazione che non è definita chiaramente perché alle certe condizioni non possono essere adempiute non si può considerare che corrisponda ad un'aspettativa legittima.
Da questo posto d'osservazione, è chiaro che non era considerato automaticamente che possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti avessero una proprietà in Slovenia, ma solamente se loro soddisfassero i requisiti attinenti come insorga avanti la legislazione che li dà un titolo a per acquistare gli appartamenti loro stavano occupando od ottenere il risarcimento finanziario.
Così, il “prima il modello” non poteva creare “le aspettative legittime” secondo la causa-legge della Corte, fin dalla possibilità di acquistare un appartamento era condizionale sull'accordo del suo proprietario precedente (veda paragrafo 33 della sentenza).
Il “secondo modello” il risarcimento garantito ad un inquilino che decise di muoversi fuori ed acquistare o costruire un'altra abitazione se una richiesta a che fine fu presentata entro due anni della restituzione della proprietà (veda paragrafo 34); comunque, nessuni dei richiedenti nella causa presente si avvalse di questa scelta.
Come riguardi il “terzo modello” che purché possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti con la possibilità di acquistare un'abitazione di sostituto dal municipio sotto termini favorevoli, fu abolito con la Corte Costituzionale a novembre 1999. In finora come i richiedenti può essere capito per stare invocando il “le aspettative legittime” derivando da questo modello, loro depositarono la loro richiesta con la Corte a marzo 2004, quel è, più di sei mesi dopo che questo modello cessò esistere.
Infine, un “modello nuovo” di privatizzazione di sostituto fu previsto per con l'Alloggio Atto del 2003 ed il risarcimento speciale e garantito per possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti (su a 74% del prezzo per quelli che decisero di acquistare o costruire un'altra abitazione-veda paragrafo 42 della sentenza). Nessuni dei richiedenti mai tentò di avvalersi di questa possibilità all'interno del set di tempo-limite.
Così, è chiaro che al tempo le richieste furono depositate e da allora in poi, i richiedenti non si possono vedere siccome avendo avuto un interesse di proprietà riservato o le aspettative legittime proteggerono con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione poiché loro non soddisfecero i requisiti insorti avanti la legislazione nazionale che li abilita per acquisire proprietà di un'abitazione su termini favorevoli o ricevere il risarcimento finanziario. Di conseguenza, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non è applicabile e l'azione di reclamo sarebbe dovuta essere respinta per essere ratione materiae incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione ed i Protocolli inoltre.
In prospettiva dell'importanza dell'eccezione del Governo, io pento, che alla Corte ha mancato un'opportunità di chiarificare la sua causa-legge in questo riguardo a.
 
OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENDO DI GIUDICE ZUPANIČČ
Al mio rammarico, io non posso unirmi alla maggioranza nella loro conclusione che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Nel primo posto, io considero questa disposizione per essere applicabile nella causa presente (questa questione è stata lasciata aperta con la Corte-veda paragrafo 135 di sentenza). Io ricordo che anche se Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà (veda Slivenko ed Altri c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II), il fatto mero che un diritto di proprietà è soggetto a revoca nelle certe circostanze non gli impedisca dall'essere un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, almeno finché è revocato (veda Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 105 ECHR 2000-io, e Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, §§ 38 e 40, 15 settembre 2009). È vero che il diritto per vivere in una particolare proprietà non possedette col richiedente non fa come simile costituisca un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Panchenko c. l'Ucraina, n. 10911/05, § 50 10 dicembre 2010); comunque, nella causa di Saghinadze ed Altri c. la Georgia (n. 18768/05, §§ 104-108 27 maggio 2010), anche nell'assenza di un titolo di proprietà registrato, la Corte è riguardata come un “la proprietà” il diritto per usare un cottage che fu esercitato in buon fede e con la tolleranza delle autorità per più di dieci anni.
Come lontano come il più specifico diritto ad un “affitto specialmente protetto” in paesi socialisti e precedenti riguarda, la Corte ha sostenuto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per essere inapplicabile in due cause riguardo a restituzione di appartamenti (Gaeša ćc. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43389/02, 1 aprile 2008, e Trifunovi c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 34162/06, 6 novembre 2008), perché occupazione possessori corretti in Croatia non erano stati più in grado acquistare i loro appartamenti fin da 1 gennaio 1996. La Corte giunse alla conclusione opposta in Mago ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (N. 12959/05, 19724/05 47860/06, 8367/08 9872/09 e 11706/09, §§ 75-78 3 maggio 2012), notando che in Bosnia e Herzegovina ogni occupazione che possessori corretti erano come un articolo dato un titolo a riavere i loro primo della guerra appartamenti e poi acquistarli sotto termini molto favorevoli, e che diversamente da autorità croate, quegli in Bosnia e Herzegovina avevano contenuto costantemente, che diritti di occupazione costituirono “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Questa disposizione fu ritenuta anche per essere applicabile in Brezovec c. Croatia (n. 13488/07, §§ 40-46 29 marzo 2011) in che, in contrasto alla causa di Gaeša, il richiedente aveva soddisfatto le condizioni legali per acquisire il diritto per acquistare un appartamento (notevolmente, lui aveva presentato la sua richiesta all'interno del tempo-limite legale ed era stato il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto sull'appartamento lui volle comprare-veda anche Panchenko, citato sopra, §§ 49-51, riguardo ad esecuzione di una sentenza che accorda il richiedente un “garanzia di alloggio” per un appartamento municipale). Con contrasto, nessuno “la proprietà” fu trovato in riguardo di un Secondo veterano di Guerra di Mondo che era su una lista d'attesa per un appartamento municipale (veda Babenko c. l'Ucraina (il dec.), n. 68726/10, 4 gennaio 2012).
Quando facendo domanda i principi sopra a cause individuali, la Corte ha esaminato se le circostanze della causa, considerato nell'insieme, conferì sul titolo di richiedenti ad un interesse effettivo protegguto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda, per istanza, Bozcaada Kimisis Teodoku il Rum Ortodoks Kilisesi Vakfi c. la Turchia, N. 37639/03, 37655/03 26736/04 e 42670/04, § 41 3 marzo 2009; Depalle c. la Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 62 ECHR 2010 -..; e Plalam S.P.A. c. l'Italia (i meriti), n. 16021/02, § 37 18 maggio 2010).
Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, io osservo che possessori precedenti di affitti specialmente protetti non avevano un titolo formale di proprietà delle abitazioni loro stavano occupando. Allo stesso tempo l'affitto specialmente protetto non poteva essere descritto come un diritto contrattuale e mero che nasce da da un accordo di contratto d'affitto. I possessori di questo diritto avevano il permanenti, uso di tutta la vita ed ininterrotto dell'abitazione e potrebbe trasmetterlo inter vivos o mortis causa a membri di famiglia che vissero con loro. Loro non pagarono un mercato gratis affittato ma una semplice parcella spese di manutenzione coprenti ed il deprezzamento (veda divide in paragrafi 8 e 12 della sentenza) e fu dato diritti di gestione, come il diritto ed il dovere di partecipare nella gestione del loro alloggio socialmente-posseduto (veda paragrafo 9 della sentenza). Possessori di diritti di occupazione avevano un diritto di pre-acquisto ad un prezzo determinato con un stimatore munito di certificato (veda divide in paragrafi 38 e 128 della sentenza).
Allo stesso tempo, io considero, che delle caratteristiche dell'affitto specialmente protetto erano dure riconciliare con l'esistenza di un diritto di proprietà riservato. In particolare, nell'evento di una riduzione del numero di utenti dell'abitazione, la relazione di occupazione potrebbe essere terminata, ed un altro, abitazione più appropriata potrebbe essere assegnata al possessore del diritto; le modifiche all'abitazione, i suoi mobili ed apparecchi potrebbero essere resi solamente con l'approvazione scritto e precedente dell'amministrazione di alloggio (veda paragrafo 9 della sentenza); il diritto di occupazione potrebbe essere annullato per insuccesso prolungato per usare l'appartamento senza la buon ragione ed in cause del pieno subaffitto o proprietà di un appartamento non occupato appropriato per residenza (veda paragrafo 14 della sentenza).
La somma degli elementi sopra spiega perché in teoria legale e pratica giudiziale l'affitto specialmente protetto fu descritto come un sui generis corretto (veda paragrafo 11 della sentenza). Allo stesso tempo, io non posso, ma allego un certo peso al fatto che nel 1998 la Corte Costituzionale descrisse l'affitto specialmente protetto come più simile ad un diritto di proprietà che ad un diritto di affitto (veda paragrafo 11 della sentenza).
Inoltre, anche dopo l'entrata in vigore dell'Alloggio Atto 1991, possessori precedenti di diritti di occupazione furono concessi per entrare in accordi di contratto d'affitto che previdero per una protezione rinforzata dell'inquilino. I contratti d'affitto in oggetto fu concluso per un periodo indefinito e per un affitto senza scopo di lucro (mantenimento coprente, gestione dell'appartamento e capitale costa-veda paragrafo 19 della sentenza), ed era mortis cause trasmissibili al consorte o ad una persona che ha vissuto con l'inquilino in una relazione di scadenza lunga (veda divide in paragrafi 23 e 69 della sentenza). Questi elementi militano per il permanenti, natura di tutta la vita del contratto d'affitto e per la sua sottrazione dagli articoli ordinari dell'economia di mercato.
Contro questo sfondo, io do la particolare importanza al fatto che digitando il contratto d'affitto come possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto diede l'accesso di richiedenti a schemi che offrono appoggio finanziario e pubblico per l'acquisto di beni immobili. Notevolmente, secondo il “prima il modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto, il “proprietario precedente” fu incentivato per accettare la vendita del denationalised che indulge con la possibilità di ricevere una ricompensa finanziaria e supplementare da finanziamenti pubblici (paragrafo 33 della sentenza), mentre secondo il “secondo modello”, un inquilino che decise di muoversi fuori ed acquistare un appartamento o costruire un alloggio fu concesso a risarcimento che corrisponde a 50 per cento del valore dell'abitazione (l'ulteriore risarcimento di 30 per cento sarebbe pagato col “proprietario precedente”-veda paragrafo 34 della sentenza). Un diritto per acquistare un appartamento di sostituto comparabile su termini molto favorevoli dai municipi fu introdotto col “terzo modello” (veda paragrafo 35 della sentenza). È vero che questo scorso modello fu abrogato più tardi con la Corte Costituzionale per evitare mettere un carico finanziario ed eccessivo sui municipi (veda paragrafo 37 della sentenza); comunque, l'abrogazione del “terzo modello” è una delle ragioni perché i richiedenti considerano che loro hanno sofferto di un'interferenza sproporzionata col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà. Inoltre, l'Alloggio Atto del 2003 introdusse un “modello nuovo” di privatizzazione di sostituto secondo che occupazione precedente possessori corretti che furono d'accordo a sgombrare il loro alloggio affittato e decisero di comprare un'altra abitazione o costruire un alloggio furono concessi al risarcimento speciale (su a 74% del prezzo dell'abitazione) ed ad un prestito sovvenzionato (veda paragrafo 42 della sentenza).
Nella luce di tutti gli elementi sopra, io sono dell'opinione che lo status di possessore precedente di affitto specialmente protetto conferì diritti che erano più forte che quelli che sorgono da un accordo di contratto d'affitto tradizionale e sufficientemente fu connesso al diritto a contributi finanziari e pubblici nel campo di alloggio costituire un interesse effettivo protegguto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Io considero perciò che questa disposizione sia applicabile.
Come ai meriti dei richiedenti ' chiede, io ricordo i principi generali esposti fuori in paragrafi 196-204 della sentenza prima. Nel fare domanda questi principi alla causa presente, il mio approccio differisce da che della maggioranza nel fatto che io sono dell'opinione che per assicurare un equilibrio equo del sociale e carico finanziario della riforma di alloggio, persone nei richiedenti la situazione di ' fu concessa a della forma del risarcimento per il sacrificio che era stato imposto su loro. In questo collegamento, vale, che i richiedenti avevano acquisito i diritti di occupazione in buon fede ed in un modo legale e che, come individui, loro non potevano essere considerati responsabili per l'elaborazione di nationalisation.
Inoltre, io considero che anche se garantisce il diritto di proprietà, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non può essere interpretato per volere dire che la protezione di proprietari di vero-appezzamento di terreno è legittima sempre quando è garantito con sacrificando l'altro pubblico attinente interessa, specialmente quando il collegamento con una proprietà determinata è remoto. Al giorno d'oggi la causa il “proprietari precedenti” aveva, per un decorso del tempo significativo, perduto qualsiasi contatto con le abitazioni in problema e generazioni è passato. La loro aspettativa di recuperare proprietà delle abitazioni era stata relativamente bassa. Sotto queste circostanze, la protezione degli interessi del “proprietari precedenti” non poteva giustificare una noncuranza totale per i richiedenti ' “le proprietà” e la mancanza di qualsiasi il risarcimento adeguato in che riguardo a (veda, mutatis mutandis, le considerazioni della Corte in Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia [GC] (il dec.), N. 46113/99, 3843/02 13751/02, 13466/03 10200/04, 14163/04 19993/04 e 21819/04, §§ 83-86 ECHR 2010 -..).
I richiedenti considerarono che il “terzo modello” di privatizzazione di sostituto li avrebbe potuti riconoscere il risarcimento equo (veda paragrafo 138 della sentenza): loro potrebbero decidere di sgombrare i locali e così cessare avere i loro diritti di occupazione limitò col “proprietari precedenti '” i diritti ed allo stesso tempo acquisisca la piena proprietà di un'abitazione di sostituto dal municipio su termini particolarmente favorevoli (veda paragrafo 35 della sentenza). Io posso dividere i richiedenti la prospettiva di ': la limitazione dei loro diritti sotto la riforma di alloggio era ad una certa misura compensata equamente con la possibilità di accesso a proprietà di un altro, appartamento comparabile ad un prezzo economico.
Comunque, questo modello di privatizzazione di sostituto fu abrogato con la Corte Costituzionale 25 novembre 1999 (veda paragrafo 37 della sentenza). Non è per la Corte per esaminare se le ragioni addussero con la Corte Costituzionale era attinente e sufficiente sotto diritto nazionale; io mi confino a notando che l'abrogazione del “terzo modello” creò un aspirapolvere nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale e deprivato i richiedenti e le altre persone in un pertinentemente posizione vulnerabile e simile di una protezione sostanziale nell'ambito della riforma di alloggio.
È vero, come notato col Governo (veda paragrafo 125 della sentenza) e con la maggioranza (veda paragrafo 209 della sentenza), che il “terzo modello” fu introdotto ad aprile 1994 e che nessuni dei richiedenti registrò una richiesta valida e completa per acquistare un'abitazione di sostituto durante i cinque anni e sette mesi che passarono prima la decisione della Corte Costituzionale. Comunque, io sono dell'opinione che è probabile che questo sia spiegato coi fattori seguenti. Nel primo posto, i 1994 emendamenti all'Alloggio Atto non previdero, per qualsiasi il tempo-limite entro che il diritto per acquistare sotto il “terzo modello” sarebbe esercitato, mentre dando così l'impressione che il diritto detto potrebbe essere usato a qualsiasi il tempo. Inoltre, una delle pre-condizioni per benefitting da questo modello era che il “proprietario precedente” non era preparato per vendere l'abitazione (veda paragrafo 35 della sentenza). Segue che una richiesta per acquisto dal municipio potrebbe essere registrata solamente quando un “proprietario precedente” era stato identificato e lui o lei avevano affermato suo o il suo desiderio per non vendere la proprietà. Ora, la restituzione ad un “proprietario precedente” era un'elaborazione che potrebbe impiegare molti anni, come sé rese necessario procedimenti di denationalisation che sarebbero seguiti con procedimenti di eredità nell'evento il proprietario originale erano passati nel frattempo via. Non sta sorprendendo perciò che i richiedenti non usarono il loro diritto per acquistare all'interno di una tempo-spanna di poco più di cinque anni. Io assegno, su questo punto, ai dettagli riguardo alla situazione di richiedenti individuali prevista per con le parti (veda divide in paragrafi 222-232 e 239-251 della sentenza).
Nella luce del sopra, io sono dell'opinione che la riforma di alloggio mise un carico significativo su possessori precedenti di affitto specialmente protetto in abitazioni di denationalized, senza prevedere per misure sufficienti ed effettive mirò a proteggendo questa categoria vulnerabile di inquilini. La distribuzione equa del sociale e carico finanziario coinvolta nella riforma dell'approvvigionamento di alloggio del paese fu sconvolta perciò. Questo mi porta alla conclusione che i richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 fu violato.


ANNESSO 1

OMISSIS


ANNESSO 2


OMISSIS




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 22/06/2021.