Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF STEFANETTI AND OTHERS v. ITALY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 21838/10/2014
STATO: Italia
DATA: 15/04/2014
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions : Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings
Article 6-1 - Fair hearing) Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property Possessions) Pecuniary damage - award Just satisfaction partially reserved




FORMER SECOND SECTION







CASE OF STEFANETTI AND OTHERS v. ITALY

(Applications nos. 21838/10, 21849/10, 21852/10, 21855/10, 21860/10, 21863/10, 21869/10 and 21870/10)







JUDGMENT

(Merits)


STRASBOURG


15 April 2014





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Stefanetti and Others v. Italy,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Işıl Karakaş, President,
Guido Raimondi,
Peer Lorenzen,
András Sajó,
Nebojša Vučinić,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Egidijus KÅ«ris, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 25 March 2014,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in eight applications against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by eight Italian nationals (“the applicants”) in 2010 (see Appendix for details).
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Sondrio, Italy. The Italian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent Ms Ersiliagrazia Spatafora, and their Co-Agent, Ms Paola Accardo.
3. The applicants alleged that legislative intervention while their proceedings were pending had breached their right to a fair trial under Article 6 and their right of property under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 29 August 2012 the applications were communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The circumstances of the case are analogous to those described in Maggio and Others v. Italy (nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, 31 May 2011).
6. The applicants worked in Switzerland for the following periods of time, in total, over the relevant years:
OMISSIS
OMISSIS: approximately 23 years between 1959 and 1996;
OMISSIS: approximately 31 years between 1962 and 1996;
OMISSIS: approximately 13 years between 1954 and 1997;
OMISSIS Nave: approximately 28 years between 1962 and 1989;
OMISSIS: approximately 32.5 years between 1959 and 1996;
OMISSIS: approximately 26 years between 1962 and 1987;
OMISSIS: approximately 28 years between 1962 and 1997;
OMISSIS: approximately 10.5 years between 1967 and 1977.
7. In 1982 Italy changed its pension system from a contributory one, where the amount received in pension was dependent on the contributions paid, to an earnings- or remuneration-based (“retributivo”) one.
8. The applicants, who had transferred to Italy the contributions they had paid in Switzerland, requested the Istituto Nazionale della Previdenza Sociale (“INPS”) to calculate their pensions, in accordance with the 1962 Italo-Swiss Convention on Social Security (see Relevant domestic law and practice below), on the basis of the contributions paid in Switzerland for work they had done there over a number years (see appended table for details). As a basis for the calculation of their pensions (in respect of their average remuneration over the last ten years), the INPS employed a theoretical remuneration (“retribuzione teorica”) instead of the real remuneration (“retribuzione effettiva”). The former resulted in a readjustment on the basis of the contribution rate applied in Switzerland (8%) and that applied in Italy (32.7%), which meant that the calculation had as its basis a pseudo-salary with the result that the applicants received a lower pension than expected. According to the applicants, their pension was approximately a third of what it should have been.
9. As an example, the pension the applicants actually received in 2010 and an estimation, calculated by them, of what they should have received in that same year had this method of calculation not been applied is appended.
10. Consequently, in 2006 the applicants instituted judicial proceedings, contending that this was contrary to the spirit of the Italo-Swiss Convention. Various individuals in the applicants’ position had done the same and had been successful. The domestic courts had determined that people who had worked in Switzerland and had subsequently transferred their contributions to Italy should benefit from the remuneration-based pension calculations based on the wages they had earned in Switzerland, irrespective of the fact that the transferred contributions had been paid at a much lower Swiss rate.
11. While their proceedings were still pending, Law no. 296/2006 (see Relevant domestic law and practice below) entered into force on 1 January 2007.
12. The applicants’ claims were rejected in separate judgments of the Sondrio Tribunal (filed in the relevant registry as mentioned below), in view of the entry into force of Law no. 296/2006:
Judgment (no. 149/09) of 30 November 2009 in respect of Mr Stefanetti;
Judgment (no. 96/09) of 27 October 2009 in respect of OMISSIS;
Judgment (no. 09/10) of 28 January 2010 in respect of OMISSIS;
Judgment (no. 104/09) of 27 October 2009 in respect of OMISSIS;
Judgment (no. 09/10) of 28 January 2010 in respect of OMISSIS;
Judgment (no. 166/09) of 10 December 2010 in respect of OMISSIS;
Judgment (no. 112/09) of 10 November 2009 in respect of OMISSIS;
Judgment (no. 96/09) of 27 October 2009 in respect of OMISSIS.
None of the applicants appealed further, deeming it to be futile given that Law no. 296/2006 had been found legitimate by the Constitutional Court in its judgment of 23 May 2008, no. 172 (see Relevant Domestic Law and Practice below), which other courts were then bound to uphold.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Italo-Swiss Convention on Social Security
13. Article 23 of the transitional provisions of the Italo-Swiss Convention on Social Security, of 14 December 1962, provides, in so far as relevant, as follows (unofficial translation):
“1. In so far as Switzerland is concerned, performance shall be in accordance with the provisions of this Convention, even in cases where the insured event occurred before the entry into force of the Convention. Old-age and survivors’ ordinary annuities will, however, only apply in accordance with these provisions if the insured event took place before 21 December 1959, and if the contributions were not or will not be transferred or reimbursed in accordance with the Convention of 17 October 1951, or paragraph 5 of this Article. ...
2. In so far as Italy is concerned, performance shall be in accordance with the provisions of this Convention where the insured event occurred on or after the date of its entry into force. Nevertheless, when the insured event occurred before that date, performance shall take place in accordance with the present Convention from the date of its entry into force, if it would not have been possible to grant such a pension owing to the insufficiency of the insurance periods, and only if the contributions have not been reimbursed by the Italian social insurance scheme.
3. With the exception of the above provisions, periods of insurance, of contributions and of residence occurring before the entry into force of this Convention will be taken into consideration.
...
5. For a period of five years from the entry into force of this Convention, on reaching pensionable age under Italian law, Italian citizens may request, in derogation of Article 7, that the contributions paid by them and their employers into the Swiss old-age and survivors insurance schemes be transferred to the Italian insurance scheme, on condition that they left Switzerland to settle permanently in Italy or in a third country prior to the end of the year in which their pensionable age was reached. Article 5 (4) and (5) of the Convention of 17 October 1951 will apply to the use of such transferred contributions, any reimbursements made and the effects of such transfers.”
14. In so far as relevant, Article 5 of the Italo-Swiss Convention on Social Insurance of 17 October 1951 provides (unofficial translation):
“... (4) Italian citizens not covered by the preceding sub-paragraph (*) or their survivors, may request contributions paid by them and their employers into the Swiss old-age and survivors’ insurance schemes to be transferred to the Italian social welfare insurance scheme as indicated in Article 1 (*). The latter will use the said contributions to ensure that the insured person obtains the benefits derived from Italian law quoted in Article 1 (*) and any other provisions issued by the Italian authorities. In the event that, under the relevant Italian legal provisions, the insured person cannot assert his or her right to a pension, the Italian social welfare services will, upon request, reimburse the transferred contributions.
(5) Transfer of contributions as provided for in the above sub-paragraph may be requested:
(a) if the Italian citizen left Switzerland at least ten years before,
(b) on the occurrence of the insured event.
An Italian citizen whose contributions have been transferred to the Italian social insurance scheme cannot assert any right in respect of Swiss old-age and survivors’ insurance on the basis of such contributions. Such a person, or his [or her] survivors, may expect an ordinary annuity from the Swiss old-age and survivors’ insurance scheme only ... [under] the conditions set out in the first paragraph (*).”
15. It is noted that the articles marked (*) were repealed by Article 26 (3) of the 1962 Convention, except for the purposes of the above-cited Article 23 (5).
16. The transitional provision of Article 23 of the 1961 Convention became final by means of the additional agreement of 4 July 1969, Article 1 (1) and (3) of which read:
“On reaching pensionable age under Italian law, and where they have not already been in receipt of a pension, Italian citizens may request, in derogation of Article 7, that the contributions paid by them and their employers into the Swiss old-age and survivors’ insurance schemes be transferred to the Italian insurance scheme, on condition that they have left Switzerland to settle permanently in Italy ...”
“The Italian social welfare entities must use such contributions in favour of the insured or his or her heirs in such a way as to ensure that they enjoy the benefits derived from Italian law, as cited in Article 1 of the Convention, in accordance with the specific arrangements issued by the Italian authorities. If no benefits can be attained on the basis of such arrangements, the Italian social welfare entities must reimburse the transferred contributions to the interested parties.”
B. Case-law relevant to the period before the enactment of Law no. 296/2006
17. The Court of Cassation’s judgment of 6 March 2004, and other analogous case-law at the material time, established that in the absence of specific legislation regulating the transfer of contributions, the method of calculation used to determine workers’ pensions should be based on the real remuneration received by that person, including any work undertaken in Switzerland, irrespective of the fact that contributions paid in Switzerland and transferred to Italy were calculated on the basis of much lower rates than those applied under Italian law.
C. Law no. 296 of 27 December 2006
18. Article 1, paragraph 777, of Law no. 296/2006, which entered into force on 1 January 2007, provides (unofficial translation):
“Article 5 (2) of Presidential Decree no. 488 of 27 April 1968 and subsequent modifications must be interpreted to mean that, in the event of transfer of contributions paid to foreign welfare entities to the Italian obligatory general insurance scheme, as a consequence of international social security treaties and conventions, the pensionable remuneration relative to the employment period abroad is calculated by multiplying the amount of transferred contributions by a hundred and dividing the result by the contribution rates for the invalidity, old-age and survivors insurance schemes as applicable during the relevant contributory period. More favourable pension treatment already liquidated before the entry into force of the current law is exempted.”
D. Constitutional Court judgment of 23 May 2008, no. 172
19. By a writ of 5 March 2007, the Court of Cassation questioned the legitimacy of Law no. 296/2006 and referred the case to the Constitutional Court. The Constitutional Court gave judgment on 23 May 2008, holding, in sum, as follows.
20. Although interpretative, Law no. 296/2006 was innovative. There had been no conflicting case-law on the pension regime but a single well-established interpretation, according to which the Italian worker could ask to transfer his or her contributions, paid in Switzerland, to the INPS, in order to obtain the advantages provided for by Italian law in respect of invalidity, old-age and survivors’ insurance, including that of remuneration-based pension calculations, on the basis of wages earned in Switzerland, irrespective of the fact that the transferred contributions had been paid at a much lower Swiss rate.
21. The Constitutional Court noted that the laws defining pension payments were part of a welfare system which balanced available resources and the services supplied. A change in method of calculating pensions from the contributory one to the remuneration-based one (“retributivo”) was not to the detriment of the financial sustainability of the system. Thus, the changes brought about by the impugned Law sought to bring the relationship between pensionable remuneration and contributions into line with the system in force in Italy during the same period of time. The Law provided that remuneration received abroad (used as a basis for pension calculations) was to be adjusted by applying the same percentage ratios used for pension contributions paid in Italy during the same period. Thus, the norm made explicit what had been in the original interpretative provisions. Consequently, there had been no breach of the principle of legal certainty. Nor was the norm discriminatory since the acquired and more favourable rights of earlier pensioners were, by then, unassailable. Furthermore, the Law did not discriminate against people who had worked abroad, because it simply ensured an overall balance in the welfare system, and avoided a situation where people who had contributed relatively little to a foreign pension scheme were entitled to the same pension as those who had paid the much higher Italian contributions. The contested Law did not provide for any ex post facto reductions, as it merely imposed an interpretation which could already have been inferred from the original provisions. Lastly, this system still allowed for a sufficient and satisfactory pension, adequate for the lifestyle of a worker. Accordingly, the claim of unconstitutionality of the said Law was manifestly ill-founded.
E. Constitutional Court judgment of 28 November 2012, no. 264
22. The matter came up again before the Italian Constitutional Court following the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in Maggio and Others, cited above, in which the Court found, in circumstances similar to those of the present case, that by enacting Law no. 296/2006 the Italian State had infringed the applicants’ rights under Article 6 § 1 by intervening in a decisive manner to ensure that the outcome of proceedings to which it was a party was favourable to it. The Constitutional Court had therefore to examine the compatibility of Law no. 296/2006 with the relevant legal framework, and it found that it was in fact compatible.
23. The Constitutional Court noted that Presidential Decree no. 488 of 27 April 1968 had introduced a new, earnings/remuneration-based pension calculation method (metodo retributivo). A constant case-law had been established holding that Italians who had worked in Switzerland and then transferred their contributions into the Italian system would also benefit from the remuneration-based calculation, irrespective of the fact that they had paid lower contributions than those payable in Italy. Subsequently Law no. 296/2006 was enacted, and its constitutionality was confirmed by the Constitutional Court in 2008, since the law had been an authentic interpretation of the original law and was therefore reasonable, and from then onwards the case-law shifted accordingly.
24. The Constitutional Court referred to the findings in Maggio, but considered that it should assess the matter itself; the ECHR had acknowledged that it was possible to intervene in pending proceedings where there existed compelling general interest reasons, and in the Constitutional Court’s view it was the role of the Contracting States to identify those compelling general interest reasons and intervene legislatively to ensure they were resolved.
25. The case-law of the Constitutional Court showed that when comparing the national and Convention protection mechanisms, it was the protection of the guarantees that must prevail, account being taken, however, of other constitutionally protected interests. The principle of the margin of appreciation established by the Court itself was of particular relevance, and had to be taken into account by the Constitutional Court to ensure a uniform system of coherent laws.
26. While it was in principle bound by the Maggio judgment (the principles on which it was based being also constitutionally recognised principles), the Constitutional Court had to lend itself to a balancing exercise. It considered that other, opposing interests which were also constitutionally protected and which related to the matter in issue prevailed in the circumstances of the case. It followed that there existed compelling general interest reasons justifying a retroactive application of the law. Indeed the effects of the new law were such as to avoid a welfare system which privileged some and was disadvantageous to others, guaranteeing respect for the principles of equality and solidarity, which because of their founding nature, occupied a privileged position when weighed against other constitutional rights. The impugned law was inspired by the principles of equality and proportionality and took into account the fact that contributions paid in Switzerland were four times lower than those paid in Italy. It thus applied a direct recalculation which allowed pensions to be dispensed in proportion to the contributions paid, thus levelling out any inequalities and rendering the welfare system more sustainable for the benefit of all its users. Even the ECHR had upheld this reasoning in the Maggio case in relation to the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, although it did not find it to be sufficient to avoid a violation of Article 6. However, unlike the Court, which is bound to examine complaints separately, the Constitutional Court had to take a global approach and evaluate a case on the basis of all the relevant constitutional guarantees. The claim of unconstitutionality was therefore unfounded. Indeed to conclude otherwise would not only have consequences on the pension system but would also go against the spirit of the Court’s judgment in Maggio, which rejected the applicant’s claims for a pension based on the previous calculation method.
F. Conclusions of the European Committee of Social Rights on the conformity of the situation in Italy with the European Social Charter (2013)
27. The relevant parts of the report read as follows:
"The Committee further notes from MISSOC [EU’s Mutual Information System on Social Protection] that in 2011 the amount of minimum pension (pensione minima) stood at €6,246.89 (€520 per month). The old-age pension (pensione di vecchiaia) is brought up to the amount of the minimum pension if the annual taxable income of the pensioner is less than twice the minimum pension. The Committee observes that the level of minimum pension falls below 40% of the median equivalised income (Eurostat) and is therefore inadequate. (page 29)"
"When assessing adequacy of resources of elderly persons under Article 23, the Committee takes into account all social protection measures guaranteed to elderly persons and aimed at maintaining income level allowing them to lead a decent life and participate actively in public, social and cultural life.
In particular, the Committee examines pensions, contributory or non-contributory, and other complementary cash benefits available to elderly persons. These resources will then be compared with median equivalised income. However, the Committee recalls that its task is to assess not only the law, but also the compliance of practice with the obligations arising from the Charter. For this purpose, the Committee will also take into consideration relevant indicators relating to at-risk-of-poverty rate for persons aged 65 and over.
The Committee notes from MISSOC that no statutory minimum pension is provided for in the case of workers first insured starting from 1 January 1996; therefore, only pensions paid under the earnings-related scheme can be topped up till the minimum pension amount is reached. It is a means-tested benefit, therefore, in order to be entitled to it, personal income or household income must not exceed certain limits, which are set annually (€6 247 for a single person, approx. € 521/month in 2011). The annual amount of minimum pension (pensione minima) amounted in 2011 to €6 076 (€ 506/month). Beneficiaries of a minimum pension may also receive a supplement or supplements. The information supplied by the Italian authorities mentions different supplements and provides different rates for these. (...)
In addition, the report states that the Social Card – a magnetic card, funded by public funds and private donations, distributed by the Italian Mail Company, allows elderly persons on low income to use it to purchase food in certain shops or pay utility bills up to €40/month. It is available to persons over 65 with a pension below €6 000 per year (€8 000 if aged 70 or more), and financial holdings below €15 000.
The Committee notes that 50% of the Eurostat median equivalised income in 2011 stood at €665 (40% at €532). The minimum pension falls below 40% of the Eurostat median equivalised income, therefore the Committee cannot assess the situation until it receives further information on the supplements available (see above question).
The Committee notes from the supplementary information submitted by Italy that there is a social assistance allowance payable to those over 65 years of age and who have an income below €5 749.90. In 2012 the amount payable to a single person was €442.30 per month. The Committee notes that this also falls below 40% of the Eurostat median equivalised income and again asks whether supplements or other benefits and allowance are payable. (pages 44-45)"
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
28. In accordance with Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court, the Court decides to join the applications, given their similar factual and legal background.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
29. The applicants complained that the legislative intervention – namely the enactment of Law no. 296/2006, which changed well-established case-law while proceedings were pending – had denied them their right to a fair hearing under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
30. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
31. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
32. The applicants submitted that by means of the enactment of (Article 1 paragraph 777 of) Law no. 296/2006 the Government had interfered in favour of one of the parties in pending proceedings. Law no. 296/2006 introduced an interpretation of the relevant legal provisions which was diametrically opposed to the meaning given to them by the established case-law of the Court of Cassation (particularly after its 2004 judgment).
33. The offending provision had been included in Law no. 296/2006, the Budget Act (legge finanziaria) for the year 2007, which had a different scope altogether, and while it may have been referred to in the domestic system as a norm of authentic interpretation, in substance it was nothing of the sort, as implicitly acknowledged by the Constitutional Court in its judgment no. 72 of 2008, where it stated that “One cannot, even only at face value, attribute an interpretative value to a provision which, with detailed rules never previously expressed in the system, affects a norm which entered into force thirty-eight years earlier.” The applicants considered that the provision in issue was an innovative norm which introduced an adjustment mechanism (detrimental to the applicants) which had not existed previously in the Italian legal system. While three parameters for calculating pensions existed, none referred to the ratio of contributions paid at the relevant time. Moreover, even the general principles of law provided that the calculations had to be based on the laws of the recipient insurance scheme and on the same criteria as if the applicant had always been registered with the INPS (that is, on the basis of the salaries received).
34. The norm aimed to amend the content of a treaty which had come into force forty-three years earlier and which had moreover been abrogated four years earlier (as a result of a new agreement between Switzerland and the European Union). Thus, the aim of the legislator had been precisely to extinguish the rights of people who had worked in Switzerland (rights which had been confirmed by the Italian tribunals) and in so doing to influence the outcome of those pending cases. The norm was retroactive, excluding people whose proceedings had come to an end, but not those whose proceedings were still pending; and it had not been based on any compelling general interest reasons. The applicants referred to the Court’s findings in Maggio and Others, cited above.
(b) The Government
35. The Government recapitulated the facts, highlighting that the Italo-Swiss Convention had been ratified in 1963 and Law no. 1987 had been passed in 1982. That law changed the pension calculation method from a contributory one to a remuneration-based one (metodo retributivo). It thus posed a serious problem of coherence in relation to the evaluation of periods worked in Switzerland, in so far as Swiss salaries were subject to a contribution of 8%, compared with 32% for Italian salaries. It followed that the pensions of Italian people who had worked in Switzerland were overvalued vis-à-vis both other Italian workers who had paid contributions only in Italy and also Swiss workers who had paid lower contributions but who also received smaller pensions. That is why the Government enacted Law no. 296/2006, which provided that if contributions paid abroad were transferred to the Italian system in accordance with international agreements regarding social security, the remuneration of people having worked abroad, for the period during which they worked abroad, was to be determined by multiplying their paid-up contributions by one hundred and dividing that sum by the contribution rate applicable in Italy in the relevant period. More favourable pension entitlements already liquidated before the entry into force of the law were to be exempt.
36. The Government considered that there had not been an unjustified interference with judicial decisions, nor any breach of legal certainty, because the interpretation of the law had in any event been controversial – a number of first-instance decisions having confirmed the INPS method of calculation – and because the law had no effect on cases which had already been concluded. The reason behind the enactment of the law, namely to ensure that the method of calculation used by the INPS (and confirmed by the minority case-law) became the prevalent interpretation of the relevant laws, was serious and reasonable because it provided for the same value to be given to periods of work whether they were served in Italy or abroad. It followed that the reasons had not been solely financial as they had been in Zielinski and Pradal and Gonzalez and Others v. France ([GC], nos. 24846/94 and 34165/96 to 34173/96, ECHR 1999 VII), and Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) ([GC], no. 36813/97, ECHR 2006 V).
37. The Government considered that the case was comparable to that of OGIS-Institut Stanislas, OGEC Saint-Pie X and Blanche de Castille and Others v. France (nos. 42219/98 and 54563/00, 27 May 2004), where the Court had found no violation because the interference was aimed at ensuring respect for the original will of the legislator, and where the Court had also given weight to the aim of re-establishing equal treatment between teachers in private and public establishments. In the present case too, the purpose of the legislature’s intervention in enacting Law no. 296/2006 had been to ensure respect for the original will of the legislator, and to coordinate the application of the Italo-Swiss Convention and the new method of calculation which had come into force in 1982 and created an imbalance in the relevant evaluations. It followed that the interference was justified for a compelling general interest reason.
2. The Court’s assessment
38. The Court has repeatedly ruled that although the legislature is not prevented from regulating, through new retrospective provisions, rights derived from the laws in force, the principle of the rule of law and the notion of a fair trial enshrined in Article 6 preclude, except for compelling public-interest reasons, interference by the legislature with the administration of justice designed to influence the judicial determination of a dispute (see, among many other authorities, Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 49, Series A no. 301-B; National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society v. the United Kingdom, 23 October 1997, § 112, Reports 1997-VII; and Zielinski and Pradal and Gonzalez and Others, cited above). Although statutory pension regulations are liable to change and a judicial decision cannot be relied on as a guarantee against such changes in the future (see Sukhobokov v. Russia, no. 75470/01, § 26, 13 April 2006), even if such changes are to the disadvantage of certain welfare recipients, the State cannot interfere with the process of adjudication in an arbitrary manner (see, mutatis mutandis, Bulgakova v. Russia, no. 69524/01, § 42, 18 January 2007).
39. In analogous circumstances, in the case of Maggio and Others, cited above, §§ 44-50, the Court, in finding a violation of Article 6, held as follows:
“the Law [296/2006] expressly excluded from its scope court decisions that had become final (pension treatments already liquidated) and settled once and for all the terms of the disputes before the ordinary courts retrospectively. Indeed, the enactment of Law 296/2006 while the proceedings were pending, in reality determined the substance of the disputes and the application of it by the various ordinary courts made it pointless for an entire group of individuals in the applicants’ positions to carry on with the litigation. Thus, the law had the effect of definitively modifying the outcome of the pending litigation, to which the State was a party, endorsing the State’s position to the applicants’ detriment.
... Respect for the rule of law and the notion of a fair trial require that any reasons adduced to justify such measures be treated with the greatest possible degree of circumspection (see, Stran Greek Refineries, cited above, § 49). ... The Court has previously held that financial considerations cannot by themselves warrant the legislature substituting itself for the courts in order to settle disputes (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 132, ECHR 2006 V, and Cabourdin v. France, no. 60796/00, § 37, 11 April 2006).
The Court notes that, after 1982, the INPS applied an interpretation of the law in force at the time which was most favourable to it as the disbursing authority. This system was not supported by the majority case-law. The Court cannot imagine in what way the aim of reinforcing a subjective and partial interpretation, favourable to a State’s entity as party to the proceedings, could amount to justification for legislative interference while those proceedings were pending, particularly when such an interpretation had been found to be fallacious on a majority of occasions by the domestic courts, including the Court of Cassation.
As to the Government’s argument that the Law had been necessary to re-establish an equilibrium in the pension system by removing any advantages enjoyed by individuals who had worked in Switzerland and paid lower contributions, while the Court accepts this to be a reason of general interest, the Court is not persuaded that it was compelling enough to overcome the dangers inherent in the use of retrospective legislation which had the effect of influencing the judicial determination of a pending dispute to which the State was a party.
In conclusion, the State infringed the applicants’ rights under Article 6 § 1 by intervening in a decisive manner to ensure that the outcome of proceedings to which it was a party was favourable to it.”
40. In the present case, the Government submitted further arguments, highlighting in particular that the enactment of Law no. 296/2006 was intended to ensure respect for the original will of the legislator, and to coordinate the application of the Italo-Swiss Convention and the new method of calculation which had come into force in 1982 and created an imbalance in the relevant evaluations. They relied on the case of OGIS-Institut Stanislas, OGEC Saint-Pie X and Blanche de Castille and Others (cited above).
41. The Court considers that the present case is different from that of National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society (cited above), where the applicant societies’ institution of proceedings was considered as an attempt to benefit from the vulnerability of the authorities resulting from technical defects in the law, and as an effort to frustrate the intention of Parliament (§§ 109 and 112). The instant case is also different from the case of OGIS-Institut Stanislas, OGEC Saint-Pie X and Blanche de Castille and Others cited by the Government, where the applicants also attempted to derive benefits as a result of a lacuna in the law, which the legislative interference was aimed at remedying. In those two cases the domestic courts had acknowledged the deficiencies in the law in issue and action by the State to remedy the situation had been predictable (§§ 112 and 72 respectively).
42. In the present case there had been no major flaws in the legal framework of 1962, and, as acknowledged by the Government, the need for a legislative intervention only arose as a result of the State’s decision, in 1982, to reform the pension system. At that stage the State itself created a disparity which it tried to amend only twenty-four years later (and thirty-eight years after the enactment of the original legal provisions). Indeed it does not appear that there had been any timely attempts at adjusting the system earlier, despite the fact that numerous pensioners who had worked in Switzerland were repeatedly winning their claims before the domestic courts. In this connection the Court notes that before the enactment of Law no. 296/2006 the domestic courts had repeatedly found in favour of people in the applicants’ position, and that interpretation of the relevant legal provisions (as confirmed by the Court of Cassation’s judgment of 6 March 2004) had become the majority case-law. It follows that, given also that in the decades during which the application of the calculation concerned had been challenged in the domestic courts there had been a majority interpretation in favour of the claimants (save some first-instance decisions), in the present case, unlike in the above-mentioned cases, a legislative interference (shifting the balance in favour of one of the parties) was not foreseeable.
43. The Court further considers that, given the sequence of events, it cannot be said that the legislative intervention aimed at restoring the original intention of the legislator in 1962. Furthermore, even assuming that the law did aim at reintroducing the legislator’s original wishes following the changes in 1982, the Court has already accepted that the aim of re-establishing an equilibrium in the pension system, while in the general interest, was not compelling enough to overcome the dangers inherent in the use of retrospective legislation affecting a pending dispute. Indeed, even accepting that the State was attempting to adjust a situation it had not originally intended to create, it could have done so perfectly well without resorting to a retrospective application of the law. Furthermore, the fact that the State waited twenty-four years before making such an adjustment, despite the fact that numerous pensioners who had worked in Switzerland were repeatedly winning their claims before the domestic courts, also creates doubts as to whether that really was the legislator’s intention in 1982.
44. In the light of the above, and reaffirming the Court’s considerations in the above-mentioned Maggio judgment, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
45. The applicants complained that the enactment of Law no. 296/2006 and its application to their cases constituted an unjustified interference with their possessions. Moreover, it was arbitrary since it created a disparity in treatment between people who had chosen to work in Switzerland and those who had remained in Italy. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention. The relevant provisions read as follows:
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
Article 14 of the Convention
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
A. The parties’ observations
46. The applicants considered that they had a possession provided for by domestic law that fell within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Their right to a pension had been based on the salaries they had earned; however, because of Law no. 296/06 that right had been denied to people like the applicants who had worked in Switzerland. While it was true that the Italo–Swiss Convention had provided for the possibility for the State to enact specific norms regulating the matter, norms which totally reshaped the law to the detriment of the applicants had only come into being thirty-eight years after the adoption of that Convention. By that time, in the absence of a lex specialis, the rights in question had matured and become part of the applicants’ patrimony in accordance with the applicable general laws. Thus, the new law had interfered with the applicants’ peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, in an arbitrary and radically unjustified manner, drastically reducing their pensions. They further considered the interference to be discriminatory and aimed solely at those people who had worked abroad, particularly in Switzerland.
47. The Government reiterated their observations under Article 6.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. General principles
48. The Court reiterates that, according to its case-law, an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or assets, including, in certain well-defined situations, claims. For a claim to be capable of being considered an “asset” falling within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the claimant must establish that it has a sufficient basis in national law, for example where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming it. Where that has been done, the concept of “legitimate expectation” can come into play (see Maurice v. France [GC], no. 11810/03, § 63, ECHR 2005 IX).
49. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee as such any right to become the owner of property (see Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 48, Series A no. 70; Slivenko v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II; and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, for example, Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX; Domalewski v. Poland (dec.), no. 34610/97, ECHR 1999-V; Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Valkov and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04, 19490/04, 19495/04, 19497/04, 24729/04, 171/05 and 2041/05, § 25, 25 October 2011; and Frimu and 4 other applications v. Romania (dec.), nos. 45312/11, 45581/11, 45583/11, 45587/11 and 45588/11, § 42, 7 February 2012). Similarly, the right to receive a pension in respect of activities carried out in a State other than the respondent State is not guaranteed (see L.B. v. Austria (dec.), no. 39802/98, 18 April 2002). However, a “claim” concerning a pension can constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 where it has a sufficient basis in national law, for example where it is confirmed by a final court judgment (see Pravednaya v. Russia, no. 69529/01, §§ 37-39, 18 November 2004; and Bulgakova, cited above, § 31).
50. Where the amount of a benefit is reduced or discontinued, this may constitute interference with possessions which requires to be justified (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40, and Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009).
51. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: “the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, “distinct” in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule” (see, among other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98; Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999-II; and Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 98, ECHR 2000-I).
52. An essential condition for interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful. Moreover, any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 27265/95, § 85, 17 October 2002, and Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 59, 8 December 2009). Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 also requires that any interference be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, §§ 81-94, ECHR 2005-VI). The requisite fair balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52).
2. Application to the present case
(a) The complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
i. Admissibility
53. In the light of its case-law the Court is ready to accept that for the purposes of this case the applicants’ pension entitlements constituted a possession within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, for example, Lakićević and Others v. Montenegro and Serbia, nos. 27458/06, 37205/06, 37207/06 and 33604/07, § 34, 13 December 2011, Grudić v. Serbia, no. 31925/08, § 77, 17 April 2012; Pejčić v. Serbia, no. 34799/07, § 55, 8 October 2013). It follows that the provision is applicable in the present case.
54. The Court further notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
ii. Merits
55. In the case of Maggio and Others v. Italy, cited above, §§ 60-64, in the same context and in very similar circumstances, the Court found that Mr Maggio had not suffered a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It held as follows:
“The Court has previously acknowledged that laws with retrospective effect which were found to constitute legislative interference still conformed with the lawfulness requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Maurice v. France [GC], no. 11810/03, § 81, ECHR 2005 IX; Draon v. France [GC], no. 1513/03, § 73, 6 October 2005; and Kuznetsova v. Russia, no. 67579/01, § 50, 7 June 2007). It finds no reason to deem otherwise in the present case. It further accepts that the enactment of Law no. 296/2006 pursued the public interest (such as providing a harmonised pension calculation, aiming at a balanced and sustainable welfare system).
In considering whether the interference imposed an excessive individual burden on the first applicant, the Court has regard to the particular context in which the issue arises in the present case, namely that of a social security scheme. Such schemes are an expression of a society’s solidarity with its vulnerable members (see, mutatis mutandis, Goudswaard-Van der Lans v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI).
The Court notes that Law no. 296/2006 provided that the pensionable remuneration relative to the working period abroad was to be calculated by multiplying the amount of contributions transferred by a hundred and dividing the result by the contribution rates for the invalidity, old-age and survivors’ insurance scheme, as applicable during the relevant contributory period. As a consequence, according to the first applicant, between the years 1996 when he started receiving his pension and 2009, he received a monthly pension of EUR 873 as opposed to EUR 1,372 which he would have obtained had his proceedings not been interfered with and had he been successful, and for the year 2010 he received a pension of EUR 1,178 instead of EUR 1,900. On the basis of these calculations the Court observes that the first applicant lost considerably less than half of his pension. Thus, the Court considers that the applicant was obliged to endure a reasonable and commensurate reduction, rather than the total deprivation of his entitlements (see, conversely, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above § 45).
In consequence, the applicant’s right to derive benefits from the social insurance scheme in question has not been infringed in a manner resulting in the impairment of the essence of his pension rights. In this respect the Court notes that the applicant had in fact paid lower contributions in Switzerland than he would have paid in Italy, and thus he had had the opportunity to enjoy more substantial earnings at the time. Moreover, this reduction only had the effect of equalizing a state of affairs and avoiding unjustified advantages (resulting from the decision to retire in Italy) for the applicant and other persons in his position. Against this background, bearing in mind the State’s wide margin of appreciation in regulating the pension system and the fact that the applicant only lost a partial amount of pension, the Court considers that the applicant was not made to bear an individual and excessive burden.
It follows that, even assuming the provision was applicable, there has not been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.”
56. The Court reiterates that the removal of discriminatory regulations and the control of public expenses by the State are legitimate aims for the purposes of securing social justice and protecting the State’s economic well being, and in implementing social and economic policies the margin of appreciation enjoyed by the national authorities in determining what is in the general interest of the community is a broad one (see, Hoogendijk v. the Netherlands, (dec.) no. 58641/00, 6 January 2005).
57. However, the Court notes that unlike in the case of Mr Maggio, the applicants in the present case claim that they have lost more than half of what they would have received in pension. Indeed, the figures submitted by the applicants, which have not been contested by the Government and must therefore be taken to be correct, indicate that the applicants in the present case have suffered the loss of around two-thirds (about 67%) of their respective pensions.
58. The Court observes that in Maggio and Others, cited above, the fact that the applicant had lost considerably less than half of his pension, which therefore amounted to a reasonable and commensurate reduction, undeniably carried some weight in the finding that the provision had not been breached. Given the more substantial reduction in the present case and in view of the total contribution of the applicants, the Court must reassess the matter and scrutinise the reduction more closely in the context of the case.
59. The Court observes that the deprivation of the entirety of a pension is likely to breach the said provision (see, for example, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, and Apostolakis v. Greece, no. 39574/07, 22 October 2009) and that, conversely, minimal reductions to a pension or related benefits are likely not to do so (see, for example, among many other authorities, Valkov and Others, cited above; Arras and Others v. Italy, no. 17972/07, 14 February 2012; Poulain v. France (dec.), no. 52273/08, 8 February 2011; Lenz v. Germany (dec.), no. 40862/98, ECHR 2001 X; and Janković, cited above). However, the fair balance test cannot be based solely on the amount or percentage of the reduction suffered, in the abstract. In all of these cases, and other similar ones, the Court endeavours to assess all the relevant elements of the case against a specific background (see, as other examples, amongst others, Kuna v. Germany (dec.), no. 52449/99, ECHR 2001 V (extracts) concerning the reduction of the applicant’s pension rights under an additional pension scheme, and Da Conceiçao Mateus and Santos Januario v. Portugal (dec.), nos. 62235/12 and 57725/12 concerning the impact of the reduction of some subsidies on the applicants’ financial situation and living conditions). In proceeding in this way the Court has found that even reductions of 65%, as substantial as that may be, did not in the specific circumstances of the case upset the said fair balance in the very exceptional context of a punishment of a convicted and dismissed policeman (see Banfield v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 6223/04, ECHR 2005 XI concerning the forfeiture of part of the applicant’s pension after his dismissal from the police force after a conviction).
60. Turning to the present case and its specific circumstances, the Court considers that a reduction of two-thirds of one’s pension (and not solely of a benefit linked to pensions) is indisputably, in itself, a sizeable decrease which must seriously affect a person’s standard of living. However, their contribution in absolute terms must also be taken into consideration. This loss must be examined in the light of all the relevant factors.
61. Of particular importance are the two factors already considered in Maggio and Others (cited above). Primarily, that the applicants paid on the one hand lower contributions, in terms of percentage, in Switzerland than they would have paid in Italy – but on the other hand had to pay, in absolute terms, contributions of a considerable amount during long contributory periods of their entire active life in Switzerland. Secondly, that the reduction was aimed at, but did not have the effect of, equalising a state of affairs and avoiding unjustified advantages (resulting from the decision to retire in Italy) for people in the applicants’ position (see above paragraphs 42-43).
62. However, the Court notes that, according to statistical data collected by the INPS for the year 2010 , in Italy, the average old-age pension for that year was EUR 15,015 that is EUR 1,251 monthly. From the information publicly available it also appears that the minimum pension for that year amounted to EUR 5,993, that is, EUR 461 per month. The Court further notes that according to the European Committee of Social Rights, the amount of minimum pension (pensione minima) in 2011 stood at EUR 6,246.89 (EUR 520 per month). The said Committee observed that that level of minimum pension fell below 40% of the median equivalised income (Eurostat) and thus it considered it to be inadequate (see paragraph 27 above).
63. The Court observes that, in the present case, as transpires from the annexed table, the applicants receive in old-age pension monthly sums varying between EUR 714 (the lowest being OMISSIS) and EUR 1,820 (the highest being OMISSIS) (see annexed table for details about each applicant). Indeed, save for OMISSIS, all the applicants receive less than the average monthly pension in Italy, and six out of eight applicants receive less than EUR 1,000 per month. The difference in sums received between the applicants reflects their job category as well as the different periods of time they spent in Switzerland and in consequence the actual contributions they paid. In that connection, the Court highlights that the present case concerns contributory benefits, and while it is true that the Court no longer makes a distinction between contributory and non-contributory benefits for the purposes of the applicability of the provision (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 53, ECHR 2005 X), when assessing a reduction of social security payments, it is indeed of significance that such pensions were based on actual contributions paid by the applicants (transferred to the relevant disbursing authority), albeit lower than those paid by others, and that therefore they were not a gratuitous welfare aid solely funded by the tax-payer in general.
64. Moreover, the Court observes that the Government gave no information as to the quality of life one could expect to have on the basis of the sums received in pension by the applicants. In that light the Court cannot but find guidance in the conclusions of the European Committee of Social Rights and it therefore considers that if the sum of EUR 461 is inadequate as a minimum pension, the majority of the sums at issue, which do not exceed EUR 1,000 a month, must be considered as providing for only basic commodities. Thus, the reductions have undoubtedly affected the applicants’ way of life and hindered its enjoyment substantially. The same can also be said of the higher pensions, despite them allowing for more comfortable living.
65. Furthermore, in the present case the Court cannot lose sight of the fact that the applicants made a conscious decision to move back to Italy at a time when they had a legitimate expectation of receiving higher pensions, and therefore a more comfortable standard of living. However, as a result of the calculation being applied by the INPS and eventually the impugned legislative action, they not only found themselves in a more difficult financial situation but they further had to institute proceedings to recover what they deemed was due - proceedings which were frustrated by the Government’s actions in breach of the Convention. Through those actions, the Italian legislature deprived arbitrarily the applicants of their claims to the amount of pension which they could legitimately expect to be determined in accordance with the decided case-law of the highest courts of the land (see above paragraph 42), an element which cannot be ignored for the purpose of determining the proportionality of the impugned measure (see Maurice v. France, Draon v. France; and Kuznetsova v. Russia, all cited above, §§ 90 -91, §§ 82-83 and § 51, respectively). Contrary to the case-law of the Italian Constitutional Court, there existed no compelling general interest reasons justifying a retrospective application of the Law no. 296/2006, which was not an authentic interpretation of the original law and was therefore unforeseeable (compare and contrast paragraphs 26 and 42).
66. In conclusion the Court considers that, following a life-time of paying contributions, by losing 67% of their pensions the applicants had not suffered commensurate reductions but were in fact made to bear an excessive burden. Thus, despite the reasons behind the impugned measures, in the present cases, the Court cannot find that a fair balance was struck.
67. It follows that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention taken alone has been violated.
(b) The complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention
68. The Court cannot accept the applicants’ argument that the measure was discriminatory. In reference to their argument in this connection, the Court notes that in the partial admissibility decision in the Maggio case ((dec.) nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, 8 June 2010) the Court found that the complaint that the measure constituted discrimination vis-à-vis people like the applicants who, unlike most Italians, had opted to leave Italy for work purposes was manifestly ill-founded as the applicants could not be compared, for the purposes of Article 14, with Italian residents who had worked in Italy their entire lives. The Court finds no reasons to hold otherwise in relation to people who moved to Switzerland. Furthermore, in the Maggio judgment (§ 73), the Court also held that the impugned cut-off date arising out of Law no. 296/2006 was reasonably and objectively justified given that Law no. 296/2006 was intended to level out any favourable treatment arising from the previous interpretation of the provisions in force, which had given people in the applicants’ position an unjustified advantage, bearing in mind the needs of the social security system in Italy.
69. Thus, the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in connection with Article 14 must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
70. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
71. The applicants claimed the sums listed below in respect of pecuniary damage, representing the difference between the amount of pension payable to the applicants and what was actually liquidated to them by the INPS, in respect of the period from the date of retirement to the average age of life expectancy, bearing in mind that in the cases of Messrs. Stefanetti, Rodelli, Curti, Del Maffeo and Negri the pension benefits paid by the INPS verge on the poverty threshold. They further claimed 40,000 euros (EUR) each in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
The sums claimed for pecuniary damage are as follows:
EUR 435,549 Mr Stefanetti
EUR 394,309 Mr Rodelli
EUR 391,462 Mr Negri
EUR 452,878 Mr Della Nave
EUR 423,348 Mr Del Maffeo
EUR 565,282 Mr Cotta
EUR 375,771 Mr Curti
EUR 873,683 Mr Andreola.
72. The Government considered that the claims were unfounded given that in Maggio (cited above) the Court had only found a violation of Article 6 § 1, and no violation in respect of Articles 1 of Protocol No. 1 and 14 of the Convention. They further considered that it was only a loss of opportunities which was owed to the applicants, which in their view was to be limited to the period before the law entered into force.
73. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of compensation for pecuniary damage is not ready for decision. That question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed having regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent State and the applicants (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of the Court).
74. On the other hand, the Court considers that the applicants must have sustained non-pecuniary damage in view of the violations it has found of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention resulting from the legislative intervention affecting pending litigation relating to the amounts due in pension to the applicants. Ruling on an equitable basis, the Court awards each applicant EUR 12,000 (twelve thousand euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable.
B. Costs and expenses
75. The applicants also claimed a sum to be awarded in equity for costs and expenses incurred.
76. The Government made no comment.
77. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, the applicants have neither quantified nor substantiated their claims. The Court therefore makes no award under this head.
C. Default interest
78. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Decides, unanimously to join the applications;

2. Declares, unanimously the complaints concerning Article 6 § 1 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible, and the remainder of the applications inadmissible;

3. Holds, unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;

4. Holds, by five votes to two that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

5. Holds, by five votes to two, that, as far as the financial award to the applicants for any pecuniary damage resulting from the violations found in the present case is concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question as a whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which this judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Section the power to fix the same if need be;

6. Holds, by five votes to two,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay, each applicant, EUR 12,000 (twelve thousand euros), plus any tax that maybe chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention,
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

7. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction;
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 April 2014, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Işıl Karakaş
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the partly dissenting opinion of Judge Raimondi, joined by Judge Lorenzen, is annexed to this judgment.
A.I.K.
S.H.N.

 
APPENDIX
No.
Application
no. Lodged on Applicant name
date of birth
place of residence Years worked in Switzerland Total pension received in 2010 in EUR
(approx. sum per month) Pension which would have been received in EUR
1. 21838/10 14/04/2010 OMISSIS
Dubino
1959-1996 9,898

(825) 29,696
2. 21849/10 14/04/2010 OMISSIS
18/03/1942
Talamona
1962-1973
1977-1996 8,571

(714) 25,715
3. 21852/10 14/04/2010 OMISSIS
11/01/1937
Castione Andevenno
1954-1957
1965-1973
1975-1997 11,513

(960) 34,540
4. 21855/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
28/03/1933
Morbegno
1962-1989 11,321

(943) 33,965
5. 21860/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
20/10/1938
Spriana
1959-1996 10,583

(882) 31,751
6. 21863/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
14/08/1944
San Martino Val Masino
1962-1987 14,132

(1,178) 42,396
7. 21869/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
28/05/1942
Verceia
1962-1976
1978-1997 10,473

(872) 31,419
8. 21870/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
22/10/1944
Tirano
1967-1977 21,842

(1,820) 65,526

PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE RAIMONDI JOINED BY JUDGE LORENZEN
1. With regret, I cannot join my colleagues of the majority in their view that Article 1 of the Additional Protocol has been breached in this case.
2. In the case of Maggio and Others v. Italy (nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, 31 May 2011) the fact that the applicant had lost considerably less than half of his pension, which therefore amounted to a reasonable and commensurate reduction, undeniably carried some weight in the finding that the provision had not been breached. Given the more substantial reduction in the present case, I agree with the majority that the Court had to scrutinise the reduction more closely in the context of the case.
3. The deprivation of the entirety of a pension is likely to breach the said provision (see for example, Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX, and Apostolakis v. Greece, no. 39574/07, 22 October 2009); conversely, minimal reductions to a pension or related benefits are likely not to do so (see, among many other authorities, Valkov and Others, cited above; Arras and Others v. Italy, no. 17972/07, 14 February 2012; Poulain v. France (dec.), no. 52273/08, 8 February 2011; Lenz v. Germany (dec.), no. 40862/98, ECHR 2001 X; and Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X).
4. However, the fair balance test cannot be based solely on the amount or percentage of the reduction, in the abstract. In all of these cases, and other similar ones, the Court endeavoured to assess all the relevant elements of the case against a specific background (for another example see, amongst other authorities, Kuna v. Germany (dec.), no. 52449/99, ECHR 2001 V (extracts)). Proceeding in this way, the Court found that even a reduction of 65%, as substantial as that might be, did not in the specific circumstances of the case upset the said fair balance (see Banfield v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 6223/04, ECHR 2005 XI).
5. I admit that a reduction of two-thirds of one’s pension (and not solely of a pension-related benefit) is indisputably, in itself, a sizeable decrease which must seriously affect a person’s standard of living. This loss must be examined in the light of all the relevant factors.
6. Of particular importance are the two factors already considered in Maggio (cited above). Primarily, the fact that the applicants paid lower contributions in Switzerland than they would have paid in Italy, with the result that they had the benefit of more substantial earnings at the time. Secondly, the fact that the reduction was aimed at, and had the effect of, equalising a state of affairs and avoiding unjustified advantages (resulting from the decision to retire in Italy) for people in the applicants’ position.
7. According to statistical data collected by the INPS for the year 2010[1], in Italy, 14.4 % of pensioners received pensions of less than EUR 500; 31 % of pensioners received pensions of between EUR 500 and EUR 1,000; 23.5 % of pensioners received pensions of between EUR 1,000 and EUR 1,500, while 31.1 % of pensioners received pensions of more than EUR 1,500. Those sums take into consideration all pensions received, such as old-age, invalidity and war pensions, etc. Therefore, in the present case, none of the applicants falls into the lowest pension bracket. However, even if they did, given that approximately 15% of the retired population gets by on less than EUR 500 per month, it cannot be said that pensions in that lowest bracket, and still less the old-age pensions actually received by the applicants (which fall into the more advantageous brackets), are at such a low level as to deprive the applicants of the basic means of existence (see, mutatis mutandis, Fiedler v. Germany and Mann v. Germany, nos. 24116/94 and 24077/94, Commission decisions of 15 May 1996, both unreported; see also, more recently, Koufaki and Adedy v. Greece (dec.), nos. 57665/12 and 57657/12, §§ 45-46, 7 May 2013). These data further prove the huge and unjustified disparity there would have been, to the advantage of the applicants, had the system not been amended. In that connection one cannot lose sight of the importance of maintaining a healthy and sustainable pensions framework for the good of society at large. The removal of discriminatory regulations and the control of public expenses by the State are legitimate aims for the purposes of securing social justice and protecting the State’s economic well being, and in implementing social and economic policies the margin of appreciation enjoyed by the national authorities in determining what is in the general interest of the community is a broad one (see Hoogendijk v. the Netherlands, (dec.) no. 58641/00, 6 January 2005).
8. In conclusion, despite the reduction being a sizeable one, it nevertheless did not deprive the applicants of their pensions altogether. Bearing in mind the State’s wide margin of appreciation in regulating the pensions system and all the factors mentioned above, and reaffirming the Court’s findings in Maggio, cited above, I find that the applicants were not made to bear an individual and excessive burden.
9. It follows that, in my view, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has not been breached in this case.

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile Violazione di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - l'udienza corretta) Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Previdenza di proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Privazione di Proprietà) danno Patrimoniale - assegnazione per soddisfazione Equa parzialmente riservata




EX SECONDA SEZIONE







CAUSA STEFANETTI ED ALTRI C. ITALIA

(Richieste N. 21838/10, 21849/10 21852/10, 21855/10 21860/10, 21863/10 21869/10 e 21870/10)







SENTENZA

(meriti)


STRASBOURG


15 aprile 2014





Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Stefanetti ed Altri c. Italia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Il ıKaraka, şPresidente
Guido Raimondi,
Pari Lorenzen,
András Sajó,
Nebojša Vuinić,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque,
Egidijus Kris, Å«giudici
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 25 marzo 2014,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in otto richieste contro la Repubblica italiana depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Previdenza di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con otto cittadini italiani (“i richiedenti”) nel 2010 (vedere Appendice per dettagli).
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Sondrio, Italia. Il Governo italiano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Rappresentante Sig.ra Ersiliagrazia Spatafora, ed il loro Co-agente, il Sig.ra Paola Accardo.
3. I richiedenti addussero che intervento legislativo mentre i loro procedimenti erano pendenti aveva violato il loro diritto ad un processo equanime sotto Articolo 6 ed il loro diritto di proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
4. 29 agosto 2012 le richieste furono comunicate al Governo.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. Le circostanze della causa sono analoghe a quelli descritti in Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia (N. 46286/09, 52851/08 53727/08, 54486/08 e 56001/08 31 maggio 2011).
6. I richiedenti lavorarono in Svizzera per i periodi seguenti di tempo, in totale, durante il corso degli anni attinenti:
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 23 anni fra il 1959 ed il 1996;
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 31 anni fra il 1962 ed il 1996;
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 13 anni fra il 1954 ed il 1997;
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 28 anni fra il 1962 ed il 1989;
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 32.5 anni fra il 1959 ed il 1996;
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 26 anni fra il 1962 ed il 1987;
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 28 anni fra il 1962 ed il 1997;
OMISSIS: approssimativamente 10.5 anni fra il 1967 ed il 1977.
7. Nel 1982 Italia cambiò il suo sistema di pensione da un contribuente, dove era dipendente sui contributi pagati l'importo ricevuto in pensione, ad un guadagni - o rimunerazione-basato (“il retributivo”) uno.
8. I richiedenti che avevano trasferito ad Italia i contributi che loro avevano pagato in Svizzera, richiese l'Istituto il della di Nazionale Previdenza Sociale (“INPS”) calcolare le loro pensioni, nella conformità con l'Italo-svizzero Convention del 1962 su Social Security (vedere diritto nazionale Attinente e pratichi sotto), sulla base dei contributi pagata in Svizzera per lavoro loro avevano fatto là durante il corso di un anni di numero (vedere tavola appesa per dettagli). Come una base per il calcolo delle loro pensioni (in riguardo della loro rimunerazione media durante il corso degli ultimi dieci anni), l'INPS assunse una rimunerazione teoretica (“retribuzione teorica”) invece della vera rimunerazione (“retribuzione effettiva”). I precedenti diedero luogo ad un riadattamento sulla base del tasso di contributo fatta domanda in Svizzera (8%) e quel fece domanda in Italia (32.7%) che volle dire che il calcolo aveva come la sua base una falso-salario col risultato che i richiedenti ricevettero una pensione più bassa che aspettato. Secondo i richiedenti, la loro pensione era verso un terzo di che che sarebbe dovuto essere.
9. Per esempio, la pensione che i richiedenti davvero hanno ricevuto in 2010 ed un preventivo, calcolò con loro di che in che loro avrebbero dovuto ricevere che lo stesso anno faceva non essere fatto domanda questo metodo del calcolo è appeso.
10. Nel 2006 i richiedenti avviarono di conseguenza, procedimenti giudiziali, mentre contendendo che questo era contrario allo spirito dell'Italo-svizzero Convention. Vari individui nei richiedenti la posizione di ' aveva fatto lo stessa ed aveva avuto successo. Le corti nazionali avevano determinato che persone che avevano lavorato in Svizzera ed avevano trasferito successivamente i loro contributi ad Italia dovrebbero trarre profitto dai calcoli di pensione rimunerazione-basati basati sui salarii che loro avevano guadagnato in Svizzera, irrispettoso del fatto che i contributi trasferiti erano stati pagati ad un svizzero molto più basso tasso.
11. Mentre i loro procedimenti ancora erano pendenti, la Legge n. 296/2006 (vedere diritto nazionale Attinente e pratichi sotto) entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2007.
12. I richiedenti le rivendicazioni di ' furono respinte in sentenze separate del Tribunale di Sondrio (registrò nella cancelleria attinente siccome menzionato sotto), in prospettiva dell'entrata in vigore di Legge n. 296/2006:
Sentenza (n. 149/09) di 30 novembre 2009 in riguardo del OMISSIS;
Sentenza (n. 96/09) di 27 ottobre 2009 in riguardo di OMISSIS;
Sentenza (n. 09/10) di 28 gennaio 2010 in riguardo di OMISSIS;
Sentenza (n. 104/09) di 27 ottobre 2009 in riguardo di OMISSIS;
Sentenza (n. 09/10) di 28 gennaio 2010 in riguardo di OMISSIS;
Sentenza (n. 166/09) di 10 dicembre 2010 in riguardo di OMISSIS;
Sentenza (n. 112/09) di 10 novembre 2009 in riguardo di OMISSIS;
Sentenza (n. 96/09) di 27 ottobre 2009 in riguardo di OMISSIS.
Nessuno dei richiedenti fece ricorso inoltre, ritenendolo futile dato che per la Legge n. 296/2006 era stata giudicata legittima dalla Corte Costituzionale nella sua sentenza di 23 maggio 2008, n. 172 (vedere Diritto nazionale Attinente e Pratichi sotto) che le altre corti furono legate poi per sostenere.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. L'Italo-svizzero Convention su Social Security
13. Articolo 23 delle disposizioni di transizione dell'Italo-svizzero Convention su Social Security, di 14 dicembre 1962 prevede, in finora come attinente, siccome segue (traduzione non ufficiale):
“1. In finora come la Svizzera riguarda, l'adempimento sarà in conformità con le disposizioni di questa Convenzione, anche in cause dove l'evento assicurato accadde di fronte all'entrata in vigore della Convenzione. La vecchio-età e superstiti che ' che le annualità ordinarie vogliono, comunque fanno domanda solamente in conformità con queste disposizioni se l'evento assicurato avesse luogo di fronte a 21 dicembre 1959, e se i contributi non erano o non saranno trasferiti o rimborsò in conformità con la Convenzione di 17 ottobre 1951, o divide in paragrafi 5 di questo Articolo. ...
2. In finora come l'Italia riguarda, l'adempimento sarà in conformità con le disposizioni di questa Convenzione dove l'evento assicurato accadde su o dopo la data della sua entrata in vigore. Ciononostante, quando l'evento assicurato accadde prima che data, l'adempimento avrà luogo in conformità con la Convenzione presente dalla data della sua entrata in vigore, se non fosse stato possibile accordare tale pensione che deve all'insufficienza dei periodi di assicurazione, e solamente se i contributi non sono stati rimborsati col piano assicurativo sociale italiano.
3. Con l'eccezione delle disposizioni sopra, periodi di assicurazione, di contributi e di residenza che accade di fronte all'entrata in vigore di questa Convenzione sarà preso nell'esame.
...
5. Per un periodo di cinque anni dall'entrata in vigore di questa Convenzione, su giungere ad età pensionabile sotto legge italiana cittadini italiani possono richiedere, in derogazione di Articolo 7, che i contributi pagarono con loro ed i loro datori di lavoro nella vecchio-età svizzera e piani assicurativo di superstiti siano trasferiti al piano assicurativo italiano, a condizione che loro lasciarono Svizzera per stabilire permanentemente in Italia o in un terzo paese prima della fine dell'anno nella quale alla loro età pensionabile fu giunta. Articolo 5 (4) e (5) della Convenzione di 17 ottobre 1951 farà domanda all'uso di simile contributi trasferiti qualsiasi rimborsi resero e gli effetti di simile trasferimenti.”
14. In finora come attinente, Articolo 5 dell'Italo-svizzero Convention su Assicurazione Sociale di 17 ottobre 1951 prevede (traduzione non ufficiale):
“... (4) cittadini italiani non coperto con la supplire-paragrafo precedente (*) o i loro superstiti, può richiedere contributi pagati con loro ed i loro datori di lavoro nella vecchio-età svizzera e superstiti i piani assicurativo di ' per essere trasferito al piano assicurativo di benessere sociale italiano siccome indicato in Articolo 1 (*). Il secondo userà i contributi detti per assicurare che la persona assicurata ottiene i benefici derivati da legge italiana citata in Articolo 1 (*) e qualsiasi le altre disposizioni emesse con le autorità italiane. Nell'evento che, sotto le disposizioni legali italiane ed attinenti, la persona assicurata non può asserire, suo o il suo diritto ad una pensione, il benessere sociale italiano ripara volontà, su richiesta rimborsi i contributi trasferiti.
(5) trasferisca di contributi come previsto per nella supplire-paragrafo sopra può essere richiesto:
(a) se il cittadino italiano lasciasse almeno prima Svizzera dieci anni,
(b) sull'avvenimento dell'evento assicurato.
Un cittadino italiano i cui contributi sono stati trasferiti al piano assicurativo sociale italiano non può asserire qualsiasi diritto in riguardo della vecchio-età svizzera e superstiti l'assicurazione di ' sulla base di simile contributi. Tale persona, o suo [o lei] i superstiti, può aspettarsi solamente un'annualità ordinaria dalla vecchio-età svizzera e superstiti il piano assicurativo di '... [sotto] le condizioni esposero fuori nel primo paragrafo (*).”
15. Si nota che gli articoli marcarono (*) fu abrogato con Articolo 26 (3) della Convenzione del 1962, a parte i fini dell'Articolo 23 sopra-citata (5).
16. La disposizione di transizione di Articolo 23 della Convenzione del 1961 divenne definitivo con vuole dire dell'accordo supplementare di 4 luglio 1969, Articolo 1 (1) e (3) di che la lettura:
“Su giungere ad età pensionabile sotto legge italiana, e dove già non sono stati in ricevuta di una pensione loro, cittadini italiani possono richiedere, in derogazione di Articolo 7, che i contributi pagarono con loro ed i loro datori di lavoro nella vecchio-età svizzera e superstiti i piani assicurativo di ' sia trasferito al piano assicurativo italiano, a condizione che loro hanno lasciato Svizzera per stabilire permanentemente in Italia...”
“Le entità di benessere sociale italiane devono usare simile contributi in favore dell'assicurato o suo o i suoi eredi in tale modo come assicurare che loro godono i benefici derivati da legge italiana, siccome citata in Articolo 1 della Convenzione, in conformità con le specifiche disposizioni emesse con le autorità italiane. Se nessuno beneficio può essere raggiunto sulla base di simile disposizioni, le entità di benessere sociale italiane devono rimborsare i contributi trasferiti alle parti interessate.”
B. giurisprudenza attinente al periodo prima della promulgazione di Legge n. 296/2006
17. La Corte della sentenza della Cassazione di 6 marzo 2004, e l'altra causa-legge analoga al tempo di materiale, stabilito che nell'assenza di specifica legislazione che regola il trasferimento di contributi, il metodo del calcolo determinava lavoratori che le pensioni di ' dovrebbero essere basate sulla vera rimunerazione ricevuta con che persona incluso qualsiasi lavoro si impegnato in Svizzera, irrispettoso del fatto che contributi pagarono in Svizzera e trasferirono ad Italia fu calcolato sulla base di molti tassi più bassi che quelli fecero domanda sotto legge italiana.
Legge di C. n. 296 27 dicembre 2006
18. Articolo 1, divida in paragrafi 777, di Legge n. 296/2006 che entrarono in vigore 1 gennaio 2007 prevedono (traduzione non ufficiale):
“Articolo 5 (2) di Decreto Presidenziale n. 488 27 aprile 1968 e modifiche susseguenti devono essere interpretati per volere dire che, nell'evento di trasferimento di contributi pagato alle entità di welfare estere agli italiani piano assicurativo generale ed obbligatorio, come una conseguenza di trattati di previdenza sociale internazionali e convenzioni la rimunerazione pensionabile relativo al periodo di lavoro all'estero è calcolato con moltiplicando l'importo di contributi trasferiti entro cento e dividendo il risultato col contributo tassa per l'invalidamento, la vecchio-età e piani assicurativo di superstiti come applicabile durante il periodo contribuente ed attinente. Trattamento di pensione più favorevole già liquidato di fronte all'entrata in vigore della legge corrente è esentato.”
D. sentenza di Corte Costituzionale di 23 maggio 2008, n. 172
19. Con un documento di 5 marzo 2007, la Corte di Cassazione mise in dubbio la legittimità di Legge n. 296/2006 e si riferì la causa alla Corte Costituzionale. La Corte Costituzionale diede sentenza in 23 maggio 2008, mentre sostenendo, in somma siccome segue.
20. Benché interpretativo, Legge n. 296/2006 erano innovativi. Non c'era stata causa-legge contraddittoria sul regime di pensione ma una sola interpretazione ben stabilita secondo le quali il lavoratore italiano potrebbe chiedere a trasferire suo o i suoi contributi, pagò in Svizzera, all'INPS per ottenere i vantaggi previsti per con legge italiana in riguardo dell'invalidamento, la vecchio-età e superstiti l'assicurazione di ' incluso che dei calcoli di pensione rimunerazione-basati, sulla base di salari guadagnata in Svizzera irrispettoso del fatto che i contributi trasferiti erano stati pagati ad un svizzero molto più basso tasso.
21. La Corte Costituzionale notò che le leggi gli importanti pagamenti di pensione erano parte di un sistema di welfare che bilanciò risorse disponibili ed i servizi approvvigionata. Un cambio in metodo di pensioni calcolatrici dal contribuente al rimunerazione-basato (“il retributivo”) non era al danno della sostenibilità finanziaria del sistema. Così, i cambi provocati con la Legge contestata cercarono di portare la relazione fra rimunerazione pensionabile e contributi in linea col sistema in vigore in Italia durante lo stesso periodo di tempo. La Legge previde che rimunerazione ricevette all'estero (usato come una base per i calcoli di pensione) sarebbe aggiustato con facendo domanda gli stessi rapporti di percentuale usati per contributi di pensione pagati in Italia durante lo stesso periodo. Così, la norma rese esplicita che che era stato nelle disposizioni interpretative ed originali. Non c'era stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione del principio della certezza legale. Né era la norma discriminatorio fin dagli acquisiti e diritti più favorevoli di più primi pensionati era, con poi, inattaccabile. Inoltre, la Legge non discriminò contro persone che avevano lavorato all'estero, perché assicurò semplicemente un equilibrio complessivo nel sistema di welfare, ed evitò una situazione dove persone che avevano contribuito relativamente poco ad un schema di pensione estero furono concesse alla stessa pensione come quelli che avevano pagato il molto contributi italiani e più alti. La Legge contestata non previde per qualsiasi ex riduzioni di facto di posto, come sé soltanto impose un'interpretazione che già sarebbe potuta essere dedotta dalle disposizioni originali. Questo sistema ancora lasciò spazio infine, ad una pensione sufficiente e soddisfacente, adeguato per il modo di vivere di un lavoratore. La rivendicazione di incostituzionalità della Legge detta era mal-fondata manifestamente di conseguenza.
E. sentenza di Corte Costituzionale di 28 novembre 2012, n. 264
22. La questione entrò su di nuovo di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale italiana seguente la sentenza della Corte europea di Diritti umani in Maggio ed Altri, citata sopra in che fondò la Corte, in circostanze simile a quelli della causa presente che con decretando Legge n. 296/2006 lo Stato italiano aveva infranto i richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 6 § 1 con intervenendo in una maniera decisiva di assicurare che la conseguenza di procedimenti alla quale era una parte era favorevole a sé. La Corte Costituzionale doveva esaminare perciò la compatibilità di Legge n. 296/2006 con la struttura legale ed attinente, e fondò che era infatti compatibile.
23. La Corte Costituzionale notò che Decreto Presidenziale n. 488 27 aprile 1968 avevano introdotto un metodo di calcolo di pensione nuovo, earnings/remuneration-basato (metodo retributivo). Una causa-legge continua era stata stabilita partecipazione azionaria che italiani che aveva lavorato in Svizzera e poi aveva trasferito i loro contributi nel sistema italiano trarrebbero profitto anche dal calcolo rimunerazione-basato, irrispettoso del fatto che loro avevano pagato contributi più bassi che quelli pagabile in Italia. Successivamente la Legge n. 296/2006 furono decretati, e la sua costituzionalità fu confermata con la Corte Costituzionale nel 2008, poiché la legge era stata un'interpretazione autentica della legge originale ed era stata perciò ragionevole, e da poi onwards la causa-legge spostò di conseguenza.
24. La Corte Costituzionale si riferì alle sentenze in Maggio, ma considerato che dovrebbe valutare la questione stessa; l'ECHR aveva ammesso che era possibile intervenire in procedimenti pendenti dove là esistè obbligando ragioni di interesse generali, e nella prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale era il ruolo degli Stati Contraenti per identificare quelli che obbligano ragioni di interesse generali ed intervenire legislativamente assicurare loro furono risolti.
25. La causa-legge della Corte Costituzionale mostrò che quando comparando il cittadino e meccanismi di Previdenza di Convenzione, era la Previdenza delle garanzie che devono prevalere, conto che è preso, comunque di altri interessi costituzionalmente protegguti. Il principio del margine della valutazione stabilito con la Corte stessa era di particolare attinenza, e doveva essere preso in considerazione con la Corte Costituzionale per assicurare un sistema di uniforme di leggi aderenti.
26. Mentre era in principio limitato con la sentenza di Maggio (i principi sui quali fu basato anche essere riconobbero costituzionalmente principi), la Corte Costituzionale doveva prestarsi ad un esercizio di bilanciamento. Considerò che altri, avversario interessi che furono protetti anche costituzionalmente e quale relativo alla materia del contendere prevalsa nelle circostanze della causa. Seguì che là esistevano ragioni di interesse generali che giustificano un’applicazione retroattiva della legge. Effettivamente gli effetti della legge nuova erano come per evitare un sistema di welfare che privilegiò alcuni ed era svantaggioso ad altri, mentre garantendo riguardo per i principi dell'uguaglianza e la solidarietà che a causa della loro natura fondatore, occupò una posizione privilegiata quando pesò contro gli altri diritti costituzionali. La legge contestata fu inspirata coi principi dell'uguaglianza e la proporzionalità e prese in considerazione il fatto che contributi pagarono in Svizzera era quattro volte abbassano che quelli pagarono in Italia. Fece domanda così un ricalcolo diretto che permise a pensioni di essere dispensate in proporzione ai contributi pagato, così il livellamento fuori qualsiasi le ineguaglianze e rendendo il sistema di welfare più sostenibile per il beneficio di tutti i suoi utenti. Anche l'ECHR aveva sostenuto questo ragionamento nella causa di Maggio in relazione all'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, benché non lo trovasse per essere sufficiente per evitare una violazione di Articolo 6. Diversamente da Corte che è legata per esaminare separatamente azioni di reclamo la Corte Costituzionale aveva comunque, prendere un approccio globale e valutare una causa sulla base di tutte le garanzie costituzionali ed attinenti. La rivendicazione di unconstitutionality era perciò infondata. Effettivamente concludere altrimenti non solo avrebbe conseguenze sul sistema di pensione ma andrebbe anche contro lo spirito della sentenza della Corte in Maggio che respinse le rivendicazioni del richiedente per una pensione basò sul metodo di calcolo precedente.
Conclusioni di F. del Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali sulla conformità della situazione in Italia con lo Statuto Sociale europeo (2013)
27. Le parti attinenti del rapporto lessero siccome segue:
"Il Comitato nota inoltre da MISSOC [l'Informazioni Sistema Reciproco di EU su Previdenza Sociale] che nel 2011 l'importo di minima pensione (minimi di pensione) stette in piedi a €6,246.89 (€520 per mese). La pensione di vecchio-età (vecchiaia di di di pensione) è portato su all'importo della minima pensione se il reddito imponibile annuale del pensionato è meno che due volte la minima pensione. Il Comitato osserva che il livello di minima pensione incorre sotto 40% del reddito equivalente medio (Eurostat) e è perciò inadeguato. (pagina 29) "
"Quando valutando adeguatezza di risorse di persone anziane sotto Articolo 23, il Comitato prende in considerazione tutte le misure di Previdenza sociali garantite a persone anziane e mirò a mantenendo livello di reddito che concede loro condurre una vita decente ed attivamente partecipare in pubblico, vita sociale e culturale.
In particolare, il Comitato esamina pensioni, benefici di soldi complementari e contribuente o non contribuenti, ed altri disponibile a persone anziane. Queste risorse saranno comparate poi con reddito equivalente medio. Comunque, i richiami di Comitato che il suo compito è non solo valutare la legge, ma anche l'ottemperanza di pratica con gli obblighi che sorgono dallo Statuto. Il Comitato prenderà anche nell'esame indicatori attinenti relativo a tasso di a-rischio-di-povertà per persone per questo fine, invecchiò 65 e su.
Il Comitato nota da MISSOC che nessuna minima pensione legale è offerta per nella causa di lavoratori prima assicurò cominciando da 1 gennaio 1996; solamente pensioni pagate sotto lo schema guadagno-relativo possono essere superate su perciò, fino al minimo importo di pensione ha raggiunto. È un beneficio mezzi-esaminato, perciò per essere concesso a sé, reddito personale o reddito di famiglia non deve eccedere i certi limiti che sono esposti annualmente (€6 247 per una sola persona, approx. €521/al mese nel 2011). L'importo annuale di minima pensione (minimi di pensione) corrispose nel 2011 a €6 076 (€506/month). Beneficiari di una minima pensione possono ricevere anche un supplemento o supplementi. Le informazioni approvvigionate con le menzioni di autorità italiane supplementi diversi ed offre tassi diversi per questi. (...)
In oltre, gli stati di rapporto che la Scheda Sociale-una scheda magnetica, procurò con finanziamenti pubblici e donazioni private, distribuite con la Posta Società italiana permette persone anziane su reddito basso per usarlo per acquistare cibo nei certi negozi o pagare l'utilità conti su a €40/al mese. È disponibile a persone più di 65 con una pensione sotto €6 000 per anno (€8 000 se anziano 70 o più), e partecipazione azionaria finanziarie sotto €15 000.
Il Comitato nota che 50% dell'Eurostat reddito equivalente medio in 2011 stati in piedi a €665 (40% a €532). La minima pensione incorre sotto 40% dell'Eurostat reddito equivalente medio, perciò il Comitato non può valutare la situazione finché riceve le ulteriori informazioni sui supplementi disponibile (vedere questione sopra).
Il Comitato nota dalle informazioni supplementari presentate con Italia che c'è un assegno di assistenza sociale pagabile a quelli più di 65 anni maggiorenne e che ha un reddito sotto €5 749.90. Nel 2012 l'importo pagabile ad una sola persona era €442.30 per mese. Il Comitato nota che questo incorre anche sotto 40% dell'Eurostat reddito di equivalised mediano e di nuovo chiede se supplementi o gli altri benefici ed assegno sono pagabili. (pagine 44-45) "
LA LEGGE
I. UNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
28. Nella conformità con Articolo 42 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte, la Corte decide di congiungere le richieste, determinato il loro sfondo che riguarda i fatti e legale simile.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
29. I richiedenti si lamentarono che l'intervento legislativo -vale a dire la promulgazione di Legge n. 296/2006 che cambiarono causa-legge ben stabilita mentre procedimenti erano pendenti-li aveva negati il loro diritto ad un'udienza corretta sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...”
30. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità 31. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) I richiedenti
32. I richiedenti presentarono che con vuole dire della promulgazione di (l'Articolo 1 paragrafo 777 di) la Legge n. 296/2006 che il Governo aveva interferito in favore di una delle parti in procedimenti pendenti. Legge n. 296/2006 introdussero un'interpretazione delle disposizioni legali ed attinenti che furono opposte diametralmente al significato data a loro con la causa-legge stabilita della Corte di Cassazione (particolarmente dopo la sua sentenza del 2004).
33. La disposizione offensiva era stata inclusa in Legge n. 296/2006, il Bilancio Atto (legge finanziaria) per l'anno 2007 che aveva insieme una sfera diversa e mentre è potuto essere assegnato a nel sistema nazionale come una norma di interpretazione autentica, in sostanza non era nulla del genere, come ammise implicitamente con la Corte Costituzionale nella sua sentenza n. 72 di 2008, dove affermò che “Uno non può, addirittura solamente a valore nominale, attribuisca un valore interpretativo ad una disposizione che, con particolareggiato non decide mai prima espresso nel sistema, colpisce una norma che entrò in vigore trentotto anni prima.” I richiedenti considerarono che la disposizione in problema era una norma innovativa che introdusse un meccanismo di rettifica (dannoso ai richiedenti) quale prima non era esistito nell'ordinamento giuridico italiano. Mentre tre parametri per pensioni calcolatrici esistite, nessuno si riferì al rapporto di contributi pagato al tempo attinente. Inoltre, anche i principi generali di legge previde che i calcoli dovevano essere basati sulle leggi del piano assicurativo ricettivo e sullo stesso criterio come se il richiedente fosse stato registrato con l'INPS sempre (quel è, sulla base dei salari ricevuta).
34. La norma mirò a correggere il contenuto di un trattato che era entrato in vigore quaranta-tre anni più primo e quale era stato abrogato inoltre quattro anni più primo (come un risultato di un accordo nuovo fra Svizzera e l'Unione europea). Lo scopo del legislatore era stato precisamente così, estinguere i diritti di persone che avevano lavorato in Svizzera (diritti che erano stati confermati coi tribunali italiani) e nel fare così influenzare la conseguenza di quelli cause pendenti. La norma era retroattiva, mentre escludendo persone i cui procedimenti avevano finito, ma non quegli i cui procedimenti ancora erano pendenti; e non era stato basato su qualsiasi obbligando ragioni di interesse generali. I richiedenti si riferirono alle sentenze della Corte in Maggio ed Altri, citata sopra.
(b) Il Governo
35. Il Governo ricapitolò i fatti, mentre accentuando che l'Italo-svizzero Convention era stata ratificata in 1963 e Legge n. 1987 erano stati passati nel 1982. Che legge cambiò il metodo di calcolo di pensione da un contribuente ad un rimunerazione-basato (metodo retributivo). Posò così un problema serio di coesione in relazione alla valutazione di periodi lavorata in Svizzera, in finora come salari svizzeri era soggetto ad un contributo di 8%, comparato con 32% per salari di italiano. Seguì che le pensioni di persone italiane che avevano lavorato in Svizzera furono sopravvalutate vis-à-vis sia gli altri lavoratori italiani che avevano pagato solamente contributi in Italia ed anche lavoratori svizzeri che avevano pagato contributi più bassi ma che anche ricevettero le più piccole pensioni. Quel è perché il Governo decretò Legge n. 296/2006 che purché che se contributi pagassero all'estero fu trasferito al sistema italiano in conformità con accordi internazionali riguardo alla previdenza sociale, la rimunerazione di persone che hanno lavorato all'estero, per il periodo durante il quale loro lavorarono all'estero sarebbe determinata con moltiplicando i loro contributi versati entro cento e dividere che somma col tasso di contributo applicabile in Italia di periodo attinente. Diritti di pensione più favorevoli già liquidati di fronte all'entrata in vigore della legge dovevano essere esenti.
36. Il Governo considerò che non c'era stata un'interferenza ingiustificata con decisioni giudiziali, né qualsiasi violazione della certezza legale, perché l'interpretazione della legge aveva in qualsiasi evento stato controverso-un numero di decisioni di primo-istanza che hanno confermato il metodo di INPS del calcolo-e perché la legge non aveva effetto su cause che già erano state concluse. La ragione dietro alla promulgazione della legge, vale a dire assicurare che il metodo del calcolo usò con l'INPS (e confermò con la causa-legge di minoranza) divenne l'interpretazione comune delle leggi attinenti, era serio e ragionevole perché previde per lo stesso valore per essere dato a periodi di lavoro se loro furono notificati in Italia o all'estero. Seguì che le ragioni non erano state solamente finanziarie siccome loro erano stati in Zielinski e Pradal e Gonzalez ed Altri c. la Francia ([GC], N. 24846/94 e 34165/96 a 34173/96, ECHR 1999 VII), e Scordino c. l'Italia (n. 1) ([GC], n. 36813/97, ECHR 2006 V).
37. Il Governo considerò che la causa era comparabile a che di OGIS-Institut Stanislas, Santo-torta di OGEC X ed il de di Blanche Castille ed Altri c. la Francia (N. 42219/98 e 54563/00, 27 maggio 2004), dove la Corte non aveva trovato violazione perché l'interferenza che assicurò riguardo per la volontà originale del legislatore fu tirata, e dove la Corte aveva dato anche peso allo scopo di riattivare l'uguaglianza di trattamento fra insegnanti in costituzioni private e pubbliche. Al giorno d'oggi la causa anche, il fine dell'intervento della legislatura nel decretare Legge n. 296/2006 erano stati assicurare riguardo per la volontà originale del legislatore, e coordinare la richiesta dell'Italo-svizzero Convention ed il metodo nuovo di calcolo che era entrato in vigore nel 1982 ed aveva creato un squilibrio nelle valutazioni attinenti. Seguì che l'interferenza fu giustificata per una ragione di interesse generale ed irresistibile.
2. La valutazione della Corte
38. La Corte ha deciso ripetutamente che benché alla legislatura non sia impedita di regolare, per disposizioni di retrospettiva nuove diritti derivarono dalle leggi in vigore, il principio dell'articolo di legge e la nozione di un processo equanime custodito in Articolo 6 preclude, a parte irresistibile pubblico-interessi ragioni, interferenza con la legislatura con l'amministrazione della giustizia progettò per influenzare la determinazione giudiziale di una controversia (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. la Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 49 la Serie Un n. 301-B; il Cittadino & Edificio Società Provinciale, Leeds Edificio Società Permanente e Yorkshire Building la Società c. il Regno Unito, 23 ottobre 1997, § 112 Relazioni 1997-VII; e Zielinski e Pradal e Gonzalez ed Altri, citata sopra). Benché regolamentazioni di pensione legali siano responsabili a cambio ed una decisione giudiziale non può essere appellatosi su come una garanzia contro simile cambi nel futuro (vedere Sukhobokov c. la Russia, n. 75470/01, § 26 13 aprile 2006), anche se simile cambi sono allo svantaggio di certi destinatari di welfare, lo Stato non può interferire con l'elaborazione dell'aggiudicazione in una maniera arbitraria (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Bulgakova c. la Russia, n. 69524/01, § 42 18 gennaio 2007).
39. In circostanze analoghe, nella causa di Maggio ed Altri citata sopra, §§ 44-50, la Corte, nel trovare una violazione di Articolo 6 sostenne siccome segue:
“la Legge [296/2006] escluse espressamente dalle sue decisioni di corte di sfera che erano divenute definitivo (trattamenti di pensione già liquidarono) e stabilì una volta e per sempre retrospettivamente i termini delle controversie di fronte alle corti ordinarie. Effettivamente, la promulgazione di Legge 296/2006 mentre i procedimenti erano pendenti, in realtà determinata la sostanza delle controversie e la richiesta di sé con le varie corti ordinarie lo costituì spuntato un gruppo intero di individui nei richiedenti ' posiziona continuare con la causa. Così, la legge aveva l'effetto di cambiare definitivamente la conseguenza della causa pendente alla quale lo Stato era una parte, mentre girando la posizione dello Stato ai richiedenti il danno di '.
... Rispetti per l'articolo di legge e la nozione di un processo equanime richieda che qualsiasi ragioni addotte per giustificare simile misure siano trattate col più grande possibile grado della circospezione (vedere, Stran Raffinerie greche, citata sopra, § 49). ... La Corte prima ha sostenuto che le considerazioni finanziarie non possono garantire la legislatura che si sostituisce per le corti per stabilire controversie da sole (vedere Scordino c. l'Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 132 ECHR 2006 V, e Cabourdin c. la Francia, n. 60796/00, § 37 11 aprile 2006).
La Corte nota che, dopo 1982, l'INPS fece domanda un'interpretazione del diritto vigente al tempo che era molto favorevole a sé come l'autorità che sborsa. Questo sistema non fu sostenuto con la causa-legge di maggioranza. La Corte non può immaginare in che modo lo scopo di rafforzare un'interpretazione soggettiva e parziale, favorevole all'entità di un Stato come parte ai procedimenti, potrebbe corrispondere alla giustificazione per interferenza legislativa mentre quelli procedimenti erano pendenti, particolarmente quando tale interpretazione era stata trovata essere fallace su una maggioranza di occasioni con le corti nazionali, incluso la Corte di Cassazione.
Come all'argomento del Governo che la Legge era stata necessaria per riattivare un equilibrio nel sistema di pensione con rimuovere qualsiasi vantaggi piacquero con individui che avevano funzionato in Svizzera e contributi più bassi e pagati, mentre la Corte accetta questo per essere una ragione di interesse generale, la Corte non si persuade che stava obbligando abbastanza a superare i pericoli inerente nell'uso di legislazione retrospettiva che aveva l'effetto di influenzare la determinazione giudiziale di una controversia pendente alla quale lo Stato era una parte.
Lo Stato infranse i richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 6 § 1 in conclusione, con intervenendo in una maniera decisiva di assicurare che la conseguenza di procedimenti alla quale era una parte era favorevole a sé.”
40. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il Governo presentò gli ulteriori argomenti, mentre accentuando in particolare che la promulgazione di Legge n. 296/2006 furono intesi di assicurare riguardo per la volontà originale del legislatore, e coordinare la richiesta dell'Italo-svizzero Convention ed il metodo nuovo di calcolo che era entrato in vigore nel 1982 ed aveva creato un squilibrio nelle valutazioni attinenti. Loro si appellarono sulla causa di OGIS-Institut Stanislas, Santo-torta di OGEC X ed il de di Blanche Castille ed Altri (citò sopra).
41. La Corte considera che la causa presente è diversa da che di Cittadino & Edificio Società Provinciale, Leeds Edificio Società Permanente e Yorkshire Building la Società (citò sopra), dove le società di richiedente che l'istituzione di ' di procedimenti è stata considerata come un tentativo di trarre profitto dalla vulnerabilità delle autorità che danno luogo da difetti tecnici alla legge, e come un sforzo di frustrare l'intenzione di Parlamento (§§ 109 e 112). La causa presente è anche diversa dalla causa di OGIS-Institut Stanislas, Santo-torta di OGEC X ed il de di Blanche Castille ed Altri citarono col Governo, dove i richiedenti tentarono anche di dedurre benefici come un risultato di una lacuna nella legge che fu tirata l'interferenza legislativa che rimediò a. In quelle due cause le corti nazionali avevano dato credito alle deficienze nella legge in problema ed azione con lo Stato rimediare alla situazione era stato prevedibile (§§ 112 e 72 rispettivamente).
42. Nella presente causa non c'erano stati difetti notevoli nella struttura legale di 1962, e, siccome ammesso col Governo, il bisogno per un intervento legislativo sorse solamente come un risultato della decisione dello Stato, nel 1982 riformare il sistema di pensione. A che stadio lo Stato stesso creò una disparità che tentò di correggere solamente ventiquattro anni più tardi (e trentotto anni dopo la promulgazione delle disposizioni legali ed originali). Effettivamente non sembra che c'era stato qualsiasi tentativi opportuni ad aggiustando il sistema più primo, nonostante il fatto che pensionati numerosi che avevano lavorato in Svizzera stavano vincendo ripetutamente le loro rivendicazioni di fronte alle corti nazionali. In questo collegamento la Corte nota che di fronte alla promulgazione di Legge n. 296/2006 che le corti nazionali avevano trovato ripetutamente in favore di persone nei richiedenti che ' posiziona, e che interpretazione delle disposizioni legali ed attinenti (come confermato con la Corte della sentenza della Cassazione di 6 marzo 2004) era divenuto la causa-legge di maggioranza. Segue che, dato anche che nelle decadi durante le quali la richiesta del calcolo riguardata era stata impugnata nelle corti nazionali era stata un'interpretazione di maggioranza in favore dei rivendicatori (salvi delle decisioni di primo-istanza), al giorno d'oggi la causa, diversamente da nelle cause summenzionate, un'interferenza legislativa (spostando l'equilibrio in favore di una delle parti) non era prevedibile.
43. La Corte considera inoltre che, determinato la sequenza di eventi, non si può dire che l'intervento legislativo mirò a ripristinando l'intenzione originale del legislatore nel 1962. Inoltre, presumendo anche che la legge mirò a reintroducing i desideri originali del legislatore seguente i cambi nel 1982, la Corte già ha accettato che lo scopo di riattivare un equilibrio nel sistema di pensione, mentre nell'interesse generale, non stava obbligando abbastanza a superare i pericoli inerente nell'uso di legislazione retrospettiva che colpisce una controversia pendente. Effettivamente, accettando anche che lo Stato stava tentando di aggiustare una situazione non aveva inteso originalmente di creare, avrebbe potuto fare così perfettamente bene senza ricorrere ad una richiesta retrospettiva della legge. Inoltre, il fatto che lo Stato aspettò ventiquattro anni prima di fare tale rettifica, nonostante il fatto che pensionati numerosi che avevano lavorato in Svizzera stavano vincendo ripetutamente le loro rivendicazioni di fronte alle corti nazionali, anche crea dubbi come a se che realmente era l'intenzione del legislatore nel 1982.
44. Nella luce del sopra, e riaffermando le considerazioni della Corte nella sentenza di Maggio summenzionata, i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
45. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la promulgazione di Legge n. 296/2006 e la sua richiesta alle loro cause costituirono un'interferenza ingiustificata con le loro proprietà. Inoltre, era arbitrario poiché creò una disparità in trattamento fra persone che avevano scelto di lavorare in Svizzera e quelli che erano rimasti in Italia. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Le disposizioni attinenti lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Articolo 14 della Convenzione
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
46. I richiedenti considerarono che loro avevano una proprietà prevista per con diritto nazionale che è incorso all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Il loro diritto ad una pensione era stato basato sui salari loro avevano guadagnato; comunque, a causa di Legge n. 296/06 che diritto era stato negato a persone come i richiedenti che avevano lavorato in Svizzera. Mentre era vero che l'Italo-svizzero Convention aveva previsto per la possibilità per lo Stato per decretare le specifiche norme che regolano la questione, norme che totalmente rifoggiarono la legge al danno dei richiedenti erano entrate solamente in essendo trentotto anni dopo l'adozione di quel la Convenzione. Con che tempo, nell'assenza di una lex specialis i diritti in oggetto erano maturati ed erano diventati parte del patrimonio dei richiedenti in conformità con le leggi generali ed applicabili. Così, la legge nuova aveva interferito col godimento tranquillo dei richiedenti delle loro proprietà, in una maniera arbitraria e radicalmente ingiustificata riducendo drasticamente le loro pensioni. Loro considerarono inoltre che l'interferenza fosse discriminatoria e mirarono solamente a quelle persone che avevano lavorato all'estero, particolarmente in Svizzera.
47. Il Governo reiterò le loro osservazioni sotto Articolo 6.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Principi Generali
48. La Corte reitera che, secondo la sua causa-legge, un richiedente può addurre una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente in finora come le decisioni contestate riferisca a suo “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di quel la disposizione. “Le proprietà” può essere “proprietà esistenti” o i beni, incluso, nelle certe situazioni ben definite, rivendicazioni. Per una rivendicazione essere capace di essere considerò un “il bene” incorrendo all'interno della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il rivendicatore deve stabilire che ha una base sufficiente in legge nazionale, per esempio dove là è stabilito causa-legge delle corti nazionali che lo confermano. Dove quel è stato fatto, il concetto di “l'aspettativa legittima” può venire in giochi (vedere Maurizio c. la Francia [GC], n. 11810/03, § 63 ECHR 2005 IX).
49. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce come simile qualsiasi diritto per divenire il proprietario di proprietà (vedere il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 48 la Serie Un n. 70; Slivenko c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II; e Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Né garantisce, come così qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, per esempio, Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39 ECHR 2004-IX; Domalewski c. la Polonia (il dec.), n. 34610/97, il 1999-V di ECHR; Jankovi ćc. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Valkov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04 19490/04, 19495/04 19497/04, 24729/04 171/05 e 2041/05, § 25 25 ottobre 2011; e Frimu e le 4 altre richieste c. la Romania (il dec.), N. 45312/11, 45581/11, 45583/11 45587/11 e 45588/11, § 42 7 febbraio 2012). Similmente, il diritto per ricevere una pensione in riguardo delle attività eseguì in un Stato altro che lo Stato rispondente non è garantito (vedere L.B. c. l'Austria (il dec.), n. 39802/98, 18 aprile 2002). Comunque, un “la rivendicazione” riguardo ad una pensione può costituire un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 dove ha una base sufficiente in legge nazionale, per esempio dove è confermato con una definitivo sentenza di corte (vedere Pravednaya c. la Russia, n. 69529/01, §§ 37-39 18 novembre 2004; e Bulgakova, citata sopra, § 31).
50. Dove l'importo di un beneficio è ridotto o è cessato, questo può costituire interferenza con proprietà che costringono ad essere giustificate (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 40, e Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71 28 aprile 2009).
51. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: “il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono “distinto” nel senso di essere distaccato. Il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò nella luce del principio generale enunciata nel primo articolo” (vedere, fra le altre autorità, James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37 la Serie Un n. 98; Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 55 ECHR 1999-II; e Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 98 ECHR 2000-io).
52. Una condizione essenziale per interferenza per essere ritenuto compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale. Inoltre qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà si può giustificare solamente se notifica un pubblico legittimo (o generale) l'interesse. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di Previdenza stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 27265/95, § 85, 17 ottobre 2002, e Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 59 8 dicembre 2009). Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede anche che qualsiasi interferenza è ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, §§ 81-94 ECHR 2005-VI). L'equilibrio equo e richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardò sopporta un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 la Serie Un n. 52).
2. L’applicazione alla causa presente
(a) L'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
i. Ammissibilità
53. Nella luce della sua causa-legge la Corte è pronta accettare che per i fini di questa causa i richiedenti che ' assegna una pensione a diritti costituirono una proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Lakievi ćed Altri c. Montenegro e Serbia, N. 27458/06, 37205/06, 37207/06 e 33604/07 § 34, 13 dicembre 2011 Grudi c. Serbia, n. 31925/08, § 77 17 aprile 2012; Peji c. Serbia, n. 34799/07, § 55 8 ottobre 2013). Segue che la disposizione è applicabile nella causa presente.
54. La Corte nota inoltre che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
ii. Meriti
55. Nella causa di Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia, citata sopra, §§ 60-64, nello stesso contesto ed in circostanze molto simili, la Corte trovata, che il Sig. Maggio non aveva sofferto di una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Contenne siccome segue:
“La Corte prima ha ammesso che leggi con effetto di retrospettiva che fu trovato ancora costituire interferenza legislativa adattato col requisito di legalità di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Maurizio c. la Francia [GC], n. 11810/03, § 81 ECHR 2005 IX; Draon c. la Francia [GC], n. 1513/03, § 73 6 ottobre 2005; e Kuznetsova c. la Russia, n. 67579/01, § 50 7 giugno 2007). Non trova nessuna ragione di ritenere altrimenti nella causa presente. Accetta inoltre che la promulgazione di Legge n. 296/2006 intrapresero l'interesse pubblico (come offrendo un calcolo di pensione armonizzato, mirando ad un sistema di welfare equilibrato e sostenibile).
Nel considerare se l'interferenza impose un carico individuale ed eccessivo sul primo richiedente, la Corte ha riguardo ad al particolare contesto nel quale il problema sorge nella causa presente, vale a dire che di un schema di previdenza sociale. Simile schemi sono un'espressione della solidarietà di una società coi suoi membri vulnerabile (vedere, mutatis mutandis, il der di Goudswaard-Van Lans c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI).
La Corte nota che Legge n. 296/2006 purché che la rimunerazione pensionabile relativo al periodo che lavora all'estero sarebbe calcolato con moltiplicando l'importo di contributi trasferito entro cento e dividendo il risultato col contributo tassa per l'invalidamento, la vecchio-età e superstiti il piano assicurativo di ', come applicabile durante il periodo contribuente ed attinente. Come una conseguenza, secondo il primo richiedente fra gli anni 1996 quando lui cominciò a ricevere la sua pensione e 2009, lui ricevette una pensione mensile di EUR 873 come opposto ad EUR 1,372 quale lui avrebbe ottenuto avuto i suoi procedimenti non stato interferito con e l'avrebbe avuto avuto successo, e per l'anno 2010 lui ricevette una pensione di EUR 1,178 invece di EUR 1,900. Sulla base di questi calcoli la Corte osserva che il primo richiedente perse notevolmente meno che la metà della sua pensione. Così, la Corte considera che il richiedente fu obbligato per sopportare una riduzione ragionevole e commisurata, piuttosto che la privazione totale dei suoi diritti (vedere, al contrario., Kjartan Ásmundsson, § 45 sopra e citata).
In conseguenza, il diritto del richiedente per dedurre benefici dal piano assicurativo sociale in oggetto non è stato infranto in una maniera che dà luogo al danneggiamento dell'essenza dei suoi diritti di pensione. In questo riguardo la Corte nota che il richiedente aveva infatti contributi più bassi e pagati in Svizzera che lui avrebbe pagato in Italia, e così lui aveva avuto l'opportunità di godere guadagni più sostanziali al tempo. Questa riduzione aveva solamente inoltre, l'effetto di pareggiando un stato di affari ed evitare vantaggi ingiustificati (essendo il risultato della decisione di andare in pensione in Italia) per il richiedente e le altre persone nella sua posizione. Contro questo sfondo, tenendo presente il margine ampio dello Stato della valutazione nel regolare il sistema di pensione ed il fatto che il richiedente perse solamente un importo parziale di pensione, la Corte considera che il richiedente non fu reso per sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo.
Segue che, presumere anche che la disposizione, era applicabile, non c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.”
56. La Corte reitera che l'allontanamento di regolamentazioni discriminatorie ed il controllo di spese pubbliche dello Stato è scopi legittimi per i fini di garantendo la giustizia sociale e proteggere lo Stato economico essendo bene, e nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche il margine della valutazione godè con le autorità nazionali nel determinare che che è nell'interesse generale della comunità è un largo (vedere, Hoogendijk c. i Paesi Bassi, (il dec.) n. 58641/00, 6 gennaio 2005).
57. Comunque, la Corte nota che diversamente da nella causa del Sig. Maggio, i richiedenti nella rivendicazione di causa presente che loro hanno perso più di mezzo di che che loro avrebbero ricevuto in pensione. Effettivamente, le cifre presentate coi richiedenti che non sono stati contestati col Governo e devono essere presi perciò avere ragione, indica che i richiedenti nella causa presente hanno sofferto della perdita di circa due-terzo (approssimativamente 67%) delle loro rispettive pensioni.
58. La Corte osserva che in Maggio ed Altri, citata sopra, il fatto che il richiedente aveva perso notevolmente meno che la metà della sua pensione che perciò corrispose ad una riduzione ragionevole e commisurata portò innegabilmente del peso nella sentenza che la disposizione non era stata violata. Dato la riduzione più sostanziale nella causa presente ed in prospettiva del contributo totale dei richiedenti, la Corte dovuta rimporre la questione e deve scrutare più da vicino la riduzione nel contesto della causa.
59. La Corte osserva che è probabile che la privazione dell'interezza di una pensione violi la disposizione detta (vedere, per esempio, Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, ed Apostolakis c. la Grecia, n. 39574/07, 22 ottobre 2009) e che, al contrario., le minime riduzioni ad una pensione o è probabili che benefici relativi non facciano così (vedere, per esempio, fra molte altre autorità Valkov ed Altri, citata sopra; Arras ed Altri c. l'Italia, n. 17972/07, 14 febbraio 2012; Poulain c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 52273/08, 8 febbraio 2011; Lenz c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 40862/98, ECHR 2001 X; e Janković, citata sopra). La prova di equilibrio equa non può essere basata solamente comunque, sull'importo o percentuale della riduzione subita, nell'astratto. In tutte di queste cause, e gli altri uni simili, gli sforzi di Corte per valutare tutti gli elementi attinenti della causa contro un specifico sfondo (vedere, come gli altri esempi, fra altri Kuna c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 52449/99, ECHR 2001 V (gli estratti) riguardo alla riduzione dei diritti di pensione del richiedente sotto un schema di pensione supplementare, e Da Conceiçao Mateus e Santos Januario c. il Portogallo (il dec.), N. 62235/12 e 57725/12 riguardo all'impatto della riduzione di alcuni sussidi sui richiedenti ' situazione finanziaria e le condizioni viventi). Nel procedere in così la Corte ha trovato che riduzioni pari di 65%, come sostanziale come quel può essere, non faceva nelle specifiche circostanze della causa sconvolga l'equilibrio equo e detto nel contesto molto eccezionale di una punizione di un condannato e respinse poliziotto (vedere Banfield c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 6223/04, ECHR 2005 XI riguardo alla confisca di parte della pensione del richiedente dopo il suo proscioglimento dal vigore di polizia dopo una condanna).
60. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente e le sue specifiche circostanze, la Corte considera che una riduzione di due-terzo della pensione di uno (e non solamente di un beneficio collegato a pensioni) è indiscutibilmente, in se stesso, un calo piuttosto grande che deve colpire lo standard di vita di una persona seriamente. Il loro contributo in termini assoluti deve essere preso anche comunque, nell'esame. Questa perdita deve essere esaminata nella luce di tutti i fattori attinenti.
61. Della particolare importanza i due fattori considerati in Maggio già sono ed Altri (citò sopra). Primariamente, che i richiedenti pagarono sulla mano del una contributi più bassi, in termini di percentuale in Svizzera che loro avrebbero pagato in Italia-ma sull'altra mano pagare, in termini assoluti aveva contributi di un importo considerevole durante periodi contribuente e lunghi di vita attiva ed intera loro in Svizzera. In secondo luogo, che la riduzione fu mirata a, ma non aveva l'effetto di, equalising un stato di affari ed evitando vantaggi ingiustificati (essendo il risultato della decisione di andare in pensione in Italia) per persone nei richiedenti ' posiziona (vedere sopra divide in paragrafi 42-43).
62. Comunque, la Corte nota che, secondo dati statistici raccolti con l'INPS per l'anno 2010, in Italia la pensione di vecchio-età media per che anno era EUR 15,015 quel è EUR 1,251 ogni mese. Dalle informazioni pubblicamente disponibile sembra anche che la minima pensione per che anno corrispose ad EUR 5,993, quel è, EUR 461 per mese. La Corte nota inoltre che secondo il Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali, l'importo di minima pensione (minimi di pensione) in 2011 stati di fronte ad EUR 6,246.89 (EUR 520 per mese). Il Comitato detto osservò che quel livello di minima pensione si abbatteva sotto 40% del reddito equivalente medio (Eurostat) e così considerò che sé fosse inadeguato (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra).
63. La Corte osserva che, al giorno d'oggi la causa, siccome traspira dalla tavola annessa, i richiedenti ricevono in pensione di anzianità somme mensili che variano fra EUR 714 (l'essere più basso OMISSIS) ed EUR 1,820 (l'essere più alto OMISSIS) (vedere tavola annessa per dettagli di ogni richiedente). Effettivamente, salvi per OMISSIS, tutti i richiedenti ricevono meno che la pensione mensile e media in Italia, e sei fuori di otto richiedenti ricevono meno che EUR 1,000 per mese. La differenza in somme ricevute fra i richiedenti riflette la loro categoria di lavoro così come i periodi diversi di tempo loro spesero in Svizzera ed in conseguenza i contributi effettivi che loro hanno pagato. In che il collegamento, le zona di massima luce di Corte che la causa presente concerne benefici contribuente, e mentre è vero che la Corte non costituisce più una distinzione fra benefici contribuente e non contribuenti i fini dell'applicabilità della disposizione (vedere Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 53 ECHR 2005 X), quando valutando una riduzione di pagamenti di previdenza sociale, è davvero di significato che simile pensioni sono state basate su contributi effettivi pagato coi richiedenti (trasferì all'attinente sborsando autorità), benché abbassa che quelli pagarono con altri, e che perciò loro non erano solamente un aiuto di welfare gratuito procurato col contribuente in generale.
64. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che il Governo non diede informazioni come alla qualità di vita uno potrebbe aspettarsi di avere sulla base delle somme ricevette in pensione coi richiedenti. In che luce la Corte non può ma trova guida nelle conclusioni del Comitato europeo di Diritti Sociali e considera perciò che se la somma di EUR 461 è inadeguata come una minima pensione, la maggioranza delle somme in questione che non eccede EUR 1,000 per mese deve essere considerato siccome prevedendo per solamente prodotto-base. Le riduzioni hanno colpito indubbiamente così, i richiedenti il modo di ' della vita e hanno impedito sostanzialmente il suo godimento. Gli stessi possono essere detti anche delle pensioni più alte, nonostante loro lasciando spazio ad abitare più comodo.
65. Inoltre, al giorno d'oggi la causa la Corte non può perdere vista del fatto che i richiedenti presero una decisione consapevole di ritrasferirsi ad Italia ad un tempo quando loro avevano un'aspettativa legittima di ricevere pensioni più alte, e perciò un standard di vita più comodo. Comunque, come un risultato del calcolo che è fatto domanda con l'INPS ed infine l'azione legislativa e contestata, loro non solo si trovarono in una situazione finanziaria e più difficile ma loro dovevano avviare inoltre procedimenti per recuperare ciò che loro ritennero era dovuto - procedimenti che furono frustrati con le azioni del Governo in violazione della Convenzione. Per quelle azioni, la legislatura italiana spogliò arbitrariamente i richiedenti delle loro rivendicazioni all'importo di pensione che loro potrebbero aspettarsi di legittimamente essere determinati in conformità con la causa-legge decisa delle corti più alte della terra (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra), un elemento che non può essere ignorato per il fine di determinare la proporzionalità della misura contestata (vedere Maurizio c. la Francia, Draon c. la Francia; e Kuznetsova c. la Russia, tutti citarono sopra, §§ 90 -91, §§ 82-83 e § 51 rispettivamente). Contrari alla causa-legge della Corte Costituzionale italiana, là esistè nessun interesse generale ed irresistibile discute giustificando una richiesta retrospettiva della Legge n. 296/2006 che non erano un'interpretazione autentica della legge originale ed erano perciò imprevedibile (compari e contrasto divide in paragrafi 26 e 42).
66. In conclusione la Corte considera che, seguendo una vita-tempo di pagare contributi, perdendo 67% delle loro pensioni i richiedenti riduzioni commisurate non avevano subito ma erano state infatti rese sopportare un carico eccessivo. Così, nonostante le ragioni dietro alle misure contestate, al giorno d'oggi le cause, la Corte non può trovare che un equilibrio equo fu previsto.
67. Segue che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione presa da solo è stato violato.
(b) L'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione
68. La Corte non può accettare l'argomento di ' i richiedenti che la misura era discriminatoria. In riferimento al loro argomento in questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che nella decisione di ammissibilità parziale nella causa di Maggio ((il dec.) N. 46286/09, 52851/08 53727/08, 54486/08 e 56001/08 8 giugno 2010) la Corte fondò che l'azione di reclamo che la misura costituì persone di vis-à-vis di discriminazione come i richiedenti che, diversamente dal più italiani, aveva optato di lasciare Italia per fini di lavoro fu mal-fondato manifestamente come i richiedenti non poteva essere comparato, per i fini di Articolo 14, con residenti italiani che avevano funzionato in Italia le loro vite intere. La Corte non trova nessuno ragioni di sostenere altrimenti in relazione a persone che si trasferirono a Svizzera. Inoltre, nella sentenza di Maggio (§ 73), la Corte sostenne anche che la data d'arresta e contestata che sorge fuori di Legge n. 296/2006 erano ragionevolmente ed obiettivamente giustificati determinato che Legge n. 296/2006 furono intesi di livellare fuori qualsiasi trattamento favorevole che sorge dall'interpretazione precedente delle disposizioni in vigore che aveva dato persone nei richiedenti ' posiziona un vantaggio ingiustificato, mentre tenendo presente le necessità del sistema di previdenza sociale in Italia.
69. Così, l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nel collegamento con Articolo 14 deve essere respinto come essendo mal-fondato manifestamente facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
70. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
71. I richiedenti chiesero le somme elencate sotto in riguardo di danno patrimoniale, mentre rappresentando la differenza fra l'importo di pensione pagabile ai richiedenti e che che davvero fu liquidato a loro con l'INPS, in riguardo del periodo dalla data di pensionamento all'età media di durata presunta della vita, tenendo presente che nelle cause del Signori OMISSIS i benefici di pensione pagati dall’ INPS sono al limite della soglia di povertà. Loro chiesero inoltre 40,000 euro (EUR) ognuno in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
Le somme chieste per danno patrimoniale sono siccome segue:
EUR 435,549 OMISSIS
EUR 394,309 OMISSIS
EUR 391,462 OMISSIS
EUR 452,878 OMISSIS
EUR 423,348 OMISSIS
EUR 565,282 OMISSIS
EUR 375,771 OMISSIS
EUR 873,683 OMISSIS.
72. Il Governo considerò che le rivendicazioni erano infondate determinato che in Maggio (citò sopra) la Corte aveva trovato solamente una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1, e nessuna violazione in riguardo di Articoli 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e 14 della Convenzione. Loro considerarono inoltre che era solamente una perdita di opportunità che furono dovute ai richiedenti che nella loro prospettiva sarebbero limitati al periodo di fronte alla legge entrata in vigore.
73. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione del risarcimento per danno patrimoniale non è pronta per decisione. Che questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e la procedura susseguente fissò avendo riguardo ad a qualsiasi accordo che sarebbe giunto allo Stato rispondente ed i richiedenti (l'Articolo 75 § 1 degli Articoli della Corte).
74. D'altra parte la Corte considera che i richiedenti hanno dovuto subire danno non-patrimoniale in prospettiva delle violazioni ha trovato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che è il risultato dell'intervento legislativo che colpisce la causa pendente relativo agli importi dovuto in pensione ai richiedenti. Decidendo su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 12,000 ogni richiedente (dodici mila euros) in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile.
Costi di B. e spese
75. I richiedenti anche chiesti una somma per essere assegnati in equità per costi e spese incorsero in.
76. Il Governo non fece commento.
77. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, i richiedenti né hanno quantificato né hanno provato le loro rivendicazioni. La Corte non fa perciò assegnazione sotto questo capo.
C. Interesse di mora
78. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Decide, all’unanimità congiungere le richieste;

2. Dichiara, all’unanimità, le azioni di reclamo riguardo ad Articolo 6 § 1 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibile, ed il resto delle richieste inammissibile;

3. Sostiene, all’unanimità , che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;

4. Sostiene, per cinque voti a due che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

5. Sostiene, con cinque voti a due, che, come lontano come l'assegnazione finanziaria ai richiedenti per qualsiasi danno patrimoniale che è il risultato delle violazioni trovato nella causa presente riguarda, la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione e di conseguenza,
(a) riserve la detta questione nell'insieme;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui questa sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere;
(c) le riserve l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Sezione il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza;

6. Sostiene, per cinque voti a due,
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare, a ogni richiedente EUR 12,000 (dodici mila euro), più qualsiasi la tassa che forse addebitabile, a riguardo di danno morale, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;

7. Respinge, all’unanimità, il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per soddisfazione equa;
Fatto in inglesiw, e notificato per iscritto il 15 aprile 2014, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Il ıKarakaş
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione in parte dissentente del Giudice Raimondi, congiunta con il Giudice Lorenzen è annessa a questa sentenza.
A.I.K.
S.H.N.

 
APPENDICE
No
Richiesta
n. Depositato su Nome di richiedente
data di nascita
residenza Anni lavorati in Svizzera Pensione totale ricevette nel 2010 in EUR
(l'approx. sommi per mese) Pensione che sarebbe stata ricevuta in EUR
1. 21838/10 14/04/2010 OMISSIS
Dubino
1959-1996 9,898

(825) 29,696
2. 21849/10 14/04/2010 OMISSIS
18/03/1942
Talamona
1962-1973
1977-1996 8,571

(714) 25,715
3. 21852/10 14/04/2010 OMISSIS
11/01/1937
Castione Andevenno
1954-1957
1965-1973
1975-1997 11,513

(960) 34,540
4. 21855/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
28/03/1933
Morbegno
1962-1989 11,321

(943) 33,965
5. 21860/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
20/10/1938
Spriana
1959-1996 10,583

(882) 31,751
6. 21863/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
14/08/1944
Il San Martino Val Masino
1962-1987 14,132

(1,178) 42,396
7. 21869/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
28/05/1942
Verceia
1962-1976
1978-1997 10,473

(872) 31,419
8. 21870/10 13/04/2010 OMISSIS
22/10/1944
Tirano
1967-1977 21,842

(1,820) 65,526

OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENTE DEL GIUDICE RAIMONDI JOINED DEL GIUDICE LORENZEN
1. Con rammarico, io non posso unirmi ai miei colleghi della maggioranza nella loro prospettiva che Articolo 1 del Protocollo Supplementare è stato violato in questa causa.
2. Nella causa di Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia (N. 46286/09, 52851/08 53727/08, 54486/08 e 56001/08 31 maggio 2011) il fatto che il richiedente aveva perso notevolmente meno che la metà della sua pensione che perciò corrispose ad una riduzione ragionevole e commisurata portò innegabilmente del peso nella sentenza che la disposizione non era stata violata. Dato la riduzione più sostanziale nella causa presente, io convengo con la maggioranza che la Corte doveva scrutare più da vicino la riduzione nel contesto della causa.
3. È probabile che la privazione dell'interezza di una pensione violi la disposizione detta (vedere per esempio, Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX, ed Apostolakis c. la Grecia, n. 39574/07, 22 ottobre 2009); al contrario., le minime riduzioni ad una pensione o è probabili che benefici relativi non facciano così (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Valkov ed Altri, citata sopra; Arras ed Altri c. l'Italia, n. 17972/07, 14 febbraio 2012; Poulain c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 52273/08, 8 febbraio 2011; Lenz c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 40862/98, ECHR 2001 X; e Jankovi ćc. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X).
4. La prova di equilibrio equa non può essere basata solamente comunque, sull'importo o percentuale della riduzione, nell'astratto. In tutte di queste cause, e gli altri uni simili, l'endeavoured di Corte per valutare tutti gli elementi attinenti della causa contro un specifico sfondo (per un altro esempio vedere, fra le altre autorità, Kuna c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 52449/99, ECHR 2001 V (gli estratti)). Procedendo così in, la Corte fondò che anche una riduzione di 65%, come sostanziale come quel sarebbe, non faceva nelle specifiche circostanze della causa sconvolga l'equilibrio equo e detto (vedere Banfield c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 6223/04, ECHR 2005 XI).
5. Io ammetto che una riduzione di due-terzo della pensione di uno (e non solamente di un beneficio pensione-relativo) è indiscutibilmente, in se stesso, un calo piuttosto grande che deve colpire lo standard di vita di una persona seriamente. Questa perdita deve essere esaminata nella luce di tutti i fattori attinenti.
6. Della particolare importanza i due fattori considerati in Maggio già sono (citò sopra). Primariamente, il fatto che i richiedenti pagarono contributi più bassi in Svizzera che loro avrebbero pagato in Italia, col risultato che loro avevano il beneficio di guadagni più sostanziali al tempo. In secondo luogo, il fatto che la riduzione fu mirata a, ed aveva l'effetto di, equalising un stato di affari ed evitando vantaggi ingiustificati (essendo il risultato della decisione di andare in pensione in Italia) per persone nei richiedenti la posizione di '.
7. Secondo dati statistici raccolti con l'INPS per l'anno 2010[1], in Italia, 14.4% di pensionati ricevettero pensioni di meno che EUR 500; 31% di pensionati ricevettero pensioni di fra EUR 500 ed EUR 1,000; 23.5% di pensionati ricevettero pensioni di fra EUR 1,000 ed EUR 1,500, mentre 31.1% di pensionati ricevettero pensioni di più di EUR 1,500. Quelle somme prendono nell'esame tutte le pensioni ricevute, come vecchio-età l'invalidamento e guerra assegna una pensione a, ecc. Perciò, al giorno d'oggi la causa, nessuni dei richiedenti incorre nel parentesi quadrato di pensione più basso. Comunque, anche se loro facevano, dato che approssimativamente 15% della popolazione pensionata ottengono con su meno che EUR 500 per mese, non può essere detto che pensioni in che parentesi quadrato più basso, ed ancora meno le pensioni di vecchio-età davvero ricevute coi richiedenti (quali incorrono nei parentesi quadrati più vantaggiosi), è a tale livello basso come spogliare i richiedenti del di base vuole dire di esistenza (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Fiedler c. Germania e Mann c. la Germania, N. 24116/94 e 24077/94, decisioni di Commissione di 15 maggio 1996 sia non segnalato; vedere anche, più recentemente, Koufaki ed Adedy c. la Grecia (il dec.), N. 57665/12 e 57657/12, §§ 45-46 7 maggio 2013). Questi dati provano inoltre l'enorme e la disparità ingiustificata ci sarebbe stato, al vantaggio dei richiedenti, aveva il sistema non stato corretto. In che collegamento uno non può perdere vista dell'importanza di mantenere una struttura di pensioni sana e sostenibile per il buono di società a grande. L'allontanamento di regolamentazioni discriminatorie ed il controllo di spese pubbliche dello Stato è scopi legittimi per i fini di garantendo la giustizia sociale e proteggere lo Stato economico essendo bene, e nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche il margine della valutazione godè con le autorità nazionali nel determinare che che è nell'interesse generale della comunità è un largo (vedere Hoogendijk c. i Paesi Bassi, (il dec.) n. 58641/00, 6 gennaio 2005).
8. In conclusione, nonostante la riduzione che è un piuttosto grande, non spogliò ciononostante insieme i richiedenti delle loro pensioni. Tenendo presente il margine ampio dello Stato della valutazione nel regolare il sistema di pensioni e tutti i fattori menzionarono sopra di, e riaffermando le sentenze della Corte in Maggio, citata sopra, io trovo che i richiedenti non furono resi per sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo.
9. Segue che, nella mia prospettiva, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non è stato violato in questa causa.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 11/07/2020.