Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BITTÓ AND OTHERS v. SLOVAKIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 30255/09/2014
STATO: Slovacchia
DATA: 28/01/2014
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion(s)
Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property)
Respondent State to take measures of a general character (Article 46-2 - Measures of a general character)
Just satisfaction reserved



THIRD SECTION






CASE OF BITTÓ AND OTHERS v. SLOVAKIA

(Application no. 30255/09)









JUDGMENT
(Merits)




STRASBOURG

28 January 2014



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Bittó and Others v. Slovakia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Josep Casadevall, President,
Alvina Gyulumyan,
Ján Šikuta,
Luis López Guerra,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Johannes Silvis,
Valeriu Griţco, judges,
and Santiago Quesada, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 7 January 2014,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 30255/09) against the Slovak Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by twenty-one Slovakian nationals on 28 May 2009. On 16 January 2011, one of the applicants, OMISSIS, (see point 17 of Appendix 1) died. Mr B. Vojtáš (see point 18 of Appendix 1), her son and sole heir, expressed the wish to pursue the application in his late mother’s stead.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Bratislava, and OMISSIS of EL Partners s.r.o. in Bratislava. The Government of the Slovak Republic (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Pirošíková.
3. The applicants complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, both taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, about restrictions which the rules governing rent control imposed on their right to peacefully enjoy their possessions.
4. By a decision of 4 January 2012 the Court declared the application partly admissible.
5. The applicants and the Government each filed further written observations (Rule 59 § 1) on the merits. The Chamber having decided, after consulting the parties, that no hearing on the merits was required (Rule 59 § 3 in fine), the parties replied in writing to each other’s observations.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The particulars of the applicants appear in Appendix 1.
A. Background information on rent control
7. After 1948, when the communist regime had been installed in the former Czechoslovakia, the housing policy was based on a doctrine aimed at the restriction and abolition of private ownership.
8. Some residential houses were confiscated and some owners of residential houses were compelled to transfer their property to the State for no or inadequate compensation. Those owners who were not formally deprived of the ownership of their residential housing were subjected to restrictions in the exercise of their property rights.
9. As regards flats in residential houses, tenancies were replaced by the “right of lasting use”.
10. The Flats Management Act 1964, which was in force until 1 January 1992, entitled public authorities to decide on the right of use of flats. Special regulations governed the sums which the users had to pay. On 1 January 1992 “the right of lasting use” was transformed into a tenancy with regulated rent.
11. After 1991 some residential houses were restored to their former owners; however, flats in these houses were mostly occupied by tenants with regulated rent.
12. Under the relevant law (for details see “Relevant domestic law and practice” below), owners of residential houses in a position similar to that of the applicants in the present case have been obliged to accept that all or some of their flats are occupied by tenants while charging no more than the maximum amount of rent fixed by the State (“the rent-control scheme”). Despite repeated increases in the maximum rent which the domestic law entitles house owners in this position to charge, that amount has remained below the level of rent chargeable for similar housing let on the principles of a free-market economy.
13. In situations similar to that of the applicants, the owners of residential houses had practically no means of terminating tenancies and evicting tenants without providing them with “housing compensation”. Furthermore, owners were not allowed to transfer ownership of a flat rented by an individual to any third person other than the tenant.
14. The Government of the Slovak Republic have dealt with the issue of rent control on several occasions as indicated below.
15. Documents of the Ministry of Construction and Regional Development indicate that, by 20 January 2009, registration forms had been submitted by tenants in respect of 923 flats where rent control was applied. 2,311 persons lived in those flats, the average surface area of which was 71.38 square metres. The documents indicate that it was envisaged that substitute accommodation would be made available to the persons concerned by the planned reform so long as this was justified by their social situation. 76.5% of the tenants thus registered lived in flats located in Bratislava.
16. On the basis of those data, the authorities estimated that the rent control scheme concerned approximately 1,000 flats, that is, 0.24% of rented flats in houses that existed in 1991 and 0.06% of the inhabited housing facilities which were available in Slovakia in 2001.
B. Particular circumstances of the applicants’ cases
17. The applicants are owners or co-owners of residential buildings in Bratislava and Trnava to which the rent-control scheme applies, or has applied, (further details are set out in Appendix 2). They obtained the ownership of the flats by various means, such as restitution, donation or inheritance from their relatives to whom the flats had been restored in the early 1990s. In two cases the applicants purchased further shares of ownership from the other co-owner, the Bratislava Municipality. Mr Dobšovič and Ms Dobšovičová (applicants listed in points 6 and 7 of Appendix 1) purchased the flats from individuals in 2005. The majority of the other applicants acquired ownership in the course of the 1990s.
In the meantime, the rent-control scheme has ceased to be applicable to several of the flats concerned.
18. The applicants maintained that the rent to which they are, or were, entitled for letting their property is far below the maintenance costs for their houses and disproportionately low compared with similar flats to which the rent-control scheme does not apply.
19. The parties submitted the following information as regards the impact of the rent-control scheme on the applicants.
1. Documents submitted by the applicants
20. Initially, and by way of example, the applicants pointed out that the controlled rent in respect of a flat with a surface area of 72.56 square metres was 71.50 euros (EUR) per month, which corresponds to EUR 0.99 per square metre. However, the monthly free-market rent in respect of such a flat was approximately EUR 830, that is EUR 11.40 per square metre.
21. The applicants further relied on the opinion of an expert provided at their request on 19 July 2010. It set out the difference between the free market rent and the controlled rent in respect of a residential house located at Trenčianska St. in Bratislava-Nivy for the period from 1993 to 2010 (for further details see Appendix 3).
22. Following the Court’s decision to declare the application admissible, the applicants submitted voluminous opinions of experts concerning their properties.
23. The opinion of expert I. no. 51/2012 of 26 April 2012, which the applicants relied on by way of example, concerns a residential house where rent control applied to five out of the eight flats. It was situated on Tallerova St. in Bratislava – in the Staré Mesto district – and several applicants are co owners of the flats concerned (see also Appendix 4). The opinion indicated that the relevant legislation allowed for regulated rent which corresponded, on average, to 0.69% of the acquisition value of a flat in 1994. That ratio was 0.79% in 2001 and 1.96% in 2011.
24. According to expert opinion no. 51/2012, the regulated rent amounted to 2.2% of the free-market rent in 1993. In 2002 it corresponded, on average, to 4.5% of the free-market rent, and in 2011 the average regulated rent corresponded to 14.3% of the free-market rent. The applicants submitted that the other opinions concerning their properties were in line with that conclusion. The above opinion contains the following valuation of the flats concerned for the period from 1 January to 31 March 2012:

Flat
no.
Monthly market
rent EUR/m2
Monthly controlled
rent EUR/m2
Percentage controlled/
market rent

1 8.28 1.58 19%
2 N/A in 2012
5 8.28 1.55 18.7%
6 7.92 1.11 14%
7
8.16
1.12
13.7%

25. As regards the maintenance costs of their properties, the applicants submitted that most of them did not have sufficient means to ensure renovation and maintenance of the houses because of low incomes under the rent-control scheme. They relied on the expert opinions which determined the “cost-based rent” in respect of the houses owned by them, namely, the rent calculated on the basis of the current technical value of the buildings and on the costs necessary for their ordinary and adequate periodic maintenance, while taking into account the gradual wear and tear of the buildings. Thus according to expert opinion no. 51/2012, the regulated rent amounted to 3.3% of the “cost-based rent” in 1993. In 2002 it corresponded, on average, to 5.3% of the “cost-based rent”, and in 2011 the average regulated rent corresponded to 26.4% of the “cost-based rent”.
26. With reference to the experts’ conclusions, the applicants maintained that they had suffered pecuniary damage on account of the application of the rent-control scheme to their property. This was determined as the difference between the free-market rent applicable to similar dwellings and the controlled rent which the applicants were allowed to charge throughout the period of ownership and application of the rent-control scheme. The damage which the individual applicants claimed to have suffered is specified in Appendix 5.
2. Documents submitted by the Government
27. The Government initially submitted the opinion of a different expert, drawn up in 2010, according to which the average free-market monthly rent for flats comparable to those of the applicants in the municipality of Bratislava-Staré Mesto was between EUR 6.13 and 6.48 per square metre. In the broader centre of Trnava the free-market rent was between EUR 3.37 and EUR 3.87 per square metre at that time.
28. In response to the detailed expert opinions submitted by the applicants, the Government first submitted an opinion by the Forensic Engineering Institute in Žilina. It pointed to errors in several of the expert opinions, challenged the methods applied by the experts and their standing to determine the amount of profit lost by the applicants. The view was expressed that direct comparison with dwellings where the rent-control scheme did not apply was the most appropriate method for determining the damage suffered by the applicants.
29. Subsequently, the Government submitted an opinion drawn up by the Forensic Engineering Institute in Žilina on 15 November 2012. It indicated that lack of statistical data for the overall period of rent control prevented the flat owners’ lost profit from being determined in an objective manner. In order to establish appropriate compensation for the applicants, it was therefore appropriate to use a methodology similar to determination of compensation for tolerating an easement over the property. Among other data, the opinion indicated that, under the regulation in force between 1964 and the end of June 1992, the rent in respect of a three-room flat corresponded to EUR 0.08 per square metre. As from 1 July 1992 a 100% increase was applied.
30. By means of comparison, the opinion established that, in 2012, the monthly market rental value of flats in Bratislava varied between EUR 4.71 and EUR 5.97 per square metre depending on the location, number of rooms and equipment. It amounted to EUR 4.51/4.52 in respect of one/two-room flats in Trnava.
At the same time, the rental value of the applicants’ flats under the rent control scheme was between EUR 1.20 and 1.60 in most cases, the extreme and exceptional values being EUR 0.45 and EUR 2.21 in Bratislava. In Trnava the controlled rent of the applicants’ flats varied between EUR 1.24 and EUR 1.60 in 2012. In determining the rental value of the applicants’ flats in 2012 a 40% increase was applied (as provided for by Law no. 260/2011 in 2011 and 2012).
The relevant data are set out in Appendix 4 (columns A – F).
31. According to the expert opinion, appropriate compensation payable to the applicants should be calculated as the difference between the net monthly income (profit) which they were able to obtain for renting their flats under the rent-control scheme and the net monthly income (profit) which could be drawn from letting comparable flats at the market price. The calculation is based on (i) the technical value of the flats in 2012, (ii) their rental value (both on the free market and under the rent-control scheme) in 2012; (iii) duration of application of the rent-control scheme; (iv) the ownership share of individual applicants; and (v) the marginal interest rate of the European Central Bank.
The amounts of compensation to which the individual applicants are entitled in accordance with the above method of calculation for the period covered by the opinion are set out in Appendix 4 (column G).
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Constitution
32. Pursuant to Article 20 § 1, the ownership right of all persons has the same legal content and enjoys the same protection.
B. Civil Code
33. Article 124 guarantees the same rights and obligations to all owners. Equal legal protection is to be granted to all owners.
34. Provisions concerning the lease of flats are set out in Articles 685 to 716 of the Civil Code.
35. Pursuant to Article 687, a landlord is obliged to put a flat at a tenant’s disposal in a fit state for normal use and to secure to the tenant the full and uninterrupted enjoyment of rights in connection with the use of the flat.
36. Article 696 § 1 provides, inter alia, that the method of calculating the rent, the service charges related to the use of the flat, the method of paying the rent and service charges, and the conditions under which a landlord is entitled to unilaterally increase the rent and service charges and amend other terms of the lease are governed by special legislation.
37. Under Article 706, after a tenant’s death the right to the lease passes to the tenant’s relatives if they can prove that they were living with the tenant in a shared household on the day of his or her death and do not have their own flat. The same right is to be enjoyed by persons who have taken care of a shared household and lived with the tenant in a shared household for at least three years and do not have their own flat.
38. Article 707 § 1 entitles the surviving spouse to become the sole tenant of a jointly leased flat upon the other spouse’s death.
39. The provisions of Article 706 and Article 707 § 1 are also applicable in the event that a tenant permanently leaves a shared household.
40. Pursuant to Article 871 § 1, enacted with effect from 1 January 1992, “the right of lasting use” of flats and other premises under the law previously in force and subsisting on that date was transformed into a tenancy with regulated rent.
C. The Flats (and other Premises) Ownership of Act (Law no. 182/1993)
41. Section 16(1) governs the transfer of ownership of a flat. Where a flat is rented by an individual, unless the right to rent the flat was agreed for a fixed period, a landlord can transfer ownership of it only to the tenant. This provision does not affect the co-owner’s pre-emption right.
D. The Price Act 1996 (Law no. 18/1996)
42. As a general rule, the price of goods, including the amount of rent, is determined on the basis of an agreement between the seller and the buyer (sections 1-3).
43. Part Three of the Price Act 1996 allows State measures to be taken in response to undesired price developments. They include regulation of prices and a prohibition on agreeing a price which is inappropriate.
44. Under section 4a (formerly section 4), price regulation is permissible where, inter alia, an extraordinary market situation arises, where there is a threat to the market as a result of an insufficiently developed competitive environment, or where it is required for the purpose of protecting consumers or on grounds of another public interest.
45. Price regulation can be achieved through the fixing of prices by the authorities, the setting of conditions for agreements on prices or a combination of those two methods (section 5).
46. Section 8, enacted with effect from 1 November 2008, provides that, when regulating prices, the authorities must take into account justified costs and an appropriate profit.
47. Pursuant to section 20(1) and (2), the Ministry of Finance sets conditions for price regulation and decides on related matters. Until 1 March 2005 the Ministry of Construction and Regional Development was authorised to regulate rent. The scope of regulation is to be determined by a generally binding legal rule (section 11).
48. Law no. 68/2005 of 3 February 2005 introduced a number of amendments to the Price Act 1996. Pursuant to section 1(12) of Law no. 68/2005, the 2003 Ordinance (see below) was repealed. Law no. 68/2005 came into force on 1 March 2005 with the exception of section 1(12), which took effect on 1 July 2007.
49. Another amendment to the Price Act 1996 was introduced by Law no. 200/2007 of 29 March 2009, with effect from 1 July 2007. Pursuant to that amendment, the date when the 2003 Ordinance would cease to have effect was postponed until 31 December 2008.
E. Law no. 260/2011
50. On 15 September 2011, the Termination and Settlement of Tenancy (Certain Apartments) Act (Law no. 260/2011) came into force. It was enacted with a view to eliminating rent restrictions concerning individual owners.
51. Its provisions are applicable, in particular, to apartments of individuals whose rent has so far been regulated. In those cases, landlords were entitled to give notice of termination of a tenancy contract by 31 March 2012. Such termination of tenancy takes effect after a twelve month notice period. However, if a tenant is exposed to material hardship, he or she will be able to continue to use the apartment with regulated rent, even after expiry of the notice period, until a new tenancy contract with a municipality has been set up. Law no. 260/2011 further entitles landlords to increase the rent by 20% once a year until 2015.
52. Municipalities are obliged to provide a person exposed to material hardship with a municipal apartment with regulated rent. If a municipality does not comply with that obligation by 31 December 2016 in a given case, the landlord can claim the difference between the free market and the regulated rent.
F. Housing Development State Fund Act 2013
53. Law no. 150/2013 amends the earlier legislation on the Housing Development State Fund. It will take effect on 1 January 2014. Among other things, with reference to Law no. 260/2011 it entitles owners of houses or flats which had been restored to the original owners to apply for a preferential loan for the purpose of modernisation of such buildings.
G. Subordinate legal rules governing rent
54. Decree no. 60/1964 of the Central Authority for the Development of Local Economy on payment for the use of flats and related services was in force from 1964 until the end of 1999. It divided flats into four categories according to their status and fixed the yearly price for their use.
55. On 12 March 1996 the Ministry of Finance issued Regulations no. 87/1996 implementing the Price Act 1996. They became operative on 1 April 1996. Regulation 3(1) and 3(2) requires economically justified costs and appropriate profit to be taken into account in the context of price regulation.
56. In 1992, 2000 and 2001 and on 1 March 2003 the Ministry of Finance issued four instruments of subordinate legislation providing for an increase in controlled rent by 100%, 70%, 45% and 95% respectively.
57. On 22 December 2003 the Ministry of Construction and Regional Development issued the 2003 Ordinance (Ordinance (výnos) no. V-1/2003 on Control of Rent for Lease of Flats). It fixes the maximum permissible amount of rent for a flat according to its surface area and category, without distinction as to its location. The ordinance ceased to have effect on 1 May 2008.
58. On 23 April 2008 the Ministry of Finance issued Measure (opatrenie) no. 01/R/2008 on Control of Rent for Flats with reference to sections 11 and 20 of the Price Act 1996. It entered into force on 1 May 2008.
59. Similarly to the previous rules, it fixes the maximum amount of rent per square metre of inhabitable space and annexes (section 1). An increase or reduction is possible depending on the furnishings available. In respect of flats built from public funds after 1 February 2001 the maximum rent is fixed at 5% of their acquisition value (section 2(1)).
60. Section 3 allows an increase of the maximum rent by 15% in houses built without public funding or those which were restored to owners or their successors by way of redress for past wrongs.
61. Pursuant to section 4, rent control does not apply to, inter alia, vacant flats in houses built without public funding or in houses restored to owners by way of redress for past wrongs, with the exception of cases which concern the transfer of a lease or the exchange of a flat (Articles 706 08 of the Civil Code). Similarly, rent control does not apply to houses built without any public funding where construction officially ended after 1 February 2001.
62. Lastly, section 5 of the Measure repeals the 2003 Ordinance.
63. On 25 September 2008 the Ministry of Finance issued Measure no. 02/R/2008 amending the above Measure of 23 April 2008 on rent control. It entered into force on 1 October 2008. It does not affect the amount of permissible rent but specifies the conditions under which such rent can be charged after 31 December 2011.
64. In particular, the newly introduced section 4a(1) allows the rent control scheme to continue to apply after the above date where, on 1 October 2008, (i) tenants or persons sharing their household did not own or co-own a comparable flat or inhabitable real property in the same municipality or within 50 kilometres of its boundaries; (ii) the landlord and the tenant have not reached a different agreement on rent before 1 January 2012; and (iii) the tenants concerned have submitted a registration form to the Ministry of Construction and Regional Development before 31 December 2008.
H. Government policy and planning documents
65. The Government’s plan on housing policy and construction of flats for the period between 1994 and 2000, drawn up in 1994, envisaged that rent in respect of flats owned by individuals should be increased with a view to covering the owners’ costs as from 1 January 1995. It further envisaged the introduction of rent levels based on market prices as from 1 January 1996.
66. The Government Manifesto of November 2002 indicated that the Government would take measures for deregulation of rent before the envisaged accession of Slovakia to the European Union. Any regulatory measures thereafter were to be exclusively linked to the real increase of costs.
67. Further plans on housing policy and construction of flats, drawn up in 2000 and 2005, also envisaged the introduction of market-level rent in the private sector. Housing capacity in municipal flats was to be increased so that substitute accommodation could be provided to indigent persons who would be affected by such liberalisation of rent.
68. The need for elimination of rent control was confirmed in the most recent plan of 2010, which covers the period until 2015. The document indicates that the private sector of rented housing is underdeveloped, particularly because of the past system of rent control and the excessive protection of tenants.
69. In decision no. 357/2008 the Ministry of Construction and Regional Development was instructed to prepare a plan for settling relations between landlords and tenants in flats where rent control had been applied. The plan was approved on 16 September 2009 (decision no. 640/2009). That decision instructed the ministers concerned to prepare, before 31 December 2010, Bills on termination and settlement of certain landlord/tenant relationships and on rent control in the public sector, as well as regulations on housing allowances, to offer substitute housing facilities to the tenants concerned and to lay down the scope, conditions and manner of their acquisition. In addition, compensation of a structural nature was envisaged for owners of residential houses.
70. Subsequently, the Minister of Construction and Regional Development asked the Mayor of Bratislava to identify suitable plots on which substitute housing facilities could be built for persons in need.
I. Proceedings before the Constitutional Court
71. In an application to the Constitutional Court, lodged on 29 March 2007, the General Prosecutor challenged, inter alia, the 2003 Ordinance as being contrary to the Constitution. The application expressed the view that the Price Act 1996 did not entitle the Ministry of Construction and Regional Development to issue an ordinance on rent control; that the Ordinance was discriminatory and restricted the right of flat owners; that it was questionable whether such a restriction was in the public interest and necessary; and that the Ordinance should have ceased to have effect as from 1 March 2005. The absence of any compensation for landlords to whom the rent-control scheme applied was also criticised. On 7 June 2007 the General Prosecutor supplemented the application by also challenging Law no. 200/2007 amending the Price Act 1996.
72. On 8 April 2009 the Constitutional Court discontinued the proceedings without examination of the merits, on the ground that the application had been withdrawn. It noted that the Price Act 1996 had been amended and that the 2003 Ordinance had ceased to have effect.
THE LAW
I. LOCUS STANDI OF THE SON OF THE DECEASED APPLICANT
73. One of the applicants, OMISSIS, died on 16 January 2011. OMISSIS, her son and sole heir, who also lodged an application in respect of property which he had co-owned with his mother, expressed the wish to pursue the application in his late mother’s stead.
74. The Court notes that the present application concerns a property right which is, in principle, transferable to the next of kin of the deceased person. Mr B. Vojtáš was a co-owner of the flats in question and inherited the ownership share of the deceased applicant. In these circumstances the Court considers that he has standing to continue the present proceedings in his mother’s stead (see Sharenok v. Ukraine, no. 35087/02, § 12, 22 February 2005).
II. COMPLIANCE WITH THE TIME-LIMIT OF SIX MONTHS
75. Under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, the Court may only deal with the matter “within a period of six months from the date on which the final decision was taken”. Where the alleged violation constitutes a continuing situation against which no domestic remedy is available, such as application of rent-control scheme under the relevant legislation in the present case, the six-month period starts to run from the end of the situation concerned (see, among other authorities, Mosendz v. Ukraine, no. 52013/08, § 68, 17 January 2013).
Pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention, the Court shall reject any application which it considers inadmissible under that Article. It may do so at any stage of the proceedings.
76. Following the Court’s decision to declare the application admissible, the parties submitted further relevant information. It comprised expert opinions which specified the periods of application of the rent-control scheme in respect of the individual flats concerned.
77. The documents submitted indicate (see Appendix 2) that rent control had ceased to apply in respect of the flats owned by the following applicants more than six months before the introduction of the application on 28 May 2009:
- OMISSIS: flats nos. 3, 5, 6, 7 and 14 in the house at Zámočnícka 11 St. in Bratislava and flats nos. 5, 9, 10, 13 and 14 in the house at Dunajská 38 St. in Bratislava;
- OMISSIS: flats nos. 3 and 6 in the house at Kalinčiakova 31 St. in Trnava;
- OMISSIS: flats nos. 12, 15, 19 and 23 in the house at Štefánikova 31 St. in Bratislava;
- OMISSIS: flats no. 3, 8 and 9 in the house at Jelenia 7 St. in Bratislava;
- OMISSIS: flats nos. 1, 3, 5, 6 and 7 in the house at Trenčianska 6 St. in Bratislava: and
- OMISSIS: flat no. 1 in the house at Šancová 30 St. in Bratislava.
78. To the extent that those applicants allege a breach of their rights as a result of rent control in respect of the flats indicated in the preceding paragraph, they failed to respect the time-limit of six months laid down in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
It follows that this part of the application has been introduced out of time and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
79. The applicants complained that their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions had been breached as a result of the implementation of the rules governing rent control in respect of their property. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The arguments of the parties
1. The applicants
80. The applicants alleged that the successive ministerial ordinances and measures governing rent control ran contrary to the Price Act 1996 and Regulations no. 87/1996 on the implementation of that Act. In particular, the subordinate legislation on rent control disregarded the requirement, laid down in Regulation 3(1) and 3(2) of Regulations no. 87/1996, that economically justified costs and appropriate profit should be taken into account in the context of price regulation.
81. The limitations imposed on the use of their property, over a period of nearly twenty years, were excessive. A disproportionate and unjustified burden had been thereby imposed on the applicants. The controlled rent corresponded to some 10 to 20% of the free-market rent during the period from 1993 to 2010. Despite an increase which had been permissible as from 2011, controlled rent remained several times lower than free-market rent. The amounts in question did not even suffice to cover the maintenance costs inherently associated with the houses to which the rent-control scheme applied. The figures put forward by the Government did not allow a different conclusion to be reached.
82. The aim pursued, namely to ensure housing for persons in need, could have been achieved by different means, such as providing housing allowances for those persons. Continued implementation of the rent-control scheme ran contrary to the general interest, as it hampered the development of a free market in the area of rented housing including appropriate maintenance of the existing housing facilities and the construction of new ones.
83. Expert opinion no. 51/2012 of 26 April 2012 (see paragraph 23 above) indicated that in Slovakia the relevant legislation allowed for regulated rent which had corresponded, on average, to 0.69% of the acquisition value of a flat in 1994. That percentage had been 0.79% in 2001 and 1.96% in 2011.
In contrast, section 2(1) of the Ministry of Finance Measure 1/R/2008 provided that the maximum permissible annual rent for flats which were built from public funds from 2001 onwards was 5% of their acquisition value (see paragraph 59 above). The State thus shifted a heavier burden onto private owners of the flats, including the applicants.
84. Furthermore, the amendments as regards the maximum controlled rent did not automatically entitle the applicants to charge the corresponding amounts as, in accordance with the domestic courts’ practice, any increase of rent had to be the subject of an agreement between the landlords and tenants.
85. The applicants also argued that, unlike in social flats built from public funds, there was no reliable system to check whether their tenants’ current situation justified their benefitting from regulated rent. As a result, the applicants were obliged to let their flats to the original users or their descendants regardless of their current financial or social situation.
86. Slovak legislation foresaw no compensation for owners of residential houses in the applicants’ position and the rules enacted in 2011 unnecessarily prolonged the rent-control scheme until the end of 2016.
2. The Government
87. The Government conceded that the rent-control scheme had resulted in a restriction on the use of the applicants’ property. Such a measure was in accordance with the relevant domestic law.
88. The interference pursued a legitimate aim, namely, to protect tenants against unaffordable increases in rent. The Government argued that the national authorities had, in principle, more direct knowledge of the general interest, and that areas such as housing, as a prime social need, often called for some form of regulation by the State.
89. As to the requirement of proportionality, the Government maintained that a swift deregulation of rent would have had unfavourable social implications. For that reason, the rights of tenants which had been established in the earlier non-market environment had to be protected while the State found a means of gradually resolving the issue. The rent-control scheme was therefore compatible with the general interest within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The levels of regulated rent had been repeatedly increased and other measures had been taken with a view to reducing the burden imposed on flat owners.
90. The Government further pointed to the fact that many of the tenants were elderly and that the municipalities concerned did not have enough housing stock for those socially dependent on regulated rent schemes.
91. With respect to the amount of rent chargeable under the rent-control scheme, maintenance costs would also have had to be borne by the owners if their flats had not been rented out at all. Thus, the amount of rent and the allegedly higher costs of maintaining the property could not automatically be associated.
92. The Government objected to the applicants’ estimation of the amount of rent they could have obtained had the rent-control scheme not applied to their flats. They also disagreed with the argument that the applicants were not able to automatically charge the maximum amount of controlled rent. Such situations could occur only in cases where they had made different arrangements with the tenants.
93. The Government concluded that the rent-control scheme met the general interest of society and was compatible with the interests of house and flat owners as (i) the maximum level of rent chargeable had been regularly increased, (ii) the number of houses to which the rent-control scheme was applicable after 2011 had been reduced, (iii) a legal framework for resolving the housing shortage and ending the rent-control system had been devised, and (iv) the legislation were amended to support modernisation of houses including those which are owned by the applicants.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Recapitulation of the relevant principles
94. The relevant case-law of the Court is summed up in, for example, Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, §§ 160-68 and Edwards v. Malta, no. 17647/04, §§ 52-78, 24 October 2006; both with further references. It can be summarised as follows.
95. In some previous cases where the Court has examined similar complaints of a continuing violation of one’s property rights created by the implementation of laws imposing tenancy agreements on the landlords and setting an allegedly inadequate level of rent, it has held that this constituted a means of State control of the use of property. They fell to be examined under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such interference must be compatible with the principles of (i) lawfulness, (ii) legitimate aim in the general interest, and (iii) “fair balance” (along with cases cited in the preceding paragraph see, for example, Nobel and Others v. the Netherlands, (dec.), no. 27126/11, § 31, 2 July 2013).
96. In particular, the Court has acknowledged that areas such as housing may often call for some form of regulation by the State. Decisions as to whether, and if so when, it may fully be left to the play of free-market forces or whether it should be subject to State control, as well as the choice of measures for securing the housing needs of the community and of the timing for their implementation, necessarily involve consideration of complex social, economic and political issues. Acknowledging that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, the Court has declared that it will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is in the “public” or “general” interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation. Those principles apply equally, if not a fortiori, to measures adopted in the course of the fundamental reform of a country’s political, legal and economic system in the transition from a totalitarian regime to a democratic State.
97. Nevertheless, there must be a reasonable relation of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by measures applied by the State to control the use of the individual’s property. That requirement is expressed by the notion of a “fair balance” that must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. In that context the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests and ascertain whether by reason of the State’s interference the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden.
98. In cases concerning the operation of wide-ranging housing legislation, that assessment may involve not only the conditions for reducing the rent received by individual landlords and the extent of the State’s interference with freedom of contract and contractual relations in the rental market, but also the existence of procedural safeguards ensuring that the operation of the system and its impact on a landlord’s property rights are neither arbitrary nor unforeseeable. Uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State’s conduct. Where an issue in the general interest is at stake, it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time and in an appropriate and consistent manner.
99. Thus in Hutten-Czapska (cited above, § 224 and point 4 of the operative provisions) the Court found a violation of the right of property which consisted in the combined effect of defective provisions on the determination of rent and various restrictions on landlords’ rights in respect of the termination of leases, the statutory financial burdens imposed on them and the absence of any legal ways and means making it possible for them either to offset or mitigate the losses incurred in connection with the maintenance of property or to have the necessary repairs subsidised by the State in justified cases.
100. In the cases of Edwards (cited above, § 78) and Ghigo v. Malta (no. 31122/05, § 69, 26 September 2006), the Court found that a disproportionate and excessive burden had been imposed on the applicants who had been requested to bear most of the social and financial costs of supplying housing accommodation to other individuals. In reaching that conclusion, the Court had regard, in particular, to the extremely low amount of rent, due to the fact that the applicants’ premises had been requisitioned for more than two and three decades respectively and a number of restrictions of the landlords’ rights.
2. Application of the relevant principles to the present case
101. The Court notes, and it has not been disputed between the parties, that the rent control-scheme amounts to an interference with the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as it prevents, or has prevented, them from freely negotiating a level of rent for their flats and has made the termination of the lease of their flats conditional to providing the tenants with adequate alternative accommodation. That interference constitutes a means of State control of the use of property. The application should therefore be examined under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 160-61).
102. The rent-control scheme was based on the Price Act 1996, the Regulations no. 87/1996 implementing that Act, and a successive series of ministerial ordinances and measures. Law no. 260/2011 re-defined the conditions of implementation of the rent-control scheme and set the limits on its maximum duration.
Thus the interference in question has a basis in Slovak law. There is no indication that the relevant provisions do not meet the requirements of sufficient accessibility, precision and foreseeability.
103. The applicants argued that the subordinate legislation on rent control disregarded the requirement, laid down in Regulations no. 87/1996, that economically justified costs and appropriate profit should be taken into account in the context of price regulation. The Court considers that in substance that argument pertains to the effect on the applicant’s rights under the rent-control scheme. As such, it will be best addressed below in the context of examination of the proportionality of the interference complained of.
104. Thus the interference in issue was “lawful” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In view of the information before it, and considering the wide margin of appreciation reserved to national authorities in areas such as housing of the population, the Court further accepts that the relevant legislation governing the rent-control scheme has pursued a legitimate social policy aim (see also Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 165 66). The control of use of the applicants’ property has therefore been “in accordance with the general interest” as required by the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
105. For the Court, the following facts are of particular relevance when assessing whether the interference has satisfied the requirement of proportionality.
106. On the one hand, rent control has been maintained in Slovakia following the fall of the communist regime, establishment of an independent State, and in the context of the country’s transition to a market-oriented economy. It has been aimed at protecting the tenants of flats in houses which had been restored to the original owners or their successors in the context of remedying the wrongs which had been committed earlier. The decision as to how best to reconcile the competing interests at stake undoubtedly involved complex social, economic and political issues which domestic authorities are best placed to know and assess.
107. Furthermore, the Court has noted that both governmental policy and legislative amendments pursued the aim of alleviating the burden put on owners of flats to which rent-control applies by gradually increasing the maximum rent chargeable and, at a later stage, setting a framework and time-limit for its termination. In legislation enacted with effect from 1 January 2014 measures have been taken with a view to facilitating the modernisation of residential houses (see paragraph 53 above).
108. On the other hand, the rent-control scheme has been applied throughout the period during which Slovakia has been bound by the Convention and which started running on 18 March 1992 (the date of ratification of the Convention by the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic, to which Slovakia is one of the successor States). Under Law no. 260/2011, the owners’ loss resulting from regulated rent should be entirely eliminated by the end of 2016 at the latest (see paragraphs 51-52 above).
The above period of more than twenty years of implementation of the rent-control scheme does not coincide with the period during which it actually has been or was applicable in respect of individual flats owned by the applicants in the present case. The Court has noted, nevertheless, that in a majority of the cases the applicants acquired ownership of the flats in the course of the 1990s and that the rent-control scheme is still applicable in respect of a considerable number of their flats (see Appendix 2).
109. It is further relevant that the Government’s housing policy plans of 1994, 2000 and 2005 envisaged the introduction of market-level rent in the private sector. The Government Manifesto of 2002 indicated that the Government would take measures for deregulation of rent before the accession of Slovakia to the European Union which took effect on 1 May 2004 (see paragraphs 65-67 above). Moreover, it appears from the Government’s plan on housing policy and construction of flats of 2010 that the rental market in Slovakia has remained underdeveloped, particularly because of the system of rent control and protection of tenants (see paragraph 68 above). Thus the Governmental documents concede that there have been shortcomings in pursuing the proclaimed policy aimed at putting an end to the rent-control scheme.
110. The documents before the Court do not indicate, in respect of the period prior to 2008, the number of flats to which rent control applied and any steps taken with a view to ensuring that regulated rent be justified by each tenant’s situation. Such steps are contained in the Ministry of Finance Measure no. 02/R/2008 (see paragraphs 63-64 above). The registration forms submitted by tenants indicate that, by 20 January 2009, the rent-control scheme concerned 923 flats, corresponding to 0.24% of rented flats in houses that had existed in 1991. Nevertheless, it is foreseen that, where a municipality has not provided housing to tenants exposed to material hardship, the rent-control scheme will continue to apply until the end of 2016.
111. The actual impact of the rent-control scheme is a particularly important factor in determining whether a fair balance has been struck between the interests at stake. The Court has not been provided with information permitting to assess the actual effects of the rent control on the applicants’ ability to properly maintain their property. It will have regard to the difference between the maximum rent permissible under the rent-control scheme and the market rental value of the flats.
112. In that connection, each party submitted opinions prepared by experts which were based on different valuation methods and the conclusions of which vary. Notwithstanding such difference, and without taking any stand as regards the methods used by the experts, the Court notes that
(i) as from 2000 the relevant rules repeatedly allowed for substantial increase of the maximum amount of controlled rent (see paragraphs 51, 56 and 60 above);
(ii) according to expert opinions submitted by the applicants in 2010, the monthly controlled rent for similar flats corresponded to approximately 14% of the market rent, and that percentage was lower in the preceding period (see Appendix 3);
(iii) in 2012, after a further increase for which Law no. 260/2011 provided, the expert opinion to which the applicants referred by way of example established that the controlled rent corresponded to some 14 to 19% of the market rent of the individual flats concerned (see paragraph 24);
(iv) according to expert opinions submitted by the Government in 2012, and after application of a 40% increase which Law no. 260/2011 allowed for, the controlled rent corresponded, in the case of most of the applicants, to some 20-26% of the market rent, and, in respect of a limited number of cases, the extreme limits of that percentage varied between 7.6% and 36.9% (see Appendix 4);
(v) there is no indication/argument that the controlled rent/market rent ratio was higher during the preceding period (see also Appendix 3); and
(vi) the expert opinions submitted by both the applicants and the Government indicate that the individual applicants’ loss resulting from the fact that they were not allowed to let out their flats at the market price has amounted to several tens or even hundreds of thousands of euros (see Appendix 4, columns G and H).
113. Thus, regardless of the difference between the opinions on which the parties relied, the information before the Court indicates that, even after a number of increases after 2000, the amount of controlled rent which the applicants are entitled to charge has remained considerably lower than the rent for similar housing in respect of which the rent control scheme does not apply. The Court is not convinced that the interests of the applicants, “including their entitlement to derive profit from their property” (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 239; Ghigo, cited above, § 66; and also paragraphs 46, 55 and 99 above), have been met by restricting the owners to such low returns. It is true that Law no. 260/2011 has provided for a yearly 20% increase in regulated rent as from the end of 2011. However, this measure was taken into account in the expert opinions submitted by the Government. It does not address the situation that preceded the enactment of the above law which, as the documents available indicate, was even more detrimental to the applicants.
114. The Court accepts that the shortage of flats available for rent at an affordable level after the fall of the communist regime called for a reconciliation of the conflicting interests of landlords and tenants, especially in respect of flats which had been restored to the original owners. The State authorities had, on the one hand, to secure the protection of the property rights of the former and, on the other, to respect the social rights of the latter, often vulnerable individuals.
115. Nevertheless, the legitimate interests of the community in such situations call for a fair distribution of the social and financial burden involved in the transformation and reform of the country’s housing supply. This burden cannot be placed on one particular social group, however important the interests of the other group or the community as a whole (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 225).
This is all the more relevant in situations as in the present case where (i) the number of flats in respect of which the rent-control scheme applied has not been shown to be particularly high (see paragraph 16 above), and (ii) it has been conceded that shortcomings in the housing planning and policy prevented the rent-control scheme from being terminated at an earlier date in accordance with the proclaimed aim (see paragraphs 68 and 109 above).
116. The above considerations are sufficient for the Court to conclude that the Slovak authorities failed to strike the requisite fair balance between the general interests of the community and the protection of the applicants’ right of property.
117. In reaching that conclusion the Court does not consider it appropriate at this stage to make any distinction as regards the manner and time of acquisition by the applicants of the individual flats. Admittedly, the two applicants who had bought the flats in 2005 (see paragraph 17 above) were aware of the restrictions under the rent-control scheme and they should have included that fact in the price negotiations with the vendor. On the other hand, in view of the Government’s declarations and plans, they could reasonably expect that the rent-control scheme would be dismantled shortly after the purchase. Therefore such issues should be addressed, if appropriate, in the context of determination of the applicants’ claims under Article 41 of the Convention.
118. The applicants also argued that, in accordance with domestic practice they could only charge the maximum rent permissible under the rent-control scheme, subject to the tenants’ agreement. However, the Court notes that they submitted no further details as regards the situation in respect of their individual flats, and that they based the calculation of the damage suffered on the amounts of controlled rent permissible under the rent-control scheme. In these circumstances, and in view of the conclusion reached in paragraph 113 above, the Court does not consider it necessary to pursue this issue.
119. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN TOGETHER WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
120. The applicants maintained that the restrictions imposed by the rent control scheme amounted to discriminatory treatment. They alleged a breach of Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Article 14 reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
121. The applicants argued, in particular, that the Constitution guaranteed equal rights and protection to all owners. The mere fact that the property had been restored to the applicants by the State did not imply that their position was different from other house owners and it did not justify their different treatment as to the scope of their ownership rights.
122. The applicants referred to the reasons for the General Prosecutor’s application to the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 71 above). They argued that persons falling under section 1 of the 2003 Ordinance were subjected to broader restrictions than the owners who had acquired the property by other means than restitution.
123. Lastly, the applicants argued that they were discriminated against in that the relevant law fixed the rent for flats whose construction had been financed by public funds at 5% of the acquisition value. However, in the other houses, including those of the applicants, the rent-control scheme allowed for a maximum rent of approximately 2% of the acquisition value.
124. The Government maintained that the applicants’ situation was not relevantly similar to that of other house owners to whose property the rent control scheme did not apply. In particular, persons like the applicants, to whom the houses had been restored at the beginning of the 1990s, had been aware that the persons living in the flats concerned would retain the right to use them. Unlike in the case of publicly owned flats, those inhabitants had had no right to purchase the flats in houses which had been restored to the original owners. There was therefore a requirement to provide legal protection to those persons by means of the rent-control scheme.
125. In view of its conclusion that there has been a breach of the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court finds that no separate issue arises under Article 14 of the Convention and that, accordingly, it is unnecessary to examine the matter under these provisions taken together.
V. ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
126. The Court considers it appropriate to address this case under Article 46 of the Convention which provides:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
A. The parties’ submissions
127. The applicants maintained that the continued implementation of the rent-control scheme raised a systemic problem under the Convention which affected a high number of persons. The situation was similar to that in Hutten-Czapska (cited above). They called for measures to be taken, in particular since the gradual deregulation of rent did not involve compensation for the low amounts of controlled rent which they had been allowed to charge in the past.
128. The Government pointed out that the rent-control scheme currently affected only about 1,000 dwellings, amounting to 0.06% of the overall number of permanently inhabited housing facilities. It was therefore questionable whether the situation in question was “systemic”.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. General principles
129. The general principles related to Article 46 are set out, for example, in Kurić and Others v. Slovenia [GC], no. 26828/06, §§ 406-07, ECHR 2012 (extracts); Lukenda v. Slovenia, no. 23032/02, §§ 94-97, ECHR 2005 X; and Suljagić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 27912/02, § 60, 3 November 2009; all with further references). They may be summed up as follows.
130. By becoming High Contracting Parties to the European Convention on Human Rights, the respondent States assumed the obligation to secure to everyone within their jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in Section 1 of the Convention. In fact, the States have a general obligation to resolve the problems that have led to the Court finding a violation of the Convention. Should violations of Convention rights still occur, the respondent States must set up mechanisms within their respective legal systems for the effective redress of violations of those rights.
131. Article 46 of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of Article 1, imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to secure the right of the applicant which the Court found to be violated. Such measures must also be taken in respect of other persons in the applicant’s position, notably by solving the problems that have led to the Court’s findings. Subject to monitoring by the Committee of Ministers, the respondent State remains free to choose the means by which it will discharge its legal obligation under Article 46 of the Convention, provided that such means are compatible with the conclusions set out in the Court’s judgment.
132. However, in exceptional cases, with a view to helping the respondent State to fulfil its obligations under Article 46, the Court will seek to indicate the type of measure that might be taken in order to put an end to a situation it has found to exist.
2. Application of these principles to the present case
133. The Court’s conclusion above, as regards the effects of the rent control scheme on the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, suggests that the violation found originated in a problem arising out of the state of the Slovakian legislation and practice, which has affected a number of flat owners to whom the rent-control scheme has applied (see also paragraph 16 above). The Court further notes that 13 other applications concerning the same issue are pending before it which concern some 170 persons.
134. It is true that measures have been taken with a view to gradually improving the situation of landlords. Thus, as a result of the introduction of Law no. 216/2011, the controlled rent could be increased by 20% every year as from the end of 2011. Where a municipality has not provided tenants exposed to material hardship with a dwelling by the end of 2016, the landlords will have the right to claim the difference between the free-market rent and the controlled rent (see paragraph 52 above). Thus those measures provide for a complete elimination of the effects on flat owners of rent-control only as from 2017, and they do not address the situation existing prior to their adoption.
135. The Court considers that further measures should be taken in order to achieve compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. To prevent future findings of infringement of that provision, the respondent State should introduce, as soon as possible, a specific and clearly regulated compensatory remedy in order to provide genuine effective relief for the breach found.
VI. ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
136. Article 41 provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
137. The applicants claimed compensation for pecuniary damage which they suffered as a result of the obligation to let their flats under the rent control scheme.
For the period between 18 March 1992 (date of entry into force of the Convention in respect of the former Czech and Slovak Federal Republic, of which Slovakia is one of the successor States) and 31 March 2012 the amounts claimed were based on opinions prepared by experts and they were increased by default interest applicable under Slovak law. The individual applicants’ claims are set out in Appendix 5 (columns C - E).
The applicants reserved the right to specify the damage sustained during the period starting on 1 April 2012 which could not be covered by the opinions prepared by experts. In the alternative, they claimed the sums indicated in Appendix 5 (column F) in respect of each day since 1 April 2012. Those sums corresponded to the average daily loss determined by experts for the period from 1 January 2012 to 31 March 2012. The applicants further claimed interest on both the damage determined by experts in respect of the period up to 31 March 2012 and the sums claimed in respect of the period starting on 1 April 2012, payable as from the latter date, at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus eight percentage points.
Lastly, the applicants claimed EUR 50,000 each in respect of non pecuniary damage.
138. The Government contested as non-objective the method by which the experts hired by the applicants had determined the alleged pecuniary damage. They also pointed to certain mathematical mistakes in those opinions. They argued that the Court should base its decision on the opinion submitted by the Forensic Engineering Institute in Žilina on 15 November 2012.
In their submission, the applicants who had purchased the flats must have been aware that the rent-control scheme applied to those flats as reflected in the purchase price. The claims of those applicants should therefore be rejected.
The applicants’ claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage was excessive.
Lastly, the Government proposed that the Court adjourn its decision under Article 41 while indicating in its judgment the period during which the application of the rent-control scheme could be regarded as acceptable in Slovakia for the purpose of achieving the legitimate aim pursued. Such indication was relevant for the purpose of determining the actual damage suffered by the applicants.
139. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of the applicants’ claim for compensation for damage is not yet ready for decision and should be reserved, due regard being had to the possibility that a friendly settlement may be reached on this point between the respondent State and the applicants (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
140. The applicants claimed the global sum of EUR 217,106.99. It comprised the following items:
(i) EUR 8,325 in respect of legal assistance at domestic level in the context of pleadings to and negotiations with public authorities and presentation to the media;
(ii) EUR 95,793.93 for legal representation of the applicants in proceedings before the Court on the basis of an hourly fee of EUR 150;
(iii) EUR 1,605 in respect of translation costs;
(iv) EUR 4,284 in respect of the expert opinion submitted in 2010; and
(v) EUR 107,099.06 for preparation of expert opinions submitted in 2012.
As to the last mentioned item, the experts’ costs were determined in accordance with the relevant regulations. Documents attached to two of the reports indicate that the applicants concerned were liable to pay an advance to the experts. This corresponded to EUR 100 for the opinion in respect of the first flat in a given house and EUR 50 in respect of the other flats valued and situated in the same house. Any further sums were payable by the applicants only in the event that they were successful and the Court made an award under Article 41 in respect of costs and expenses. The sums due were to be determined in accordance with the agreement depending on the Court’s actual award.
141. The Government challenged the legal costs claimed by the applicants as being excessive. As to the experts’ fees, the Government argued that the Court should award only the sums actually incurred and disregard the agreement between the applicants and the experts on further amounts being payable depending on the outcome of the Convention proceedings.
142. The Court considers that this part of the applicants’ Article 41 claim is also not ready for decision. It therefore reserves its determination thereof, due regard being had to the possibility that on this point also a friendly settlement may be reached between the respondent State and the applicants (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Holds that OMISSIS has standing to continue the present proceedings in Ms H. Vojtášová’s stead;

2. Declares the application inadmissible to the extent that it concerns application of rent-control scheme to flats indicated in paragraph 77;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

4. Holds that it is not necessary to examine the applicants’ complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

5. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 28 January 2014, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court
Santiago Quesada Josep Casadevall
Registrar President

Appendix 1/2/3/4/5


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 2 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà)
Stato rispondente deve prendere misure di carattere generale (Articolo 46-2 - Misure di carattere generale) Soddisfazione equa riservata



TERZA SEZIONE






CAUSA BITTÓ ED ALTRI C. SLOVACCHIA

(Richiesta n. 30255/09)









SENTENZA
(I meriti)




STRASBOURG

28 gennaio 2014



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Bittó ed Altri c. Slovacchia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Josep Casadevall, Presidente
Alvina Gyulumyan,
Ján Šikuta,
Luis López Guerra,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Johannes Silvis,
Valeriu Griţco, giudici
e Santiago Quesada, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 7 gennaio 2014,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 30255/09) contro la Repubblica slovacca depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con ventuno cittadini slovacchi in 28 maggio 2009. 16 il 2011 gennaio uno dei richiedenti, OMISSIS, (vedere punto 17 di Appendice 1) morì. Il Sig. B. Vojtáš (vedere punto 18 di Appendice 1), suo figlio e risuola erede, espresse il desiderio per intraprendere la richiesta nel posto di sua defunta madre.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Bratislava ed OMISSIS in Bratislava. Il Governo della Repubblica slovacca (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra M. Pirošíková.
3. I richiedenti si lamentarono Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1, sia preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione, di restrizioni che gli articoli che controllo di affitto governante ha imposto sul loro diritto per godere pacatamente le loro proprietà.
4. Con una decisione di 4 gennaio 2012 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente ammissibile.
5. I richiedenti ed il Governo ognuno registrò inoltre osservazioni scritto (l'Articolo 59 § 1) sui meriti. La Camera che ha deciso, dopo avere consultato le parti che nessuna udienza sui meriti è stata richiesta (l'Articolo 59 § 3 in multa), le parti risposero per iscritto all'un l'altro osservazioni.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I dettagli dei richiedenti compaiono in Appendice 1.
A. informazioni di sfondo sul controllo di affitto
7. Dopo 1948, quando il regime comunista era stato installato nella Cecoslovacchia precedente, la politica di alloggio fu basata su una dottrina mirata alla restrizione e l'abolizione di proprietà privata.
8. Degli alloggi residenziali furono confiscati e dei proprietari di alloggi residenziali furono obbligati per trasferire la loro proprietà allo Stato per nessuno o il risarcimento inadeguato. Quelli proprietari che non furono privati formalmente della proprietà del loro alloggio residenziale furono sottoposti a restrizioni nell'esercizio dei loro diritti di proprietà.
9. Come appartamenti di riguardi in alloggi residenziali, affitti furono sostituiti col “diritto di uso durevole.”
10. L'Appartamenti Gestione Atto 1964 che era in vigore sino a 1 gennaio 1992 autorità pubbliche e concesse per decidere sul diritto di uso di appartamenti. Regolamentazioni speciali governarono le somme che gli utenti dovevano pagare. 1 gennaio 1992 “il diritto di uso durevole” fu trasformato in un affitto con affitto regolato.
11. Dopo 1991 degli alloggi residenziali furono ripristinati ai loro proprietari precedenti; appartamenti in questi alloggi furono occupati soprattutto comunque, con inquilini con affitto regolato.
12. Sotto la legge attinente (per dettagli vedere “diritto nazionale Attinente e pratica” sotto), proprietari di alloggi residenziali in una posizione simile a che dei richiedenti nella causa presente accettare è stato obbligato che tutti o alcuni di appartamenti loro sono occupati con inquilini mentre accusa nessuno più dell'importo di massimo di affitto fissato con lo Stato (“lo schema di affitto-controllo”). Nonostante aumenti ripetuti nel massimo affittati che il diritto nazionale dà un titolo a proprietari di alloggio in questa posizione per accusare, che importo è rimasto sotto il livello di affitto addebitabile per alloggio simile affittato sui principi di un'economia di libero-mercato.
13. In situazioni simile a che dei richiedenti, i proprietari di alloggi residenziali non avevano praticamente nessuno mezzi di terminando affitti e sfrattare inquilini senza offrirli con “il risarcimento di alloggio.” Ai proprietari non fu permesso inoltre, per trasferire proprietà di un appartamento affittata con un individuo a qualsiasi il terza persona altro che l'inquilino.
14. Il Governo della Repubblica slovacca ha trattato col problema di controllo di affitto su molte occasioni siccome indicato sotto.
15. Documenti del Ministero di Costruzione e Sviluppo Regionale indicano che, in 20 gennaio 2009, moduli di iscrizione erano stati presentati con inquilini in riguardo di 923 appartamenti dove affittò controllo fu fatto domanda. 2,311 persone vissero in quegli appartamenti, l'area di superficie media di che era 71.38 metri di piazza. I documenti indicano che fu previsto che alloggio di sostituto sarebbe reso disponibile alle persone riguardate con la riforma progettata così lungo come questo fu giustificato con la loro situazione sociale. 76.5% degli inquilini registrarono così abitato in appartamenti localizzati in Bratislava.
16. Sulla base di quelli dati, le autorità valutarono, che lo schema di affitto-controllo riguardò verso 1,000 appartamenti che sono 0.24% di appartamenti affittati in alloggi che sono esistiti in 1991 e 0.06% degli installazioni di alloggio abitati che erano disponibili in Slovacchia nel 2001.
B. le cause delle Particolari circostanze dei richiedenti
17. I richiedenti sono proprietari o comproprietari di edifici residenziali in Bratislava e Trnava ai quali fa domanda lo schema di affitto-controllo, o ha fatto domanda, (gli ulteriori dettagli sono esposti fuori in Appendice 2). Loro ottennero la proprietà degli appartamenti con vario vuole dire, come restituzione, donazione o eredità dai loro parenti a chi gli appartamenti erano stati ripristinati nei primi 1990s. In due cause i richiedenti acquistarono le ulteriori quote di proprietà dall'altro comproprietario, il Municipio di Bratislava. Il Sig. Dobšovič ed il Sig.ra Dobšovičová (richiedenti elencarono in punti 6 e 7 di Appendice 1) acquistò gli appartamenti da individui nel 2005. La maggioranza degli altri richiedenti acquisì proprietà nel corso degli anni novanta.
Nel frattempo, lo schema di affitto-controllo ha cessato essere applicabile a molto degli appartamenti riguardati.
18. I richiedenti sostennero che l'affitto al quale sono loro, o era, concedè per affittare la loro proprietà è lontano sotto le spese di manutenzione per alloggi loro e sproporzionatamente minimo comparò con appartamenti simili ai quali non fa domanda lo schema di affitto-controllo.
19. Le parti presentarono le informazioni seguenti come riguardi l'impatto dello schema di affitto-controllo sui richiedenti.
1. Documenti presentati coi richiedenti
20. Inizialmente, e con modo di esempio, i richiedenti indicarono, che l'affitto controllato in riguardo di un appartamento con un'area di superficie di 72.56 metri di piazza era 71.50 euros (EUR) per mese che corrisponde ad EUR 0.99 per metro quadrato. Comunque, il libero-mercato mensile affittato in riguardo di tale appartamento era verso EUR 830, quel è EUR 11.40 per metro quadrato.
21. I richiedenti si appellarono inoltre sull'opinione di un esperto prevista alla loro richiesta 19 luglio 2010. Liberò fuori la differenza - mercato affittò e l'affitto controllato in riguardo di un alloggio residenziale localizzato a Trenčianska Via in Bratislava-Nivy per il periodo da 1993 a 2010 (per ulteriori dettagli vedere Appendice 3).
22. Seguendo la decisione della Corte di dichiarare la richiesta ammissibile, i richiedenti presentarono opinioni voluminose di esperti che concernono le loro proprietà.
23. L'opinione di esperto io. n. 51/2012 26 aprile 2012 che i richiedenti si appellarono su con modo di esempio, concerne un alloggio residenziale dove affittò controllo fatto domanda a cinque fuori dell'otto appartamenti. Fu situato su Tallerova Via in Bratislava-nello Staré il distretto di Mesto-e molti richiedenti sono coproprietari degli appartamenti riguardati (vedere anche Appendice 4). L'opinione indicò che la legislazione attinente lasciò spazio ad affitto regolato che corrispose, su media, a 0.69% del valore attuale di un appartamento nel 1994. Che rapporto era 0.79% nel 2001 e 1.96% nel 2011.
24. Secondo opinione competente n. 51/2012, l'affitto regolato corrispose a 2.2% del libero-mercato affittati nel 1993. Nel 2002 corrispose, su media, a 4.5% del libero-mercato affittati e nel 2011 la media regolò affitto corrisposto a 14.3% dell'affitto di libero-mercato. I richiedenti presentarono che le altre opinioni che concernono le loro proprietà erano in linea con quel la conclusione. L'opinione sopra contiene la valutazione seguente degli appartamenti riguardata per il periodo da 1 gennaio a 31 marzo 2012:
Appartamento
n. Mercato mensile
affitti EUR/m2
Ogni mese controllato
affitti EUR/m2
Percentuale controllato /
affitto di mercato
1 8.28 1.58 19%
2 N/A nel 2012
5 8.28 1.55 18.7%
6 7.92 1.11 14%
7 8.16 1.12 13.7%

25. Come riguardi le spese di manutenzione delle loro proprietà, i richiedenti presentarono che la maggior parte di loro non avevano sufficienti vuole dire assicurare rinnovamento e mantenimento degli alloggi a causa di redditi bassi sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo. Loro si appellarono sulle opinioni competenti che determinarono il “affitto basato sul prezzo” in riguardo degli alloggi posseduto con loro, vale a dire l'affitto calcolò sulla base del valore tecnico e corrente degli edifici e sui costi necessario per il loro mantenimento periodico ed ordinario ed adeguato, mentre prendendo in considerazione il deterioramento graduale degli edifici. Così secondo opinione competente n. 51/2012, l'affitto regolato corrispose a 3.3% del “affitto basato sul prezzo” nel 1993. Nel 2002 corrispose, su media, a 5.3% del “affitto basato sul prezzo”, e nel 2011 la media regolò affitto corrisposto a 26.4% del “affitto basato sul prezzo.”
26. Con riferimento agli esperti le conclusioni di ', i richiedenti sostennero che loro avevano sofferto di danno patrimoniale su conto della richiesta dello schema di affitto-controllo alla loro proprietà. Questo fu determinato come la differenza fra l'affitto di libero-mercato applicabile ad abitazioni simili e l'affitto controllato ai quali ai richiedenti fu permesso per accusare in tutto il periodo di proprietà e la richiesta dello schema di affitto-controllo. Il danno che i richiedenti individuali chiesero di avere subito è specificato in Appendice 5.
2. Documenti presentati dal Governo
27. Il Governo presentò inizialmente l'opinione di un esperto diverso, disegnato su nel 2010 secondo che il libero-mercato medio affitto mensile per appartamenti comparabile a quelli dei richiedenti nel municipio di Bratislava-Staré Mesto era fra EUR 6.13 e 6.48 per metro quadrato. Nel centre più largo di Trnava l'affitto di libero-mercato era fra EUR 3.37 ed EUR 3.87 per metro di piazza a quel il tempo.
28. In risposta alle opinioni competenti e particolareggiate presentata coi richiedenti, il Governo prima presentò un'opinione con l'Istituto di Ingegneria Forense in Žilina. Aguzzò ad errori in molto delle opinioni competenti, impugnò i metodi fatti domanda con gli esperti e la loro posizione per determinare l'importo di profitto perso coi richiedenti. La prospettiva fu espressa che paragone diretto con abitazioni dove lo schema di affitto-controllo non fece domanda era il metodo più appropriato per determinare il danno subito coi richiedenti.
29. Successivamente, il Governo presentò un'opinione stesa con l'Istituto di Ingegneria Forense in Žilina 15 novembre 2012. Indicò che mancanza di dati statistici per il periodo complessivo di controllo di affitto ostacolò i proprietari piatti ' perse profitto dall'essere determinato in una maniera obiettiva. Per stabilire il risarcimento appropriato per i richiedenti era perciò appropriato per usare una metodologia simile alla determinazione del risarcimento per tollerare una servitù sulla proprietà. Fra gli altri dati, l'opinione indicò, che, sotto la regolamentazione in vigore fra 1964 e la fine di giugno 1992, l'affitto in riguardo di un appartamento di tre-stanza corrisposto ad EUR 0.08 per metro quadrato. Come da 1 luglio 1992 che un 100% aumento è stato fatto domanda.
30. Con vuole dire di paragone, l'opinione stabilì che, nel 2012, il valore di noleggio di mercato mensile di appartamenti in Bratislava variò fra EUR 4.71 ed EUR 5.97 per metro di piazza che dipende dall'ubicazione, numero di stanze ed attrezzatura. Corrispose ad EUR 4.51/4.52 in riguardo di appartamenti di one/two-stanza in Trnava.
Il valore di noleggio dei richiedenti che ' spiana sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo era fra EUR 1.20 e 1.60 in più cause, l'estremo ed essere di valori eccezionale EUR 0.45 ed EUR 2.21 allo stesso tempo, in Bratislava. In Trnava l'affitto controllato dei richiedenti che gli appartamenti di ' hanno variato fra EUR 1.24 ed EUR 1.60 nel 2012. Nel determinare il valore di noleggio dei richiedenti ' spiana nel 2012 un 40% aumento fu fatto domanda (come previsto per con Legge n. 260/2011 nel 2011 e 2012).
I dati attinenti sono esposti fuori in Appendice 4 (le colonne Un-F).
31. Secondo l'opinione competente, il risarcimento appropriato pagabile ai richiedenti dovrebbe essere calcolato come la differenza fra il reddito mensile e netto (il profitto) quale loro erano in grado ottenere per affittare i loro appartamenti sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo ed il reddito mensile e netto (il profitto) quale potrebbe essere dedotto dall'affittare appartamenti comparabili al prezzo di mercato. Il calcolo è basato su (i) il valore tecnico degli appartamenti nel 2012, (l'ii) il loro valore di noleggio (sia sul mercato gratis e sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo) nel 2012; (l'iii) la durata della richiesta dello schema di affitto-controllo; (l'iv) la quota di proprietà di richiedenti individuali; e (v) il tasso di interesse marginale della Banca Centrale europea.
Gli importi di risarcimento ai quali i richiedenti individuali sono concessi in conformità col metodo sopra del calcolo per il periodo coperti con l'opinione sono esposti fuori in Appendice 4 (colonna G).
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Costituzione
32. Facendo seguito ad Articolo 20 § 1, il diritto di proprietà di tutte le persone ha lo stesso contenuto legale e gode la stessa protezione.
B. Codice civile
33. Articolo 124 garanzie gli stessi diritti ed obblighi a tutti i proprietari. Tutela giuridica uguale sarà accordata a tutti i proprietari.
34. Disposizioni riguardo al contratto d'affitto di appartamenti sono esposte fuori in Articoli 685 a 716 del Codice civile.
35. Facendo seguito ad Articolo 687, un padrone di casa è obbligato a mettere un appartamento alla disposizione di un inquilino in un stato appropriato per uso normale e garantire all'inquilino il pieno e godimento ininterrotto di diritti in collegamento con l'uso dell'appartamento.
36. Articolo che 696 § 1 offre, inter l'alia che il metodo di calcolare l'affitto, il servizio accusa riferito all'uso dell'appartamento, il metodo di pagare l'affitto ed accuse di servizio e le condizioni sotto le quali un padrone di casa è dato un titolo ad aumentare unilateralmente l'affitto ed accuse di servizio e correggere gli altri termini del contratto d'affitto sono governate con legislazione speciale.
37. Sotto Articolo 706, dopo la morte di un inquilino il diritto al contratto d'affitto passa ai parenti dell'inquilino se loro possono provare che loro stavano vivendo con l'inquilino in una famiglia condivisa nel giorno di suo o la sua morte e non ha il loro proprio appartamento. Lo stesso diritto sarà goduto con persone che si sono prese cura di una famiglia condivisa e hanno vissuto con l'inquilino in una famiglia condivisa per almeno tre anni e non hanno il loro proprio appartamento.
38. Articolo 707 § 1 dà un titolo al coniuge superstite per divenire il risuoli inquilino di un appartamento congiuntamente affittato sulla morte dell'altro consorte.
39. Le disposizioni di Articolo 706 ed Articolo 707 § 1 sono anche applicabili nell'evento che un inquilino lascia permanentemente una famiglia condivisa.
40. Facendo seguito ad Articolo 871 § 1, decretati con effetto da 1 gennaio 1992 “il diritto di uso durevole” di appartamenti e gli altri locali sotto la legge prima in vigore e sostenendosi su che data fu trasformata in un affitto con affitto regolato.
C. Atto sulla Proprietà di Appartamenti (e altri Locali) (la Legge n. 182/1993)
41. Sezione 16(1) governa il trapasso di proprietà di un appartamento. Dove un appartamento è affittato con un individuo, a meno che il diritto per affittare l'appartamento fu concordato per un periodo fisso, un padrone di casa può trasferire solamente proprietà di sé all'inquilino. Questa disposizione non colpisce il diritto di pre-acquisto del comproprietario.
D. Atto sul Prezzo del 1996 (la Legge n. 18/1996)
42. Come un articolo generale, il prezzo di beni, incluso l'importo di affitto è determinato sulla base di un accordo fra il venditore e l'acquirente (sezioni 1-3).
43. Parte Tre del Prezzo Atto 1996 permette a misure Statali di essere prese in risposta ad undesired fissi il prezzo di sviluppi. Loro includono regolamentazione di prezzi ed una proibizione su dire di sì un prezzo che è improprio.
44. Sotto sezione 4a (precedentemente sezione 4), regolamentazione di prezzo è lecita dove, inter l'alia, una situazione di mercato straordinaria sorge, dove c'è una minaccia al mercato come un risultato di un ambiente competitivo ed insufficientemente sviluppato, o dove è richiesto per il fine di proteggere consumatori o sui motivi di un altro interesse pubblico.
45. Regolamentazione di prezzo può essere realizzata per la fissazione di prezzi con le autorità, il setting delle condizioni per accordi sui prezzi o una combinazione di quelli due metodi (sezione 5).
46. Sezione 8, decretata con effetto da 1 novembre 2008 prevede che, quando prezzi che regola, le autorità devono prendere in considerazione giustificato costa ed un profitto appropriato.
47. Facendo seguito a sezione 20(1) e (2), il Ministero delle condizioni di set di Finanza per regolamentazione di prezzo e decide su questioni relative. Sino a 1 marzo 2005 il Ministero di Costruzione e Sviluppo Regionale fu autorizzato per regolare affitto. La sfera di regolamentazione sarà determinata con un articolo legale e generalmente legando (sezione 11).
48. Legge n. 68/2005 3 febbraio 2005 introdussero un numero di emendamenti al Prezzo Atto 1996. Facendo seguito a sezione 1(12) di Legge n. 68/2005, l'Ordinanza del 2003 (vedere sotto) fu abrogato. Legge n. 68/2005 entrarono in vigore 1 marzo 2005 con l'eccezione di sezione 1(12) che prese effetto 1 luglio 2007.
49. Un altro emendamento al Prezzo Atto 1996 fu introdotto con Legge n. 200/2007 29 marzo 2009, con effetto da 1 luglio 2007. Facendo seguito a quell'emendamento, la data quando l'Ordinanza del 2003 cesserebbe avere effetto stato posticipato sino a 31 dicembre 2008.
Legge di E. n. 260/2011
50. Su 15 settembre 2011, la Conclusione ed Accordo di Affitto (i Certi Appartamenti) l'Atto (la Legge n. 260/2011) entrò in vigore. Fu decretato con una prospettiva ad eliminando restrizioni di affitto riguardo a proprietari individuali.
51. Le sue disposizioni sono applicabili, in particolare, ad appartamenti di individui il cui affitto è stato regolato finora. In quelle cause, padroni di casa furono concessi per dare avviso di conclusione di un contratto di affitto in 31 marzo 2012. Simile conclusione di prese di affitto effettua dopo un periodo di avviso di dodici-mese. Comunque, se un inquilino è messo in mostra alla fatica di materiale, lui o lei sarà in grado continuare ad usare l'appartamento con affitto regolato, anche dopo scadenza del periodo di avviso sino ad un contratto di affitto nuovo con un municipio è stato esposto su. Legge n. 260/2011 danno un titolo ad inoltre padroni di casa per aumentare una volta l'affitto entro 20% per anno fino a 2015.
52. Municipi sono obbligati per offrire una persona messa in mostra alla fatica di materiale con un appartamento municipale con affitto regolato. Se un municipio non si attiene con che obbligo in 31 dicembre 2016 in una causa determinata, il padrone di casa può chiedere la differenza fra il libero-mercato e l'affitto regolato.
F. Atto del 2013 sul fondo statale per lo Sviluppo degli alloggi
53. Legge n. 150/2013 ammende la più prima legislazione sull'Alloggio Sviluppo Fondo Statale. Prenderà effetto 1 gennaio 2014. Fra le altre cose, con riferimento a Legge n. 260/2011 dà un titolo a proprietari di alloggi o appartamenti che erano stati ripristinati ai proprietari originali per fare domanda per un prestito preferenziale per il fine di modernizzazione di simile edifici.
G. norme legali che governano gli affitti
54. Decreto n. 60/1964 dell'Autorità Centrale per lo Sviluppo di Economia Locale su pagamento per l'uso di appartamenti e servizi relativi erano in vigore da 1964 sino alla fine di 1999. Divise appartamenti in quattro categorie secondo il loro status e fisso il prezzo annuale per il loro uso.
55. 12 marzo 1996 il Ministero di Finanza emise Regolamentazioni n. 87/1996 che implementano il Prezzo Atto 1996. Loro divennero operativi 1 aprile 1996. Regolamentazione 3(1) e 3(2) richiede giustificato economicamente costa e profitto appropriato per essere preso in considerazione nel contesto di regolamentazione di prezzo.
56. Nel 1992, 2000 e 2001 e 1 marzo 2003 il Ministero di Finanza emise quattro strumenti di legislazione subordinata che prevede per un aumento in affitto controllato entro 100%, 70% 45% e 95% rispettivamente.
57. 22 dicembre 2003 il Ministero di Costruzione e Sviluppo Regionale emise l'Ordinanza del 2003 (l'Ordinanza (il výnos) n. V-1/2003 su Controllo di Affitto per Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti). Fissa il massimo importo lecito di affitto per un appartamento secondo la sua area di superficie e categoria, senza distinzione come alla sua ubicazione. L'ordinanza cessò avere effetto in 1 maggio 2008.
58. 23 aprile 2008 il Ministero di Finanza emise Misura (l'opatrenie) n. 01/R/2008 su Controllo di Affitto per Appartamenti con riferimento a sezioni 11 e 20 del Prezzo Atto 1996. Entrò in vigore in 1 maggio 2008.
59. Similmente agli articoli precedenti, fissa l'importo di massimo di affitto per metro di piazza di spazio abitabile ed annette (sezione 1). Un aumento o riduzione è la possibile dipendendo sui mobili disponibile. In riguardo di appartamenti costruito da finanziamenti pubblici dopo 1 febbraio 2001 l'affitto di massimo è fissato a 5% del loro valore attuale (sezione 2(1)).
60. Sezione 3 concede un aumento del massimo affittato entro 15% in alloggi costruiti senza consolidamento pubblico o quelli che furono ripristinati a proprietari o i loro successori con modo di compensazione per mali passati.
61. Facendo seguito a sezione 4, controllo di affitto non fa domanda a, inter l'alia, appartamenti vacanti in alloggi costruiti senza consolidamento pubblico o in alloggi ripristinati a proprietari con modo di compensazione per mali passati, con l'eccezione di cause che concernono il trasferimento di un contratto d'affitto o il cambio di un appartamento (Articoli 706-08 del Codice civile). Similmente, controllo di affitto non fa domanda ad alloggi costruiti senza qualsiasi consolidamento pubblico dove costruzione terminò ufficialmente dopo 1 febbraio 2001.
62. Infine, sezione 5 delle abrogazioni di Misura l'Ordinanza del 2003.
63. 25 settembre 2008 il Ministero di Finanza emise Misura n. 02/R/2008 che correggono la Misura sopra di 23 aprile 2008 sul controllo di affitto. Entrò in vigore 1 ottobre 2008. Non colpisce l'importo di affitto lecito ma specifica le condizioni sotto le quali simile affitto può essere accusato dopo 31 dicembre 2011.
64. In particolare, la sezione 4a(1 di recente introdotta) permette allo schema di affitto-controllo di continuare a fare domanda dopo la data sopra dove, 1 ottobre 2008, (i) inquilini o persone che dividono la loro famiglia non possedettero o co-proprio un appartamento comparabile o beni immobili abitabile nello stesso municipio o all'interno di 50 chilometri dei suoi confini; (l'ii) il padrone di casa e l'inquilino non è giunto prima ad un accordo diverso su affitto 1 gennaio 2012; e (l'iii) gli inquilini riguardati hanno presentato un modulo di iscrizione al Ministero di Costruzione e Sviluppo Regionale di fronte a 31 dicembre 2008.
H. Politica governativa e documenti di proggettazione
65. Il piano del Governo su politica di alloggio e costruzione di appartamenti per il periodo fra il 1994 ed il 2000, disegnato su nel 1994, previde che affitto in riguardo di appartamenti posseduto con individui dovrebbe essere aumentato con una prospettiva a coprendo i proprietari ' costa come da 1 gennaio 1995. Previde inoltre l'introduzione di livelli di affitto basata su prezzi di mercato come da 1 gennaio 1996.
66. Il Manifesto Statale di novembre 2002 indicò che il Governo avrebbe portato misure per deregolamentazione di affitto di fronte all'accessione prevista della Slovacchia all'Unione europea. Qualsiasi misure regolatore dovettero essere collegate da allora in poi esclusivamente al vero aumento di costi.
67. Ulteriori piani su politica di alloggio e costruzione di appartamenti, disegnato su nel 2000 e 2005, anche previde l'introduzione di affitto di mercato-livello nel settore privato. Veste di alloggio in appartamenti municipali sarebbe aumentata così che alloggio di sostituto potrebbe essere offerto a persone indigenti che sarebbero colpite con simile liberalizzazione di affitto.
68. Il bisogno per l'eliminazione di controllo di affitto fu confermato nel più recente piano di 2010 che coprono il periodo sino a 2015. Il documento indica che il settore privato di alloggio affittato è sottosviluppato, particolarmente a causa del sistema passato di controllo di affitto e la protezione eccessiva di inquilini.
69. In decisione n. 357/2008 il Ministero di Costruzione e Sviluppo Regionale fu istruito per preparare un piano per stabilire relazioni fra padroni di casa ed inquilini in appartamenti dove affittò controllo era stato fatto domanda. Il piano fu approvato 16 settembre 2009 (la decisione n. 640/2009). Che decisione istruì i ministri riguardarono preparare, di fronte a 31 dicembre 2010, Conti su conclusione ed accordo di certe relazioni di landlord/tenant e su controllo di affitto nel settore pubblico, così come regolamentazioni su assegni di alloggio, proporre installazioni di alloggio di sostituto agli inquilini riguardò ed a posi in giù la sfera, le condizioni e maniera della loro acquisizione. In oltre, il risarcimento di una natura strutturale fu previsto per proprietari di alloggi residenziali.
70. Successivamente, il Ministro di Costruzione e Sviluppo Regionale chiese al Sindaco di Bratislava di identificare aree appropriate sulle quali installazioni di alloggio di sostituto potrebbero essere costruiti per persone in bisogno.
I. Procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale
71. In una richiesta alla Corte Costituzionale, depositò 29 marzo 2007, il Generale Accusatore impugnò, inter alia, l'Ordinanza del 2003 come essendo contrario alla Costituzione. La richiesta espresse la prospettiva che il Prezzo Atto 1996 non diede un titolo al Ministero di Costruzione e Sviluppo Regionale per emettere un'ordinanza sul controllo di affitto; che l'Ordinanza era discriminatoria e limitata il diritto di proprietari piatti; che era discutibile se tale restrizione era nell'interesse pubblico e necessario; e che l'Ordinanza avrebbe dovuto cessare avere effetto come da 1 marzo 2005. L'assenza di qualsiasi il risarcimento per padroni di casa a chi lo schema di affitto-controllo fatto domanda fu criticato anche. 7 giugno 2007 il Generale Accusatore completò la richiesta con Legge anche difficile n. 200/2007 che correggono il Prezzo Atto 1996.
72. 8 aprile 2009 la Corte Costituzionale cessò i procedimenti senza esame dei meriti, sulla base che la richiesta era stata ritirata. Notò che il Prezzo Atto 1996 era stato corretto e che l'Ordinanza del 2003 aveva cessato avere effetto.
LA LEGGE
IO. LOCUS STANDI DEL FIGLIO DEL RICHIEDENTE DECEDUTO
73. Uno dei richiedenti, OMISSIS morì 16 gennaio 2011. OMISSIS, suo figlio e risuola erede che anche depositò una richiesta in riguardo di proprietà che lui aveva co-posseduto con sua madre espresse il desiderio per intraprendere la richiesta nel posto di sua defunta madre.
74. La Corte nota che le preoccupazioni applicative e presenti un diritto di proprietà che è, in principio trasferibile al parente prossimo della persona deceduta. Il Sig. B. Vojtáš era un comproprietario degli appartamenti in oggetto ed ereditò la quota di proprietà del richiedente deceduto. In queste circostanze la Corte considera che lui ha sostenendo continuare i procedimenti presenti nel posto di sua madre (vedere Sharenok c. l'Ucraina, n. 35087/02, § 12 22 febbraio 2005).
II. OTTEMPERANZA CON IL TEMPO-LIMITE DEI SEI MESI
75. Sotto l'Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, la Corte può trattare solamente con la questione “entro un periodo di sei mesi dalla data sul quale la definitivo decisione fu presa.” Dove la violazione allegato costituisce una situazione che continua contro la quale nessuna via di ricorso nazionale è disponibile, come la richiesta di schema di affitto-controllo sotto la legislazione attinente nella causa presente, il periodo di sei-mese avvia correre dalla fine della situazione riguardò (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Mosendz c. l'Ucraina, n. 52013/08, § 68 17 gennaio 2013).
Facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione, la Corte respingerà qualsiasi richiesta sotto la quale considera inammissibile quel l'Articolo. Può fare così a qualsiasi stadio dei procedimenti.
76. Seguendo la decisione della Corte di dichiarare la richiesta ammissibile, le parti presentarono le ulteriori informazioni attinenti. Sé comprised che opinioni competenti che specificarono i periodi della richiesta dello schema di affitto-controllo in riguardo degli appartamenti individuali hanno concernito.
77. I documenti presentati indicano (vedere Appendice 2) che controllo di affitto aveva cessato fare domanda in riguardo degli appartamenti possedette coi richiedenti seguenti più di sei mesi di fronte all'introduzione della richiesta in 28 maggio 2009:
- OMISSIS: appartamenti N. 3, 5, 6 7 e 14 nell'alloggio a Zámočnícka 11 Via in Bratislava ed appartamenti N. 5, 9, 10 13 e 14 nell'alloggio a Dunajská 38 Via in Bratislava;
- OMISSIS: appartamenti N. 3 e 6 nell'alloggio a Kalinčiakova 31 Via in Trnava;
- OMISSIS: appartamenti N. 12, 15 19 e 23 nell'alloggio a Štefánikova 31 Via in Bratislava;
- OMISSIS: appartamenti n. 3, 8 e 9 nell'alloggio a Jelenia 7 Via in Bratislava;
- OMISSIS: appartamenti N. 1, 3, 5, 6 e 7 nell'alloggio a Trenčianska 6 Via in Bratislava: e
- OMISSIS: appartamento n. 1 nell'alloggio a Šancová 30 Via in Bratislava.
78. Alla misura che quelli richiedenti adducono una violazione dei loro diritti come un risultato di controllo di affitto in riguardo degli appartamenti indicò nel paragrafo precedente, loro non riuscirono a rispettare il tempo-limite di sei mesi posato in giù in Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
Segue che questa parte della richiesta è stata introdotta fuori termini e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
79. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il loro diritto a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà era stato violato come un risultato dell'attuazione degli articoli controllo di affitto governante in riguardo della loro proprietà. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Gli argomenti delle parti
1. I richiedenti
80. I richiedenti addussero che le ordinanze ministeriali e successive e misure controllo di affitto governante funzionò contrario al Prezzo Atto 1996 e Regolamentazioni n. 87/1996 sull'attuazione di quel l'Atto. In particolare, la legislazione subordinata sul controllo di affitto trascurò il requisito, posò in giù in Regolamentazione 3(1) e 3(2) di Regolamentazioni n. 87/1996, che giustificò economicamente costi e profitto appropriato dovrebbe essere preso in considerazione nel contesto di regolamentazione di prezzo.
81. Le limitazioni imposte sull'uso della loro proprietà, su un periodo di quasi venti anni erano eccessive. Un carico sproporzionato ed ingiustificato era stato imposto con ciò sui richiedenti. L'affitto controllato corrispose a dei 10 a 20% del libero-mercato affittati durante il periodo da 1993 a 2010. Nonostante un aumento che era stato lecito come da 2011, affitto controllato rimasto molte volte abbassa, che affitto di libero-mercato. Gli importi in oggetto non basti anche coprire inerentemente le spese di manutenzione associate con gli alloggi ai quali fece domanda lo schema di affitto-controllo. Le cifre fissate in avanti col Governo non permisero ad una conclusione diversa di essere raggiunta.
82. Lo scopo perseguì, vale a dire assicurare alloggio per persone in bisogno, sarebbe potuto essere realizzato con diverso vuole dire, come offrendo assegni di alloggio per quelle persone. Attuazione continuata dello schema di affitto-controllo funzionò contrario all'interesse generale, come sé lo sviluppo di un mercato gratis impedì nell'area di alloggio affittato incluso mantenimento appropriato degli installazioni di alloggio esistenti e la costruzione di uni nuovi.
83. Opinione competente n. 51/2012 26 aprile 2012 (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra) indicò che in Slovacchia la legislazione attinente lasciò spazio ad affitto regolato che aveva corrisposto, su media, a 0.69% del valore attuale di un appartamento nel 1994. Che percentuale era stata 0.79% nel 2001 e 1.96% nel 2011.
In contrasto, sezione 2(1) del Ministero di Finanza Misura 1/R/2008 purché che il massimo affitto annuale e lecito per appartamenti che furono costruiti da finanziamenti pubblici da 2001 in avanti era 5% del loro valore attuale (vedere paragrafo 59 sopra). Lo Stato spostò così un carico più pesante sopra proprietari privati degli appartamenti, incluso i richiedenti.
84. Inoltre, gli emendamenti come riguardi il massimo affitto controllato non diede un titolo ad automaticamente i richiedenti per accusare gli importi corrispondenti come, in conformità col nazionale corteggia ' pratica qualsiasi aumento di affitto doveva essere la materia di un accordo fra i padroni di casa ed inquilini.
85. I richiedenti dibatterono anche che, diversamente da in appartamenti sociali costruiti da finanziamenti pubblici, non era nessun sistema affidabile da controllare se i loro inquilini ' situazione corrente giustificò il loro beneficio da affitto regolato. Di conseguenza, i richiedenti furono obbligati per affittare i loro appartamenti agli utenti originali o i loro discendenti nonostante la loro corrente situazione finanziaria o sociale.
86. Legislazione slovacca non previde risarcimento per proprietari di alloggi residenziali nei richiedenti ' posiziona e gli articoli inutilmente decretarono nel 2011 prolungò lo schema di affitto-controllo sino alla fine di 2016.
2. Il Governo
87. Il Governo ammise che lo schema di affitto-controllo aveva dato luogo ad una restrizione sull'uso dei richiedenti la proprietà di '. Tale misura era in conformità col diritto nazionale attinente.
88. L'interferenza intraprese un scopo legittimo, vale a dire proteggere inquilini contro aumenti di non sopportabili in affitto. Il Governo dibatté che le autorità nazionali avevano, in principio, conoscenza più diretta dell'interesse generale, e che aree come alloggio, come un primo bisogno sociale spesso mandato a chiamare della forma di regolamentazione con lo Stato.
89. Come al requisito della proporzionalità, il Governo sostenne, che una deregolamentazione rapida di affitto avrebbe avuto implicazioni sociali non favorevoli. Per che ragione, i diritti di inquilini che erano stati stabiliti nel più primo ambiente di non-mercato dovevano essere protetti mentre lo Stato trovò un mezzi di gradualmente chiarire il problema. Lo schema di affitto-controllo era perciò compatibile con l'interesse generale all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. I livelli di affitto regolato erano aumentati ripetutamente e le altre misure erano state cominciate con una prospettiva a ridurre il carico imposto su proprietari piatti.
90. Il Governo aguzzò inoltre al fatto che molti degli inquilini erano anziani e che i municipi riguardati non avevano abbastanza scorta di alloggio per quelli socialmente dipendente su schemi di affitto regolati.
91. Riguardo all'importo di affitto addebitabile sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo, spese di manutenzione avrebbero dovuto anche essere sopportate coi proprietari se i loro appartamenti non fossero stati affittati affatto fuori. Così, l'importo di affitto ed il presumibilmente costi più alti di mantenere la proprietà non potevano essere associati automaticamente.
92. Il Governo obiettò ai richiedenti il preventivo di ' dell'importo di affitto che loro avrebbero potuto ottenere avuto lo schema di affitto-controllo non fatto domanda ai loro appartamenti. Loro non furono d'accordo anche con l'argomento che i richiedenti non erano in grado accusare automaticamente l'importo di massimo di affitto controllato. Simile situazioni potrebbero accadere solamente in cause dove loro avevano fatto disposizioni diverse con gli inquilini.
93. Il Governo concluse che lo schema di affitto-controllo soddisfece l'interesse generale di società ed era compatibile con gli interessi di alloggio e proprietari di appartamento come (i) il livello di massimo di affitto addebitabile era aumentato regolarmente, (l'ii) il numero di alloggi al quale lo schema di affitto-controllo era applicabile dopo 2011 era stato ridotto, (l'iii) una struttura legale per chiarendo la penuria di alloggi e terminare il sistema di affitto-controllo era stata concepita, e (l'iv) la legislazione fu corretta per sostenere modernizzazione di alloggi incluso quelli che sono posseduti coi richiedenti.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ricapitolazione dei principi attinenti
94. La causa-legge attinente della Corte è sommata su in, per esempio, Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, §§ 160-68 ed Edwards c. il Malta, n. 17647/04, §§ 52-78 24 ottobre 2006; sia con gli ulteriori riferimenti. Può essere riassunto siccome segue.
95. In delle cause precedenti dove la Corte ha esaminato azioni di reclamo simili di una violazione che continua dei diritti di proprietà di uno create con l'attuazione di leggi accordi di affitto imponenti sui padroni di casa ed esponendo un presumibilmente livello inadeguato di affitto, ha contenuto che questo costituì un mezzi di controllo Statale dell'uso di proprietà. Loro incorsero essere esaminati sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Simile interferenza deve essere compatibile coi principi di (i) la legalità, (l'ii) scopo legittimo nell'interesse generale, e (l'iii) “equilibrio equo” (insieme a cause citate nel paragrafo precedente vedere, per esempio, Nobel ed Altri c. i Paesi Bassi, (il dec.), n. 27126/11, § 31 2 luglio 2013).
96. In particolare, la Corte ha ammesso che aree come alloggio possono mandare a chiamare della forma di regolamentazione con lo Stato spesso. Decisioni come a se, ed in tal caso quando, può essere lasciato pienamente il giochi di vigori di libero-mercato o se dovrebbe essere soggetto a controllo di Stato, così come la scelta di misure per garantire le necessità di alloggio della comunità e del tempismo per la loro attuazione, necessariamente comporti considerazione di complesso problemi sociali, economici e politici. Ammettendo che il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere un ampio, la Corte ha dichiarato che rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che in che è il “pubblico” o “generale” interessi a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole. Quelli principi fanno domanda ugualmente, se non un fortiori, a misure adottate nel corso della riforma fondamentale del sistema politico, legale ed economico di un paese nella transizione da un regime totalitario ad un Stato democratico.
97. Ci deve essere ciononostante, una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso con misure fece domanda con lo Stato per controllare l'uso della proprietà dell'individuo. Che requisito è espresso con la nozione di un “equilibrio equo” quel deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. In che contesto la Corte deve fare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi e deve accertare se con ragione dell'interferenza dello Stato la persona riguardata dovuto per sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo.
98. In cause riguardo all'operazione di ampio-variare legislazione di alloggio, che valutazione non solo può comportare le condizioni per ridurre l'affitto ricevette con padroni di casa individuali e la misura dell'interferenza dello Stato con libertà di contratto e relazioni contrattuali nel noleggio introduca sul mercato, ma anche l'esistenza di salvaguardie procedurali che assicurano che l'operazione del sistema ed il suo impatto sui diritti di proprietà di un padrone di casa è né arbitraria né imprevedibile. Incertezza -sia sé legislativo, amministrativo o sorgendo da pratiche fece domanda con le autorità -è un fattore per essere preso in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato. Dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale, è in carica sulle autorità pubbliche per agire nel buon tempo ed in una maniera appropriata e coerente.
99. Così in Hutten-Czapska (citò sopra, § 224 ed punto 4 delle disposizioni operative) la Corte trovò una violazione del diritto di proprietà che consisteva nell'effetto combinato di disposizioni difettose sulla determinazione di affitto e le varie restrizioni su padroni di casa i diritti di ' in riguardo della conclusione di contratti d'affitto, i carichi finanziari e legali imposero su loro e l'assenza di qualsiasi modi legali ed intende creazione sé possibile per loro o compensare o attenuare le perdite, incorse in in collegamento col mantenimento di proprietà o avere il necessario ripara sovvenzionato con lo Stato in cause allineato.
100. Nelle cause di Edwards (citò sopra, § 78) e Ghigo c. il Malta (n. 31122/05, § 69 26 settembre 2006), la Corte fondò che un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo era stato imposto sui richiedenti che erano stati richiesti di sopportare la maggior parte dei sociali e costi finanziari di provvedere alloggio di alloggio agli altri individui. Nel raggiungere che conclusione, la Corte aveva riguardo a, in particolare, all'importo estremamente basso di affitto, a causa del fatto che i richiedenti i locali di ' erano rispettivamente requisitioned da più di due e tre decadi ed un numero di restrizioni dei padroni di casa i diritti di '.
2. La richiesta dei principi attinenti alla causa presente
101. La Corte nota, e non è stato contestato fra le parti che gli importi di controllare-schema di affitto ad un'interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 come sé ostacola, o ha ostacolato, loro dal negoziare liberamente un livello di affitto per i loro appartamenti e ha fatto la conclusione del contratto d'affitto dei loro appartamenti condizionale a fornendo agli inquilini alloggio alternativo ed adeguato. Che interferenza costituisce un mezzi di controllo Statale dell'uso di proprietà. La richiesta dovrebbe essere esaminata perciò sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, §§ 160-61).
102. Lo schema di affitto-controllo fu basato sul Prezzo Atto 1996, le Regolamentazioni n. 87/1996 che implementano che Atto, ed una serie successiva di ordinanze ministeriali e misure. Legge n. 260/2011 re-definito le condizioni di attuazione dello schema di affitto-controllo ed espose i limiti sulla sua durata di massimo.
Così l'interferenza in oggetto ha una base in legge slovacca. Non c'è indicazione che le disposizioni attinenti non soddisfano i requisiti dell'accessibilità sufficiente, precisione e prevedibilità.
103. I richiedenti dibatterono che la legislazione subordinata sul controllo di affitto trascurò il requisito, posò in giù in Regolamentazioni n. 87/1996, che giustificò economicamente costi e profitto appropriato dovrebbe essere preso in considerazione nel contesto di regolamentazione di prezzo. La Corte considera che in sostanza che argomento concerne all'effetto sui diritti del richiedente sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo. Come così, sarà rivolto meglio sotto nel contesto di esame della proporzionalità dell'interferenza si lamentò di.
104. Così l'interferenza in problema era “legale” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. In prospettiva delle informazioni di fronte a sé, ed in considerazione del margine ampio della valutazione riservato ad autorità nazionali in aree come alloggio della popolazione, la Corte accetta inoltre, che la legislazione attinente che governa lo schema di affitto-controllo ha intrapreso un scopo di politica sociale e legittimo (vedere anche Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, §§ 165-66). Il controllo di uso dei richiedenti la proprietà di ' è stata perciò “nella conformità con l'interesse generale” come richiesto col secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
105. Per la Corte, i fatti seguenti sono di particolare attinenza quando valutando se l'interferenza ha soddisfatto il requisito della proporzionalità.
106. Sulla mano del una, controllo di affitto è stato sostenuto in Slovacchia che segue l'incorra del regime comunista, costituzione di un Stato indipendente e nel contesto della transizione del paese ad un'economia mercato-diretta. È stato puntato contro di proteggendo gli inquilini di appartamenti in alloggi che erano stati ripristinati ai proprietari originali o i loro successori nel contesto di rimediare ai mali che erano stati commessi più primo. La decisione come a come meglio riconciliare indubbiamente gli interessi che competono in pericolo comportò problemi sociali, economici e politici e complessi che autorità nazionali sono messe meglio sapere e valutare.
107. Inoltre, la Corte ha notato che politica governativa ed emendamenti legislativi, intrapresero lo scopo di alleviare il carico porsi proprietari di appartamenti ai quali affitto-controllo fa domanda con gradualmente aumentando il massimo affittati addebitabile e, ad un più tardi stadio, esponendo una struttura e tempo-limite per la sua conclusione. In legislazione decretata con effetto dal 2014 misure di 1 gennaio è stato cominciato con una prospettiva a facilitare la modernizzazione di alloggi residenziali (vedere paragrafo 53 sopra).
108. D'altra parte lo schema di affitto-controllo è stato fatto domanda in tutto il periodo durante il quale Slovacchia è stata legata con la Convenzione e quale cominciò a correre 18 marzo 1992 (la data di ratifica della Convenzione dei cechi e Repubblica Federale slovacca alla quale Slovacchia è uno del successore Stati). Sotto la Legge n. 260/2011, i proprietari perdita di ' che è il risultato di affitto regolato dovrebbe essere completamente eliminata con la fine di 2016 all'ultimo (vedere divide in paragrafi 51-52 sopra).
Il periodo sopra di più di venti anni di attuazione dello schema di affitto-controllo non coincide col periodo durante il quale davvero è stato o è stato applicabile in riguardo di appartamenti individuali posseduto coi richiedenti nella causa presente. La Corte ha notato, ciononostante, che in una maggioranza delle cause i richiedenti acquisirono proprietà degli appartamenti nel corso degli anni novanta e che lo schema di affitto-controllo ancora è applicabile in riguardo di un numero considerevole dei loro appartamenti (vedere Appendice 2).
109. È inoltre attinente che la politica di alloggio del Governo progetta di 1994, 2000 e 2005 previdero l'introduzione di affitto di mercato-livello nel settore privato. Il Manifesto Statale di 2002 indicò che il Governo avrebbe portato misure per deregolamentazione di affitto di fronte all'accessione della Slovacchia all'Unione europea che impiegò effetto in 1 maggio 2004 (vedere divide in paragrafi 65-67 sopra). Inoltre, sembra dal piano del Governo su politica di alloggio e costruzione di appartamenti di 2010 che il mercato di noleggio in Slovacchia è rimasto sottosviluppato, particolarmente a causa del sistema di controllo di affitto e protezione di inquilini (vedere paragrafo 68 sopra). Così i documenti Governativi concedono che ci sono stati difetti nell'intraprendere la politica proclamata mirata a ponendo fine allo schema di affitto-controllo.
110. I documenti di fronte alla Corte non indicano, in riguardo del periodo prima di 2008, il numero di appartamenti al quale controllo di affitto fece domanda e qualsiasi passi cominciati con una prospettiva ad assicurare quel regolò affitto sia giustificato con la situazione di ogni inquilino. Simile passi sono contenuti nel Ministero di Finanza Misura n. 02/R/2008 (vedere divide in paragrafi 63-64 sopra). I moduli di iscrizione presentati con inquilini indicano che, in 20 gennaio 2009, lo schema di affitto-controllo concernè 923 appartamenti, mentre corrispondendo a 0.24% di appartamenti affittati in alloggi che erano esistiti nel 1991. Ciononostante, è previsto che, dove un municipio non ha offerto alloggio ad inquilini messi in mostra alla fatica di materiale, lo schema di affitto-controllo continuerà a fare domanda sino alla fine di 2016.
111. L'impatto effettivo dello schema di affitto-controllo è un fattore particolarmente importante nel determinare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra gli interessi in pericolo. Alla Corte non è stata fornita informazioni che permettono di valutare gli effetti effettivi del controllo di affitto sui richiedenti la capacità di ' di in modo appropriato mantenere la loro proprietà. Avrà riguardo ad alla differenza fra l'affitto di massimo lecito sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo ed il valore di noleggio di mercato degli appartamenti.
112. In che il collegamento, ogni parte presentò opinioni preparate con esperti che furono basati su metodi di valutazione diversi e le conclusioni di che varia. Ciononostante simile differenza, e senza prendere qualsiasi banco come riguardi i metodi usati con gli esperti, la Corte nota quel
(i) come da 2000 gli articoli attinenti lasciarono spazio ripetutamente ad aumento sostanziale dell'importo di massimo di affitto controllato (vedere divide in paragrafi 51, 56 e 60 sopra);
(l'ii) secondo opinioni competenti presentate coi richiedenti in 2010, l'affitto controllato e mensile per appartamenti simili corrisposti ad approssimativamente 14% del mercato affittati e che percentuale era più bassa di periodo precedente (vedere Appendice 3);
(l'iii) nel 2012, dopo un ulteriore aumento per che la Legge n. 260/2011 purché, l'opinione competente alla quale i richiedenti si riferirono con modo di esempio stabilì che l'affitto controllato corrispose a dei 14 a 19% del mercato affittati degli appartamenti individuali riguardati (vedere paragrafo 24);
(l'iv) secondo opinioni competenti presentate col Governo nel 2012, e dopo la richiesta di un 40% aumento che la Legge n. 260/2011 concederono per, l'affitto controllato corrispose, nella causa della maggior parte dei richiedenti, a dei 20-26% del mercato affittati e, in riguardo di un numero limitato di cause, i limiti estremi di che percentuale variò fra il 7.6% ed il 36.9% (vedere Appendice 4);
(v) non c'è indicazione/argomento che il rapporto degli affitti di mercato controllati era più alto durante il periodo precedente (vedere anche Appendice 3); e
(il vi) le opinioni competenti presentate con sia i richiedenti ed il Governo indicano che i richiedenti individuali perdita di ' che è il risultato del fatto che loro non fu concesso per affittare fuori i loro appartamenti al prezzo di mercato ha corrisposto a molto tens o centinaio pari di migliaia di euro (vedere Appendice 4, colonne G e H).
113. Nonostante la differenza fra le opinioni sulla quale le parti si appellarono, le informazioni di fronte alla Corte indicano così, che, l'importo di affitto controllato che i richiedenti sono concessi per accusare è rimasto notevolmente anche dopo un numero di aumenti dopo 2000, abbassi che l'affitto per alloggio simile in riguardo del quale lo schema di controllo di affitto non fa domanda. La Corte non è convinta che gli interessi dei richiedenti, “incluso il loro diritto per dedurre profitto dalla loro proprietà” (vedere Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 239; Ghigo, citato sopra, § 66; ed anche divide in paragrafi 46, 55 e 99 sopra), si è stato incontrato restringendo i proprietari a simile minimo ritorna. È vero che Legge n. 260/2011 hanno previsto per un 20% aumento annuale in affitto regolato come dalla fine di 2011. Comunque, questa misura fu presa in considerazione nelle opinioni competenti presentate col Governo. Non rivolge la situazione che ha preceduto la promulgazione della legge sopra che, come i documenti disponibile indichi, era anche più dannoso ai richiedenti.
114. La Corte accetta che la scarsità di appartamenti disponibile per affitto ad un livello economico dopo l'incorra del regime comunista mandato a chiamare una riconciliazione degli interessi contraddittori di padroni di casa ed inquilini, specialmente in riguardo di appartamenti che erano stati ripristinati ai proprietari originali. Le autorità Statali avevano, sulla mano del una, garantire la protezione dei diritti di proprietà del precedente e, sull'altro, rispettare i diritti sociali del secondo, individui spesso vulnerabile.
115. Ciononostante, gli interessi legittimi della comunità in simile situazioni mandano a chiamare una distribuzione equa del sociale e carico finanziario coinvolta nella trasformazione e riforma dell'approvvigionamento di alloggio del paese. Questo carico non può essere messo su un particolare gruppo sociale, comunque importante gli interessi dell'altro gruppo o la comunità nell'insieme (vedere Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 225).
Questo è tutto il più attinente in situazioni come nella causa presente dove (i) il numero di appartamenti in riguardo del quale lo schema di affitto-controllo fatto domanda non è stato mostrato per essere particolarmente alto (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra), e (l'ii) è stato concesso che difetti nell'alloggio che progetta e politica impedì allo schema di affitto-controllo dell'essere terminato ad una più prima data in conformità con lo scopo proclamato (vedere divide in paragrafi 68 e 109 sopra).
116. Le considerazioni sopra sono sufficienti per la Corte per concludere che le autorità slovacche andarono a vuoto a prevedere l'equilibrio equo e richiesto fra gli interessi generali della comunità e la protezione dei richiedenti il diritto di ' di proprietà.
117. Nel raggiungere che conclusione la Corte non lo considera appropriato a questo stadio rendere qualsiasi distinzione come riguardi la maniera e tempo dell'acquisizione coi richiedenti degli appartamenti individuali. Per ammissione, i due richiedenti che avevano comprato gli appartamenti nel 2005 (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra) era consapevole delle restrizioni sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo e loro avrebbero dovuto includere che fatto nelle negoziazioni di prezzo col venditore. Loro potrebbero aspettarsi ragionevolmente d'altra parte in prospettiva delle dichiarazioni del Governo e piani, che lo schema di affitto-controllo sarebbe smantellato brevemente dopo l'acquisto. Perciò simile problemi dovrebbero essere rivolti, se appropriato, nel contesto della determinazione dei richiedenti ' chiede sotto Articolo 41 della Convenzione.
118. I richiedenti dibatterono anche che, nella conformità con pratica nazionale loro potrebbero accusare solamente l'affitto di massimo lecito sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo, soggetto agli inquilini l'accordo di '. Comunque, la Corte nota che loro non presentarono ulteriori dettagli come riguardi la situazione in riguardo dei loro appartamenti individuali, e che loro basarono il calcolo del danno subito sugli importi di affitto controllato lecito sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo. In queste circostanze, ed in prospettiva della conclusione giunta a paragrafo 113 sopra, la Corte non lo considera necessario intraprendere questo problema.
119. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
IV. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione Presa Insieme Con Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1
120. I richiedenti sostennero che le restrizioni imposero con lo schema di affitto-controllo corrisposto a trattamento discriminatorio. Loro addussero una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Articolo 14 letture siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
121. I richiedenti dibatterono, in particolare, che la Costituzione garantì diritti uguali e protezione a tutti i proprietari. Il fatto mero che la proprietà era stata ripristinata ai richiedenti con lo Stato non implicò che la loro posizione era diversa dagli altri proprietari di alloggio e non giustificò il loro trattamento diverso come alla sfera dei loro diritti di proprietà.
122. I richiedenti si riferirono alle ragioni per la richiesta del Generale Accusatore alla Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 71 sopra). Loro dibatterono che persone che incorrono sezione 1 dell'Ordinanza del 2003 sotto furono sottoposte a restrizioni più larghe che i proprietari che avevano acquisito la proprietà con altro vogliono dire che la restituzione.
123. Infine, i richiedenti dibatterono che loro furono discriminati contro in che la legge attinente fissò l'affitto per appartamenti la cui costruzione era stata finanziata con finanziamenti pubblici a 5% del valore attuale. Negli altri alloggi, incluso quelli dei richiedenti lo schema di affitto-controllo lasciò spazio comunque, ad un affitto di massimo di approssimativamente 2% del valore attuale.
124. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti la situazione di ' non era in modo pertinente simile a che di altri proprietari di alloggio a cui proprietà che lo schema di affitto-controllo non ha fatto domanda. In particolare, a persone piacciono i richiedenti, a chi gli alloggi erano stati ripristinati all'inizio degli anni novanta, era stato consapevole che le persone che vivono negli appartamenti riguardate avrebbero trattenuto il diritto per usarli. Diversamente da nella causa di appartamenti pubblicamente posseduti, quegli abitanti avevano avuto, nessuno diritto acquistare gli appartamenti in alloggi che erano stati ripristinati ai proprietari originali. C'era perciò un requisito per offrire tutela giuridica a quelle persone con vuole dire dello schema di affitto-controllo.
125. In prospettiva della sua conclusione che c'è stata una violazione dei richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, i costatazione di Corte che nessun problema separato deriva Articolo 14 della Convenzione sotto e che, di conseguenza, è non necessario per esaminare la questione sotto queste disposizioni preso insieme.
V. ARTICOLO 46 della CONVENZIONE
126. La Corte lo considera appropriato rivolgere questa causa sotto Articolo 46 della Convenzione che prevede:
“1. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alle sentenze definitive della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
127. I richiedenti sostennero che l'attuazione continuata dello schema di affitto-controllo sollevò un problema sistematico sotto la Convenzione che colpì un numero alto di persone. La situazione era simile a che in Hutten-Czapska (citò sopra). Loro mandati a chiamare misure per essere presi, in particolare fin dalla deregolamentazione graduale di affitto il risarcimento non coinvolse per gli importi bassi di affitto controllato ai quali loro era stato permesso per accusare di passato.
128. Il Governo indicò che lo schema di affitto-controllo colpì attualmente solamente approssimativamente 1,000 abitazioni, mentre corrispose a 0.06% del numero complessivo di installazioni di alloggio permanentemente abitati. Era perciò discutibile se la situazione in oggetto era “sistematico.”
B. la valutazione della Corte
1. Principi Generali
129. I principi generali riferiti ad Articolo 46 sono esposti fuori, per esempio, in Kurić ed Altri c. la Slovenia [GC], n. 26828/06, §§ 406-07 ECHR 2012 (gli estratti); Lukenda c. la Slovenia, n. 23032/02, §§ 94-97 ECHR 2005-X; e Suljagić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 27912/02, § 60 3 novembre 2009; tutti con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Loro possono essere sommati su siccome segue.
130. Divenendo Parti Contraenti ed Alte alla Convenzione europea su Diritti umani, gli Stati rispondenti presunsero l'obbligo per garantire ad ognuno all'interno della loro giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definite in Sezione 1 della Convenzione. Infatti, gli Stati hanno un obbligo generale per chiarire i problemi che hanno condotto alla sentenza di Corte una violazione della Convenzione. Se dovessero accadere violazioni di diritti di Convenzione, gli Stati rispondenti devono preparare meccanismi all'interno dei loro rispettivi ordinamenti giuridici per la compensazione effettiva di violazioni di quelli diritti.
131. Articolo 46 della Convenzione, siccome interpretato nella luce di Articolo 1, impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato di Ministri and/or generale ed appropriato misure individuali per garantire il diritto del richiedente che la Corte fondò essere violata. Simile misure devono essere prese anche in riguardo di altre persone nella posizione del richiedente, notevolmente con risolvendo i problemi che hanno condotto alle sentenze della Corte. Soggetto ad esaminando col Comitato di Ministri, i resti Statali e rispondenti liberano scegliere i mezzi con che assolverà il suo obbligo legale sotto Articolo 46 della Convenzione, purché che simile mezzi sono compatibili col set di conclusioni fuori nella sentenza della Corte.
132. In cause eccezionali, con una prospettiva ad aiutando lo Stato rispondente ad adempiere i suoi obblighi sotto Articolo 46 la Corte cercherà comunque, di indicare il tipo di misura che sarebbe preso per porre fine ad una situazione ha trovato esistere.
2. L’applicazione di questi principi alla causa presente
133. La conclusione della Corte sopra, come riguardi gli effetti dello schema di affitto-controllo sui richiedenti il diritto di ' a godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà, suggerisce che la violazione trovata nato da in un problema che sorge fuori dello stato della legislazione di Slovakian e pratica che ha colpito un numero di proprietari piatti a chi lo schema di affitto-controllo ha fatto domanda (vedere anche paragrafo 16 sopra). La Corte nota inoltre che le 13 altre richieste riguardo allo stesso problema sono pendenti di fronte a sé quali concernono delle 170 persone.
134. È vero che misure sono state cominciate con una prospettiva a gradualmente migliorare la situazione di padroni di casa. Così, come un risultato dell'introduzione di Legge n. 216/2011, l'affitto controllato potrebbe essere aumentato entro 20% ogni anno come dalla fine di 2011. Dove un municipio non ha offerto inquilini messi in mostra alla fatica di materiale con un'abitazione con la fine di 2016, i padroni di casa avranno diritto a chiedere la differenza fra il libero-mercato affitti e l'affitto controllato (vedere paragrafo 52 sopra). Così quelle misure prevedono solamente per un'eliminazione completa degli effetti su proprietari piatti di affitto-controllo come da 2017, e loro non rivolgono la situazione che esiste prima della loro adozione.
135. La Corte considera che le ulteriori misure dovrebbero essere prese per per realizzare ottemperanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Ostacolare sentenze future di violazione di che disposizione, lo Stato rispondente dovrebbe introdurre, al più presto possibile, un specifico e chiaramente regolò via di ricorso compensativa per offrire il sollievo effettivo e genuino per la violazione fondi.
VI. ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
136. Articolo 41 prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
137. I richiedenti chiesero il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale del quale loro soffrirono come un risultato dell'obbligo per affittare i loro appartamenti sotto lo schema di affitto-controllo.
Per il periodo fra 18 marzo 1992 (data di entrata in vigore della Convenzione in riguardo dei cechi precedenti e Repubblica Federale slovacca del quale Slovacchia è uno del successore Stati) e 31 marzo 2012 gli importi chiesti furono basati su opinioni preparate con esperti e loro furono aumentati per difetto interessi applicabile sotto legge slovacca. I richiedenti individuali le rivendicazioni di ' sono esposte fuori in Appendice 5 (colonne C - E).
I richiedenti riservati il diritto per specificare il danno subito durante il periodo che comincia 1 aprile 2012 quale non potevano essere coperti con le opinioni preparate con esperti. Nell'alternativa, loro dissero le somme indicate in Appendice 5 (la colonna F) in riguardo di ogni giorno fin da 1 aprile 2012. Quelle somme corrisposero alla perdita quotidiana e media determinata con esperti per il periodo dal 2012 a 31 marzo 2012 di 1 gennaio. I richiedenti chiesero inoltre interesse su sia il danno determinò con esperti in riguardo del periodo su a 31 marzo 2012 e le somme chieste in riguardo del periodo che comincia 1 aprile 2012, pagabile come dalla data seconda, ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più otto punti di percentuale.
Infine, i richiedenti chiesero EUR 50,000 ognuno in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
138. Il Governo contestato come non-obiettivo il metodo col quale gli esperti noleggiarono coi richiedenti aveva determinato il danno patrimoniale ed allegato. Loro aguzzarono anche ai certi errori matematici in quelle opinioni. Loro dibatterono che la Corte dovrebbe basare la sua decisione sull'opinione presentata con l'Istituto di Ingegneria Forense in Žilina 15 novembre 2012.
Nella loro osservazione, i richiedenti che avevano acquistato gli appartamenti sono dovuti essere consapevoli che lo schema di affitto-controllo fece domanda a quegli appartamenti siccome riflesso nel prezzo di acquisto. Le rivendicazioni di quelli richiedenti dovrebbero essere respinte perciò.
I richiedenti ' chiede in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale era eccessivo.
Infine, il Governo propose che la Corte aggiorna la sua decisione sotto Articolo 41 mentre indicò nella sua sentenza il periodo durante il quale la richiesta dello schema di affitto-controllo potrebbe essere riguardata come accettabile in Slovacchia per il fine di realizzare lo scopo legittimo perseguì. Simile indicazione era attinente per il fine di determinare il danno effettivo subito coi richiedenti.
139. La Corte considera che la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 in riguardo dei richiedenti che ' chiede per il risarcimento per danno non è ancora pronta per decisione e dovrebbe essere riservata, dovuto riguardo ad essere aveva alla possibilità alla quale un regolamento amichevole può essere giunto su questo punto fra lo Stato rispondente ed i richiedenti (l'Articolo 75 §§ 1 e 4 degli Articoli di Corte).
B. Costi e spese
140. I richiedenti chiesero la somma globale di EUR 217,106.99. Sé il comprised gli articoli seguenti:
(i) EUR 8,325 in riguardo di assistenza legale a livello nazionale nel contesto di note ad e negoziazioni con autorità pubbliche e presentazione ai media;
(l'ii) EUR 95,793.93 per rappresentanza legale dei richiedenti in procedimenti di fronte alla Corte sulla base di una parcella oraria di EUR 150;
(l'iii) EUR 1,605 in riguardo di costi di traduzione;
(l'iv) EUR 4,284 in riguardo dell'opinione competente presentato nel 2010; e
(v) EUR 107,099.06 per preparazione di opinioni competenti presentata nel 2012.
Come allo scorso articolo menzionato, gli esperti che i costi di ' sono stati determinati in conformità con le regolamentazioni attinenti. Documenti allegati a due dei rapporti indicano che i richiedenti riguardati erano responsabili per pagare un anticipo agli esperti. Questo corrispose ad EUR 100 per l'opinione in riguardo del primo appartamento in un alloggio determinato ed EUR 50 in riguardo degli altri appartamenti valutato e situato nello stesso alloggio. Qualsiasi le ulteriori somme erano solamente pagabili coi richiedenti nell'evento che loro avevano successo e la Corte fece un'assegnazione sotto Articolo 41 in riguardo di costi e spese. La quota di somme sarebbe determinata in conformità con l'accordo che dipende dall'assegnazione effettiva della Corte.
141. Il Governo impugnò le spese processuali chieste coi richiedenti come essendo eccessivo. Come agli esperti le parcelle di ', il Governo dibattè che la Corte davvero dovrebbe assegnare solamente le somme incorse in e dovrebbe trascurare l'accordo fra i richiedenti e gli esperti su ulteriori importi che sono dipendendo pagabile sulla conseguenza dei procedimenti di Convenzione.
142. La Corte considera che questa parte dei richiedenti Articolo di ' 41 rivendicazione è neanche pronta per decisione. Riserva perciò al riguardo la sua determinazione, dovuto riguardo ad essere aveva alla possibilità che su questo punto un regolamento amichevole può essere raggiunto anche fra lo Stato rispondente ed i richiedenti (l'Articolo 75 §§ 1 e 4 degli Articoli di Corte).
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE, UNANIMAMENTE
1. Sostiene che OMISSIS ha sostenendo continuare i procedimenti presenti nel posto del Sig.ra H. Vojtášová;

2. Dichiara la richiesta inammissibile alla misura che concerne richiesta di schema di affitto-controllo ad appartamenti indicò in paragrafo 77;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

4. Sostiene che non è necessario per esaminare i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

5. Sostiene che la questione della richiesta di Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione;
di conseguenza,
(un) le riserve la questione detta in intero;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritto sulla questione e, in particolare, notificare la Corte di qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere;
(il c) le riserve l'ulteriore procedura e delegati al Presidente della Camera il potere per fissare lo stesso se bisogno è.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 28 gennaio 2014, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte
Santiago Quesada Josep Casadevall
Cancelliere Presidente

Appendice 1/2/3/4/5




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 02/12/2020.