Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BOGDEL v. LITHUANIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 41248/06/2013
STATO: Lituania
DATA: 26/11/2013
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions
No violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Deprivation of property)
No violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings
Article 6-1 - Access to court)




SECOND SECTION






CASE OF BOGDEL v. LITHUANIA


(Application no. 41248/06)



JUDGMENT






STRASBOURG


26 November 2013






This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Bogdel v. Lithuania,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Guido Raimondi, President,
Danutė Jočienė,
Peer Lorenzen,
Dragoljub Popović,
Işıl Karakaş,
Nebojša Vučinić,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 22 October 2013,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 41248/06) against the Republic of Lithuania lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Lithuanian nationals, OMISSIS(“the applicants”), on 13 October 2006.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Vilnius. The Lithuanian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms E. Baltutytė.
3. The applicants alleged that when interpreting the period of statutory limitation relating to their civil claim the domestic courts had breached the principle of legal certainty, in violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. They also argued that the annulment of their title to a plot of land in the town of Trakai was in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 5 July 2010 the application was communicated to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants were born in 1953 and 1986 respectively and live in Trakai.
6. By a decision of 12 March 1992 the Trakai City Council leased a plot of land 22 square metres in size, situated at no. 41 Karaimų Street in the town of Trakai, to Galina Bogdel, the wife of Piotras Bogdel and mother of Snežana Bogdel. The plot was situated on land which was State property. The plot was leased for a term of five years, for the construction of a kiosk (pastatas-kioskas) for selling pottery and souvenirs. The applicants stated that by February 1993 the kiosk had been built and was ready for use.
7. By decision no. 395v of 22 December 1993 the Trakai District Council established a territorial plan for the old town of Trakai city, on the basis of plans drawn up by experts on cultural heritage. The plans stipulated that plot no. 41 in Karaimų Street, situated at the entrance to Trakai castle, was not to be divided and was not to be privatised (“neprivatizuojama: salos pilies prieigos; ribos lieka esamos”).
8. By a decision of 27 July 1994 the Trakai District Executive Council leased to Galina Bogdel, for a term of five years, a State-owned plot of land of 134 square metres, which consisted of the previous plot and enlarged it.
9. On 18 January 1995 the Trakai District Executive Council adopted a decision approving the sale of the said plot of 134 square metres to Galina Bogdel for 2,874 Lithuanian litas (LTL).
10. On 10 February 1995 a representative of the Trakai District Executive Council and Galina Bogdel signed the land purchase agreement. The land purchase agreement was registered at the Real Estate Registry and, in accordance with Lithuanian law, Galina Bogdel became the owner of the land.
11. Later that year Galina Bogdel died and her husband and daughter (the applicants) inherited the plot of land with the kiosk. According to the applicants, they subsequently obtained the necessary permission and transformed the kiosk into a café.
12. In July 1998 the applicants contacted the Trakai District Municipality to request the enlargement of the plot of land they owned to roughly twice its size by the addition of more State land. They mentioned that the building they had erected at 41 Karaimų Street was being used as premises for public catering (kaip viešojo maitinimo patalpa). As the number of tourists in Trakai was constantly growing, there was a need to expand the premises in order to meet the hygiene and sanitary needs of a public catering facility. The municipality informed them that a new territorial plan was necessary and by a decision of 28 July 1998 entrusted the coordination of the planning project to the applicants.
13. Once preliminary plans had been published in the Trakai town newspaper in August 1999, wide repercussions in connection with the plot of land in issue arose in the local community of Trakai. In particular, on 19 August 1999 ten residents of Karaimų Street wrote to the Head of the Vilnius County Administration (hereinafter – “the HVCA”), the director of Trakai Historical National Park and the Mayor of Trakai claiming that some time ago a small building had been erected on the plot [it was not clear whether legally or illegally], and that it had now been turned into a noisy café. The residents asked the authorities not to permit any new construction on the plot, which was in a historical place – Trakai Historical National
Park – and right in front of Trakai castle and other monuments of particular architectural and historical importance (prie pat pilies, krantinės ir seniausių architektūrinių paminklų).
Further, in accordance with the requirements of the Law on Territorial Planning, on 7 September 1999 a public meeting (viešas svarstymas) was held in Trakai city. The meeting was attended by residents and the Trakai town authorities. It is stated in the minutes of the meeting that some residents feared the construction of a large restaurant on the plot of land in issue.
14. In December 1999 a private person, R.L., who lived in Trakai city, wrote to the Committee of Education, Science and Culture of the Lithuanian Seimas. He submitted that Galina Bogdel, and later her heirs (the applicants), had been attempting to illegally obtain the plot of land situated at 41 Karaimų Street in Trakai since 1992, eventually succeeding in their unlawful endeavours. R.L. argued that the plot was situated immediately in front of Trakai castle in the Trakai Historical National Park and thus could not be privatised.
15. By a letter of 25 January 2000 the Committee of Education, Science and Culture forwarded the letter to the Ministry of Culture and the State Audit Office (Valstybės kontrolė, hereinafter – “the SAO”), a body whose function is to supervise the lawfulness and effectiveness of management of State property, asking them to investigate the matter.
16. On 3 July 2000 the SAO adopted decision no. 70, finding that the decisions to lease to Galina Bogdel and subsequently to sell her the plot of land in question (paragraphs 6, 8 and 9 above) were in breach of the legislation on territorial planning, including Article 5 § 4 of the Law on the Protected Territories, the Regulations of the Trakai Historical National Park, approved by Government ruling no. 283 of 22 April 1992, and the Trakai District Council decision of 22 December 1993 (see paragraph 7 above).
The auditors also established that the Trakai municipality’s decision of 28 July 1998 to put the applicants in charge of the project of enlarging their plot of land had breached the Law on the Protection of Immovable Cultural Heritage, in that it had not been agreed upon by the State Department for the Protection of Cultural Heritage.
17. The SAO invited the HVCA to take appropriate measures in respect of the plot at 41 Karaimų Street “which had been sold to Galina Bogdel in breach of the applicable laws”. The SAO was to be informed of the HVCA’s decision within two months.
The SAO observed that the Trakai municipality officials responsible for the decisions to sell the plot to Galina Bogdel no longer worked in the relevant section. It nevertheless urged the Trakai District Mayor to respect the law when executing territorial planning.
18. In the meantime another investigation was ongoing. On 3 November another auditing body, this time that of the Trakai District Municipality itself, found that Galina Bogdel had obtained her ownership of the plot of land in question in breach of the laws on the protection of cultural heritage and the relevant territorial planning decisions.
19. On 24 January 2001 the Trakai District Council annulled the decision of 28 July 1998. The applicants challenged that decision in court.
20. On 18 April 2001 the HVCA asked the court to annul the decisions of 27 July 1994 and 18 January 1995 permitting Galina Bogdel to lease the plot of land and selling it to her respectively.
On 21 February the HVCA asked the court to annul the sale agreement of 10 February 1995.
21. Both cases were joined. The applicants then asked the court to dismiss the HVCA’s action, arguing that it was time-barred.
22. By a decision of 11 July 2005 the Trakai District Court dismissed the applicants’ action and granted all the HVCA’s claims. It found that the time-limit for initiating court proceedings had not been missed by the HVCA. The three-year statutory time-limit had to be calculated from the date the HVCA had learned of or should have learned of the breach of the State’s rights. That date was 3 July 2000, the date when the SAO had concluded that the land had been purchased in breach of the legislation on the protection of cultural heritage, protected territories and territorial planning. The court also noted that in 1995 the land had been sold to Galina Bogdel by a Trakai municipality official. However, in the same year the Lithuanian legislation had been amended and different administrative
units – counties (in the present case, the County of Vilnius) – had been granted competence to deal with questions relating to the management of State land. Even so, after assuming competence over the administration of State land, the HVCA had had no legal obligation to initiate checks to verify whether contracts concluded by the municipalities in the past had been concluded lawfully.
23. On the merits of the case the Trakai District Court found that when concluding the agreements leasing the State-owned plot of land to Galina Bogdel and, subsequently, selling that plot to her, the officials of the Trakai District Municipality had breached the applicable laws and local regulations. Consequently, the court declared those agreements null and void. The court ordered restitution and returned the 134 square meters plot of land to the HVCA. No money was returned to the applicants.
24. The court also annulled the agreement of 27 July 1998 by which the Trakai District Municipality had entrusted the applicants with coordinating the preparation of the local plan.
25. The applicants appealed, arguing that more than six years had elapsed between the date the land had been bought and the date when the HVCA had initiated court proceedings for annulment. The applicants also submitted that the purpose of statutory limitation was to guarantee legal certainty. The stability of civil legal relations would be breached if a person could not reasonably expect the status quo to be maintained after the expiry of the limitation period. They also challenged the unilateral restitution. Lastly, the applicants argued that the lower court had erred in interpreting and applying the territorial planning legislation.
26. By a ruling of 8 November 2005 the Vilnius Regional Court upheld the reasoning of the Trakai District Court. However, it ordered double restitution. The applicants were to be refunded LTL 2,874 – the sum which Galina Bogdel had paid for the plot of land.
27. The applicants lodged an appeal on points of law. They argued that the lower courts had erred in interpreting the legal norms on the calculation of the limitation period, and the starting date of that term in particular. They did not argue that the courts had acted in a discriminatory fashion when interpreting the public authorities’ civil action, compared with civil actions between private parties. They also submitted that the annulment of the land purchase agreement had breached their right of property, without in any way complaining that the sum they had received in restitution had been too little.
28. On 10 May 2006 the Supreme Court dismissed the applicants’ appeal, endorsing the reasoning of the lower courts. It observed that at the time when the lease and sale contracts were concluded in 1994-1995, the 1964 Civil Code (Articles 84 and 86) had provided for a three-year statutory time-limit for initiating court proceedings. It had been established in the case that the HVCA had learned of the breaches of the law by those transactions on 3 July 2000, from the report by the SAO. Accordingly, when lodging its claim for the annulment of the land lease decision and the decision to sell the plot of land to Galina Bogdel, the HVCA had not missed the three-year statutory deadline. In the view of the Supreme Court, it would have been unreasonable to calculate the term of statutory limitation from 10 February 1995, the date when the land was sold to Galina Bogdel, because when the counties had been created [in 1995] the administration of each county had not been entrusted with the task of reviewing all the administrative decisions and contracts which the municipalities falling under its competence had adopted or concluded in the past.
29. As to the applicants’ argument that there were no legal barriers to their owning the plot of land in question, the Supreme Court noted that the Trakai Historical National Park had been created by the Supreme Soviet (Aukščiausioji Taryba, the parliament of the Republic of Lithuania at that time) on 23 April 1992, and by a Government resolution of 22 April 1992 the old town of Trakai had been recognised as an urban heritage site (urbanistinis draustinis). For that reason, on 25 May 1992 the regulations on cultural heritage established that the plot of land situated at 41 Karaimų Street was not to be privatised. Moreover, on 9 November 1993 the Law on the Protected Territories had been passed by the Seimas, providing that land in State-protected areas was not to be sold. Subsequently, by decision no. 395v of 22 December 1993, the Trakai District Council had approved a territorial plan for Trakai old town which specified that the plot of land in question was not to be privatised.
30. On the basis of the above, the Supreme Court held that the lower courts had been correct in quashing the Trakai municipal authorities’ decisions of 27 July 1994 and 18 January and 10 February 1995 leasing and selling the plot of land to Galina Bogdel. Moreover, the appellate court had been correct in applying the restitution procedure and refunding to the applicants the sum of LTL 2,874.
31. The Government submitted that after the final decision by the Supreme Court, the applicants’ property rights to the café built on the plot of land situated at 41 Karaimų Street had remained unchanged. Moreover, it can be seen from the documents submitted by the Government that after the Supreme Court’s decision the HVCA still granted the applicants’ request to lease the plot of land in question for a period of eighty-seven years. On 16 November 2006 two lease agreements were thus concluded – 34 square metres were leased to Snežana Bogdel, and 100 square metres were leased to Piotras Bogdel.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
32. Article 47 of the Civil Code of 1964, in force up to 30 June 2001 (“the old Civil Code”), provided that any transaction that failed to meet the requirements of the statutory provisions was null and void. Once a transaction had been declared null and void, each party was bound to return to the other party everything it had obtained as a result of the transaction.
The Civil Code in force since 1 July 2001 (“the new Civil Code”) provides an analogous norm in Article 1.80 §§ 1 and 2.
33. As regards the statutory limitation period, it begins to run from the date on which the right to bring an action may be enforced. A person has the right to bring an action from the date on which he becomes aware or should have become aware of the violation of his right (Article 86 of the old Civil Code and Article 1.127 § 1 of the new Civil Code). The old Civil Code provided that the general term of limitation was three years (Article 84). Under the new Civil Code, the general term of limitation is ten years (Article 1.125).
34. As to the date on which the limitation period starts to run when the authorities lodge an action for annulment in order to defend the public interest, the Government referred to the Supreme Court’s ruling of 28 April 2010 in civil case no. 3K-3-143/2010, which stated as follows:
“The case-law of the Supreme Court is coherent to the effect that in a case where a court (of either general or administrative jurisdiction) is approached with the aim of protecting the public interest, the limitation period for submitting a claim starts on the day when the plaintiff was provided with sufficient data to prove that the public interest had been breached.”
35. The Ruling of the Senate of Judges of the Supreme Court of Lithuania No. 39 of 20 December 2002 “On the Case-law of the Courts of the Republic of Lithuania on the Application of the Legal Norms Governing the Limitation Period” reads as follows:
“5.3. If the limitation period for bringing a certain claim started running under the Civil Code of 1964 or other laws before 1 July 2001 [the date of entry into force of the new Civil Code], the rules governing the determination of the beginning of the limitation period under the Civil Code of 200[1] are not applicable, because the rules which were in force at the time when the limitation period started running shall be applicable.
In accordance with the general rule governing the determination of the commencement of the statutory limitation period, that period shall start on the day on which the right to bring an action may be enforced, and the right to bring an action arises on the date when a person becomes aware or should have become aware of the violation of his right. Thus under Article 1.127 (Article 86 of the Civil Code of 1964) the limitation period starts running only after a person is subjectively aware, or should be aware, of the violation of his right.
The law links the beginning of the limitation period with the following criteria: the day when the person became aware (subjective criterion) or the day when the person should have become aware (objective criterion). ... Therefore, when deciding the question of the beginning of the limitation period, the court must first of all determine the precise moment of the violation of the law. The day when the person becomes aware of the violation of the law is the day when the person realises in fact that his right or interest protected by law has been violated or disputed. ... In cases where a person claims that he/she did not become aware of the violation of his/her right on the day when it was violated, the court must verify whether there is any evidence indicating the contrary and whether a claimant became aware of the violation of the law no later than would any prudent and careful person in the same situation.”
36. As regards the rules for establishing the date on which the limitation starts to run in cases where a claim has been submitted by private entities, the applicants submitted that the Supreme Court had held that the limitation period in respect of the invalidity of a contract started on the exact date the parties became aware that the contract had been concluded (decisions in case no. 3K-3-229/2006 of 24 April 2006 and case no. 3K-7-4/2006 of 3 January 2006). They also referred to the Supreme Court’s decision in case no. 3K-3-11/2010 of 5 January 2010, in which it had held that the claimant (a private party) was deemed to have been aware of the infringement of her rights from the date the authorities had adopted an official decision regarding her property rights.
37. The question of balancing the protection of the public interest and the necessity to ensure the stability of legal relations had also been examined by the Supreme Administrative Court in case no. A575-1576/08 of 26 September 2008. In that case a municipal institution had sold a plot of land designated for agricultural use to a private person in 1994. In 2006 the State authorities discovered that the person had been allowed to purchase the plot in error, for the mere reason that she did not live in the area where the plot was situated, that being a precondition for becoming its owner. The Supreme Administrative Court nevertheless found that, given that that private person had paid taxes on that land and managed it up to 2008, she had a legitimate expectation that her rights to that plot of land would be protected:
“The enlarged chamber of the Supreme Administrative Court in case no. A146-335-2008 of 25 July 2008 has stated that not only prosecutors but also other State bodies or municipalities are responsible for the protection of the public interest. Even though not all of them have competence to bring an action in court to defend the public interest, the principles of the rule of law, cooperation among institutions, effectiveness and other principles of good administration require that, once a breach of the public interest has been established, an institution must inform a prosecutor or another competent body of the breach without undue delay ... The principle of the rule of law requires that the stability of legal relations be preserved. Such stability would be not guaranteed if persons could never be sure that court proceedings for [the annulment] of administrative acts adopted in respect of them could always be initiated. If State or municipal institutions acted with unjustified delay ... it would mean that the opportunity to initiate court proceedings to protect the public interest would become unlimited in time, and such situation is not possible in a State governed by the rule of law. Therefore, a court, having examined the balance to be struck between the values protected and the need to guarantee the stability of legal relations, may refuse to protect the public interest even in those cases where [the institution] has not missed [the statutory time limit] for bringing court proceedings (counting from the moment when the evidence of the breached public interest was gathered or should have been gathered), if a sufficiently long period of time has passed since the administrative legal acts were adopted and legal relations were established.”
The Supreme Administrative Court then established that the authorities had learned that the plot of land had been given to the private person in breach of certain laws in July 2006, but had started court proceedings only in July 2007. In particular, a significant period of time had elapsed between the time when the private person had obtained title to the plot in 1994 and when the State authorities had initiated court proceedings to annul her title. The court therefore refused to protect the public interest in order that the stability of legal relations would be preserved. It also noted that such a conclusion was supported by the practice of the Lithuanian courts, namely, the Supreme Administrative Court’s ruling no. A10-131/2007 of 6 February 2007, where it had held that the time-limit had been missed because eleven years had elapsed since the challenged administrative act had been adopted.
38. The Law on the Territorial Planning (Teritorijų planavimo įstatymas) provided at the relevant time that territorial plans were public and residents had a right to take part in the public consideration (viešas svarstymas) of new territorial plans (Articles 25-28).
39. Pursuant to Article 5 of the Law on the Protection of Immovable Cultural Heritage (Nekilnojamųjų kultūros vertybių apsaugos įstatymas), if a decision of a ministry or municipality could have an impact on the protection of immovable cultural heritage and related land, it had to be approved by the Department for the Protection of Cultural Heritage. Decisions without such approval were considered unlawful.
40. The State Audit Office (Valstybės kontrolė) is the institution tasked with controlling the legality of privatisations of State property as well as the legality of the use of State-owned land and other natural resources (Article 10 §§ 13 and 14 of the Law on the State Audit Office).
41. In accordance with Article 49 of the Code of Civil Procedure, in the cases provided for by law a prosecutor or other public or municipal authority may submit a civil claim for the protection of a public interest.
42. The Law on the Protected Territories (Saugomų teritorijų įstatymas) provided at the relevant time that the land in State-protected areas was not subject to sale (Article 5 § 4). In this connection, the Constitutional Court has held that by that prohibition the State sought to ensure the protection and longevity of State-protected areas and recreation zones as areas of particular importance. Accordingly, the land specified may not be transferred to private ownership (ruling of 14 March 2006).
By a resolution no. 283 of 22 April 1992 the Government recognised the old town of Trakai as an urban heritage site (urbanistinis draustinis) in the historical national park of Trakai.
43. On 9 February 2010 the Constitutional Court gave a Ruling “On the Compliance of Government Resolution no. 912 ‘On the Approval of the Trakai Historical National Park Planning Scheme’ of 6 December 1993 with the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania”, in which it held as follows:
“7. On 31 March 1992 (when the accession document was deposited with the Director-General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)), the Republic of Lithuania joined the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage ... which was adopted on 16 November 1972 in Paris. In the Republic of Lithuania the Convention came into force on 30 June 1992. In joining the Convention, the Republic of Lithuania undertook the obligation to protect the cultural and natural heritage in its territory and acquired the right to propose properties in its territory for inclusion in the UNESCO World Heritage List.
In 2002, UNESCO experts, while in Lithuania, looked at the properties of Trakai Historical National Park, which received their favorable evaluation, and recommended that a nomination be prepared in respect of that Lithuanian item for the UNESCO World Heritage List. At the Conference ‘The Trakai Historical National Park – on the UNESCO World Heritage Lists – the Need and Opportunities’, held on 3-4 April 2003 in Lithuania, a resolution was adopted wherein it was held, inter alia, as follows: ‘Taking into consideration the particular value of the landscape as a whole, the Trakai Historical National Park should be nominated for the World Heritage List of Mixed Properties’ and it was decided to ask ‘the Ministry of Culture to approve the inclusion of the Trakai Historical National Park in the World Heritage List of Mixed Properties, to approve a working group, and to delegate to it the task of preparing, in accordance with the terms established, the submission of the Trakai Historical National Park to the World Heritage Committee and to allocate the funds necessary for [that] purpose’.
On 28 July 2003, upon submission by the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Lithuania, Trakai Historical National Park was included in a tentative list for [nomination to] the UNESCO World Heritage List (category of properties – mixed).
8. Thus, the State of Lithuania has treated and treats Trakai and its environs as a unique complex of landscape created by nature and man, a territory which must be protected and in respect of which a special legal regime must be created; this is a universally acknowledged fact.”
44. The new Civil Code provides that the State must compensate damage caused by unlawful acts of institutions of public authority, irrespective of the fault of a particular public servant or other employee of a public authority institution (Article 6.271).
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL LAW
45. The Council of Europe Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe, ratified by Lithuania on 7 December 1999, reads, inasmuch as relevant, as follows:
Article 3
“Each Party undertakes:
1. to take statutory measures to protect the architectural heritage;
2. within the framework of such measures and by means specific to each State or region, to make provision for the protection of monuments, groups of buildings and sites.”
Article 4
“Each Party undertakes:
...
2. to prevent the disfigurement, dilapidation or demolition of protected properties. To this end, each Party undertakes to introduce, if it has not already done so, legislation which:
...
(d) allows compulsory purchase of a protected property.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
46. The applicants complained that divesting them of their title to the plot of land in question amounted to an unjustified deprivation of property. This complaint falls to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
47. The applicants argued that they had been arbitrarily deprived of their title to the plot of land in question. Firstly, they challenged the Lithuanian courts’ interpretation of the domestic law regulating territorial planning in general, and that in respect of Trakai town in particular. Secondly, the applicants maintained that their spouse and mother, Galina Bogdel, had been an honest acquirer: neither she nor the applicants had ever committed any breach of the law. It was therefore unfair for the applicants to bear responsibility for the mistakes of the municipal institutions, which, moreover, should have known the applicable laws at the time of the transaction. On this last point the applicants referred to the Court’s case-law to the effect that if a mistake was made by the authorities themselves, without any fault on the part of a third party, a different proportionality approach must be taken in determining whether the burden borne by an applicant was excessive (see Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 73, 15 September 2009). They also argued that the mistakes or errors of the State authorities should serve to the benefit of the defendant. In other words, the risk of any mistake made by the State authorities must be borne by the State and the errors must not be remedied at the expense of the individual concerned (see, mutatis mutandis, Radchikov v. Russia, no. 65582/01, § 50, 24 May 2007).
48. For the applicants, the deprivation of their property rights was disproportionate and had imposed an excessive burden on them, causing them significant disadvantage. They considered that not every case which dealt with privatisation of State-owned property included a public-interest element. On the contrary, in every case many other aspects had to be evaluated, for example, how the State property was used and whether it was in the public interest. In this connection, they submitted that most of the neighbouring plots of land in Karaimų Street in Trakai had been privatised by private persons who used them for economic and commercial activities. The applicants then challenged the pertinence of the territorial planning scheme in respect of Trakai old town, maintaining that their plot was no different from neighbouring plots and thus had no exceptional importance. The fact that after the annulment of the land purchase agreement the State had leased that particular plot of land to them for eighty-seven years confirmed that ownership of the plot by the applicants and its use as a café would not conflict with any public interest.
2. The Government
49. The Government maintained that, even supposing that the annulment of the applicants’ title to the plot of land in question constituted an interference with their right to property, that interference was lawful, had a legitimate aim and was proportionate.
50. Firstly, as had been established by the SAO, the plot of land had been transferred to Galina Bogdel’s ownership, and subsequently inherited by the applicants, in violation of numerous pieces of legislation and administrative regulations concerning territorial planning and protection of the cultural and historical heritage. That being so, there was a genuine and clear legitimate interest in having the plot returned to the State’s ownership: the impugned plot of land was located in an urban heritage area, a territory subject to the strictest legal protection and which was of unique cultural and historic value, situated in the heart of one of the most unique areas of cultural and historical heritage in Lithuania, the Trakai Historical National Park, as confirmed by the Constitutional Court in its decisions of 14 March 2006 and 9 February 2010 (see paragraphs 42 and 43 above). Moreover, the existence of a public interest was perfectly illustrated by the fact that the initiative for the annulment of the land purchase agreement had come not from the State authorities, but from the residents of Trakai town themselves, who were concerned that the historic old town was being destroyed (see paragraphs 13 and 14 above). In this context the Government also relied on the reasoning of the Court’s judgment in Moskal (cited above, § 73) to the effect that public authorities should not be prevented from correcting their mistakes, even those resulting from their own negligence, because holding otherwise would be contrary to the doctrine of unjust enrichment.
51. The Government also considered that the interference with the applicants’ rights was proportionate. Even though they had lost their title to the plot of land in question, their right of property in respect of the café they had built on that plot of land remained unchanged. Most importantly, after the annulment of the land purchase agreement the HVCA had granted the applicants’ request and leased them the same plot of land for a period of eighty-seven years. That meant that the applicants had never been precluded from exercising their commercial activity on that land. It was also noteworthy that after the annulment of the land purchase agreement the appellate and cassation courts had ordered full restitution, and the applicants had received the sum of LTL 2,874 which Galina Bogdel had paid for the plot. Given that the applicants had not questioned the adequacy of that sum in their appeal on points of law, it had to be considered that the sum was fair. Lastly, if the applicants considered that the sum was too low, it had been and still was open to them to seek damages from the State under Article 6.271 of the Civil Code.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
52. The Court turns first to the Government’s suggestion that the applicants could have lodged a new civil claim for damages if they had thought that the sum of money returned to them in compensation for the annulment of the land purchase agreement was too low. It considers, however, that such a claim in separate civil proceedings, once civil proceedings as regards their title to the plot of land had been completed, would have placed a somewhat excessive burden on the applicants’ shoulders. The Court therefore finds that that was not a remedy to be exhausted in the circumstances of this case.
53. The Court also finds that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
54. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. These rules are not, however, unconnected: the second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions and are therefore to be construed in the light of the principle laid down in the first rule (see, for example, Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 78, ECHR 2006 V).
55. Turning to the circumstances of the instant case the Court recalls that in 1995 the applicants inherited title to the disputed plot of land, which the first applicant’s wife and the second applicant’s mother Galina Bogdel had earlier acquired for LTL 2,874 and which had been registered in the Real Estate Registry (see paragraphs 9–11 above). It therefore considers that the Supreme Court’s decision of 10 May 2006 annulling the applicants’ title to that plot amounted to a “deprivation of possessions” within the meaning of the second sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It must therefore be ascertained whether the interference was justified under that provision.
56. To be compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, a measure of interference must fulfil three basic conditions: it must be carried out “subject to the conditions provided for by law”, which excludes any arbitrary action on the part of the national authorities, must be “in the public interest”, and must strike a fair balance between the owner’s rights and the interests of the community (see Vistiņš and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 94, 25 October 2012).
(a) Compliance with the principle of lawfulness
57. Turning to the circumstances of the instant case, the Court observes that the SAO and, later, the Lithuanian courts at three levels of jurisdiction found that the transfer of the plot of land in issue to the applicants’ ownership had been in breach of a number of legal provisions concerning the protection of cultural and historical heritage (see paragraphs 16 and 29 above). Moreover, the Court cannot find that the HVCA acted arbitrarily when instituting court proceedings for the annulment of the applicants’ title to the plot of land at 41 Karaimų Street in Trakai. In this context the Court also takes cognisance of the Supreme Court’s finding, based on its knowledge of the domestic law, that the HVCA, like the heads of the other counties, was not under an obligation to review contracts concluded by the municipalities prior to the date when the new administrative units – counties – were established (see paragraph 28 above).
58. The Court, giving due deference to the findings of the domestic courts, accepts that the proceedings in the applicants’ case were opened as a consequence of the discovery of the municipal authority’s mistake in allowing the privatisation of a plot of land in an urban heritage area. The challenged procedure was thus used to correct an error on the part of the Trakai municipality and to divest the applicants of their title to that plot, which they had acquired unjustly (see Moskal, cited above, § 56).
59. The Court therefore concludes that the interference with the applicants’ property rights was provided for by law, as required by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(b) “In the public interest”
60. The Court has held that the conservation of the cultural heritage and, where appropriate, its sustainable use, have as their aim, in addition to the maintenance of a certain quality of life, the preservation of the historical, cultural and artistic roots of a region and its inhabitants. As such, they are an essential value, the protection and promotion of which are incumbent on the public authorities (see SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy v. France (dec.), no. 61093/00, ECHR 2005 XIII (extracts); Debelianovi v. Bulgaria, no. 61951/00, § 54, 29 March 2007; Kozacıoğlu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, § 54, 19 February 2009; and Potomska and Potomski v. Poland, no. 33949/05, § 64, 29 March 2011). In this connection the Court also refers to the Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe, which sets out tangible measures, specifically with regard to the architectural heritage (see paragraph 45 above).
61. Turning to the circumstances of the instant case the Court recalls that the HVCA instituted court proceedings challenging the privatisation of the plot of land by Galina Bogdel, and its subsequent transfer to the applicants, in the name of protecting the public interest – the historical and cultural heritage of the State – since the site was on the State’s tentative list for UNESCO World Heritage status. The Court further notes that the domestic court proceedings were in fact prompted by Trakai residents themselves, who were concerned that the plot of land had been misappropriated by the applicants who, moreover, intended to enlarge their property and to build a larger building on territory designated as an urban heritage site. That being so, the Court perceives nothing liable to refute the Government’s argument that deprivation of the applicants’ title was “in the public interest”. It also reiterates its constant case-law to the effect that because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is “in the public interest” (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 87, ECHR 2000 XII).
62. The Court therefore concludes that the interference with the applicants’ property rights was “in the public interest”, within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(c) Proportionality
63. Even if lawful and carried out in the public interest, a measure of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must always strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measure depriving a person of his possessions (see Scordino, cited above, § 93).
64. In determining whether this requirement is met, the Court recognises that the State enjoys a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing the means of enforcement and to ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question (see Vistiņš and Perepjolkins, cited above, § 109). Nevertheless, the Court cannot abdicate its power of review and must determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 93, ECHR 2005 VI).
65. In the present case the HVCA, with a view to protecting the State’s cultural and historical heritage, instituted court proceedings to quash the municipal decisions and contract concluded with Galina Bogdel which had been adopted and concluded some six years earlier (see paragraph 20 above). In this connection the Court reiterates the particular importance of the principle of “good governance”. It requires that where an issue in the general interest is at stake, in particular when the matter affects fundamental human rights such as those involving property, the public authorities must act in good time and in an appropriate and above all consistent manner (see Rysovskyy v. Ukraine, no. 29979/04, §§ 70-71, 20 October 2011).
66. The good governance principle should not, as a general rule, prevent the authorities from correcting occasional mistakes, even those resulting from their own negligence (see Moskal, cited above, § 73). However, the need to correct an old “wrong” should not disproportionately interfere with a new right which has been acquired by an individual relying on the legitimacy of the public authority’s action in good faith (see, mutatis mutandis, Pincová and Pinc v. the Czech Republic, no. 36548/97, § 58, ECHR 2002 VIII). In other words, State authorities which fail to put in place or adhere to their own procedures should not be allowed to profit from their wrongdoing or to escape their obligations (see Lelas v. Croatia, no. 55555/08, § 74, 20 May 2010). The risk of any mistake made by the State authority must be borne by the State itself and the errors must not be remedied at the expense of the individuals concerned (see, among other authorities, mutatis mutandis, Pincová and Pinc, cited above, § 58; Gashi v. Croatia, no. 32457/05, § 40, 13 December 2007; and Trgo v. Croatia, no. 35298/04, § 67, 11 June 2009). In the context of revoking ownership of a property transferred erroneously, the good governance principle may not only impose on the authorities an obligation to act promptly in correcting their mistake (see, for example, Moskal, cited above, § 69), but may also necessitate the payment of adequate compensation or another type of appropriate reparation to the former bona fide holder of the property (see Pincová and Pinc, cited above, § 53, and Toşcuţă and Others v. Romania, no. 36900/03, § 38, 25 November 2008).
67. In the circumstances of the instant case the Court firstly notes that once the Trakai town residents drew the attention of the Seimas Committee for Education, Science and Culture to the possible violations as regards territorial planning in Trakai, the Lithuanian authorities acted without undue delay. Once the auditors had confirmed breaches of the law with regard to the privatisation of the State’s land, the HVCA started court proceedings within months (see paragraphs 14-20 above). Above all, the Court cannot find that the earlier mistakes of the Trakai municipality were remedied at the expense of the applicants. Firstly, immediately after the land lease agreements and land purchase agreement were annulled by the Supreme Court, at the applicants’ request the HVCA leased the same plot to the applicants for a fairly long period – eighty-seven years. The Court also notes that the appellate and cassation courts applied a double restitution procedure and that even though the plot of land was returned to the State’s ownership, the applicants received the sum of LTL 2,874 which Galina Bogdel had paid for the plot. Lastly, the Court takes note of the Government’s argument that the applicants have continuously remained the owners of the café built on the plot of land and have continued to be able to use that property. That being so, and observing that the applicants indeed did not dispute the adequacy of the sum they received before the Supreme Court, the Court finds that the applicants were fairly compensated for the Trakai municipality’s authorities’ mistakes in privatising that plot of land in 1994-5 (see, by converse implication, Maksymenko and Gerasymenko v. Ukraine, no. 49317/07, § 67, 16 May 2013). The interference with the applicants’ property rights was therefore proportionate.
68. In the light of the above considerations, the Court holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
69. The applicants complained that they had not had a fair hearing of their case. They submitted that the Lithuanian courts had misinterpreted the domestic law when calculating the statutory limitation period and thus breached the principle of legal certainty in respect of civil legal relations.
70. The Court considers that the complaint falls to be examined under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
71. The applicants acknowledged from the outset that it was not the Court’s task to take place of the domestic courts in interpreting the domestic legislation. They considered, however, that any misapplication of domestic law in respect of the calculation of the limitation period not only constituted a breach of procedural law but also infringed the principle of legal certainty and negated the substantive rights of the person, for example, the right to property. The domestic courts thus had discretion to establish and interpret the rules regulating statutory limitation only in so far as the rights and interests protected by the Convention were not thereby infringed.
72. The applicants’ main argument rested on what they saw as discrimination between private parties and the State with regard to the way the limitation period was applied by the Lithuanian courts in general, and in their case in particular. They noted that under Lithuanian law the right to bring an action could be enforced from the date on which a person became aware or should have become aware of a violation of his or her rights (Article 86 of the old Civil Code and Article 1.127 of the new Civil Code). Accordingly, the principle of equality of arms required that the same interpretation of the above-mentioned provision be applied both in cases where the claimant was a private entity and when the claimant was the State, represented by its officials or institutions. However, the domestic courts’ decisions showed two different results in civil cases: when examining claims submitted by private entities, the limitation period for challenging the validity of a contract was considered to begin on the date when the parties became aware that the contract had been concluded (see paragraph 36 above), and when deciding claims lodged by State authorities, the courts took as the starting-point the date when the claimant had been provided with sufficient data to prove that a particular legal act or transaction was against the law, as in the case in issue (see paragraph 34 above).
73. The applicants considered that such an interpretation by the domestic courts as to the beginning of the limitation period was contrary to the general aim and essence of the principle of statutory limitation, which was to ensure the stability of civil legal relations. Furthermore, from a practical point of view, such an interpretation was tantamount to a rule that the limitation period should not apply to claims submitted by the State regarding its property at all, because in practice it was almost impossible to miss a general limitation deadline of three or ten years calculated from the date the State institutions became aware and were provided with sufficient data to prove that a public interest had been breached. For the applicants, the above interpretation of the rules regarding the commencement of the limitation period embodied the idea that the State institutions were not obliged to verify the lawfulness of their decisions and transactions in due time. The State’s obligation to verify the decisions and transactions of its institutions was therefore not subject to a time-limit.
74. The applicants lastly contended that the domestic courts had erred in establishing that even after the administrative reform of 1995 county governors in general, and the HVCA in particular, did not have competence to and were not obliged to review the Trakai local authorities’ decisions on the lease and sale of the disputed plot to Galina Bogdel. On that premise they therefore argued that the start of the limitation period should have been calculated as 10 February 1995 – the date when the land purchase agreement was concluded. In their case, however, the courts had become the advocates of the State by exclusively defending the interests of the public institution and ignoring the legal interests of another party – private persons.
2. The Government
75. The Government submitted that the domestic courts’ decision to calculate the statutory limitation period from 3 July 2000 was fully compatible with the Convention in general and with the principle of legal certainty guaranteed by Article 6 in particular. They noted, firstly, that under Lithuanian law the limitation period started to run on the date on which the right to bring a civil action became enforceable, that is, the date when the person became aware of the violation of his right. That reasoning had been confirmed by the Supreme Court on a number of occasions (see paragraph 35 above). Similarly, when a case had been brought before a court in order for a public interest to be protected, the commencement of the limitation period was to be held to be the date when the claimant was provided with sufficient data to prove that a public interest had been violated (see paragraph 34 above).
76. In the instant case there was no indication that the State authority, namely the HVCA, could have become aware of the breach of the State’s interests before 3 July 2000, when the SAO established that the disputed plot of land had been acquired unlawfully and prompted the HVCA to take appropriate measures. The Government also considered it important to note that it was not the State institutions which had been behind the initiative to verify the lawfulness of the land purchase agreement of 10 February 1995. It had in fact been the initiative of a private person, R.L., who had written to the SAO expressing his concerns about the applicants’ business and the building work they intended to carry out.
77. Lastly, the Government also considered it relevant that in the present case a clear and weighty public interest existed (see paragraph 50 above). They further observed that under the domestic case-law a court, having assessed the balance to be struck between the values to be protected and the need to ensure the stability of legal relations, could refuse to protect the public interest even in those cases where the State institution defending the public interest had complied with the limitation period for bringing a case before the court, if there had been an unjustifiably long delay between the adoption of certain administrative acts and the lodging of court proceedings (see paragraph 37 above). However, the case at hand was different, because a fairly short time – six years – had passed between the date the legislation on the protection of historical and cultural heritage was breached and the date the transaction was challenged in court. Moreover, the public interest at stake in the instant case was beyond comparison.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
78. The Court finds that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
79. The Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is, the right to institute proceedings before a court in civil matters, constitutes one aspect. However, this right is not absolute, but may be subject to limitations; these are permitted by implication since the right of access by its very nature calls for regulation by the State. It is also noteworthy that limitation periods are a common feature of the domestic legal systems of the Contracting States. They serve several important purposes, namely to ensure legal certainty and finality, protect potential defendants from stale claims which might be difficult to counter, and prevent the injustice which might arise if courts were required to decide upon events which took place in the distant past on the basis of evidence which might have become unreliable and incomplete because of the passage of time (see, mutatis mutandis, Stubbings and Others v. the United Kingdom, 22 October 1996, §§ 50 and 51, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 IV).
80. The Court has held that the observance of admissibility requirements for carrying out procedural acts is an important aspect of the right to a fair trial. The role played by limitation periods is of major importance when interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which, in its relevant part, declares the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States (see Dacia S.R.L. v. Moldova, no. 3052/04, § 75, 18 March 2008). The Court also reiterates that it is not its task to take the place of the domestic courts. It is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to resolve problems of interpretation of domestic legislation. This applies in particular to the interpretation by courts of rules of a procedural nature such as the prescribed time for lodging a court action. The Court’s role is confined to ascertaining whether the effects of such an interpretation are compatible with the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Platakou v. Greece, no. 38460/97, § 37, ECHR 2001 I; also see Ghirea v. Moldova, no. 15778/05, § 30, 26 June 2012).
81. Turning to the circumstances of the instant case, the Court recalls that, pursuant to Article 86 of the old Civil Code, the right to bring an action started from the date on which the person became aware or should have become aware of the violation of his rights (see paragraph 33 above). It has given due consideration to the applicants’ argument that calculating the limitation period from the date when the State or municipal authorities were provided with sufficient information to prove the fact of a violation,
vis-à-vis the rule applied to private entities – that the limitation period started to run from the date when the contract had been concluded – is discriminatory. The Court cannot fail to observe that the applicants did not raise this particular discrimination-related complaint in their appeal on points of law to the Supreme Court, a copy of which it has examined with due attention. Even so, on the basis of the submissions by the Government and, above all, the Court’s conclusion in paragraph 67 above, it considers that the effect of such a distinction on the applicants was compatible with their “right to a court” under the Convention.
Accordingly, the Court concludes that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible;

2. Declares by a majority the complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention admissible;

3. Holds by five votes to two that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

4. Holds by five votes to two that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 26 November 2013, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Guido Raimondi
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judges Popović and Pinto de Albuquerque is annexed to this judgment.
G.R.A.
S.H.N.

JOINT DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES POPOVIĆ
AND PINTO DE ALBUQUERQUE
1. Much to our regret we are unable to follow the majority. For the reasons stated below, we think that there was no legal basis for the interference with the applicants’ property right, since the proceedings to annul the administrative decisions of 27 July 1994 and 18 January 1995 and the land purchase contract of 10 February 1995 were already time-barred when they were initiated. In addition, even assuming that the interference with the applicants’ right to property was lawful, that interference would in any case be disproportionate.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
2. The majority held that there had been interference with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their property, but that the interference had been lawful and proportionate. The reasons for the majority’s holding were that the proceedings to annul the sale agreement for the plot of land in dispute were “used to correct an error on the part of the Trakai municipality and to divest the applicants of their title to that plot, which they had acquired unjustly”, and that these proceedings started “within months” after the auditors had in 2001 established breaches of the law as regards the administrative decision of the Trakai District Executive Council of 18 January 1995 to sell the plot of land to Galina Bogdel .
3. The majority failed to note that the limitation period for bringing such proceedings had already expired in 1998, and that therefore the interference with the applicants’ property right lacked any lawful basis, as will be shown below.
4. The majority also observed that, immediately after the annulment of the land purchase, the administration had granted a long-term lease in favour of the applicants for the same plot. According to the majority, this fact rendered the interference with the applicants’ property right proportionate . This reasoning runs counter to the majority’s other argument that the aim of the annulment of the contract was to “protect cultural and historical heritage” . In their capacity as lessees, the applicants were entitled to use the plot of land in question in the same way as they would have done had they been its proper owners. In fact, as the majority themselves underlined, since the annulment of the land purchase contract, “the applicants have continuously remained the owners of the café built on the plot of land and have continued to be able to use that property” . The Government themselves admitted that “the applicant’s property right to the café situated in the land plot at issue remained unchanged” and that “in reality the applicants were never precluded (and are not precluded at present) to continue in exercising their commercial activity in the cafe owned by them, which is constructed in the land plot at issue” . But by renting out the plot of land to the applicants for a period of eighty-seven years after the annulment of the land purchase contract, the administration was implicitly admitting that the use of the plot of land for the commercial exploitation of a café was not in conflict with any public interest. Hence, it is contradictory to maintain at the same time that the annulment of the purchase of the land was necessary to protect the public interest and avoid its use for commercial purposes, but that the public interest is compatible with the lease of that same land and its future commercial use in the exact same way as that in which it had been used in the past.
5. The majority thus failed to explain how the protection of the cultural and historical heritage had been furthered by the annulment of the land purchase contract, since the applicants’ commercial activity on the disputed plot of land remained exactly the same as before the annulment of the contract. Moreover, no explanation was given for the fact that the applicants were allowed to continue their commercial activity in spite of the findings of the Trakai District Court and the Municipality’s Audit Office that the applicants’ business could not even have been built at all on the disputed land plot, and notwithstanding the annulment by the Trakai District Court of the administrative decision of 27 July 1994 to permit Galina Bogdel to lease the plot of land.
In view of the facts presented by the applicants and accepted by the respondent Government, we cannot but conclude that the applicants continued, after the annulment of the purchase contract, to run their business on the leased plot of land exactly as they had done since at least 1993, because the local authorities considered that this exploitation did not conflict with public interest. Therefore, the interference with the applicants’ property right was clearly disproportionate, in so far as it did not pursue, in any possible practical way, the alleged public interest of protection of the cultural and historical heritage.
6. The majority also argued that after the Supreme Court’s ruling of 8 November 2005 the applicants were refunded the exact amount of money that they had paid for the plot of land ten years earlier.
7. The majority failed to realise that the applicants had been deprived of ten years of interest on that amount of money, which the administration had used for its own benefit. In fact, the respondent Government themselves admitted that the refunded amount might be too low, and argued that the applicants could still seek damages from the State under Article 6.271 of the Civil Code, although they did not provide relevant case-law examples supporting that assumption .
8. Furthermore, in the context of revoking ownership of a property transferred erroneously, it is often necessary to provide for the payment of adequate compensation or another type of appropriate reparation to the former bona fide holder of the property title . That was the case with Galina Bogdel, the applicants’ mother and spouse, who was an honest purchaser. Neither she nor the applicants committed any breach of the law. On the contrary, they relied on the administrative decisions of the competent administrative entity, namely the Trakai District Executive Council, approving the sale of the plot of land and the land purchase agreement, which was also lawfully registered. In fact, the applicants built a kiosk on the plot of land after having obtained the lease for a five-year term in February 1993 and only transformed the kiosk into a café after obtaining the necessary permission by the local authorities . Thus, the applicants’ property title, effective land possession and legitimate expectations were repeatedly confirmed by the administration. It is thus evident that both Galina Bogdel and the applicants always acted in good faith and in accordance with the administrative authorities’ decisions.
9. Taking into account the facts referred to above, the interference with the applicants’ property right fails the proportionality test. If a mistake is made by the public authorities themselves, without any fault on the part of the private party, a rigorous proportionality approach must be taken in determining whether the burden borne by the private party was excessive . The risk of any mistake made by the public authorities must be assumed by them and the errors must not be remedied at the expense of the private party concerned , particularly when a new right has been acquired by the private party relying in good faith on the legitimacy of the public authorities’ action . In the instant case, the burden of correction of an alleged mistake by the Trakai District Executive Council was placed entirely on the shoulders of the applicants, without any consideration for their good faith.
10. Hence, we conclude that the interference with the applicants’ property right was neither lawful, nor proportionate.
Article 6
11. With regard to the Article 6 claim, the majority endorsed the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the applicable rules on the limitation period within which to bring an action for the annulment of an administrative decision and the sale agreement based thereon in order to defend the public interest, and more specifically its interpretation of the date on which the period started running . In fact, the majority did not dispute, and even accepted, the Supreme Court’s argument that the administrative reorganisation of the State and the creation of new territorial entities were sufficient grounds on which to justify the restarting of the statutory limitation period for the benefit of the administration .
Under Lithuanian law, the limitation period for claiming a breach of a right resulting from the invalidity of a contract commences when the parties become or should have become aware of the fact that the contract was entered into . This is the common rule established by law and any exception to this rule must be provided for by statute (see Article 1127 of the Civil Code and Article 86 of the previous Civil Code of 1964). Nonetheless, the Supreme Court has made a different interpretation of the domestic legal norms as to the calculation of the limitation period when applied to actions brought by the administration. According to this interpretation, the limitation period only starts running at the time when the administration is “provided with sufficient data to prove that the public interest was breached”. Applying this interpretation to the present case, the Supreme Court concluded that the limitation period started running neither from the date of signature of the land purchase agreement by the applicants (10 February 1995), nor from the time of the creation of new administrative entities (an undetermined date in 1995), but from the moment when the authorities of those new administrative entities were provided with evidence about the unlawfulness of the land purchase agreement, that is, 3 July 2000, the date when the National Audit Office allegedly found out about the breach of the legislation.
12. We see absolutely no grounds for such a holding, and we submit that it breaches the right to legal certainty enshrined in Article 6 of the Convention.
Firstly, we note that this interpretation has no express legal basis. It results from creative case-law of the Supreme Court, reflected in its ruling of 28 April 2010 . Since this interpretation creates an exception to the general rule established in Article 1127 of the Civil Code and Article 86 of the previous Civil Code of 1964, it should have an express basis in law, but that is not the case. Secondly, this interpretation is at odds with the Supreme Court’s own interpretation of the subjective and objective requirements of statutory limitation, because it does not apply the objective criterion for the calculation of such periods (“should have become aware”) to the administration and its officials and representatives. The administration is bound to act according to the law and refrain from committing any unlawful acts. Administrative entities and their officials and representatives are obliged to verify, in the performance of their functions, whether their acts are in accordance with the law, on pain of disciplinary, civil and possibly criminal liability. If the limitation period did not start running for the administration when its officials and representatives should have become aware of the unlawfulness of their acts, this would promote negligence and disrespect for the rule of law among administrative officials and representatives. Thirdly, the Supreme Court’s interpretation referred to above creates an unjustified benefit for the administration which can prolong indefinitely any time bar, allowing the courts to proceed with an annulment claim by the administration even though a private party’s claim would have been left without examination in similar circumstances. In other words, the pure inertia of the administration, even in cases where it is aware or should have been aware of the unlawfulness of administrative acts and contracts, does not trigger the starting date for the limitation period, as long as no evidence (“sufficient data”) of the said unlawfulness is presented to it. That interpretation of domestic law, allowing the administration to challenge a contract between the administration and a private party despite the expiry of the general limitation period, albeit valid for the private party, is clearly contrary to the principle of legal certainty protected by Article 6 of the Convention .
In the present case, the Trakai District Board was vested with authority to dispose of public property and also had the duty to ensure the lawfulness of the decisions taken regarding such public property, including the plot of land at issue. Municipal officials, to whom the District Board had delegated the right to dispose of public property, were obliged to know the applicable laws at the time the contract was signed. Thus, the Trakai municipal officials and representative should have become aware of the alleged legal flaws in the land purchase contract at least from the date of the transaction in question.
13. The aforementioned obligation of the Trakai municipal officials and representative has consequences for the mode of calculation of the limitation period for bringing annulment proceedings in respect of the contract between the administration and Galina Bogdel. The contract of land purchase by virtue of which Galina Bogdel became the owner of the plot in question was entered into on 18 January 1995. The limitation period for an action seeking to have that contract annulled was three years under Article 84 of the 1964 Civil Code then in force, as the Supreme Court itself affirmed, bearing in mind that the rules which were in force at the time when the period started running are applicable . This leads to the conclusion that as of 18 January 1998 there was no legal basis whatsoever on which to file for the annulment of the contract of purchase and therefore the interference with the applicants’ property right was unlawful.
14. The administrative reform of 1995 and the creation of the new counties do not change this conclusion, contrary to the Supreme Court’s assumption. Firstly, Lithuanian law did not provide at the relevant time, and still does not, for any cause of suspension or interruption of the limitation period for the annulment of administrative contracts by virtue of any succession of the parties to the contract. Secondly, the counties were created by legislation of 1995 prior to the time when it became impossible to annul the purchase contract on any grounds, that is, 18 January 1998. The new administrative entities had the duty to review the pending contracts since they succeeded the former administrative entities and therefore inherited their contractual position and obligations in respect of all contracts entered into by the former administrative entities. Hence, the new administrative entities, through their competent institutions and officials, should have acted promptly and instituted court proceedings in order to quash the alleged unlawful municipal decisions and land purchase contract in good time . Thirdly, the change in the law on the powers of review and inspection of administrative decisions and contracts between the administration and private parties is an internal matter of the State as a single entity, and therefore cannot in any way change the mode of calculation of the limitation period. Public authorities which fail to abide by their own rules of internal organisation and procedures should not be allowed to profit from their wrongdoing or to escape their obligations .
Having said that, the Vilnius County Administration, as well as the Trakai District Municipality and specifically their Audit Offices, should have checked whether administrative decisions adopted and contracts entered into prior to the administrative reform were valid and should have challenged in court those which were in breach of the law, failing which they had to assume the legal consequences of the acts of the entities to which they had succeeded.
15. Furthermore, no plausible justification was provided for the discrepancy between the above-mentioned case-law of the Supreme Court and the case-law of the Supreme Administrative Court, according to which in order to ensure the stability of legal relations, the courts should refuse to protect the public interest even in those cases where the State institution defending the public interest had complied with the limitation period for bringing a case before the court, if there had been an unjustifiably long delay between the adoption of certain administrative acts and the lodging of court proceedings . A period of six years of inertia on the part of the administration is clearly excessive. That was so in the present case, since the land purchase contract was signed in 1995 and the proceedings for its annulment only started in 2001, well beyond the statutory three-year deadline established for that purpose.
16. To sum up, it was the complacency of the Trakai District Executive Council and its officials and representative in 1994 and 1995 and the pure inertia of the Vilnius County Administration and the Trakai District Municipality, its officials and audit offices in the subsequent years that caused the annulment action to become time-barred on 18 January 1998. In other words, it was the total lack of diligence on the part of the administration on 18 January 1995 and 10 February 1995, and in the consecutive years, that allowed for the consolidation of an alleged unlawful transaction between the administration and a bona fide private party. In fact, it was only on the initiative of some private persons that the administration started to investigate the said transaction many years after it was agreed. To count the starting date of the limitation period as 3 July 2000, when allegedly the National Audit Office found out about the breach of the legislation, or as 6 October 2000, when allegedly the Trakai District Municipality Audit Office reached that same conclusion in another autonomous investigation, would be tantamount to rewarding the negligence and inertia of the administration and punishing a bona fide private party. Having ignored the statutory limitation period of three years, and remedied an allegedly unlawful administrative decision and contract at the expense of the individuals concerned, the national authorities breached the principle of legal certainty enshrined in Article 6 of the Convention .
Conclusion
17. The limitation period for claims raised against contracts between the administration and a private party serves the interest of the aggrieved party in having the alleged violation of its right adjudicated without any unreasonable delay, and conversely guarantees the right of the other party to be certain that after the period has expired its acquired rights will no longer be at risk. The miscalculation of the limitation period by the public authorities of the respondent State not only infringed the principle of legal certainty, but also negated the applicants’ property right. For these reasons, we are of the opinion that there has been a violation of both Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 6 of the Convention in the present case.

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni: Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Privazione di proprietà)
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili
Articolo 6-1 - Accesso ad un tribunale)




SECONDA SEZIONE






CAUSA BOGDEL C. LITUANIA


(Richiesta n. 41248/06)



SENTENZA






STRASBOURG


26 novembre 2013






Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Bogdel c. la Lituania,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Guido Raimondi, Presidente
Danutė Jočienė,
Pari Lorenzen,
Dragoljub Popović,
Işıl Karakaş,
Nebojša Vučinić,
Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque, judges,and
Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 22 ottobre 2013,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 41248/06) contro la Repubblica della Lituania depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con due cittadini lituani, i richiedenti di OMISSIS(“the”), 13 ottobre 2006.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Vilnius. Il Governo lituano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra E. Baltutytė.
3. I richiedenti addussero che quando interpretando il periodo di limitazione legale relativo alla loro rivendicazione civile le corti nazionali aveva violato il principio della certezza legale, in violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Loro dibatterono anche che l'annullamento del loro titolo ad un'area di terra nella città di Trakai era in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. 5 luglio 2010 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1953 e 1986 e vivono in Trakai.
6. Con una decisione di 12 marzo 1992 il Trakai Consiglio Urbano affittò un'area di terra 22 metri di piazza in taglia, situato a n. 41 Strada di Karaimų nella città di Trakai, a Galina Bogdel la moglie di Piotras Bogdel e madre di Snežana Bogdel. L'area fu situata su terra che era proprietà Statale. L'area fu affittata per un termine di cinque anni, per la costruzione di un chiosco (il pastatas-kioskas) per vendere arte ceramica e souvenir. I richiedenti affermarono che in febbraio 1993 il chiosco era stato costruito ed era stato pronto per uso.
7. Con decisione n. 395v 22 dicembre 1993 il Trakai Distretto Consiglio stabilì un piano territoriale per la vecchia città della città di Trakai, sulla base di piani stesa con esperti su eredità culturale. I piani convennero che area n. 41 in Strada di Karaimų, situato all'ingresso a Trakai arrocchi, non sarebbe diviso e non sarebbe privatizzato (“il neprivatizuojama: prieigos di pilies di salos; esamos di lieka di ribos”).
8. Con una decisione di 27 luglio 1994 il Distretto di Trakai che Consiglio Esecutivo ha affittato a Galina Bogdel, per un termine di cinque anni un'area Statale di terra di 134 metri di piazza che consisterono dell'area precedente e l'allargarono.
9. 18 gennaio 1995 il Distretto di Trakai Consiglio Esecutivo adottò una decisione che approva la vendita dell'area detta di 134 metri di piazza a Galina Bogdel per 2,874 litas lituani (LTL).
10. 10 febbraio 1995 un rappresentante del Distretto di Trakai Consiglio Esecutivo e Galina Bogdel firmarono l'accordo di acquisto di terra. L'accordo di acquisto di terra fu registrato alla Beni immobili Cancelleria e, nella conformità con legge lituana, Galina Bogdel divenne il proprietario della terra.
11. Più tardi che anno Galina Bogdel morì e suo marito e figlia (i richiedenti) ereditò l'area di terra col chiosco. Secondo i richiedenti, loro ottennero successivamente il permesso necessario e trasformarono il chiosco in un café.
12. A luglio 1998 i richiedenti contattarono il Trakai Distretto Municipio per richiedere l'ingrandimento dell'area di terra loro possedettero rudemente due volte alla sua taglia con l'oltre di terra più Statale. Loro menzionarono che l'edificio che loro avevano eretto a 41 Strada di Karaimø era usato come locali per servizio buffet pubblico (kaip viešojo maitinimo patalpa). Come il numero di turisti in Trakai continuamente stava crescendo, c'era un bisogno di espandere i locali per soddisfare l'igiene e le necessità sanitarie di una facilità di servizio buffet pubblica. Il municipio li informò che un piano territoriale e nuovo era necessario e con una decisione di 28 luglio 1998 la coordinazione del progetto di pianificazione affidò ai richiedenti.
13. Una volta piani preliminari erano stati pubblicati nel giornale di città di Trakai ad agosto 1999, ripercussioni ampie nel collegamento con l'area di terra in problema sorsero nella comunità locale di Trakai. In particolare, sul 1999 dieci residenti di 19 agosto di Strada di Karaimø scrisse al Capo del Vilnius Amministrazione Provinciale (in seguito-“il HVCA”), il direttore di Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico ed il Sindaco di Trakai che chiede che qualche tempo fa un piccolo edificio era stato eretto sull'area [non era chiaro se giuridicamente o illegalmente], e che ora era stato trasformato in un café chiassoso. I residenti chiesero alle autorità di non permettere qualsiasi costruzione nuova sull'area che era in un posto storico-Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico
-e diritto di fronte a Trakai arrocca e gli altri monumenti della particolare importanza architettonica e storica (prie accarezzano pilies, krantinës ir seniausiø architektûriniø paminklø).
Inoltre, nella conformità coi requisiti della Legge su Pianificazione Territoriale, 7 settembre 1999 una riunione pubblica (viešas svarstymas) fu sostenuto in città di Trakai. La riunione fu presenziata con residenti e le autorità di città di Trakai. È affermato nei verbali dell'assemblea che alcuni residenti temerono la costruzione di un grande ristorante sull'area di terra in problema.
14. A dicembre 1999 una persona privata, R.L. che abitò in città di Trakai scrisse al Comitato di Istruzione, Scienza e la Cultura del Seimas lituano. Lui presentò che Galina Bogdel, e più tardi i suoi eredi (i richiedenti), stava tentando di ottenere illegalmente l'area di terra situata a 41 Strada di Karaimų in Trakai fin da 1992, succedendo infine nei loro sforzi illegali. R.L. dibattè che l'area immediatamente fu situata di fronte a Trakai arrocchi nel Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico e così non poteva essere privatizzata.
15. Con una lettera di 25 gennaio 2000 il Comitato di Istruzione, Scienza e la Cultura spedirono la lettera al Ministero della Cultura ed il Revisione Ufficio Statale (kontrolė di Valstybės, in seguito-“il SAO”), un corpo la cui funzione è soprintendere alla legalità e l'efficacia di gestione di proprietà Statale, mentre chiedendo a loro di investigare la questione.
16. 3 luglio 2000 il SAO adottò decisione n. 70, trovando che le decisioni di affittare a Galina Bogdel e successivamente venderle l'area di terra in oggetto (divide in paragrafi 6, 8 e 9 sopra) era in violazione della legislazione su pianificazione territoriale, incluso Articolo 5 § 4 della Legge sui Territori Protetti, le Regolamentazioni del Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico, approvò con direttiva di Governo n. 283 22 aprile 1992, e la Trakai Distretto Consiglio decisione di 22 dicembre 1993 (veda paragrafo 7 sopra).
I revisori dei conti stabilirono anche che la decisione del municipio di Trakai di 28 luglio 1998 di mettere i richiedenti in accusa del progetto di allargare la loro area di terra aveva violato la Legge sulla Protezione di Eredità Culturale ed Immobile, in che non era stato concordato su col Settore Statale per la Protezione di Eredità Culturale.
17. Il SAO invitò il HVCA a prendere misure appropriate in riguardo dell'area a 41 Strada di Karaimų “quale era stato venduto a Galina Bogdel in violazione delle leggi applicabili.” Il SAO sarebbe informato della decisione del HVCA entro due mesi.
Il SAO osservò che gli ufficiali di municipio di Trakai responsabile per le decisioni di vendere più l'area a Galina Bogdel funzionò nella sezione attinente. Esortò ciononostante il Trakai Distretto Sindaco a rispettare la legge quando eseguendo pianificazione territoriale.
18. Nel frattempo un'altra indagine era in corso. 3 novembre un altro corpo di revisione contabile, questa volta che del Trakai Distretto Municipio stesso, fondò che Galina Bogdel aveva ottenuto la sua proprietà dell'area di terra in oggetto in violazione delle leggi sulla protezione di eredità culturale e le decisioni di pianificazione territoriali ed attinenti.
19. 24 gennaio 2001 il Trakai Distretto Consiglio annullò la decisione di 28 luglio 1998. I richiedenti impugnarono che decisione in corte.
20. 18 aprile 2001 il HVCA chiese alla corte di annullare le decisioni di 27 luglio 1994 ed il 1995 Galina Bogdel che permettono di 18 gennaio di affittare l'area di terra e vendendoglielo rispettivamente.
21 febbraio il HVCA chiese alla corte di annullare l'accordo di vendita di 10 febbraio 1995.
21. Ambo le cause furono congiunte. I richiedenti chiesero poi alla corte di respingere l'azione del HVCA, mentre dibattendo che fu tempo-sbarrato.
22. Con una decisione di 11 luglio 2005 la Corte distrettuale di Trakai respinse i richiedenti l'azione di ' ed ammise tutti il ricorsi di HVCA. Fondò che il tempo-limite per iniziare atti non era stato perso col HVCA. Il tre-anno tempo-limite legale doveva essere calcolato dalla data il HVCA aveva imparato di o avrebbe dovuto sapere della violazione dei diritti dello Stato. Che data era 3 luglio 2000, la data quando il SAO aveva concluso che la terra era stata acquistata in violazione della legislazione sulla protezione di eredità culturale, territori protetti e pianificazione territoriale. La corte notò anche che nel 1995 la terra era stata venduta a Galina Bogdel con un ufficiale di municipio di Trakai. Di stesso anno la legislazione lituana era stata corretta comunque, ed
unità amministrative e diverse-le contee (nella causa presente, la Contea di Vilnius)-era stato accordato la competenza per trattare con questioni relativo alla gestione di terra Statale. Anche così, dopo la competenza presuntuosa sull'amministrazione di terra Statale, il HVCA non aveva avuto nessun obbligo legale per iniziare controlla verificare se contratti conclusero coi municipi di passato era stato concluso legalmente.
23. Sui meriti della causa la Corte distrettuale di Trakai trovata che quando concludendo gli accordi che affittano l'area Statale di terra a Galina Bogdel e, successivamente, vendendo che area a lei, gli ufficiali del Trakai Distretto Municipio avevano violato le leggi applicabili e regolamentazioni locali. Di conseguenza, la corte dichiarò quegli accordi privo di valore legale. La restituzione di ordine della corte e restituì l'il area di 134 metri di piazza di terra al HVCA. Nessun soldi fu ritornato ai richiedenti.
24. La corte annullò anche l'accordo di 27 luglio 1998 col quale il Trakai Distretto Municipio aveva affidato i richiedenti col coordinando la preparazione del piano locale.
25. I richiedenti fecero appello, mentre dibattè che più di sei anni erano passati fra la data la terra era stata comprata e la data quando il HVCA era iniziato atti per annullamento. I richiedenti presentarono anche che il fine di limitazione legale era garantire la certezza legale. La stabilità di relazioni legali e civili si violerebbe se una persona non potesse aspettarsi ragionevolmente che il quo di status sia sostenuto dopo lo scadenza del termine di prescrizione. Loro impugnarono anche la restituzione unilaterale. Infine, i richiedenti dibatterono che la corte più bassa aveva errato nell'interpretando e fare domanda la legislazione di pianificazione territoriale.
26. Con una direttiva di 8 novembre 2005 il Vilnius Corte Regionale sostenne il ragionamento della Corte distrettuale di Trakai. Comunque, ordinò restituzione duplice. I richiedenti sarebbero risarciti LTL 2,874-la somma che Galina Bogdel aveva pagato per l'area di terra.
27. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso su questioni di diritto. Loro dibatterono che le corti più basse avevano errato nell'interpretare le norme legali sul calcolo del termine di prescrizione, e la data iniziale di che termine in particolare. Loro non dibatterono che le corti avevano agito in una maniera discriminatoria quando interpretando le autorità pubbliche ' azione civile, comparato con azioni civili fra parti private. Loro presentarono anche che l'annullamento dell'accordo di acquisto di terra aveva violato il loro diritto di proprietà senza in qualsiasi modo che si lamenta che la somma che loro avevano ricevuto in restituzione era stata troppo poco.
28. In 10 maggio 2006 la Corte Suprema respinse i richiedenti che ' piace, mentre girando il ragionamento delle corti più basse. Osservò che al tempo quando il contratto d'affitto e contratti di vendita furono conclusi nel 1994-1995, il Codice civile del 1964 (gli Articoli 84 e 86) prevedeva dall'un tre-anno tempo-limite legale per iniziare atti. Era stato stabilito nella causa che il HVCA aveva saputo delle violazioni della legge con quelle operazioni 3 luglio 2000, dal rapporto col SAO. Di conseguenza, quando depositando la sua rivendicazione per l'annullamento della decisione di contratto d'affitto di terra e la decisione per vendere l'area di terra a Galina Bogdel, il HVCA non aveva fallito il tre-anno termine massimo legale. Nella prospettiva della Corte Suprema, sarebbe stato irragionevole per calcolare il termine di limitazione legale da 10 febbraio 1995, la data quando la terra fu venduta a Galina Bogdel, perché quando le contee erano state create [nel 1995] l'amministrazione di ogni contea non era stata affidata col compito di fare una rassegna tutte le decisioni amministrative e contratti che i municipi che incorrono la sua competenza sotto avevano adottato o avevano concluso di passato.
29. Come ai richiedenti argomento di ' che non c'erano barriere legali al loro possedendo l'area di terra in oggetto, la Corte Suprema notò che il Trakai Parco Nazionale e Storico era stato creato col soviet Supremo (Aukšèiausioji Taryba, il parlamento della Repubblica della Lituania a che tempo) 23 aprile 1992, e con una decisione Statale di 22 aprile 1992 la vecchia città di Trakai era stata riconosciuta come un luogo di eredità urbano (urbanistinis draustinis). Per che ragione, in 25 maggio 1992 le regolamentazioni su eredità culturale stabilita che l'area di terra situò a 41 Strada di Karaimø non sarebbe privatizzato. 9 novembre 1993 la Legge sui Territori Protetti era stata varata inoltre, col Seimas, mentre prevedendo che terra in aree Stato-protette non sarebbe stata venduta. Successivamente, con decisione n. 395v 22 dicembre 1993, il Trakai Distretto Consiglio aveva approvato un piano territoriale per Trakai la vecchia città che specificò che l'area di terra in oggetto non sarebbe privatizzato.
30. Sulla base del sopra, la Corte Suprema sostenne, che le corti più basse avevano avuto ragione nell'annullando il Trakai autorità municipali le decisioni di ' del 1994 e 18 gennaio di 27 luglio ed il 1995 leasing di 10 febbraio e vendere l'area di terra a Galina Bogdel. Inoltre, la corte di appello aveva avuto ragione nel facendo domanda la procedura di restituzione e risarcire ai richiedenti la somma di LTL 2,874.
31. Il Governo presentò che dopo la definitivo decisione della Corte Suprema, i richiedenti diritti di proprietà di ' al café costruito sull'area di terra situata a 41 Strada di Karaimø erano rimasti immutati. Inoltre, può essere visto dai documenti presentati col Governo che dopo la decisione della Corte Suprema il HVCA ancora accordò i richiedenti che ' richiede di affittare l'area di terra in oggetto per un periodo di ottanta-sette anni. Sul 2006 due accordi di contratto d'affitto di 16 novembre fu concluso così-34 metri quadrati furono affittati a Snežana Bogdel, e 100 metri quadrati furono affittati a Piotras Bogdel.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
32. Articolo 47 del Codice civile di 1964, in vigore su a 30 giugno 2001 (“il vecchio Codice civile”), purché che qualsiasi operazione che è andata a vuoto a soddisfare i requisiti delle disposizioni legali era privo di valore legale. Una volta un'operazione era stata dichiarata privo di valore legale, ogni parte fu legata per ritornare all'altra parte tutto aveva ottenuto come un risultato dell'operazione.
Il Codice civile in vigore fin da 1 luglio 2001 (“il Codice civile nuovo”) offre una norma analoga in Articolo 1.80 §§ 1 e 2.
33. Come riguardi il termine di prescrizione legale, comincia a correre dalla data su che può essere eseguito il diritto per portare un'azione. Una persona ha diritto a portare un'azione dalla data sulla quale lui diviene consapevole o sarebbe dovuto divenire consapevole della violazione del suo diritto (Articolo 86 del vecchio Codice civile ed Articolo 1.127 § 1 del Codice civile nuovo). Il vecchio Codice civile previde che il termine generale di limitazione era tre anni (Articolo 84). Sotto il Codice civile nuovo, il termine generale di limitazione è dieci anni (Articolo 1.125).
34. Come alla data sulla quale il termine di prescrizione avvia correre quando le autorità depositano un'azione annullatrice per difendere l'interesse pubblico, il Governo si riferito alla Corte Suprema sta decidendo di 28 aprile 2010 in giudizio civile n. 3K-3-143/2010 che determinato siccome segue:
“La causa-legge della Corte Suprema è aderente all'effetto che in una causa dove una corte (di giurisdizione generale o amministrativa) si è avvicinato con lo scopo di proteggere l'interesse pubblico, il termine di prescrizione per presentare una rivendicazione comincia nel giorno quando al querelante fu fornito dati sufficienti per provare che l'interesse pubblico era stato violato.”
35. La Direttiva del Senato di Giudici della Corte Suprema della Lituania N.ro 39 20 dicembre 2002 “Sulla Causa-legge delle Corti della Repubblica della Lituania sulla Richiesta delle Norme Legali che Governano il Termine di prescrizione” legge siccome segue:
“5.3. Se il termine di prescrizione per portare una certa rivendicazione cominciata a correre il Codice civile di 1964 o le altre leggi di fronte a 1 luglio 2001 sotto [la data di entrata in vigore del Codice civile nuovo], gli articoli che governano la determinazione dell'inizio del termine di prescrizione sotto il Codice civile di 200[1] non è applicabile, perché gli articoli che erano in vigore al tempo quando il termine di prescrizione cominciò a correre sarà applicabile.
Nella conformità con l'articolo generale che governa la determinazione del principio del termine di prescrizione legale che periodo comincerà nel giorno su che può essere eseguito il diritto per portare un'azione, ed il diritto per portare un'azione sorge sulla data quando una persona diviene consapevole o sarebbe dovuta divenire consapevole della violazione del suo diritto. Così sotto Articolo 1.127 (Articolo 86 del Codice civile di 1964) il termine di prescrizione comincia a correre solamente dopo che una persona è soggettivamente consapevole, o dovrebbe essere consapevole, della violazione del suo diritto.
La legge collega l'inizio del termine di prescrizione col criterio seguente: il giorno quando la persona divenne consapevole (criterio soggettivo) o il giorno quando la persona sarebbe dovuta divenire consapevole (criterio obiettivo). ... Perciò, quando decidendo la questione dell'inizio del termine di prescrizione, la corte deve di tutti prima determini il momento preciso della violazione della legge. Il giorno quando la persona diviene consapevole della violazione della legge è il giorno quando la persona comprende infatti che il suo diritto o interesse proteggerono con legge sono stati violati o sono stati contestati. ... In cause dove una persona chiede che he/she non divennero consapevoli della violazione di diritto di his/her nel giorno quando fu violato, la corte deve verificare se c'è qualsiasi prova che indica il contrario e se un rivendicatore divenne consapevole della violazione della legge nessuno più tardi che qualsiasi persona prudente ed accurata nella stessa situazione.”
36. Come riguardi gli articoli per stabilire la data sulla quale la limitazione avvia correre in cause dove una rivendicazione è stata presentata con entità private, i richiedenti presentarono che la Corte Suprema aveva sostenuto che il termine di prescrizione in riguardo dell'invalidamento di un contratto cominciato sulla data esatta le parti divennero consapevoli che il contratto era stato concluso (decisioni in causa n. 3K-3-229/2006 24 aprile 2006 e causa n. 3K-7-4/2006 3 gennaio 2006). Loro si riferirono anche alla decisione della Corte Suprema in causa n. 3K-3-11/2010 5 gennaio 2010 nei quali aveva contenuto che il rivendicatore (una parte privata) fu ritenuto per essere stato consapevole della violazione dei suoi diritti dalla data le autorità aveva adottato una decisione ufficiale che riguarda i suoi diritti di proprietà.
37. La questione di bilanciare la protezione dell'interesse pubblico e la necessità di assicurare la stabilità di relazioni legali era stata esaminata anche con la Corte amministrativa Suprema in causa n. A575-1576/08 di 26 settembre 2008. In che causa un'istituzione municipale aveva venduto un'area di terra designata per uso agricolo ad una persona privata nel 1994. Nel 2006 le autorità Statali scoprirono che alla persona era stato permesso per acquistare l'area in errore, per la ragione mera che lei non ha vissuto nell'area dove l'area fu situata, che essendo un requisito indispensabile per divenire il suo proprietario. La Corte amministrativa Suprema fondò ciononostante che, determinato che che persona privata aveva pagato tasse su che terra e lo maneggiò su a 2008, lei aveva un'aspettativa legittima che i suoi diritti a che area di terra sarebbe protegguta:
“La camera allargata della Corte amministrativa Suprema in causa n. A146-335-2008 di 25 luglio 2008 ha affermato che non solo gli accusatori ma anche gli altri corpi Statali o municipi sono responsabili per la protezione dell'interesse pubblico. Anche se non tutti di loro hanno la competenza per portare un'azione in corte per difendere l'interesse pubblico, i principi dell'articolo di legge la cooperazione fra istituzioni, l'efficacia e gli altri principi di buona amministrazione richiede che, una volta una violazione dell'interesse pubblico è stata stabilita, un'istituzione deve informare un accusatore o un altro corpo competente della violazione senza ritardo indebito... Il principio dell'articolo di legge richiede che la stabilità di relazioni legali sia preservata. Simile stabilità non si garantirebbe se persone non potessero essere mai sicure che atti per [l'annullamento] di atti amministrativi adottati in riguardo di loro potrebbe essere iniziato sempre. Se Stato o istituzioni municipali agissero con ritardo ingiustificato... vorrebbe dire che l'opportunità di iniziare atti di proteggere l'interesse pubblico diverrebbe illimitata in tempo, e simile situazione non è possibile in un Stato governato con l'articolo di legge. Perciò, una corte, avendo esaminato che l'equilibrio per essere previsto fra i valori, proteggè ed il bisogno di garantire la stabilità di relazioni legali, può rifiutare di proteggere anche l'interesse pubblico in quelle cause dove [l'istituzione] non ha perso [il termine di decadenza legale] per portare atti (contando dal momento quando la prova dell'interesse pubblico e violato fu raggruppata o sarebbe dovuta essere raggruppata), se un periodo sufficientemente lungo di tempo è passato poiché gli atti legali ed amministrativi furono adottati e relazioni legali furono stabilite.”
La Corte amministrativa Suprema stabilì poi che le autorità avevano imparato che l'area di terra era stata data alla persona privata in violazione di certe leggi a luglio 2006, ma aveva avviato solamente atti a luglio 2007. In particolare, un periodo significativo di tempo era passato fra il tempo quando la persona privata aveva ottenuto titolo all'area nel 1994 e quando le autorità Statali erano iniziate atti per annullare il suo titolo. La corte rifiutò perciò di proteggere l'interesse pubblico in ordine che la stabilità di relazioni legali sarebbe preservata. Notò anche che tale conclusione fu sostenuta con la pratica delle corti lituane, vale a dire la Corte amministrativa Suprema sta decidendo n. A10-131/2007 di 6 febbraio 2007, dove aveva contenuto che il tempo-limite era stato perso perché undici anni erano passati poiché l'atto amministrativo ed impugnato era stato adottato.
38. La Legge sulla Pianificazione Territoriale (įstatymas di planavimo di Teritorijų) purché al tempo attinente che piani territoriali erano pubblici e residenti avevano diritto a prendere parte nella considerazione pubblica (viešas svarstymas) di piani territoriali e nuovi (Articoli 25-28).
39. Facendo seguito ad Articolo 5 della Legge sulla Protezione di Eredità Culturale ed Immobile (Nekilnojamųjų kultūros vertybių apsaugos įstatymas), se una decisione di un ministero o municipio potesse avere un impatto sulla protezione di eredità culturale ed immobile e terra relativa, doveva essere approvato col Settore per la Protezione di Eredità Culturale. Decisioni senza simile approvazione furono considerate illegali.
40. Il Revisione Ufficio Statale (kontrolė di Valstybės) è il tasked dell'istituzione con controllare la legalità di privatizzazioni di proprietà Statale così come la legalità dell'uso di terra Statale e le altre risorse naturale (l'Articolo 10 §§ 13 e 14 della Legge sul Revisione Ufficio Statale).
41. Nella conformità con Articolo 49 del Codice di Procedura Civile, nelle cause previste per con legge un accusatore o l'altro pubblico o autorità municipale possono presentare una rivendicazione civile per la protezione di un interesse pubblico.
42. La Legge sui Territori Protetti (įstatymas di teritorijų di Saugomų) purché al tempo attinente che la terra in aree Stato-protette non era soggetto a vendita (l'Articolo 5 § 4). In questo collegamento, la Corte Costituzionale ha sostenuto, che con che proibizione che lo Stato cercato di assicurare la protezione e la longevità di aree Stato-protette e ricreazione suddivide in zone come aree della particolare importanza. Di conseguenza, la terra specificata non può essere trasferita a proprietà privata (decidendo di 14 marzo 2006).
Con una decisione n. 283 22 aprile 1992 il Governo riconobbe la vecchia città di Trakai come un luogo di eredità urbano (urbanistinis draustinis) nel parco nazionale e storico di Trakai.
43. 9 febbraio 2010 la Corte Costituzionale diede una Direttiva “Sull'Ottemperanza di Decisione Statale n. 912 ‘Sull'Approvazione del Trakai Cittadino Parco Pianificazione Schema Storico ' di 6 dicembre 1993 con la Costituzione della Repubblica della Lituania” in che sostenne siccome segue:
“7. 31 marzo 1992 (quando il documento di accessione fu depositato col Direttore-generale delle Nazioni Unito Organizzazione Istruttiva, Scientifica e Culturale (UNESCO)), la Repubblica della Lituania si unì alla Convenzione riguardo alla Protezione del Mondo Eredità Culturale e Naturale... quale fu adottato 16 novembre 1972 a Parigi. Nella Repubblica della Lituania la Convenzione entrò in vigore 30 giugno 1992. Nel congiungere la Convenzione, la Repubblica della Lituania intraprese l'obbligo per proteggere il culturale e la naturale eredità nel suo territorio ed acquisito il diritto per proporre proprietà nel suo territorio per inclusione nell'UNESCO Mondo Eredità Ruolo.
Nel 2002, gli esperti di UNESCO, mentre in Lituania, guardò alle proprietà di Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico che ricevette la loro valutazione favorevole e raccomandato che una nomina è preparata in riguardo di che articolo lituano per l'UNESCO Mondo Eredità Ruolo. Alla Conferenza ‘Il Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico-sugli UNESCO Mondo Eredità Ruoli-il Bisogno e le Opportunità ', sostenne 3-4 aprile 2003 in Lituania, una decisione si adottò dove fu contenuto, inter l'alia, siccome segue: ‘Taking nella considerazione il particolare valore del panorama nell'insieme, il Trakai che Parco Nazionale e Storico dovrebbe essere nominato per il Ruolo dell'Eredità del Mondo di Proprietà Mescolate ' e sé fu deciso di chiedere a ‘il Ministero della Cultura per approvare l'inclusione del Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico nel Ruolo dell'Eredità del Mondo di Proprietà Mescolate, approvare un gruppo di lavoro e delegare a sé il compito di preparare, in conformità coi termini stabiliti l'osservazione del Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico al Comitato dell'Eredità del Mondo ed assegnare i finanziamenti necessario per [che] il fine '.
28 luglio 2003, su osservazione del Ministero della Cultura della Repubblica della Lituania, Trakai Parco Nazionale e Storico fu incluso in un ruolo provvisorio per [la nomina a] l'UNESCO Mondo Eredità Ruolo (categoria di proprietà-mescolato).
8. Così, lo Stato della Lituania ha trattato e ha trattato Trakai e la sua periferia come un complesso unico di panorama creato con natura e ha equipaggiato, un territorio che deve essere protegguto ed in riguardo del quale deve essere creato un regime legale e speciale; questo è un fatto universalmente ammesso.”
44. Il Codice civile nuovo prevede che lo Stato deve compensare danno causato con atti illegali di istituzioni di autorità pubblica, irrispettoso della colpa di un particolare servitore pubblico o l'altro impiegato di un'istituzione di autorità pubblica (Articolo 6.271).
III. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE
45. Il Consiglio di Convenzione di Europa per la Protezione dell'Eredità Architettonica dell'Europa, ratificò con la Lituania 7 dicembre 1999, letture poiché attinente, siccome segue:
Articolo 3
“Ciascune imprese di Parte:
1. prendere misure legali per proteggere l'eredità architettonica;
2. all'interno della struttura di simile misure e con vuole dire specifico ad ogni Stato o regione, costituire disposizione la protezione di monumenti gruppi di edifici e luoghi.”
Articolo 4
“Ciascune imprese di Parte:
...
2. ostacolare la deformazione, lo sfacelo o la demolizione di proprietà protette. A questa fine, ogni Parte si impegna introdurre, se non ha già fatto così, legislazione che:
...
(d) concede acquisto obbligatorio di una proprietà protetta.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
46. I richiedenti si lamentarono che spossessandoli del loro titolo all'area di terra in oggetto corrispose ad una privazione ingiustificata di proprietà. Questa azione di reclamo incorre essere esaminata sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. I richiedenti
47. I richiedenti dibatterono che loro erano stati privati arbitrariamente del loro titolo all'area di terra in oggetto. In primo luogo, loro impugnarono il lituano corteggia interpretazione di ' del diritto nazionale che regola pianificazione territoriale in generale, e che in riguardo della città di Trakai in particolare. In secondo luogo, i richiedenti sostennero che il loro consorte e madre, Galina Bogdel erano state un'acquisitore onesta: né lei né i richiedenti, mai avevano commesso qualsiasi violazione della legge. Era perciò ingiusto per i richiedenti per sopportare la responsabilità per gli errori delle istituzioni municipali che, inoltre, avrebbe dovuto sapere le leggi applicabili al tempo dell'operazione. Su questo scorso punto i richiedenti si riferirono alla causa-legge della Corte all'effetto che se un errore fosse commesso con le autorità loro senza qualsiasi colpa da parte di una terza parte, un approccio di proporzionalità diverso deve essere preso nel determinare se il carico sopportato con un richiedente era eccessivo (veda Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 73 15 settembre 2009). Loro dibatterono anche che gli errori o errori delle autorità Statali dovrebbero notificare al beneficio dell'imputato. Nelle altre parole, il rischio di qualsiasi errore rese con le autorità Statali deve essere sopportato con lo Stato e gli errori non devono essere rimediati ad alla spesa dell'individuo riguardata (veda, mutatis mutandis, Radchikov c. la Russia, n. 65582/01, § 50 24 maggio 2007).
48. Per i richiedenti, la privazione dei loro diritti di proprietà era sproporzionata ed aveva imposto un carico eccessivo su loro, mentre provocandoli svantaggio significativo. Loro considerarono che non ogni causa che trattò con privatizzazione di proprietà Statale incluse un elemento di pubblico-interesse. In ogni causa molti altri aspetti avevano essere valutati, per esempio sul contrario, come la proprietà Statale fu usata e se era nell'interesse pubblico. In questo collegamento, loro presentarono, che la maggior parte delle aree di neighbouring di terra in Strada di Karaimø in Trakai erano state privatizzate con persone private che li usarono per le attività economiche e commerciali. I richiedenti impugnarono poi la pertinenza dello schema di pianificazione territoriale in riguardo di Trakai la vecchia città, sostenendo che la loro area era nessuno diverso da aree di neighbouring e così non aveva importanza eccezionale. Il fatto che dopo l'annullamento dell'accordo di acquisto di terra lo Stato aveva affittato che la particolare area di terra a loro per ottanta-sette anni confermati che proprietà dell'area coi richiedenti ed il suo uso come un café non contrasterebbe con qualsiasi interesse pubblico.
2. Il Governo
49. Il Governo sostenne che, supponendo anche che l'annullamento dei richiedenti in oggetto il quale ' intitola all'area di terra costituì un'interferenza col loro diritto a proprietà, che interferenza era legale, aveva un scopo legittimo ed era proporzionato.
50. In primo luogo, siccome era stato stabilito col SAO, l'area di terra era stata trasferita alla proprietà OMISSIS, e successivamente ereditò coi richiedenti, in violazione di pezzi numerosi di legislazione e regolamentazioni amministrative che concernono pianificazione territoriale e protezione del culturale ed eredità storica. Che essendo così, c'era un interesse legittimo e genuino e chiaro nell'avere l'area ritornata alla proprietà dello Stato: l'area contestata di terra fu localizzata in un'area di eredità urbana, un territorio soggetto alla tutela giuridica più severa e quale era di valore culturale e storico unico, situato nel cuore di una delle aree più uniche di eredità culturale e storica in Lituania il Trakai Cittadino Parco Storico, come confermato con la Corte Costituzionale nelle sue decisioni del 2006 e 9 febbraio 2010 di 14 marzo (veda divide in paragrafi 42 e 43 sopra). L'esistenza di un interesse pubblico fu illustrata perfettamente inoltre, col fatto che l'iniziativa per l'annullamento dell'accordo di acquisto di terra non era venuta dalle autorità Statali, ma dai residenti della città di Trakai loro che concernerono che la vecchia città storica era distrutta (veda divide in paragrafi 13 e 14 sopra). In questo contesto il Governo si appellò anche sul ragionamento della sentenza della Corte in Moskal (citò sopra, § 73) all'effetto che ad autorità pubbliche non dovrebbero essere impedite di correggere i loro errori, anche quelli che sono il risultato della loro propria negligenza, perché sostenere altrimenti sarebbe contrario alla dottrina dell'arricchimento ingiusto.
51. Il Governo considerò anche che l'interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' erano proporzionati. Anche se loro avevano perso il loro titolo all'area di terra in oggetto, il loro diritto di proprietà in riguardo del café loro avevano costruito su che area di terra rimase immutata. Dopo l'annullamento dell'accordo di acquisto di terra il HVCA aveva accordato più importantemente, i richiedenti ' richiede e li affittò la stessa area di terra per un periodo di ottanta-sette anni. Quel volle dire che i richiedenti non erano stati preclusi mai dall'esercitare la loro attività commerciale su quel la terra. Era anche notevole che dopo l'annullamento dell'accordo di acquisto di terra i di appello e corti di cassazione avevano ordinato la piena restituzione, ed i richiedenti avevano ricevuto la somma di LTL 2,874 Galina Bogdel aveva pagato quale per l'area. Dato che i richiedenti non avevano messo in dubbio l'adeguatezza di che somma nel loro ricorso su questioni di diritto, doveva essere considerato che la somma era equa. Infine, se i richiedenti considerassero che la somma era troppo bassa, era stato ed ancora era stato aperto a loro per chiedere danni dallo Stato sotto Articolo 6.271 del Codice civile.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
52. La Corte si rivolge al suggerimento del Governo prima che i richiedenti avessero potuto depositare una rivendicazione civile e nuova per danni se loro avessero pensato che la somma di soldi ritornò a loro in risarcimento per l'annullamento dell'accordo di acquisto di terra era troppo basso. Comunque, considera che tale rivendicazione in procedimenti civili e separati, una volta procedimenti civili come riguardi il loro titolo all'area di terra era stato completato, avrebbe messo un piuttosto carico eccessivo sui richiedenti le spalle di '. La Corte perciò i costatazione che quel non era una via di ricorso per essere esaurito nelle circostanze di questa causa.
53. La Corte anche costatazione che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
54. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 contiene tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, questi articoli non sono distaccati: il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e perciò saranno costruiti nella luce del principio posata in giù nel primo articolo (veda, per esempio, Scordino c. l'Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 78 il 2006-V di ECHR).
55. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente i richiami di Corte che nel 1995 i richiedenti ereditarono titolo all'area contestata di terra che la moglie del primo richiedente e la madre del secondo richiedente Galina Bogdel aveva più primo acquisito per LTL 2,874 e quale era stato registrato nella Beni immobili Cancelleria (veda divide in paragrafi 9–11 sopra). Considera perciò che la decisione della Corte Suprema di 10 maggio 2006 che annulla i richiedenti ' intitola che area corrispose un “la privazione di proprietà” all'interno del significato della seconda frase di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Deve essere accertato perciò se l'interferenza fu giustificata sotto quel la disposizione.
56. Essere compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, una misura di interferenza deve adempiere le tre condizioni di base: deve essere eseguito “soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge” che esclude qualsiasi azione arbitraria da parte delle autorità nazionali, deve essere “nell'interesse pubblico”, e deve prevedere un equilibrio equo fra i diritti del proprietario e gli interessi della comunità (veda Vistiņš e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 94 25 ottobre 2012).
(a) Ottemperanza col principio della legalità
57. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte osserva che il SAO e, più tardi, le corti lituane a tre livelli di giurisdizione trovati che il trasferimento dell'area di terra in problema ai richiedenti la proprietà di ' era stata in violazione di un numero di disposizioni legali riguardo alla protezione di eredità culturale e storica (veda divide in paragrafi 16 e 29 sopra). Inoltre, la Corte non può trovare che il HVCA agì arbitrariamente quando avviando atti per l'annullamento dei richiedenti ' intitola all'area di terra a 41 Strada di Karaimų in Trakai. In questo contesto la Corte prende anche giurisdizione della Corte Suprema sta trovando, basò sulla sua conoscenza del diritto nazionale che il HVCA, come i capi delle altre contee non era sotto un obbligo per fare una rassegna contratti conclusi coi municipi prima della data quando le unità amministrative e nuove-le contee-fu stabilito (veda paragrafo 28 sopra).
58. La Corte, mentre dando riguardo dovuto alle sentenze delle corti nazionali, accetta che i procedimenti nei richiedenti la causa di ' fu aperta come una conseguenza della scoperta dell'errore dell'autorità municipale nel concedere la privatizzazione di un'area di terra in un'area di eredità urbana. La procedura impugnata fu usata così correggere un errore da parte del municipio di Trakai e spossessare i richiedenti del loro titolo a che area che loro ingiustamente avevano acquisito (veda Moskal, citato sopra, § 56).
59. La Corte conclude perciò che l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritti di proprietà di ' furono offerti per con legge, come richiesto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(b) “Nell'interesse pubblico”
60. La Corte ha sostenuto che la conservazione dell'eredità culturale e, dove appropriato, il suo uso sostenibile, abbia come il loro scopo, oltre al mantenimento di una certa qualità della vita la conservazione dello storico, radici culturali ed artistiche di una regione ed i suoi abitanti. Come così, loro sono un valore essenziale, la protezione e promozione di che è in carica sulle autorità pubbliche (veda SCEA il de di Ferme Fresnoy c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 61093/00, ECHR 2005-XIII (gli estratti); Debelianovi c. la Bulgaria, n. 61951/00, § 54 29 marzo 2007; Kozacıoğlu c. la Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03, § 54 19 febbraio 2009; e Potomska e Potomski c. la Polonia, n. 33949/05, § 64 29 marzo 2011). In questo collegamento la Corte si riferisce anche specificamente alla Convenzione per la Protezione dell'Eredità Architettonica di Europa che espone fuori misure tangibili con riguardo ad all'eredità architettonica (veda paragrafo 45 sopra).
61. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente la Corte richiama che il HVCA avviò atti che impugnano la privatizzazione dell'area di terra con Galina Bogdel, ed il suo trasferimento susseguente ai richiedenti, nel nome di proteggere l'interesse pubblico-lo storico ed eredità culturale dello Stato-poiché il luogo era sul ruolo provvisorio dello Stato per UNESCO Mondo Eredità status. La Corte nota inoltre che gli atti nazionali erano infatti incitò coi residenti di Trakai loro che concernerono che l'area di terra si era stata appropriata indebitamente di coi richiedenti che, inoltre, intese di allargare la loro proprietà e costruire un più grande edificio su territorio designò come un luogo di eredità urbano. Che essendo così, la Corte non percepisce niente responsabile confutare l'argomento del Governo che la privazione dei richiedenti il titolo di ' era “nell'interesse pubblico.” Reitera anche la sua causa-legge continua all'effetto che a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è “nell'interesse pubblico” (veda Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 87 ECHR 2000-XII).
62. La Corte conclude perciò che l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritti di proprietà di ' erano “nell'interesse pubblico”, all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(c) la Proporzionalità
63. Anche se legale ed eseguì nell'interesse pubblico, una misura di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà deve prevedere sempre un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso con qualsiasi misura che spoglia una persona delle sue proprietà (veda Scordino, citato sopra, § 93).
64. Nel determinare se questo requisito è soddisfatto, la Corte riconosce che lo Stato gode un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo a sia a scegliendo i mezzi di esecuzione ed ad accertando se le conseguenze di esecuzione sono giustificate nell'interesse generale per il fine di realizzare l'oggetto della legge in oggetto (veda Vistiņš e Perepjolkins, citato sopra, § 109). Ciononostante, la Corte non può abdicare il suo potere di revisione e deve determinare se l'equilibrio richiesto fu sostenuto in una maniera conforme coi richiedenti il diritto di ' al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà, all'interno del significato della prima frase di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 93 ECHR 2005-VI).
65. Al giorno d'oggi la causa il HVCA, con una prospettiva a proteggendo l'eredità culturale e storica dello Stato atti avviati per annullare le decisioni municipali e contratto conclusi con Galina Bogdel che era stato adottato ed era stato concluso dei sei anni più primo (veda paragrafo 20 sopra). In questo collegamento la Corte reitera la particolare importanza del principio di “il buon governo.” Richiede che dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale, in particolare quando la questione colpisce diritti umani fondamentali come quelli che comportano proprietà, le autorità pubbliche devono agire nel buon tempo ed in un appropriato e soprattutto maniera coerente (veda Rysovskyy c. l'Ucraina, n. 29979/04, §§ 70-71 20 ottobre 2011).
66. Il buon principio di governo non deve, come un articolo generale, impedisca alle autorità di correggere errori occasionali, anche quelli che sono il risultato della loro propria negligenza (veda Moskal, citato sopra, § 73). Comunque, il bisogno di correggere un vecchio “sbagliato” non dovrebbe interferire sproporzionatamente con un diritto nuovo che è stato acquisito con un appellandosi individuale sulla legittimità dell'azione dell'autorità pubblica in buon fede (veda, mutatis mutandis, Pincová e Pinc c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 36548/97, § 58 ECHR 2002-VIII). Nelle altre parole, ad autorità Statali che vanno a vuoto a fissare in posto o aderire alle loro proprie procedure non dovrebbe essere permesso di trarre profitto dal loro male o scappare i loro obblighi (veda Lelas c. Croatia, n. 55555/08, § 74 20 maggio 2010). Il rischio di qualsiasi errore rese con l'autorità Statale deve essere sopportato con lo Stato stesso e gli errori non devono essere rimediati ad alla spesa degli individui riguardata (veda, fra le altre autorità, mutatis mutandis, Pincová e Pinc, citato sopra, § 58; Gashi c. Croatia, n. 32457/05, § 40 13 dicembre 2007; e Trgo c. Croatia, n. 35298/04, § 67 11 giugno 2009). Nel contesto di revocare proprietà di una proprietà trasferito erroneamente, il buon principio di governo non solo può imporre sulle autorità un obbligo per agire prontamente nel correggere il loro errore (veda, per esempio, Moskal, citato sopra, § 69), ma può rendere necessario anche il pagamento del risarcimento adeguato o un altro tipo di riparazione appropriata al detentore in buona fede precedente della proprietà (veda Pincová e Pinc, citato sopra, § 53, e Toşcuţă ed Altri c. la Romania, n. 36900/03, § 38 25 novembre 2008).
67. Nelle circostanze della causa presente la Corte nota in primo luogo che una volta i residenti di città di Trakai attrassero l'attenzione del Comitato di Seimas per Istruzione, Scienza e la Cultura alle possibili violazioni come riguardi pianificazione territoriale in Trakai, le autorità lituane agirono senza ritardo indebito. Una volta i revisori dei conti avevano confermato violazioni della legge con riguardo ad alla privatizzazione della terra dello Stato, il HVCA avviò atti entro mesi (veda divide in paragrafi 14-20 sopra). Soprattutto, la Corte non può trovare che i più primi errori del municipio di Trakai furono rimediati ad alla spesa dei richiedenti. In primo luogo, immediatamente dopo che gli accordi di contratto d'affitto di terra ed accordo di acquisto di terra furono annullati con la Corte Suprema, ai richiedenti ' richiede il HVCA affittò la stessa area ai richiedenti per un periodo abbastanza lungo-ottanta-sette anni. La Corte nota anche che i di appello e corti di cassazione fecero domanda una procedura di restituzione duplice e che anche se l'area di terra fu ritornata alla proprietà dello Stato, i richiedenti ricevettero la somma di LTL 2,874 Galina Bogdel aveva pagato quale per l'area. Infine, le prese di Corte notano dell'argomento del Governo che i richiedenti sono rimasti i proprietari del café continuamente costruito sull'area di terra e hanno continuato ad essere in grado usare quel la proprietà. Che essendo così, ed osservando che i richiedenti non contestarono davvero l'adeguatezza della somma che loro hanno ricevuto di fronte alla Corte Suprema, la Corte trova che i richiedenti furono compensati equamente per le autorità del municipio di Trakai ' si sbaglia in privatising che disegna di terra nel 1994-5 (veda, con implicazione contraria, Maksymenko e Gerasymenko c. l'Ucraina, n. 49317/07, § 67 16 maggio 2013). L'interferenza coi richiedenti diritti di proprietà di ' erano perciò proporzionati.
68. Nella luce delle considerazioni sopra, la Corte sostiene, che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE PRESUNTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
69. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro non avevano avuto un'udienza corretta della loro causa. Loro presentarono che le corti lituane avevano interpretato male il diritto nazionale quando calcolando il termine di prescrizione legale e così violò il principio della certezza legale in riguardo di relazioni legali e civili.
70. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo incorre essere esaminata sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. I richiedenti
71. I richiedenti ammisero dall'inizio che non era il compito della Corte per succedere nell'interpretare la legislazione nazionale. Comunque, loro considerarono che qualsiasi misapplication di diritto nazionale in riguardo del calcolo del termine di prescrizione non solo costituirono una violazione di diritto procedurale ma anche infransero il principio della certezza legale e negò i diritti effettivi della persona, per esempio, il diritto a proprietà. Le corti nazionali così avute la discrezione per stabilire ed interpretare gli articoli che regolano solamente finora limitazione legale in come i diritti ed interessi proteggute con la Convenzione non furono infrante con ciò.
72. I richiedenti ' argomento principale rimase su che con cui loro videro come discriminazione fra parti private e lo Stato riguardo ad al modo il termine di prescrizione fu fatto domanda con le corti lituane in generale, e nella loro causa in particolare. Loro notarono che sotto legge lituana il diritto per portare un'azione potrebbe essere eseguito dalla data sulla quale una persona divenne consapevole o sarebbe dovuta divenire consapevole di una violazione di suo o i suoi diritti (Articolo 86 del vecchio Codice civile ed Articolo 1.127 del Codice civile nuovo). Di conseguenza, il principio dell'uguaglianza di braccio richiese che la stessa interpretazione della disposizione summenzionata sia fatta domanda sia in cause dove era un'entità privata il rivendicatore e quando il rivendicatore era lo Stato, rappresentato coi suoi ufficiali o istituzioni. Comunque, il nazionale corteggia le decisioni di ' mostrarono due diverso dà luogo a giudizi civili: quando rivendicazioni esaminatore presentarono con entità private, era considerato che il termine di prescrizione per impugnare la validità di un contratto cominciasse sulla data quando le parti divennero consapevoli che il contratto era stato concluso (veda paragrafo 36 sopra), e quando decidendo rivendicazioni depositate con autorità Statali, le corti presero come l'inizio-punto la data quando al rivendicatore era stato fornito dati sufficienti per provare che un particolare atto legale od operazione erano contro la legge, come nella causa in problema (veda paragrafo 34 sopra).
73. I richiedenti considerarono che tale interpretazione con le corti nazionali come all'inizio del termine di prescrizione era contrario allo scopo generale ed essenza del principio di limitazione legale che era assicurare la stabilità di relazioni legali e civili. Da un punto di vista pratico, tale interpretazione era inoltre, uguale ad un articolo che il termine di prescrizione non dovrebbe fare domanda a rivendicazioni presentato con lo Stato che riguarda la sua proprietà a tutti, perché in pratica era quasi impossibile per fallire un termine massimo di limitazione generale di tre o dieci anni calcolato dalla data le istituzioni Statali divennero consapevoli e furono previste con dati sufficienti per provare che un interesse pubblico era stato violato. Per i richiedenti, l'interpretazione sopra degli articoli riguardo al principio del termine di prescrizione incarnò l'idea che le istituzioni Statali non sono state obbligate per verificare la legalità delle loro decisioni ed operazioni in tempo dovuto. L'obbligo dello Stato per verificare le decisioni ed operazioni delle sue istituzioni non era perciò soggetto ad un tempo-limite.
74. I richiedenti contesero infine che le corti nazionali avevano errato nello stabilire che anche dopo la riforma amministrativa di 1995 governatori provinciali in generale, ed il HVCA in particolare, non abbia la competenza ad e non obblighi a fare una rassegna il Trakai autorità locali le decisioni di ' sul contratto d'affitto e vendita dell'area contestata a Galina Bogdel. Su che locale che loro hanno dibattuto perciò che l'inizio del termine di prescrizione sarebbe dovuto essere calcolato come 10 febbraio 1995-la data quando l'accordo di acquisto di terra fu concluso. Nella loro causa, comunque le corti erano divenute i difensori dello Stato con difendendo esclusivamente gli interessi dell'istituzione pubblica ed ignorando gli interessi legali di un'altra parte-persone private.
2. Il Governo
75. Il Governo presentò che il nazionale corteggia la decisione di ' di calcolare il termine di prescrizione legale da 3 luglio 2000 era completamente compatibile con la Convenzione in generale e col principio della certezza legale garantito con Articolo 6 in particolare. Loro notarono, in primo luogo, che sotto legge lituana il termine di prescrizione avviò correre sulla data su che il diritto per portare un'azione civile divenne esecutivo, quel è, la data quando la persona divenne consapevole della violazione del suo diritto. Che ragionando era stato confermato con la Corte Suprema su un numero di occasioni (veda paragrafo 35 sopra). Similmente, quando una causa era stata portata di fronte ad una corte in ordine per un interesse pubblico per essere protegguto, il principio del termine di prescrizione sarebbe contenuto per essere la data quando al rivendicatore fu fornito dati sufficienti per provare che un interesse pubblico era stato violato (veda paragrafo 34 sopra).
76. Nella causa presente non era nessuna indicazione che l'autorità Statale, vale a dire il HVCA sarebbe potuta divenire consapevole della violazione degli interessi dello Stato di fronte a 3 luglio 2000, quando il SAO stabilì che l'area contestata di terra era stata acquisita illegalmente ed era stata incitata il HVCA a prendere misure appropriate. Il Governo lo considerò anche importante notare che non era le istituzioni Statali che erano state dietro all'iniziativa per verificare la legalità dell'accordo di acquisto di terra di 10 febbraio 1995. Aveva infatti stato l'iniziativa di una persona privata, R.L. che aveva scritto al SAO che si preoccupa dei richiedenti gli affari di ' e l'edificio lavori loro intesero di eseguire.
77. Il Governo lo considerò anche infine, attinente che nella causa presente un interesse pubblico e chiaro e pesante esistè (veda paragrafo 50 sopra). Loro osservarono inoltre che sotto la causa-legge nazionale una corte, avendo valutato l'equilibrio per essere previsto fra i valori per essere protegguto ed il bisogno di assicurare la stabilità di relazioni legali, potrebbe rifiutare di proteggere anche l'interesse pubblico in quelle cause dove l'istituzione Statale che difende l'interesse pubblico si era attenuta col termine di prescrizione per portare una causa di fronte alla corte, se c'era stato un ingiustificabilmente ritardo lungo fra l'adozione dei certi atti amministrativi e l'alloggio di atti (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). Comunque, la causa a mano era diversa, perché un tempo abbastanza breve-sei anni-era passato fra la data la legislazione sulla protezione di eredità storica e culturale fu violato e la data che l'operazione è stata impugnata in corte. Inoltre, l'interesse pubblico a gioco nella causa presente era oltre paragone.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
78. I costatazione di Corte che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
79. La Corte reitera che Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione incarna il “diritto ad una corte” di che il diritto di accesso che è il diritto per avviare procedimenti di fronte ad una corte in questioni civili, costituisce un aspetto. Comunque, questo diritto non è assoluto, ma può essere soggetto a limitazioni; questi sono permessi con implicazione fin dal diritto di accesso con la sua molta natura manda a chiamare regolamentazione con lo Stato. È anche notevole che termini di prescrizione sono una caratteristica comune degli ordinamenti giuridici nazionali degli Stati Contraenti. Loro notificano molti importanti fini, vale a dire assicurare certezza legale e la finalità proteggono imputati potenziali dalle vecchie rivendicazioni che sarebbero difficili opporsi a, ed ostacola l'ingiustizia che sorgerebbe se corti fossero costrette a decidere su eventi che ebbero luogo di passato distante sulla base di prova che sarebbe divenuta inattendibile ed incompleto a causa del passaggio di tempo (veda, mutatis mutandis, Stubbings ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 22 ottobre 1996 §§ 50 e 51, Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV).
80. La Corte ha sostenuto che l'osservanza di requisiti di ammissibilità per eseguire atti procedurali è un importante aspetto del diritto ad un processo equanime. Il ruolo giocato con termini di prescrizione è dell'importanza notevole quando interpretò nella luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, dichiara l'articolo di legge per essere parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti (veda Dacia S.R.L. c. la Moldavia, n. 3052/04, § 75 18 marzo 2008). La Corte reitera anche che non è il suo compito da succedere. È primariamente per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti, chiarire problemi di interpretazione di legislazione nazionale. Questo fa domanda in particolare all'interpretazione con corti di articoli di una natura procedurale come il tempo prescritto per depositare un'azione di corte. Il ruolo della Corte è confinato ad accertando se gli effetti di tale interpretazione sono compatibili con la Convenzione (veda, mutatis mutandis, Platakou c. la Grecia, n. 38460/97, § 37 ECHR 2001-io; anche veda Ghirea c. la Moldavia, n. 15778/05, § 30 26 giugno 2012).
81. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, i richiami di Corte che, facendo seguito ad Articolo 86 del vecchio Codice civile, il diritto per portare un'azione cominciata dalla data sulla quale la persona divenne consapevole o sarebbe dovuta divenire consapevole della violazione dei suoi diritti (veda paragrafo 33 sopra). Ha dato la considerazione dovuta ai richiedenti l'argomento di ' che calcolando il termine di prescrizione dalla data quando alle autorità Statali o municipali furono fornite informazioni sufficienti per provare il fatto di una violazione, il
vis-à-vis l'articolo fece domanda alle entità private-che il termine di prescrizione avviò correre dalla data quando il contratto era stato concluso-è discriminatorio. La Corte non può andare a vuoto ad osservare che i richiedenti non sollevarono questa particolare azione di reclamo discriminazione-relativa nel loro ricorso su questioni di diritto alla Corte Suprema, una copia della quale ha esaminato con attenzione dovuta. Anche così, sulla base delle osservazioni del Governo e, soprattutto, la conclusione della Corte in paragrafo 67 sopra, considera che l'effetto di tale distinzione sui richiedenti era compatibile con loro “diritto ad una corte” sotto la Convenzione.
Di conseguenza, la Corte conclude che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibile;

2. Dichiara con una maggioranza l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ammissibile;

3. Sostiene con cinque voti a due che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;

4. Sostiene con cinque voti a due che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 26 novembre 2013, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Guido Raimondi
Cancelliere Presidente
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudici Popović ed il de di Pinto che Albuquerque è annesso a questa sentenza.
G.R.A.
S.H.N.

OPINIONE DISSIDIDENTE CONGIUNTA DEI GIUDICI POPOVIĆ
E PINTO DE ALBUQUERQUE
1. Molto al nostro rammarico noi non siamo capaci di seguire la maggioranza. Per le ragioni affermarono sotto, noi pensiamo che non c'era base legale per l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritto di proprietà di ', poiché i procedimenti per annullare le decisioni amministrative del 1994 e 18 gennaio 1995 di 27 luglio e la terra acquistano contratto di 10 febbraio 1995 già fu tempo-sbarrato quando loro furono iniziati. In oltre, presumendo anche che l'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' a proprietà era legale, che interferenza può in qualsiasi causa è sproporzionata.
Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
2. La maggioranza contenne che c'era stata interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà, ma che l'interferenza era stata legale e proporzionata. Le ragioni per la maggioranza stanno contenendo era che i procedimenti per annullare l'accordo di vendita per l'area di terra in controversia erano “usato correggere un errore da parte del municipio di Trakai e spossessare i richiedenti del loro titolo a che area che loro ingiustamente avevano acquisito”, e che questi procedimenti cominciarono “entro mesi” dopo che i revisori dei conti avevano in 2001 violazioni stabilite della legge come riguardi la decisione amministrativa del Distretto di Trakai Consiglio Esecutivo di 18 gennaio 1995 vendere l'area di terra a Galina Bogdel.
3. La maggioranza andò a vuoto a notare che il termine di prescrizione per portare simile procedimenti già era scaduto nel 1998, e che perciò l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritto di proprietà di ' mancò qualsiasi base legale, come sarà mostrato sotto.
4. La maggioranza osservò anche che, immediatamente dopo l'annullamento dell'acquisto di terra, l'amministrazione aveva accordato un contratto d'affitto a lungo termine in favore dei richiedenti per la stessa area. Questo fatto rese l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritto di proprietà di ' proporzionato secondo la maggioranza. Questo ragionamento funziona cassa all'altro argomento della maggioranza al quale lo scopo dell'annullamento del contratto era “protegga eredità culturale e storica.” Nella loro veste come affittuari, i richiedenti furono concessi per usare l'area di terra in oggetto nello stesso modo, siccome loro avrebbero fatto li avuti stato i suoi proprietari corretti. Infatti, come la maggioranza loro sottolinearono, fin dall'annullamento del contratto di acquisto di terra, “i richiedenti sono rimasti i proprietari del café costruiti sull'area di terra continuamente e hanno continuato ad essere in grado ad uso che la proprietà.” Il Governo che loro hanno ammesso che “il diritto di proprietà del richiedente al café situato nell'area di terra in questione rimasto immutato” e che “in realtà i richiedenti non furono preclusi mai (e non è precluso attualmente) continuare nell'esercitare la loro attività commerciale nel caffè possedette con loro in questione i quali sono costruiti nell'area di terra.” Ma affittando fuori l'area di terra ai richiedenti per un periodo di ottanta-sette anni dopo l'annullamento del contratto di acquisto di terra, l'amministrazione stava ammettendo implicitamente, che l'uso dell'area di terra per lo sfruttamento commerciale di un café non era in conflitto con qualsiasi interesse pubblico. Da adesso, è contraddittorio per sostenere allo stesso tempo che l'annullamento dell'acquisto della terra era necessario proteggere l'interesse pubblico ed evitare il suo uso per fini commerciali, ma che l'interesse pubblico è compatibile col contratto d'affitto di che la stessa terra ed il suo uso commerciale e futuro nello stesso modo esatto come che in che si usava di passato.
5. La maggioranza andò a vuoto così a spiegare come la protezione del culturale ed eredità storica era stata furthered con l'annullamento del contratto di acquisto di terra, fin dai richiedenti ' l'attività commerciale sull'area contestata di terra rimase precisamente lo stessa come di fronte all'annullamento del contratto. Inoltre, nessun chiarimento fu dato per il fatto che ai richiedenti fu permesso per continuare la loro attività commerciale nonostante le sentenze della Corte distrettuale di Trakai ed il Revisione Ufficio del Municipio che i richiedenti che gli affari di ' non poteva essere costruito anche a tutti sull'area di terra contestata, e nonostante l'annullamento della Corte distrettuale di Trakai della decisione amministrativa di 27 luglio 1994 per permettere Galina Bogdel per affittare l'area di terra.
In prospettiva dei fatti presentata coi richiedenti ed accettò col Governo rispondente, noi non possiamo ma concludiamo che i richiedenti continuarono, dopo l'annullamento del contratto di acquisto, correre precisamente i loro affari sull'area affittata di terra siccome loro avevano fatto da allora almeno 1993, perché le autorità locali considerarono che questo sfruttamento non contrastò con interesse pubblico. Perciò, l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritto di proprietà di ' chiaramente era sproporzionato, in finora come sé non persegua in qualsiasi il possibile modo pratico, l'interesse pubblico ed allegato di protezione del culturale ed eredità storica.
6. La maggioranza dibattè anche che dopo che la Corte Suprema sta decidendo di 8 novembre 2005 i richiedenti furono risarciti l'importo esatto di soldi che loro avevano pagato per l'area di terra dieci anni più primo.
7. La maggioranza andò a vuoto a comprendere che i richiedenti erano stati privati di dieci anni di interesse su che importo di soldi che l'amministrazione aveva usato per suo proprio beneficio. Infatti, il Governo rispondente che loro hanno ammesso che è probabile che l'importo risarcito sia troppo basso, e dibattè che i richiedenti ancora potessero chiedere danni dallo Stato sotto Articolo 6.271 del Codice civile, benché loro non offrissero esempi di causa-legge attinenti che sostengono quel l'assunzione.
8. Nel contesto di revocare proprietà di una proprietà trasferito erroneamente, è inoltre, spesso necessario per prevedere per il pagamento del risarcimento adeguato o un altro tipo di riparazione appropriata al detentore in buona fede precedente del titolo di proprietà. Quel era la causa con Galina Bogdel, i richiedenti la madre di ' e consorte che erano un acquirente onesto. Né lei né i richiedenti, commisero qualsiasi violazione della legge. Sul contrario, loro si appellarono sulle decisioni amministrative dell'entità amministrativa e competente, vale a dire il Distretto di Trakai Consiglio Esecutivo, approvando che la vendita dell'area di terra e la terra, acquista accordo che fu registrato anche legalmente. Infatti, i richiedenti costruirono un chiosco sull'area di terra dopo avere ottenuto il contratto d'affitto per un termine quinquennale a febbraio 1993 e solamente trasformarono il chiosco in un café dopo avere ottenuto il permesso necessario con le autorità locali. Così, i richiedenti che titolo di proprietà di ', proprietà di terra effettiva e le aspettative legittime sono state confermate ripetutamente con l'amministrazione. È così evidente che Galina Bogdel ed i richiedenti, agirono sempre in buon fede e nella conformità con le autorità amministrative le decisioni di '.
9. Prendendo in considerazione i fatti assegnò a sopra, l'interferenza coi richiedenti la proprietà di ' errori destri la prova di proporzionalità. Se un errore è commesso con le autorità pubbliche loro senza qualsiasi colpa da parte della parte privata, un approccio di proporzionalità rigido deve essere preso nel determinare se il carico sopportato con la parte privata era eccessivo. Il rischio di qualsiasi errore rese con le autorità pubbliche deve essere presunto con loro e gli errori non deve essere rimediato ad alla spesa della parte privata riguardata, particolarmente quando un diritto nuovo è stato acquisito con la parte privata che si appella in buon fede sulla legittimità delle autorità pubbliche l'azione di '. Nella causa presente, il carico di correzione di un errore allegato del Distretto di Trakai Consiglio Esecutivo fu messo completamente sulle spalle dei richiedenti senza qualsiasi la considerazione per la loro buon fede.
10. Da adesso, noi concludiamo che l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritto di proprietà di ' né era legale, né proporzionato.
Articolo 6
11. Con riguardo ad all'Articolo 6 rivendicazione, la maggioranza girò l'interpretazione della Corte Suprema degli articoli applicabili sul termine di prescrizione entro il quale portare un'azione per l'annullamento di una decisione amministrativa e l'accordo di vendita basò thereon per difendere l'interesse pubblico, e più specificamente la sua interpretazione della data sulla quale il periodo cominciò a correre. Infatti, la maggioranza non contestò, ed anche accettò, l'argomento della Corte Suprema che i reorganisation amministrativi dello Stato e la creazione delle entità territoriali e nuove erano i motivi sufficienti su che giustificare il ricominciare del termine di prescrizione legale per il beneficio dell'amministrazione.
Sotto legge lituana, il termine di prescrizione per chiedere una violazione di un diritto che è il risultato dell'invalidamento di un contratto comincia quando le parti divenute o sarebbe dovuto divenire consapevole del fatto che il contratto fu entrato in. Questo è l'articolo comune stabilito con legge e qualsiasi eccezione a questo articolo deve essere prevista per con statuto (veda Articolo 1127 del Codice civile ed Articolo 86 del Codice civile precedente di 1964). Nondimeno, la Corte Suprema ha fatto un'interpretazione diversa delle norme legali e nazionali come al calcolo del termine di prescrizione quando fece domanda ad azioni portate con l'amministrazione. Secondo questa interpretazione, il termine di prescrizione comincia solamente a correre al tempo quando l'amministrazione è “purché con dati sufficienti per provare che l'interesse pubblico fu violato.” Facendo domanda questa interpretazione alla causa presente, la Corte Suprema concluse che il termine di prescrizione cominciò a né amministrare dalla data di firma dell'accordo di acquisto di terra coi richiedenti (10 febbraio 1995), né dal tempo della creazione delle entità amministrative e nuove (una data indeterminata nel 1995), ma dal momento quando alle autorità di quelle entità amministrative e nuove furono fornite prova dell'illegalità dell'accordo di acquisto di terra che è 3 luglio 2000, la data quando il Revisione Ufficio Nazionale fondò presumibilmente fuori della violazione della legislazione.
12. Noi completamente non vediamo motivi per tale partecipazione azionaria, e noi presentiamo che viola il diritto a certezza legale custodita in Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
In primo luogo, noi notiamo che questa interpretazione non ha base legale ed espressa. È il risultato di causa-legge creativa della Corte Suprema, riflessa nella sua direttiva di 28 aprile 2010. Poiché questa interpretazione crea un'eccezione all'articolo generale stabilito in Articolo 1127 del Codice civile ed Articolo 86 del Codice civile precedente di 1964, dovrebbe avere una base espressa in legge, ma quel non è la causa. Questa interpretazione è in disaccordo in secondo luogo, con la propria interpretazione della Corte Suprema dei soggettivi e requisiti obiettivi di limitazione legale, perché non fa domanda il criterio obiettivo per il calcolo di simile periodi (“sarebbe dovuto divenire consapevole”) all'amministrazione ed i suoi ufficiali e rappresentanti. L'amministrazione è legata agire a norma di legge e frenarsi dal commettere qualsiasi atti illegali. Le entità amministrative ed i loro ufficiali e rappresentanti sono obbligati a verificare, nell'adempimento delle loro funzioni se i loro atti sono in conformità con la legge, su dolore di disciplinare, civile e possibilmente la responsabilità penale. Se il termine di prescrizione non cominciasse a correre per l'amministrazione quando i suoi ufficiali e rappresentanti sarebbero dovuti divenire consapevoli dell'illegalità dei loro atti, questo promuoverebbe negligenza e mancanza di rispetto per l'articolo di legge fra ufficiali amministrativi e rappresentanti. In terzo luogo, l'interpretazione della Corte Suprema assegnata a sopra crea un beneficio ingiustificato per l'amministrazione che può prolungare indefinitamente qualsiasi il termine di decadenza, permettendo alle corti di procedere con una rivendicazione di annullamento con l'amministrazione anche se la rivendicazione di una parte privata sarebbe stata lasciata senza esame in circostanze simili. Nelle altre parole, l'inerzia pura dell'amministrazione, anche in cause dove è consapevole o sarebbe dovuto essere consapevole dell'illegalità di atti amministrativi e contratti, non provochi la data iniziale per il termine di prescrizione, lungo come nessuna prova (“dati sufficienti”) dell'illegalità detta è presentato a sé. Che interpretazione di diritto nazionale, permettendo all'amministrazione di impugnare un contratto fra l'amministrazione ed una parte privata nonostante la scadenza del termine di prescrizione generale benché valido per la parte privata, chiaramente è contrario al principio della certezza legale protegguto con Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il Trakai Distretto Consiglio era assegnato legalmente con autorità per sbarazzarsi di proprietà pubblica ed anche aveva il dovere di assicurare la legalità delle decisioni preso riguardo a simile proprietà pubblica, incluso l'area di terra in questione. Ufficiali municipali, a chi il Consiglio di Distretto aveva delegato il diritto per sbarazzarsi di proprietà pubblica, fu obbligato per sapere le leggi applicabili al tempo il contratto fu firmato. Così, il Trakai ufficiali municipali e rappresentante sarebbero dovuti divenire almeno consapevoli dei difetti legali ed allegato nel contratto di acquisto di terra dalla data dell'operazione in oggetto.
13. L'obbligo summenzionato del Trakai ufficiali municipali e rappresentante ha conseguenze per la maniera del calcolo del termine di prescrizione per portare procedimenti di annullamento in riguardo del contratto fra l'amministrazione e Galina Bogdel. Il contratto di acquisto di terra con virtù del quale Galina Bogdel divenne il proprietario dell'area in oggetto fu entrato in 18 gennaio 1995. Il termine di prescrizione per un'azione che cerca di avere che contratto annullato era poi tre anni sotto Articolo 84 del Codice civile del 1964 in vigore, come la Corte Suprema stessa affermata mentre tenendo presente che gli articoli che erano in vigore al tempo quando il periodo cominciò a correre è applicabile. Questo conduce alla conclusione che come di 18 gennaio 1998 non c'era qualsiasi base legale su che registrare per l'annullamento del contratto di acquisto e perciò l'interferenza coi richiedenti diritto di proprietà di ' era illegale.
14. La riforma amministrativa di 1995 e la creazione delle contee nuove non cambia questa conclusione, contrari all'assunzione della Corte Suprema. In primo luogo, legge lituana non previde al tempo attinente, ed ancora non fa per qualsiasi causa di sospensione o interruzione del termine di prescrizione per l'annullamento di contratti amministrativi con virtù di qualsiasi successione delle parti al contratto. In secondo luogo, le contee furono create con legislazione di 1995 prima del tempo quando divenne impossibile per annullare il contratto di acquisto su qualsiasi motivi che sono 18 gennaio 1998. Le entità amministrative e nuove avevano il dovere di fare una rassegna i contratti pendenti poiché loro succederono le entità amministrative e precedenti e perciò ereditarono la loro posizione contrattuale ed obblighi in riguardo di tutti i contratti entrato in con le entità amministrative e precedenti. Le entità amministrative e nuove, per le loro istituzioni competenti ed ufficiali avrebbero dovuto agire prontamente da adesso, ed avrebbero dovuto avviare atti per annullare le decisioni municipali illegali ed allegato e contratto di acquisto di terra nel buon tempo. In terzo luogo, il cambio nella legge sui poteri di revisione ed ispezione di decisioni amministrative e contratti fra l'amministrazione e parti private sono una questione interna dello Stato come una sola entità, e perciò non può in qualsiasi cambio di modo la maniera del calcolo del termine di prescrizione. Ad autorità pubbliche che vanno a vuoto ad attenersi ai loro propri articoli di organizzazione interna e procedure non dovrebbe essere permesso di trarre profitto dal loro male o scappare i loro obblighi.
Avendo detto che, il Vilnius Amministrazione Provinciale, così come il Trakai Distretto Municipio e specificamente i loro Revisione Uffici, avrebbe dovuto controllare se decisioni amministrative adottarono e contratti entrarono in prima della riforma amministrativa era valido ed avrebbe dovuto impugnare in corte quelli che erano in violazione della legge, mentre fallendo loro avevano quale per presumere le conseguenze legali degli atti delle entità ai quali loro erano successi.
15. Inoltre, nessuna giustificazione plausibile fu offerta per la discrepanza fra la causa-legge summenzionata della Corte Suprema e la causa-legge della Corte amministrativa Suprema secondo che per assicurare la stabilità di relazioni legali le corti dovrebbero rifiutare di proteggere anche l'interesse pubblico in quelle cause dove l'istituzione Statale che difende l'interesse pubblico si era attenuta col termine di prescrizione per portare una causa di fronte alla corte, se c'era stato un ingiustificabilmente ritardo lungo fra l'adozione dei certi atti amministrativi e l'alloggio di atti. Un periodo di sei anni dell'inerzia da parte dell'amministrazione chiaramente è eccessivo. Quel era così nella causa presente, poiché il contratto di acquisto di terra fu firmato solamente in 1995 ed i procedimenti per il suo annullamento cominciato nel 2001, bene oltre il termine massimo di tre-anno legale stabilito per quel il fine.
16. Era il compiacimento del Distretto di Trakai Consiglio Esecutivo ed i suoi ufficiali e rappresentante in 1994 e 1995 e l'inerzia pura del Vilnius Amministrazione Provinciale ed il Trakai Distretto Municipio, i suoi ufficiali ed uffici di revisione sommare su, di anni susseguenti che causò l'azione di annullamento del contratto per divenire tempo-sbarrato 18 gennaio 1998. Nelle altre parole, era la mancanza totale di diligenza da parte dell'amministrazione il 1995 e 10 febbraio 1995 di 18 gennaio, e di anni consecutivi che concedè per il consolidamento di un'operazione illegale ed allegato fra l'amministrazione ed una parte privata ed in buona fede. Infatti, era solamente sull'iniziativa di delle persone private che l'amministrazione ha avviato investigare l'operazione detta molti anni dopo che fu concordato. Contare la data iniziale del termine di prescrizione come 3 luglio 2000, quando presumibilmente il Revisione Ufficio Nazionale fondò fuori della violazione della legislazione, o come 6 ottobre 2000, quando presumibilmente il Trakai Distretto Municipio Revisione Ufficio raggiunse che stessa conclusione in un'altra indagine autonoma, sarebbe uguale a ricompensando la negligenza e l'inerzia dell'amministrazione e castigando una parte privata ed in buona fede. Avendo ignorato il termine di prescrizione legale di tre anni, e rimediò ad un presumibilmente decisione amministrativa ed illegale e contrae alla spesa degli individui riguardata, le autorità nazionali violarono il principio della certezza legale custodito in Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
Conclusione
17. Il termine di prescrizione per rivendicazioni sollevate contro contratti fra l'amministrazione ed una parte privata notifica l'interesse della parte addolorata nell'avere la violazione allegato del suo diritto aggiudicata senza qualsiasi ritardo irragionevole, ed al contrario. garantisce il diritto dell'altra parte per essere sicuro che dopo che il periodo è scaduto i suoi diritti acquisiti non saranno più a rischio. L'errore di calcolo del termine di prescrizione con le autorità pubbliche dello Stato rispondente non solo infranse il principio della certezza legale, ma anche negò i richiedenti diritto di proprietà di '. Per queste ragioni, noi siamo dell'opinione che c'è stata una violazione di ambo l'Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ed Articolo 6 della Convenzione nella causa presente.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è domenica 09/02/2020.

Se volete sapere come funziona LA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, qui c'è uno schema:

I COSTI DELLA NOSTRA ASSISTENZA, IN SINTESI

Consulenza iniziale: esame di atti e consigli

Gratuita
Per richiederla cliccate qui: Colloquio telefonico gratuito

Eventuale successiva assistenza, se richiesta

Da concordare:

  • Con accordo scritto (a garanzia dell'espropriato)
  • Con pagamento posticipato (si paga con i soldi che si ottengono dall'Amministrazione)
  • Col criterio: SE NON OTTIENI NON PAGHI

Se sei assistito da un professionista aderente all'Associazione pagherai solo a risultato raggiunto, "con i soldi" dell'Amministrazione.

Non si deve pagare se non si ottiene il risultato stabilito. Tutto ciò viene pattuito, a garanzia dell'espropriato, sempre con un contratto scritto. E' ammesso solo il rimborso spese vive: ad. es. 1.000 euro per il DAP (tutelarsi e opporsi senza contenzioso) o 2.000 euro per il contenzioso.

Per vedere l'ACCORDO TIPO per l'assistenza, cliccate qui Vademecum gratuito e andate a pag. 20

Ricordate che il principale custode dei vostri diritti siete voi stessi.
E' quindi essenziale capire ciò che accade e ciò che accadrà.

Se volete sapere come si svolge la PROCEDURA ESPROPRIATIVA e come tutelarvi nelle varie fasi, abbiamo predisposto una breve sintesi degli strumenti da utilizzare.
Potete esaminarla cliccando qui: Come Tutelarsi in tre passi