Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF DAMJANAC v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 52943/10/2013
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 24/10/2013
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (Article 35-3 - Ratione materiae) Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) Just satisfaction dismissed (out of time)



FIRST SECTION








CASE OF DAMJANAC v. CROATIA

(Application no. 52943/10)








JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

24 October 2013





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Damjanac v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, President,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse,
Ksenija Turković,
Dmitry Dedov, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 1 October 2013,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 52943/10) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian and Serbian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 24 August 2010.
2. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicant alleged in particular that stopping payment of his YPA military pension for a period of thirteen months after he had changed his place of residence to Serbia, had been arbitrary and discriminatory and thus contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention.
4. On 21 March 2012 the complaints concerning the stopping of payment of the applicant’s pension and discrimination in that respect were communicated to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
5. On 17 January 2013 the Government of Serbia was informed of the case and invited to exercise their right to intervene if they wished to do so. On 1 March 2013 the Government of Serbia informed the Court that they did not wish to exercise their right to intervene in the present case.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1926 and lives in Belgrade.
A. Background to the case
1. Military pensions in the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
7. The general pension system of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (hereinafter “the SFRY”) was set up on the principle of territoriality. This meant that each federal entity, namely the six republics (Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Macedonia and Montenegro) and two autonomous provinces (Vojvodina and Kosovo), had their own pension funds, which were independent of federal government and were responsible for the collection of contributions and the payment of pensions to all individuals who had been working on the territory of the respective republic or province. The pension system was based on the “pay-as-you-go” model and the principle of inter-generational solidarity, which was essentially based on the payment of mandatory contributions during the years of employment and then receiving the pension by instalments once retired.
8. The military pension system differed, in that it was centralised at the federal level. On 1 January 1973 under, at the relevant time, the Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act (Zakon o mirovinskom i invalidskom osiguranju vojnih obveznika) a federal pension fund was established for employees of the Yugoslav People’s Army (hereinafter “the YPA”) with its registered headquarters in Belgrade. Contributions to this fund were paid from the federal budget, and the fund then paid pensions to military pensioners, irrespective of the location of their military service or where they lived once retired.
2. YPA military pensions in Croatia
9. On 25 June 1991 the Croatian Parliament (Sabor Republike Hrvatske) declared Croatia independent of Yugoslavia, and on 8 October 1991 all relations between Croatia and the SFRY federal Government were dissolved. The SFRY Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act was incorporated into the Croatian legal system by the Military Personnel Federal Pension, Invalidity Insurance and Child Support Legislation (Acceptance in the Republic of Croatia as Republic Law) Act (Zakon o preuzimanju saveznih zakona iz oblasti mirovinskog i invalidskog osiguranja i doplatka za djecu vojnih osiguranika koji se u Republici Hrvatskoj primjenjuju kao republički zakoni), enacted by the Parliament on 26 June 1991.
10. On 23 July 1992 the Government of Croatia enacted a decree on “Pension and Invalidity Rights of Persons Whose Active Military Service in the YPA Terminated Prior to 31 December 1991” (Uredba o ostvarivanju prava iz mirovinskog i invalidskog osiguranja osoba kojima je prestalo svojstvo aktivne vojne osobe u bivšoj JNA do 31. prosinca 1991.; hereinafter: “the Military Pensions Decree”). The Military Pensions Decree laid down conditions for recognition of the right to advance payments of pensions (akontacija) to former YPA military personnel, provided that they had terminated their military service prior to 31 December 1991, but had not obtained pension rights prior to that date, and that they met all the necessary conditions to be granted a pension under the Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act (see paragraph 8 above). The Military Pensions Decree set out three additional complementary conditions: (1) residence in Croatia, (2) Croatian nationality, and (3) that the person concerned had made himself available for service in the Croatian army prior to 31 December 1991 and was not suspected of an offence against Croatia. The Croatian Republic Workers’ Pension and Invalidity Insurance Fund (Republički fond mirovinskog i invalidskog osiguranja radnika Hrvatske; hereinafter “the Republic Workers’ Fund”) was assigned to make the necessary arrangements under this Decree.
11. On the same day the Government of Croatia also enacted a decree on “Payment of Pensions to Former SFRY Republic Pension Beneficiaries” (Uredba o isplati mirovina korisnicima koji su mirovinu ostvarili u republikama bivše Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije). Under that decree all residents of Croatia who had been granted pensions in other republics of the former SFRY, except Slovenia, which had at the time also dissolved its relations with the SFRY federal government, were entitled to payment of their pensions by Croatia. The Republic Workers’ Fund was ordered to pay pensions from the collected contributions which Croatia was not paying to pensioners residing in other republics of the former SFRY due to the ending of financial transfers.
12. On 6 October 1993 the Croatian Parliament enacted the Yugoslav People’s Army Personnel Pensions Act (Zakon o ostvarivanju prava iz mirovnskog i invalidskog osigurnja pripadnika bivše JNA), which set aside the 1992 Decree (see paragraph 10 above) and part of the 1991 transitional legislation (see paragraph 9 above). Under this Act Croatia assumed responsibility for payment of YPA military pensions obtained prior to 8 October 1991, and for the granting of pensions to YPA military personnel whose service in Croatia had terminated prior to 31 December 1991.
13. Former YPA military personnel who had obtained pension rights under the former SFRY pension regime prior to 8 October 1991 had the right to have their pension paid by Croatia if their pension from the former federal fund was no longer being paid. Two further conditions were laid down: residence in Croatia and that the person concerned was not being prosecuted for certain criminal offences against Croatia, listed in section 2 of the Act. The Republic Workers’ Fund was tasked with enforcement of the Act.
14. The Act was set aside by the Pension Insurance Act (Zakon o mirovinskom osiguranju), which was enacted on 10 July 1998 and came into force on 1 January 1999. In the period relevant to this case it was amended several times (see paragraphs 50-53 below). The Pension Insurance Act regulated the compulsory pension insurance scheme on the basis of the principle of inter-generational solidarity (section 2 § 1). It established the Croatian Pension Fund (Hrvatski zavod za mirovinsko osiguranje), which was tasked with the management of pension affairs (section 6) thus replacing the previous Republic Workers’ Fund (section 187 §§ 1 and 3). Accordingly, the Croatian Pension Fund was tasked with the collection of pension contributions and payment of pensions and with the observance of obligations under international agreements on pensions (section 130). Under the Pension Insurance Act payment of pensions abroad was possible only under either an international agreement or a reciprocal agreement (section 88).
15. The Pension Insurance Act also provided that funds for payment of pensions to YPA military pensioners should be secured in the State’s budget, and that the necessary contributions should be paid to the Croatian Pension Fund on a monthly basis (section 152 § 1). For all Croatian nationals the Pension Insurance Act recognised pensionable years of employment in the period prior to 8 October 1991 under the Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act (see paragraphs 8 and 9 above) as pensionable years of employment (section 186).
16. By an amendment of 29 November 2001 the pensions of, inter alia, YPA military pensioners were reduced and the Croatian Pension Fund was ordered to set the amended levels of their pensions.
3. Croatian treaties with Serbia
17. On 15 September 1997 Croatia and the then Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (later Serbia and Montenegro) signed a Social Insurance Treaty (Ugovor o socijalnom osiguranju), hereinafter “the Social Insurance Treaty”), which came into force on 1 May 2003. The Social Insurance Treaty listed the relevant domestic legislation to which it was applicable, namely health insurance and health protection legislation; pension and invalidity insurance legislation; legislation on work-related accidents and work-related illnesses; and unemployment benefits. It was applicable to all persons in the two countries who had rights and duties under the relevant domestic legislation. The right to payment of a pension abroad existed irrespective of the place of residence of the pension beneficiaries within one of the contracting States. The Republic Workers’ Fund was designated the competent liaison authority in Croatia concerning all pension issues (see paragraph 54 below).
18. According to the Government, after the dissolution of the former SFRY, Serbia maintained a dual pension system for civilian and military pensioners, and stopped paying YPA military pensions to pensioners residing in Croatia. Only in January 2012 was a pension reform carried out in Serbia which had the effect of integrating the military pension fund into the civilian pension and invalidity insurance fund. On an unspecified date the Serbian authorities informed the Croatian pension authorities of this change. They also indicated that they would pay what formerly were military pensions to pensioners residing abroad under the relevant treaties on social insurance or reciprocal agreements.
19. On 29 June 2001 the republics of the former SFRY signed the Agreement on Succession Issues (Ugovor o pitanjima sukcesije, hereinafter “the Succession Agreement”), which came into force on 2 June 2004 (see paragraph 55 below).
20. Annexe E to the Succession Agreement dealt with pensions. It was based on the principle of acquired rights, in that rights acquired under one system must be acknowledged and respected in another. Article 1 established the said principle in respect of the pension rights acquired under the former republics’ pension regime (see paragraph 7 above), while Article 2 dealt with military pensions under the former federal regime (see paragraph 8 above). The latter provision stipulated that the State which had recognised the right to payment of the pensions to former SFRY military personnel should continue to pay pensions to all its nationals, irrespective of their place of residence. In cases where a person was a national of more than one republic of the former SFRY, the pension should be paid by the State where that person resided. This pension payment regime differed from the regime established for civilian pensions under Article 1 of Annexe E to the Succession Agreement, which provided that the State which had recognised the pension rights and which paid the pensions should continue with the payments entirely irrespective of the nationality or place of residence of the pension beneficiaries.
B. The applicant’s personal circumstances
21. The applicant served as a military officer in the YPA between 1941 and 1979, when he retired. On 16 May 1979 the SFRY federal pension fund for retired YPA employees authorised the applicant’s entitlement to a military pension. At that time the applicant was residing in Dubrovnik, Croatia.
22. On 19 June 1992 the applicant requested the Dubrovnik office of the Republic Workers’ Fund (Republički fond mirovinskog i invalidskog osiguranja radnika Hrvatske, Područna služba u Dubrovniku) to recognise his entitlement to a military pension under the new Croatian legislation. The applicant substantiated his request by submitting evidence of his place of residence in Croatia at an address in Dubrovnik, evidence of Croatian citizenship, and a document from the Dubrovnik Municipal Court (Općinski sud u Dubrovniku), confirming that no criminal proceedings against him had been instituted.
23. On 7 July 1992 the Dubrovnik Office of the Republic Workers’ Fund recognised the applicant’s entitlement to a military pension, as established under the former SFRY Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act (see paragraph 47 below). It found that the applicant had Croatian citizenship and a place of residence in Croatia, and that the competent domestic authorities had not instituted criminal proceedings against the applicant for any offence against Croatia.
24. On 12 December 1992, acting ex officio, the Dubrovnik Office of the Republic Workers’ Fund established the amount of the applicant’s pension under the Military Pensions Decree. The pension was to be paid to the applicant as long as the necessary requirements existed.
25. On 6 May 1994 the Military Social Insurance Fund of the then Federal Yugoslav Republic Army in Belgrade, Serbia, ordered that payment of the applicant’s military pension should be stopped, on the grounds that they had been informed by the Croatian authorities that the applicant had been granted a pension in Croatia.
26. According to the applicant, in October 1998 he visited his son in Belgrade, Serbia, and decided to stay with his son for a longer period. He continued to receive payments of his pension through a representative in Dubrovnik.
27. On 9 June 2003 the applicant informed the Dubrovnik office of the Croatian Pension Fund (Područna služba u Dubrovniku Hrvatskog zavoda za mirovinsko osiguranje) that he had changed his place of residence to Belgrade, Serbia, and requested that his pension be paid to his new address. He submitted evidence of residence in Belgrade and details of his bank account in Serbia.
28. On 30 September 2003 the Croatian Pension Fund stopped payment of the applicant’s pension. It found that the Social Insurance Treaty with Serbia did not cover YPA military pensions, and that there was no reciprocal agreement with Serbia in that respect, as required under the relevant domestic law, for the payment of pensions abroad. Pension payments were stopped with effect from 1 October 2003.
29. On 16 December 2003 the applicant lodged an appeal with the Appeal Council of the Executive Council of the Croatian Pension Fund (Žalbeno vijeće Upravnog vijeća Hrvatskog zavoda za mirovinsko osiguranje) arguing that there was no legal ground for his pension to be stopped. He contended that when his pension rights had been recognised under the Military Pensions Decree he had obtained the right to receive the pension from the Republic Workers’ Fund, and that his status was therefore equal to that of other old-age pensioners. He also complained that he had not been able to obtain his pension in Serbia, since payment of his pension there had been stopped on the grounds that his entitlement to a pension had been recognised in Croatia. Finally, the applicant explained that the pension which had been stopped was his only income.
30. On 17 March 2004 the applicant lodged an administrative action in the Administrative Court (Upravni sud Republike Hrvatske) complaining that the Croatian Pension Fund had failed to decide on his appeal against the first-instance decision of the Dubrovnik office of the Croatian Pension Fund.
31. In his administrative action the applicant reiterated that by recognising his entitlement to a pension under the Military Pensions Decree he had the same status as all other pensioners in Croatia who had been receiving pensions from the Croatian Pension Fund. He explained that he had submitted his request for payment of the pension to Serbia under the Social Insurance Treaty and that the stopping of his pension had been unlawful. The applicant also complained that he and his wife had no other financial means now that his pension had been discontinued.
32. The Administrative Court invited the applicant to substantiate his action further on 18 March 2004. The applicant complied with this request, and submitted a supplemented administrative action on 3 September 2004, reiterating his previous arguments.
33. On 5 October 2004 the applicant changed his place of residence to his old address in Dubrovnik and the following day he informed the Dubrovnik Office of the Croatian Pension Fund, asking for payment of his pension to be resumed. The applicant also pointed out that the Croatian Pension Fund had never decided on his appeal against the decision to stop the payment of his pension.
34. The Appeal Council of the Executive Council of the Croatian Pension Fund dismissed the applicant’s appeal against the first-instance decision of the Dubrovnik Office of the Croatian Pension Fund as ill-founded on 24 November 2004, endorsing the reasoning of the first-instance decision.
35. On 10 January 2005 the Dubrovnik office of the Croatian Pension Fund resumed payment of the applicant’s pension. It found that the applicant had changed his place of residence to Croatia, and that all other requirements under the relevant domestic law had been met. The payment of the applicant’s pension was to be resumed with effect from 1 November 2004.
36. On 12 April 2006 the Administrative Court invited the applicant to explain whether he wanted to pursue his administrative action of 17 March 2004, since the Appeal Council of the Executive Council of the Croatian Pension Fund had decided on his appeal in the meantime.
37. On 13 November 2006 the applicant informed the Administrative Court that he wanted to pursue his administrative action. Moreover, he indicated that he wanted to extend it to the second-instance decision of the Appeal Council of the Executive Council of the Croatian Pension Fund of 24 November 2004. The applicant again argued that the change of his place of residence had not warranted in any respect, legal or factual, stopping the payment of his pension, and that therefore depriving him of his pension for the period between 1 October 2003 and 31 October 2004 had been unlawful.
38. On 8 March 2007 the Administrative Court dismissed the applicant’s administrative action as ill-founded. The relevant part of the decision reads:
“The reasoning of the impugned decision, and of the first-instance decision, is based on the fact that the plaintiff’s request for payment of the recognised military pension which he had obtained as a YPA employee prior to 8 October 1991 had been refused, because he had a place of residence in Serbia ... and the Social Insurance Treaty between the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia did not cover military pensions of former YPA military personnel obtained through the military [pension] fund prior to 8 October 1991. Between the Republic of Croatia and Serbia and Montenegro there is no reciprocal agreement in payment of military pensions, so the [plaintiff’s] pension cannot be paid in Serbia ...
In view of what is discernible from the case file this court finds that there has been no breach of law to the detriment of the plaintiff.
In this specific case the reasons adduced by the respondent body and the first-instance body are valid. This court finds that it was correctly held by the respondent body that it was not possible for military pensions to be paid abroad ... since it was impossible under either the Treaty or Croatian pension legislation. Payment of a pension abroad is possible under an international treaty or on the basis of a reciprocal agreement, which is not the situation in the present case.”
39. On 11 May 2007 the applicant lodged a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske). He contended that there had been no legal ground for stopping payment of thirteen of his pension instalments, and that his change of place of residence should not have had any adverse effects on his pension rights. In his view this had created an inequality before the law.
40. The applicant supplemented his constitutional complaint on 5 June 2007, reiterating his previous arguments.
41. On 11 March 2010 the Constitutional Court declared the applicant’s constitutional complaint inadmissible as manifestly ill-founded. The decision of the Constitutional Court was served on the applicant on 21 May 2010.
42. On 24 February 2012 the applicant informed the Dubrovnik office of the Croatian Pension Fund that he had changed his place of residence to Belgrade, and asked for the pension to be paid to him in Serbia.
43. On 27 February 2012 the information submitted by the applicant was registered in the information system of the Croatian Pension Fund. Since March 2012 the applicant’s pension has been paid to him in Belgrade, Serbia.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Constitution
44. The relevant provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette nos. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998 (consolidated text), 113/2000, 124/2000 (consolidated text), 28/2001 and 41/2001 (consolidated text), 55/2001 (corrigendum), 76/2010, 85/2010) read as follows:
Article 14
“Everyone in the Republic of Croatia shall enjoy rights and freedoms regardless of their race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other belief, national or social origin, property, birth, education, social status or other characteristics.
All shall be equal before the law.
Article 16
Rights and freedoms may be restricted only according to law in order to protect the freedoms and rights of others, legal system, public morals and health.
Any restriction of the freedoms and rights must be proportionate with the interest involved in a particular case.
Article 48
The right of ownership shall be guaranteed.
Article 140
International agreements in force which have been concluded and ratified in accordance with the Constitution and made public shall be part of the internal legal order of the Republic of Croatia and shall have precedence in terms of their legal effects over the [domestic] statutes ...”
45. The relevant part of section 62 of the Constitutional Court Act (Official Gazette no. 49/2002, of 3 May 2002, Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske) reads as follows:
Section 62
“1. Anyone may lodge a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court if he or she deems that the individual act of a state body, a body of local and regional self-government, or a legal person with public authority, concerning his or her rights and obligations, or a suspicion or an accusation of a criminal act, has violated his or her human rights or fundamental freedoms or his or her right to local and regional self-government guaranteed by the Constitution (hereinafter: a constitutional right) ...
2. If another legal remedy exists in respect of the violation of the constitutional right [complained of], a constitutional complaint may be lodged only after that remedy has been used.”
B. Croatian pension legislation
46. The relevant provisions of the Military Personnel Federal Pension and Invalidity Insurance Legislation (Acceptance) Act (to be applicable in the Republic of Croatia as Republic Law) (Zakon o preuzimanju saveznog zakona iz oblasti mirovinskog i invalidskog osiguranja vojnih osiguranika koji se u Republici Hrvatskoj primjenjuje kao republički zakon, Official Gazette nos. 53/1991, 73/1991, 18/1992, 71/1992), enacted on 26 June 1991, read as follows:
Section 1
“The Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act (SFRY Official Gazette nos. 7/1985, 74/1987, 20/1989) shall be accepted and applied in the Republic of Croatia as the law of the republic.
Section 5
The federal financial rights and obligations under the legislation referred to in section 1 of this Act shall become rights and obligations of the budget of the Republic of Croatia.”
47. The relevant provisions of the Decree on Pension and Invalidity Rights of Persons Whose Active Military Service in the former YPA Terminated Prior to 31 December 1991 (Uredba o ostvarivanju prava iz mirovinskog i invalidskog osiguranja osoba kojima je prestalo svojstvo aktivne vojne osobe u bivšoj JNA do 31. prosinca 1991, Official Gazette nos. 46/1992, 71/1992), enacted on 23 July 1992, provided:
Section 1
“A person who ceases to be an active officer in the YPA in the territory of the Republic of Croatia prior to 31 December 1991, and who has not prior to that date obtained entitlement to a pension and invalidity insurance, may obtain that entitlement if he fulfils the conditions to obtain it concerning pension and invalidity insurance in accordance with the Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act (Official Gazette nos. 53/91, 73/91, 18/92) and if:
- he has residence on the territory of the Republic of Croatia;
- he has Croatian nationality;
- he made himself available for service in the Croatian army prior to 31 December 1991, and criminal proceedings have not been instituted against him by the competent authorities in connection with preparation or commission of offences under Head XX of the Criminal Code of the Republic of Croatia.
Section 4
The tasks under this Decree shall be carried out by the Republic Workers’ Fund according to law.”
48. The relevant provisions of the Decree on the Payment of Pensions to Republic Pension Beneficiaries in the former SFRY (Uredba o isplati mirovina korisnicima koji su mirovinu ostvarili u republikama bivše Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije, Official Gazette no. 46/1992), enacted on 23 July 1992, provided:
Section 1
“The beneficiaries of pensions ... with residence on the territory of the Republic of Croatia who have obtained pension entitlement in the republics of the former SFRY, apart from Slovenia, and who have been receiving payments in the Republic of Croatia, shall receive payments starting from the first day of the month after that in which the payment was halted due to the termination of financial transfers. The payment shall be made by the Republic Workers’ Fund ...
Section 2
The funds for payment of the pensions referred to in section 1 of this Decree shall be secured from the resources of the Republic Workers’ Fund which the Republic Workers’ Fund is unable to pay to pension beneficiaries in the republics of the former SFRY because of the discontinuance of financial transfers.
Section 4
The pension payments referred to in section 1 of this Decree shall be made until financial transfers between the Republic of Croatia and the republics of the former SFRY are resumed or the payment of the pensions otherwise settled.”
49. The relevant provisions of the Yugoslav People’s Army Personnel Pensions Act (Zakon o ostvarivanju prava iz mirovnskog i invalidskog osigurnja pripadnika bivše JNA, Official Gazette no. 96/1993), enacted on 6 October 1993, read as follows:
Section 1
“This Act concerns the methods and conditions for recognition of the pension rights, ..., of former YPA personnel, acquired prior to 8 October 1991, ...
Section 2
A beneficiary who has acquired the right to a pension ... in the Military Personnel Social Insurance Federal Fund prior to 8 October 1991, and if the payment of his pension and other payments from the federal fund has been halted, shall have that right recognised ... if he meets the following conditions:
- he has residence on the territory of the Republic of Croatia;
- he acquired the right to a pension in the Military Personnel Social Insurance Federal Fund prior to 8 October 1991;
- criminal proceedings have not been instituted against him by the competent authorities in connection with offences under Head XIV, XV and XVIII of the Basic Criminal Code of the Republic of Croatia ... Head XIX of the Criminal Code of the Republic of Croatia ... and the Offences of Incitement and Terrorism Against the Sovereignty and Territorial Integrity of the Republic of Croatia Act ... “
Section 9
The Republic Workers’ Fund shall carry out the enforcement of this Act.
Section 11
This Act shall substitute:
1. The Act on Acceptance of the Military Personnel Federal Pension and Invalidity Insurance Legislation Acceptance Act (to be applicable in the Republic of Croatia as Republic Law) (Official Gazette nos. 53/1991, 73/1991, 18/1992, and 71/1992) – sections 3b, 3c and 3e,
2. The Decree on Realisation of the Pension and Invalidity Rights of Persons Whose Active Military Service in the former YPA Terminated prior to 31 December 1991 (Official Gazette nos. 46/1992, 71/1992) ... “
50. The relevant provisions of the Pension Insurance Act (Zakon o mirovinskom osiguranju, Official Gazette no. 102/1998), enacted on 10 July 1998 (came into force on 1 January 1999), provided:
Section 2
“(1) This Act regulates the compulsory pension insurance on the basis of the principle of inter-generational solidarity .. “
Section 6
To assure the rights of employees, ... and other insured persons under this Act, the Croatian Pension Fund (hereinafter “the Fund”) shall be established.
Section 88
Payment of pensions abroad shall be made under international agreements or on the basis of a reciprocal agreement.
Section 130
“The Fund shall:
1) carry out all tasks concerning the exercise of pension insurance rights,
2) collect pension contributions,
3) secure enforcement of international treaties on pension insurance ...
Section 152
(1) The Republic of Croatia shall secure resources in its budget for part of the pension insurance obligations arising out of the recognition of privileged pensions, namely for ...
8) pensions for former YPA personnel and for their families after their death ...
Section 186
(1) Pensionable years of employment prior to 8 October 1991 under the Military Personnel Pension and Invalidity Insurance Act shall be recognised for Croatian nationals as pensionable years of employment when obtaining pension rights under this Act ...
Section 187
(1) On the day this Act comes into force the Croatian Republic Workers’ Pension and Invalidity Insurance Fund ... shall cease its activities ...
(3) On the day this Act comes into force the Croatian Pension Fund, which shall inherit the resources, rights and obligations of the above Funds .... shall begin its activities.
Section 194
This Act replaces: ...
5) The Yugoslav People’s Army Personnel Pensions Act (Official Gazette no. 96/1993) ...”
51. The Pension Insurance (Amendments) Act (Zakon o dopunama Zakona o mirovinskom osiguranju, Official Gazette no. 109/2001), enacted on 29 November 2001, provided:
Section 1
“In the Pension Insurance Act (Official Gazette nos. 102/1998, 127/2000, 59/2001) after section 172 there shall be section 172a, which provides
Section 172a
(1) The pension beneficiaries of the former YPA ... shall have their pension payments reduced proportionally to their incomes ...
Section 2
The Croatian Pension Fund shall ex officio issue a decision concerning pension reduction under section 1 of this Act.”
52. The relevant provision of the Pension Insurance (Amendments) Act (Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Zakona o mirovinskom osiguranju, Official Gazette no. 92/2005), enacted on 15 July 2005, provided:
Section 5
“In section 88 [of the Pension Insurance Act] after the words “agreement” words “on social insurance” shall be added.”
53. The Pension Insurance (Amendments) Act (Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Zakona o mirovinskom osiguranju, Official Gazette no. 121/2010), enacted on 22 October 2010, provided:
Section 16
“Section 88 shall be amended as follows: ...
(2) Payment of pensions and other benefits abroad shall be made under international agreements on social insurance or on a reciprocal basis, or under a decision of the [Croatian Pension] Fund granting the right to receive payments abroad in a State with which there is no international agreement or reciprocity.”
C. The relevant treaties with Serbia
54. The relevant provisions of the Social Insurance Treaty between the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Zakon o potvrđivanju Ugovora između Republike Hrvatske i Savezne Republike Jugoslavije o socijalnom osiguranju, Official Gazette – International treaties no. 14/2001), signed on 15 September 1997 (came into force on 1 May 2003), provide:
Article 2
Relevant legislation
“(1) This Treaty concerns:
the Croatian legislation on:
1) health insurance and health protection,
2) pension and invalidity insurance,
3) insurance against work-related accidents and work-related illnesses,
4) unemployment insurance ...
(2) This Treaty is applicable to legislation integrating, amending or supplementing the legislation referred to in § 1 of this Article.
Article 3
Applicability ratione personae
(1) This Treaty applies to:
a) all persons to whom the relevant legislation of one or both of the contracting States applies or has applied ...
Article 5
Equality of territories
(1) Pensions, and other monetary benefits, apart from unemployment benefits, under the relevant legislation in one of the contracting States, cannot be reduced, stopped, seized or confiscated on the ground of the beneficiary’s place of residence on the territory of one of the contracting States, unless this Treaty provides otherwise ...
Article 28
Liaison bodies
“To improve the enforcement of this Treaty, particularly with a view to easier and faster communication between authorities in the contracting States, the liaison body shall be:
in Croatia ... the Croatian Republic Workers’ Pension and Invalidity Insurance Fund in respect of the relevant legislation referred to in Article 2 § 1 (2) and (3) ...
Article 29
Obligations of the responsible bodies, legal and administrative assistance ...
(5) The responsible bodies of the contracting States may, in the enforcement of this treaty, make direct contact among themselves, as well as [contact] with interested individuals and their representatives ...”
Article 37
Settlement of disputes
“All disputes relating to the application or interpretation of this Treaty shall be dealt with by the competent bodies in the contracting States.”
55. Annexe E to the Succession Issues Agreement (Ugovor o pitanjima sukcesije; Official Gazette – International treaties no. 2/2004), signed on 29 June 2001 (came into force on 2 June 2004), reads:
Pensions
Article 1
“Each State shall assume responsibility for and regularly pay legally authorised pensions funded by that State in its former capacity as a constituent Republic of the SFRY, irrespective of the nationality, citizenship, residence or domicile of the beneficiary.
Article 2
Each State shall assume responsibility for, and regularly pay, pensions which are due to its citizens who were civil or military servants of the SFRY, irrespective of where they are resident or domiciled, if those pensions were funded from the federal budget or other federal resources of the SFRY; provided that, in the case of a person who is a citizen of more than one State
(i) if that person is domiciled in one of those States, payment of the pension shall be made by that State, and
(ii) if that person is not domiciled in any State of which that person is a citizen, payment of the pension shall be made by the State in the territory of which that person was resident on 1 June 1991.
Article 3
The States shall, if necessary, conclude bilateral arrangements for ensuring the payment of pensions pursuant to Articles 1 and 2 above to persons located in a State other than that which is paying the pensions of those persons, for transferring the necessary funds to ensure payment of those pensions, and for the payment of pensions at a level proportionate to the contributions made. Where appropriate, the conclusion of such definitive bilateral arrangements may be preceded by the conclusion of interim arrangements for ensuring the payment of pensions pursuant to Article 2. Any bilateral agreements concluded between any two of the States shall prevail over the provisions of this Annexe and shall resolve the issue of mutual claims between the pension funds of the States relating to payments of pensions made before such agreements entered into force.”
D. Other international law
56. The relevant provisions of International Labour Organisation Convention 102 concerning Minimum Standards of Social Security (Konvencija 102 Međunarodne organizacije rada o najnižim standardima socijalne sigurnosti, Official Gazette – International treaties no. 1/2002), in force in Croatia as of 8 October 1991, read:
Article 68
Part XII Equality of Treatment of Non-National Residents
Article 68
“1. Non-national residents shall have the same rights as national residents: Provided that special rules concerning non-nationals and nationals born outside the territory of the Member may be prescribed in respect of benefits or portions of benefits which are payable wholly or mainly out of public funds and in respect of transitional schemes.
2. Under contributory social security schemes which protect employees, the persons protected who are nationals of another Member which has accepted the obligations of the relevant Part of the Convention shall have, under that Part, the same rights as nationals of the Member concerned: Provided that the application of this paragraph may be made subject to the existence of a bilateral or multilateral agreement providing for reciprocity.
Part XIII Common Provisions
Article 69
A benefit to which a person protected would otherwise be entitled in compliance with any of Parts II to X of this Convention may be suspended to such extent as may be prescribed:
(a) as long as the person concerned is absent from the territory of the Member ... “
57. The relevant provision of International Labour Organisation Convention 48 concerning the Establishment of an International Scheme for the Maintenance of Rights under Invalidity, Old-Age and Widows’ and Orphans’ Insurance (Konvencija 48 Međunarodne organizacije rada o utemeljenju međunarodnog sustava očuvanja prava iz osiguranja za slučaj invalidnosti, starosti i smrti, Official Gazette – International treaties no. 11/2003, hereinafter “ILO Convention 48”), in force in Croatia as of 8 October 1991, reads:
Article 10
“(1) Persons who have been affiliated to an insurance institution of a Member and their dependants shall be entitled to the entirety of the benefits the right to which has been acquired in virtue of their insurance:
(a) if they are resident in the territory of a Member, irrespective of their nationality;
(b) if they are nationals of a Member, irrespective of their place of residence ... “
58. The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties of 23 May 1969 (Bečka konvencija o pravu međunarodnih ugovora, Official Gazette – International treaties no. 12/1993) provides:
Article 27
Internal law and observance of treaties
“A party may not invoke the provisions of its internal law as justification for its failure to perform a treaty ... “
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1, TAKEN ALONE AND IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
59. The applicant complained that the stopping of the payment of his YPA military pension for a period of thirteen months, after he had changed his place of residence to Serbia, had been arbitrary and discriminatory. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, which read as follows:
Article 14 of the Convention
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Compatibility ratione materiae
(a) The parties’ arguments
60. The Government submitted, relying on the Court’s case-law in Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, ECHR 2010, and Grudić v. Serbia, no. 31925/08, 17 April 2012, that in the period in which the payment of the applicant’s pension had been stopped the applicant did not have a right to payment of his pension, and therefore did not have possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They stressed that the applicant was a YPA military pensioner and that the payment of his pension abroad would only have been possible under the relevant domestic law if there had been an international treaty or a reciprocal agreement. However, there was no such international treaty or reciprocal agreement between Croatia and Serbia at the time. In the Government’s view it had been crucial to make a distinction between the right to a pension and the right to payment of a pension. In Croatia the applicant had only had the right to payment of the pension. This right existed as long as the necessary conditions were satisfied and it was impossible to make the payments abroad due to the absence of a treaty or reciprocal agreement, which the applicant had known or ought to have known.
61. The applicant disagreed with the Government, arguing that Croatia had recognised his right to payment of the YPA military pension and that there had been no legal ground for the payments to be stopped.
(b) The Court’s assessment
62. Having regard to the parties’ arguments, the Court considers that the question of whether there is a possession in the present case is inextricably linked to the question of whether there has been an interference, a matter to be examined in the context of the Court’s consideration of the merits of the case. The Court further considers that the application raises complex issues of fact and law which cannot be resolved at this stage in the examination of the application (see, mutatis mutandis, Malik v. the United Kingdom, no. 23780/08, § 100, 13 March 2012). It therefore joins the question to the merits of the applicant’s property complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. Compatibility ratione personae
(a) The parties’ arguments
63. The Government referred to the case-law in Banković and Others v. Belgium and Others (dec.) [GC], no. 52207/99, § 60, ECHR 2001 XII, arguing that when he moved to Serbia the applicant lost any territorial link with Croatia and came under the jurisdiction of Serbia.
64. The applicant put forward no arguments in this respect.
(b) The Court’s assessment
65. In view of all the circumstances of the present case, and the material available before it, and the fact that the applicant complains that his pension was not paid abroad by Croatian authorities although such obligation existed under the national law and an international treaty, the Court considers that the Government’s objection should be rejected.
3. Exhaustion of domestic remedies and compliance with the six-month time-limit
(a) The parties’ arguments
66. The Government argued that the final domestic courts’ decision in the applicant’s case had been the decision of the Administrative Court of 8 March 2007, which had been served on the applicant on 27 April 2007, and the applicant had lodged his application with the Court more than six months later, namely in August 2010. The Government considered that the applicant had failed to complain in his constitutional complaint of 11 May 2007 about any violation of his human rights and had only asked the Constitutional Court for a revision of the administrative proceedings. Therefore, in their view, the six-month time-limit could not have started from the service of the Constitutional Court’s decision on the applicant on 21 May 2010. Furthermore, the Government pointed out that the payment of the applicant’s pension had been resumed on 20 January 2005 and that therefore the six-month time-limit should be calculated from that date, which meant that the applicant had lodged his application with the Court outside the six months.
67. The Government also stressed that during the administrative proceedings, and in the proceedings before the Constitutional Court, the applicant had only contested the application of the relevant domestic law and had never complained that his Convention rights had been violated. In his constitutional complaint the applicant had only complained about the stopping of the payment of his pension and asked that the decisions of the administrative bodies be quashed and the payment of his pension resumed. The Government also pointed out that the applicant had never complained that his property rights had been violated or that he had been discriminated against in that respect, and stated that he had failed to cite the relevant provisions of the domestic law. Therefore, in their view, the applicant had failed to exhaust the available and effective domestic remedies, and had consequently failed to comply with the principle of subsidiarity.
68. The applicant considered that he had exhausted all available domestic remedies and had complied with the six-month time-limit.
(b) The Court’s assessment
69. The Court reiterates that the requirements contained in Article 35 § 1 concerning the exhaustion of domestic remedies and the six-month period are closely interrelated, since not only are they combined in the same Article, but they are also expressed in a single sentence whose grammatical construction implies such a correlation (see Hatjianastasiou v. Greece, no. 12945/87, Commission decision of 4 April 1990, and Berdzenishvili v. Russia (dec.), no. 31697/03, ECHR 2004 II (extracts)).
70. As a rule, the six-month period runs from the date of the final decision in the process of exhaustion of domestic remedies. Article 35 § 1 cannot be interpreted in a manner which would require an applicant to inform the Court of his complaint before his position in connection with the matter has been finally settled at the domestic level. In this regard, the Court has already held that in order to comply with the principle of subsidiarity, before bringing complaints against Croatia to the Court applicants are in principle required to afford the Croatian Constitutional Court the opportunity to remedy their situation (see Orlić v. Croatia, no. 48833/07, § 46, 21 June 2011).
71. The Court notes that in the course of the administrative proceedings concerning the applicant’s pension, after the Dubrovnik office of the Croatian Pension Fund had stopped paying his pension the applicant lodged an appeal with the Appeal Council of the Executive Council of the Croatian Pension Fund, arguing that there had been no legal ground for stopping his pension payments (see paragraph 29 above). In his administrative action before the Administrative Court against lack of action on the part of the lower administrative bodies (see paragraphs 30 and 31 above) and in his administrative action against the second-instance decision of the Croatian Pension Fund (see paragraph 37 above), the applicant raised the same arguments, complaining about the arbitrary stopping of the payment of his pension. Furthermore, the applicant reiterated the same complaints in his constitutional complaint before the Constitutional Court, pointing out that there had been no legal ground for stopping the payment of his pension, and that the circumstances of the case showed that he had not had equal treatment before the law (see paragraph 39 above). Thus, the applicant raised before the national authorities the same complaints which are the essence of his arguments before the Court.
72. The final domestic courts’ decision was adopted on 11 March 2010 by the Constitutional Court and served on the applicant on 21 May 2010, and the applicant lodged his application with the Court on 24 August 2010, thus within the six-month time-limit. As regards the Government’s argument that the six-month time-limit should be calculated from 20 January 2005, when the payment of the applicant’s pension was resumed, the Court does not see the relevance of this date to the calculation of the six-month time-limit, since the resumption of the applicant’s payments from 20 January 2005 has not compensated for the payments not made, nor has it any other connection with the applicant’s complaints about the stopping of the payment of his thirteen pension instalments prior to that date, in respect of which the applicant complained.
73. Against the above background, the Court finds that the Government’s objections must be rejected.
4. Abuse of the right of individual application
(a) The parties’ arguments
74. The Government submitted that in the meantime the applicant had moved to Serbia, where he has been living ever since. In February 2012 he requested that his pension be paid in Serbia, and the Croatian Pension Fund granted that request. Accordingly, the applicant’s pension has been paid by the Croatian Pension Fund to him in Serbia since March 2012. The Government pointed out that the applicant had failed to inform the Court of this change, and considered that this amounted to abuse of the right of individual application.
75. The applicant made no arguments in this respect.
(b) The Court’s assessment
76. The Court reiterates that if new, important developments occur during proceedings before the Court and if, despite the express obligation on him or her under Rule 47 § 6 of the Rules of the Court, an applicant fails to disclose that information to the Court, thereby preventing it from ruling on the case in full knowledge of the facts, his or her application may be rejected as an abuse of application (see Harbadová and Others v. the Czech Republic (dec.), nos. 42165/02, 466/03, 25 September 2007; Predescu v. Romania, no. 21447/03, §§ 25-27, 2 December 2008; and Miroļubovs and Others v. Latvia, no. 798/05, § 63, 15 September 2009).
77. The Court notes that the applicant’s present complaints concern the period of what he states was an arbitrary stopping of the payment of his pension between October 2003 and November 2004, and that he had been discriminated against in that respect. Therefore, it remains for the Court to examine whether in the said period the stopping of the payment of the applicant’s pension was in fact arbitrary, and whether he has been discriminated against. In respect of these complaints there has been no relevant new development, and regard being had to the fact that the information allegedly withheld only concerned new developments which had occurred significantly later than the time when the applicant’s pension payments were stopped, the Court does not find it established that the applicant deliberately grounded his complaints on a version of events which omitted any event of central importance (see, mutatis mutandis, Al-Nashif v. Bulgaria, no. 50963/99, § 89, 20 June 2002; Adamović v. Serbia, no. 41703/06, § 34, 2 October 2012). This is, moreover, so, because the applicant never tried to negate or to provide false information in connection with the fact that he was receiving his pension in Serbia from March 2012.
78. Therefore, the Court considers that the Government’s objection must be rejected.
5. Conclusion
79. The Court notes that the applicant’s complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone
(a) The parties’ arguments
80. The applicant contended that the stopping of the payment of the thirteen pension instalments in the period between 1 October 2003 and 1 November 2004 had been arbitrary, in that there had been no legal ground to justify it. He explained that he was a YPA military pensioner, who had retired under the former SFRY pension regime. However, after the independence of Croatia he had applied for his pension to be recognised in Croatia and the competent domestic pension authorities, namely the Republic Workers’ Fund, on 12 December 1992 had recognised his right to receive pension payments from the Croatian authorities. When applying for a pension in Croatia he had met all the legal requirements, including that of being domiciled in Croatia. With the enactment of the 1998 Pension Insurance Act the military pensions of former YPA military personnel had been incorporated into the general pension insurance scheme in Croatia, and thus he had had the same status as any other pensioner in Croatia.
81. In the meantime, in October 1998, he had visited his son in Belgrade, Serbia, and had decided to stay there. His pension was then paid to him through a representative in Croatia. In June 2003, after the Social Insurance Treaty of 15 September 1997 had come into force, the applicant applied for his pension to be paid in Serbia. In his view, the Social Insurance Treaty had opened up a possibility for pensions from Croatia to be paid in Serbia, and vice versa, and there had been no legal ground to treat his military pension differently, since it had been incorporated into the general pension scheme, and all the rules applicable to pensions should have been directly applicable to military pensions. However, the Croatian pension authorities had arbitrarily stopped the payment of his pension, arguing that the Social Insurance Treaty did not apply to YPA military pensions. Therefore, he had been forced to return to Croatia in October 2004, and the payment of his pension had been resumed from 1 November 2004. Finally, the applicant submitted that two other provisions of international law had been applicable to his situation, namely Annexe E of the Agreement on Succession Issues and Article 10 of ILO Convention 48.
82. The Government submitted that it had been necessary to make a clear distinction between entitlement to a military pension and entitlement to payment of military pensions to former YPA military personnel. The applicant’s entitlement to a pension had been recognised by the former SFRY authorities, and Croatia had only acknowledged that fact and continued to pay the pension. The applicant had been entitled to receive the pension abroad only under section 88 of the Pension Insurance Act. In other words, the applicant would have received his pension as long as he lived in Croatia or in one of the countries in respect of which it was possible to receive payments from Croatia. Instead, the applicant had moved to Serbia, with which Croatia had not made any arrangement for payment of military pensions abroad, and with which there was no reciprocal agreement, and Serbia had maintained a separate pension system for military pensioners. Therefore, in the Government’s view, the applicant had himself created a situation in which he had ceased to satisfy the requirements of the domestic law to receive his pension, and accordingly he had no possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. At the same time, all this should have been well known to the applicant, since the Pension Insurance Act and the Pension Insurance Treaty had been published in the Official Gazette and on the Internet and therefore accessible to him. The fact that he had misinterpreted the relevant domestic law, which in the Government’s view he himself was also aware of, had not changed the fact that he and he alone was responsible for the cessation of payment of his pension. The mere hope he had had that the pension would be paid in Serbia had no basis in the relevant domestic law. This is moreover so since he had failed to make the necessary enquiries of the competent authorities as to whether there was such a possibility.
83. The Government further argued that, if the Court found that the applicant had had possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the interference with his possessions had been lawful, pursued a legitimate aim and was proportionate. Regarding the lawfulness of the interference, the Government pointed out that Croatia had agreed to pay YPA military pensions under certain conditions, which were even more flexible than the conditions later set out in the Succession Agreement. Referring to the case-law in Carson and Others (cited above) the Government argued that the payment of pensions abroad had been possible only under a treaty or a reciprocal agreement, which were legitimate requirements of the domestic law within the State’s margin of appreciation. There had been no international treaty or reciprocal agreement with Serbia on payment of YPA military pensions abroad, and the applicant’s misinterpretation of the relevant law, notably the Social Insurance Agreement, had had no bearing in this respect. Since at the time Serbia was not paying pensions to YPA military pensioners living in Croatia, the Government saw no reason why Croatia should be paying such pensions in Serbia. In the Government’s view, the domestic authorities had sufficiently reasoned their decisions when dismissing the applicant’s request, and it appeared from his submissions to the Court that he had himself understood the whole situation. The Government also pointed out that the applicant had dual citizenship, Croatian and Serbian, and that it had been open to him to apply to the Serbian authorities for a pension. He had, however, failed to do so, and had then later returned to Croatia, following which the payment of his pension was resumed since the previously existing impediments had been removed. The Government also submitted that Annexe E of the Agreement on Succession Issues was not applicable to the applicant’s situation at the time, since it had come into force only later. In any event, under that Agreement the obligation to pay the applicant’s pension had been on Serbia. The Government also considered that ILO Convention 48 was not applicable to the applicant’s case, since it concerned contributory pension systems, and the applicant had not been a member of such a scheme in Croatia.
84. As regards the alleged interference being in the public interest, the Government pointed out that the State had a wide margin of appreciation in this respect, and that the public interest in limiting the conditions for payment of YPA military pensions had been justified primarily by the fact that Croatia, suffering from the effects of the war at the time, had been paying pensions to thousands of such pensioners, although they had never paid contributions in Croatia. The Government also argued, reiterating their arguments that there was no treaty or reciprocal agreement with Serbia on the issue, that the applicant in this case had not borne an excessive individual burden, since he was able to receive his pension through a representative in Croatia without the involvement of the pension system. They pointed out that the applicant had never lost his entitlement to a pension, and that the payment of his pension had been resumed once he had returned to Croatia. In any event, even under the Succession Agreement, once the applicant had moved to Serbia, in view of the fact that he also had Serbian citizenship, the applicant would have had the right to receive a pension from Serbia and not Croatia.
(b) The Court’s assessment
(i) General principles
85. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not create a right to acquire property. It places no restriction on the Contracting States’ freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security or pension system, or to choose the type or amount of benefits or pension to provide under any such scheme. However, where a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit or pension – whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 for persons satisfying its requirements. Therefore, where the amount of a benefit or pension is reduced or eliminated, this may constitute an interference with possessions which requires to be justified in the general interest (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], no. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 54, ECHR 2005-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004 IX; and Valkov and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04, 19490/04, 19495/04, 19497/04, 24729/04, 171/05 and 2041/05, § 84, 25 October 2011).
86. Where, however, the person concerned does not satisfy, or ceases to satisfy, the legal conditions laid down in domestic law for the grant of any particular form of benefits or pension, there is no interference with the rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 76, 28 April 2009; and Richardson v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 26252/08, §§ 17-18, 10 April 2012). Finally, the Court observes that the fact that a person has entered into and forms part of a State social security system does not necessarily mean that that system cannot be changed either as to the conditions of eligibility of payment or as to the quantum of the benefit or pension (see, mutatis mutandis, Carson and Others [GC], cited above, §§ 85-89).
(ii) Application of these principles to the present case
87. The Court firstly observes that there is no dispute between the parties that the payment of the applicant’s YPA military pension, obtained under the relevant pension insurance legislation of the former SFRY, has been accepted as an obligation of the Croatian pension authorities, first by its transitional, and then by its general, pension legislation. As suggested by the Government, the payment of the applicant’s pension is subject to certain conditions, one of which was residence in Croatia or any other country with which Croatia had a reciprocal agreement or a treaty on payment of pensions abroad. The question therefore arises whether the applicant satisfied the necessary conditions for the payment of his pension. In view of the principle that there is no right under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to receive a social security benefit or pension payment of any kind or amount, unless national law provides for such entitlement (see, for example, Raviv v. Austria, no. 26266/05, § 61, 13 March 2012), the central issue which remains for the Court to determine is whether the applicant satisfied all the requirements under the relevant Croatian pension legislation at the time, generating a property right to receive payment of his pension in Serbia. Or, in other words, whether there was a sufficient legal basis in the Croatian domestic legislation for the applicant to claim the payment of his pension in Serbia (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 54, ECHR 2004 IX).
88. A negative answer to this question will consequently lead the Court to a finding that the stopping of the payment of the applicant’s pension, as a result of conditions which he had created himself, did not amount to an interference with his property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 given that the applicant would not have a proprietary interest falling within Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Carson and Others [GC], cited above, § 57).
89. However, by contrast, if the Court finds that the applicant satisfied the requirements as set out by the relevant Croatian pension legislation, then the stopping of the payment of the applicant’s pension by the domestic authorities will be regarded as an interference with the applicant’s property interests which was not in accordance with the law as required under the Convention. Such a conclusion will make it unnecessary for the Court to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights in finding a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 62, ECHR 1999 II).
90. The Court reiterates in the first place that a wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention as regards general measures of economic or social strategy (see Stec and Others, cited above, § 52) which means that the State has a wide margin of appreciation in the enactment of this kind of statute and in the interpretation of such statutes by the domestic courts (see, mutatis mutandis, Von Maltzan and Others v. Germany (dec.) [GC], nos. 71916/01, 71917/01 and 10260/02, § 101, ECHR 2005 V). This does not, however, exclude the Court’s power to review to what extent such legislation is specific and foreseeable (see Caytas v. Turkey (dec.), nos. 25409/04, 19647/06, 22505/06, 22514/06, 31463/07, 62002/08 and 14842/09, 29 September 2009) and with what degree of clarity it allows the establishment of whether the applicant’s situation falls within the provisions of the relevant law (compare Von Maltzan and Others, cited above, § 98). Therefore, the Court must satisfy itself that the legislation regulating the conditions for payment of the pension is clear, precise and foreseeable with regard to the specific legal requirements (see Croitoru v. Romania (dec.), no. 3205/03, 14 September 2010).
91. As regards the residence requirements, the Court cannot in principle substitute its view for that of the domestic authorities as to whether an individual complies with such requirements, so long as the decisions of the domestic authorities do not disclose any arbitrariness, are sufficiently reasoned, and, if appropriate, provide references to the relevant domestic case-law and practice (see Jantner v. Slovakia, no. 39050/97, §§ 30-32, 4 March 2003, and Kopecký, cited above, § 56). Furthermore, the Court is not prevented from examining the manner in which international agreements on social policy and pensions have affected an individual’s situation at the domestic level (see Tarkoev and Others v. Estonia, nos. 14480/08 and 47916/08, §§ 61-65, 4 November 2010). In this respect the Court reiterates that it is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law, even when that law refers to international law or agreements. In each instance, however, the Court’s role is confined to ascertaining whether the effects of such adjudication are compatible with the Convention (see Bosphorus Hava Yolları Turizm ve Ticaret Anonim Şirketi v. Ireland [GC], no. 45036/98, § 143, ECHR 2005 VI).
92. The Court notes that following the dissolution of the former SFRY, the military pensions of former YPA military personnel were regulated in Croatia under transitional legislation, namely an Act incorporating the former SFRY legislation on the matter into the Croatian legal system (see paragraph 46 above). A further temporary measure aimed at assisting the transition was a Republic of Croatia Government Decree, providing for advance payments of pensions to persons who satisfied the relevant requirements, one of which was residence in Croatia (see paragraph 47 above). In parallel with the transitional legislation on YPA military pensions, civilian pensions related to the former SFRY pension scheme were regulated by separate transitional legislation (see paragraph 48 above). However, the same body, namely the Republic Workers’ Fund, was tasked with making the necessary arrangements in both cases.
93. Regarding the applicant’s particular situation relevant to this period, the Court observes that on 7 July 1992 the Dubrovnik Office of the Republic Workers’ Fund recognised the applicant’s right to advance payment of his YPA military pension, after it had found that the applicant satisfied the necessary requirements, including residence, in that he lived in Dubrovnik, Croatia. Furthermore, the same state body, acting ex officio, on 12 December 1992 set the level of the applicant’s pension and ordered that the pension be paid to the applicant as long as he satisfied the necessary requirements (see paragraphs 22-24 above).
94. The Court further notes that the transitional legislation concerning YPA military pensions was repealed by the 1993 Former Yugoslav People’s Army Personnel Pension Act. Under that Act Croatia assumed responsibility for payment of YPA military pensions to persons satisfying the necessary requirements, one of which was residence in Croatia. The Republic Workers’ Fund was tasked with enforcement of the Act (see paragraph 49 above).
95. However, in 1998, through legislative pension reform in Croatia, the Yugoslav People’s Army Personnel Pension Act was repealed by the enactment of the Pension Insurance Act, which finally incorporated YPA military pensions into the Croatian general pension scheme. That conclusion, in addition to the fact that separate legislation on YPA military pensions no longer existed, also follows from the following. The Pension Insurance Act, in section 186, recognised pensionable years of employment in the period prior to 8 October 1991 acquired under the former SFRY legislation on military pensions as pensionable years of employment to be recognised when obtaining a pension under the Pension Insurance Act. Furthermore, the Pension Insurance Act, in section 152 § 1, provided that the means for payment of pensions to YPA military pensioners should be secured in Croatia’s budget, and that the necessary contributions should be paid on a monthly basis. The enforcement of the Act was assigned to the Croatian Pension Fund, a body replacing the Republic Workers’ Fund, which had ceased to exist. In the period relevant to the present case, the Pension Insurance Act was amended several times. The amendment of 29 November 2001 reduced the amount of YPA military pension instalments. The Pension Insurance Act, including its amendments, never set out any special requirements for the payment of pensions to former YPA military personnel (see paragraphs 51-53 above).
96. The Court further notes that cooperation between Croatia and Serbia on pension matters after the dissolution of the former SFRY was initially regulated by the Social Insurance Treaty which came into force on 1 May 2003. This Treaty listed the legislation which it concerned, including pension insurance legislation and all other legislation “integrating, amending or supplementing” pension insurance legislation. In Article 3 it expressly stated that it applied to “all persons to whom the relevant legislation of one or both of the contracting States applies or has applied”. One of the principles set out in this Treaty provided that pensions under the relevant legislation of one of the contracting States could not be stopped or otherwise adversely affected on the grounds of the beneficiary’s place of residence. The competent domestic authority in Croatia under this Treaty was the Croatian Pension Fund (see paragraph 54 above).
97. As to the applicant’s particular situation in view of the above developments in the sphere of pension legislation, the Court notes that in June 2003 the applicant informed the Croatian Pension Fund that he had changed his place of residence to Belgrade, Serbia, and asked for his pension to be paid there. However, the Croatian Pension Fund, acting upon the applicant’s request, stopped payment of his pension on the grounds that the Social Insurance Treaty did not cover YPA military pensions, and that there was no reciprocal agreement with Serbia in that respect. Further remedies used by the applicant before higher administrative bodies and the Administrative Court, by which he argued that his YPA military pension had been incorporated into the general pension scheme and that there had been no reason to stop his pension, were dismissed with the same summary reasons.
98. The summary reasons provided by the domestic authorities, without any specific reference to the applicant’s complaints, relevant domestic courts’ case-law or any domestic authorities’ practice (see, by contrast, Jantner, cited above, § 30), as well as the absence of an analysis mandated by the complexity of the issues associated with the problems of transitional arrangements for a federal military pension system after the dissolution of the former SFRY and its integration into the pension systems of the former SFRY republics, cannot satisfy the Court sufficiently to enable it to accept the Government’s argument that by changing his place of residence to Serbia the applicant had lost his property entitlement to receive the pension payments (see, by contrast, Jantner, cited above, § 33).
99. Specifically, as already indicated above, the Court considers that the applicant’s YPA military pension was incorporated into the Croatian pension scheme with the enactment of the Pension Insurance Act in 1998. That Act set aside the previous legislation on the matter which made pension payments conditional, inter alia, on residence in Croatia and did not set out any special requirements for YPA military pensioners as to their right to receive pension payments.
100. However, even assuming that residence in Croatia continued to be a requirement for the payment of the applicant’s pension even after the enactment of the Pension Insurance Act, that requirement appeared no longer relevant for those pensioners who moved to Serbia, once the Social Insurance Treaty had been incorporated into the Croatian legal system.
101. In this respect the Court firstly notes that under the Croatian Constitution international agreements have precedence in terms of their legal effects over domestic statutes (see paragraph 44 above), and that by ratifying the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties Croatia undertook the obligation not to hinder its obligation to perform an international treaty by citing provisions of its internal law. The Social Insurance Treaty with Serbia did not expressly exclude its application to YPA military pensions which had been recognised and incorporated in the general pension legislation of the respective countries. Moreover, regarding its applicability, it referred to “all persons” to whom pension legislation and other legislation “integrating, amending or supplementing” primary pension legislation applied, and indicated the Croatian Pension Fund as the competent domestic authority in Croatia; the same body that was in charge of payment of the applicant’s pension (see paragraph 54 above).
102. Therefore, in the absence of any reasons to the contrary provided by the domestic pension authorities, the Court considers that the applicant, whose YPA military pension had been incorporated into the general pension scheme, had every reason to rely on the Social Insurance Treaty, duly incorporated in the domestic system, providing that pension payments should be continued, irrespective of his place of residence (see, mutatis mutandis, Brezovec v. Croatia, no. 13488/07, § 68, 29 March 2011). Accordingly, the change of the applicant’s place of residence to Serbia could not foreseeably extinguish his entitlement to claim the payment of his pension, as provided under the relevant domestic law.
103. The argument that at the time Serbia was not paying pensions to YPA military pensioners in Croatia, as the respondent Government suggested, was irrelevant in this respect, since Article 5 of the Social Insurance Treaty guaranteed that the pensions could not be “reduced, stopped, seized or confiscated on the ground of residence on the territory of one of the contracting States” even without any further action by the domestic authorities necessary to make this provision operative (see paragraph 54 above).
104. In view of the above findings, the Court considers that when stopping payment of the applicant’s pension on the grounds that he had changed his place of residence to Serbia, which was not sufficiently foreseeable as a consequence in the relevant domestic law, the competent domestic pension authorities had interfered with the applicant’s property interests in breach of the principle of lawfulness and accordingly incompatible with the applicant’s right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.
105. Such a situation persisted until 2 June 2004 when Annexe E of the Agreement on Succession Issues between the former SFRY republics came into force. Annexe E, which in particular dealt with pension matters, for pensioners with dual citizenship such as the applicant (Croatian and Serbian) whose pensions had been funded from the former SFRY federal budget, provided for the obligation for payment of the pension on the State in which that person was domiciled (see paragraph 55 above). Since at that time the applicant had domicile in Serbia (see paragraphs 27 and 33 above) it follows that since 2 June 2004 Croatia had no longer responsibility for the payment of his pension.
106. The Court therefore rejects the Government’s preliminary objection it had previously joined to the merits (paragraph 62 above) and finds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as regards the stopping of the payment of the applicant’s pension in the period between 1 October 2003 and 2 June 2004.
2. Alleged violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) The parties’ arguments
107. The applicant contended that the stopping of the payment of his YPA military pension in the period between 1 October 2003 and 1 November 2004 had been done because of his Serbian ethnic origin and the fact that he had changed his place of residence to Serbia.
108. The Government submitted, relying on the Court’s case-law in Raviv v. Austria, no. 26266/05, 13 March 2012, that the applicant had never paid any contributions to a pension fund in Croatia and therefore he was not in the same position as other pension beneficiaries who had been paying contributions in Croatia. Therefore, in the Government’s view, there had been no issue under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No.1. Furthermore, the Government pointed out that the domestic legislation concerning the payment of pensions abroad did not distinguish between pension beneficiaries on any ground, including their nationality, ethnicity or the nature of the pension entitlement. All of them, including YPA military pensioners, had had equal opportunities to obtain payment of their pension abroad if there was a bilateral treaty or reciprocal agreement between Croatia and their country of residence. The stopping of pension payments in a country with which there was no treaty or reciprocal agreement had been a consequence of an objective nature and not discrimination on any ground. In this respect, Croatia had made no distinction between YPA military pensioners and persons who had been paying contributions to pension funds in Croatia. Therefore, the fact that the applicant had not been receiving his pension in Serbia was a consequence of the fact that no reciprocal agreement or treaty on payment of YPA military pensions existed between Croatia and Serbia at the time.
109. Furthermore, the Government argued that there had been no discrimination on the ground of the applicant’s place of residence. The Croatian authorities had never tried to influence the applicant’s choice of a place of residence or to discriminate against him in that respect, but it was simply objectively impossible for his YPA military pension to be paid in Serbia. He had made his choice of residence himself, and the fact that he had failed to make proper enquiries as to the possibility of having his pension paid in Serbia could not be imputed to Croatia. The Government pointed out that the domestic pension authorities had not kept records of the pension beneficiaries’ ethnicity, which would have enabled them to discriminate against the applicant on that ground. Moreover, neither the pension legislation nor any other Croatian legislation had provided for ethnicity to be a relevant factor in obtaining or losing certain rights. Therefore, the Government reiterated that the stopping of the applicant’s pension payments had not been done as a result of a measure which was aimed at any particular group.
(b) The Court’s assessment
110. The Court reiterates that it has held on many occasions that Article 14 has no independent existence, but plays an important role by complementing the other provisions of the Convention and the Protocols, since it protects individuals placed in similar situations from any discrimination in the enjoyment of the rights set forth in those other provisions. Where a substantive Article of the Convention has been cited, both on its own and together with Article 14, and a separate breach of the substantive Article has been found, it is not generally necessary for the Court also to consider the case under Article 14, though the position is otherwise if a clear inequality of treatment in the enjoyment of the right in question is a fundamental aspect of the case (see Dudgeon v. the United Kingdom, 22 October 1981, § 67, Series A no. 45; Chassagnou and Others v. France [GC], nos. 25088/94, 28331/95 and 28443/95, § 89, ECHR 1999 III; Herrmann v. Germany [GC], no. 9300/07, § 104, 26 June 2012; and Vistiņš and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 135, 25 October 2012).
111. In the present case the Court notes that neither the domestic legislation nor the decisions of the domestic authorities in any way referred to the applicant’s ethnicity when stopping payment of his pension. Moreover, the applicant did not dispute the Government’s assertion that the domestic pension authorities had not recorded his ethnicity.
112. As regards the applicant’s complaint that the payment of his military pension was stopped because he had moved to Serbia, the Court is of the view that the complaint of inequality of treatment in this respect has been sufficiently taken into account in the above assessment that has led to the finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken separately. Accordingly, it finds that there is no cause for a separate examination of the same facts from the standpoint of Article 14 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Vistiņš and Perepjolkins, cited above, § 136).
II. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
113. Lastly, the applicant complained, citing Articles 3, 6 § 1, 13 and 17 of the Convention, that the stopping of his pension amounted to degrading treatment, and that he had not had fair proceedings or an effective domestic remedy concerning his pension rights.
114. In the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court considers that this part of the application does not disclose any appearance of a violation of the Convention. It follows that it is inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 as manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article35 § 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
115. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
116. In his initial application the applicant claimed 7,280 euros (EUR) and the related statutory default interests in respect of pecuniary damage and EUR 3,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage. He did not claim any costs and expenses.
117. The Government contested that claim.
118. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and to make reparation for its consequences. If the national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 32-33, ECHR 2000-XI).
119. As regards the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction mentioned in the application form, the Court notes that under Rule 60 of the Rules of Court an applicant has to submit a just satisfaction claim within the time-limit fixed for the submission of his or her observations on the merits. The applicant did not claim any damage when invited to do so by the Court (see Trifković v. Croatia, no. 36653/09, § 146, 6 November 2012). Thus, the Court is not in a position to award him any amount in that respect.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Joins to the merits of the applicant’s property complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 the Government’s objection based on incompatibility ratione materiae and rejects it;

2. Declares the applicant’s complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, admissible, and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone;

4. Holds that there is no need to examine separately the applicant’s complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

5. Holds that there is no call to award the applicant just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 24 October 2013, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Eccezione preliminare congiunse a meriti e respinse (Articolo 35-3 – Ratione materiae) il Resto inammissibile
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) soddisfazione Equa respinsta (fuori termini)



PRIMA SEZIONE








CAUSA DAMJANAC C. CROATIA

(Richiesta n. 52943/10)








SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

24 ottobre 2013





Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Damjanac c. Croatia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Presidente
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse,
Ksenija Turković,
Dmitry Dedov, judges,and
Søren Nielsen, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 1 ottobre 2013,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 52943/10) contro la Repubblica di Croatia depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino croato e serbo, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 24 agosto 2010.
2. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il richiedente addusse in particolare che fermando pagamento del suo YPA pensione militare per un periodo di tredici mesi dopo che lui aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Serbia, era stato arbitrario e discriminatorio e così aveva contrariato ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
4. 21 marzo 2012 le azioni di reclamo riguardo all'arresto di pagamento della pensione del richiedente e la discriminazione in che riguardo fu comunicato al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
5. 17 gennaio 2013 il Governo di Serbia fu informato della causa ed invitò ad esercitare il loro diritto per intervenire se loro desiderassero fare così. 1 marzo 2013 il Governo di Serbia informò la Corte che loro non hanno desiderato esercitare il loro diritto per intervenire nella causa presente.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1926 e vive in Belgrade.
Sfondo di A. alla causa
1. Pensioni militari nella Repubblica Federale Socialista e precedente dell'Iugoslavia
7. Il sistema di pensione generale della Repubblica Federale Socialista e precedente dell'Iugoslavia (in seguito “il SFRY”) sia esposto su sul principio di territoriality. Questo volle dire che ogni entità federale, vale a dire le sei repubbliche (Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia e Herzegovina, Serbia, Macedonia ed il Montenegro) e due province autonome (Vojvodina e Kosovo), aveva i loro propri fondi pensioni che erano indipendente da governo federale ed erano responsabile per la raccolta di contributi ed il pagamento di pensioni a tutti gli individui che stavano funzionando sul territorio della rispettiva repubblica o provincia. Il sistema di pensione fu basato sul “pagare-come-tu-vada” modello ed il principio di solidarietà intergenerazionale che essenzialmente fu basata sul pagamento di contributi obbligatori durante gli anni di lavoro e ricevendo una volta poi la pensione con rate andarono in pensione.
8. Il sistema di pensione militare differì, in che fu centralizzato al livello federale. 1 gennaio 1973 sotto, al tempo attinente, la Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (Zakon o mirovinskom gli invalidskom osiguranju vojnih obveznika) un fondo pensioni federale fu stabilito per impiegati dell'Esercito delle Persone iugoslave (in seguito “lo YPA”) con la sua sede centrale registrata in Belgrade. Contributi a questo finanziamento furono pagati dal bilancio federale, ed il finanziamento pagò poi pensioni a pensionati militari, irrispettoso dell'ubicazione del loro servizio militare o dove loro vissero una volta andato in pensione.
2. YPA pensioni militari in Croatia
9. 25 giugno 1991 il Parlamento croato (Sabor Republike Hrvatske) dichiarò Croatia indipendente dell'Iugoslavia, e 8 ottobre 1991 tutte le relazioni fra Croatia ed il SFRY Governo federale si fu sciolto. Il SFRY Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento furono incorporati nell'ordinamento giuridico croato col Personale Militare Pensione Federale, Assicurazione di Invalidamento e Mantenimento dei figli Legislazione (l'Accettazione nella Repubblica di Croatia come Repubblica Legge) l'Atto (Zakon o preuzimanju saveznih zakona iz oblasti mirovinskog osiguranja di invalidskog degli i doplatka za djecu vojnih osiguranika koji se u Republici Hrvatskoj primjenjuju kao republički zakoni), decretò col Parlamento 26 giugno 1991.
10. 23 luglio 1992 il Governo di Croatia decretò un decreto su “Pensione e Diritti di Invalidamento di Persone Cui Servizio Militare ed Attivo nello YPA Terminated prima di 31 dicembre 1991” (Uredba od ostvarivanju prava iz mirovinskog gli invalidskog osiguranja osoba kojima je prestalo svojstvo aktivne vojne osobe u bivšoj JNA fa 31. prosinca 1991.; in seguito: “il Pensioni Decreto Militare”). Il Pensioni Decreto Militare posò in giù le condizioni per riconoscimento del diritto a pagamenti anticipati di pensioni (l'akontacija) a YPA precedente personale militare, previde che loro avevano terminato il loro servizio militare prima di 31 dicembre 1991, ma non aveva ottenuto diritti di pensione prima di che data, e che loro soddisfecero tutte le condizioni necessarie per essere accordati una pensione sotto la Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (veda paragrafo 8 sopra). Il Pensioni Decreto Militare espose fuori le tre condizioni complementari supplementari: (1) residenza in Croatia, (2) la nazionalità croata, e (3) che la persona riguardata si era costituita disponibile servizio nell'esercito croato prima di 31 dicembre 1991 e non fu sospettato di un reato contro Croatia. I Repubblica Lavoratori croati Pensione di ' e Fondo dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (Republički mirovinskog affettuoso gli invalidskog osiguranja radnika Hrvatske; in seguito “i Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di '”) fu assegnato per fare le disposizioni necessarie sotto questo Decreto.
11. Nello stesso giorno il Governo di Croatia decretò anche un decreto su “Pagamento di Pensioni a SFRY Repubblica Pensione Beneficiari Precedenti” (Uredba o isplati mirovina korisnicima koji su mirovinu ostvarili bivše di republikama di u Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije). Sotto che decreto tutti i residenti di Croatia che era stato accordato pensioni nelle altre repubbliche del SFRY precedente, eccetto Slovenia che aveva anche al tempo le sue relazioni si sciolsero col SFRY governo federale, fu concesso a pagamento delle loro pensioni con Croatia. I Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' fu ordinato per pagare pensioni dai contributi raccolti che Croatia non stava pagando a pensionati che risiedono nelle altre repubbliche del SFRY precedente a causa della fine di trasferimenti finanziari.
12. 6 ottobre 1993 il Parlamento croato decretò l'Esercito Personale Pensioni Atto delle Persone iugoslave (Zakon od ostvarivanju prava iz mirovnskog gli invalidskog osigurnja pripadnika bivše JNA) che espose a parte il Decreto del 1992 (veda paragrafo 10 sopra) e parte della di transizione del 1991 legislazione (veda paragrafo 9 sopra). Sotto questo Atto Croatia si prese la responsabilità per pagamento di YPA che pensioni militari hanno ottenuto prima di 8 ottobre 1991, e per l'accordare di pensioni a YPA personale militare il cui servizio in Croatia aveva terminato prima di 31 dicembre 1991.
13. YPA precedente personale militare che aveva ottenuto diritti di pensione sotto il SFRY precedente assegna una pensione a regime prima di 8 ottobre 1991 aveva diritto ad avere la loro pensione pagato con Croatia se la loro pensione dal finanziamento federale e precedente non fosse pagata più. Le due ulteriori condizioni furono posate in giù: residenza in Croatia e che la persona riguardata non era perseguita per certi reati penali contro Croatia, elencato in sezione 2 dell'Atto. I Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' era tasked con esecuzione dell'Atto.
14. L'Atto fu accantonato con l'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione (Zakon osiguranju di mirovinskom di o) che fu decretato 10 luglio 1998 ed entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 1999. Di periodo attinente a questa causa fu corretto molte volte (veda divide in paragrafi 50-53 sotto). L'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione regolò il piano assicurativo di pensione obbligatorio sulla base del principio della solidarietà intergenerazionale (la sezione 2 § 1). Stabilì il Pensione Fondo croato (Hrvatski zavod za mirovinsko osiguranje) che era tasked con la gestione di affari di pensione (sezione 6) sostituendo così i Repubblica Lavoratori precedenti Fondo di ' (la sezione 187 §§ 1 e 3). Di conseguenza, il Pensione Fondo croato era tasked con la raccolta di contributi di pensione e pagamento di pensioni e con l'osservanza di obblighi sotto accordi internazionali su pensioni (sezione 130). Sotto il Pensione Assicurazione Atto pagamento di pensioni all'estero era solamente possibile sotto un accordo internazionale o un accordo reciproco, (sezione 88).
15. L'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione anche previde che finanziamenti per pagamento di pensioni a YPA pensionati militari dovrebbero essere garantiti nel bilancio dello Stato, e che i contributi necessari dovrebbero essere pagati al Pensione Fondo croato su una base mensile (la sezione 152 § 1). Per tutti i cittadini croati l'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione riconobbe anni pensionabili di lavoro di periodo prima di 8 ottobre 1991 sotto la Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (veda divide in paragrafi 8 e 9 sopra) come anni pensionabili di lavoro (sezione 186).
16. Con un emendamento di 29 novembre 2001 le pensioni di, inter l'alia, YPA pensionati militari furono ridotti ed il Pensione Fondo croato fu ordinato per esporre i livelli corretti delle loro pensioni.
3. Trattati croati con Serbia
17. Sul 1997 Croatia di 15 settembre ed il poi Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia (più tardi Serbia ed il Montenegro) firmato un Assicurazione Trattato Sociale (Ugovor osiguranju di socijalnom di o), in seguito “l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale”) che venne in vigore in 1 maggio 2003. L'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale elencò la legislazione nazionale ed attinente alla quale era applicabile, vale a dire assicurazione contro le malattie e legislazione di protezione di salute; pensione e legislazione di assicurazione di invalidamento; legislazione su incidenti lavoro-relativi e malattie lavoro-relative; e sussidi di disoccupazione. Era applicabile a tutte le persone nei due paesi che avevano diritti ed i doveri sotto la legislazione nazionale ed attinente. Il diritto a pagamento di una pensione all'estero esistito irrispettoso della residenza dei beneficiari di pensione all'interno di uno degli Stati contraenti. I Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' fu designato l'autorità di relazione competente in Croatia riguardo ad ogni pensione emette (veda paragrafo 54 sotto).
18. Secondo il Governo, dopo la risoluzione del SFRY precedente Serbia mantenne un sistema di pensione duplice per civile e pensionati militari, e fermò di pagare YPA pensioni militari a pensionati che risiedono in Croatia. Solamente a gennaio 2012 era una riforma di pensione eseguita in Serbia che aveva l'effetto di integrare il fondo pensioni militare nella pensione civile e finanziamento di assicurazione di invalidamento. Su una data non specificata le autorità serbe informarono le autorità di pensione croate di questo cambio. Loro indicarono anche che loro avrebbero pagato che che precedentemente era pensioni militari a pensionati che risiedono all'estero sotto i trattati attinenti su assicurazione sociale o accordi reciproci.
19. 29 giugno 2001 le repubbliche del SFRY precedente firmate l'Accordo su Successione Emettono (Ugovor sukcesije di pitanjima di o, in seguito “il Successione Accordo”) che venne in vigore 2 giugno 2004 (veda paragrafo 55 sotto).
20. Annexe Ed al Successione Accordo trattato con pensioni. Fu basato sul principio di diritti acquisiti, in che diritti acquisirono sotto un sistema devono essere ammessi e devono essere rispettati in un altro. Articolo 1 stabilito il principio detto in riguardo dei diritti di pensione acquisito sotto le repubbliche precedenti ' assegna una pensione a regime (veda paragrafo 7 sopra), mentre Articolo 2 trattò con pensioni militari sotto il regime federale e precedente (veda paragrafo 8 sopra). La disposizione seconda convenne che lo Stato che aveva riconosciuto il diritto a pagamento delle pensioni a SFRY precedente personale militare dovrebbe continuare a pagare pensioni a tutti i suoi cittadini, irrispettoso della loro residenza. In cause dove era una cittadina di più di una repubblica del SFRY precedente una persona, la pensione dovrebbe essere pagata con lo Stato dove che persona risiedde. Questo regime di pagamento di pensione differì dal regime stabilito per pensioni di civile sotto Articolo 1 di Annexe Ed al Successione Accordo che previde che lo Stato che aveva riconosciuto i diritti di pensione e quale pagato le pensioni dovrebbero continuare coi pagamenti completamente irrispettoso della nazionalità o residenza dei beneficiari di pensione.
B. le circostanze personali di Il richiedente
21. Il richiedente notificò come un ufficiale militare nello YPA fra il 1941 ed il 1979, quando lui andò in pensione. In 16 maggio 1979 il SFRY fondo pensioni federale per impiegati di YPA pensionati autorizzò il diritto del richiedente ad una pensione militare. A che tempo che il richiedente stava risiedendo in Dubrovnik, Croatia.
22. 19 giugno 1992 il richiedente richiese l'ufficio di Dubrovnik dei Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' (Republički mirovinskog affettuoso gli invalidskog osiguranja radnika Hrvatske, lo služba di Područna u Dubrovniku) riconoscere il suo diritto ad una pensione militare sotto la legislazione croata e nuova. Il richiedente provò la sua richiesta presentando prova della sua residenza in Croatia ad un indirizzo in Dubrovnik, prova di cittadinanza croata ed un documento dal Dubrovnik Corte Municipale (sud di Općinski u Dubrovniku), confermando che nessuno procedimenti penali contro lui erano stati avviati.
23. 7 luglio 1992 l'Ufficio di Dubrovnik dei Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' riconobbe il diritto del richiedente ad una pensione militare, come stabilito sotto il SFRY precedente Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (veda paragrafo 47 sotto). Fondò che il richiedente aveva cittadinanza croata ed una residenza in Croatia, e che le autorità nazionali e competenti non avevano avviato procedimenti penali contro il richiedente per qualsiasi reato contro Croatia.
24. 12 dicembre 1992, agendo ex l'officio, l'Ufficio di Dubrovnik dei Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' stabilì l'importo della pensione del richiedente sotto il Pensioni Decreto Militare. La pensione sarebbe pagata al richiedente come lungo come i requisiti necessari esisterono.
25. In 6 maggio 1994 l'Assicurazione Fondo Sociale e Militare del poi Repubblica Esercito iugoslavo e Federale in Belgrade, Serbia, ordinò che pagamento della pensione militare del richiedente dovrebbe essere fermatosi, per motivi che loro erano stati informati con le autorità croate che il richiedente era stato accordato una pensione in Croatia.
26. Ad ottobre 1998 lui visitò suo figlio in Belgrade, Serbia secondo il richiedente, e decise di sospendere con suo figlio per un periodo più lungo. Lui continuò a ricevere pagamenti della sua pensione per un rappresentante in Dubrovnik.
27. 9 giugno 2003 il richiedente informò l'ufficio di Dubrovnik del Pensione Fondo croato (služba di Područna u Dubrovniku Hrvatskog zavoda za mirovinsko osiguranje) che lui aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Belgrade, Serbia e richiese che la sua pensione sia pagata al suo indirizzo nuovo. Lui presentò prova di residenza in Belgrade e dettagli del suo conto bancario in Serbia.
28. 30 settembre 2003 il Pensione Fondo croato fermò pagamento della pensione del richiedente. Fondò che l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale con Serbia non coprì YPA pensioni militari, e che non c'era accordo reciproco con Serbia in che riguardo, come richiesto sotto il diritto nazionale attinente, per il pagamento di pensioni all'estero. Pagamenti di pensione furono fermati con effetto da 1 ottobre 2003.
29. 16 dicembre 2003 il richiedente depositò un ricorso col Ricorso Consiglio del Consiglio Esecutivo del Pensione Fondo croato (vijeće di Žalbeno il vijeća di Upravnog Hrvatskog zavoda za mirovinsko osiguranje) dibattendo che non c'era base legale per la sua pensione per essere fermatosi. Lui contese che quando i suoi diritti di pensione erano stati riconosciuti sotto il Pensioni Decreto Militare lui aveva ottenuto il diritto per ricevere la pensione dai Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ', e che il suo status era perciò uguale a che di altri pensionati di vecchio-età. Lui si lamentò anche che lui non era stato in grado ottenere la sua pensione in Serbia, fin da pagamento della sua pensione là si era stato fermato per motivi che il suo diritto ad una pensione era stato riconosciuto in Croatia. Infine, il richiedente spiegò che la pensione che si era stata fermata era il suo reddito solo.
30. 17 marzo 2004 il richiedente depositò un'azione amministrativa nella Corte amministrativa (sud di Upravni Republike Hrvatske) lamentandosi che il Pensione Fondo croato era andato a vuoto a decidere sul suo ricorso contro la decisione di primo-istanza dell'ufficio di Dubrovnik del Pensione Fondo croato.
31. Nella sua azione amministrativa il richiedente reiterò che con recognising il suo diritto ad una pensione sotto il Pensioni Decreto Militare lui aveva lo stesso status come tutti gli altri pensionati in Croatia che stava ricevendo pensioni dal Pensione Fondo croato. Lui spiegò che lui aveva presentato la sua richiesta per pagamento della pensione a Serbia sotto l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale e che l'arresto della sua pensione era stato illegale. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che lui e sua moglie non avevano altre finanziario ora vuole dire che la sua pensione era stata cessata.
32. La Corte amministrativa invitò il richiedente a provare inoltre la sua azione 18 marzo 2004. Il richiedente approvò questa richiesta, e presentò un'azione amministrativa completata 3 settembre 2004, mentre reiterando i suoi argomenti precedenti.
33. 5 ottobre 2004 il richiedente cambiò la sua residenza al suo vecchio indirizzo in Dubrovnik ed il giorno seguente lui informò l'Ufficio di Dubrovnik del Pensione Fondo croato, mentre chiedendo pagamento della sua pensione per essere ricapitolato. Il richiedente indicò anche che il Pensione Fondo croato non aveva deciso mai sul suo ricorso contro la decisione per fermare il pagamento della sua pensione.
34. Il Ricorso Consiglio del Consiglio Esecutivo del Pensione Fondo croato respinse il ricorso del richiedente contro la decisione di primo-istanza dell'Ufficio di Dubrovnik del Pensione Fondo croato siccome mal-fondato 24 novembre 2004, mentre girando il ragionamento della decisione di primo-istanza.
35. 10 gennaio 2005 l'ufficio di Dubrovnik del Pensione Fondo croato riprese pagamento della pensione del richiedente. Fondò che il richiedente aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Croatia, e che tutti gli altri requisiti sotto il diritto nazionale attinente erano stati soddisfatti. Il pagamento della pensione del richiedente sarebbe ripreso con effetto da 1 novembre 2004.
36. 12 aprile 2006 la Corte amministrativa invitò il richiedente a spiegare se lui volle intraprendere la sua azione amministrativa di 17 marzo 2004, fin dal Ricorso Consiglio del Consiglio Esecutivo del Pensione Fondo croato aveva deciso nel frattempo sul suo ricorso.
37. 13 novembre 2006 il richiedente informò la Corte amministrativa che lui ha voluto intraprendere la sua azione amministrativa. Inoltre, lui indicò che lui volle prolungarlo alla decisione di secondo-istanza del Ricorso Consiglio del Consiglio Esecutivo del Pensione Fondo croato di 24 novembre 2004. Il richiedente dibattè di nuovo che i cambi della sua residenza non avevano garantito in qualsiasi riguardo, legale o che riguarda i fatti che ferma il pagamento della sua pensione, e che spogliarlo perciò della sua pensione per il periodo fra il 2003 e 31 ottobre 2004 di 1 ottobre era stato illegale.
38. 8 marzo 2007 la Corte amministrativa respinse l'azione amministrativa del richiedente siccome mal-fondato. La parte attinente delle letture di decisione:
“Il ragionamento della decisione contestata, e della decisione di primo-istanza, è basato sul fatto che la richiesta del querelante per pagamento della pensione militare e riconosciuta che lui aveva ottenuto come un impiegato di YPA prima di 8 ottobre 1991 era stata rifiutata, perché lui aveva una residenza in Serbia... e l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale fra la Repubblica di Croatia e la Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia non coprì pensioni militari di YPA precedente personale militare ottenuto per il militare [la pensione] finanziamento prima di 8 ottobre 1991. Fra la Repubblica di Croatia e Serbia ed il Montenegro non è accordo reciproco in pagamento di pensioni militari, così il [querelante] pensione non può essere pagata in Serbia...
In prospettiva di che che è discernibile dall'archivio di causa questa corte trova che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di legge al danno del querelante.
In questa specifica causa le ragioni addotte col corpo rispondente ed il corpo di primo-istanza è valido. Questa corte trova che fu contenuto correttamente col corpo rispondente che non era possibile per pensioni militari per essere pagato all'estero... poiché era impossibile sotto il Trattato o legislazione di pensione di croato. Pagamento di una pensione è all'estero possibile sotto un trattato internazionale o sulla base di un accordo reciproco che non è la situazione nella causa presente.”
39. In 11 maggio 2007 il richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale (sud di Ustavni Republike Hrvatske). Lui contese che non c'era stata base legale per fermare pagamento di tredici delle sue rate di pensione, e che i suoi cambi di residenza non avrebbero dovuto avere qualsiasi effetti avversi sui suoi diritti di pensione. Nella sua prospettiva questo aveva creato un'ineguaglianza di fronte alla legge.
40. Il richiedente completò la sua azione di reclamo costituzionale 5 giugno 2007, mentre reiterando i suoi argomenti precedenti.
41. 11 marzo 2010 la Corte Costituzionale dichiarata manifestamente l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente inammissibile come mal-fondò. La decisione della Corte Costituzionale fu notificata sul richiedente in 21 maggio 2010.
42. 24 febbraio 2012 il richiedente informò l'ufficio di Dubrovnik del Pensione Fondo croato che lui aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Belgrade, e chiese la pensione per essere pagato a lui in Serbia.
43. 27 febbraio 2012 le informazioni presentate col richiedente furono registrate nel sistema di informazioni del Pensione Fondo croato. Fin da marzo 2012 la pensione del richiedente è stata pagata a lui in Belgrade, Serbia.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
Costituzione di A.
44. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione della Repubblica di Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 56/1990, 135/1997 8/1998 (testo consolidato), 113/2000, 124/2000 (testo consolidato), 28/2001 e 41/2001 (testo consolidato), 55/2001 (il corrigendum), 76/2010, 85/2010) legga siccome segue:
Articolo 14
“Ognuno nella Repubblica di Croatia godrà di diritti e le libertà nonostante la loro razza, colore, sesso, lingua, religione, credenza politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, proprietà, nascita, istruzione, posizione sociale o le altre caratteristiche.
Tutti saranno uguali di fronte alla legge.
Articolo 16
Diritti e le libertà possono essere restrette solamente secondo legge per proteggere le libertà e diritti di altri, ordinamento giuridico, morale pubblica e salute.
Qualsiasi restrizione delle libertà e diritti deve essere proporzionata con l'interesse coinvolse in una particolare causa.
Articolo 48
Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito.
Articolo 140
Accordi internazionali in vigore che è stato concluso e è stato ratificato in conformità con la Costituzione e è stato reso pubblico saranno parte dell'ordine legale ed interno della Repubblica di Croatia ed avranno su precedenza in termini dei loro effetti legali il [nazionale] gli statuti...”
45. La parte attinente di sezione 62 del Corte Atto Costituzionale (Ufficiale Pubblica n. 49/2002, di 3 maggio 2002 lo zakon di Ustavni o il sudu di Ustavnom Republike Hrvatske) legge siccome segue:
Sezione 62
“1. Chiunque può presentare un reclamo costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale se lui o lei ritengono che l'atto individuale di un corpo statale, un corpo di autogoverno locale e regionale o un soggetto giuridico con autorità pubblica, riguardando suo o i suoi diritti ed obblighi, o un sospetto o un'accusa di un atto penale, ha violato suo o i suoi diritti umani o le libertà fondamentali o suo o il suo diritto ad autogoverno locale e regionale garantito con la Costituzione (in seguito: un diritto costituzionale)...
2. Se un'altra via di ricorso legale esiste in riguardo della violazione del diritto costituzionale [si lamentò di], un reclamo costituzionale può essere presentato solamente dopo che via di ricorso è usata.”
B. croato pensione legislazione
46. Le disposizioni attinenti del Personale Militare Pensione Federale e Legislazione dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (Accettazione) l'Atto (essere applicabile nella Repubblica di Croatia come Repubblica Legge) (Zakon o preuzimanju saveznog zakona iz oblasti mirovinskog gli invalidskog osiguranja vojnih osiguranika koji se u Republici Hrvatskoj primjenjuje kao republički zakon, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 53/1991, 73/1991, 18/1992 71/1992), decretò 26 giugno 1991, legga siccome segue:
Sezione 1
“La Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (Ufficiale di SFRY Pubblica N. 7/1985, 74/1987 20/1989) sarà accettato e sarà fatto domanda nella Repubblica di Croatia come la legge della repubblica.
Sezione 5
I diritti finanziari e federali ed obblighi sotto la legislazione assegnata ad in sezione 1 di questo Atto diverranno diritti ed obblighi del bilancio della Repubblica di Croatia.”
47. Le disposizioni attinenti del Decreto su Pensione e Diritti di Invalidamento di Persone Cui Servizio Militare ed Attivo nello YPA Terminated precedente prima di 31 dicembre 1991 (Uredba od ostvarivanju prava iz mirovinskog gli invalidskog osiguranja osoba kojima je prestalo svojstvo aktivne vojne osobe u bivšoj JNA fa 31. prosinca 1991, Ufficiale Pubblica N. 46/1992, 71/1992), decretò 23 luglio 1992, purché:
Sezione 1
“Una persona che cessa essere un ufficiale attivo nello YPA nel territorio della Repubblica di Croatia prima di 31 dicembre 1991, e prima di che non ha che data ottenne diritto ad una pensione ed assicurazione di invalidamento, può ottenere che diritto se lui adempie le condizioni per ottenerlo riguardo a pensione ed assicurazione di invalidamento in conformità con la Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento (Ufficiale Pubblica N. 53/91, 73/91 18/92) e se:
- lui ha residenza sul territorio della Repubblica di Croatia;
- lui ha la nazionalità croata;
- lui si costituì disponibile servizio nell'esercito croato prima di 31 dicembre 1991, e procedimenti penali non sono stati avviati contro lui con le autorità competenti in collegamento con preparazione o perpetrazione di reati sotto Capo XX del Codice Penale della Repubblica di Croatia.
Sezione 4
I compiti sotto questo Decreto saranno eseguiti coi Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' secondo legge.”
48. Le disposizioni attinenti del Decreto sul Pagamento di Pensioni a Beneficiari della Pensione della Repubblica nel SFRY precedente (Uredba o isplati mirovina korisnicima koji su mirovinu ostvarili bivše di republikama di u Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 46/1992), decretò 23 luglio 1992, purché:
Sezione 1
“I beneficiari di pensioni... con residenza sul territorio della Repubblica di Croatia che ha ottenuto diritto di pensione nelle repubbliche del SFRY precedente, separatamente dalla Slovenia, e che sta ricevendo pagamenti nella Repubblica di Croatia, riceverà pagamenti che cominciano dal primo giorno del mese dopo che in che il pagamento si fu arrestato dovuto alla conclusione di trasferimenti finanziari. Il pagamento sarà reso coi Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di '...
Sezione 2
I finanziamenti per pagamento delle pensioni assegnato ad in sezione 1 di questo Decreto saranno garantiti dalle risorse dei Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' che i Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' non è capace di pagare assegnare una pensione a beneficiari nelle repubbliche del SFRY precedente a causa della cessazione di trasferimenti finanziari.
Sezione 4
I pagamenti di pensione assegnati ad in sezione 1 di questo Decreto saranno resi sino a trasferimenti finanziari fra la Repubblica di Croatia e le repubbliche del SFRY precedente è ricapitolato o il pagamento delle pensioni stabilì altrimenti.”
49. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Esercito Personale Pensioni Atto delle Persone iugoslave (Zakon od ostvarivanju prava iz mirovnskog gli invalidskog osigurnja pripadnika bivše JNA, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 96/1993), decretò 6 ottobre 1993, legga siccome segue:
Sezione 1
“Questo Atto concerne i metodi e le condizioni per riconoscimento dei diritti di pensione,..., di personale di YPA precedente, acquisito prima di 8 ottobre 1991,...
Sezione 2
Un beneficiario che ha acquisito il diritto ad una pensione... nel Personale Militare Assicurazione Sociale Fondo Federale prima di 8 ottobre 1991, e se il pagamento della sua pensione e gli altri pagamenti dal finanziamento federale si è stato arrestato, avrà che diritto riconobbe... se lui soddisfa le condizioni seguenti:
- lui ha residenza sul territorio della Repubblica di Croatia;
- lui acquisì il diritto ad una pensione nel Personale Militare Assicurazione Sociale Fondo Federale prima di 8 ottobre 1991;
- procedimenti penali non sono stati avviati contro lui con le autorità competenti in collegamento con reati sotto Capo XIV, XV e XVIII del Codice Penale e Di base della Repubblica di Croatia... Capeggi XIX del Codice Penale della Repubblica di Croatia... ed i Reati di Incitamento ed il Terrorismo Contro la Sovranità e l'Integrità Territoriale della Repubblica di Atto di Croatia... “
Sezione 9
I Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' eseguirà l'esecuzione di questo Atto.
Sezione 11
Questo Atto sostituirà:
1. L'Atto sull'Accettazione del Personale Militare Pensione Federale ed Invalidamento Assicurazione Legislazione Accettazione Atto (essere applicabile nella Repubblica di Croatia come Repubblica Legge) (Ufficiale Pubblica N. 53/1991, 73/1991, 18/1992, e 71/1992)-sezioni 3b, 3c e 3e
2. Il Decreto su Realizzazione della Pensione e Diritti di Invalidamento di Persone Cui Servizio Militare ed Attivo nello YPA Terminated precedente prima di 31 dicembre 1991 (Ufficiale Pubblica N. 46/1992, 71/1992)... “
50. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione (Zakon osiguranju di mirovinskom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 102/1998), decretò 10 luglio 1998 (entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 1999), purché:
Sezione 2
“(1) questo Atto regola l'assicurazione di pensione obbligatoria sulla base del principio della solidarietà intergenerazionale.. “
Sezione 6
Assicurare i diritti di impiegati,... e le altre persone assicurate sotto questo Atto, il Pensione Fondo croato (in seguito “il Fondo”) sarà stabilito.
Sezione 88
Pagamento di pensioni sarà fatto all'estero sotto accordi internazionali o sulla base di un accordo reciproco.
Sezione 130
“Il Fondo può:
1) esegua tutti i compiti riguardo all'esercizio di diritti di assicurazione di pensione,
2) raccolga contributi di pensione,
3) esecuzione sicura di trattati internazionali su assicurazione di pensione...
Sezione 152
(1) la Repubblica di Croatia garantirà risorse nel suo bilancio per parte degli obblighi di assicurazione di pensione che sorgono fuori del riconoscimento di pensioni privilegiate, vale a dire per...
8) pensioni per personale di YPA precedente e per le loro famiglie dopo la loro morte...
Sezione 186
(1) anni pensionabili di lavoro prima di 8 ottobre 1991 sotto la Personale Pensione Militare ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento sarà riconosciuto per cittadini croati come anni pensionabili di lavoro quando ottenendo diritti di pensione sotto questo Atto...
Sezione 187
(1) nel giorno questo Atto entra in vigore i Repubblica Lavoratori croati Pensione di ' e Fondo dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento... cesserà le sue attività...
(3) nel giorno questo Atto entra in vigore il Pensione Fondo croato che erediterà le risorse, diritti ed obblighi dei Fondi sopra.... comincerà le sue attività.
Sezione 194
Questo Atto sostituisce: ...
5) l'Esercito Personale Pensioni Atto delle Persone iugoslave (Ufficiale Pubblica n. 96/1993)...”
51. La Pensione Assicurazione (gli Emendamenti) l'Atto (Zakon o dopunama Zakona osiguranju di mirovinskom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 109/2001), decretò 29 novembre 2001, purché:
Sezione 1
“Nell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione (Ufficiale Pubblica N. 102/1998, 127/2000 59/2001) dopo sezione 172 sarà sezione 172a che prevede
Sezione 172a
(1) i beneficiari di pensione dello YPA precedente... avrà i loro pagamenti di pensione ridotti proporzionalmente ai loro redditi...
Sezione 2
Il Pensione Fondo croato può ex officio emettono una decisione riguardo a riduzione di pensione sotto sezione 1 di questo Atto.”
52. La disposizione attinente della Pensione Assicurazione (gli Emendamenti) l'Atto (Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Zakona osiguranju di mirovinskom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 92/2005), decretò 15 luglio 2005, purché:
Sezione 5
“In sezione 88 [dell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione] dopo le parole “l'accordo” le parole “su assicurazione sociale” sarà aggiunto.”
53. La Pensione Assicurazione (gli Emendamenti) l'Atto (Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Zakona osiguranju di mirovinskom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica n. 121/2010), decretò 22 ottobre 2010, purché:
Sezione 16
“Sezione 88 sarà corretta siccome segue: ...
(2) pagamento di pensioni e gli altri benefici sarà fatto all'estero sotto accordi internazionali su assicurazione sociale o su una base reciproca, o sotto una decisione del [Pensione croata] Fondo che accorda il diritto per ricevere all'estero pagamenti in un Stato con cui non ci sono nessun accordo internazionale o la reciprocità.”
C. I trattati attinenti con Serbia
54. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale fra la Repubblica di Croatia e la Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia (Zakon o potvrđivanju l'između di Ugovora Republike Hrvatske i Savezne Republike Jugoslavije osiguranju di socijalnom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica-trattati Internazionali n. 14/2001), firmato 15 settembre 1997 (entrò in vigore in 1 maggio 2003), preveda:
Articolo 2
Legislazione attinente
“(1) questo Trattato riguarda:
la legislazione croata su:
1) assicurazione contro le malattie e protezione di salute,
2) pensione ed assicurazione di invalidamento,
3) assicurazione contro incidenti lavoro-relativi e malattie lavoro-relative,
4) assicurazione di disoccupazione...
(2) questo Trattato è applicabile a legislazione integrando, mentre correggendo o completando la legislazione assegnarono ad in § 1 di questo Articolo.
Articolo 3
Personae di ratione di applicabilità
(1) questo Trattato fa domanda:
un) tutte le persone a chi la legislazione attinente di uno o sia degli Stati contraenti fa domanda o ha fatto domanda...
Articolo 5
L'uguaglianza di territori
(1) le pensioni, e gli altri benefici valutari, separatamente da sussidi di disoccupazione, sotto la legislazione attinente in uno degli Stati contraenti non può essere ridotto, si fermò, sequestrò o confiscò sulla base della residenza del beneficiario sul territorio di uno degli Stati contraenti, a meno che questo Trattato prevede altrimenti...
Articolo 28
Corpi di relazione
“Particolarmente con una prospettiva a comunicazione più facile e più veloce fra autorità negli Stati contraenti, il corpo di relazione sarà migliorare l'esecuzione di questo Trattato,:
in Croatia... i Repubblica Lavoratori croati Pensione di ' e Fondo dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidamento in riguardo della legislazione attinente assegnato ad in Articolo 2 § 1 (2) e (3)...
Articolo 29
Obblighi dei corpi responsabili, assistenza legale ed amministrativa...
(5) i corpi responsabili degli Stati contraenti possono, nell'esecuzione di questo trattato, faccia contatto diretto fra loro, così come [il contatto] con individui interessati ed i loro rappresentanti...”
Articolo 37
Accordo di controversie
“Tutte le controversie relativo alla richiesta o interpretazione di questo Trattato saranno date con coi corpi competenti negli Stati contraenti.”
55. Annexe Ed all'Accordo dei Problemi della Successione (Ugovor sukcesije di pitanjima di o; Ufficiale Pubblica-trattati Internazionali n. 2/2004), firmato 29 giugno 2001 (entrò in vigore 2 giugno 2004), letture:
Pensioni
Articolo 1
“Ogni Stato si prenderà la responsabilità per e regolarmente pagherà pensioni giuridicamente autorizzate procurate con che Stato nella sua veste precedente come una Repubblica costituente del SFRY, irrispettoso della nazionalità, cittadinanza, residenza o domicilio del beneficiario.
Articolo 2
Ogni Stato si prenderà la responsabilità per, e regolarmente paga, pensioni che sono dovute ai suoi cittadini che erano servitori civili o militari del SFRY, irrispettoso di dove sono residenti o stabiliti la residenza loro, se quelle pensioni fossero procurate dal bilancio federale o le altre risorse federali del SFRY; purché che, nella causa di una persona che è un cittadino di più di un Stato
(i) se che persona è stabilita la residenza in uno di quelli Stati, pagamento della pensione sarà reso con che Stato, e
(l'ii) se che persona non è stabilita la residenza in qualsiasi lo Stato di che che persona è una cittadina, pagamento della pensione sarà reso con lo Stato nel territorio di che che persona era residente 1 giugno 1991.
Articolo 3
Gli Stati possono, se necessario, concluda disposizioni bilaterali per assicurare il pagamento di pensioni facendo seguito ad Articoli 1 e 2 sopra a persone localizzate in un Stato altro che che quale sta pagando le pensioni di quelle persone, per trasferire i finanziamenti necessari per assicurare pagamento di quelle pensioni e per il pagamento di pensioni ad un livello proporzionato ai contributi resi. Dove appropriato, la conclusione di disposizioni bilaterali e così definitive può essere preceduta con la conclusione di accordi provisionale per assicurare il pagamento di pensioni facendo seguito ad Articolo 2. Qualsiasi accordi bilaterali conclusero fra qualsiasi due degli Stati prevarranno sulle disposizioni di questo Annexe e chiariranno il problema di rivendicazioni reciproche fra i fondi pensioni degli Stati relativo a pagamenti di pensioni rese di fronte a simile accordi entrati in vigore.”
D. l'Altro diritto internazionale
56. Le disposizioni attinenti di Internazionale Operi Organizzazione Convenzione 102 riguardo ai Minimi Standard di Social Security (Konvencija 102 rade di organizacije di Međunarodne o najnižim standardima socijalne sigurnosti, Ufficiale Pubblica-trattati Internazionali n. 1/2002), in vigore in Croatia come di 8 ottobre 1991, lettura:
Articolo 68
Parte la XII Uguaglianza di Trattamento di Non-cittadino Residenti
Articolo 68
“1. Residenti di non-cittadino avranno gli stessi diritti come residenti nazionali: Purché che articoli speciali riguardo a non-cittadini e cittadini nati fuori del territorio del Membro possono essere prescritti in riguardo di benefici o porzioni di benefici che sono completamente pagabili o principalmente fuori di finanziamenti pubblici ed in riguardo di schemi di transizione.
2. Sotto schemi di previdenza sociale contribuente che proteggono impiegati, le persone proteggerono chi sono cittadini di un altro Membro che ha accettato gli obblighi della Parte attinente della Convenzione avranno, sotto che Parte, gli stessi diritti come cittadini del Membro riguardati: Purché che la richiesta di questo paragrafo può essere resa soggetto all'esistenza di un accordo bilaterale o multilaterale che prevede per la reciprocità.
Parte XIII Disposizioni Comuni
Articolo 69
Un beneficio al quale proteggè una persona sarebbe concesso altrimenti in ottemperanza con qualsiasi di Parti II a X di questa Convenzione può essere sospeso a simile misura siccome può essere prescritto:
(un) come lungo come la persona riguardata è assente dal territorio del Membro... “
57. La disposizione attinente di Internazionale Operi Organizzazione Convenzione 48 riguardo alla Costituzione di un Schema Internazionale per il Mantenimento di Diritti sotto l'Invalidamento, la Vecchio-età e Vedove ' e Rende orfano Assicurazione di ' (Konvencija 48 rade di organizacije di Međunarodne o utemeljenju međunarodnog sustava očuvanja prava iz osiguranja za slučaj invalidnosti, starosti gli smrti, Ufficiale Pubblica-trattati Internazionali n. 11/2003, in seguito “ILO Convenzione 48”), in vigore in Croatia come di 8 ottobre 1991, letture:
Articolo 10
“(1) persone che sono state affiliate ad un'istituzione di assicurazione di un Membro e le loro persone a carico saranno concesse all'interezza dei benefici il diritto a che è stato acquisito nella virtù della loro assicurazione:
(un) se loro sono residenti nel territorio di un Membro, irrispettoso della loro nazionalità;
(b) se loro sono cittadini di un Membro, irrispettoso della loro residenza... “
58. La Convenzione di Vienna sulla Legge di Trattati di 23 maggio 1969 (konvencija di Bečka o pravu međunarodnih ugovora, Ufficiale Pubblica-trattati Internazionali n. 12/1993) prevede:
Articolo 27
Legge interna e l'osservanza di trattati
“Una parte non può invocare le disposizioni della sua legge interna come giustificazione per il suo inadempimento contrattuale un trattato... “
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1, Preso Da solo Ed In Concomitanza Con Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione
59. Il richiedente si lamentò che l'arresto del pagamento del suo YPA pensione militare per un periodo di tredici mesi, dopo che lui aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Serbia, era stato arbitrario e discriminatorio. Lui si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione che lesse siccome segue:
Articolo 14 della Convenzione
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
1. Materiae di ratione di compatibilità
(un) Le parti gli argomenti di '
60. Il Governo presentò, mentre appellandosi sulla causa-legge della Corte in Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, ECHR 2010, e Grudić c. Serbia, n. 31925/08, 17 aprile 2012 che nel periodo durante il quale il pagamento della pensione del richiedente era stato fermato il richiedente non abbia un diritto a pagamento della sua pensione, e perciò non aveva proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro sottolinearono che il richiedente era un YPA pensionato militare e che il pagamento della sua pensione sarebbe stato all'estero solamente possibile sotto il diritto nazionale attinente se c'erano stati un trattato internazionale o un accordo reciproco. Non c'erano comunque, nessun trattato così internazionale o accordo reciproco fra Croatia e Serbia al tempo. Nella prospettiva del Governo era stato cruciale per fare una distinzione fra il diritto ad una pensione ed il diritto a pagamento di una pensione. In Croatia il richiedente aveva avuto solamente il diritto a pagamento della pensione. Questo diritto esistè come lungo come le condizioni necessarie furono soddisfatte ed era impossibile per fare all'estero i pagamenti a causa dell'assenza di un trattato o accordo reciproco che il richiedente aveva saputo o avrebbe dovuto sapere.
61. Il richiedente non fu d'accordo col Governo, mentre dibattendo che Croatia aveva riconosciuto il suo diritto a pagamento dello YPA pensione militare e che non c'era stata base legale per i pagamenti per essere fermatosi.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
62. Avendo riguardo ad alle parti gli argomenti di ', la Corte considera che la questione di se c'è una proprietà nella causa presente è collegato inestricabilmente alla questione di se c'è stata un'interferenza, una questione per essere esaminato nel contesto della considerazione della Corte dei meriti della causa. La Corte considera inoltre che gli aumenti applicativi problemi complessi di fatto e diritto che non può essere risolto a questo stadio nell'esame della richiesta (veda, mutatis mutandis, Malik c. il Regno Unito, n. 23780/08, § 100 13 marzo 2012). Si unisce perciò alla questione ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo di proprietà del richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. Personae di ratione di compatibilità
(un) Le parti gli argomenti di '
63. Il Governo si riferì alla causa-legge in Banković ed Altri c. il Belgio ed Altri (il dec.) [GC], n. 52207/99, § 60 ECHR 2001-XII, dibattendo che quando lui si trasferì a Serbia il richiedente perso qualsiasi collegamento territoriale con Croatia e venne alla giurisdizione di Serbia sotto.
64. Il richiedente non mise in avanti argomenti in questo riguardo.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
65. In prospettiva di tutte le circostanze della causa presente, ed il materiale disponibile di fronte a sé, ed il fatto che il richiedente si lamenta che la sua pensione non fu pagata all'estero con autorità croate benché simile obbligo esistesse sotto la legge nazionale ed un trattato internazionale, la Corte considera che l'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere respinta.
3. L'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali ed ottemperanza col tempo-limite di sei-mese
(un) Le parti gli argomenti di '
66. Il Governo dibattè che il definitivo nazionale corteggia la decisione di ' nella causa del richiedente era stato la decisione della Corte amministrativa di 8 marzo 2007 che era stato notificato sul richiedente 27 aprile 2007 ed il richiedente aveva depositato la sua richiesta con la Corte più che sei mesi più tardi, vale a dire ad agosto 2010. Il Governo considerò che il richiedente non era riuscito a lamentarsi nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale di 11 maggio 2007 di qualsiasi violazione dei suoi diritti umani ed aveva chiesto solamente la Corte Costituzionale una revisione dei procedimenti amministrativi. Nella loro prospettiva, il tempo-limite di sei-mese non poteva cominciare perciò, dal servizio della decisione della Corte Costituzionale sul richiedente in 21 maggio 2010. Inoltre, il Governo indicò che il pagamento della pensione del richiedente era stato ripreso 20 gennaio 2005 e che perciò il tempo-limite di sei-mese dovrebbe essere calcolato da che data che volle dire che il richiedente aveva depositato la sua richiesta con la Corte fuori dei sei mesi.
67. Il Governo sottolineò anche che durante i procedimenti amministrativi, e nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, il richiedente aveva contestato solamente la richiesta del diritto nazionale attinente e non si era lamentato mai che i suoi diritti di Convenzione erano stati violati. Nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale il richiedente si era lamentato solamente dell'arresto del pagamento della sua pensione e chiese che le decisioni dei corpi amministrativi siano annullate ed il pagamento della sua pensione ricapitolò. Il Governo indicò anche che il richiedente non si era lamentato mai che i suoi diritti di proprietà erano stati violati o che lui era stato discriminato contro in che riguardo, e determinato che lui non era riuscito a citare le disposizioni attinenti del diritto nazionale. Nella loro prospettiva, il richiedente non era riuscito perciò, ad esaurire i disponibili e via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive, e non era riuscito di conseguenza ad attenersi col principio di sussidiarietà.
68. Il richiedente considerò che lui aveva esaurito via di ricorso nazionali e del tutto disponibili e si era attenuto col tempo-limite di sei-mese.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
69. La Corte reitera che i requisiti contennero in Articolo 35 § 1 riguardo all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali ed il periodo di sei-mese è collegato da vicino, poiché non solo è loro combinarono nello stesso Articolo, ma loro sono espressi anche in una sola frase la cui costruzione grammaticale implica tale correlazione (veda Hatjianastasiou c. la Grecia, n. 12945/87, decisione di Commissione di 4 aprile 1990 e Berdzenishvili c. la Russia (il dec.), n. 31697/03, ECHR 2004-II (gli estratti)).
70. Come un articolo, il periodo di sei-mese funziona dalla data della definitivo decisione nell'elaborazione dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali. Articolo che 35 § 1 non può essere interpretato in una maniera che costringerebbe un richiedente ad informare la Corte della sua azione di reclamo di fronte alla sua posizione in collegamento con la questione infine è stato stabilito al livello nazionale. In questo riguardo a, la Corte già ha sostenuto che per attenersi col principio di sussidiarietà, prima di portare azioni di reclamo contro Croatia ai richiedenti di Corte è in principio richiesto per riconoscere la Corte Costituzionale croata l'opportunità di rimediare alla loro situazione (veda Orlić c. Croatia, n. 48833/07, § 46 21 giugno 2011).
71. La Corte nota che nel corso dei procedimenti amministrativi riguardo alla pensione del richiedente, dopo che l'ufficio di Dubrovnik del Pensione Fondo croato aveva fermato di pagare la sua pensione il richiedente depositò un ricorso col Ricorso Consiglio del Consiglio Esecutivo del Pensione Fondo croato, mentre dibattendo che non c'era stata base legale per fermare i suoi pagamenti di pensione (veda paragrafo 29 sopra). Nella sua azione amministrativa di fronte alla Corte amministrativa contro mancanza di azione da parte dei corpi amministrativi e più bassi (veda divide in paragrafi 30 e 31 sopra) e nella sua azione amministrativa contro la decisione di secondo-istanza del Pensione Fondo croato (veda paragrafo 37 sopra), il richiedente sollevò gli stessi argomenti, mentre lamentandosi dell'arresto arbitrario del pagamento della sua pensione. Inoltre, il richiedente reiterò le stesse azioni di reclamo nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, indicando che non c'era stata base legale per fermare il pagamento della sua pensione, e che le circostanze della causa mostrarono che lui non aveva avuto l'uguaglianza di trattamento di fronte alla legge (veda paragrafo 39 sopra). Così, il richiedente sollevò di fronte alle autorità nazionali le stesse azioni di reclamo che sono l'essenza dei suoi argomenti di fronte alla Corte.
72. Il definitivo nazionale corteggia la decisione di ' fu adottata 11 marzo 2010 con la Corte Costituzionale e notificò sul richiedente in 21 maggio 2010, ed il richiedente depositò la sua richiesta con la Corte 24 agosto 2010, così all'interno del tempo-limite di sei-mese. Come riguardi l'argomento del Governo che il tempo-limite di sei-mese dovrebbe essere calcolato da 20 gennaio 2005, quando il pagamento della pensione del richiedente fu ripreso, la Corte non vede l'attinenza di questa data al calcolo del tempo-limite di sei-mese, fin dalla riassunzione dei pagamenti del richiedente da 20 gennaio 2005 non ha compensato per i pagamenti non resi, né l'ha qualsiasi l'altro collegamento con le azioni di reclamo del richiedente dell'arresto del pagamento delle sue tredici rate di pensione prima di che data, in riguardo del quale si lamentò il richiedente.
73. Contro lo sfondo sopra, i costatazione di Corte che le eccezioni del Governo devono essere respinte.
4. L'abuso del diritto della richiesta individuale
(un) Le parti gli argomenti di '
74. Il Governo presentò che nel frattempo il richiedente si era trasferito a Serbia, dove lui sta vivendo sin da allora. A febbraio 2012 lui richiese che la sua pensione sia pagata in Serbia, ed il Pensione Fondo croato accordò quel la richiesta. Di conseguenza, la pensione del richiedente è stata pagata col Pensione Fondo croato a lui in Serbia fin da marzo 2012. Il Governo indicò che il richiedente non era riuscito ad informare la Corte di questo cambio, e considerato che questo corrispose abusare del diritto della richiesta individuale.
75. Il richiedente non fece argomenti in questo riguardo.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
76. La Corte reitera che se sviluppi nuovi, importanti accadono durante procedimenti di fronte alla Corte e se, nonostante l'obbligazione espressa su lui o lei sotto Articolo 47 § 6 degli Articoli della Corte, un richiedente non riesce a rivelare che informazioni alla Corte, impedendogli con ciò dal decidere sulla causa nella piena conoscenza dei fatti, suo o la sua richiesta può essere respinta come un abuso della richiesta (veda Harbadová ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca (il dec.), N. 42165/02, 466/03 25 settembre 2007; Predescu c. la Romania, n. 21447/03, §§ 25-27 2 dicembre 2008; e Miroïubovs ed Altri c. la Lettonia, n. 798/05, § 63 15 settembre 2009).
77. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo presenti del richiedente concernono il periodo di che che lui afferma era un arresto arbitrario del pagamento della sua pensione fra ottobre 2003 e novembre 2004, e che lui era stato discriminato contro in quel il riguardo. Perciò, rimane per la Corte per esaminare se di periodo detto l'arresto del pagamento della pensione del richiedente era infatti arbitrario, e se lui è stato discriminato contro. In riguardo di queste azioni di reclamo non è stato sviluppo nuovo ed attinente, e riguardo ad essere aveva al fatto che le informazioni trattennero presumibilmente sviluppi nuovi e solamente riguardati che erano accaduti significativamente più tardi che il tempo quando i pagamenti di pensione del richiedente si furono fermati, la Corte non trova stabilì che il richiedente incagliò intenzionalmente le sue azioni di reclamo su una versione di eventi che omisero qualsiasi evento dell'importanza centrale (veda, mutatis mutandis, Al-Nashif c. la Bulgaria, n. 50963/99, § 89 20 giugno 2002; Adamović c. Serbia, n. 41703/06, § 34 2 ottobre 2012). Questo è, inoltre, così, perché il richiedente non tentò mai di negare o fornire ad informazioni false in collegamento il fatto che lui stava ricevendo la sua pensione in Serbia da marzo 2012.
78. Perciò, la Corte considera che l'eccezione del Governo deve essere respinta.
5. Conclusione
79. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
1. Violazione allegato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo
(un) Le parti gli argomenti di '
80. Il richiedente contese che l'arresto del pagamento delle tredici rate di pensione nel periodo fra il 2003 e 1 novembre 2004 di 1 ottobre era stato arbitrario, in che non c'era stata nessuna base legale per giustificarlo. Lui spiegò che lui era un YPA pensionato militare che era andato in pensione sotto il SFRY precedente assegni una pensione a regime. Dopo l'indipendenza di Croatia lui aveva fatto domanda comunque, per la sua pensione per essere riconosciuto in Croatia e le autorità di pensione nazionali e competenti, vale a dire i Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ', 12 dicembre 1992 aveva riconosciuto il suo diritto per ricevere pagamenti di pensione dalle autorità croate. Quando facendo domanda per una pensione in Croatia lui aveva soddisfatto tutti i requisiti giuridici, incluso che di essere stabilito la residenza in Croatia. Con la promulgazione dell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione del 1998 le pensioni militari di YPA precedente che personale militare era stato incorporato nel piano assicurativo di pensione generale in Croatia, e così lui aveva avuto lo stesso status come qualsiasi l'altro pensionato in Croatia.
81. Ad ottobre 1998, lui aveva visitato nel frattempo, suo figlio in Belgrade, Serbia ed aveva deciso di sospendere là. La sua pensione fu pagata poi a lui per un rappresentante in Croatia. A giugno 2003, dopo l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale di 15 settembre 1997 era entrato in vigore, il richiedente fece domanda per la sua pensione per essere pagato in Serbia. L'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale aveva aperto su una possibilità per pensioni da Croatia essere pagato in Serbia nella sua prospettiva, e viceversa, e non c'era stata nessuna base legale per trattare differentemente la sua pensione militare, poiché era stato incorporato nello schema di pensione generale, e tutti gli articoli applicabile a pensioni sarebbe dovuto essere direttamente applicabile a pensioni militari. Le autorità di pensione croate avevano fermato arbitrariamente comunque, il pagamento della sua pensione, mentre dibattendo che l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale non fece domanda a YPA pensioni militari. Perciò, lui era stato costretto per ritornare a Croatia ad ottobre 2004, ed il pagamento della sua pensione era ripreso da 1 novembre 2004. Infine, il richiedente presentò che due altre disposizioni di diritto internazionale erano state applicabili alla sua situazione, vale a dire Annexe E dell'Accordo su Successione Emette ed Articolo 10 di ILO Convenzione 48.
82. Il Governo presentò che era stato necessario per fare una distinzione chiara fra diritto ad una pensione militare e diritto a pagamento di pensioni militari a YPA precedente personale militare. Il diritto del richiedente ad una pensione era stato riconosciuto con le autorità di SFRY precedenti, e Croatia aveva ammesso solamente che fatto e continuò a pagare la pensione. Il richiedente era stato concesso per ricevere all'estero solamente la pensione sotto sezione 88 dell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione. Nelle altre parole, il richiedente avrebbe ricevuto la sua pensione come lungo come lui visse in Croatia o in uno dei paesi in riguardo del quale era possibile ricevere pagamenti da Croatia. Invece, il richiedente si era trasferito a Serbia col quale non aveva reso Croatia qualsiasi disposizione per pagamento di pensioni militari all'estero, e con cui non c'era accordo reciproco, e Serbia aveva mantenuto un sistema di pensione separato per pensionati militari. Nella prospettiva del Governo, il richiedente si aveva perciò, creato una situazione nella quale lui aveva cessato soddisfare i requisiti del diritto nazionale per ricevere la sua pensione, e di conseguenza lui non aveva proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Allo stesso tempo, tutti questo sarebbe dovuto essere conosciuto bene al richiedente, fin dall'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione ed il Trattato dell'Assicurazione della Pensione era stato pubblicato nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi e sull'Internet e perciò accessibile a lui. Il fatto che lui aveva interpretato male il diritto nazionale attinente che nella prospettiva del Governo lui lui era anche consapevole di, non aveva cambiato il fatto che lui e lui erano responsabili per la cessazione di pagamento della sua pensione da solo. La speranza mera che lui aveva avuto che la pensione sarebbe pagata in Serbia non aveva base nel diritto nazionale attinente. Questo è inoltre così poiché lui non era riuscito a fare l'enquiries necessario delle autorità competenti come a se c'era tale possibilità.
83. Il Governo dibattè inoltre che, se la Corte fondasse che il richiedente aveva avuto proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, l'interferenza con le sue proprietà era stata legale, aveva intrapreso un scopo legittimo ed era stata proporzionato. Riguardo alla legalità dell'interferenza, il Governo indicò, che Croatia era stato d'accordo a pagare YPA pensioni militari certe condizioni che erano anche sotto più flessibile che le condizioni esposero più tardi fuori nel Successione Accordo. Riferendosi alla causa-legge in Carson ed Altri (citò sopra) il Governo dibattè che il pagamento di pensioni era stato all'estero solamente possibile sotto un trattato o un accordo reciproco che erano requisiti legittimi del diritto nazionale all'interno del margine dello Stato della valutazione. Non c'erano stati all'estero nessun trattato internazionale o accordo reciproco con Serbia su pagamento di YPA pensioni militari, ed il malinteso del richiedente della legge attinente, notevolmente l'Assicurazione Accordo Sociale non aveva avuto nascendo in questo riguardo. Da allora al tempo Serbia non stava pagando pensioni a YPA pensionati militari che vivono in Croatia, la sega Statale nessuna ragione perché Croatia dovrebbe stare pagando simile pensioni in Serbia. Nella prospettiva del Governo, le autorità nazionali sufficientemente avevano discusso le loro decisioni quando respingendo la richiesta del richiedente, e sembrò dalle sue osservazioni alla Corte che lui si aveva capì la situazione intera. Il Governo indicò anche che il richiedente aveva cittadinanza duplice, croato e serbo, e che era stato aperto a lui per fare domanda alle autorità serbe per una pensione. Comunque, lui non era riuscito a fare così, ed era ritornato poi più tardi a Croatia, mentre seguendo il pagamento della sua pensione fu ripreso quale fin dal prima impedimenti esistenti erano stati rimossi. Il Governo presentò anche che Annexe E dell'Accordo su Successione Problemi non era applicabile alla situazione del richiedente al tempo, poiché era entrato solamente più tardi in vigore. In qualsiasi l'evento, sotto che Accordo l'obbligo per pagare la pensione del richiedente era stato su Serbia. Il Governo considerò anche che ILO Convenzione 48 non era applicabile alla causa del richiedente, poiché concernè sistemi di pensione contribuente, ed il richiedente non era stato un membro di tale schema in Croatia.
84. Come riguardi l'interferenza allegato che è nell'interesse pubblico, il Governo indicò che lo Stato aveva un margine ampio della valutazione in questo riguardo, e che l'interesse pubblico nel limitare le condizioni per pagamento di YPA pensioni militari era stato giustificato primariamente col fatto che Croatia, mentre patendo gli effetti della guerra al tempo, stava pagando pensioni a migliaia di simile pensionati, benché loro non avessero pagato mai contributi in Croatia. Il Governo dibattè anche, mentre reiterando i loro argomenti che non c'erano nessun trattato o accordo reciproco con Serbia sul problema, che il richiedente in questa causa non aveva sopportato un carico individuale ed eccessivo, poiché lui era in grado ricevere la sua pensione per un rappresentante in Croatia senza il coinvolgimento del sistema di pensione. Loro indicarono che il richiedente non aveva perso mai il suo diritto ad una pensione, e che il pagamento della sua pensione era stato ripreso una volta lui era ritornato a Croatia. In qualsiasi l'evento, addirittura sotto il Successione Accordo, il richiedente si era trasferito una volta a Serbia, in prospettiva del fatto che lui aveva anche cittadinanza serba, il richiedente avrebbe avuto diritto a ricevere una pensione da Serbia e non Croatia.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
(i) principi di Generale
85. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non crea un diritto per acquisire proprietà. Non mette restrizione sugli Stati Contraenti la libertà di ' decidere se avere in posto o no qualsiasi forma della previdenza sociale o sistema di pensione, o scegliere il tipo o importo di benefici o assegnare una pensione a prevedere sotto qualsiasi simile schema. Comunque, dove un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di un beneficio di welfare o pensione-se condizionale o non sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione che genera un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti deve essere considerata. Perciò, dove l'importo di un beneficio o pensione è ridotto o è eliminato, questo può costituire un'interferenza con proprietà che costringono ad essere giustificate nell'interesse generale (veda Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.) [GC], n. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 54 ECHR 2005-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39 ECHR 2004-IX; e Valkov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04 19490/04, 19495/04 19497/04, 24729/04 171/05 e 2041/05, § 84 25 ottobre 2011).
86. Comunque, dove la persona riguardata non soddisfa, o cessa soddisfare, le condizioni legali posarono in giù in diritto nazionale per la concessione di qualsiasi la particolare forma di benefici o assegna una pensione a, non c'è interferenza coi diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 76 28 aprile 2009; e Richardson c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 26252/08, §§ 17-18 10 aprile 2012). Infine, la Corte osserva che il fatto che una persona è entrata in e parte di forme di un sistema di previdenza sociale Statale non vuole dire necessariamente che che sistema non può essere cambiato o come alle condizioni dell'eleggibilità di pagamento o come al quantum del beneficio o pensione (veda, mutatis mutandis, Carson ed Altri [GC], citato sopra, §§ 85-89).
(l'ii) la Richiesta di questi principi alla causa presente
87. La Corte osserva in primo luogo che non c'è controversia fra le parti che il pagamento dello YPA del richiedente che pensione militare, ottenuta sotto la legislazione di assicurazione di pensione attinente del SFRY precedente è stata accettata come un obbligo delle autorità di pensione croate, prima con suo di transizione, e poi con suo generale, legislazione di pensione. Siccome suggerito col Governo, il pagamento della pensione del richiedente è soggetto a certe condizioni uno di che erano residenza in Croatia o qualsiasi l'altro paese col quale Croatia aveva all'estero un accordo reciproco o un trattato su pagamento di pensioni. La questione sorge perciò se il richiedente soddisfece le condizioni necessarie per il pagamento della sua pensione. In prospettiva del principio che c'è nessuno diritto sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per ricevere un beneficio di previdenza sociale o pagamento di pensione di qualsiasi il genere o corrisponde, a meno che legge nazionale prevede per simile diritto (veda, per esempio, Raviv c. l'Austria, n. 26266/05, § 61 13 marzo 2012), il problema centrale che rimane per la Corte per determinare è se il richiedente soddisfece tutti i requisiti sotto la legislazione di pensione croata ed attinente al tempo, generando un diritto di proprietà per ricevere pagamento della sua pensione in Serbia. O, nelle altre parole, se c'era una base legale e sufficiente nella legislazione nazionale croata per il richiedente chiedere il pagamento della sua pensione in Serbia (veda Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 54 ECHR 2004-IX).
88. Una risposta negativa a questa questione condurrà di conseguenza la Corte ad una sentenza che l'arresto del pagamento della pensione del richiedente, come un risultato di condizioni che lui si era creato non ha corrisposto ad un'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 determinato che il richiedente non avrebbe un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda Carson ed Altri [GC], citato sopra, § 57).
89. Comunque, con contrasto, se i costatazione di Corte come che il richiedente ha soddisfatto i requisiti esposti fuori con la legislazione di pensione croata ed attinente, poi l'arresto del pagamento della pensione del richiedente con le autorità nazionali sarà considerato un'interferenza con la proprietà del richiedente interessa come che non era in conformità con la legge richiesto sotto la Convenzione. Tale conclusione lo costituirà non necessario la Corte accertare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo nel trovare una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1 (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 62 ECHR 1999-II).
90. La Corte reitera nel primo posto che ad un margine ampio è concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione come riguardi misure generali della strategia economica o sociale di solito (veda Stec ed Altri, citato sopra, § 52) quale vuole dire che lo Stato ha un margine ampio della valutazione nella promulgazione di qualche genere di statuto e nell'interpretazione di simile statuti con le corti nazionali (veda, mutatis mutandis, Von Maltzan ed Altri c. la Germania (il dec.) [GC], N. 71916/01, 71917/01 e 10260/02, § 101 il 2005-V di ECHR). Comunque, questo non esclude il potere della Corte per fare una rassegna a che misura simile legislazione è specifica e prevedibile (veda Caytas c. la Turchia (il dec.), N. 25409/04, 19647/06 22505/06, 22514/06 31463/07, 62002/08 e 14842/09 29 settembre 2009) e con che grado della chiarezza concede la costituzione di se la situazione del richiedente incorre all'interno delle disposizioni della legge attinente (compari Von Maltzan ed Altri, citato sopra, § 98). Perciò, la Corte deve soddisfarsi che la legislazione che regola le condizioni per pagamento della pensione è chiara, precisa e prevedibile con riguardo ad agli specifici requisiti giuridici (veda Croitoru c. la Romania (il dec.), n. 3205/03, 14 settembre 2010).
91. Come riguardi i requisiti di residenza, la Corte non può in sostituto di principio la sua prospettiva per che delle autorità nazionali come a se un individuo si attiene con simile requisiti, così lungo come le decisioni delle autorità nazionali non riveli qualsiasi l'arbitrarietà, sufficientemente è ragionato, e, se appropriato, offra riferimenti alla causa-legge nazionale ed attinente e pratica (veda Jantner c. la Slovacchia, n. 39050/97, §§ 30-32, 4 marzo 2003, e Kopecký citato sopra, § 56). Alla Corte non è impedita inoltre, dell'esaminare la maniera nella quale accordi internazionali su politica sociale e pensioni hanno colpito la situazione di un individuo al livello nazionale (veda Tarkoev ed Altri c. l'Estonia, N. 14480/08 e 47916/08, §§ 61-65 4 novembre 2010). In questo riguardo la Corte reitera che è primariamente per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti, interpretare e fare domanda diritto nazionale anche quando che legge si riferisce a diritto internazionale o accordi. In ogni istanza, comunque il ruolo della Corte è confinato ad accertando se gli effetti di simile aggiudicazione sono compatibili con la Convenzione (veda Bosforo Hava Yolları Turizm ve Ticaret Anonim Şirketi c. l'Irlanda [GC], n. 45036/98, § 143 ECHR 2005-VI).
92. La Corte nota che seguendo la risoluzione del SFRY precedente, le pensioni militari di YPA precedente personale militare fu regolato in Croatia sotto legislazione di transizione, vale a dire un Atto che incorpora la legislazione di SFRY precedente sulla questione nell'ordinamento giuridico croato (veda paragrafo 46 sopra). Un'ulteriore misura provvisoria mirata ad assistendo la transizione era una Repubblica di Croatia Governo Decreto, mentre prevedendo per pagamenti anticipati di pensioni a persone che soddisfecero i requisiti attinenti uno di che erano residenza in Croatia (veda paragrafo 47 sopra). In parallelo con la legislazione di transizione su YPA pensioni militari, pensioni civili riferite allo schema di pensione di SFRY precedente furono regolate con legislazione di transizione e separata (veda paragrafo 48 sopra). Comunque, lo stesso corpo, vale a dire i Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ', era tasked col facendo le disposizioni necessarie in ambo le cause.
93. Riguardo alla particolare situazione del richiedente attinente a questo periodo, la Corte osserva, che 7 luglio 1992 l'Ufficio di Dubrovnik dei Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' riconobbe il diritto del richiedente a pagamento anticipato del suo YPA pensione militare, dopo che aveva trovato che il richiedente soddisfece i requisiti necessari, incluso residenza in che lui visse in Dubrovnik, Croatia. Inoltre, lo stesso corpo statale, agendo ex l'officio, sul 1992 set di 12 dicembre il livello della pensione del richiedente ed ordinò che la pensione sia pagata al richiedente come lungo come lui soddisfece i requisiti necessari (veda divide in paragrafi 22-24 sopra).
94. La Corte nota inoltre che la legislazione di transizione riguardo a YPA pensioni militari furono abrogate con l'Esercito Personale Pensione Atto delle 1993 Persone iugoslave Precedenti. Sotto che Atto Croatia si prese la responsabilità per pagamento di YPA pensioni militari a persone che soddisfano i requisiti necessari uno di che erano residenza in Croatia. I Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' era tasked con esecuzione dell'Atto (veda paragrafo 49 sopra).
95. In 1998, per riforma di pensione legislativa in Croatia l'Esercito Personale Pensione Atto delle Persone iugoslave fu abrogato comunque, con la promulgazione dell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione che infine YPA registrato pensioni militari nello schema di pensione generale croato. Che conclusione, oltre al fatto che legislazione separata su YPA pensioni militari non esisterono più, anche segue dal seguente. L'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione, in sezione 186 anni pensionabili e riconosciuti di lavoro nel periodo prima di 8 ottobre 1991 acquisito sotto la legislazione di SFRY precedente su pensioni militari come anni pensionabili di lavoro per essere riconosciuto quando ottenendo una pensione sotto l'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione. Inoltre, l'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione, in sezione 152 § 1, purché che i mezzi per pagamento di pensioni a YPA pensionati militari dovrebbero essere garantiti nel bilancio di Croatia, e che i contributi necessari dovrebbero essere pagati su una base mensile. L'esecuzione dell'Atto fu assegnata al Pensione Fondo croato, un corpo che sostituisce i Repubblica Lavoratori Fondo di ' che aveva cessato esistere. Di periodo attinente alla causa presente, l'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione fu corretto molte volte. L'emendamento di 29 novembre 2001 ridotto l'importo di YPA rate di pensione militari. L'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione, incluso i suoi emendamenti non espose mai fuori qualsiasi requisiti speciali per il pagamento di pensioni a YPA precedente personale militare (veda divide in paragrafi 51-53 sopra).
96. La Corte nota inoltre che la cooperazione fra Croatia e Serbia su questioni di pensione dopo che la risoluzione del SFRY precedente fu regolata inizialmente con l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale che entrò in vigore in 1 maggio 2003. Questo Trattato elencò la legislazione che concernè, incluso legislazione di assicurazione di pensione ed ogni altra legislazione “integrando, mentre correggendo o completando” legislazione di assicurazione di pensione. In Articolo 3 affermò espressamente che fece domanda “tutte le persone a chi la legislazione attinente di uno o sia degli Stati contraenti fa domanda o ha fatto domanda.” Uno del set di principi fuori in questo Trattato previde che assegna una pensione a sotto la legislazione attinente di uno degli Stati contraenti non poteva essere fermatosi o altrimenti potrebbe essere colpito avversamente per motivi della residenza del beneficiario. L'autorità nazionale e competente in Croatia sotto questo Trattato era il Pensione Fondo croato (veda paragrafo 54 sopra).
97. Come alla particolare situazione del richiedente in prospettiva degli sviluppi sopra nella sfera di legislazione di pensione, la Corte nota, che a giugno 2003 il richiedente informò il Pensione Fondo croato che lui aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Belgrade, Serbia e chiese la sua pensione per essere pagato là. Comunque, il Pensione Fondo croato, agendo sulla richiesta del richiedente pagamento fermato della sua pensione per motivi che l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale non coprì YPA pensioni militari, e che non c'era accordo reciproco con Serbia in quel il riguardo. Ulteriori via di ricorso usate col richiedente di fronte a corpi amministrativi e più alti e la Corte amministrativa con le quali lui dibattè che il suo YPA pensione militare era stata incorporata nello schema di pensione generale e che non c'era stata nessuna ragione di fermare la sua pensione, fu respinto con le stesse ragioni riassuntive.
98. Le ragioni riassuntive previste con le autorità nazionali senza qualsiasi lo specifico riferimento alle azioni di reclamo del richiedente, attinente nazionale corteggia la causa-legge di ' o qualsiasi autorità nazionali ' pratica (veda, con contrasto, Jantner, citato sopra, § 30), così come l'assenza di un'analisi affidò con la complessità dei problemi associata coi problemi di disposizioni di transizione per un sistema di pensione militare e federale dopo la risoluzione del SFRY precedente e la sua integrazione nei sistemi di pensione delle repubbliche di SFRY precedenti, sufficientemente non può soddisfare la Corte per abilitarlo per accettare l'argomento del Governo che con cambiando la sua residenza a Serbia il richiedente aveva perso il suo diritto di proprietà per ricevere i pagamenti di pensione (veda, con contrasto, Jantner, citato sopra, § 33).
99. Specificamente, come già indicato sopra, la Corte considera che lo YPA del richiedente che pensione militare è stata incorporata nello schema di pensione croato con la promulgazione dell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione nel 1998. Che Atto accantonò la legislazione precedente sulla questione che fece pagamenti di pensione condizionale, inter l'alia, su residenza in Croatia e non espose fuori qualsiasi requisiti speciali per YPA pensionati militari come al loro diritto per ricevere pagamenti di pensione.
100. Comunque, presumendo anche che residenza in Croatia continuò ad essere anche un requisito per il pagamento della pensione del richiedente dopo la promulgazione dell'Atto dell'Assicurazione della Pensione che requisito non è sembrato più attinente per quelli pensionati che si trasferirono a Serbia, una volta l'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale era stato incorporato nell'ordinamento giuridico croato.
101. In questo riguardo la Corte nota in primo luogo che sotto la Costituzione croata accordi internazionali hanno su precedenza in termini dei loro effetti legali statuti nazionali (veda paragrafo 44 sopra), e che ratificando la Convenzione di Vienna sulla Legge di Trattati Croatia l'obbligo si impegnò non impedire il suo obbligo per compiere un trattato internazionale con citando disposizioni della sua legge interna. L'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale con Serbia non escluse espressamente la sua richiesta a YPA pensioni militari che erano state riconosciute ed erano state incorporate nella legislazione di pensione generale dei rispettivi paesi. Riguardo alla sua applicabilità, assegnò inoltre, a “tutte le persone” a chi legislazione e l'altra legislazione assegnano una pensione a “integrando, mentre correggendo o completando” legislazione di pensione primaria fece domanda, ed indicò il Pensione Fondo croato come l'autorità nazionale e competente in Croatia; lo stesso corpo che era responsabile di pagamento della pensione del richiedente (veda paragrafo 54 sopra).
102. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi ragioni al contrario previdero con le autorità di pensione nazionali, la Corte considera perciò, che il richiedente cui YPA che pensione militare era stata incorporata nello schema di pensione generale, aveva ogni ragione di appellarsi sull'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale, incorporata debitamente nel sistema nazionale mentre previde che pagamenti di pensione dovrebbero essere continuati, irrispettoso della sua residenza (veda, mutatis mutandis, Brezovec c. Croatia, n. 13488/07, § 68 29 marzo 2011). I cambi della residenza del richiedente a Serbia non potevano estinguere prevedibilmente di conseguenza, il suo diritto per chiedere il pagamento della sua pensione, come previsto sotto il diritto nazionale attinente.
103. L'argomento che al tempo Serbia non stava pagando pensioni a YPA pensionati militari in Croatia, siccome suggerì il Governo rispondente, era irrilevante in questo riguardo, fin da Articolo 5 dell'Assicurazione Trattato Sociale garantito che le pensioni non potessero essere “ridotto, si fermò, sequestrò o confiscò sulla base di residenza sul territorio di uno degli Stati contraenti” anche senza qualsiasi l'ulteriore azione con le autorità nazionali necessario fare questa disposizione operativo (veda paragrafo 54 sopra).
104. In prospettiva delle sentenze sopra, la Corte considera, che quando fermando pagamento della pensione del richiedente per motivi che lui aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Serbia che non era sufficientemente prevedibile come una conseguenza nel diritto nazionale attinente le autorità di pensione nazionali e competenti aveva interferito con la proprietà del richiedente interessa in violazione del principio della legalità e di conseguenza incompatibile col diritto del richiedente a godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
105. Tale situazione persistè sino a 2 giugno 2004 quando Annexe E dell'Accordo su Successione Emette fra le repubbliche di SFRY precedenti entrò in vigore. Annexe E che in particolare trattò con questioni di pensione, per pensionati con cittadinanza duplice come il richiedente (croato e serbo) di chi pensioni erano state procurate dal SFRY precedente bilancio federale, purché per l'obbligo per pagamento della pensione sullo Stato in che che persona fu stabilita la residenza (veda paragrafo 55 sopra). Da allora a che tempo il richiedente aveva domicilio in Serbia (veda divide in paragrafi 27 e 33 sopra) segue che poiché il 2004 Croatia di 2 giugno non aveva più la responsabilità per il pagamento della sua pensione.
106. La Corte respinge perciò l'eccezione preliminare del Governo prima aveva congiunto ai meriti (paragrafo 62 sopra) e costatazione che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 come riguardi l'arresto del pagamento della pensione del richiedente nel periodo fra il 2003 e 2 giugno 2004 di 1 ottobre.
2. Violazione allegato di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
(un) Le parti gli argomenti di '
107. Il richiedente contese che l'arresto del pagamento del suo YPA pensione militare nel periodo fra il 2003 e 1 novembre 2004 di 1 ottobre era stata fatta a causa della sua origine etnica serba ed il fatto che lui aveva cambiato la sua residenza a Serbia.
108. Il Governo presentò, mentre appellandosi sulla causa-legge della Corte in Raviv c. l'Austria, n. 26266/05, 13 marzo 2012 che il richiedente non aveva pagato mai qualsiasi contributi ad un fondo pensioni in Croatia e perciò lui non era nella stessa posizione come gli altri beneficiari di pensione che stavano pagando contributi in Croatia. Nella prospettiva del Governo, non era stato perciò, problema sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1. Inoltre, il Governo indicò che la legislazione nazionale riguardo al pagamento di pensioni non distinse all'estero fra beneficiari di pensione su qualsiasi base, incluso la loro nazionalità, ethnicity o la natura del diritto di pensione. Tutti di loro, incluso YPA pensionati militari, aveva avuto le uguaglianze di opportunità per ottenere all'estero pagamento della loro pensione se c'erano stati un trattato bilaterale o accordo reciproco fra Croatia ed il loro paese di residenza. L'arresto di pagamenti di pensione in un paese con cui non c'era trattato o accordo reciproco era stato una conseguenza di una natura obiettiva e non la discriminazione su qualsiasi la base. In questo riguardo, Croatia non aveva fatto distinzione fra YPA pensionati militari e persone che stavano pagando contributi a fondi pensioni in Croatia. Perciò, il fatto che il richiedente non stava ricevendo la sua pensione in Serbia era una conseguenza del fatto che nessun accordo reciproco o trattato su pagamento di YPA pensioni militari esisterono fra Croatia e Serbia al tempo.
109. Inoltre, il Governo dibattè che non c'era stata discriminazione sulla base della residenza del richiedente. Le autorità croate non avevano tentato mai di influenzare la scelta del richiedente di una residenza o discriminare contro lui in che riguardo, ma era semplicemente obiettivamente impossibile per il suo YPA pensione militare per essere pagato in Serbia. Lui aveva fatto la sua scelta di residenza lui, ed il fatto che lui non era riuscito a fare enquiries corretto come alla possibilità di avere la sua pensione pagò in Serbia non poteva essere imputato a Croatia. Il Governo indicò che le autorità di pensione nazionali non avevano tenuto documenti dei beneficiari di pensione ethnicity di ' che li avrebbe abilitati per discriminare contro il richiedente su quel la base. Inoltre, né la legislazione di pensione né qualsiasi l'altra legislazione croata aveva previsto per ethnicity per essere un fattore attinente nell'ottenendo o perdere i certi diritti. Perciò, il Governo reiterò che l'arresto dei pagamenti di pensione del richiedente non era stato fatto come un risultato di una misura che fu mirata a qualsiasi il particolare gruppo.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
110. La Corte reitera che ha contenuto su molte occasioni che Articolo 14 non ha esistenza indipendente, ma ha un importante ruolo completando le altre disposizioni della Convenzione ed i Protocolli, poiché protegge individui messi in situazioni simili da qualsiasi la discriminazione nel godimento dei diritti insorse avanti quelle altre disposizioni. Dove un Articolo effettivo della Convenzione è stato citato, sia da solo ed insieme con Articolo 14, ed una violazione separata dell'Articolo effettivo è stata trovata, è neanche generalmente necessario per la Corte per considerare la causa sotto Articolo 14, sebbene la posizione è altrimenti se un'ineguaglianza chiara di trattamento nel godimento del diritto in oggetto è un aspetto fondamentale della causa (veda Dudgeon c. il Regno Unito, 22 ottobre 1981, § 67 la Serie Un n. 45; Chassagnou ed Altri c. la Francia [GC], N. 25088/94, 28331/95 e 28443/95, § 89 ECHR 1999-III; Herrmann c. la Germania [GC], n. 9300/07, § 104 26 giugno 2012; e Vistiņš e Perepjolkins c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 135 25 ottobre 2012).
111. Al giorno d'oggi causa che la Corte nota che né la legislazione nazionale né le decisioni delle autorità nazionali in qualsiasi modo si riferì all'ethnicity del richiedente quando fermando pagamento della sua pensione. Inoltre, il richiedente non contestò l'asserzione del Governo che le autorità di pensione nazionali non avevano registrato il suo ethnicity.
112. Come riguardi l'azione di reclamo del richiedente che il pagamento della sua pensione militare si è stato fermato perché lui si era trasferito a Serbia, la Corte è della prospettiva che l'azione di reclamo dell'ineguaglianza di trattamento in questo riguardo sufficientemente è stata presa in considerazione nella valutazione sopra che ha condotto alla sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso separatamente. Di conseguenza, trova che non c'è causa per un esame separato degli stessi fatti dal posto d'osservazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione (veda, mutatis mutandis, Vistiņš e Perepjolkins citato sopra, § 136).
II. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ALLEGATO DI LA CONVENZIONE
113. Infine, il richiedente si lamentò, mentre citando Articoli 3, 6 § 1, 13 e 17 della Convenzione che l'arresto della sua pensione ha corrisposto a trattamento degradante e che lui non aveva avuto procedimenti equi o una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva che concernono i suoi diritti di pensione.
114. Nella luce di tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come le questioni si lamentò di è all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte considera che questa parte della richiesta non rivela qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione della Convenzione. Segue che è manifestamente inammissibile sotto Articolo 35 § 3 come mal-fondò e deve essere respinto facendo seguito ad Article35 § 4 della Convenzione.
III. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
115. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
116. Nella sua richiesta iniziale il richiedente chiese 7,280 euros (EUR) e gli interessi di mora legali e relativi in riguardo di danno patrimoniale ed EUR 3,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. Lui non disse qualsiasi costi e spese.
117. Il Governo contestò quel la rivendicazione.
118. La Corte reitera che una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione le sue conseguenze. Se la legge nazionale non concede-o concede solamente parziale-riparazione per essere reso, Articolo 41 conferisce poteri la Corte per riconoscere la vittima simile soddisfazione siccome sembra a sé per essere appropriato (veda Iatridis c. la Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 32-33 ECHR 2000-XI).
119. Come riguardi la rivendicazione del richiedente per soddisfazione equa menzionata nel modulo di domanda, la Corte nota che sotto Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte un richiedente deve presentare una rivendicazione di soddisfazione equa all'interno del tempo-limite fissato per l'osservazione di suo o le sue osservazioni sui meriti. Il richiedente non chiese qualsiasi il danno quando invitò a fare così con la Corte (veda Trifković c. Croatia, n. 36653/09, § 146 6 novembre 2012). Così, la Corte non è in una posizione per assegnarlo qualsiasi l'importo in quel il riguardo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Congiunge ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo di proprietà del richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che l'eccezione del Governo ha basato su materiae di ratione di incompatibilità e rifiuti sé;

2. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione, ammissibile, ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo;

4. Sostiene che c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare separatamente l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

5. Sostiene che non c'è nessuna chiamata per assegnare la soddisfazione equa il richiedente.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 24 ottobre 2013, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 05/04/2021.