Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF WALLISHAUSER v. AUSTRIA (No. 2)

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, 35, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 14497/06/2013
STATO: Austria
DATA: 20/06/2013
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Remainder inadmissible
No violation of Article 14+6-1 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) (Article 6 - Right to a fair trial
Civil proceedings



FIRST SECTION






CASE OF WALLISHAUSER v. AUSTRIA (No. 2)

(Application no. 14497/06)








JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

20 June 2013




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Wallishauser v. Austria (No. 2),
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, President,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Ksenija Turković,
Dmitry Dedov, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 28 May 2013,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 14497/06) against the Republic of Austria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Austrian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 24 March 2006.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Vienna. The Austrian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ambassador H. Tichy, Head of the International Law Department at the Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged that the imposition on her, as an employee of the United States embassy in Vienna, of the entire amount of social security contributions, including the employer’s contributions due in respect of her salary for a given period, placed a disproportionate burden on her and thus violated her right to peaceful enjoyment of her possessions.
4. On 14 April 2009 the application was communicated to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1941 and lives in Vienna.
A. Background
6. The applicant had been an employee of the embassy of the United States of America in Vienna since March 1978. From January 1981 onwards she had a contract of indefinite duration and worked as a photographer at the embassy. Following an accident in 1983, the competent authority issued a decision stating that she qualified for protection under the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act (Invaliden¬einstellungs¬gesetz). The embassy dismissed her in September 1987, following a further accident in March of that year which was classified as work-related.
7. While the applicant was employed by the US embassy in Vienna, she registered herself as an employee under the social security system pursuant to section 35(4)(a) of the General Social Security Act (Allgemeines Sozialversicherungsgesetz). She paid both the employer’s and employee’s contributions to the social security system to the Vienna Health Insurance Board (Gebietskrankenkasse, “the Health Insurance Board”) until August 1988. In accordance with her contract of employment, the United States reimbursed the applicant the employer’s contribution, which amounted to 53% of the total social security contributions until November 1983. Subsequently, on the basis of administrative notices of the US embassy in Vienna of 21 April 1982 and 13 January 1984, the United States undertook to refund its employees the employer’s contributions in the amount of 55% of the total social security contributions, upon timely submission of the relevant statements of the Health Insurance Board. According to the applicant, the United States did so in her case until March 1987; however, according to the Government, the relevant date was August 1988.
8. The applicant’s dismissal was declared void by the Vienna Labour and Social Court (Arbeits- und Sozialgericht) on the grounds that it required the prior agreement of the competent authority under the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act. The court dismissed the argument submitted by the United States that it lacked jurisdiction on account of the country’s immunity. It found that, while foreign States enjoyed immunity with regard to acta iure imperii, they came within the jurisdiction of the domestic courts with regard to acta iure gestionis. The conclusion and performance of an employment contract fell within the latter category. The Supreme Court (Oberster Gerichthof) upheld that judgment on 21 November 1990, noting that the United States had not maintained the objection of State immunity in the further course of the proceedings.
9. As a result of the above proceedings, the applicant continued to have a valid employment contract with the Unites States’ embassy in Vienna. However, the latter refused to make use of her services.
10. The applicant brought proceedings against the United States requesting payment of her salary. In a first set of proceedings, concerning salary payments from 1 September 1988 to 30 June 1995, the United States unsuccessfully raised the objection of jurisdictional immunity. In compliance with a judgment of the Vienna Labour and Social Court of 14 July 1995, the United States paid the applicant a total amount of 3.7 million Austrian schillings (ATS – approximately 269,000 euros (EUR)), composed of some ATS 3 million (approximately EUR 224,000) for salary arrears plus staggered interest. As before, the salary payment corresponded to the applicant’s gross salary, including the employee’s contributions to the social security system, which she had to pay to the Health Insurance Board. On the occasion of the payment, the lawyer who had represented the United States in the proceedings informed the applicant by a letter of 16 October 1996 that the payment did not imply any acceptance of the Austrian courts’ judgments, that the United States considered her employment contract to be terminated and would, if she raised any further claims, “make use of its diplomatic rights and immunities”.
11. Further proceedings relating to the payment of salary from July 1995 to August 1996 led to a final default judgment by the Vienna Labour and Social Court. However, the United States did not pay the amount awarded to the applicant.
12. The applicant brought proceedings relating to salary payments from September 1996 onwards but they were also unsuccessful, as the US Department of State had refused to serve the relevant summons on the Department of Justice, which was competent to represent the United States in civil litigation. The Austrian courts held that the refusal to serve summons fell within the category of acta iure imperii. They concluded that the defendant had not been duly summoned and that they could not proceed with the applicant’s case. The Supreme Court confirmed that position in judgments delivered on 5 September 2001 and 7 May 2003. Those proceedings were the subject of application no. 156/04, Wallishauser v. Austria. In its judgment of 17 July 2012, the Court held that by accepting the United States’ refusal to serve the summonses in the applicant’s case as a sovereign act and by refusing, consequently, to proceed with the applicant’s case, the Austrian courts had impaired the very essence of the applicant’s right of access to court and had thus violated Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
B. Proceedings giving rise to the present application
13. On 17 March 1999 the Federal Ministry for Labour, Health and Social Security (Bundesministerium für Arbeit, Gesundheit und Soziales) issued a declaratory decision, holding that the applicant continued to be an employee within the meaning of section 4 of the General Social Security Act on account of her valid employment contract with the US embassy in Vienna (see paragraphs 8 and 9 above). Consequently, she was affiliated to the social security system.
14. Subsequently, the Health Insurance Board ordered the applicant to pay the employer’s and employee’s social security contributions for the period from 1 September 1988 to 30 June 1995, that is to say the period for which she had received salary payments (see paragraph 10 above). The applicant raised objections. As the Health Insurance Board failed to decide on them within the statutory time-limit, the applicant filed an application for transfer of jurisdiction (Devolutionsantrag).
15. In a decision of 7 June 2000 the Vienna Regional Governor ordered the applicant to pay the employer’s and employee’s social security contributions amounting to ATS 1,088,676.76 (EUR 79,117.22) in total, which were due for her employment at the US embassy in Vienna for the above-mentioned period. The decision relied on section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act, noting that the United States was an employer enjoying extraterritorial status and had not paid any social security contributions for the applicant during the period at issue. Finally, the Regional Governor found that in the circumstances of the case, no default interest was to be charged.
16. The applicant paid the employee’s contributions of ATS 502,631.67 (EUR 36,527.70). However, she appealed against the decision. In her appeal of 6 July 2000 she argued, in particular, that the US embassy had undertaken to pay the employer’s social security contributions and had laid down its obligation to do so in an administrative notice of 21 April 1982. In the applicant’s view, section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act did not apply, as her employer had agreed to pay the employer’s contribution. Instead the general rules should have been applied, namely section 51(3) of the said Act, which provided that social security contributions were to be borne in part by the employer and in part by the employee, and section 58(2), which provided that the employer was the contribution debtor for the entire amount of social security contributions vis-à-vis the Health Insurance Board. In the alternative, the applicant submitted that section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act violated the principle of equality before the law guaranteed by Article 7 of the Federal Constitution. Under public international law as it stood, the fulfilment of employment contracts fell within the category of acta iure gestionis and was thus not exempt from domestic jurisdiction. There was thus no objective reason for treating employees of an employer having extraterritorial status differently from other employees.
17. On 18 June 2001 the Federal Ministry for Social Security and Generations (Bundesministerium für soziale Sicherheit und Generationen) allowed the applicant’s appeal, holding that she did not have to pay the employer’s social security contributions for the period from 1 September 1988 to 30 June 1995. It noted, in particular, that the US embassy in Vienna, on the basis of an administrative notice of 21 April 1982, had concluded an agreement with its employees to reimburse the employer’s social security contributions amounting to 55% of the total contributions. It had constantly complied with that agreement, but had refused to reimburse the applicant following her accident in 1987. The Ministry found that the US embassy was obliged to pay the employer’s contributions for the applicant’s employment.
18. On 3 October 2001 the Constitutional Court refused to deal with the applicant’s complaint for lack of prospects of success and transferred the complaint to the Administrative Court (Verwaltungsgerichtshof).
19. In her complaint to the Administrative Court, the applicant maintained that section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act should not have been applied in her case. Instead the general rule of section 58(2) should have been applied, which provided that the employer was the contribution debtor for the entire amount of social security contributions. Consequently, she should not have been treated as the contribution debtor for the employee’s contributions either.
20. The Health Insurance Board also lodged a complaint with the Administrative Court, asserting that under section 53(3)(a) the applicant was obliged to pay both the employer’s and employee’s contributions.
21. On 15 March 2005 the Administrative Court, having joined both cases, upheld the Health Insurance Board’s complaint and quashed the Federal Ministry’s decision. It held that section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act applied in the present case, as the applicant’s employer enjoyed extraterritorial status and did not pay social security contributions. Referring to its case-law, the Administrative Court noted that section 53(3)(a), which required the employee to pay the entire amount of social security contributions, provided, firstly, for an exception from the rule laid down in section 51(3) of the General Social Security Act which provided that the contribution burden was to be shared between the employer and the employee. As a consequence, it also made the employee liable to pay the entire amount of contributions. The application of section 53(3)(a) was not excluded on account of the fact that the US embassy had given an undertaking to its employees to reimburse the employers’ contributions provided that certain requirements were met.
22. In a decision of 10 June 2005 the Federal Ministry for Social Security, Generations and Consumer Protection (Bundesministerium für soziale Sicherheit, Generationen und Konsumentenschutz) ordered the applicant to pay both the employee’s and employer’s social security contributions, in a total amount of EUR 79,177.22 for the period from 1 September 1988 to 30 June 1995. It relied on section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act, noting that the provision had been introduced in 1962. The legislature’s intention had been to regulate the rare cases in which extraterritorial employers refused to pay the relevant employer’s social security contributions. As such employers could not be forced to comply with Austrian law, the legislature had considered that there was no other solution than to require the entire amount of social security contributions to be paid by the employee.
23. Regarding the applicant’s submissions that section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act was unconstitutional for being discriminatory, the Ministry noted that it was not called upon to examine the constitutionality of the provision at issue. It had to apply the law in force, with the exception of cases in which provisions of EU law had precedence over Austrian law.
24. In her complaint to the Constitutional Court (Verfassungsgerichtshof), the applicant claimed that the Ministry’s decision had violated her right to property and her right not to be discriminated against as well as her right to social security and to a fair trial. She maintained her argument that under current public international law there was no objective reason for the distinction made by section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act between employees of an extraterritorial employer and any other employees. Moreover, the case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Communities (ECJ) provided that the rights guaranteed by the European Convention on Human Rights formed part of the basic principles of community law. The ECJ had also held in a number of cases that a difference in treatment had to be objectively justified. However, the Ministry had failed to obtain a preliminary ruling on whether section 53(3)(a) violated EU law. In conclusion, the applicant requested the Constitutional Court to quash the Ministry’s decision or, if need be, to examine the constitutionality of the said provision or to request the ECJ to give a preliminary ruling.
25. On 27 September 2005 the Constitutional Court refused to deal with the applicant’s complaint for lack of prospects of success. Referring, inter alia, to Article 29 of the 1972 European Convention on State Immunity (which exempts proceedings concerning social security from the application of that Convention), the Constitutional Court noted that due to the practical consequences of the employer’s extraterritorial status there was no appearance of a violation of constitutional law by section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act. The decision was served on the applicant’s counsel on 7 October 2005.
C. Other proceedings and further developments
26. While the above proceedings were pending, the applicant brought proceedings against the United States claiming reimbursement of the employer’s part of the social security contributions which she had been ordered to pay to the Health Insurance Board. In those proceedings, the US Department of State had refused to serve the summons on the Department of Justice, which was competent to represent the United States in civil litigation. The Austrian courts held that the refusal to serve the summons fell within the category of acta jure imperii. They dismissed the applicant’s request for a judgment in default. Their position was confirmed by the Supreme Court’s judgment of 11 June 2001.
27. In a decision of 3 June 2002 the proceedings were stayed, pending the Administrative Court’s decision in the proceedings between the applicant and the Health Insurance Board. Following the Administrative Court’s judgment of 15 March 2005 (see paragraph 21 above), they were resumed by the Vienna Labour and Social Court on 27 December 2005, which noted, however, that service of the summons was not possible.
28. In April 2002 the applicant reached pensionable age. She gave the US embassy in Vienna notice of termination of her employment and applied to the competent Pension Insurance Office for an old-age pension from 1 May 2002.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW
A. Domestic law
29. The General Social Security Act encompasses Austria’s health and accident insurance and old-age pension schemes. Austrian social security law is based on the contributory principle.
30. Section 4 of the General Social Security Act regulates compulsory affiliation to the social security system. Pursuant to section 4(1)(1), employees are affiliated to the health and accident insurance and old-age pension schemes. Section 4(2) defines an employee as any person working in consideration of remuneration in a relationship of personal and economic dependency.
31. As a general rule, an employer is obliged to register its employees with the social security system (section 33 of the General Social Security Act).
32. Section 35(4) of the General Social Security Act lays down exceptions to that rule:
Section 35(4) of the General Social Security Act
“The employee shall be responsible for his or her own registration as provided in sections 33 and 34
(a) if the employer enjoys the privileges of extraterritoriality or has been granted special privileges or immunities by virtue of an intergovernmental treaty or Austria’s membership of an international organisation, or
(b) if the employer (contracting entity) has no permanent business establishment (branch, office, agency) in Austria . ...”
33. Section 51(3) of the General Social Security Act provides that for an employee affiliated to the social security system, compulsory contributions have to be borne in part by the employer and in part by the employee unless section 53 applies.
34. As a general rule, the employer is the contribution debtor (Beitragsschuldner) for the entire amount of social security contributions due (section 58(2) of the General Social Security Act). That means in practice that the employer pays the entire amount of social security contributions (namely the employer’s and employee’s share) directly to the competent social security board, and pays the employee a salary from which his or her social security contributions have already been deducted.
35. Section 53 of the General Social Security Act, so far as material, provides as follows:
Section 53 of the General Social Security Act
“(3) The employee shall pay the full amount of the contributions
(a) if contributions are not paid by an employer that enjoys the privileges of extraterritoriality or has been granted special privileges and immunities by virtue of an intergovernmental agreement or Austria’s membership of an international organisation;
(b) if the employer has no permanent business establishment (branch, office, agency) in Austria . ...”
B. International law
1. The 1972 European Convention on State Immunity
36. The 1972 European Convention on State Immunity (“the Basle Convention”) entered into force on 11 June 1976 after its ratification by three States. It has been ratified by eight States (Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) and signed by one State (Portugal). On 11 June 1976 it entered into force in respect of Austria, which had ratified it on 10 July 1974.
37. For the text of Article 5 of the Convention, concerning the limits of jurisdictional immunity in respect of employment contracts, see Wallishauser, cited above, § 29.
38. The following Article is relevant in the context of the present case:
Article 29
“The present Convention shall not apply to proceedings concerning:
a) social security;
b) damage or injury in nuclear matters;
c) customs duties, taxes or penalties.”
2. The 2004 United Nations Convention on Jurisdictional Immunities of States and their Property
39. State immunity from jurisdiction is governed by customary international law, the codification of which is enshrined in the United Nations Convention on Jurisdictional Immunities of States and their Property of 2 December 2004 (“the 2004 Convention”). The principle is based on the distinction between acts of sovereignty or authority (acta jure imperii) and acts of commerce and administration (acta jure gestionis) (see Cudak v. Lithuania [GC], no. 15869/02, §§ 25-33, ECHR 2010; Sabeh El Leil v. France [GC], no. 34869/05, §§ 18-23, 29 June 2011; and Wallishauser, cited above, § 30).
40. The 2004 Convention was opened for signature on 17 January 2005 and has not yet entered into force. Austria signed the Convention on 17 January 2005 and ratified it on 14 September 2006. The United States has not ratified the 2004 Convention, but did not vote against it when it was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly.
41. The draft text of the Convention was prepared by the United Nations International Law Commission (ILC) which, in 1979, was given the task of codifying and gradually developing international law in matters of jurisdictional immunities of States and their property. It produced a number of drafts that were submitted to States for comment. The Draft Articles that were used as the basis for the text adopted in 2004 dated back to 1991 (“the 1991 Draft Articles”). They were subsequently further revised by the Sixth Committee of the United Nations General Assembly. States were again given an opportunity to comment.
42. For the text of Article 11 of the 2004 Convention and of Article 11 of the 1991 Draft Articles concerning the limits of jurisdictional immunity in respect of employment contracts, see Wallishauser, cited above, §§ 33 and 35, respectively.
43.The 2004 Convention (Part IV) contains a number of provisions on State immunity from measures of constraint in connection with proceedings before a court.
Article 18 (State immunity from pre-judgment measures of constraint) reads as follows:
“No pre-judgment measures of constraint, such as attachment or arrest, against property of a State may be taken in connection with a proceeding before a court of another State unless and except to the extent that:
(a) the State has expressly consented to the taking of such measures as indicated:
(i) by international agreement;
(ii) by an arbitration agreement or in a written contract; or
(iii) by a declaration before the court or by a written communication after a dispute between the parties has arisen; or
(b) the State has allocated or earmarked property for the satisfaction of the claim which is the object of that proceeding.”
Article 19 (State immunity from post-judgment measures of constraint) reads as follows:
“No post-judgment measures of constraint, such as attachment, arrest or execution, against property of a State may be taken in connection with a proceeding before a court of another State unless and except to the extent that:
(a) the State has expressly consented to the taking of such measures as indicated:
(i) by international agreement;
(ii) by an arbitration agreement or in a written contract; or
(iii) by a declaration before the court or by a written communication after a dispute between the parties has arisen; or
(b) the State has allocated or earmarked property for the satisfaction of the claim which is the object of that proceeding; or
(c) it has been established that the property is specifically in use or intended for use by the State for other than government non-commercial purposes and is in the territory of the State of the forum, provided that post-judgment measures of constraint may only be taken against property that has a connection with the entity against which the proceeding was directed.”
Article 20 (effect of consent to jurisdiction to measures of constraint) reads as follows:
“Where consent to the measures of constraint is required under articles 18 and 19, consent to the exercise of jurisdiction under article 7 shall not imply consent to the taking of measures of constraint.”
Article 21 (specific categories of property) reads as follows:
“1. The following categories, in particular, of property of a State shall not be considered as property specifically in use or intended for use by the State for other than government non-commercial purposes under article 19, subparagraph (c):
(a) property, including any bank account, which is used or intended for use in the performance of the functions of the diplomatic mission of the State or its consular posts, special missions, missions to international organizations or delegations to organs of international organizations or to international conferences;
(b) property of a military character or used or intended for use in the performance of military functions;
(c) property of the central bank or other monetary authority of the State;
(d) property forming part of the cultural heritage of the State or part of its archives and not placed or intended to be placed on sale;
(e) property forming part of an exhibition of objects of scientific, cultural or historical interest and not placed or intended to be placed on sale.
2. Paragraph 1 is without prejudice to article 18 and article 19, subparagraphs (a) and (b).”
44. The 1991 Draft Articles of the International Law Commission already contained a Part IV on State immunity from measures of constraint in connection with proceedings before a court:
Article 18 (State immunity from measures of constraint) of the 1991 Draft Articles provided as follows:
“1. No measures of constraint, such as attachment, arrest and execution, against property of a State may be taken in connection with a proceeding before a court of another State unless and except to the extent that:
(a) the State has expressly consented to the taking of such measures as indicated:
(i) by international agreement;
(ii) by an arbitration agreement or in a written contract; or
(iii) by a declaration before a court or by a written communication after a dispute between the parties has arisen;
(b) the State has allocated or earmarked property for the satisfaction of the claim which is the object of that proceeding; or
(c) the property is specifically in use or intended for use by the State for other than government non-commercial purposes and is in the territory of the State of the forum and has a connection with the claim which is the object of the proceeding or with the agency or instrumentality against which the proceeding was directed.
2. Consent to the exercise of jurisdiction under article 7 shall not imply consent to the taking of measures of constraint under paragraph 1, for which separate consent shall be necessary.”
The International Law Commission’s commentary, on Article 18, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“(1) Article 18 concerns immunity from measures of constraint only to the extent that they are linked to a judicial proceeding. Theoretically, immunity from measures of constraint is separate from jurisdictional immunity of the State in the sense that the latter refers exclusively to immunity from the adjudication of litigation. Article 18 clearly defines the rule of State immunity in its second phase, concerning property, particularly measures of execution as a separate procedure from the original proceeding.
(2) The practice of States has evidenced several theories in support of the immunity from execution as separate from and not interconnected with immunity from jurisdiction. Whatever the theories, for the purposes of this article, the question of immunity from execution does not arise until after the question of jurisdictional immunity has been decided in the negative and until there is a judgment in favour of the plaintiff. Immunity from execution may be viewed, therefore, as the last bastion of State immunity. If it is admitted that no sovereign State can exercise its sovereign power over another equally sovereign State (par in parem imperium non habet), it follows a fortiori that no measures of constraint by way of execution or coercion can be exercised by the authorities of one State against another State and its property. Such a possibility does not exist even in international litigation, whether by judicial settlement or arbitration.”
Article 19 (Specific categories of property) of the 1991 Draft Articles provided as follows:
“1. The following categories, in particular, of property of a State shall not be considered as property specifically in use or intended for use by the State for other than government non-commercial purposes under paragraph 1 (c) of article 18:
(a) property, including any bank account, which is used or intended for use for the purposes of the diplomatic mission of the State or its consular posts, special missions, missions to international organizations, or delegations to organs of international organizations or to international conferences;
(b) property of a military character or used or intended for use for military purposes;
(c) property of the central bank or other monetary authority of the State;
(d) property forming part of the cultural heritage of the State or part of its archives and not placed or intended to be placed on sale;
(e) property forming part of an exhibition of objects of scientific, cultural or historical interest and not placed or intended to be placed on sale.
2. Paragraph 1 is without prejudice to paragraph 1 (a) and (b) of article 18.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
45. The applicant complained that section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act imposed a disproportionate burden on her, in that she was obliged to pay both the employee’s and employer’s social security contributions. She relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
46. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
47. The Government observed that the applicant complained that she had been obliged to pay both the employer’s and employee’s social security contributions. However, in so far as her obligation to pay the employee’s contributions was concerned, she could not be regarded as a victim of the alleged violation within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention. For the relevant period, namely September 1988 to June 1995, the contributions had been included in the amount paid by the United States in compliance with the Vienna Labour and Social Court’s judgment of 14 July 1995 (see paragraph 10 above).
48. The applicant confirmed that she not only complained that she had been obliged to pay her employer’s social security contributions under section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act, but that she had been the contribution debtor for both the employer’s and employee’s contributions. In her view, as the US embassy had undertaken to pay the employer’s contribution, section 51(3) of the General Social Security Act applied in respect of the distribution of the contribution burden. Consequently, section 58(2) applied, which provided that the employer was the contribution debtor for the entire amount of contributions. In her view, there was no room for the application of section 53(3)(a), which made her the contribution debtor for the entire amount of contributions.
49. While conceding that the payment awarded to her by the Vienna Labour and Social Court’s judgment of 14 July 1995 had been her gross salary and thus had included the employee’s social security contributions, she asserted that the contributions had been calculated as average monthly amounts, and that owing to increases to the contributions during the proceedings, the amount awarded did not cover the entire amount she had to pay.
50. The Court reiterates that the word “victim” in Article 34 of the Convention denotes the person directly affected by the act or omission in issue, the existence of a violation of the Convention being conceivable even in the absence of prejudice, which is only relevant in the context of Article 41 (see, as a recent authority, Nada v. Switzerland [GC], no. 10593/08, § 128, ECHR 2012).
51. The Court observes that the applicant was directly affected by the decisions complained of, in that she was ordered to pay both the employer’s and employee’s social security contributions. The Government pointed out that, as far as the employee’s contributions were concerned, the applicant had not suffered any damage, as the contributions had been included in the salary payment she had received from her employer for the period at issue. For her part, the applicant asserted that she had suffered at least some damage in respect of the employee’s contributions. At this stage, the Court finds it sufficient to reiterate that the absence of prejudice does not remove the applicant’s victim status. The Court therefore dismisses the Government’s objection.
52. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
53. The applicant claimed that the application of section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act imposed a disproportionate burden on her. She maintained that a rule which made the employee liable for paying the extraterritorial employer’s social security contributions was no longer justified under public international law. The provision was still based on the consideration that compliance with Austrian law could not be enforced as regards employers enjoying extraterritorial status. However under current international law, obligations resulting from employment contracts with a foreign State’s diplomatic missions were no longer exempt from jurisdiction on account of State immunity. Consequently, the provision at issue was not necessary in the interests of securing the payment of social security contributions.
54. In that connection, the applicant contested the Government’s argument that the imposition on her of the employer’s contributions was the result of a correct balancing of public and individual interests. Even if it were to be accepted that the United States’ undertaking to reimburse the employer’s social security contributions were a private-law arrangement – which she explicitly contested – she could have expected that any claims resulting from that arrangement would be examined and eventually enforced by the Austrian courts, as they were not covered by jurisdictional immunity. Hence there was no risk in being an employee of an extraterritorial employer which she could legitimately be expected to bear.
55. In the alternative, the applicant asserted that section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act should not have been applied in her case. She argued that the US embassy had guaranteed to refund all its employees, including the applicant, the employer’s contributions to the social security system. She contested the Government’s view that it was a private-law arrangement between the United States and its employees, and claimed that the social security institutions had been involved in and aware of the arrangements. The fact that the United States had only refused to comply with their duty to refund contributions in the applicant’s case did not remove the principle of sharing social security contributions between employer and employee which they had previously accepted. There was thus no room for the application of section 53(3)(a) and for imposing on her the burden of paying both the employee’s and employer’s contributions.
56. Furthermore, the rule as such was disproportionate, as contributions became due irrespective of whether or not a salary had actually been paid. Lastly, if the employee failed to pay the contributions, the social security board was entitled to set off its claims against cash benefits due to the insured person.
57. For their part, the Government accepted that the application of section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act interfered with the applicant’s right to property. However, they argued that the interference was justified as being necessary to secure the payment of contributions within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They emphasised that States enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation in matters of social and economic policy.
58. The Government explained that for the purposes of the General Social Security Act, which covered the health and accident insurance and old-age pension schemes, all employees were considered as one risk group. The social security system was financed by way of a pay-as-you-go system. Furthermore, it was based on the underlying consideration that obligations were shared between the employer and the employee. As a general rule, the employer was obliged to register the employee with the social security system. Regarding the payment of contributions, they had to be borne in part by the employer and in part by the employee. However, as a general rule laid down in section 58(2) of the General Social Security Act, the employer was obliged to withhold the part due as the employee’s contributions and to pay that part together with the employer’s contributions directly to the competent social security board.
59. In specific cases where employers enjoyed extraterritorial status, the General Social Security Act provided a number of exceptions from those general rules. It was for the employee to register with the social security system pursuant to section 35(4) of the said Act. Moreover, pursuant to section 53(3)(a), in cases where the employer did not do so, it was for the employee to pay the entire amount of social security contributions to the Health Insurance Board. In the Government’s view, that rule served the public interest in ensuring that social security contributions were actually paid, which was necessary to keep the pay-as-you-go system functioning. The legislature had considered the contested rule as a last resort for the rare cases in which an extraterritorial employer refused to pay social security contributions. The contested rule was based on the consideration that the obligation to pay social security contributions could not be enforced against an employer enjoying extraterritorial status. The Government added that the same rules applied in the case of employers which did not have a permanent business establishment in Austria.
60. The Government asserted that a reasonable balance between general and individual interests had been struck in the applicant’s case. By accepting that in such a case the employer’s contributions remained unpaid would undermine one of the leading principles of social security law, namely the principle of solidarity of all insured persons. It was rather for the employee to bear the risk that the extraterritorial employer may refuse to pay its part of the social security contributions.
61. In that context, the Government pointed out that section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act was already in force when the applicant had entered into the employment contract with the US embassy in Vienna. She had been aware of the legal situation in that she registered herself with the Vienna Health Insurance Board and paid both the employer’s and employee’s contributions until August 1988. The mere fact that the embassy, in accordance with a private-law agreement, reimbursed the part due as employer’s contributions until that time, but refused to do so thereafter, did not change the nature of the applicant’s relationship with the Health Insurance Board.
62. Lastly, the decisions at issue in the present case only obliged her to pay social security contributions for the period from September 1988 to June 1995 for which her salary (including the sum due as the employee’s social security contribution) had been paid by the United States. In summary, the application of the contested provision did not place a disproportionate burden on her.
2. The Court’s assessment
63. The Court considers, and this is not in dispute between the parties, that the obligation to pay social security contributions for the period from 1 September 1988 to 30 June 1995 constituted an interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions. It falls under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which recognises that the Contracting States are entitled to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions (see, for instance, Frátrik v. Slovakia (dec.), no. 51224/99, 25 May 2004 relating to the levying of social security contributions).
64. According to the Court’s well-established case-law, an interference including one resulting from a measure to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions, must strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The desire to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 as a whole, including the second paragraph: there must therefore be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aims pursued (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 50, Series A no. 98, and National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society v. the United Kingdom, 23 October 1997, § 80, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-VII).
65. Furthermore, a wide margin of appreciation is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the public interest on social or economic grounds, and the Court will generally respect the legislature’s policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (National & Provincial Building Society, cited above, § 80, and Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 52, ECHR 2006 VI).
66. In the present case, the applicant’s obligation to pay social security contributions was based on section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act. The applicant argued before the domestic authorities, as she does before the Court, that the provision should not have been applied in her case. However, the Administrative Court, giving detailed reasons, confirmed that the requirements for applying section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act were fulfilled, as her employer enjoyed extraterritorial status and did not pay social security contributions. It explicitly noted that the undertaking given by the US embassy to its employees to reimburse them the employer’s contributions could not change that assessment. The Court does not consider this interpretation to be arbitrary. In this connection, the Court reiterates that it is firstly for the domestic authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply the domestic law (see, for instance, Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 86, ECHR 2005 VI). It is therefore satisfied that the interference had a basis in domestic law.
67. The Court observes that the provision at issue is designed to ensure the good functioning of the social security system. As the Government explained, the financing of the health and accident insurance and old-age pension schemes covered by the General Social Security Act is based on a pay-as-you-go system, it was therefore vital to ensure that social security contributions were actually being made. The Court thus accepts that the interference with the applicant’s property rights pursued a legitimate aim “in accordance with the general interest”.
68. The Court will now turn to the question whether the interference was proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued. The applicant argues that the exception provided for in section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act was no longer necessary, as under current international law, obligations resulting from employment contracts with a foreign State’s diplomatic missions where no longer exempt from jurisdiction on account of State immunity.
69. As the Court has already noted, there is a development in international law towards limiting jurisdictional immunity in respect of employment-related disputes: that development is reflected in Article 5 of the 1972 European Convention on State Immunity and in Article 11 of the International Law Commission’s 1991 Draft Articles, and is now enshrined in Article 11 of the 2004 Convention (see Wallishauser, cited above, § 65; as well as Cudak v. Lithuania [GC], no. 15869/02, § 63, ECHR 2010; and Sabeh El Leil v. France [GC], no. 34869/05, § 53, 29 June 2011).
70. However, the present case concerns proceedings relating to social security and raises the question whether the assumption on which section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act is based, namely that it is not possible to enforce the obligation to pay social security contributions against an employer enjoying extraterritorial status, is still valid under international law.
71. The Court observes that the 1972 Convention does not lend any support to the applicant’s position, as proceedings relating to social security are as such excluded from its application (see paragraph 38 above). Turning to the 2004 Convention, the Court notes that it has not yet entered into force. Austria ratified it in 2006, when the proceedings at issue had already been terminated. The United States have not ratified the 2004 Convention. Nevertheless, the Court has already held that it is a well-established principle of international law that a rule enshrined in a treaty could be binding on a State as a rule of customary international law even if the State in question has not ratified the treaty, provided that it has not opposed it either (see Wallishauser, cited above, § 66, with references to Cudak, cited above, § 66, and Sabeh El Leil, cited above, §§ 54 and 57). However, under the 2004 Convention the possibilities to enforce a judgment against a foreign State are narrowly limited, as follows from Articles 18 to 21 of that Convention (see paragraph 43 above). Articles 18 and 19 of the 1991 Draft Articles contained similar provisions. The International Law Commission’s commentary on Article 18 of the 1991 Draft Articles set out clearly that immunity from execution is “separate from and not interconnected with immunity from jurisdiction” (see paragraph 44 above).
72. Consequently, even if it were established that the content of Articles 18 to 21 of the 2004 Convention were applicable as rules of customary international law at the material time, that would not support the applicant’s position. In short, the fact that a State cannot rely on jurisdictional immunity for certain categories of employment contracts does not mean that a judgment against a foreign State can be enforced in the same way as against an ordinary employer. The rationale underlying section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act, namely that obligations under social security law cannot be enforced against an employer enjoying extraterritorial status, or at least not in the same way as against an ordinary employer, is therefore still valid.
73. In the light of these considerations, it cannot be said that the legislature’s choice to maintain section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act in force was “manifestly unreasonable”. It remains to be examined whether in the circumstances of the case a disproportionate burden was placed on the applicant.
74. The Court notes in the first place, that in the proceedings at issue the applicant was ordered to pay social security contributions for the period from 1 September 1988 to 30 June 1995 for which she had received payment of her salary plus staggered interest from the US embassy in compliance with the Vienna Labour and Social Court’s judgment of 14 July 1995. Therefore her argument that, in principle, social security contributions become due even for periods for which no payment has been received is not relevant in the context of the present case.
75. As far as the applicant’s obligation to pay the employee’s share of the social security contributions is concerned, the Court notes that these shares had been included in the above-mentioned salary payment. Their payment did therefore not impose a burden on her. In so far as she claims that in her action before the Vienna Labour and Social Court these contributions had been calculated as average monthly amounts, and that owing to increases of these contributions during the proceedings the amount awarded did not cover the whole amount due, the Court considers that she could and should have raised the issue in the proceedings at issue.
76. As far as the applicant’s obligation to pay the employer’s share of the social security contributions is concerned, the Court notes that the applicant has not claimed that her employer ever directly paid the employer’s share of social security contributions to the Health Insurance Board. On the contrary, when taking up her employment with the US embassy, the applicant registered herself with the social security system pursuant to section 35(4)(a) of the General Social Security Act, the specific provision for employees of employers enjoying extraterritorial status. Subsequently, her employer the US embassy in Vienna, in accordance with her employment contract and the undertaking given to its employees, reimbursed her the employer’s social security contributions upon timely submission of the relevant statements of the Health Insurance Board. The applicant claims that the social security authorities were aware of and involved in that arrangement. Be that as it may, there is nothing to show that the applicant’s employer accepted an obligation to pay social security contributions to the Health Insurance Board. On the contrary, it follows clearly from that arrangement that it was the applicant who paid the employer’s social security contributions to the Health Insurance Board and was subsequently reimbursed by her employer.
77. When the dispute with her employer, the US embassy in Vienna, arose, the latter refused to reimburse her. However, this did not change the nature of the applicant’s relationship with the Health Insurance Board. Her obligation vis-à-vis the Vienna Health Insurance Board was based on the specific rules which had already applied when she had entered into the employment contract with the American embassy, including section 53(3)(a), which made her the contribution debtor for the entire amount of social security contributions. In the Court’s view, there is force in the Government’s argument that the applicant who had accepted the system described above, rather than the community of insured persons, could be expected to bear the risk arising out of the United States’ refusal to comply with its contractual obligations towards her. In view of the limited possibilities to enforce a claim against a foreign State as set out above, the Court is not convinced by the applicant’s argument that no foreseeable risk existed.
78. Lastly, as regards the amount of the employer’s contributions due for the period of 1 September 1988 to 30 June 1995, namely approximately EUR 42,600, the Court finds that it was not disproportionate to the overall amount of EUR 269,000 received by the applicant as salary payment for that period.
79. In conclusion, the Court finds that the obligation to pay the social security contributions at issue did not impose an excessive burden on the applicant, and is therefore not to be considered contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
There has accordingly been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
80. The applicant complained of a violation of Article 14 taken either in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 or taken in conjunction with Article 6 of the Convention. She maintained that the reasoning underlying section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act, namely that claims against employers enjoying extraterritorial status could not be enforced, was no longer justified under public international law. The ensuing distinction between employees of extraterritorial employers and other employees was therefore not justified.
81. The Court notes that these complaints are linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
82. Having regard to the finding relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that the factors to be weighed in the balance when assessing the proportionality of the measure under Article 14 of the Convention would be similar and that, therefore, there is no basis on which it can find a violation of this provision, regardless of it being read in conjunction with Article 6 of the Convention or with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
83. The applicant further complained under Article 6 of the Convention that both the Federal Ministry for Social Security, Generations and Consumer Protection and the Constitutional Court had failed to request the ECJ to give a preliminary ruling on the question whether section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act violated EU law.
84. The Court reiterates that the Convention does not guarantee, as such, any right to have a case referred to the ECJ for a preliminary ruling under Article 234 of the EC Treaty (which has become Article 267 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU since 1 December 2009). Nevertheless, refusal of a request for such a referral may infringe the fairness of proceedings if it appears to be arbitrary (see, for instance, Herma v. Germany (dec.), no. 54193/07, 8 December 2009; John v. Germany (dec.), no. 15073/03, 13 February 2007; Bakker v. Austria (dec.), no. 43454/98, 13 June 2002; and Canela v. Spain (dec.), no. 60350/00, 4 October 2001).
85. In the present case the applicant did not submit any argument regarding a possible conflict between section 53(3)(a) of the General Social Security Act and community law in her appeal to the Ministry. In her complaint to the Constitutional Court, she requested it in general terms to obtain a preliminary ruling by the ECJ. While arguing that the ECJ’s case-law provided that the rights guaranteed by the Convention formed part of the basic principles of community law, she did not specify which provisions of community law would be relevant for her case. In these circumstances the fact the Constitutional Court dismissed the applicant’s case for lack of prospects of success without dealing explicitly with her request for a preliminary ruling does not disclose any arbitrariness.
86. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints concerning Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and concerning Article 14 taken either in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 or taken in conjunction with Article 6 admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention;

3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 or Article 6 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 20 June 2013, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Resto inammissibile
Nessuna violazione di Articolo 14+6-1 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - la Discriminazione) (Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime
Procedimenti civili



PRIMA LA SEZIONE






CAUSA WALLISHAUSER C. AUSTRIA (N.RO 2)

(Richiesta n. 14497/06)








SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

20 giugno 2013




Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di Wallishauser c. l'Austria (N.ro 2),
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Presidente
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Ksenija Turković,
Dmitry Dedov, judges,and
Søren Nielsen, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato in 28 maggio 2013,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 14497/06) contro la Repubblica dell'Austria depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino austriaco, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 24 marzo 2006.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica a Vienna. Il Governo austriaco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, Ambasciatore H. Tichy Capo del Diritto internazionale Settore al Ministero Federale per europeo ed Affari Internazionali.
3. Il richiedente addusse che l'imposizione su lei, come un impiegato dell'ambasciata di Stati Uniti a Vienna, dell'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale incluso i contributi del datore di lavoro dovuto in riguardo del suo salario per un periodo determinato, mise un carico sproporzionato su lei e così violò il suo diritto a godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
4. 14 aprile 2009 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1941 e vive a Vienna.
Sfondo di A.
6. Il richiedente era stato un impiegato dell'ambasciata degli Stati Uniti dell'America a Vienna fin da marzo 1978. Da gennaio 1981 onwards lei aveva un contratto della durata indefinita e lavorò come un fotografo all'ambasciata. Seguendo un incidente nel 1983, l'autorità competente emise una decisione che afferma che lei qualificò per protezione sotto gli Invalidi (il Lavoro) l'Atto (Invalideneinstellungsgesetz¬ ). L'ambasciata la respinse a settembre 1987, mentre seguendo un ulteriore incidente a marzo di che anno come il quale fu classificato lavoro-riferito.
7. Mentre il richiedente ebbe un lavoro con l'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna, lei si registrò come un impiegato sotto il sistema di previdenza sociale facendo seguito a sezione 35(4)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale (Allgemeines Sozialversicherungsgesetz). Lei pagò sia i contributi del datore di lavoro ed impiegato al sistema di previdenza sociale al Vienna Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio (Gebietskrankenkasse, “l'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio”) sino ad agosto 1988. Nella conformità col suo contratto di lavoro, gli Stati Uniti rimborsarono il richiedente il contributo del datore di lavoro che corrispose a 53% dei contributi di previdenza sociale totali sino a novembre 1983. Sulla base di avvisi amministrativi dell'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna del 1982 e 13 gennaio 1984 di 21 aprile, gli Stati Uniti intrapresero successivamente, risarcire i suoi impiegati i contributi del datore di lavoro nell'importo di 55% dei contributi di previdenza sociale totali, su osservazione opportuna delle dichiarazioni attinenti dell'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Secondo il richiedente, gli Stati Uniti facevano, così nella sua causa sino a marzo 1987; secondo il Governo, la data attinente era comunque, agosto 1988.
8. Il proscioglimento del richiedente fu dichiarato vuoto con la Vienna Labour e Corte Sociale (Arbeits - l'und Sozialgericht) per motivi che richiese l'accordo precedente dell'autorità competente sotto gli Invalidi (il Lavoro) l'Atto. La corte respinse l'argomento presentato con gli Stati Uniti che sé mancò giurisdizione su conto dell'immunità del paese. Fondò che, mentre Stati esteri goderono dell'immunità con riguardo ad ad imperii di iure di acta, loro vennero all'interno della giurisdizione delle corti nazionali con riguardo ad a gestionis di iure di acta. La conclusione e l'adempimento di una pelle di contratto di lavoro all'interno della categoria seconda. La Corte Suprema (Oberster Gerichthof) sostenne che sentenza 21 novembre 1990, notando che gli Stati Uniti non avevano mantenuto l'eccezione dell'immunità Statale nell'ulteriore corso dei procedimenti.
9. Come un risultato dei procedimenti sopra, il richiedente continuò ad avere un contratto di lavoro valido con l'Unisce Stati l'ambasciata di ' a Vienna. Comunque, i secondi rifiutarono di avvalersi dei suoi servizi.
10. Il richiedente portò procedimenti contro gli Stati Uniti che richiedono pagamento del suo salario. Riguardo a pagamenti di salario dal 1988 a 30 giugno 1995 di 1 settembre, gli Stati Uniti inutilmente sollevarono la difficoltà dell'immunità giurisdizionale in un primo set di procedimenti. In ottemperanza con una sentenza della Vienna Labour e Corte Sociale di 14 luglio 1995, gli Stati Uniti pagarono il richiedente un importo totale di 3.7 milioni di schillings austriaci (ATS-approssimativamente 269,000 euros (EUR)), compose di alcuno ATS 3 milione (verso EUR 224,000) per arretrati di salario più interesse di staggered. Come prima, il pagamento di salario corrispose al salario lordo del richiedente, incluso i contributi dell'impiegato al sistema di previdenza sociale che lei doveva pagare all'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Sull'occasione del pagamento, l'avvocato che aveva rappresentato gli Stati Uniti nei procedimenti informò il richiedente con una lettera di 16 ottobre 1996 che il pagamento non implicò qualsiasi l'accettazione dell'austriaco corteggia le sentenze di ', che gli Stati Uniti considerarono il suo contratto di lavoro per essere terminati e potere, se lei sollevasse qualsiasi le ulteriori rivendicazioni, “si avvalga dei suoi diritti diplomatici e le immunità.”
11. Inoltre procedimenti relativo al pagamento di salario da luglio 1995 ad agosto 1996 condotto ad una definitivo sentenza contumaciale con la Vienna Labour e Corte Sociale. Comunque, gli Stati Uniti non pagarono l'importo assegnato al richiedente.
12. Il richiedente portò procedimenti relativo a pagamenti di salario da settembre 1996 onwards ma loro erano anche senza successi, come il Settore Stati Uniti di Stato notificare la citazione attinente sul Settore di Giustizia che era competente per rappresentare gli Stati Uniti in controversia civile aveva rifiutato. Le corti austriache contennero che il rifiuto per notificare citazione incorse all'interno della categoria di imperii di iure di acta. Loro conclusero che l'imputato non era stato chiamato in causa debitamente e che loro non potessero procedere con la causa del richiedente. La Corte Suprema confermò che posizione in sentenze consegnate nel 2001 e 7 maggio 2003 di 5 settembre. Quelli procedimenti erano la materia della richiesta n. 156/04, Wallishauser c. l'Austria. Nella sua sentenza di 17 luglio 2012, la Corte sostenne, che con accettando il rifiuto di ' per notificare le citazioni nella causa del richiedente come un atto supremo gli Stati Uniti e procedere con la causa del richiedente, le corti austriache avevano danneggiato la molta essenza del diritto del richiedente di accesso per corteggiare rifiutando, di conseguenza ed avevano violato così Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
B. Procedimenti che generano la richiesta presente
13. 17 marzo 1999 il Ministero Federale per Lavori, Salute e Social Security (für di Bundesministerium Arbeit, l'und di Gesundheit Soziales) emesso una decisione dichiaratoria, sostenendo che il richiedente continuò ad essere un impiegato all'interno del significato di sezione 4 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale su conto del suo contratto di lavoro valido con l'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna (veda divide in paragrafi 8 e 9 sopra). Di conseguenza, lei fu affiliata al sistema di previdenza sociale.
14. Successivamente, l'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio ordinò che il richiedente pagasse i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro ed impiegato per il periodo dal 1988 a 30 giugno 1995 di 1 settembre, quel è dire il periodo per il quale lei aveva ricevuto pagamenti di salario (veda paragrafo 10 sopra). Il richiedente sollevò le difficoltà. Siccome l'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio andò a vuoto a decidere su loro all'interno del tempo-limite legale, il richiedente registrò una richiesta per trasferimento di giurisdizione (Devolutionsantrag).
15. In una decisione di 7 giugno 2000 la Vienna Governatore Regionale ordinò che il richiedente pagasse i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro ed impiegato che corrispondono ad ATS 1,088,676.76 (EUR 79,117.22) in totale che era dovuto per il suo lavoro all'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna per il periodo summenzionato. La decisione si appellò su sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, notando che gli Stati Uniti erano un status extraterritoriale che gode padronale e non avevano pagato qualsiasi contributi di previdenza sociale per il richiedente durante il periodo in questione. Infine, il Governatore Regionale fondò che nelle circostanze della causa, nessun interesse di mora sarebbe stato accusato.
16. Il richiedente pagò i contributi dell'impiegato di ATS 502,631.67 (EUR 36,527.70). Comunque, lei fece appello contro la decisione. Nel suo ricorso di 6 luglio 2000 lei dibattè, in particolare, che l'ambasciata Stati Uniti si era impegnata pagare i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro ed aveva posato in giù il suo obbligo per fare così in un avviso amministrativo di 21 aprile 1982. Nella prospettiva del richiedente, sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale non fece domanda, siccome il suo datore di lavoro era stato d'accordo a pagare il contributo del datore di lavoro. Invece gli articoli generali sarebbero dovuti essere fatti domanda, vale a dire sezione 51(3) dell'Atto detto che previde che contributi di previdenza sociale sopporterebbero in parte col datore di lavoro ed in parte con l'impiegato, e sezione 58(2) che purché che il datore di lavoro era il debitore di contributo per l'importo intero di vis-à-vis di contributi di previdenza sociale l'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Nell'alternativa, il richiedente presentò, che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale il principio dell'uguaglianza di fronte alla legge garantito con Articolo 7 della Costituzione Federale violò. Sotto diritto internazionale pubblico come sé stette in piedi, l'adempimento di contratti di lavoro incorse all'interno della categoria di gestionis di iure di acta ed era non esenti così da giurisdizione nazionale. Non c'era così ragione obiettiva per trattare differentemente impiegati di un status extraterritoriale che ha padronale dagli altri impiegati.
17. 18 giugno 2001 il Ministero Federale per Social Security e Generazioni (soziale di für di Bundesministerium l'und di Sicherheit Generationen) concedè il ricorso del richiedente, mentre sostenendo che lei non doveva pagare i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro per il periodo dal 1988 a 30 giugno 1995 di 1 settembre. Notò, in particolare, che l'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna, sulla base di un avviso amministrativo di 21 aprile 1982 aveva concluso un accordo coi suoi impiegati per rimborsare i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro che corrispondono a 55% dei contributi totali. Si era attenuto con continuamente che accordo, ma aveva rifiutato di rimborsare il richiedente che segue il suo incidente nel 1987. Il Ministero fondò che l'ambasciata Stati Uniti fu obbligata per pagare i contributi del datore di lavoro per il lavoro del richiedente.
18. 3 ottobre 2001 la Corte Costituzionale rifiutò di trattare con l'azione di reclamo del richiedente per mancanza di prospettive del successo e trasferì l'azione di reclamo alla Corte amministrativa (Verwaltungsgerichtshof).
19. Nella sua azione di reclamo alla Corte amministrativa, il richiedente sostenne, che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale non sarebbe dovuto essere fatto domanda nella sua causa. Invece l'articolo generale di sezione 58(2) sarebbe dovuto essere fatto domanda che purché che il datore di lavoro era il debitore di contributo per l'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale. Lei non sarebbe dovuta essere trattata o di conseguenza, come il debitore di contributo per i contributi dell'impiegato.
20. L'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio presentò anche un reclamo con la Corte amministrativa, mentre asserendo che sotto sezione 53(3)(a) il richiedente fu obbligato per pagare sia i contributi del datore di lavoro ed impiegato.
21. 15 marzo 2005 la Corte amministrativa, mentre avendo congiunto ambo le cause, sostenne l'azione di reclamo dell'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio ed annullò la decisione del Ministero Federale. Contenne che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale fatto domanda nella causa presente, status extraterritoriale godè come il datore di lavoro del richiedente e non pagò contributi di previdenza sociale. Riferendosi alla sua causa-legge, la Corte amministrativa notò che sezione 53(3)(a) che richiesto l'impiegato per pagare l'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale, purché, in primo luogo, per un'eccezione dall'articolo posato in giù in sezione 51(3) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale che previde che il carico di contributo sarebbe diviso fra il datore di lavoro e l'impiegato. Come una conseguenza, fece anche l'impiegato responsabile pagare l'importo intero di contributi. La richiesta di sezione 53(3)(a) non fu escluso su conto del fatto che l'ambasciata Stati Uniti aveva dato un'impresa ai suoi impiegati per rimborsare i datori di lavoro i contributi di ' previde che i certi requisiti furono soddisfatti.
22. In una decisione di 10 giugno 2005 il Ministero Federale per Social Security, Generazioni e Tutela del consumatore (soziale di für di Bundesministerium Sicherheit, l'und di Generationen Konsumentenschutz) ordinò che il richiedente pagasse sia i contributi di previdenza sociale dell'impiegato e datore di lavoro, in un importo totale di EUR 79,177.22 per il periodo dal 1988 a 30 giugno 1995 di 1 settembre. Si appellò su sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, notando che la disposizione era stata introdotta nel 1962. L'intenzione della legislatura era stata regolare le cause rare nelle quali datori di lavoro extraterritoriali rifiutarono di pagare i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro attinente. Siccome simile datori di lavoro non potevano essere costretti per attenersi con legge austriaca, la legislatura aveva considerato che non c'era altra soluzione che costringere l'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale ad essere pagato con l'impiegato.
23. Riguardo alle osservazioni del richiedente che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale era incostituzionale per essere discriminatorio, il Ministero notò che non fu chiamato su per esaminare la costituzionalità della disposizione in questione. Doveva fare domanda il diritto vigente, con l'eccezione di cause in che approvvigiona della legge di EU aveva precedenza su legge austriaca.
24. Nella sua azione di reclamo alla Corte Costituzionale (Verfassungsgerichtshof), il richiedente affermò che la decisione del Ministero aveva violato il suo diritto a proprietà ed il suo diritto per non essere discriminato contro così come il suo diritto alla previdenza sociale ed ad un processo equanime. Lei mantenne il suo argomento che sotto diritto internazionale pubblico e corrente non era ragione obiettiva per la distinzione reso con sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale fra impiegati di un datore di lavoro extraterritoriale e qualsiasi gli altri impiegati. Inoltre, la causa-legge della Corte di giustizia delle Comunità europee (ECJ) purché che i diritti garantirono con la Convenzione europea su Diritti umani formò parte dei principi di base di legge di comunità. L'ECJ aveva sostenuto anche in un numero di cause che una differenza in trattamento doveva essere giustificata obiettivamente. Comunque, il Ministero era andato a vuoto ad ottenere una direttiva preliminare su se sezione 53(3)(a) violò la legge di EU. In conclusione, il richiedente richiese la Corte Costituzionale per annullare la decisione del Ministero o, se bisogno è, esaminare la costituzionalità della disposizione detta o richiedere l'ECJ per dare una direttiva preliminare.
25. 27 settembre 2005 la Corte Costituzionale rifiutò di trattare con l'azione di reclamo del richiedente per mancanza di prospettive del successo. Assegnando, inter l'alia, ad Articolo 29 dell'europea del 1972 Convenzione su Immunità Statale (quale esenta procedimenti riguardo alla previdenza sociale dalla richiesta di che Convenzione), la Corte Costituzionale notò che a causa delle conseguenze pratiche dello status extraterritoriale del datore di lavoro non era nessuna comparizione di una violazione di legge costituzionale con sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale. La decisione fu notificata sul consiglio del richiedente 7 ottobre 2005.
C. gli Altri procedimenti e gli ulteriori sviluppi
26. Mentre i procedimenti sopra erano pendenti, il richiedente portò procedimenti contro gli Stati Uniti che chiedono rimborso della parte del datore di lavoro dei contributi di previdenza sociale che lei era stata ordinata per pagare all'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. In quelli procedimenti, il Settore Stati Uniti di Stato aveva rifiutato di notificare la citazione sul Settore di Giustizia che era competente per rappresentare gli Stati Uniti in controversia civile. Le corti austriache contennero che il rifiuto per notificare la citazione incorse all'interno della categoria di imperii di jure di acta. Loro respinsero la richiesta del richiedente per una sentenza in contumacia. La loro posizione fu confermata con la sentenza della Corte Suprema di 11 giugno 2001.
27. In una decisione di 3 giugno 2002 i procedimenti furono sospesi, durante la decisione della Corte amministrativa nei procedimenti fra il richiedente e l'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Seguendo la sentenza della Corte amministrativa di 15 marzo 2005 (veda paragrafo 21 sopra), loro furono ripresi con la Vienna Labour e Corte Sociale 27 dicembre 2005 che celebre, comunque, che servizio della citazione non era possibile.
28. Ad aprile 2002 il richiedente giunse ad età pensionabile. Lei diede l'ambasciata Stati Uniti in avviso di Vienna di conclusione del suo lavoro e fece domanda all'Ufficio dell'Assicurazione della Pensione competente per una pensione di vecchio-età da 1 maggio 2002.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE E INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Diritto nazionale
29. L'Atto del Social Security del Generale include la salute dell'Austria ed assicurazione contro gli incidenti e schemi di pensione di vecchio-età. Legge di previdenza sociale austriaca è basata sul principio contribuente.
30. Sezione 4 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale regola l'affiliazione obbligatoria al sistema di previdenza sociale. Facendo seguito a sezione 4(1)(1), impiegati sono affiliati alla salute ed assicurazione contro gli incidenti e schemi di pensione di vecchio-età. Sezione 4(2) definisce un impiegato come qualsiasi persona che lavora nella considerazione di rimunerazione in una relazione di dipendenza personale ed economica.
31. Come un articolo generale, un datore di lavoro è obbligato per registrare i suoi impiegati col sistema di previdenza sociale, (sezione 33 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale).
32. Sezione 35(4) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale posa in giù eccezioni a quel l'articolo:
Sezione 35(4) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale
“L'impiegato sarà responsabile per suo o la sua propria registrazione come previsto in sezioni 33 e 34
(un) se il datore di lavoro gode i diritti dell'extraterritorialità o è stato accordato diritti speciali o le immunità con virtù di un trattato intergovernativo o l'appartenenza dell'Austria di un'organizzazione internazionale, o
(b) se il datore di lavoro (entità contraente) non ha costituzione di affari permanente (ramo, ufficio l'agenzia) in Austria. ...”
33. Sezione 51(3) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale prevede che per un impiegato affiliato al sistema di previdenza sociale, contributi obbligatori dovevano essere sopportati in parte col datore di lavoro ed in parte con l'impiegato a meno che sezione 53 fa domanda.
34. Come un articolo generale, il datore di lavoro è il debitore di contributo (Beitragsschuldner) per l'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale dovuto (sezione 58(2) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale). Quel vuole dire in pratica che il datore di lavoro paga l'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale (vale a dire la quota del datore di lavoro ed impiegato) direttamente all'asse di previdenza sociale competente, e paga l'impiegato un salario da che suo o i suoi contributi di previdenza sociale già sono stati dedotti.
35. Sezione 53 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, finora come materiale prevede siccome segue:
Sezione 53 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale
“(3) l'impiegato pagherà il pieno importo dei contributi
(un) se contributi non sono pagati con un datore di lavoro che gode i diritti dell'extraterritorialità o è stato accordato diritti speciali e le immunità con virtù di un accordo intergovernativo o l'appartenenza dell'Austria di un'organizzazione internazionale;
(b) se il datore di lavoro non ha costituzione di affari permanente (ramo, ufficio l'agenzia) in Austria. ...”
B. Diritto internazionale
1. L'europea del 1972 Convenzione su Immunità Statale
36. L'europea del 1972 Convenzione su Immunità Statale (“la Convenzione di Basle”) entrò in vigore 11 giugno 1976 dopo la sua ratifica coi tre Stati. È stato ratificato con gli otto Stati (Austria, Belgio, Cipro, Germania, Lussemburgo, i Paesi Bassi, Svizzera ed il Regno Unito) e firmò con un Stato (il Portogallo). 11 giugno 1976 entrò in vigore in riguardo di Austria che l'aveva ratificato 10 luglio 1974.
37. Per il testo di Articolo 5 della Convenzione, riguardo ai limiti dell'immunità giurisdizionale in riguardo di contratti di lavoro Wallishauser vede, citato sopra, § 29.
38. L'Articolo seguente è attinente nel contesto della causa presente:
Articolo 29
“La Convenzione presente non farà domanda a procedimenti riguardando:
un) la previdenza sociale;
b) danno o danno in questioni nucleari;
c) i doveri di dogane, tasse o sanzioni penali.”
2. L'Unito del 2004 Nazioni Convenzione sulle Immunità Giurisdizionali di Stati e la loro Proprietà
39. L'immunità statale da giurisdizione è governata con diritto internazionale consueto, la codificazione di che è custodito nella Nazioni Convenzione Unito sulle Immunità Giurisdizionali di Stati e la loro Proprietà di 2 dicembre 2004 (“la Convenzione del 2004”). Il principio è basato sulla distinzione fra atti della sovranità o autorità (imperii di jure di acta) ed atti di commercio ed amministrazione (gestionis di jure di acta) (veda Cudak c. la Lituania [GC], n. 15869/02, §§ 25-33 ECHR 2010; Sabeh El Leil c. la Francia [GC], n. 34869/05, §§ 18-23 29 giugno 2011; e Wallishauser, citato sopra, § 30).
40. La Convenzione del 2004 fu aperta per firma 17 gennaio 2005 e non è entrata ancora in vigore. Austria firmò la Convenzione 17 gennaio 2005 e lo ratificò 14 settembre 2006. Gli Stati Uniti non hanno ratificato la Convenzione del 2004, ma non votò contro sé quando fu adottato con la Riunione del Generale delle Nazioni Unito.
41. Il testo di bozza della Convenzione fu preparato con la Commissione del Diritto internazionale delle Nazioni Unito (ILC) quale, nel 1979 fu dato il compito di codificare e gradualmente diritto internazionale in sviluppo nelle questioni delle immunità giurisdizionali di Stati e la loro proprietà. Produsse un numero di bozze che sono state presentate a Stati per commento. I Bozza Articoli che sono stati usati come la base per il testo adottarono in 2004 datati di nuovo a 1991 (“i 1991 Bozza Articoli”). Loro furono revisionati successivamente inoltre col sesto Comitato della Riunione del Generale delle Nazioni Unito. Stati fu dato di nuovo un'opportunità di fare commenti.
42. Per il testo di Articolo 11 della Convenzione del 2004 e di Articolo 11 dei 1991 Bozza Articoli riguardo ai limiti dell'immunità giurisdizionale in riguardo di contratti di lavoro, veda Wallishauser, citato sopra, §§ 33 e 35, rispettivamente.
43.The 2004 Convenzione (la Parte IV) contiene un numero di disposizioni su immunità Statale da misure di costrizione in collegamento con procedimenti di fronte ad una corte.
Articolo 18 (l'immunità Statale da pre-sentenza misura di costrizione) legge siccome segue:
“Nessuna pre-sentenza misura di costrizione, come sequestro o arresta, contro proprietà di un Stato può essere preso in collegamento con un procedimento di fronte ad una corte di un altro Statale a meno che ed omette alla misura che:
(un) lo Stato ha acconsentito espressamente alla presa di simile misure siccome indicato:
(i) con accordo internazionale;
(l'ii) con un accordo di arbitrato o in un contratto scritto; o
(l'iii) con una dichiarazione di fronte alla corte o con una comunicazione scritto dopo una controversia fra le parti è sorto; o
(b) lo Stato ha assegnato o marchiò proprietà per la soddisfazione della rivendicazione della quale è l'oggetto che procedendo.”
Articolo 19 (l'immunità Statale da posto-sentenza misura di costrizione) legge siccome segue:
“Nessuna posto-sentenza misura di costrizione, come sequestro, arresto o esecuzione contro proprietà di un Stato può essere preso in collegamento con un procedimento di fronte ad una corte di un altro Statale a meno che ed omette alla misura che:
(un) lo Stato ha acconsentito espressamente alla presa di simile misure siccome indicato:
(i) con accordo internazionale;
(l'ii) con un accordo di arbitrato o in un contratto scritto; o
(l'iii) con una dichiarazione di fronte alla corte o con una comunicazione scritto dopo una controversia fra le parti è sorto; o
(b) lo Stato ha assegnato o marchiò proprietà per la soddisfazione della rivendicazione della quale è l'oggetto che procedendo; o
(il c) si ha stabilito che la proprietà specificamente è in uso o intenzionale per uso dello Stato per altro che fini non-commerciali e statali e è nel territorio dello Stato del foro, purché che posto-sentenza misura di costrizione può essere preso solamente contro proprietà che ha un collegamento con l'entità contro la quale fu diretto il procedimento.”
Articolo 20 (effetto di beneplacito a giurisdizione a misure di costrizione) legge siccome segue:
“Dove acconsente alle misure di costrizione è richiesto sotto articoli 18 e 19, acconsenta all'esercizio di giurisdizione sotto articolo 7 non implicherà beneplacito alla presa di misure di costrizione.”
Articolo 21 (le specifiche categorie di proprietà) legge siccome segue:
“1. Le categorie seguenti, in particolare, di proprietà di un Stato non sarà considerato specificamente come proprietà in uso o intenzionale per uso dello Stato per altro che fini non-commerciali e statali sotto articolo 19, subparagraph (il c):
(un) la proprietà incluso qualsiasi conto bancario che è usato o intenzionale per uso nell'adempimento delle funzioni della rappresentanza diplomatica dello Stato o i suoi posti consolare, missioni speciali, missioni ad organizzazioni internazionali o delegazioni ad organi di organizzazioni internazionali o a conferenze internazionali;
(b) proprietà di un carattere militare o usato o intenzionale per uso nell'adempimento di funzioni militari;
(il c) proprietà della banca centrale o l'altra autorità valutaria dello Stato;
(d) proprietà che forma parte dell'eredità culturale dello Stato o parte del suo archivio e non mise o intese di essere messo in saldi;
(e) proprietà che forma parte di un'esposizione di oggetti di interesse scientifico, culturale o storico e non mise o intese di essere messo in saldi.
2. Divida in paragrafi 1 è senza pregiudizio ad articolo 18 ed articolo 19, subparagraphs (un) e (b).”
44. I 1991 Bozza Articoli della Diritto internazionale Commissione già contennero una Parte IV su immunità Statale da misure di costrizione in collegamento con procedimenti di fronte ad una corte:
Articolo 18 (l'immunità Statale da misure di costrizione) dei 1991 Bozza Articoli previsti siccome segue:
“1. Nessuno misure di costrizione, come sequestro, arresto ed esecuzione contro proprietà di un Stato possono essere prese in collegamento con un procedimento di fronte ad una corte di un altro Statale a meno che ed omette alla misura che:
(un) lo Stato ha acconsentito espressamente alla presa di simile misure siccome indicato:
(i) con accordo internazionale;
(l'ii) con un accordo di arbitrato o in un contratto scritto; o
(l'iii) con una dichiarazione di fronte ad una corte o con una comunicazione scritto dopo una controversia fra le parti è sorto;
(b) lo Stato ha assegnato o marchiò proprietà per la soddisfazione della rivendicazione della quale è l'oggetto che procedendo; o
(il c) la proprietà specificamente è in uso o intenzionale per uso dello Stato per altro che fini non-commerciali e statali e è nel territorio dello Stato del foro e ha un collegamento con la rivendicazione che è l'oggetto del procedimento o con l'agenzia o instrumentality contro i quali fu diretto il procedimento.
2. Acconsenta all'esercizio di giurisdizione sotto articolo 7 non implicherà beneplacito alla presa di misure di costrizione sotto paragrafo 1 per il quale beneplacito separato sarà necessario.”
Il commentario della Diritto internazionale Commissione, su Articolo 18 in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
“(1) l'Articolo la 18 immunità di preoccupazioni da misure di costrizione solamente alla misura che loro sono collegati ad un procedimento giudiziale. Teoreticamente, l'immunità da misure di costrizione è separato dall'immunità giurisdizionale dello Stato nel senso che il secondo si riferisce esclusivamente all'immunità dall'aggiudicazione della causa. Articolo 18 chiaramente definisce l'articolo dell'immunità Statale nella sua seconda fase, riguardo a proprietà particolarmente misure di esecuzione come una procedura separata dal procedimento originale.
(2) la pratica degli Stati ha attestato molte teorie in appoggio dell'immunità da esecuzione come separato da e non interconnesse con immunità da giurisdizione. Purchessia le teorie, per i fini di questo articolo la questione dell'immunità da esecuzione non sorge sino a dopo che la questione dell'immunità giurisdizionale è stata decisa nel negativo e sino a là una sentenza è in favore del querelante. L'immunità da esecuzione può essere vista, perciò, come lo scorso bastione dell'immunità Statale. Se è ammesso che nessun Stato supremo può esercitare sul suo potere supremo un altro Stato ugualmente supremo (parità in parem imperium non il habet), segue un fortiori contro il quale nessuno misure di costrizione con modo di esecuzione o coercizione possono essere esercitate con le autorità di un Stato un altro Statale e la sua proprietà. Tale possibilità non esiste anche in causa internazionale, se con liquidazione giudiziale o l'arbitrato.”
Articolo 19 (le Specifiche categorie di proprietà) dei 1991 Bozza Articoli previsti siccome segue:
“1. Le categorie seguenti, in particolare, di proprietà di un Stato non sarà considerato specificamente come proprietà in uso o intenzionale per uso dello Stato per altro che fini non-commerciali e statali sotto paragrafo 1 (il c) di articolo 18:
(un) la proprietà incluso qualsiasi conto bancario che è usato o intenzionale per uso per i fini della rappresentanza diplomatica dello Stato o i suoi posti consolare, missioni speciali, missioni ad organizzazioni internazionali o delegazioni ad organi di organizzazioni internazionali o a conferenze internazionali;
(b) proprietà di un carattere militare o usato o intenzionale per uso per fini militari;
(il c) proprietà della banca centrale o l'altra autorità valutaria dello Stato;
(d) proprietà che forma parte dell'eredità culturale dello Stato o parte del suo archivio e non mise o intese di essere messo in saldi;
(e) proprietà che forma parte di un'esposizione di oggetti di interesse scientifico, culturale o storico e non mise o intese di essere messo in saldi.
2. Divida in paragrafi 1 è senza pregiudizio per dividere in paragrafi 1 (un) e (b) di articolo 18.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
45. Il richiedente si lamentò che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale un carico sproporzionato impose su lei, in che lei fu obbligata per pagare sia i contributi di previdenza sociale dell'impiegato e datore di lavoro. Lei si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
46. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
47. Il Governo osservò che il richiedente si lamentò che lei era stata obbligata per pagare sia i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro ed impiegato. Comunque, in finora come il suo obbligo pagare i contributi dell'impiegato concernè, lei non poteva essere considerata una vittima della violazione allegato all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Per il periodo attinente, vale a dire settembre 1988 a giugno 1995, i contributi erano stati inclusi nell'importo pagato con gli Stati Uniti in ottemperanza con la Vienna Labour e la sentenza di Corte Sociale di 14 luglio 1995 (veda paragrafo 10 sopra).
48. Il richiedente confermò che lei non solo si lamentò che lei era stata obbligata per pagare i contributi di previdenza sociale del suo datore di lavoro sotto sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, ma che lei era stata la debitrice di contributo per sia i contributi del datore di lavoro ed impiegato. Nella sua prospettiva, siccome l'ambasciata Stati Uniti si era impegnata pagare il contributo del datore di lavoro, sezione 51(3) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale fatto domanda in riguardo della distribuzione del carico di contributo. Di conseguenza, sezione 58(2) fece domanda che purché che il datore di lavoro era il debitore di contributo per l'importo intero di contributi. Nella sua prospettiva, non era stanza per la richiesta di sezione 53(3)(a) che le fabbricò il debitore di contributo per l'importo intero di contributi.
49. Mentre ammise che il pagamento assegnò a lei con la Vienna Labour e la sentenza di Corte Sociale di 14 luglio 1995 era stato il suo salario lordo e così aveva incluso i contributi di previdenza sociale dell'impiegato, lei asserì che i contributi erano stati calcolati come importi mensili e medi, e che dovendo ad aumenti ai contributi durante i procedimenti, l'importo assegnato non coprì l'importo intero lei doveva pagare.
50. La Corte reitera che la parola “la vittima” in Articolo 34 della Convenzione la persona colpita direttamente con l'atto od omissione in problema denota, l'esistenza di una violazione della Convenzione che è anche concepibile nell'assenza di pregiudizio che è solamente attinente nel contesto di Articolo 41 (veda, come una recente autorità, Nada c. la Svizzera [GC], n. 10593/08, § 128 ECHR 2012).
51. La Corte osserva che il richiedente fu colpito direttamente con le decisioni si lamentò di, in che lei fu ordinata per pagare sia i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro ed impiegato. Il Governo indicò che, come lontano come i contributi dell'impiegato concernerono, il richiedente non aveva subito qualsiasi il danno, siccome i contributi erano stati inclusi nel pagamento di salario lei riceveva dal suo datore di lavoro dall'il periodo in questione. Per la sua parte, il richiedente asserì, che lei aveva sofferto almeno di alcuno danno in riguardo dei contributi dell'impiegato. A questo stadio, la Corte lo trova sufficiente reiterare che l'assenza di pregiudizio non rimuove lo status di vittima del richiedente. La Corte respinge perciò l'eccezione del Governo.
52. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
53. Il richiedente chiese che la richiesta di sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale un carico sproporzionato impose su lei. Lei sostenne che un articolo che fece l'impiegato responsabile per pagare i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro extraterritoriale non fu giustificato più sotto diritto internazionale pubblico. La disposizione ancora fu basata sulla considerazione come la quale ottemperanza con legge austriaca non poteva essere eseguita riguarda datori di lavoro che godono status extraterritoriale. Obblighi che sono il risultato di contratti di lavoro con le rappresentanze diplomatiche di un Stato estero erano più comunque sotto diritto internazionale corrente, esenti da giurisdizione su conto dell'immunità Statale. Di conseguenza, la disposizione in questione non era necessario negli interessi di garantire il pagamento di contributi di previdenza sociale.
54. In che il collegamento, il richiedente contestò l'argomento del Governo che l'imposizione su lei dei contributi del datore di lavoro era il risultato di un bilanciamento corretto di pubblico ed interessi individuali. Anche se sarebbe accettato che il ' di Stati Uniti che si impegna rimborsare i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro sia una disposizione di privato-legge-quale lei contestò esplicitamente-lei si sarebbe potuta aspettare che qualsiasi rivendicazioni che risultano da che disposizione sarebbe esaminata ed eseguì infine con le corti austriache, siccome loro non furono coperti con immunità giurisdizionale. Non c'era da adesso rischio nell'essere un impiegato di un datore di lavoro extraterritoriale che lei legittimamente potrebbe essere aspettatasi di nascere.
55. Nell'alternativa, il richiedente asserì, che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale non sarebbe dovuto essere fatto domanda nella sua causa. Lei dibattè che l'ambasciata Stati Uniti aveva garantito risarcire tutti i suoi impiegati, incluso il richiedente i contributi del datore di lavoro al sistema di previdenza sociale. Lei contestò la prospettiva del Governo che era una disposizione di privato-legge fra gli Stati Uniti ed i suoi impiegati, ed affermò che le istituzioni di previdenza sociale erano state comportate in e consapevole delle disposizioni. Il fatto che gli Stati Uniti avevano rifiutato solamente di attenersi col loro dovere di risarcire contributi nella causa del richiedente non rimuova il principio di dividere contributi di previdenza sociale fra datore di lavoro ed impiegato che loro prima avevano accettato. Non c'era così stanza per la richiesta di sezione 53(3)(a) e per imporre su lei il carico di pagare sia i contributi dell'impiegato e datore di lavoro.
56. Inoltre, l'articolo come simile era sproporzionato, siccome contributi divennero dovuti irrispettoso di se o non un salario davvero era stato pagato. Infine, se l'impiegato non riuscisse a pagare i contributi, l'asse di previdenza sociale fu concesso per esporre via le sue rivendicazioni contro benefici di soldi dovuto alla persona assicurata.
57. Per la loro parte, il Governo accettò, che la richiesta di sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale interferito col diritto del richiedente a proprietà. Comunque, loro dibatterono che l'interferenza fu giustificata come essendo necessario per garantire il pagamento di contributi all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro enfatizzarono che Stati goderono un margine ampio della valutazione nelle questioni di politica sociale ed economica.
58. Il Governo spiegò che per i fini dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale che coprì la salute ed assicurazione contro gli incidenti e schemi di pensione di vecchio-età tutti gli impiegati furono considerati come un gruppo di rischio. Il sistema di previdenza sociale fu finanziato con modo di un pay-as-you-go sistema. Inoltre, fu basato sulla considerazione fondamentale che obblighi sono stati divisi fra il datore di lavoro e l'impiegato. Come un articolo generale, il datore di lavoro fu obbligato per registrare l'impiegato col sistema di previdenza sociale. Riguardo al pagamento di contributi, loro dovevano essere sopportati in parte col datore di lavoro ed in parte con l'impiegato. Comunque, siccome un articolo generale posò in giù in sezione 58(2) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, il datore di lavoro fu obbligato a trattenere la parte dovuto come i contributi dell'impiegato e pagare che parte insieme coi contributi del datore di lavoro direttamente all'asse di previdenza sociale competente.
59. Nelle specifiche cause dove datori di lavoro goderono status extraterritoriale, l'Atto del Social Security del Generale offrì un numero di eccezioni da quegli articoli generali. Era per l'impiegato per registrare col sistema di previdenza sociale facendo seguito a sezione 35(4) dell'Atto detto. Inoltre, facendo seguito a sezione 53(3)(a), in cause dove il datore di lavoro non faceva così, era per l'impiegato per pagare l'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale all'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Nella prospettiva del Governo, che articolo notificò l'interesse pubblico nell'assicurare che contributi di previdenza sociale davvero furono pagati che era necessario per tenere pay-as-you-go sistema funzionante. La legislatura aveva considerato l'articolo contestato come un ultima istanza per le cause rare nelle quali un datore di lavoro extraterritoriale rifiutò di pagare contributi di previdenza sociale. L'articolo contestato fu basato sulla considerazione che l'obbligo per pagare contributi di previdenza sociale non poteva essere eseguito contro un status extraterritoriale che gode padronale. Il Governo aggiunse che gli stessi articoli fecero domanda nella causa di datori di lavoro che non avevano una costituzione di affari permanente in Austria.
60. Il Governo asserì che un equilibrio ragionevole fra interessi generali ed individuali era stato previsto nella causa del richiedente. Con accettando che in tale causa i contributi del datore di lavoro rimasti non retribuito minerebbero uno dei principi principali di legge di previdenza sociale, vale a dire il principio della solidarietà di tutte le persone di assicurato. Era piuttosto per l'impiegato per sopportare il rischio che il datore di lavoro extraterritoriale può rifiutare di pagare la sua parte dei contributi di previdenza sociale.
61. In che contesto, il Governo indicò che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale già era in vigore quando il richiedente era entrato nel contratto di lavoro con l'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna. Lei era stata consapevole della situazione legale in che lei si registrò col Vienna Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio e pagato sia i contributi del datore di lavoro ed impiegato sino ad agosto 1988. Il fatto mero che l'ambasciata, in conformità con un accordo di privato-legge rimborsò la parte dovuto come i contributi di datore di lavoro sino a che tempo, ma rifiutò di fare così da allora in poi, non cambi la natura della relazione del richiedente con l'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio.
62. Infine, le decisioni in questione nella causa presente solamente l'obbligò a pagare contributi di previdenza sociale per il periodo da settembre 1988 a giugno 1995 per che il suo salario (incluso la somma dovuto come il contributo di previdenza sociale dell'impiegato) era stato pagato con gli Stati Uniti. In riassunto, la richiesta della disposizione contestata non mise un carico sproporzionato su lei.
2. La valutazione della Corte
63. La Corte considera, e questo non è in controversia fra le parti che l'obbligo per pagare contributi di previdenza sociale per il periodo dal 1988 a 30 giugno 1995 di 1 settembre costituì un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Incorre il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 che riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono dati un titolo a controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi (veda, per istanza, Frátrik c. la Slovacchia (il dec.), n. 51224/99, 25 maggio 2004 relativo all'imporre di contributi di previdenza sociale).
64. Secondo la causa-legge ben stabilita della Corte, un'interferenza incluso uno che è il risultato di una misura per garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi, deve prevedere un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. Il desiderio di realizzare questo equilibrio è riflesso nella struttura di Articolo 1 nell'insieme, incluso il secondo paragrafo: ci deve essere perciò una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e gli scopi perseguirono (veda James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 50 la Serie Un n. 98, e Cittadino & Edificio Società Provinciale, Leeds Edificio Società Permanente e Yorkshire Building la Società c. il Regno Unito, 23 ottobre 1997, § 80 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-VII).
65. Ad un margine ampio della valutazione di solito è concesso inoltre, allo Stato sotto la Convenzione quando viene a misure generali della strategia economica o sociale. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è nell'interesse pubblico su motivi sociali o economici, e la Corte rispetterà la scelta di politica della legislatura generalmente a meno che è “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (il Cittadino & Edificio Società Provinciale, citato sopra, § 80, e Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 52 ECHR 2006-VI).
66. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, l'obbligo del richiedente per pagare contributi di previdenza sociale fu basato su sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale. Il richiedente dibattè di fronte alle autorità nazionali, siccome lei fa di fronte alla Corte che la disposizione non sarebbe dovuta essere fatta domanda nella sua causa. Comunque, la Corte amministrativa, dando ragioni particolareggiate inveterato che i requisiti per fare domanda sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale fu adempiuto, siccome il suo datore di lavoro godè status extraterritoriale e non pagò contributi di previdenza sociale. Notò esplicitamente che l'impresa data con l'ambasciata Stati Uniti ai suoi impiegati per rimborsarli i contributi del datore di lavoro non potevano cambiare quel la valutazione. La Corte non considera che questa interpretazione sia arbitraria. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che è in primo luogo per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti interpretare e fare domanda il diritto nazionale (veda, per istanza, Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 86 ECHR 2005-VI). Si soddisfa perciò che l'interferenza aveva una base in diritto nazionale.
67. La Corte osserva che la disposizione in questione è progettato per assicurare il buono funzionando del sistema di previdenza sociale. Siccome spiegò il Governo, il finanziamento della salute ed assicurazione contro gli incidenti e schemi di pensione di vecchio-età coperto con l'Atto del Social Security del Generale è basato su un pagare-come-tu-vada sistema, era perciò vitale per assicurare che contributi di previdenza sociale davvero erano resi. La Corte accetta così che l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente intraprese un scopo legittimo “nella conformità con l'interesse generale.”
68. La Corte ora si rivolgerà alla questione se l'interferenza era proporzionata allo scopo legittimo perseguito. Il richiedente dibatte che l'eccezione previde per in sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale era più necessario, come sotto diritto internazionale corrente, obblighi che sono il risultato di contratti di lavoro con le rappresentanze diplomatiche di un Stato estero dove più esenta da giurisdizione su conto dell'immunità Statale.
69. Siccome già ha notato la Corte, c'è un sviluppo in diritto internazionale verso limitando l'immunità giurisdizionale in riguardo di controversie lavoro-relative: che sviluppo è riflesso in Articolo 5 dell'europea del 1972 Convenzione su Immunità Statale ed in Articolo 11 dei 1991 Bozza Articoli della Diritto internazionale Commissione, ed ora è custodito in Articolo 11 della Convenzione del 2004 (veda Wallishauser, citato sopra, § 65; così come Cudak c. la Lituania [GC], n. 15869/02, § 63 ECHR 2010; e Sabeh El Leil c. la Francia [GC], n. 34869/05, § 53 29 giugno 2011).
70. Comunque, la causa presente concerne procedimenti relativo alla previdenza sociale ed aumenti la questione se l'assunzione su che sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale è basato, vale a dire che non è possibile eseguire l'obbligo per pagare contributi di previdenza sociale contro un status extraterritoriale che gode padronale, ancora è valido sotto diritto internazionale.
71. La Corte osserva che la Convenzione del 1972 non presta qualsiasi sostiene alla posizione del richiedente, come procedimenti relativo alla previdenza sociale è come simile escluse dalla sua richiesta (veda paragrafo 38 sopra). Rivolgendosi alla Convenzione del 2004, la Corte nota che non è entrato ancora in vigore. Austria lo ratificò nel 2006, quando i procedimenti in questione già era stato terminato. Gli Stati Uniti non hanno ratificato la Convenzione del 2004. La Corte già ha sostenuto ciononostante, che è un principio ben stabilito di diritto internazionale che un articolo ha custodito in un trattato potrebbe essere vincolante per un Stato come un articolo di diritto internazionale consueto anche se lo Stato in oggetto non ha ratificato il trattato, purché che non l'ha opposto uno (veda Wallishauser, citato sopra, § 66, con riferimenti a Cudak citato sopra, § 66, e Sabeh El Leil, citato sopra, §§ 54 e 57). Sotto la Convenzione del 2004 le possibilità di eseguire una sentenza contro un Stato estero sono limitate attentamente comunque, siccome segue da Articoli 18 a 21 di che Convenzione (veda paragrafo 43 sopra). Articoli 18 e 19 dei 1991 Bozza Articoli contennero disposizioni simili. Il commentario della Diritto internazionale Commissione su Articolo 18 del set di Articoli di Bozza del 1991 fuori chiaramente che l'immunità da esecuzione è “separato da e non interconnesse con immunità da giurisdizione” (veda paragrafo 44 sopra).
72. Di conseguenza, anche se fu stabilito che il contenuto di Articoli 18 a 21 della Convenzione del 2004 erano applicabili come articoli di diritto internazionale consueto al tempo di materiale che non sosterrebbe la posizione del richiedente. In breve, il fatto che un Stato non può appellarsi su immunità giurisdizionale per certe categorie di contratti di lavoro non vuole dire che una sentenza contro un Stato estero può essere eseguita nello stesso modo come contro un datore di lavoro ordinario. La base razionale sezione 53(3)(a fondamentale) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, vale a dire che obblighi sotto legge di previdenza sociale non possono essere eseguiti contro un status extraterritoriale che gode padronale, o almeno non nello stesso modo come contro un datore di lavoro ordinario, è perciò ancora valido.
73. Nella luce di queste considerazioni, non può essere detto, che la scelta della legislatura per mantenere sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale in vigore era “manifestamente irragionevole.” Rimane essere esaminato se nelle circostanze della causa un carico sproporzionato fu messo sul richiedente.
74. La Corte nota nel primo posto che nei procedimenti in questione il richiedente pagare contributi di previdenza sociale per dal 1988 a 30 giugno 1995 di 1 settembre il periodo per il quale lei aveva ricevuto pagamento del suo salario fu ordinato più staggered interessano dall'ambasciata Stati Uniti in ottemperanza con la Vienna Labour e la sentenza di Corte Sociale di 14 luglio 1995. Perciò il suo argomento che, in principio, contributi di previdenza sociale divenuti anche dovuto per periodi per i quali è stato ricevuto nessun pagamento non sono attinenti nel contesto della causa presente.
75. Come lontano come l'obbligo del richiedente per pagare la quota dell'impiegato dei contributi di previdenza sociale concerne, la Corte nota che queste quote erano state incluse nel pagamento di salario summenzionato. Il loro pagamento non impose perciò un carico su lei. In finora siccome lei dice che nella sua azione di fronte alla Vienna Labour e Corte Sociale questi contributi erano stati calcolati come importi mensili e medi, e che dovendo ad aumenti di questi contributi durante i procedimenti l'importo assegnato non copra l'importo dovuto intero, la Corte considera che lei poteva ed avrebbe dovuto sollevare il problema nei procedimenti in questione.
76. Come lontano come l'obbligo del richiedente per pagare la quota del datore di lavoro dei contributi di previdenza sociale concerne, la Corte nota che il richiedente non ha chiesto che il suo datore di lavoro mai pagò direttamente la quota del datore di lavoro di contributi di previdenza sociale all'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Sul contrario, quando prendendo sul suo lavoro con l'ambasciata Stati Uniti, il richiedente si registrò col sistema di previdenza sociale facendo seguito a sezione 35(4)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, la specifica disposizione per impiegati di datori di lavoro che godono status extraterritoriale. Successivamente, il suo datore di lavoro l'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna, nella conformità col suo contratto di lavoro e l'impresa data ai suoi impiegati, la rimborsò i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro su osservazione opportuna delle dichiarazioni attinenti dell'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Le rivendicazioni di richiedente che le autorità di previdenza sociale erano consapevoli di e coinvolto in quel la disposizione. Sia che come sé, non c'è niente da mostrare che il datore di lavoro del richiedente accettò un obbligo per pagare contributi di previdenza sociale all'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Sul contrario, chiaramente segue da che disposizione che era il richiedente che pagò i contributi di previdenza sociale del datore di lavoro all'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio e fu rimborsato successivamente col suo datore di lavoro.
77. Quando la controversia col suo datore di lavoro, l'ambasciata Stati Uniti a Vienna, sorse, i secondi rifiutarono di rimborsarla. Comunque, questo non cambiò la natura della relazione del richiedente con l'Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio. Il suo vis-à-vis di obbligo che il Vienna Assicurazione contro le malattie Consiglio è stato basato sugli specifici articoli che già avevano fatto domanda quando lei era entrata nel contratto di lavoro con l'ambasciata americana, incluso sezione 53(3)(a) che le fabbricò il debitore di contributo per l'importo intero di contributi di previdenza sociale. Nella prospettiva della Corte, è vigore nell'argomento del Governo sopra del quale il richiedente che aveva accettato il sistema ha descritto, piuttosto che la comunità di persone assicurate potrebbe essere aspettatosi di sopportare il rischio che sorge fuori degli Stati Uniti il rifiuto di ' attenersi coi suoi obblighi contrattuali verso lei. In prospettiva delle possibilità limitate di eseguire una rivendicazione contro un Stato estero come esposta fuori sopra, la Corte non è convinta con l'argomento del richiedente che nessun rischio prevedibile è esistito.
78. Infine, come riguardi l'importo dei contributi del datore di lavoro dovuto per il periodo del 1988 a 30 giugno 1995 di 1 settembre, vale a dire verso EUR 42,600, i costatazione di Corte che non era sproporzionato all'importo complessivo di EUR 269,000 ricevette col richiedente come pagamento di salario per quel periodo.
79. In conclusione, i costatazione di Corte che l'obbligo per pagare i contributi di previdenza sociale in questione non impose un carico eccessivo sul richiedente, e è non essere considerato perciò contrario ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
80. Il richiedente si lamentò di una violazione di Articolo 14 o presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 o preso in concomitanza con Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Lei sostenne che la sezione 53(3)(a fondamentale e ragionevole) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale, vale a dire che rivendicazioni contro datori di lavoro che godono status extraterritoriale non potevano essere eseguite, fu giustificato più sotto diritto internazionale pubblico. La distinzione che consegue fra impiegati di datori di lavoro extraterritoriali e gli altri impiegati non fu giustificata perciò.
81. La Corte nota che queste azioni di reclamo sono collegate all'esaminato sopra e devono essere dichiarate perciò similmente ammissibile.
82. Avendo riguardo ad alla sentenza relativo ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che i fattori per essere pesato nell'equilibrio quando valutare la proporzionalità della misura sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione sarebbe simile e che, non c'è perciò, nessuna base sulla quale può trovare una violazione di questa disposizione, nonostante sé essendo letto in concomitanza con Articolo 6 della Convenzione o con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
83. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione che sia il Ministero Federale per Social Security, Generazioni e Tutela del consumatore e la Corte Costituzionale erano andate a vuoto a richiedere l'ECJ per dare una direttiva preliminare sulla questione se sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale la legge di EU violò.
84. La Corte reitera che la Convenzione non garantisce, come così qualsiasi diritto per avere una causa si riferito all'ECJ per una direttiva preliminare sotto Articolo 234 del Trattato di EC (quale è divenuto Articolo 267 del Trattato sul Funzionare dell'EU fin da 1 dicembre 2009). Ciononostante, rifiuto di una richiesta per tale raccomandazione può infrangere l'equità di procedimenti se sembra essere arbitrario (veda, per istanza, Herma c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 54193/07, 8 dicembre 2009; John c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 15073/03, 13 febbraio 2007; Bakker c. l'Austria (il dec.), n. 43454/98, 13 giugno 2002; e Canela c. la Spagna (il dec.), n. 60350/00, 4 ottobre 2001).
85. Al giorno d'oggi la causa il richiedente non presentò qualsiasi argomento riguardo ad un possibile conflitto fra sezione 53(3)(a) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale e legge di comunità nel suo ricorso al Ministero. Nella sua azione di reclamo alla Corte Costituzionale, lei lo richiese in termini generali per ottenere una direttiva preliminare con l'ECJ. Mentre dibattendo che la causa-legge dell'ECJ previde che i diritti garantiti con la Convenzione formarono parte dei principi di base di legge di comunità, lei non specificò quale approvvigiona di legge di comunità sarebbe attinente per la sua causa. In queste circostanze il fatto la Corte Costituzionale archiviò la causa del richiedente per mancanza di prospettive del successo senza trattare esplicitamente con la sua richiesta per una direttiva preliminare non riveli qualsiasi l'arbitrarietà.
86. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e riguardo ad Articolo 14 o preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 o preso in concomitanza con Articolo 6 ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 della Convenzione;

3. Sostiene che c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 o Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 20 giugno 2013, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.