Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ANGHEL v. ITALY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: 06, 08

NUMERO: 5968/09/2013
STATO: Italia
DATA: 25/06/2013
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings
Article 6-1 - Access to court)
No violation of Article 8 - Right to respect for private and family life (Article 8-1 - Respect for family life)


SECOND SECTION






CASE OF ANGHEL v. ITALY

(Application no. 5968/09)






JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

25 June 2013




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Anghel v. Italy,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Danutė Jočienė, President,
Guido Raimondi,
Peer Lorenzen,
Dragoljub Popović,
András Sajó,
Işıl Karakaş,
Helen Keller, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 June 2013,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 5968/09) against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Romanian national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 24 January 2009.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Bucharest. The Italian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Co-Agent, Mrs P. Accardo.
3. The applicant alleged that Hague Convention proceedings in respect of his son had been unfair and that the court dealing with the matter had failed to take into account the best interests of the son. Moreover, he had been denied access to an appeal against the first-instance decision. He considered that there had been a violation of Articles 6 and 8 of the Convention.
4. On 14 December 2011 the application was communicated to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
5. The Government of Romania, who had been notified by the Registrar of their right to intervene in the proceedings (Article 48 (b) of the Convention and Rule 33 § 3 (b)), did not indicate that they intended to do so.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1961 and currently lives in Qatar. He was married to M. and they had a son, A., born in March 2003 in Bucharest, Romania.
A. Background
7. Following A.’s birth, M. occasionally worked in Italy for short periods of time, in order to ensure an income for the family. In 2005, after M. had obtained a regular job, the applicant agreed for A. to travel to Italy with his mother. A formal notarial deed of 26 April 2005, submitted to the Court, states that Mr Anghel Aurelian, residing in Bucharest, gave his consent that his under-age son, Anghel A., born in March 2003, residing at the above-mentioned address, travel to the Republic of Moldova and Italy, in the course of the year 2005, accompanied by his mother, Anghel M. The applicant submitted that such agreement had only been given for a limited period of time in order to allow ongoing contact with M. The case file shows that M. challenged this statement, alleging that she had taken the child with her because of the adverse effect that living with his father was having on A.’s development.
8. In January 2006 the applicant travelled to Italy in order to bring A. back to Romania. He claimed that he had found the child living in very poor conditions. M. had resisted the applicant’s requests to take the child back to Romania or alternatively for all of them to move to Qatar, where he had found a job.
9. Once the applicant had returned to Romania, he filed a criminal complaint under Article 301 of the Romanian Criminal Code, alleging that his wife was detaining A. in Italy without his consent.
10. On an unspecified date, the applicant moved to Qatar. On 6 December 2006 he travelled to Italy to visit his son. He alleged that A.’s health and social conditions had worsened. On 13 December 2006 father and son travelled together to Romania. On 8 January 2007 M. joined them. On 15 January 2007 they all travelled to Moldova to pay a visit to M.’s family. On 20 January 2007, M. and A. “disappeared”. The applicant eventually found out that they had returned to Italy.
11. On 9 February 2007, the Romanian Prosecutor General’s Office decided not to institute criminal proceedings against M., as there was insufficient evidence to establish a punishable offence. The applicant contested the afore-mentioned decision on 28 December 2007. It appears that a district court dismissed the challenge as unfounded on 31 March 2008. The applicant filed an appeal with a higher court. No further information has been provided in relation to these proceedings.
B. The petition for return of the child under the Hague Convention and the decision of the Bologna Youth Court
12. On 2 April 2007 the applicant applied to the Minister of Justice, designated by Romania as the Central Authority responsible for discharging the duties imposed on Romania by the Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (“the Hague Convention”). He asked the Minister to assist him in securing the return of his son, whom the child’s mother had, he alleged, wrongfully removed to Italy on 20 January 2007.
13. Following the steps undertaken by the Romanian and Italian authorities in accordance with the provisions of the Hague Convention, the Bologna Prosecutor’s Office initiated return proceedings before the Bologna Youth Court (Tribunale per i minorenni).
14. On 18 June 2007 a hearing took place in the applicant’s presence.
The following appears from the hand-written procès-verbal submitted by the Government.
Following statements by the applicant and M., the president of the court noted the existence of divorce proceedings brought by M. in Romania, together with an application for custody of the child (objected to by the applicant), which were still pending. He further noted that while the couple had cohabited from 2004 until the end of 2006, the applicant had often been absent during 2006 as he had been working in Qatar.
M. submitted that until the end of 2006 the parents had been in agreement on the whereabouts of the child, particularly in view of her employment in Italy and the fact that the child had obtained a residence permit there, started attending school and was being seen by the social and community health services. M. argued that according to changes in Romanian law she had not needed to extend the [validity of the] notarial deed (mentioned above) to subsequent years. She claimed that the child had previously had health problems and that his father had always known where they were. M. asked the court to admit in evidence a psychologist’s report on the child’s conditions and submitted written pleadings accompanied by evidence substantiating her claim.
The applicant submitted that the notarial deed between him and M. had only given consent to A. travelling to Italy for tourist purposes for the period May-December 2005 and thus he had not consented to the child’s removal after that. In the absence of a custody decision the child could have lived with him in Qatar, instead of in Italy with his mother without his consent. However, M. had failed to consent to this, despite the fact that he could give the child a better standard of living. He explained that he had tried to reach a friendly settlement, but when this had appeared impossible he had pressed charges against M. and those proceedings were still pending. Only at the end of 2006 had M. agreed to take the child back to Romania following a medical visit, which the applicant had insisted upon and which had found that the child was in poor health.
The Public Prosecutor asked the court to accept the return application, noting that the child had possibly been in Italy for more than a year and making reference to Article 17 (sic) of the Hague Convention. He further asked the court to order a report on the child’s psychological condition.
15. On 5 July 2007 the applicant wrote to the Romanian Minister of Justice, informing him of the conduct of the hearing. The applicant explained that he had not been given the opportunity to challenge the statements made by his wife’s attorney, in particular regarding: (i) the time it had taken the applicant to institute proceedings after the date of the wrongful removal or retention of the child, which according to the applicant had been 20 January 2007 and not – as the court had assumed – January 2006; the result of the court using the latter date was that Article 12 of the Hague Convention came into play, to the effect that after a period of one year a child may not be returned if he has integrated into society; (ii) the contention that the child’s health and psychological problems were imputable to the time he had spent with his father before moving to Italy, which finding had been based on medical documents to which the applicant had had no access; (iii) the allegation that M. had had his consent up to 1 January 2007, the date on which such consent was no longer necessary (Romania having joined the European Union), thus ignoring the notarial deed, which had stated a specific period of consent; and (iv) the fact that M. had changed their son’s residence without his father’s consent, as required by law. The applicant further explained that the Bologna Youth Court was considering custody issues in violation of its competence under the Hague Convention, custody issues being within the exclusive competence of the courts of the country of domicile, Romania. It would, moreover, not decide the case until the Romanian courts had made a decision in the divorce and custody proceedings. He further contested the evaluation of the potential harm for the child in the event of his return to Romania which had been made by the social services, stating that it had only made reference to the biased account of the child’s mother, without any direct evaluation of the relationship between father and son and of the social environment if A. were to live in Romania. The applicant asked the Minister to forward his letter to the competent authority in Italy and to the Bologna Youth Court.
16. By a decision of 6 July 2007, filed with the court registry on 9 July 2007, the Bologna Youth Court refused the application for return. It noted that divorce and custody proceedings were still pending in Romania; that M. had claimed that she and the child had lived in Italy since 2006; and that since June 2006 A. had been known to the Infant Neuropsychiatric Services (“NPI”) of the Parma Local Health Agency (“AUSL”). Moreover, it noted that M. had claimed to have had the required permission from her husband to keep the child in Italy in accordance with a notarial deed of 2005 and that the applicant had contested this on the basis that he had only given permission for A. to travel to Italy for tourist purposes, and that, albeit he had moved to Qatar in 2006, he wanted the child to be with him. In that light, the court considered that there were no grounds for returning A. and that, in view of the relevant international law, it could not be held that the mother had arbitrarily taken A. away from his father as legitimate custodian of the child. The Bologna Youth Court noted that the Romanian authorities had not yet taken a decision on custody, thus the parents had joint custody, and therefore the applicant did not have exclusive custody rights. Moreover, the applicant had consented to A.’s transfer to Italy and had eventually moved to Qatar. Furthermore, the Bologna Youth Court observed that the child had been in Italy for more than a year and was integrated into Italian society, albeit with some problems. In this light, the court considered that psychological harm would ensue as a result of his return. Thus it was not obliged, according to Article 13 of the Hague Convention, to order his return. Indeed, from the social services report ordered by the court, it appeared that A. had arrived at the NPI’s premises, accompanied by his mother, on the advice of his general practitioner and that since then A. had been subject to psychotherapy which included joint interviews with his mother. The doctor entrusted with the report had noted that the need for A.’s psychotherapeutic treatment was due to early and prolonged periods of separation from his parents, frequent changes of residence, and continuous parental conflict. It was therefore necessary to give A. reference points and daily routines. Overall, his psychological condition had been improving, save for a worrying regression following his return from Romania and Moldova in January 2007, from which he had recovered.
The decision was notified to the Public Prosecutor on 13 August 2007.
C. The steps taken by the applicant to contest the decision
17. On 25 July 2007 the Italian authorities informed the Romanian authorities about the Bologna Youth Court’s decision of 6 July 2007, filed with the court registry on 9 July 2007.
18. On 30 July 2007 the Romanian Ministry of Justice informed the applicant of the decision and told him that it had also requested information from the Italian Ministry of Justice about the available remedies with which to challenge the decision.
19. By letter of 6 August 2007, the Italian Ministry of Justice informed the Romanian Ministry of Justice that the decision could be appealed against through an appeal on points of law to the Court of Cassation, to be lodged within sixty days of the date of the decision – if such rejection was pronounced during a hearing at which the requesting party was present (according to Law no. 64 of 1994) – through an advocate qualified to plead before that court. Alternatively, he could bring an action in accordance with Article 11 of EC Regulation 2201/2003 (“Brussels II bis”).
20. The following day, the Romanian Ministry of Justice informed the applicant of the above and that it had requested further information on the final date to lodge the appeal on points of law and on the applicant’s ability to obtain legal aid.
21. The applicant repeatedly contacted the Romanian Ministry of Justice to obtain the response to those queries, together with the documents which would have allowed him to appeal.
22. On 13 September 2007 the Romanian Ministry of Justice forwarded to its Italian counterpart the applicant’s application for legal aid in order to file an appeal on points of law. The application for legal aid was filed on 25 October 2007.
23. On 29 October 2007 the Council of the Bologna Bar Association granted the applicant legal aid to file an appeal, indicating the Bologna Court of Appeal as the competent court and not the Court of Cassation. It further noted that it was not sure that an appeal was still possible – it being unknown whether the decision had been served, the relevant time-limit could not be calculated. On 30 October 2007 the decision was sent to the Italian Ministry of Justice.
24. By letter of 8 November 2007, the applicant was informed by the Italian authorities that his application had been received on 16 October 2007 and forwarded to the Council of the Bologna Bar Association. No mention was made of the decision of 29 October 2007.
25. According to the documents produced, on 22 November 2007 the decision granting the applicant legal aid was forwarded to the Romanian Ministry of Justice, together with an invitation to inform the applicant, as well as to adduce proof that he had received the decision. It is unknown whether this notification ever reached the Romanian Ministry of Justice, and the information was not transferred to the applicant.
26. On 13 December 2007 upon the applicant’s complaint that he had not been informed of any decision on his application, the Romanian Ministry of Justice urged the Italian authorities to provide an answer.
27. In the absence of a reply, on 3 January 2008 the applicant sent an e-mail to the Romanian Consulate in Rome asking for support in obtaining information on the matter. By letter of 17 January 2008, the General Division of Consular Affairs of the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs informed the applicant that a favourable decision on his application had been taken on 29 October 2007 and that it had been communicated to the Romanian Ministry of Justice on 22 November 2007.
28. On 27 January the applicant wrote to the Romanian Consulate again confirming that to date he had not received a copy of the decision and asking it to ascertain who had sent it on behalf of Italy and who had received it at the Romanian Ministry. On 28 January 2008 the Division of Consular Relations forwarded a copy of the correspondence pertaining to his file to the applicant.
29. On 15 February 2008 the Italian Ministry of Justice asked the Council of the Bologna Bar Association to provide, urgently, a list of the advocates qualified to plead the applicant’s appeal within the legal aid scheme. On 19 March 2008 such a list was sent by the Italian authorities to the Romanian Ministry of Justice, which forwarded it to the applicant on 24 April 2008. On 6 May 2008 the applicant wrote to the Italian Ministry of Justice and to the Council of the Bologna Bar Association indicating his choice.
30. On 16 June 2008 the appointed legal aid lawyer (MCA) made a request to the registry of the Bologna Youth Court to view the relevant files. By letter dated 23 June 2008, addressed to the applicant and the Italian and Romanian authorities (apparently faxed on 2 or 8 July 2008 to the Italian authorities, receipt date for all recipients unknown), MCA indicated that she was not in a position to represent the applicant as she was not qualified to plead before the Court of Cassation and, contrary to the indication given by the Council of the Bologna Bar Association, the only available remedy was an appeal to the Court of Cassation under Article 7 of Law no. 64 of 15 January 1994, such appeal to be lodged within sixty days of notification. She also mentioned that, as it did not appear that the applicant had been notified of the impugned decision, the time-limit to appeal in his case would expire one year and forty-five days after the date of the lodging of the decision with the court registry and, therefore, she advised the applicant to appoint an advocate qualified to plead before the Court of Cassation as soon as possible in order to be able to file the appeal.
31. On 15 July 2008, the applicant wrote to the Council of the Bologna Bar Association asking for a list of advocates qualified to plead in cassation proceedings. On 23 July 2008, the applicant received such a list by e-mail and replied indicating the name of his chosen lawyer.
32. On 12 August 2008, the applicant wrote again to the Council of the Bologna Bar Association requesting further contact details (telephone numbers and e-mail address) for his chosen lawyer. He alleged that the information contained in the list was inaccurate and that he had not been able to establish any contact with the lawyer. No reply was received.
33. The applicant eventually obtained the relevant information from personal contacts and on 23 September 2008, he wrote an e-mail to the lawyer, explaining the situation, and asking whether she had been informed of her appointment. The same day, the lawyer replied stating that she had not been informed and requesting the case documents and a copy of the decision granting legal aid, in order for her to decide whether to take up the appointment. The day after, the applicant reached the lawyer by phone and replied to her by e-mail, giving the information and documents requested.
34. On 25 September 2008 the lawyer informed the applicant that the time-limit of one year and forty-five days to appeal against the decision of 6 July 2007 had expired and that, consequently, she was not in a position to assist him.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Notification and time-limits
35. According to Article 7 of Law no. 64 of 1994, an appeal against a decree of a Youth Court regarding the repatriation of a minor is to be lodged with the Court of Cassation.
36. According to Article 325 of the Code of Civil Procedure (“CCP”), as applicable at the time of the facts of the present case, an appeal to the Court of Cassation was to be lodged within sixty days of notification. In so far as relevant, according to Article 326 of the CCP the time-limit mentioned in Article 325 starts to run from the day on which the decision is served/notified. According to Article 327 of the CCP, as applicable at the time of the present case, in the event that the decision was not served/notified, the appeal is required to be introduced not later than a year from the filing of the decision in the relevant court registry.
37. Article 1 of Law no. 742 of 7 October 1969 regarding the suspension of time-limits during holiday periods reads as follows:
“Time-limits for ordinary and administrative proceedings are legally suspended from 1 August to 15 September of every year and start to run again at the end of the suspension period. Where the time-limit is to start to run during a holiday period, the relevant time-limit shall start to run from the end of that holiday period.”
38. According to Italian jurisprudence (see for example Court of Cassation judgment no. 25702 of 9 December 2009), when, after a first suspension, the original term has not entirely come to an end before the start of a new holiday period, a double computation of the suspension is applied.
Article 3 of Law no. 742 of 7 October 1969 reads as follows:
“In civil matters, Article 1 does not apply to causes and proceedings mentioned in Article 92 of Law no. 12 (1941) on the judicial system and controversies arising under Article 409 (labour cases) and 442 (welfare benefits) of the Code of Civil Procedure.”
Article 92 of Law no. 12 (1941) reads as follows:
“During the holiday period courts of appeal and ordinary courts deal with cases regarding alimony/maintenance, labour law, interim measures, adoptions, temporary interdiction, interdiction, incapacitation, restraining orders for protection against a family member, eviction and oppositions to enforcement, bankruptcy, and other cases in respect of which a delay could cause prejudice to the parties in the proceedings. In the latter case, a declaration of urgency is made by the president at the bottom of the application, by final decree, and for causes already being heard by order of a judge.”
According to Court of Cassation judgments no. 28 of 5 January 1996 and no. 2946 of 20 March 1998, the suspension of time-limits for holiday periods applies to both adoption and paternity proceedings before a Youth Court.
B. Legal aid
39. Legal aid is provided for by Law no. 115 of 30 May 2002. The relevant Articles read as follows:
Article 75
“(2) Free legal assistance is also available in respect of civil, administrative, fiscal and tax proceedings, as well as matters related to voluntary jurisdiction, for the defence of a poor citizen when the claims at issue are not manifestly ill-founded.”
Article 124
“An application [for legal aid] must be submitted to the Council of the Bar Association by the applicant or his lawyer, by means of a registered letter.
The competent Council of the Bar Association is that of the place within which the magistrate of the pending case has his or her seat. If the proceedings are not pending, it is that of the place holding the seat of the magistrate competent to hear the case on the merits. In the event that it relates to the Court of Cassation, the Supreme Administrative Court, or (...) the Court of Auditors, the competent Council of the Bar Association is that of the seat of the magistrate who has delivered the impugned decision.”
C. International instruments and domestic law relevant to the circumstances of the case
40. The relevant articles of the Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, ratified by Romania and Italy, read as follows:
Article 3
“The removal or the retention of a child is to be considered wrongful where –
a) it is in breach of rights of custody attributed to a person, an institution or any other body, either jointly or alone, under the law of the State in which the child was habitually resident immediately before the removal or retention; and
b) at the time of removal or retention those rights were actually exercised, either jointly or alone, or would have been so exercised but for the removal or retention.
The rights of custody mentioned in sub-paragraph a) above, may arise in particular by operation of law or by reason of a judicial or administrative decision, or by reason of an agreement having legal effect under the law of that State.”
Article 4
“The Convention shall apply to any child who was habitually resident in a Contracting State immediately before any breach of custody or access rights. The Convention shall cease to apply when the child attains the age of 16 years.”
Article 6
“A Contracting State shall designate a Central Authority to discharge the duties which are imposed by the Convention upon such authorities. [..]”
Article 7
“Central Authorities shall co-operate with each other and promote co-operation amongst the competent authorities in their respective State to secure the prompt return of children and to achieve the other objects of this Convention.
In particular, either directly or through any intermediary, they shall take all appropriate measures – [...]
f) to initiate or facilitate the institution of judicial or administrative proceedings with a view to obtaining the return of the child and, in a proper case, to make arrangements for organizing or securing the effective exercise of rights of access; [...]”
Article 8
“Any person, institution or other body claiming that a child has been removed or retained in breach of custody rights may apply either to the Central Authority of the child’s habitual residence or to the Central Authority of any other Contracting State for assistance in securing the return of the child. [...].”
Article 9
“If the Central Authority which receives an application referred to in Article 8 has reason to believe that the child is in another Contracting State, it shall directly and without delay transmit the application to the Central Authority of that Contracting State and inform the requesting Central Authority, or the applicant, as the case may be.”
Article 12
“Where a child has been wrongfully removed or retained in terms of Article 3 and, at the date of the commencement of the proceedings before the judicial or administrative authority of the Contracting State where the child is, a period of less than one year has elapsed from the date of the wrongful removal or retention, the authority concerned shall order the return of the child forthwith.
The judicial or administrative authority, even where the proceedings have been commenced after the expiration of the period of one year referred to in the preceding paragraph, shall also order the return of the child, unless it is demonstrated that the child is now settled in its new environment.
Where the judicial or administrative authority in the requested State has reason to believe that the child has been taken to another State, it may stay the proceedings or dismiss the application for the return of the child.”
Article 13
“Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding Article, the judicial or administrative authority of the requested State is not bound to order the return of the child if the person, institution or other body which opposes its return establishes that –
a) the person, institution or other body having the care of the person of the child was not actually exercising the custody rights at the time of removal or retention, or had consented to or subsequently acquiesced in the removal or retention; or
b) there is a grave risk that his or her return would expose the child to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place the child in an intolerable situation.
The judicial or administrative authority may also refuse to order the return of the child if it finds that the child objects to being returned and has attained an age and degree of maturity at which it is appropriate to take account of its views.
In considering the circumstances referred to in this Article, the judicial and administrative authorities shall take into account the information relating to the social background of the child provided by the Central Authority or other competent authority of the child’s habitual residence.”
Article 17
“The sole fact that a decision relating to custody has been given in or is entitled to recognition in the requested State shall not be a ground for refusing to return a child under this Convention, but the judicial or administrative authorities of the requested State may take account of the reasons for that decision in applying this Convention.”
Article 29
“This Convention shall not preclude any person, institution or body who claims that there has been a breach of custody or access rights within the meaning of Article 3 or 21 from applying directly to the judicial or administrative authorities of a Contracting State, whether or not under the provisions of this Convention.”
41. The provisions of the Hague Convention are enforceable in the Italian courts by virtue of Law no. 64 of 15 January 1994.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLES 6 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION
42. The applicant complained that his right to appeal against the decision of the Bologna Youth Court had been impaired by the delays in granting him legal aid, denying him an effective remedy as required by Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
43. The Government contested that argument.
44. The Court reiterates that the role of Article 6 § 1 in relation to Article 13 is that of a lex specialis, the requirements of Article 13 being absorbed by the more stringent requirements of Article 6 § 1 (see, for example, Société Anonyme Thaleia Karydi Axte v. Greece, no. 44769/07, § 29, 5 November 2009). In this light, the Court will examine this complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which in so far as relevant reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
A. Admissibility
45. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
46. The applicant submitted that at the relevant time he had not had concrete information about the whereabouts of his son and the child’s mother or enough knowledge of Italian law to institute proceedings under Article 29 of the Hague Convention. In this light, he had availed himself of the procedure established by Articles 7-9 of the Hague Convention, whereby proceedings could be brought through the relevant Central Authority. In those proceedings, he had been the aggrieved party – despite the fact that it had been the Prosecutor’s Office which had brought the proceedings, as required by the Hague Convention. However, the faults in the legal aid system in his case had denied him the right to appeal against the decision of the Youth Court by which it had refused to order the return of his son.
47. He highlighted that he had only been made aware that he had been granted legal aid in February 2008, with the help of the Romanian authorities and after incessant requests for information on his part. He further noted that while it was true that MCA (who had been included in the list of lawyers proposed by the Government) had obtained copies of the file on 16 June 2008, she had informed him on 2 July 2008 that she was unable to represent him, as she was not qualified to plead before the Court of Cassation. Indeed, because of the Italian authorities’ delays and errors, he had not actually managed to obtain representation until July 2008. The applicant further complained of contradictory and incomplete information having been given to him throughout, which had ultimately denied him access to an appeal process.
48. The Government noted that the proceedings at issue had been instituted by the Prosecutor’s Office under Article 7 of the Hague Convention, and not by the applicant, who could have brought proceedings himself under Article 29 of the Convention. Thus, the relevant decision had only been notified to the parties to the proceedings, namely the Prosecutor’s Office. Given that the applicant had not been notified, the time-limit for him to lodge an appeal had been longer, namely one year from its publication and an additional ninety days as a result of holiday suspension periods. In this light, the Government confirmed that the time-limit for appealing against the decision of 6 July 2007, filed with the court’s registry on 9 July 2007, had been 9 October 2008.
49. They further submitted that the Romanian authorities had been informed of the Bologna Youth Court’s decision promptly, namely on 25 July 2007, as confirmed by a fax (submitted to the Court) of 30 July 2007 from the Romanian authorities making reference to the receipt of that information and another fax of 6 August 2007. Moreover, a decision on the applicant’s legal aid application (submitted on 25 October 2007) had been taken on 29 October 2007 and by 16 June 2008 MCA had been appointed legal aid lawyer and had made a request to the registry of the Bologna Youth Court to view the relevant files. The Government submitted that given that the applicant had been informed promptly, he had had ample time to find a lawyer and despite any misunderstanding about the relevant remedy and competent court, he had had the opportunity to challenge the decision at issue, and it could not be said that he had been denied the opportunity to appeal.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
50. The Court reiterates that Article 6 of the Convention does not compel the Contracting States to set up courts of appeal. However, where such courts do exist, the requirements of Article 6 must be complied with, so as for instance to guarantee to litigants an effective right of access to court for the determination of their “civil rights and obligations”. The “right to a court”, of which the right of access is one aspect, is not absolute; it is subject to limitations permitted by implication, in particular where the conditions of admissibility of an appeal are concerned, since by its very nature it calls for regulation by the State, which enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in this regard. However, these limitations must not restrict or reduce a person’s access in such a way or to such an extent that the very essence of the right is impaired (see Mikulová v. Slovakia, no. 64001/00, § 52, 6 December 2005).
51. There is no obligation under the Convention to make legal aid available for all disputes (contestations) in civil proceedings, as there is a clear distinction between the wording of Article 6 § 3 (c), which guarantees the right to free legal assistance on certain conditions in criminal proceedings, and of Article 6 § 1, which makes no reference to legal assistance (see Del Sol v. France, no. 46800/99, § 21, ECHR 2002-II). However, despite the absence of a similar clause for civil litigation, Article 6 § 1 may sometimes compel the State to provide for the assistance of a lawyer when such assistance proves indispensable to effective access to court, either because legal representation is rendered compulsory, as is done by the domestic law of certain Contracting States for various types of litigation, or by reason of the complexity of the procedure or of the case (see Airey v. Ireland, 9 October 1979, § 26, Series A no. 32). In discharging its obligation to provide parties to civil proceedings with legal aid, when it is provided by domestic law, the State must display diligence so as to secure to those persons the genuine and effective enjoyment of the rights guaranteed under Article 6 (see, inter alia, Staroszczyk v. Poland, no. 59519/00, § 129, 22 March 2007; Siałkowska v. Poland, no. 8932/05, § 107, 22 March 2007; and Bąkowska v. Poland, no. 33539/02, § 46, 12 January 2010). An adequate institutional framework should be in place so as to ensure effective legal representation for entitled persons and a sufficient level of protection of their interests (ibid § 47). There may be occasions when the State should act and not remain passive when problems of legal representation are brought to the attention of the competent authorities. It will depend on the circumstances of the case whether the relevant authorities should take action and whether, taking the proceedings as a whole, the legal representation may be regarded as “practical and effective”. Assigning counsel to represent a party to the proceedings does not in itself ensure the effectiveness of the assistance (see, for example, Siałkowska, cited above, § 100). It is also essential for the legal aid system to offer individuals substantial guarantees to protect those having recourse to it from arbitrariness (Gnahoré v. France, no. 40031/98, § 38, ECHR 2000 IX).
52. However, a State cannot be considered responsible for every shortcoming of a lawyer (see Kamasinski v. Austria, 19 December 1989, § 65, Series A no. 168). Given the independence of the legal profession from the State, the conduct of the case is essentially a matter between the defendant and his or her counsel, whether counsel be appointed under a legal aid scheme or be privately financed, and, as such, cannot, other than in special circumstances, incur the State’s liability under the Convention (see Artico v. Italy, 30 May 1980, § 36, Series A no. 37; Rutkowski v. Poland (dec.), no. 45995/99, ECHR 2000-XI; and Cuscani v. the United Kingdom, no. 32771/96, § 39, 24 September 2002).
(b) Application to the present case
53. The Court firstly notes that the procedure under Article 29 of the Hague Convention is not at issue in the present case in so far as the applicant, who was free to so do, chose to avail himself of proceedings under Article 7 of the said Convention. In the latter proceedings, instituted by the Prosecutor’s Office, the applicant had the role of interested party and was vested with a right to appeal. As to the relevant appeal procedure, the Court points out that, as confirmed by the Government, the relevant remedy in the circumstances of the case was an appeal to the Court of Cassation, which in the present case had to be filed by a lawyer competent to plead before that court by 9 October 2008.
54. The Court further notes that the requirement that an appellant be represented by a qualified lawyer before the Court of Cassation, such as applicable in the present case, cannot, in itself, be seen as contrary to Article 6. This requirement is clearly compatible with the characteristics of a highest court examining appeals on points of law and it is a common feature of the legal systems in several member States of the Council of Europe (see, for instance, Gillow v. the United Kingdom, § 69, 24 November 1986, Series A no. 109; and Vacher v. France, §§ 24 and 28, 17 December 1996, Reports 1996 VI). Indeed, in the present case a lawyer was required for the purposes of the relevant proceedings and in this light legal aid was granted to the applicant. The Court must, however, determine whether that grant sufficed to safeguard the applicant’s right to have access to a court secured in a “concrete and effective manner” (see, inter alia, Sialkowska, cited above § 116, and Korgul v. Poland, no. 35916/08, § 29, 17 April 2012).
55. In view of the general principles mentioned above, the Court must therefore examine whether in the context of these civil proceedings, the State displayed diligence so as to secure to the applicant the genuine and effective enjoyment of his right to appeal under Article 6 and whether the errors, as a consequence of which the applicant’s appeal was never lodged, were manifest and imputable to the legal aid lawyers and if necessary whether they were a result of a deficient framework.
56. The Court refers to the facts of the case as outlined above (paragraphs 17-34). It notes that two matters of concern transpire from those facts, namely the delays on the part of the Italian authorities and the information to the applicant. In the interests of clarity, the Court emphasises that in the present case, directed against the Italian Government, the Italian authorities cannot be held accountable for any delays which occurred in the transfer of information from the Romanian authorities to the applicant.
57. In identifying the delays attributable to the Italian authorities the Court notes that it took the Italian authorities more than two weeks to inform the Romanian authorities about the Youth Court’s decision of 6 July 2007. It then took them at least another week to submit information about the available avenue for appeal, which had been requested by the Romanian Ministry of Justice. Later on, once the information on legal aid had been obtained by the Romanian authorities and sent on to the applicant, the legal aid application sent to the Italian authorities on 13 September 2007 was only filed in court six weeks later, on 25 October 2007. Subsequently, while the decision to grant the applicant legal aid was taken promptly (on 29 October 2007), notice of this decision was only given to the Romanian authorities four weeks later, on 22 November 2007. The relevant information only reached the applicant on 28 January 2008. The Court notes in respect of this latter delay that there appears to have been some fault on the part of the Romanian authorities. However, it also notes that the Italian authorities, who had requested an acknowledgment of receipt by the applicant, did not take any action in the two months during which this acknowledgment was not forthcoming.
Following a request by the Italian Ministry of Justice of 15 February 2008, it took more than a month for the Council of the Bar Association to provide a list of lawyers qualified to plead the applicant’s case. The applicant then made his choice on 6 May 2008. However, the appointed legal aid lawyer only requested the case file six weeks later, on 16 June 2008 and two weeks later she informed the applicant that she was not competent to plead his case. Thus, on 15 July 2008 the applicant requested a new list which the authorities provided to him a week later, on 23 July 2008. However, the information contained therein, concerning his chosen lawyer, had not been correct and requests to the Council of the Bar Association for fresh information remained unanswered. As a result, the applicant only managed to contact a new lawyer through his own efforts on 23 September 2008, two months after the original list was sent.
58. Turning to the guidance supplied and the quality of the information submitted by the Italian authorities, the Court notes that the information provided by the Ministry of Justice on 6 August 2007 contained no proper guidance as to time-limits. The information given subsequently by the Council of the Bar Association on 29 October 2007 contradicted the previous instruction and was erroneous, in so far as it indicated the wrong competent court, and again this information failed to give any guidance as to the applicable time-limits to appeal. In this light, the list of lawyers provided to the applicant also turned out to be inappropriate, as MCA, the lawyer whom the applicant chose from that list, did not take up the appointment as she was not qualified to plead before the Court of Cassation. Despite the fact that at that point it was not yet critical, MCA also erred in informing the applicant that the expiry of the time-limit was one year and forty-five days from the date of the lodging of the decision. Indeed, as mentioned above, given the relevant dates in the present case, two suspension periods were applicable to the one year time-limit to appeal, and therefore the deadline was in fact one year and ninety days from the lodging of the impugned decision. Lastly, when the applicant managed to contact another lawyer (who was competent to plead before the Court of Cassation), after having seen the file the latter also informed him that she was not in a position to assist him on the basis that the time-limit to appeal had already expired. The Court notes that, in reality and as explained above, on that date the applicant still had two weeks, namely until 9 October 2008, to lodge his appeal. Therefore, this refusal by the lawyer was based on an erroneous premise.
59. As to the delays attributable to the Italian authorities discussed above, while it finds it unjustifiable that the provision of certain simple pieces of information required up to and sometimes more than a month, the Court considers that given the generous time-limits applicable in the present case it cannot be said that those delays alone, albeit regrettable, undermined the very essence of the applicant’s right of access to court in order to lodge his appeal.
60. However, the information supplied by the authorities and the legal aid lawyers raises serious concern. Indeed, in the present case, the applicant was repeatedly given incomplete or misleading information about the appeal procedure. The Court considers that the deficient and contradictory information given by two players in the legal aid system, namely the Council of the Bar Association and the Ministry of Justice, as to which remedy was available and which time-limit was applicable contributed substantially to the applicant’s unsuccessful attempt to appeal.
61. As to the advice given by the appointed legal aid lawyers, the Court considers that knowledge of simple procedural formalities falls within the ambit of a legal representative’s competencies just as much as knowledge of substantive legal issues. It is indeed also the lack of such knowledge which makes it necessary for a lay person to be represented by counsel. Therefore, the Court is of the view that such errors may, when critical to a person’s access to court, and when incurable in so far as they are not made good by actions of the authorities or the courts themselves, result in a lack of practical and effective representation which incurs the State’s liability under the Convention. In the present case, the advice of the two appointed legal aid lawyers, both of whom gave erroneous information regarding the applicable time-limit, and one of whom informed the applicant that he could no longer appeal, cannot but amount to a manifest error, which in the present case was fatal to the applicant’s chances of appealing.
62. The Court considers that, given MCA’s previous advice, the applicant could not have imagined that both lawyers were incorrectly applying the calculation of the time-limit and thus had no reason to seek further assistance. Moreover, there does not appear to be any further step he could have taken within the Italian legal framework to ensure that his case had not been dismissed arbitrarily or, even assuming the lawyer had acted in good faith, as a result of wrong advice. Thus, as a consequence of failings in the system itself, namely in the way the relevant bodies directed the applicant and particularly the failings of the appointed lawyers, the applicant lost all possibility of pursuing an appeal against the impugned decision. Thus, in the Court’s view these failings amounted to ineffective representation in special circumstances which incur the State’s liability under the Convention.
63. The Court recalls that it is incumbent on an interested party to display special diligence in the defence of his interests (see Teuschler v. Germany (dec.), no. 47636/99, 4 October 2001, and Sukhorubchenko v. Russia, no. 69315/01, §§ 41-43, 10 February 2005). In this respect it notes that in the light of the facts as presented above, the applicant persistently pursued his case and contacted the relevant authorities to obtain pertinent information. When he was required to act, such as by making his legal aid application or supplying lawyers with the relevant documentation, the time he took to proceed with those actions does not appear excessive. It follows that in the present case the applicant showed the required diligence by following his case conscientiously and maintaining effective contact with his nominated representatives (see, a contrario, Muscat v. Malta, no. 24197/10, § 59, 17 July 2012).
64. In the light of the above, the Court is of the view that the applicant was put in a position in which his efforts to exercise his right of access to court in a “concrete and effective manner” by way of legal representation appointed under the legal aid system failed. In conclusion, the Court considers that in the present case the delay by the Italian authorities in providing relevant and correct guidance, coupled with the lack of practical and effective representation, impaired the very essence of the applicant’s right of access to court in order to appeal against the judgment of the Bologna Youth Court.
65. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLES 6 AND 8 OF THE CONVENTION
66. The applicant complained that in taking the decision, the Bologna Youth Court had exceeded its jurisdiction and competence under the Hague Convention and accordingly had interfered with his right to respect for his private and family life – an interference which had neither been justified nor necessary under Article 8 of the Convention. The applicant further complained of a violation of Article 6, in so far as he had not been given the opportunity to challenge the statements made by his wife’s attorney at the hearing on 18 June 2007 and the expert report ordered by the Bologna Youth Court, and in as much as his subsequent submissions had not been taken into account. Moreover, he had not been able to fully participate in the hearing as the relevant documents had only been made available at the hearing and only in the Italian language. Article 8, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his ... family life ...
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
67. The Government contested that argument.
68. The Court reiterates that it is the master of the characterisation to be given in law to the facts of the case (see Guerra and Others, cited above, § 44). While Article 6 affords a procedural safeguard, namely the “right to court” in the determination of one’s “civil rights and obligations”, Article 8 serves the wider purpose of ensuring proper respect for, inter alia, family life. In this light, the decision-making process leading to measures of interference must be fair and such as to afford due respect to the interests safeguarded by Article 8 (see Iosub Caras v. Romania, no. 7198/04, § 48, 27 July 2006, and Moretti and Benedetti v. Italy, no. 16318/07, § 27, 27 April 2010).
69. In the instant case, the Court considers that this complaint, raised by the applicant under Article 6, is closely linked to his complaint under Article 8, and may accordingly be examined as part of the latter complaint.
A. Admissibility
70. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
71. The applicant submitted that the impugned decision had had no legitimate aim and had been disproportionate. Moreover, it had not been in accordance with the law, as the Italian court had gone beyond its competence according to Articles 13-15 of the Hague Convention by interpreting the notarial deed and making assessments as to parental rights. By refusing his return application, the court had automatically given M. custody rights over the child, a matter which had fallen within the jurisdiction of the Romanian authorities. He submitted that the court’s decision had also not been in accordance with the Hague Convention, as the parents had had joint parental rights and their son had not been allowed to leave Romania with one parent without the consent of the other parent, a consent which had been missing in the present case. He reiterated that his ex-wife and son had moved to Italy on 20 January 2007 without his consent. After he had repeatedly complained to the local authorities, he had turned to the authority responsible for matters involving international kidnapping. Thus, it could not be said that he had acted with delay, and in any event, even assuming that the removal of the child had happened in 2006, the domestic court had been obliged to apply the second paragraph of Article 12 of the Hague Convention and assess whether it would nevertheless have been in the best interests of the child to order his return. In this light, the decision of the Bologna Youth Court had not been in accordance with the Hague Convention and had totally disregarded the best interests of the child.
72. Indeed, the Bologna Youth Court had failed to assess whether, according to Romanian law, the child had been taken away and detained and whether by ordering his return to Romania the child would be faced with a serious risk of being exposed to physical or psychological harm.
73. With reference to the hearing of 18 June 2007 the applicant complained that he had been denied the right to cross-examine witnesses and that the court had disregarded any elements he had put forward relevant to his claims. While it was true that there had been cross-examination in respect of aspects related to their divorce and parental rights, the applicant had not been given access to the medical documents or other evidence referred to by his ex-wife in the proceedings, nor had he been allowed to make arguments challenging that evidence. Requests made by the applicant for the court to obtain further information had been rejected by the court, contrary to the equality of arms principle. The procès-verbal submitted by the Government also showed that the court had not examined the reasons why he deemed the child should be returned and there had been no reference to the invocation of his procedural rights under Article 6 of the Convention. The applicant noted that the situation had been exacerbated by the fact that the public prosecutor had only been entrusted with the case on the day of the hearing, and had not been familiar with the facts of the case and the Hague Convention. Moreover, she had not rebutted any of his ex-wife’s arguments. According to the applicant, the court’s neglect had also been evident in its decision, which had contained factual errors and omissions. Lastly, the applicant argued that his participation had been limited because of the poor quality of the interpretation provided by the interpreter, who had only been able to interpret the proceedings summarily given the speed of the proceedings in the Italian language.
74. The Government submitted that the Youth Court’s decision had been in accordance with the law and the Hague Convention. Even assuming that the applicant’s consent to A. travelling to Italy had been limited to 2005 and that his son’s presence in Italy had therefore become unlawful from 1 January 2006, the applicant had instituted proceedings too late for the purposes of the Hague Convention criteria. In any event, the impugned decision had been based on the pleadings made before the court at the hearing on 18 June 2007 and had had the aim of safeguarding the best interests of the child. Moreover, the applicant had been present and had been assisted by an interpreter during the hearing leading to the impugned decision and had given his views freely.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
75. The Court first notes that the mutual enjoyment by parent and child of each other’s company constitutes a fundamental element of family life and is protected under Article 8 of the Convention (see Monory v. Romania and Hungary, no. 71099/01, § 70, 5 April 2005, and Iosub Caras, cited above, §§ 28-29).
76. In the sensitive area of family relations, the State is not only bound to refrain from taking measures which would hinder the effective enjoyment of family life, but, depending on the circumstances of each case, should take positive action in order to ensure the effective exercise of such rights. Thus, the Court has repeatedly held that Article 8 includes a parent’s right to the taking of measures with a view to his or her being reunited with his or her child and an obligation on the national authorities to take such action. However, the national authorities’ obligation to take measures to facilitate reunion is not absolute, since the reunion of a parent with children who have lived for some time with the other parent may not be able to take place immediately and may require preparatory measures to be taken (see Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, § 94, ECHR 2000 I).
77. In the area of positive obligations, the decisive issue is whether a fair balance between the competing interests at stake – those of the child, of the two parents, and of public order – was struck, within the margin of appreciation afforded to States in such matters (see Maumousseau and Washington v. France, no. 39388/05, § 62, 6 December 2007), bearing in mind, however, that the child’s best interests must be the primary consideration (see Gnahoré, cited above, § 59).
78. Notwithstanding the State’s margin of appreciation, the Court is called to examine whether the decision-making process leading to an interference was fair and afforded due respect to the interests safeguarded by Article 8 (see Ignaccolo-Zenide, cited above, § 99, with further references, and Tiemann v. France and Germany (dec.), nos. 47457/99 and 47458/99, ECHR 2000 IV). To that end, the Court must ascertain whether the domestic courts have made, within a reasonable time, an adequate examination of the concrete implications which the return of the child would have had (see B. v. Belgium, no. 4320/11, § 63, 10 July 2012).
79. Furthermore, the States’ obligations under Article 8 of the Convention are to be interpreted in harmony with the general principles of international law, and, in the area of international child abduction, particular account is to be given to the provisions of the Hague Convention (see Golder v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1975, § 29, Series A no. 18, and Karrer v. Romania, no. 16965/10, § 41, 21 February 2012). A child’s return cannot be ordered automatically or mechanically when the Hague Convention is applicable, as is indicated by the recognition in that instrument of a number of exceptions to the obligation to return the child (see, in particular, Articles 12, 13 and 20), based on considerations concerning the actual person of the child and his environment, thus showing that it is for the court hearing the case to adopt an in concreto approach to it (see Maumousseau and Washington, cited above, § 72). The child’s best interests, from a personal development perspective, will depend on a variety of individual circumstances, in particular his age and level of maturity, the presence or absence of his parents and his environment and experiences (see Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland [GC], no. 41615/07, § 138, 6 July 2010).
80. The task to assess those best interests in each individual case is thus primarily one for the domestic authorities, which often have the benefit of direct contact with the persons concerned. To that end they enjoy a certain margin of appreciation, which remains subject, however, to European supervision whereby the Court reviews under the Convention the decisions that those authorities have taken in the exercise of that power (see, for example, Hokkanen v. Finland, 23 September 1994, § 55, Series A no. 299 A; Kutzner v. Germany, no. 46544/99, §§ 65-66, ECHR 2002 I; Bianchi v. Switzerland, no. 7548/04, § 92, 22 June 2006; and Carlson v. Switzerland, no. 49492/06, § 69, 6 November 2008). The Court is thus competent to review the procedure followed by the domestic courts, in particular to ascertain whether those courts, in applying and interpreting the provisions of the Hague Convention, have secured the guarantees of the Convention and especially those of Article 8 (see, to that effect, Bianchi, cited above, § 92; Carlson, cited above, § 73; and Neulinger and Shuruk, cited above, § 141).
(b) Application in the present case
i. Substantive aspect
81. The Court has previously found that an interference occurs where domestic measures hinder the mutual enjoyment by a parent and a child of each other’s company (see, for example, Raban v. Romania, no. 25437/08, § 31, 26 October 2010, and Carlson, cited above, § 69). Accordingly, the Bologna Youth Court’s decision not to return A. constituted an interference with the applicant’s right to respect for his family life.
82. Turning to the question of whether the interference complained of was “in accordance with the law” within the meaning of Article 8 § 2 of the Convention, the Court observes that the relevant provisions of the Hague Convention were sufficiently clear that in order to ascertain whether the removal was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3 of the Hague Convention, the Italian courts had to decide whether it had been carried out in breach of the rights of custody in the State in which the child was habitually resident immediately before his removal. Moreover, even where removal has been wrongful, Article 13 provides for exceptions where the court is not bound to order the return of the child. In the light of the applicant’s submissions, it must be recalled that it is not the Court’s function to deal with errors of fact or law allegedly committed by a national court unless they may have infringed rights and freedoms protected by the Convention (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 28, ECHR 1999 I). Moreover, the national courts are entrusted to resolve problems of interpretation and application of domestic legislation as well as rules of general international law or international agreement (see Maumousseau and Washington, cited above, § 79). It follows that for the purposes of the lawfulness requirement, the Court is satisfied that the Bologna Youth Court decision had its basis in the provisions of The Hague Convention coupled with Law no. 15 of 1994.
83. The Court also accepts that the interference pursued the legitimate aim of protecting the interests of others.
84. The Court must however determine whether the interference in question was “necessary in a democratic society” within the meaning of Article 8 § 2 of the Convention, interpreted in the light of the above-mentioned international instruments, and whether when striking the balance between the competing interests at stake – those of the child and of the two parents – appropriate account was given to the child’s best interests, within the margin of appreciation afforded to States in such matters (see Karrer, cited above, § 44).
85. As mentioned above, the task to assess those best interests in each individual case is thus primarily one for the domestic authorities, which have the benefit of direct contact with the persons concerned.
86. The Court notes that in the present case the Bologna Youth Court considered that the child had not been wrongfully removed. While the Court fails to see the relevance of the emphasis placed on the fact that the applicant did not have exclusive custody rights, given that the same procedure applies in cases of joint custody (see, mutatis mutandis, Monory, cited above, § 76), it notes that this factor did not constitute the sole basis of the decision that the removal was not wrongful. The domestic court further considered that the applicant had consented to A.’s transfer, presumably on the basis of M.’s testimony and the deed submitted by her, which the domestic court must have found to be more credible vis-à-vis the applicant’s assertion. The Court observes that this is essentially a matter of assessment of evidence falling within the exclusive competence of the national authorities. The Court further observes that despite its decision that the removal was not wrongful the Bologna Youth Court further assessed the implications return would have had for the child, and considered that psychological harm would ensue given that he was integrated into Italian society, albeit with some problems.
87. Having regard to the State’s margin of appreciation in this sphere, and having considered the case as a whole, the Court accepts that the Bologna Court’s decision struck a fair balance between the competing interests at stake giving appropriate account to the child’s best interests.
88. Accordingly, the Court finds that there is no substantive violation of Article 8.
ii. Procedural aspect
89. The Court notes that the applicant also complained that he had been denied access to medical documents and other evidence referred to by his ex-wife in the proceedings, and that he had not been allowed to make arguments challenging that evidence, contrary to the equality of arms principle.
90. In this respect, the Court reiterates that the Convention is designed to “guarantee not rights that are theoretical or illusory but rights that are practical and effective” (see, among other authorities, Airey, cited above, § 24). As regards litigation involving opposing private interests, equality of arms implies that each party must be afforded a reasonable opportunity to present his case – including his evidence – under conditions that do not place him at a substantial disadvantage vis-à-vis his opponent. It is left to the national authorities to ensure in each individual case that the requirements of a “fair hearing” are met (Dombo Beheer B.V. v. the Netherlands, 27 October 1993, § 33, Series A no. 274).
91. In view of its findings under Article 6 in relation to the proceedings at issue (see paragraphs 64-65 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine this part of the complaint.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 12 TO THE CONVENTION
92. The applicant further complained under Article 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 that he had been discriminated against as a father by the Bologna Youth Court, as his statements, arguments and evidence had not been given the same weight as his wife’s. He submitted that his submissions and supporting evidence had been totally disregarded by the courts, as opposed to M.’s unsubstantiated statements.
93. The Government submitted that both the pleadings of the applicant and those of the child’s mother had been considered by the domestic court and therefore no discriminatory treatment had been meted out.
94. In so far as the complaint was lodged under Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 to the Convention, the Court finds that, as Protocol No. 12 has only been signed but not ratified by the respondent State, the applicant’s complaint in this regard is incompatible ratione personae with the Convention, and must therefore be rejected pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention (Maggio and Others v. Italy, (dec.), nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, 8 June 2010).
95. In so far as the complaint was lodged under Article 14, presumably in conjunction with Articles 6 and 8 of the Convention, there are no elements in the case-file which enable the Court to find that the decision of the domestic court was motivated by discriminatory considerations (see Macready v. the Czech Republic, nos. 4824/06 and 15512/08, § 70, 22 April 2010).
96. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 5 OF PROTOCOL No. 7 TO THE CONVENTION
97. Relying upon Article 5 of Protocol No. 7, the applicant further complained that the impugned decision, in practice, had given his wife more rights vis-à-vis their child. He noted that his submissions and supporting evidence had been totally disregarded by the courts, as opposed to M.’s unsubstantiated statements, and no regard had been given to the best interests of the child.
98. The Government submitted that both the pleadings of the applicant and those of the child’s mother had been considered by the domestic court and therefore no difference in treatment had occurred.
99. The Court recalls that it has previously decided that Article 5 of Protocol No. 7 essentially imposes a positive obligation on States to provide a satisfactory legal framework under which spouses have equal rights and obligations concerning such matters as their relations with their children (see Cernecki v. Austria, (dec.), no. 31061/96, 11 July 2000, and Iosub Caras, cited above, § 56).
100. In the present case, the applicant does not question the legislative framework, his complaint being solely directed at the assessment of the domestic court.
101. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
102. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
103. The applicant claimed 150,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage suffered due to the loss of his parental rights and the effect this had had on his son, and due to the anxiety and distress he had experienced on account of the domestic proceedings.
104. The Government considered that no non-pecuniary damage had been suffered since, in their view, the applicant had not been a victim of a violation.
105. The Court considers that the applicant must have suffered distress as a result of the violation found. In the light of the circumstances of the case, and making an assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant EUR 14,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
106. The applicant also claimed EUR 3,500 for costs and expenses incurred before the Court. He submitted a lawyer’s bill for EUR 3,000 and various bills for different amounts related to photocopying, translations and postage fees in conjunction with the proceedings before the Court.
107. The Government submitted that no costs and expenses were due since, in their view, the applicant had not been a victim of a violation. In addition, they noted that the documentary evidence submitted had related to the proceedings in Romania.
108. The Court notes that all the documentation submitted by the applicant relates to the proceedings before this Court, including the bill (in Romanian) related to his lawyer’s fees dated 2012 which clearly states that it is in respect of representation before the European Court of Human Rights. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, together with the fact that a number of complaints were unsuccessful; the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 3,000 covering costs for the proceedings before the Court.
C. Default interest
109. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints brought under Articles 6 and 8 of the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention in so far as the applicant was denied access to court in order to appeal against the judgment of the Bologna Youth Court;

3. Holds that there has not been a violation of the substantive aspect of Article 8 and that it is not necessary to examine the procedural aspect of Article 8 of the Convention;

4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 14,000 (fourteen thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 25 June 2013, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Danutė Jočienė
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Violazione dell’ Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili
Articolo 6-1 - Accesso ad un tribunale)
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 8 - Diritto al rispetto della vita privata e famigliare (Articolo 8-1 - Riguardo alla vita famigliare)


SECONDA SEZIONE






CAUSA ANGHEL C. ITALIA

(Richiesta n. 5968/09)






SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

25 giugno 2013




Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Anghel c. Italia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Danutė Jočienė, Presidente
Guido Raimondi,
Pari Lorenzen,
Dragoljub Popović,
András Sajó,
Işıl Karakaş,
Helen Keller, judges,and
Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato oò 4 giugno 2013,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 5968/09) contro la Repubblica italiana depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino rumeno, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 24 gennaio 2009.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Bucharest. Il Governo italiano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Co-agente, il Sig.ra P. Accardo.
3. Il richiedente addusse che procedimenti di Convenzione di Hague in riguardo di suo figlio erano stati ingiusti e che la distribuzione di corte con la questione era andata a vuoto a prendere in considerazione i migliori interessi del figlio. Inoltre, lui era stato negato accesso ad un ricorso contro la decisione di primo-istanza. Lui considerò che c'era stata una violazione di Articoli 6 e 8 della Convenzione.
4. 14 dicembre 2011 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
5. Il Governo di Romania che era stata notificata col Cancelliere del loro diritto per intervenire nei procedimenti (Articolo 48 (b) della Convenzione e Decide 33 § 3 (b)), non indicò che loro intesero di fare così.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1961 ed attualmente vive in Qatar. Lui si sposò a M. e loro avevano un figlio, A. nato in marzo 2003 in Bucharest, la Romania.
A. Background
7. In seguito alla nascita di A., M. lavorò in Italia per periodi brevi di tempo per assicurare un reddito per la famiglia di quando in quando. Nel 2005, dopo che M. aveva ottenuto un lavoro regolare, il richiedente concordò per A. per viaggiare ad Italia con sua madre. Un atto notarile e formale di 26 aprile 2005, presentato alla Corte gli stati che il Sig. OMISSIS, mentre risiedevanoin Bucharest, diede il suo beneplacito che suo figlio di sotto-età, Anghel A. nato in marzo 2003, risiedendo all'indirizzo summenzionato viaggi alla Repubblica di Moldavia e l'Italia, nel corso dell'anno 2005 accompagnata con sua madre, Anghel M. che Il richiedente ha presentato che simile accordo era stato dato solamente per un periodo limitato di ordine di momento di entrata per concedere contatto in corso con M. Gli show di archivio di causa che M. impugnò questa dichiarazione, mentre adducendo che lei aveva preso il figlio con lei a causa dell'effetto avverso che vivendo con suo padre stava avendo su A. ' sviluppo di s.
8. A gennaio 2006 il richiedente viaggiò in Italia per ritornare A. in Romania. Lui disse che lui aveva trovato il figlio che vive in condizioni molto povere. M. era resistito alle richieste del richiedente per riprendere il figlio a Romania o alternativamente per tutti di loro trasferirsi a Qatar, dove lui aveva trovato un lavoro.
9. Una volta il richiedente era ritornato in Romania, lui registrò un'azione di reclamo penale sotto Articolo 301 del Codice Penale rumeno, mentre adducendo che sua moglie stava detenendo A. in Italia senza il suo beneplacito.
10. Su una data non specificata, il richiedente si trasferì a Qatar. 6 dicembre 2006 lui travelled ad Italia per visitare suo figlio. Lui addusse che A. ' salute di s e le condizioni sociali avevano peggiorato. Sul 2006 padre di 13 dicembre e travelled del figlio insieme a Romania. Sul 2007 M. di 8 gennaio li congiunse. 15 gennaio 2007 loro ogni travelled a Moldavia per pagare una visita a M. ' famiglia di s. Su 20 gennaio 2007, M. ed A. “scomparve.” Il richiedente fondò infine fuori che loro erano ritornati in Italia.
11. 9 febbraio 2007, l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale rumeno decise di non avviare procedimenti penali contro M., come là prova insufficiente era stabilire un reato di punibile. Il richiedente contestò la decisione menzionata sopra il 28 dicembre 2007. Sembra che una corte distrettuale respinse la richiesta come infondato 31 marzo 2008. Il richiedente registrò un ricorso con una corte più alta. Nessuno ulteriori informazioni sono state offerte in relazione a questi procedimenti.
B. Il ricorso per ritorno del figlio sotto la Convenzione di Hague e la decisione della Bologna Gioventù Corte
12. 2 aprile 2007 il richiedente fece domanda al Ministro della Giustizia, designò con la Romania come l'Autorità Centrale responsabile per assolvere i doveri imposti sulla Romania con la Convenzione di Hague di 25 ottobre 1980 sugli Aspetti Civili della Bambino Internazionale Abduction (“la Convenzione di Hague”). Lui chiese al Ministro di assisterlo nel garantire il ritorno di suo figlio che la madre del figlio aveva, lui addusse, erroneamente rimosse ad Italia 20 gennaio 2007.
13. Seguendo i passi si impegnati con le autorità rumene ed italiane in conformità con le disposizioni della Convenzione di Hague, l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore in Bologna iniziò procedimenti di ritorno di fronte alla Bologna Gioventù Corte (Tribunale per i minorenni).
14. 18 giugno 2007 un'udienza ebbe luogo nella presenza del richiedente.
Il seguente sembra dallo scritto a mano procès-verbal presentato dal Governo.
Dichiarazioni seguenti del richiedente e M., il presidente della corte notò l'esistenza di procedimenti di divorzio portata con M. in Romania, insieme con una richiesta per custodia del figlio (obiettò a col richiedente) che ancora era pendente. Lui notò inoltre che mentre la coppia coabitava dal 2004 sino alla fine di 2006, il richiedente era stato spesso assente durante 2006 siccome lui stava lavorando in Qatar.
M. presentò che sino alla fine di 2006 i genitori erano stati concordanti sul dove del figlio, particolarmente in prospettiva del suo lavoro in Italia ed il fatto che il figlio aveva ottenuto un permesso di soggiorno là, aveva cominciato a frequentare scuola e stava vedendo coi sociali e servizi di salute di comunità. M. dibattè che secondo cambi in legge rumena lei non aveva avuto bisogno di prolungare il [la validità del] atto notarile (menzionò sopra) ad anni susseguenti. Lei disse che il figlio prima aveva avuto problemi di salute e che suo padre aveva saputo sempre dove erano loro. M. chiese alla corte di ammettere nella prova il rapporto di un psicologo sulle condizioni del figlio e note scritto e presentate accompagnò con prova che prova la sua rivendicazione.
Il richiedente presentò che l'atto notarile fra lui e M. aveva dato solamente beneplacito ad A. viaggiante ad Italia per fini turistici per il periodo maggio-dicembre 2005 e così lui non aveva acconsentito all'allontanamento del figlio dopo ciò. Nell'assenza di una decisione di custodia il figlio avrebbe potuto vivere con lui in Qatar, invece di in Italia con sua madre senza il suo beneplacito. Comunque, M. era andato a vuoto ad acconsentire a questo, nonostante il fatto che lui potesse dare il figlio un migliore standard di vita. Lui spiegò che lui aveva tentato di giungere ad un regolamento amichevole, ma quando questo era sembrato impossibile lui aveva pigiato accuse contro M. e quelli procedimenti ancora era pendente. Solamente alla fine di 2006 M. avuti fu d'accordo a riprendere il figlio a Romania che segue una visita medica sulla quale aveva insistito il richiedente e quale aveva trovato che il figlio era in salute povera.
L'Accusatore Pubblico chiese alla corte di accettare la richiesta di ritorno, mentre notando che il figlio possibilmente era in Italia da più di un anno e facendo riferimento ad Articolo 17 (sic) della Convenzione di Hague. Lui chiese inoltre alla corte di ordinare un rapporto sulla condizione psicologica del figlio.
15. 5 luglio 2007 il richiedente scrisse al Ministro rumeno della Giustizia, mentre informandolo della condotta dell'udienza. Il richiedente spiegò che lui non era stato dato l'opportunità di impugnare le dichiarazioni resa con l'avvocato di sua moglie, nell'il particolare riguardare: (i) il tempo aveva preso il richiedente per avviare procedimenti dopo la data dell'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta del figlio che secondo il richiedente era stato 20 gennaio 2007 e non-come la corte aveva presunto-gennaio 2006; il risultato della corte che usa la data seconda era che Articolo 12 della Convenzione di Hague venne in giochi, all'effetto che dopo un periodo di un anno un figlio non può essere ritornato se lui ha integrato in società; (l'ii) la contesa che la salute del figlio e problemi psicologici erano imputabili al tempo lui aveva speso con suo padre prima di trasferirsi ad Italia che trovando era stato basato su documenti medici ai quali il richiedente non aveva avuto accesso; (l'iii) la dichiarazione che M. aveva avuto il suo beneplacito su a 1 gennaio 2007, la data sulla quale simile beneplacito non era più necessario (Romania che ha congiunto l'Unione europea), ignorando così l'atto notarile che aveva affermato un specifico periodo di beneplacito; e (l'iv) il fatto che M. aveva cambiato la residenza di loro figlio senza il beneplacito di suo padre, come richiesto con legge. Il richiedente spiegò inoltre che la Bologna Gioventù Corte stava considerando problemi di custodia in violazione della sua competenza sotto la Convenzione di Hague, custodia emette essere all'interno della competenza esclusiva delle corti del paese di domicilio, Romania. Può, inoltre, non decida la causa finché le corti rumene avevano preso una decisione nel divorzio e procedimenti di custodia. Lui contestò inoltre la valutazione del danno potenziale per il figlio nell'evento del suo ritorno a Romania che era stata resa coi servizi sociali, mentre affermando che aveva fatto solamente riferimento al conto parziale della madre del figlio senza qualsiasi valutazione diretta della relazione fra padre e figlio e dell'ambiente sociale se A. fosse vivere in Romania. Il richiedente chiese al Ministro di spedire la sua lettera all'autorità competente in Italia ed alla Bologna Gioventù Corte.
16. Con una decisione di 6 luglio 2007, registrò con la cancelleria di corte 9 luglio 2007, la Bologna Gioventù Corte rifiutò la richiesta per ritorno. Notò che divorzio e procedimenti di custodia ancora erano pendenti in Romania; che M. aveva chiesto che lei ed il figlio vivevano in Italia dal 2006; e che da giugno 2006 A. era conosciuto ai Servizi di Neuropsychiatric Infantili (“NPI”) della Parma Salute AGENZIA Locale (“AUSL”). Inoltre, notò che M. aveva chiesto di avere avuto il permesso richiesto da suo marito per tenere il figlio in Italia in conformità con un atto notarile di 2005 e che il richiedente aveva contestato questo sulla base che lui aveva dato solamente permesso per A. per viaggiare ad Italia per fini turistici, e che, benché lui si era trasferito a Qatar nel 2006, lui volle che il figlio fosse con lui. In che luce, la corte considerò che non c'erano motivi per restituire A. e che, in prospettiva del diritto internazionale attinente, non poteva essere contenuto, che la madre aveva tolto arbitrariamente A. da suo padre come custode legittimo del figlio. La Bologna Gioventù Corte notò che le autorità rumene non avevano preso ancora una decisione su custodia, così i genitori avevano custodia unita, e perciò il richiedente non aveva diritti di custodia esclusivi. Inoltre, il richiedente aveva acconsentito ad A. ' s trasferiscono ad Italia e si erano trasferiti infine a Qatar. Inoltre, la Bologna Gioventù Corte osservò che il figlio era in Italia da più di un anno ed aveva integrato in società italiana, benché con dei problemi. In questa luce, la corte considerò, che danno psicologico avrebbe conseguito come un risultato del suo ritorno. Così non fu obbligato, secondo Articolo 13 della Convenzione di Hague, ordinare il suo ritorno. Dal rapporto di servizi sociale ordinato con la corte, sembrò effettivamente, che A. era arrivato ai locali del NPI, accompagnati con sua madre sul consiglio del suo professionista generale e che da allora poi A. era stato soggetto a psicoterapia che incluse colloqui uniti con sua madre. Il dottore affidato col rapporto aveva notato che il bisogno per A. ' s trattamento psicoterapeutico era dovuto ai primi e prolungati periodi di separazione dai suoi genitori, cambi frequenti di residenza e conflitto parentale e continuo. Era perciò necessario per dare A. punti di riferimento e routine quotidiane. In generale, la sua condizione psicologica stava migliorando, salvi per una regressione fastidiosa che segue il suo ritorno da a gennaio 2007 Romania e la Moldavia dalle quali lui aveva recuperato.
La decisione fu notificata all'Accusatore Pubblico 13 agosto 2007.
C. I passi presi dal richiedente per contestare la decisione
17. 25 luglio 2007 le autorità italiane informarono le autorità rumene della decisione della Bologna Gioventù Corte di 6 luglio 2007, registrata con la cancelleria di corte 9 luglio 2007.
18. 30 luglio 2007 il Ministero rumeno della Giustizia informò il richiedente della decisione e gli disse che aveva richiesto anche informazioni dal Ministero italiano della Giustizia sulle via di ricorso disponibili con cui impugnare la decisione.
19. Con lettera di 6 agosto 2007, il Ministero italiano della Giustizia informò il Ministero rumeno di Giustizia che la decisione potrebbe essere piaciuta contro per un ricorso su questioni di diritto alla Corte di Cassazione, essere depositato entro sessanta giorni della data della decisione-se simile rifiuto fosse pronunciato durante un'udienza alla quale la parte che richiede era presente (secondo Legge n. 64 di 1994)-per un difensore supplicare prima qualificò quel la corte. Alternativamente, lui potrebbe portare un'azione in conformità con Articolo 11 di EC Regolamentazione 2201/2003 (“Brussels II bis”).
20. Il giorno seguente, il Ministero rumeno della Giustizia informò il richiedente del sopra e che aveva richiesto le ulteriori informazioni sulla definitivo data per depositare il ricorso su questioni di diritto e sulla capacità del richiedente di ottenere patrocinio gratuito.
21. Il richiedente contattò ripetutamente il Ministero rumeno della Giustizia per ottenere la risposta a quelle consultazioni, insieme coi documenti che gli avrebbero concesso fare appello.
22. 13 settembre 2007 il Ministero rumeno della Giustizia spedì alla sua cosa uguale italiana la richiesta del richiedente per patrocinio gratuito per registrare un ricorso su questioni di diritto. La richiesta per patrocinio gratuito fu registrata 25 ottobre 2007.
23. 29 ottobre 2007 il Consiglio della Bologna Sbarra Associazione accordò il patrocinio gratuito di richiedente per registrare un ricorso, mentre indicando la Corte d'appello di Bologna come la corte competente e non la Corte di Cassazione. Notò inoltre che non era sicuro che un ricorso ancora era possibile-sé che è ignoto se la decisione era stata notificata, il tempo-limite attinente non poteva essere calcolato. 30 ottobre 2007 la decisione fu spedita al Ministero italiano della Giustizia.
24. Con lettera di 8 novembre 2007, il richiedente fu informato con le autorità italiane che la sua richiesta era stata ricevuta 16 ottobre 2007 ed era stata spedita al Consiglio della Bologna Sbarra Associazione. Nessuna menzione fu resa della decisione di 29 ottobre 2007.
25. Secondo i documenti prodotti, 22 novembre 2007 che la decisione che accorda il patrocinio gratuito di richiedente è stata spedita al Ministero rumeno della Giustizia, insieme con un invito informare il richiedente, così come addurre prova che lui aveva ricevuto la decisione. È ignoto se questa notificazione mai giunse al Ministero rumeno della Giustizia, e le informazioni non furono trasferite al richiedente.
26. 13 dicembre 2007 sull'azione di reclamo del richiedente che gli non era stato informato di qualsiasi decisione sulla sua richiesta, il Ministero rumeno della Giustizia esortò le autorità italiane ad offrire una risposta.
27. Nell'assenza di una replica, 3 gennaio 2008 che il richiedente ha spedito un e-mail al Consolato rumeno a Roma che chiede appoggio nell'ottenere informazioni sulla questione. Con lettera di 17 gennaio 2008, la Generale Divisione di Affari Consolare del Ministero rumeno di Affari Esteri informò il richiedente che una decisione favorevole sulla sua richiesta era stata impiegata 29 ottobre 2007 e che era stato comunicato al Ministero rumeno della Giustizia 22 novembre 2007.
28. 27 gennaio il richiedente scrisse al Consolato rumeno che conferma di nuovo che datare lui non aveva ricevuto una copia della decisione e chiedendo a sé di accertare chi l'aveva spedito in favore dell'Italia e che l'aveva ricevuto al Ministero rumeno. 28 gennaio 2008 la Divisione di Relazioni Consolare spedì una copia della corrispondenza che concerne al suo archivio al richiedente.
29. 15 febbraio 2008 il Ministero italiano della Giustizia chiese al Consiglio della Bologna Sbarra Associazione di prevedere, urgentemente un ruolo dei difensori qualificò supplicare il ricorso del richiedente all'interno dello schema di patrocinio gratuito. 19 marzo 2008 tale ruolo fu spedito con le autorità italiane al Ministero rumeno di Giustizia che lo spedì al richiedente 24 aprile 2008. In 6 maggio 2008 il richiedente scrisse al Ministero italiano della Giustizia ed al Consiglio della Bologna Sbarra Associazione che indica la sua scelta.
30. 16 giugno 2008 l'avvocato di patrocinio gratuito nominato (MCA) fece una richiesta alla cancelleria della Bologna Gioventù Corte per vedere gli archivi attinenti. Con lettera 23 giugno 2008 datò, rivolse al richiedente e le autorità italiane e rumene (apparentemente faxò 2 o 8 luglio 2008 alle autorità italiane, data di ricevuta per tutti i destinatari ignoto), MCA indicò che lei non era in una posizione per rappresentare il richiedente siccome lei non fu qualificata per supplicare di fronte alla Corte di Cassazione e, contrari all'indicazione data col Consiglio della Bologna Sbarra Associazione, la via di ricorso disponibile e sola era un ricorso alla Corte di Cassazione sotto Articolo 7 di Legge n. 64 15 gennaio 1994, simile ricorso per essere depositato entro sessanta giorni di notificazione. Lei menzionò anche che, come sé non sembri che il richiedente era stato notificato della decisione contestata, il tempo-limite per fare appello nella sua causa scadrebbe un anno e quaranta-cinque giorni dopo la data dell'alloggio della decisione con la cancelleria di corte e, perciò, lei consigliò il richiedente di nominare un difensore qualificato per supplicare al più presto possibile di fronte alla Corte di Cassazione per essere in grado registrare il ricorso.
31. 15 luglio 2008, il richiedente scrisse al Consiglio della Bologna Sbarra Associazione che chiede un ruolo di difensori qualificò supplicare in procedimenti di cassazione. 23 luglio 2008, il richiedente ricevette tale ruolo con e-mail e rispose indicando il nome del suo avvocato eletto.
32. 12 agosto 2008, il richiedente scrisse di nuovo al Consiglio della Bologna Sbarra Associazione che richiede gli ulteriori dettagli di contatto (numeri telefonici ed indirizzo di e-mail) per il suo avvocato eletto. Lui addusse che le informazioni contennero nel ruolo era impreciso e che lui non era stato in grado stabilire qualsiasi contatto con l'avvocato. Nessuna replica fu ricevuta.
33. Il richiedente ottenne infine le informazioni attinenti da contatti personali e 23 settembre 2008, lui scrisse un e-mail all'avvocato, mentre spiegando la situazione, e chiedendo se lei era stata informata del suo appuntamento. Lo stesso giorno, l'avvocato rispose affermando che le non era stato informato e richiedendo la causa documenta ed una copia della decisione che accorda patrocinio gratuito, in ordine per lei per decidere se prendere sull'appuntamento. Il giorno dopo, il richiedente giunse all'avvocato con telefono e rispose a lei con e-mail, mentre dando le informazioni e documenti richiesero.
34. 25 settembre 2008 l'avvocato informò il richiedente che il tempo-limite di un anno e quaranta-cinque giorni per fare appello contro la decisione di 6 luglio 2007 era scaduto e che, di conseguenza, lei non era in una posizione per assisterlo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Notificazione e tempo-limite
35. Secondo Articolo 7 di Legge n. 64 di 1994, un ricorso contro un decreto di una Gioventù Corte riguardo al rimpatrio di un minore sarà depositato con la Corte di Cassazione.
36. Secondo Articolo 325 del Codice di Procedura Civile (“CCP”), come applicabile al tempo dei fatti della causa presente, un ricorso alla Corte di Cassazione sarebbe depositato entro sessanta giorni di notificazione. In finora come attinente, secondo Articolo 326 del CCP il tempo-limite menzionato in Articolo 325 avvia correre dal giorno sul quale la decisione è served/notified. Secondo Articolo 327 del CCP, come applicabile al tempo della causa presente, nell'evento che la decisione non era served/notified, il ricorso è costretto a non essere introdotto più tardi che un anno dall'archiviazione della decisione nella cancelleria di corte attinente.
37. Articolo 1 di Legge n. 742 7 ottobre 1969 riguardo alla sospensione di tempo-limiti durante letture di periodi di festa siccome segue:
“il tempo limite per procedimenti ordinari ed amministrativi sono sospesi giuridicamente da 1 agosto a 15 settembre di ogni anno ed avviano correre di nuovo alla fine del periodo di sospensione. Dove è avviare correre durante un periodo di festa il tempo-limite, il tempo-limite attinente avvierà correre dalla fine di che periodo di festa.”
38. Secondo la giurisprudenza italiana (veda per esempio Corteggia di sentenza di Cassazione n. 25702 9 dicembre 2009), quando, dopo una prima sospensione, il termine originale non ha finito completamente di fronte all'inizio di un periodo di festa nuovo, un calcolo duplice della sospensione è fatto domanda.
Articolo 3 di Legge n. 742 del 1969 letture di 7 ottobre siccome segue:
“In questioni civili, Articolo 1 non fa domanda a cause e procedimenti menzionati in Articolo 92 di Legge n. 12 (1941) sul sistema giudiziale e controversie che derivano Articolo 409 sotto (operi cause) e 442 (welfare trae profitto) del Codice di Procedura Civile.”
Articolo 92 di Legge n. 12 (1941) legge siccome segue:
“Durante la corte d'appello di periodo di festa e quantità di corti ordinaria con cause riguardo ad alimenti/mantenimento, operi legge, misure provvisorie, adozioni, interdizione provvisoria, interdizione, incapacità, frenando ordini per protezione contro un membro di famiglia, sfratto ed opposizioni ad esecuzione, fallimento, e le altre cause in riguardo del quale un ritardo potrebbe provocare pregiudizio alle parti nei procedimenti. Nella causa seconda, una dichiarazione di urgenza è resa col presidente al fondo della richiesta, con definitivo decreto e per cause che già sono ascoltate con ordine di un giudice.”
Secondo la Corte le sentenze di Cassazione n. 28 5 gennaio 1996 e n. 2946 20 marzo 1998, la sospensione di tempo-limiti per periodi di festa si applica all'adozione e procedimenti di paternità, di fronte ad una Gioventù Corte.
B. Patrocinio gratuito
39. Patrocinio gratuito è offerto per con Legge n. 115 di 30 maggio 2002. Gli Articoli attinenti lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 75
“(2) assistenza legale e gratis è anche disponibile in riguardo di civile, amministrativo, fiscale e procedimenti di tassa, così come le questioni riferirono a giurisdizione volontaria, per la difesa di un cittadino povero quando le rivendicazioni in questione non è mal-fondato manifestamente.”
Articolo 124
“Una richiesta [per patrocinio gratuito] deve essere presentato al Consiglio dell'Associazione Decaduta col richiedente o il suo avvocato, con vuole dire di una lettera registrata.
Il Consiglio competente dell'Associazione Decaduta è che del posto entro il quale ha il magistrato della causa pendente suo o il suo posto. Se i procedimenti non sono pendenti, è che della partecipazione azionaria di posto il posto del magistrato competente ascoltare la causa sui meriti. Nell'evento che riferisce alla Corte di Cassazione, la Corte amministrativa Suprema, o (...) la Corte di Revisori dei conti, il Consiglio competente dell'Associazione Decaduta è che del posto del magistrato che ha consegnato la decisione contestata.”
C. strumenti Internazionali e diritto nazionale attinente alle circostanze della causa
40. Gli articoli attinenti della Convenzione di Hague di 25 ottobre 1980 sugli Aspetti Civili della Abduzione Internazionale dei Bambini, ratificata dalla Romania e dall'Italia, si legge come segue:
Articolo 3
“L'allontanamento o la ritenuta di un figlio sarà considerata sbagliata dove-
a) è in violazione di diritti di custodia attribuita ad una persona, un'istituzione o qualsiasi l'altro corpo, congiuntamente o da solo sotto la legge dello Stato nella quale il figlio abitualmente era immediatamente residente di fronte all'allontanamento o ritenuta; e
b) al tempo dell'allontanamento o ritenuta quelli diritti davvero furono esercitati, congiuntamente o da solo, o sarebbe stato esercitato così ma per l'allontanamento o ritenuta.
I diritti di custodia menzionarono in supplire-paragrafo un) sopra, può sorgere in particolare con operazione di legge o con ragione di una decisione giudiziale o amministrativa, o con ragione di un accordo che ha effetto legale sotto la legge di che Stato.”
Articolo 4
“La Convenzione farà domanda a qualsiasi figlio che abitualmente era immediatamente residente in un Stato Contraente di fronte a qualsiasi violazione di custodia o diritti di accesso. La Convenzione cesserà fare domanda quando il figlio raggiunge l'età di 16 anni.”
Articolo 6
“Un Stato Contraente designerà una Autorità Centrale per assolvere i doveri che sono imposti con la Convenzione su simile autorità. [..]”
Articolo 7
“Autorità centrali co-opereranno l'un con l'altro e promuoveranno co-operazione fra le autorità competenti nel loro rispettivo Stato garantire il ritorno pronto di figli e realizzare gli altri oggetti di questa Convenzione.
In particolare, o direttamente o per qualsiasi l'intermediario, loro prenderanno tutte le misure appropriate-[...]
f) iniziare o facilitare l'istituzione di procedimenti giudiziali o amministrativi con una prospettiva ad ottenendo il ritorno del figlio e, in una causa corretta, fabbricare disposizioni per organizzando o garantire l'esercizio effettivo di diritti di accesso; [...]”
Articolo 8
“Qualsiasi persona, istituzione o l'altro corpo che chiedono che un figlio è stato rimosso o è stato trattenuto in violazione di diritti di custodia o può fare domanda all'Autorità Centrale della residenza abituale del figlio o all'Autorità Centrale di qualsiasi l'altro Stato Contraente per assistenza nel garantire il ritorno del figlio. [...].”
Articolo 9
“Se l'Autorità Centrale che riceve una richiesta assegnasse ad in Articolo 8 ha ragione di credere che il figlio è in un altro Stato Contraente, può direttamente e senza ritardo trasmetta la richiesta all'Autorità Centrale di che Stato Contraente ed informa l'Autorità Centrale che richiede, o il richiedente, siccome può essere la causa.”
Articolo 12
“Dove un figlio è stato rimosso erroneamente o è stato trattenuto in termini di Articolo 3 e, alla data del principio dei procedimenti di fronte al giudiziale o autorità amministrativa dello Stato Contraente dove è il figlio, un periodo di meno che un anno è passato dalla data dell'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta, l'autorità riguardata ordinerà immediatamente il ritorno del figlio.
Il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa, anche dove i procedimenti sono stati cominciati dopo la scadenza del periodo di un anno assegnata a nel paragrafo precedente, ordinerà anche il ritorno del figlio, a meno che ha dimostrato che il figlio ora sia stabilito nel suo ambiente nuovo.
Dove il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa nello Stato richiesto ha ragione di credere che il figlio è stato portato ad un altro Stato, può sospendere i procedimenti o può respingere la richiesta per il ritorno del figlio.”
Articolo 13
“Nonostante le disposizioni dell'Articolo precedente, il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa dello Stato richiesto non è legato per ordinare il ritorno del figlio se la persona, istituzione o l'altro corpo che oppongono il suo ritorno stabiliscono che-
un) la persona, istituzione o l'altro corpo che hanno la cura della persona del figlio non stavano esercitando davvero i diritti di custodia al tempo dell'allontanamento o ritenuta, o aveva acconsentito ad o successivamente aveva accettato senza protestare l'allontanamento o ritenuta; o
b) c'è un rischio grave che suo o il suo ritorno metterebbe in mostra il figlio a danno fisico o psicologico o altrimenti metterebbe il figlio in una situazione intollerabile.
Il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa possono rifiutare anche di ordinare il ritorno del figlio se trova che il figlio obietta ad essendo ritornato e ha raggiunto un'età e grado di maturità ai quali è appropriato per prendere conto delle sue prospettive.
In in considerazione delle circostanze assegnate ad in questo Articolo, i giudiziali ed autorità amministrative prenderanno in considerazione le informazioni relativo allo sfondo sociale del figlio previsto con l'Autorità Centrale o l'altra autorità competente della residenza abituale del figlio.”
Articolo 17
“Il risuoli fatto che una decisione relativo a custodia è stata data in o è stata concessa a riconoscimento nello Stato richiesto non sarà una base per rifiutare di restituire un figlio sotto questa Convenzione, ma i giudiziali o autorità amministrative dello Stato richiesto possono prendere conto delle ragioni per che decisione nel fare domanda questa Convenzione.”
Articolo 29
“Questa Convenzione non precluderà qualsiasi persona, istituzione o corpo che chiedono che c'è stata una violazione di custodia o diritti di accesso all'interno del significato di Articolo 3 o 21 dal fare domanda direttamente ai giudiziali o autorità amministrative di un Stato Contraente, se o non sotto le disposizioni di questa Convenzione.”
41. Le disposizioni della Convenzione di Hague sono esecutive nelle corti italiane con virtù di Legge n. 64 15 gennaio 1994.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLI 6 E 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
42. Il richiedente si lamentò che il suo diritto per fare appello contro la decisione della Bologna Gioventù Corte era stato danneggiato coi ritardi nell'accordarlo patrocinio gratuito, mentre negandolo una via di ricorso effettiva come richiesto dall’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
43. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
44. La Corte reitera che il ruolo di Articolo 6 § 1 in relazione ad Articolo 13 è che di un specialis della legge, i requisiti di Articolo 13 che è assorbito coi requisiti più severi di Articolo 6 § 1 (veda, per esempio, Société Anonyme Thaleia Karydi Axte c. la Grecia, n. 44769/07, § 29 5 novembre 2009). In questa luce, la Corte esaminerà questa azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che in finora come letture attinenti siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad un'udienza corretta all'interno di un termine ragionevole con un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito con legge.”
A. Ammissibilità
45. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
46. Il richiedente presentò che al tempo attinente lui non aveva avuto informazioni concrete del dove di suo figlio e la madre del figlio o abbastanza conoscenza di legge italiana avviare procedimenti sotto Articolo 29 della Convenzione di Hague. In questa luce, lui si era giovato a della procedura stabilita con Articoli 7-9 della Convenzione di Hague, da che cosa procedimenti potrebbero essere portati per l'Autorità Centrale ed attinente. In quelli procedimenti, lui era stata la parte addolorata-nonostante il fatto che era stato l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore che aveva portato i procedimenti, come richiesto con la Convenzione di Hague. Comunque, le colpe nel sistema di patrocinio gratuito nella sua causa l'avevano negato il diritto per fare appello contro la decisione della Gioventù Corte con la quale aveva rifiutato di ordinare il ritorno di suo figlio.
47. Lui accentuò che lui era stato reso solamente consapevole che lui era stato accordato patrocinio gratuito a febbraio 2008, con l'aiuto delle autorità rumene e dopo richieste incessanti per informazioni da parte sua. Lui notò inoltre che mentre era vero che MCA (chi era stato incluso nel ruolo di avvocati proposto col Governo) aveva ottenuto copie dell'archivio 16 giugno 2008, lei l'aveva informato 2 luglio 2008 che lei non era capace di rappresentarlo, siccome lei non fu qualificata per supplicare di fronte alla Corte di Cassazione. A causa delle autorità italiane ' differisce effettivamente, ed errori, lui non era riuscito davvero ad ottenere rappresentanza sino a luglio 2008. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre di informazioni contraddittorie ed incomplete che gli sono state date in tutto che l'aveva negato ultimamente accesso ad un'elaborazione di ricorso.
48. Il Governo notò che i procedimenti in questione era stato avviato con l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore sotto Articolo 7 della Convenzione di Hague, e non col richiedente che avrebbe potuto portare lui procedimenti sotto Articolo 29 della Convenzione. La decisione attinente era stata notificata solamente così, alle parti ai procedimenti, vale a dire l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore. Dato che il richiedente non era stato notificato, il tempo-limite per lui per depositare un ricorso era stato più lungo, vale a dire un anno dalla sua pubblicazione ed un novanta giorni supplementari come un risultato di periodi di sospensione di festa. In questa luce, il Governo confermò, che il tempo-limite per fare appello contro la decisione di 6 luglio 2007, registrò con la cancelleria della corte 9 luglio 2007, era stato 9 ottobre 2008.
49. Loro presentarono inoltre che le autorità rumene erano state informate prontamente della decisione della Bologna Gioventù Corte, vale a dire 25 luglio 2007, come confermato con un fax (presentò alla Corte) di 30 luglio 2007 dalle autorità rumene che fanno riferimento alla ricevuta di che informazioni ed un altro fax di 6 agosto 2007. Inoltre, una decisione sulla richiesta di patrocinio gratuito del richiedente (presentò 25 ottobre 2007) era stato preso 29 ottobre 2007 e col 2008 MCA di 16 giugno avvocato di patrocinio gratuito era stato nominato ed aveva fatto una richiesta alla cancelleria della Bologna Gioventù Corte per vedere gli archivi attinenti. Il Governo presentò che determinato che il richiedente era stato informato prontamente, lui aveva avuto tempo ampio per trovare un avvocato e nonostante qualsiasi incomprendendo sulla via di ricorso attinente e corte competente, lui aveva avuto l'opportunità di impugnare la decisione in questione, e non si poteva dire che lui era stato negato l'opportunità di fare appello.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) principi Generali
50. La Corte reitera che Articolo 6 della Convenzione non obbliga gli Stati Contraenti a preparare corte d'appello. Comunque, dove simile corti esistono, i requisiti di Articolo 6 devono essere attenutisi con, così come per istanza per garantire a contendenti un diritto effettivo di accesso per corteggiare per la determinazione di loro “diritti civili ed obblighi.” Il “diritto ad una corte” di che il diritto di accesso è un aspetto, non è assoluto; è soggetto a limitazioni permesse con implicazione, in particolare dove le condizioni dell'ammissibilità di un ricorso concernono, poiché con la sua molta natura manda a chiamare regolamentazione con lo Stato nel quale gode un certo margine della valutazione questo riguardo a. Comunque, queste limitazioni non devono restringere o devono ridurre l'accesso di una persona in tale modo o a tale misura che la molta essenza del diritto è danneggiata (veda Mikulová c. la Slovacchia, n. 64001/00, § 52 6 dicembre 2005).
51. Non c'è obbligo sotto la Convenzione per costituire patrocinio gratuito disponibile tutte le controversie (le contestazioni) come là una distinzione chiara è fra l'enunciazione di Articolo 6 § 3 in procedimenti civili, (il c) che garantisce il diritto per liberare assistenza legale su certe condizioni in procedimenti penali e di Articolo 6 § 1 che non fanno riferimento ad assistenza legale (veda Sol di Del c. la Francia, n. 46800/99, § 21 ECHR 2002-II). Comunque, nonostante l'assenza di una clausola simile per controversia civile, Articolo 6 § 1 può obbligare lo Stato a prevedere per l'assistenza di un avvocato qualche volta quando simile assistenza si dimostra indispensabile ad accesso effettivo per corteggiare, uno perché rappresentanza legale è resa obbligatoria, siccome è fatto col diritto nazionale dei certi Stati Contraenti per vari tipi della causa, o con ragione della complessità della procedura o della causa (veda Airey c. l'Irlanda, 9 ottobre 1979, § 26 la Serie Un n. 32). Nell'assolvere il suo obbligo per fornire a parti a procedimenti civili patrocinio gratuito, quando è offerto con diritto nazionale, lo Stato deve visualizzare diligenza così come garantire a quelle persone il genuino e godimento effettivo dei diritti garantirono sotto Articolo 6 (veda, inter l'alia, Staroszczyk c. la Polonia, n. 59519/00, § 129 22 marzo 2007; Siałkowska c. la Polonia, n. 8932/05, § 107 22 marzo 2007; e Bąkowska c. la Polonia, n. 33539/02, § 46 12 gennaio 2010). Una struttura istituzionale ed adeguata dovrebbe essere a posto così come assicurare rappresentanza legale ed effettiva per persone concesse ed un livello sufficiente di protezione dei loro interessi (l'ibid § 47). Ci possono essere occasioni quando lo Stato dovrebbe agire e non rimane passivo quando problemi di rappresentanza legale sono portati all'attenzione delle autorità competenti. Dipenderà dalle circostanze della causa se le autorità attinenti dovrebbero intentare causa e se, prendendo i procedimenti nell'insieme, la rappresentanza legale può essere riguardata come “pratico ed effettivo.” Consiglio che assegna per rappresentare una parte ai procedimenti non assicura in se stesso l'efficacia dell'assistenza (veda, per esempio, Siałkowska, citato sopra, § 100). È anche essenziale per il sistema di patrocinio gratuito per offrire garanzie sostanziali per proteggere quelli che hanno ricorso a sé dall'arbitrarietà individui (Gnahoré c. la Francia, n. 40031/98, § 38 ECHR 2000-IX).
52. Comunque, un Stato non può essere considerato responsabile per ogni difetto di un avvocato (veda Kamasinski c. l'Austria, 19 dicembre 1989, § 65 la Serie Un n. 168). Dato l'indipendenza della professione legale dallo Stato, la condotta della causa essenzialmente è una questione fra l'imputato e suo o il suo consiglio, se consiglio sia nominato sotto un schema di patrocinio gratuito o sia finanziato privatamente, e, come così, non, altro che in circostanze speciali, incorra nella responsabilità dello Stato sotto la Convenzione (veda Artico c. l'Italia, 30 maggio 1980, § 36 la Serie Un n. 37; Rutkowski c. la Polonia (il dec.), n. 45995/99, ECHR 2000-XI; e Cuscani c. il Regno Unito, n. 32771/96, § 39 24 settembre 2002).
(b) Applicazione alla presente causa
53. La Corte nota in primo luogo che la procedura sotto Articolo 29 della Convenzione di Hague non è finora in questione nella causa presente in come il richiedente a che era libero così fa, scelse di giovarsi a di procedimenti sotto Articolo 7 della Convenzione detta. Nei procedimenti secondi, avviò con l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore, il richiedente aveva il ruolo di parte interessata ed era assegnato legalmente con un diritto per fare appello. Come alla procedura di ricorso attinente, la Corte indica, che, come confermato col Governo, la via di ricorso attinente nelle circostanze della causa era un ricorso alla Corte di Cassazione che nella causa presente doveva essere registrata con un avvocato competente supplicare prima che corte in 9 ottobre 2008.
54. La Corte nota inoltre che il requisito che un appellante sia rappresentato con un avvocato qualificato di fronte alla Corte di Cassazione, come applicabile nella causa presente, non, in se stesso, sia considerato contrario ad Articolo 6. Questo requisito chiaramente è compatibile con le caratteristiche di una corte più alta ricorsi esaminatore su questioni di diritto e è una caratteristica comune degli ordinamenti giuridici in molto membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa (veda, per istanza, Gillow c. il Regno Unito, § 69, 24 novembre 1986 la Serie Un n. 109; e Vacher c. la Francia, §§ 24 e 28, 17 dicembre 1996 Relazioni 1996-VI). Effettivamente, al giorno d'oggi la causa un avvocato fu richiesto per i fini dei procedimenti attinenti ed in questo patrocinio gratuito leggero fu accordato al richiedente. Comunque, la Corte deve determinare se che concessione bastò salvaguardare il diritto del richiedente per avere accesso ad una corte garantì in un “maniera concreta ed effettiva” (veda, inter alia, Sialkowska, § 116 sopra e citato, e Korgul c. la Polonia, n. 35916/08, § 29 17 aprile 2012).
55. In prospettiva dei principi generali menzionata sopra di, la Corte deve esaminare perciò, se nel contesto di questi procedimenti civili, lo Stato visualizzò diligenza così come garantire al richiedente il genuino e godimento effettivo del suo diritto per fare appello sotto Articolo 6 e se gli errori, come una conseguenza della quale non fu depositato mai il ricorso del richiedente erano manifesti ed imputabili agli avvocati di patrocinio gratuito e se necessario se loro erano un risultato di una struttura deficiente.
56. La Corte si riferisce ai fatti della causa siccome delineato sopra (divide in paragrafi 17-34). Nota che le due questioni di preoccupazione traspirano da quelli fatti, vale a dire i ritardi da parte delle autorità italiane e le informazioni al richiedente. Negli interessi della chiarezza, la Corte enfatizza, che nella causa presente, diresse contro il Governo italiano, le autorità italiane non possono essere contenute responsabili per qualsiasi ritardi che accaddero nel trasferimento di informazioni dalle autorità rumene al richiedente.
57. Nell'identificare i ritardi attribuibile alle autorità italiane la Corte nota che prese le autorità italiane più che due settimane per informare le autorità rumene della decisione della Gioventù Corte di 6 luglio 2007. Li prese poi almeno un'altra settimana per presentare informazioni del viale disponibile per ricorso che era stato richiesto col Ministero rumeno della Giustizia. Le informazioni su patrocinio gratuito erano state ottenute una volta più tardi, con le autorità rumene ed erano state spedite su al richiedente, la richiesta di patrocinio gratuito spedita alle autorità italiane 13 settembre 2007 fu registrata solamente sei settimane più tardi in corte, 25 ottobre 2007. Successivamente, mentre la decisione di accordare il patrocinio gratuito di richiedente fu presa prontamente (29 ottobre 2007), avviso di questa decisione fu dato solamente quattro settimane più tardi alle autorità rumene, 22 novembre 2007. Le informazioni attinenti giunsero solamente al richiedente 28 gennaio 2008. La Corte nota in riguardo di questo ritardo secondo che là sembra essere stato della colpa da parte delle autorità rumene. Nota anche comunque, che le autorità italiane che avevano richiesto un riconoscimento di ricevuta col richiedente non presero qualsiasi nei due mesi azione durante la quale questo riconoscimento non era imminente.
Seguendo una richiesta col Ministero italiano della Giustizia di 15 febbraio 2008, ci volle più di un mese per il Consiglio dell'Associazione Decaduta per offrire un ruolo di avvocati qualificato per supplicare la causa del richiedente. Il richiedente fece poi la sua scelta in 6 maggio 2008. L'avvocato di patrocinio gratuito nominato richiese solamente comunque, sei settimane più tardi l'archivio di causa, 16 giugno 2008 e due settimane più tardi lei informò il richiedente che lei non era competente per supplicare la sua causa. 15 luglio 2008 il richiedente richiese così, un ruolo nuovo che le autorità offrirono un settimana più tardi a lui, 23 luglio 2008. Comunque, le informazioni contennero therein, mentre concernendo il suo avvocato eletto, non aveva avuto ragione e richieste al Consiglio dell'Associazione Decaduta per informazioni nuove rimaste senza risposta. Di conseguenza, il richiedente riuscì solamente a contattare un avvocato nuovo per i suoi propri sforzi 23 settembre 2008, due mesi dopo che il ruolo originale fu spedito.
58. Rivolgendosi alla guida approvvigionò e la qualità delle informazioni presentò con le autorità italiane, la Corte nota che le informazioni previdero col Ministero della Giustizia 6 agosto 2007 non contenne guida corretta come a tempo-limiti. Le informazioni date successivamente col Consiglio dell'Associazione Decaduta 29 ottobre 2007 contraddissero l'istruzione precedente ed erano erronee, in finora come sé indicò la corte competente e sbagliata, e di nuovo queste informazioni andarono a vuoto a dare qualsiasi la guida come ai tempo-limiti applicabili per fare appello. In questa luce, il ruolo di avvocati previde anche al richiedente risultato per essere improprio, come MCA l'avvocato da che il richiedente scelse che ruolo, non prese sull'appuntamento siccome lei non fu qualificata per supplicare di fronte alla Corte di Cassazione. Nonostante il fatto che a che punto non era ancora critico, MCA errò anche nell'informare il richiedente che la scadenza del tempo-limite era un anno e quaranta-cinque giorni dalla data dell'alloggio della decisione. Effettivamente, siccome menzionato sopra, dato le date attinenti nella causa presente, due periodi di sospensione erano applicabili al tempo-limite di anno del uno per fare appello, e perciò il termine massimo era infatti un anno e novanta giorni dall'alloggio della decisione contestata. Infine, quando il richiedente riuscì a contattare un altro avvocato (chi era competente per supplicare di fronte alla Corte di Cassazione), dopo avere visto anche l'archivio il secondo l'informò che lei non era in una posizione per assisterlo sulla base che il tempo-limite per fare appello già era scaduto. La Corte nota che, in realtà e siccome spiegato sopra, su che data il richiedente ancora aveva due settimane, vale a dire sino a 9 ottobre 2008, depositare il suo ricorso. Perciò, questo rifiuto con l'avvocato fu basato su un locale erroneo.
59. Come ai ritardi attribuibile alle autorità italiane discusse sopra di, mentre lo trova ingiustificabile che la disposizione di certi semplici pezzi di informazioni richiese su ad e qualche volta più di un mese, la Corte considera che determinato i tempo-limiti generosi applicabile nella causa presente non può essere detto che quelli ritardi da solo, benché deplorevole, minò la molta essenza del diritto del richiedente di accesso per corteggiare per depositare il suo ricorso.
60. Comunque, le informazioni approvvigionate con le autorità e gli aumenti di avvocati di patrocinio gratuito preoccupazione seria. Effettivamente, al giorno d'oggi la causa, il richiedente fu dato ripetutamente informazioni incomplete o ingannevoli della procedura di ricorso. La Corte considera che le informazioni deficienti e contraddittorie date con due giocatori nel sistema di patrocinio gratuito, vale a dire il Consiglio dell'Associazione Decaduta ed il Ministero di Giustizia come a che via di ricorso era disponibile e quale tempo-limite era applicabile contribuito sostanzialmente al tentativo senza successo del richiedente di fare appello.
61. Come al consiglio dato con gli avvocati di patrocinio gratuito nominati, la Corte considera, che conoscenza delle semplici formalità procedurali incorre all'interno dell'ambito delle competenze di un rappresentante legale nel momento in cui molto come conoscenza di problemi legali ed effettivi. È davvero anche la mancanza di simile conoscenza che lo costituisce necessario una persona laica per essere rappresentato con consiglio. Perciò, la Corte è della prospettiva che simile errori possono, quando critico all'accesso di una persona per corteggiare, e quando incurabile in finora siccome loro non sono resi buoni con azioni delle autorità o le corti loro, dia luogo ad una mancanza di rappresentanza pratica ed effettiva che incorre nella responsabilità dello Stato sotto la Convenzione. Al giorno d'oggi causa, il consiglio dei due avvocati di patrocinio gratuito nominati sia di chi informazioni erronee diedero riguardo al tempo-limite applicabile, ed uno di chi informato il richiedente che lui non potrebbe fare appello più, non ma corrisponda ad un errore manifesto che nella causa presente era fatale alle opportunità del richiedente di fare appello.
62. La Corte considera che, il consiglio precedente di MCA determinato, il richiedente non poteva immaginare che ambo gli avvocati stavano facendo domanda erroneamente il calcolo del tempo-limite e così non avevano nessuna ragione di chiedere l'ulteriore assistenza. Inoltre, là non sembri essere qualsiasi l'ulteriore passo che lui avrebbe potuto prendere all'interno della struttura legale italiana per assicurare che la sua causa non era stata archiviata arbitrariamente o, presumendo anche che l'avvocato, aveva agito nella buon fede, come un risultato di consiglio sbagliato. Come una conseguenza delle debolezze nel sistema stesso, i corpi attinenti diressero vale a dire nel modo così, il richiedente e particolarmente le debolezze degli avvocati nominati, il richiedente perse ogni possibilità di intraprendere un ricorso contro la decisione contestata. Nella prospettiva della Corte queste debolezze corrisposero così, a rappresentanza inefficace in circostanze speciali che incorrono nella responsabilità dello Stato sotto la Convenzione.
63. I richiami di Corte che è in carica su una parte interessata per visualizzare diligenza speciale nella difesa dei suoi interessi (veda Teuschler c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 47636/99, 4 ottobre 2001, e Sukhorubchenko c. la Russia, n. 69315/01, §§ 41-43 10 febbraio 2005). In questo riguardo nota che nella luce dei fatti siccome presentato sopra, il richiedente intraprese insistentemente la sua causa e contattò le autorità attinenti per ottenere informazioni pertinenti. Quando lui fu costretto ad agire, come con facendo la sua richiesta di patrocinio gratuito o avvocati che approvvigionano con la documentazione attinente, il tempo lui prese procedere con quelle azioni non sembri eccessivo. Segue che nella causa presente il richiedente mostrò la diligenza richiesta con seguendo coscienziosamente la sua causa e mantenendo contatto effettivo coi suoi rappresentanti nominati (veda, un contrario, Moscato c. il Malta, n. 24197/10, § 59 17 luglio 2012).
64. Nella luce del sopra, la Corte è della prospettiva che il richiedente è stato fissato in una posizione in che i suoi sforzi di esercitare il suo diritto di accesso per corteggiare in un “maniera concreta ed effettiva” con modo di rappresentanza legale nominato sotto il sistema di patrocinio gratuito fallito. In conclusione, la Corte considera, che nella causa presente il ritardo con le autorità italiane nell'offrire guida attinente e corretta, accoppiò con la mancanza di rappresentanza pratica ed effettiva, danneggiò la molta essenza del diritto del richiedente di accesso per corteggiare per fare appello contro la sentenza della Bologna Gioventù Corte.
65. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLI 6 E 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
66. Il richiedente si lamentò che nel prendere la decisione, la Bologna Gioventù Corte aveva ecceduto la sua giurisdizione e la competenza sotto la Convenzione di Hague ed aveva interferito di conseguenza con diritto suo per rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia-un'interferenza che né era stata giustificata né necessario sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre di una violazione di Articolo 6, in finora siccome lui non era stato dato l'opportunità di impugnare le dichiarazioni resa con l'avvocato di sua moglie all'udienza su 18 giugno 2007 ed il rapporto competente ordinati con la Bologna Gioventù Corte, ed in tanto quanto le sue osservazioni susseguenti non era stato preso in considerazione. Inoltre, lui non era stato in grado partecipare pienamente nell'udienza come i documenti attinenti era stato reso solamente disponibile all'udienza e solamente nella lingua italiana. Articolo 8, in finora come attinente, legga siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare..”
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
67. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
68. La Corte reitera che è il padrone del characterisation per essere dato in legge ai fatti della causa (veda Guerra ed Altri, citato sopra, § 44). Mentre Articolo 6 riconosce una salvaguardia procedurale, vale a dire il “diritto per corteggiare” nella determinazione di uno “diritti civili ed obblighi”, Articolo 8 notifica il fine più ampio di assicurare riguardo corretto per, inter alia, vita di famiglia. In questa luce, l'elaborazione decisionale che conduce a misure di interferenza deve essere equa e come riconoscere riguardo dovuto agli interessi salvaguardò con Articolo 8 (veda Iosub Caras c. la Romania, n. 7198/04, § 48, 27 luglio 2006, e Moretti e Benedetti c. l'Italia, n. 16318/07, § 27 27 aprile 2010).
69. Nella causa presente, la Corte considera, che questa azione di reclamo, sollevata col richiedente sotto Articolo 6 è collegata da vicino alla sua azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 8, e può essere esaminato di conseguenza come parte dell'azione di reclamo seconda.
A. Ammissibilità
70. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
71. Il richiedente presentò che la decisione contestata non aveva avuto scopo legittimo ed era stata sproporzionata. Inoltre, non era stato in conformità con la legge, siccome la corte italiana era andata oltre la sua competenza secondo Articoli 13-15 della Convenzione di Hague con interpretando l'atto notarile e valutazioni che rendono come a diritto parentale. Rifiutando la sua richiesta di ritorno, la corte aveva dato automaticamente diritti di custodia di M. sul figlio, una questione che era incorsa all'interno della giurisdizione delle autorità rumene. Lui presentò che la decisione della corte era stata neanche in conformità con la Convenzione di Hague, siccome i genitori avevano avuto diritto parentale uniti e a loro figlio non è stato permesso di lasciare Romania con un genitore senza il beneplacito dell'altro genitore, un beneplacito che stava perdendo nella causa presente. Lui reiterò che sua ex-moglie e figlio si erano trasferiti ad Italia 20 gennaio 2007 senza il suo beneplacito. Dopo che lui si era lamentato ripetutamente alle autorità locali, lui si era rivolto all'autorità responsabile per questioni che comportano rapimento internazionale. Così, non si poteva dire che lui aveva agito con ritardo, ed in qualsiasi l'evento, presumendo anche che all'allontanamento del figlio era accaduto nel 2006, la corte nazionale era stata obbligata a fare domanda il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 12 della Convenzione di Hague e valutare se sarebbe stato ciononostante nei migliori interessi del figlio per ordinare il suo ritorno. In questa luce, la decisione della Bologna Gioventù Corte non era stata in conformità con la Convenzione di Hague ed aveva trascurato totalmente i migliori interessi del figlio.
72. Effettivamente, la Bologna Gioventù Corte era andata a vuoto a valutare se, secondo legge rumena, il figlio era stato portato via, ed era stato detenuto e se con ordinando il suo ritorno a Romania il figlio sarebbe affrontato con un rischio serio di essere messo in mostra a danno fisico o psicologico.
73. Con riferimento all'udienza di 18 giugno 2007 il richiedente si lamentò che lui era stato negato il diritto per interrogare testimoni e che la corte aveva trascurato qualsiasi elementi che lui aveva fissato in avanti attinente alle sue rivendicazioni. Mentre era vero che c'era stato interrogatorio in riguardo di aspetti riferito al loro divorzio e diritto parentale, il richiedente non era stato dato accesso ai documenti medici o l'altra prova assegnate a con sua ex-moglie nei procedimenti, né gli era stato concesso per fare argomenti che impugnano quel la prova. Richieste costituite col richiedente la corte per ottenere le ulteriori informazioni erano state respinte con la corte, contrari all'uguaglianza di principio di braccio. I procès-verbali presentarono anche col Governo mostrò che la corte non aveva esaminato le ragioni perché lui ritenne il figlio dovrebbe essere ritornato e non c'era stato riferimento alla chiamata dei suoi diritti procedurali sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Il richiedente notò che la situazione era stata esacerbata col fatto che l'accusatore pubblico era stato affidato solamente con la causa nel giorno dell'udienza, e non era stato familiarizzato coi fatti della causa e la Convenzione di Hague. Inoltre, lei non aveva rifiutato qualsiasi degli argomenti di sua ex-moglie. Secondo il richiedente, la negligenza della corte era stata anche evidente nella sua decisione che aveva contenuto errori che riguarda i fatti ed omissioni. Infine, il richiedente dibatté che la sua partecipazione era stata limitata a causa della qualità povera dell'interpretazione prevista con l'interprete che era stato solamente in grado interpretare insieme i procedimenti dato la velocità dei procedimenti nella lingua italiana.
74. Il Governo presentò che la decisione della Gioventù Corte era stata in conformità con la legge e la Convenzione di Hague. Presumendo anche che il beneplacito del richiedente ad A. viaggiante ad Italia era stato limitato a 2005 e che la presenza di suo figlio in Italia diveniva perciò illegale da 1 gennaio 2006, il richiedente aveva avviato troppo tardi procedimenti per i fini del criterio di Convenzione di Hague. In qualsiasi l'evento, la decisione contestata era stata basata sulle note rese di fronte alla corte all'udienza 18 giugno 2007 ed aveva avuto lo scopo di salvaguardare i migliori interessi del figlio. Inoltre, il richiedente era stato presente ed era stato assistito con un interprete durante l'udienza che conduce alla decisione contestata ed aveva dato liberamente le sue prospettive.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) principi Generali
75. La Corte prima nota che il godimento reciproco con genitore e figlio dell'un l'altro società costituisce un elemento fondamentale della vita di famiglia e è protetta sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione (veda Monory c. Romania e l'Ungheria, n. 71099/01, § 70, 5 aprile 2005, ed Iosub Caras citato sopra, §§ 28-29).
76. Nell'area sensibile di relazioni di famiglia, lo Stato non solo è legato per frenarsi dal prendere misure che impedirebbero il godimento effettivo della vita di famiglia, ma, dipendendo dalle circostanze di ogni causa, dovrebbe intentare causa positiva per assicurare l'esercizio effettivo di simile diritti. La Corte ha sostenuto ripetutamente così, che Articolo 8 include il diritto di un genitore alla presa di misure con una prospettiva a suo o lei che si è riunita con suo o il suo figlio ed un obbligo sulle autorità nazionali per intentare simile causa. Comunque, le autorità nazionali l'obbligo di ' per prendere misure per facilitare riunione non è assoluto, fin dalla riunione di un genitore con figli che hanno vissuto per del tempo con l'altro genitore non può essere in grado immediatamente succedere e può costringere misure preparatorie ad essere preso (veda Ignaccolo-Zenide c. la Romania, n. 31679/96, § 94 ECHR 2000-io).
77. Nell'area di obblighi positivi, il problema decisivo è, se un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi che competono in pericolo-quelli del figlio, dei due genitori e di ordine pubblico-fu previsto, all'interno del margine della valutazione riconosciuto a Stati in simile questioni (veda Maumousseau e Washington c. la Francia, n. 39388/05, § 62 6 dicembre 2007), tenendo presente, comunque che i migliori interessi del figlio devono essere la considerazione primaria (veda Gnahoré, citato sopra, § 59).
78. Nonostante il margine dello Stato della valutazione, la Corte è chiamata per esaminare, se l'elaborazione decisionale che conduce ad un'interferenza era equa e riconobbe riguardo dovuto agli interessi salvaguardati con Articolo 8 (veda Ignaccolo-Zenide, citato sopra, § 99, con gli ulteriori riferimenti e Tiemann c. Francia e la Germania (il dec.), N. 47457/99 e 47458/99, ECHR 2000-IV). A quello fine, la Corte deve accertare se le corti nazionali hanno reso, all'interno di un termine ragionevole, un esame adeguato delle implicazioni concrete che avrebbe avuto il ritorno del figlio (veda B. c. il Belgio, n. 4320/11, § 63 10 luglio 2012).
79. Inoltre, gli Stati gli obblighi di ' sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione saranno interpretati in armonia coi principi generali di diritto internazionale, e, nell'area dell'abduzione di figlio internazionale, il particolare conto sarà dato alle disposizioni della Convenzione di Hague (veda Golder c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1975, § 29 la Serie Un n. 18, e Karrer c. la Romania, n. 16965/10, § 41 21 febbraio 2012). Il ritorno di un figlio non si può ordinare automaticamente o meccanicamente quando la Convenzione di Hague è applicabile, siccome è indicato col riconoscimento in che strumento di un numero di eccezioni all'obbligo per restituire il figlio (veda, in particolare, Articoli 12, 13 e 20), basato sulle considerazioni riguardo alla persona effettiva del figlio ed il suo ambiente, mostrando così che è per l'udienza di corte la causa per adottare un in approccio di concerto a sé (veda Maumousseau e Washington, citato sopra, § 72). I migliori interessi del figlio, da una prospettiva di sviluppo personale dipenderanno da una varietà di circostanze individuali, in particolare la sua età e livello della maturità, la presenza o l'assenza dei suoi genitori ed il suo ambiente ed esperimenta (veda Neulinger e Shuruk c. la Svizzera [GC], n. 41615/07, § 138 6 luglio 2010).
80. Il compito per valutare quelli migliori interessi di ogni causa individuale è così primariamente uno per le autorità nazionali che spesso hanno il beneficio di contatto diretto con le persone riguardate. A quello fine loro godono un certo margine di valutazione che rimane materia comunque, a soprintendenza europea da che cosa la Corte fa una rassegna sotto la Convenzione le decisioni che quelle autorità hanno preso nell'esercizio di che il potere (veda, per esempio, Hokkanen c. la Finlandia, 23 settembre 1994, § 55 la Serie Un n. 299-un; Kutzner c. la Germania, n. 46544/99, §§ 65-66 ECHR 2002-io; Bianchi c. la Svizzera, n. 7548/04, § 92 22 giugno 2006; e Carlson c. la Svizzera, n. 49492/06, § 69 6 novembre 2008). La Corte è così competente per fare una rassegna la procedura seguita con le corti nazionali, in particolare accertare se quelle corti, nel facendo domanda ed interpretare le disposizioni della Convenzione di Hague hanno garantito le garanzie della Convenzione e specialmente quelli di Articolo 8 (veda, a quell'effetto, Bianchi citato sopra, § 92; Carlson, citato sopra, § 73; e Neulinger e Shuruk, citato sopra, § 141).
(b) Applicazione nella causa presente
i. Aspetto effettivo
81. La Corte prima ha trovato che accade un'interferenza dove misure nazionali impediscono il godimento reciproco con un genitore ed un figlio dell'un l'altro società (veda, per esempio, Raban c. la Romania, n. 25437/08, § 31, 26 ottobre 2010, e Carlson citato sopra, § 69). Di conseguenza, la decisione della Bologna Gioventù Corte di non restituire A. costituì un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente per rispettare per vita di famiglia sua.
82. Rivolgendosi alla questione di se l'interferenza si lamentò di era “nella conformità con la legge” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione, la Corte osserva che le disposizioni attinenti della Convenzione di Hague erano sufficientemente chiare che per accertare se l'allontanamento era sbagliato all'interno del significato di Articolo 3 della Convenzione di Hague, le corti italiane dovevano decidere se era stato eseguito in violazione dei diritti di custodia nello Stato nel quale il figlio abitualmente era immediatamente residente di fronte al suo allontanamento. Inoltre, anche dove è stato sbagliato l'allontanamento, Articolo 13 prevede per eccezioni dove la corte non è legata per ordinare il ritorno del figlio. Nella luce delle osservazioni del richiedente, deve essere ricordato, che non è la funzione della Corte per trattare con errori di fatto o legge commise presumibilmente con una corte nazionale a meno che loro possono fare proteggere diritti violati e le libertà con la Convenzione (veda García Ruiz c. la Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 28 ECHR 1999-io). Inoltre, le corti nazionali sono affidate per chiarire problemi di interpretazione e la richiesta di legislazione nazionale così come articoli di diritto internazionale generale o accordo internazionale (veda Maumousseau e Washington, citato sopra, § 79). Segue che per i fini del requisito di legalità, la Corte è soddisfatta, che la Bologna Gioventù Corte decisione aveva la sua base nelle disposizioni di La Convenzione di Hague accoppiate con Legge n. 15 di 1994.
83. La Corte accetta anche che l'interferenza intraprese lo scopo legittimo di proteggere gli interessi di altri.
84. La Corte deve determinare comunque se l'interferenza in oggetto era “necessario in una società democratica” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione, interpretati nella luce degli strumenti internazionali e summenzionati e se quando prevedendo l'equilibrio fra gli interessi che competono in pericolo-quelli del figlio e dei due genitori-conto appropriato fu dato ai migliori interessi del figlio, all'interno del margine della valutazione riconosciuto a Stati in simile questioni (veda Karrer, citato sopra, § 44).
85. Siccome menzionato sopra, il compito per valutare quelli migliori interessi di ogni causa individuale è così primariamente uno per le autorità nazionali che hanno il beneficio di contatto diretto con le persone riguardate.
86. La Corte nota che nella causa presente la Bologna Gioventù Corte considerò che il figlio non era stato rimosso erroneamente. Mentre la Corte va a vuoto a vedere l'attinenza dell'enfasi messa sul fatto che il richiedente non aveva diritti di custodia esclusivi, determinato che la stessa procedura fa domanda in cause di custodia unita (veda, mutatis mutandis, Monory citato sopra, § 76), nota che questo fattore non costituì il risuola base della decisione che l'allontanamento non era sbagliato. La corte nazionale considerò inoltre che il richiedente aveva acconsentito ad A. ' s trasferiscono, presumibilmente sulla base di M. ' testimonianza di s e l'atto presentati con lei che la corte nazionale ha dovuto trovare essere vis-à-vis più credibile l'asserzione del richiedente. La Corte osserva che questa essenzialmente è una questione di valutazione di prova che incorre all'interno della competenza esclusiva delle autorità nazionali. La Corte osserva inoltre che nonostante la sua decisione che l'allontanamento non era inoltre sbagliato la Bologna Gioventù Corte valutò le implicazioni ritornano avrebbe avuto per il figlio, e considerato che danno psicologico conseguirebbe determinato che lui fu integrato in società italiana, benché con dei problemi.
87. Avendo riguardo al margine dello Stato della valutazione in questa sfera, ed avendo considerato la causa nell'insieme, la Corte accetta che la decisione della Corte di Bologna previde un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi che competono a gioco che dà conto appropriato ai migliori interessi del figlio.
88. Di conseguenza, i costatazione di Corte che non c'è nessuna violazione effettiva di Articolo 8.
ii. Aspetto procedurale
89. La Corte nota che il richiedente si lamentò anche che lui era stato negato accesso a documenti medici e l'altra prova assegnate a con sua ex-moglie nei procedimenti, e che gli non era stato concesso per fare argomenti che impugnano che prova, contrari all'uguaglianza di principio di braccio.
90. In questo riguardo, la Corte reitera, che la Convenzione è disegnata “non garantisca diritti che sono teoretici o illusori ma diritti che sono pratici ed effettivi” (veda, fra le altre autorità, Airey, citato sopra, § 24). Come riguardi causa coinvolgendo opponendo interessi privati, l'uguaglianza di braccio implica che ogni parte deve essere riconosciuta un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare la sua causa-incluso la sua prova-sotto condizioni che non lo mettono ad un vis-à-vis di svantaggio sostanziale il suo oppositore. Ha lasciato alle autorità nazionali per assicurare in ogni causa individuale che i requisiti di un “l'udienza corretta” è incontrato (Dombo Beheer B.V. c. i Paesi Bassi, 27 ottobre 1993, § 33 la Serie Un n. 274).
91. In prospettiva delle sue sentenze sotto Articolo 6 in relazione ai procedimenti in questione (veda divide in paragrafi 64-65 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario per esaminare questa parte dell'azione di reclamo.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE ED ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 12 ALLA CONVENZIONE
92. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12 che lui era stato discriminato contro come un padre con la Bologna Gioventù Corte, come le sue dichiarazioni argomenti e prova non erano state date lo stesso peso come sua moglie. Lui presentò che le sue osservazioni e sostenere prova era stato totalmente trascurato con le corti, come opposto a M. ' s dichiarazioni non comprovate.
93. Il Governo presentò che sia le note del richiedente e quelli della madre del figlio erano state considerate con la corte nazionale e perciò nessun trattamento discriminatorio era stato meted fuori.
94. In finora come l'azione di reclamo fu depositato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12 alla Convenzione, i costatazione di Corte che, come Protocollo N.ro 12 sono stati firmati solamente ma non sono stati ratificati con lo Stato rispondente, l'azione di reclamo del richiedente in questo riguardo a è ratione personae incompatibile con la Convenzione, e deve essere respinto perciò facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione (Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia, (il dec.), N. 46286/09, 52851/08 53727/08, 54486/08 e 56001/08 8 giugno 2010).
95. In finora come l'azione di reclamo fu depositato sotto Articolo 14, presumibilmente in concomitanza con Articoli 6 e 8 della Convenzione, non ci sono elementi nella causa-archivio che abilita la Corte per trovare che la decisione della corte nazionale fu motivata con considerazioni discriminatorie (veda Macready c. la Repubblica ceca, N. 4824/06 e 15512/08, § 70 22 aprile 2010).
96. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 5 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 7 ALLA CONVENZIONE
97. Appellandosi all’ Articolo 5 del Protocollo N.ro 7, il richiedente si lamentò inoltre che la decisione contestata, in pratica aveva dato sua moglie più vis-à-vis di diritti il loro figlio. Lui notò che le sue osservazioni e sostenere prova era stato totalmente trascurato con le corti, come opposto a M. ' s dichiarazioni non comprovate, e nessuno riguardo ad era stato dato ai migliori interessi del figlio.
98. Il Governo presentò che sia le note del richiedente e quelli della madre del figlio erano state considerate con la corte nazionale ed era accaduta perciò nessuna differenza in trattamento.
99. I richiami di Corte che prima ha deciso che Articolo 5 di Protocollo N.ro 7 essenzialmente impongono un obbligo positivo sugli Stati per offrire una struttura legale e soddisfacente sotto la quale consorti hanno diritti uguali ed obblighi che concernono simile questioni come le loro relazioni coi loro figli (veda Cernecki c. l'Austria, (il dec.), n. 31061/96, 11 luglio 2000, ed Iosub Caras citato sopra, § 56).
100. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il richiedente non mette in dubbio la struttura legislativa, la sua azione di reclamo che è diretta solamente alla valutazione della corte nazionale.
101. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
V. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
102. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
103. Il richiedente chiese 150,000 euro (EUR) in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale quota subì alla perdita dei suoi diritto parentale e l'effetto che questo aveva avuto su suo figlio, ed a causa dell'ansia ed angoscia lui aveva esperimentato su conto dei procedimenti nazionali.
104. Il Governo considerò che di nessun danno non-patrimoniale era stato sofferto da allora, nella loro prospettiva, il richiedente non era stato una vittima di una violazione.
105. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha dovuto soffrire dell'angoscia come un risultato della violazione trovato. Nella luce delle circostanze della causa, e facendo una valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 14,000 il richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
106. Il richiedente chiese anche EUR 3,500 per costi e spese incorse in di fronte alla Corte. Lui presentò il conto di un avvocato per EUR 3,000 e vari conti per importi diversi riferiti a photocopying, traduzioni e parcelle di affrancatura in concomitanza coi procedimenti di fronte alla Corte.
107. Il Governo presentò che nessuno costi e spese erano dovute poiché, nella loro prospettiva, il richiedente non era stato una vittima di una violazione. In oltre, loro notarono che la prova documentaria presentata aveva riferito ai procedimenti in Romania.
108. La Corte nota che tutta la documentazione presentò col richiedente riferisce ai procedimenti di fronte a questa Corte, incluso il conto (in rumeno) relativo alle parcelle del suo avvocato 2012 chiaramente datarono quale stati che è in riguardo di rappresentanza di fronte alla Corte europea di Diritti umani. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, insieme col fatto che un numero di azioni di reclamo sia senza successo; la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare 3,000 costi di copertura la somma di EUR per i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte.
Interesse di mora di C.
109. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo portate sotto Articoli 6 e 8 della Convenzione ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata finora una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione in quanto al richiedente fu negato l’accesso ad un tribunale per fare appello contro la sentenza della Corte dei minori di Bologna;

3. Sostiene che non c'è stata una violazione dell'aspetto effettivo dell’ Articolo 8 e che non è necessario per esaminare l'aspetto procedurale dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione;

4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 14,000 (quattordici mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 3,000 (tre mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, z riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

5. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 25 giugno 2013, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Danutė Jočienė
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 20/02/2020.