Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ALIŠIĆ AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA, CROATIA, SERBIA, SLOVENIA AND "THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA"

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 13, 35, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 60642/08/2012
STATO: Bosnia Herzegovina
DATA: 06/11/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Preliminary objection dismissed (Article 35-1 - Exhaustion of domestic remedies) Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) (Serbia)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) (Slovenia)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions) (Bosnia and Herzegovina) (Croatia) (the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia)
Violation of Article 13 - Right to an effective remedy (Article 13 - Effective remedy) (Serbia)
Violation of Article 13 - Right to an effective remedy (Article 13 - Effective remedy) (Slovenia)
No violation of Article 13 - Right to an effective remedy (Article 13 - Effective remedy) (Bosnia and Herzegovina) (Croatia) (the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia)
Respondent State to take measures of a general character (Article 46 - Pilot judgment
Systemic problem
Article 46-2 - Measures of a general character)
Respondent State to take measures of a general character (Article 46 - Pilot judgment
Systemic problem Article 46-2 - Measures of a general character)
Non-pecuniary damage - award



FOURTH SECTION






CASE OF ALIŠIĆ AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA, CROATIA, SERBIA, SLOVENIA AND THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA

(Application no. 60642/08)






JUDGMENT



STRASBOURG

6 November 2012



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Ališić and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Nina Vajić,
Boštjan M. Zupančič,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Dragoljub Popović,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 11 October 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 60642/08) against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by three citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 30 July 2005. The first applicant is also a German citizen.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Germany. The Bosnian-Herzegovinian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovenian and Macedonian Governments (“the Governments”) were represented by their Agents, Ms M. Mijić, Ms Š. Stažnik, Mr S. Carić, Ms N. Pintar Gosenca and Mr K. Bogdanov, respectively.
3. The applicants alleged that they were still not able to withdraw their “old” foreign-currency savings from their accounts at the Sarajevo branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and the Tuzla branch of Investbanka.
4. By a decision of 17 October 2011, the Court joined to the merits the issue of the exhaustion of domestic remedies and declared the application admissible.
5. The parties filed further written observations on the merits (Rule 59 § 1 of the Rules of Court). The Chamber having decided, after consulting the parties, that no hearing on the merits was required (Rule 59 § 3), the parties replied in writing to each other’s observations.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1976, 1949 and 1952, respectively, and live in Germany.
7. Before the dissolution of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (“the SFRY”), Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak deposited foreign currency in the then Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo and Mr Šahdanović in the Tuzla branch of Investbanka. It would appear that the balance in their accounts is 4,715.56 German marks (DEM), DEM 129,874.30 and DEM 63,880.44, respectively. Mr Šahdanović also has 73 US dollars (USD) and 4 Austrian schillings in his accounts.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The SFRY
8. Until the 1989/90 economic reforms, the commercial banking system consisted of basic and associated banks. Basic banks were as a rule founded and controlled by socially owned companies based in the same territorial unit (that is, in one of the Republics – Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Slovenia – or Autonomous Provinces – Kosovo and Vojvodina). The founders of Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo were thus 16 socially owned companies from Bosnia and Herzegovina (such as Energoinvest Sarajevo, Gorenje Bira Bihać, Šipad Sarajevo, Velepromet Visoko, Đuro Salaj Mostar) and Pamučni kombinat Vranje from Serbia. At least two basic banks could form an associated bank, while preserving their separate legal personality. In 1978 Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, Ljubljanska Banka Zagreb, Ljubljanska Banka Skopje and some other basic banks thus founded an associated bank – Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana. Similarly, in 1978 Investbanka and a number of other basic banks founded Beogradska udružena Banka Beograd. In the SFRY there were approximately 150 basic and 9 associated banks (Jugobanka Beograd, Beogradska Udružena Banka, Privredna Banka Sarajevo, Vojvođanska Banka Novi Sad, Kosovska Banka Priština, Udružena Banka Hrvatske Zagreb, Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, Stopanska Banka Skopje and Investiciona Banka Titograd).
9. Being hard-pressed for hard currency, the SFRY made it attractive for its expatriates and other citizens to deposit foreign currency with its banks. Such deposits earned high interest (the annual interest rate often exceeded 10%). Moreover, they were guaranteed by the State (see section 14(3) of the Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 1985 and section 76(1) of the Banks and Other Financial Institutions Act 1989 ). The State guarantee was to be activated in case of the bankruptcy or “manifest insolvency” of a bank at the request of the bank (section 18 of the Banks and Other Financial Institutions Insolvency Act 1989 and the relevant secondary legislation ). None of the banks under consideration in the present case made such a request. It should be emphasised that savers could not request the activation of the guarantee on their own. They were nevertheless entitled, in accordance with the Civil Obligations Act 1978 , to collect their deposits at any time, together with accrued interest, from basic banks (see sections 1035 and 1045 of that Act).
10. Beginning in the mid 1970s, the commercial banks incurred foreign exchange losses because the dinar exchange rate depreciated. In response, the SFRY set up a system for “redepositing” of foreign currency, allowing commercial banks to transfer citizens’ foreign-currency deposits to the National Bank of Yugoslavia (“the NBY”), which assumed the currency risk (see section 51(2) of the Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 1977 ). Although the system was optional, commercial banks did not have another option as they were not allowed to maintain foreign-currency accounts with foreign banks, as was necessary to make payments abroad, nor were they allowed to grant foreign-currency loans. Virtually all foreign currency was therefore redeposited with the NBY. It should be emphasised, however, that only a fraction of that money was physically transferred to the NBY (see Kovačić and Others v. Slovenia [GC], nos. 44574/98, 45133/98 and 48316/99, §§ 36 and 39, 3 October 2008; see also decision AP 164/04 of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 1 April 2006, § 53).
11. With regard to Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, the redepositing scheme functioned as follows. Pursuant to a series of agreements between that bank, Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, the National Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the National Bank of Slovenia, Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo had to ship on a monthly basis any difference between foreign currency deposited and foreign currency withdrawn to the National Bank of Slovenia. The foreign currency so shipped was recorded as a claim of Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo against the NBY. The Slovenian Government maintained in the present case that the National Bank of Slovenia then shipped all those funds to the NBY, but they failed to provide any proof in that regard. They proved only that a part of those funds had been shipped back to Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo at the request of that bank to meet its liquidity needs (in the period when more foreign currency was withdrawn than deposited). The exact figures are: in 1984 DEM 57,389, 894 was shipped to Ljubljana and DEM 150,187 back to Sarajevo; in 1985 DEM 59,465,398 was shipped to Ljubljana and DEM 71,270 back to Sarajevo, in 1986 DEM 19,794,416 was shipped to Ljubljana and DEM 1,564,823 back to Sarajevo, and so on. In total, between 1984 and 1991 DEM 244,665,082 was shipped to Ljubljana and DEM 41,469,528 (that is, less than 17%) back to Sarajevo.
12. Another relevant factor is that basic banks were granted dinar loans (initially, interest-free) by the NBY in return for the value of the redeposited foreign currency. The dinars so received were used by basic banks to give credits, at interest rates below the rate of inflation, to companies based, as a rule, in the same territorial unit (for instance, in the case of Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, such credits were given to Polietilenka Bihać, Gorenje Bira Bihać, Šipad Šator Glamoč, Bilećanka Bileća, UPI Sarajevo, Soko Komerc Mostar, Rudi Čajavec Banja Luka, Velepromet Visoko, and so on).
13. In 1988 the redepositing system was brought to an end (by virtue of section 103 of the Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 1985, as amended on 15 October 1988). Banks were given permission to open foreign-currency accounts with foreign banks. Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, like other banks, seized that opportunity and deposited in total USD 13.5 million with foreign banks in the period from October 1988 until December 1989.
14. Within the framework of the 1989/90 reforms, the SFRY abolished the system of basic and associated banks described above. This shift in the banking regulations allowed some basic banks to opt for an independent status, while other basic banks became branches (without legal personality) of the former associated banks to which they had formerly belonged. On 1 January 1990 Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo thus became a branch (without legal personality) of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and the latter took over the former’s rights, assets and liabilities. By contrast, Investbanka became an independent bank with its headquarters in Serbia and a number of branches in Bosnia and Herzegovina (including the Tuzla branch at which Mr Šahdanović had accounts). Moreover, the convertibility of the dinar was declared and very favourable exchange rates were fixed by the NBY. It led to a massive withdrawal of foreign currency from commercial banks. The SFRY therefore resorted to emergency measures restricting to a large extent the withdrawals of foreign-currency deposits. For example, as of December 1990, when section 71 of the Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 1985 was amended, savers could use their savings only to pay for imported goods or services for their own or close relatives’ needs, to purchase foreign-currency bonds, to make testamentary gifts for scientific or humanitarian purposes, or to pay for life insurance with a local insurance company (before, they could use their deposits also to pay for goods and services abroad). In addition, section 3 of a decision of the SFRY Government of April 1991 , which was in force until 8 February 1992, and section 17c of a decision of the NBY of January 1991 , which the Constitutional Court of the SFRY declared unconstitutional on 22 April 1992, limited the amount which savers could withdraw or use for the above purposes to DEM 500 at a time, but not more than DEM 1,000 per month.
15. The SFRY disintegrated in 1991/92. In the successor States, foreign currency deposited beforehand is customarily referred to as “old” or “frozen” foreign-currency savings.
B. Bosnia and Herzegovina
1. Law and practice concerning “old” foreign-currency savings
16. In 1992 Bosnia and Herzegovina took over the statutory guarantee for “old” foreign-currency savings from the SFRY (see section 6 of the SFRY Legislation Application Act 1992 ). Although the relevant statutory provisions were not clear in that regard, the National Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina held that the guarantee covered “old” foreign-currency savings in domestic banks only (see its report 63/94 of 8 August 1994 ).
17. While during the war all “old” foreign-currency savings remained frozen, withdrawals were exceptionally allowed on humanitarian grounds and in some other special cases (see the relevant secondary legislation ).
18. After the 1992-95 war, each of the Entities (the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina – “the FBH” – and the Republika Srpska) enacted its own legislation on “old” foreign-currency savings. Only the FBH legislation is relevant in the present case, given that the branches in issue are situated in that Entity. In 1997 the FBH assumed liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in banks and branches placed in its territory (see section 3(1) of the Claims Settlement Act 1997 and the Non-Residents’ Claims Settlement Decree 1999 ). Such savings remained frozen, but they could be used to purchase State-owned flats and companies under certain conditions (section 18 of the Claims Settlement Act 1997, as amended in August 2004).
19. In 2004 the FBH enacted new legislation. It undertook to repay “old” foreign-currency savings in domestic banks in that Entity, regardless of the citizenship of the depositor concerned. Its liability for such savings in the branches of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and Investbanka were expressly excluded (see section 9(2) of the Settlement of Domestic Debt Act 2004 ).
20. In 2006 the liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in domestic banks passed from the Entities to the State. Liability for such savings at the local branches of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and Investbanka are again expressly excluded, but the State must help the clients of those branches to obtain the payment of their savings from Slovenia and Serbia, respectively (see section 2 of the Old Foreign-Currency Savings Act 2006 ). In addition, all proceedings concerning “old” foreign-currency savings ceased by virtue of law (see section 28 of that Act; that provision was declared constitutional by decision U 13/06 of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 28 March 2008, § 35). The Constitutional Court has examined numerous individual complaints about the failure of Bosnia and Herzegovina and its Entities to pay back “old” foreign-currency savings at the domestic branches of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and Investbanka: it held that neither Bosnia and Herzegovina nor its Entities were liable and ordered instead the State to help the clients of those branches to recover their savings from Slovenia and Serbia, respectively (see, for example, decisions AP 164/04 of 1 April 2006, AP 423/07 of 14 October 2008 and AP 14/08 of 21 December 2010).
2. Status of the Sarajevo branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana
21. In 1990 Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo became a branch, without legal personality, of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and the latter took over the former’s rights, assets and liabilities. Pursuant to the companies register, the Sarajevo branch acted on behalf and for the account of the parent bank. On 31 December 1991 the amount of foreign-currency savings at the Sarajevo branch was approximately DEM 250,000,000, but it would appear that less than DEM 350,000 was in the vault of the Sarajevo branch on that date. While it is unclear what happened with the remaining sum, it is likely that most of it ended up in Slovenia (see paragraph 11 above).
22. A domestic bank, Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, was set up in 1993. It assumed Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s liability for “old” foreign-currency savings at the Sarajevo branch. In 1994 the National Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina carried out an inspection and noted many shortcomings. First of all, its management had not been properly appointed and it was not clear who its shareholders were. The National Bank therefore appointed a director of Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo. Secondly, as a domestic bank, Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo could not have assumed a foreign bank’s liability for “old” foreign-currency savings, as this would impose new financial obligations on the State (as the State was the statutory guarantor for “old” foreign-currency savings in all domestic banks). The National Bank ordered that a closing balance sheet for the Sarajevo branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana as at 31 March 1992 be drawn up urgently and that its relations with the parent bank be defined. However, according to the companies register, Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo had remained liable for “old” foreign-currency savings at Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch until November 2004 (see paragraph 24 below). Accordingly, it continued to administer the savings of clients of the Sarajevo branch; those savings were used in the privatisation process in the FBH (see paragraph 18 above); and a domestic court ordered Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo to pay those savings in one case (see Višnjevac v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 2333/04, 24 October 2006).
23. In 2003 the FBH Banking Agency placed that domestic bank under its provisional administration for the reason that it had undefined relations with the foreign Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana.
24. By virtue of an amendment to the Companies Register Act 2000 , in 2003 the FBH Parliament extended the statutory time-limit for the deletion of war-time entries in the companies register until 10 April 2004. Shortly thereafter, in November 2004 the Sarajevo Municipal Court decided that the domestic Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo was not the successor of the Sarajevo branch of the foreign Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana; that it was not liable for “old” foreign-currency savings in that branch; and that, as a result, the 1993 entry in the companies register stating otherwise must be deleted.
25. In 2006 the domestic Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo sold its assets and let out premises and equipment belonging to Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch to a Croatian company which, in return, undertook to pay debts of Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo. While endorsing that agreement, the FBH Government emphasised that all premises and archives of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch remained under the care of the FBH Government pending the final determination of the status of that branch.
26. In 2010 the competent court started bankruptcy proceedings against the domestic Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo. They are still pending.
3. Status of the Tuzla branch of Investbanka
27. The Tuzla branch of Investbanka has at all times had the status of a branch without legal personality. The size of “old” foreign-currency savings at that branch was approximately USD 67 million (approximately DEM 100 million) on 31 December 1991. The branch closed on 1 June 1992 and it has never resumed its activities. It is unclear what happened with its funds, but given the manner in which the redepositing scheme was administered (see paragraph 11 above), it is likely that most of them ended up in Serbia.
28. In 2002 the competent court in Serbia made a bankruptcy order against Investbanka. The Serbian authorities then sold the premises of the FBH branches of Investbanka (those in the Republika Srpska had been sold in 1999). The bankruptcy proceedings are still pending.
29. In 2010 the FBH Government placed the premises and archives of the FBH branches of Investbanka under its care, but it would appear that Investbanka no longer has any premises or archives in the FBH.
30. In 2011, at the request of the FBH authorities, the Serbian authorities started a criminal investigation into the manner in which the archives of the Tuzla branch had been transferred to the Serbian territory in 2008.
C. Croatia
31. The Croatian Government argued that they had repaid “old” foreign-currency savings in domestic banks and their foreign branches, regardless of the citizenship of the depositor concerned. Indeed, it is clear that they repaid such savings of Bosnian-Herzegovinian citizens in Bosnian-Herzegovinian branches of Croatian banks. However, the Slovenian Government provided decisions of the Supreme Court of Croatia (Rev 3015/1993-2 of 1994, Rev 3172/1995-2 of 1996 and Rev 1747 /1995-2 of 1996) holding that the term used in that legislation (građanin) meant a Croatian citizen and argued that it was not excluded that the Bosnian-Herzegovinian citizens in issue were also Croatian citizens or that an ad hoc agreement had been concluded.
32. Croatia also repaid its citizens’ “old” foreign-currency savings which had been transferred from Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Zagreb branch to domestic banks at the request of the depositors concerned (see section 14 of the Old Foreign-Currency Savings Act 1993 and the relevant secondary legislation ). Apparently, about two thirds of all clients of that branch used that possibility. As to its remaining clients, whose “old” foreign-currency savings allegedly amount to approximately DEM 300 million, some of them have pursued civil proceedings in the Croatian courts and 63 of them have obtained their “old” foreign-currency savings from a forced sale of assets of that branch located in Croatia (decisions of the Osijek Municipal Court of 8 April 2005 and 15 June 2010) . Some others are pursuing civil proceedings in the Slovenian courts (see paragraph 38 below).
D. Serbia
33. In the direct aftermath of the dissolution of the SFRY, “old” foreign currency savings in domestic banks remained frozen, but withdrawals were exceptionally allowed on humanitarian grounds regardless of the citizenship of the depositor concerned (see the relevant secondary legislation ).
34. In 1998 and then again in 2002 Serbia agreed to repay “old” foreign-currency savings in domestic branches of domestic banks of its citizens and of citizens of all States other than the successor States of the SFRY. All savings of citizens of the SFRY successor States and all savings in domestic banks’ branches located in those States remained frozen pending succession negotiations. Moreover, all proceedings concerning “old” foreign-currency savings ceased by virtue of law in accordance with sections 21 and 22 of the Old Foreign-Currency Savings Act 1998 and sections 21 and 36 of the Old Foreign-Currency Savings Act 2002 .
35. In January 2002 the competent court in Serbia made a bankruptcy order against Investbanka. As a result, the State guarantee on “old” foreign currency savings was activated (section 18 of the Banks and Other Financial Institutions Insolvency Act 1989 and section 135 of the Foreign Currency Transactions Act 1995 ). 322 clients of Bosnian Herzegovinian branches of Investbanka unsuccessfully applied to be paid back within the context of the bankruptcy proceedings; 20 of them then pursued civil proceedings against Investbanka, but to no avail. The bankruptcy proceedings are still pending.
E. Slovenia
36. In 1991 Slovenia assumed the statutory guarantee from the SFRY for “old” foreign-currency savings in domestic branches of all banks, regardless of the citizenship of the depositor concerned (see Article 19 § 3 of the Basic Constitutional Charter Constitutional Act 1991 and section 1 of the Old Foreign-Currency Savings Act 1993 ). While, as a rule, anyone who shows legal interest may petition that abstract constitutionality review proceedings be initiated (section 24 of the Constitutional Court Act 2007 ), the Slovenian Constitutional Court held that the Basic Constitutional Charter Constitutional Act 1991 was not subject to such a review (see its decisions nos. U-I-332/94 of 11 April 1996 and U-I-184/96 of 20 June 1996).
37. After futile attempts to register the Sarajevo branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana as a separate bank (see the correspondence between the NBY and the National Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina of October 1991 stressing the unlawfulness of such proposals as Slovenia had meanwhile become an independent State and Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana a foreign bank ), Slovenia nationalised and then, in 1994, restructured Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana itself . A new bank, Nova Ljubljanska Banka, took over Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s domestic assets and liabilities. The old bank retained the liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in its branches in the other successor States and the related claims against the NBY.
38. In 1997 all proceedings concerning “old” foreign-currency savings in the old Ljubljanska Banka’s branches in the other successor States were stayed pending the outcome of the succession negotiations . In December 2009 the Constitutional Court of Slovenia, upon a constitutional petition of two Croatian savers, declared that measure unconstitutional . The Ljubljana District Court has thereafter rendered numerous judgments ordering the old Ljubljanska Banka to pay “old” foreign-currency savings in its Sarajevo and Zagreb branches together with interest. It held that the relationship between the old Ljubljanska Banka and its clients at those branches was of a private law nature. The fact that some foreign currency had allegedly been shipped to the NBY and that succession negotiations were pending was considered irrelevant. Similarly, it considered irrelevant the decisions regarding the status of the Sarajevo branch set out in paragraphs 22-24 above. At least one such judgment, concerning the Sarajevo branch, has become final (judgment P 119/1995-I of 16 November 2010). A number of clients of the Sarajevo and Zagreb branches have pursued civil proceedings also against the Republic of Slovenia, but in vain. The Ljubljana District Court has rejected such claims in three cases (as no appeals have been lodged, those decisions have become final). Around 10 similar cases are apparently still pending.
F. The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
39. It paid back “old” foreign-currency savings in domestic banks and local branches of foreign banks, such as the Skopje branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, regardless of the citizenship of the depositor concerned .
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relevant international law concerning State succession
40. The matter of State succession is regulated by customary rules, partly codified in the 1978 Vienna Convention on Succession of States in respect of Treaties and the 1983 Vienna Convention on Succession of States in respect of State Property, Archives and Debts . Although the latter treaty is not yet in force and only three respondent States are parties to it as of today (Croatia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia), it is a well-established principle of international law that, even if a State has not ratified a treaty, it may be bound by one of its provisions in so far as that provision reflects customary international law, either codifying it or forming a new customary rule (see Cudak v. Lithuania [GC], no. 15869/02, § 66, ECHR 2010, and judgment of the International Court of Justice in the North Sea Continental Shelf Cases of 20 February 1969, § 71).
41. The fundamental rule is that States must together settle all aspects of succession by agreement (see Opinion No. 9 of the Arbitration Commission of the International Conference on the Former Yugoslavia , and Article 6 of the 2001 Guiding Principles on State Succession in Matters of Property and Debts of the Institute of International Law). If one of the States refused to cooperate, it would be in breach of that obligation and would be liable internationally (Opinion No. 12 of the Arbitration Commission). While it is not required that each category of property and debts of a predecessor State be divided in equitable proportions, an overall outcome must be an equitable division (Article 41 of the 1983 Vienna Convention; Opinion No. 13 of the Arbitration Commission; Articles 8, 9 and 23 of the Guiding Principles).
B. Agreement on Succession Issues
42. This Agreement was the result of nearly ten years of negotiations under the auspices of the International Conference on the former Yugoslavia and the High Representative (an international administrator appointed under Annex 10 to the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina). It was signed on 29 June 2001 and entered into force between Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro (later succeeded by Serbia), Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia on 2 June 2004.
43. The issue of “old” foreign-currency savings was a contentious one. The successor States had different views as to whether that issue should be dealt with as a liability of the SFRY under Annex C (Financial Assets and Liabilities) or as a private-law issue under Annex G (Private Property and Acquired Rights) . Neither could those States agree whether the guarantees of the SFRY of “old” foreign-currency savings should be taken over by the State in which the parent bank in issue had its head office or by the State in which the deposit had actually been made. The following provisions were eventually included in Annex C to the Agreement:
Article 2 § 3 (a)
“Other financial liabilities [of the SFRY] include:
(a) guarantees by the SFRY or its National Bank of Yugoslavia of hard currency savings deposited in a commercial bank and any of its branches in any successor State before the date on which it proclaimed independence; ...”
Article 7
“Guarantees by the SFRY or its NBY of hard currency savings deposited in a commercial bank and any of its branches in any successor State before the date on which it proclaimed its independence shall be negotiated without delay taking into account in particular the necessity of protecting the hard currency savings of individuals. This negotiation shall take place under the auspices of the Bank for International Settlements.”
44. In 2001/2 four rounds of negotiations regarding the distribution of the SFRY’s guarantees of “old” foreign-currency savings were held. As the successor States could not reach an agreement, in September 2002 the Bank for International Settlements (“the BIS”) informed them that the expert, Mr Meyer, had decided to terminate his involvement in the matter and that the BIS had no further role to play in this regard. It concluded as follows:
“If, however, all five successor States were to decide at a later stage to enter into new negotiations about guarantees of hard currency savings deposits and were to seek the BIS’ assistance in this regard, the BIS would be prepared to give consideration to providing such assistance, under conditions to be agreed.”
It appears that four successor States (all but Croatia) notified the BIS of their willingness to continue the negotiations shortly thereafter. Croatia did so in October 2010 and received a response in November 2010 which, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“...the BIS did recently reconsider this issue and believes that its contribution to any new round of negotiations, as part of a good offices role, could not bring added value, also bearing in mind the amount of time which lapsed since the last round of negotiations, as well as its current priorities in the field of monetary and financial stability. However, we would like to emphasise that the organisation of the bi-monthly meetings in Basel offers the practical opportunity for the governors of the successor States to discuss this matter between them on an informal basis at the BIS.”
45. It should be noted that a comparable issue of the SFRY’s guarantees of savings deposited with the Post Office Savings Bank and its branches had been settled outside the negotiations of the Agreement on Succession Issues, in that each of the States had taken over the guarantees as to the branches in its territory.
46. In accordance with Article 4 of the Agreement on Succession Issues, a Standing Joint Committee of senior representatives of the successor States was established to monitor the effective implementation of the Agreement and to serve as a forum in which issues arising in the course of its implementation could be discussed. It has so far met three times: in 2005, in 2007 and in 2009.
47. The following provisions of this Agreement are also relevant in this case:
Article 5
“(1) Differences which may arise over the interpretation and application of this Agreement shall, in the first place, be resolved in discussion among the States concerned.
(2) If the differences cannot be resolved in such discussions within one month of the first communication in the discussion the States concerned shall either
(a) refer the matter to an independent person of their choice, with a view to obtaining a speedy and authoritative determination of the matter which shall be respected and which may, as appropriate, indicate specific time-limits for actions to be taken; or
(b) refer the matter to the Standing Joint Committee established by Article 4 of this Agreement for resolution.
(3) Differences which may arise in practice over the interpretation of the terms used in this Agreement or in any subsequent agreement called for in implementation of the Annexes to this Agreement may, additionally, be referred at the initiative of any State concerned to binding expert solution, conducted by a single expert (who shall not be a national of any party to this Agreement) to be appointed by agreement between the parties in dispute or, in the absence of agreement, by the President of the Court of Conciliation and Arbitration within the OSCE. The expert shall determine all questions of procedure, after consulting the parties seeking such expert solution if the expert considers it appropriate to do so, with the firm intention of securing a speedy and effective resolution of the difference.
(4) The procedure provided for in paragraph (3) of this Article shall be strictly limited to the interpretation of terms used in the agreements in question and shall in no circumstances permit the expert to determine the practical application of any of those agreements. In particular the procedure referred to shall not apply to
(a) The Appendix to this Agreement;
(b) Articles 1, 3 and 4 of Annex B;
(c) Articles 4 and 5(1) of Annex C;
(d) Article 6 of Annex D.
(5) Nothing in the preceding paragraphs of this Article shall affect the rights or obligations of the Parties to the present Agreement under any provision in force binding them with regard to the settlement of disputes.”
Article 9
“This Agreement shall be implemented by the successor States in good faith in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations and in accordance with international law.”
C. International practice concerning a pactum de negotiando in inter State cases
48. The obligation flowing from a pactum de negotiando, to negotiate with a view to concluding an agreement, must be fulfilled in good faith according to the fundamental principle pacta sunt servanda.
49. The International Court of Justice stated in its judgment of 20 February 1969 in the North Sea Continental Shelf Cases (§ 85):
“...the parties are under an obligation to enter into negotiations with a view to arriving at an agreement, and not merely to go through a formal process of negotiation as a sort of prior condition for the automatic application of a certain method of delimitation in the absence of agreement; they are under an obligation so to conduct themselves that the negotiations are meaningful, which will not be the case when either of them insists upon its own position without contemplating any modifications of it...”
50. The decision of the Arbitral Tribunal for the Agreement on German External Debts in the case of Greece v. the Federal Republic of Germany of 26 January 1972 reads, in so far as relevant, as follows (§§ 62-65):
“However, a pactum de negotiando is also not without legal consequences. It means that both sides would make an effort, in good faith, to bring about a mutually satisfactory solution by way of a compromise, even if that meant the relinquishment of strongly held positions earlier taken. It implies a willingness for the purpose of negotiation to abandon earlier positions and to meet the other side part way. The language of the Agreement cannot be construed to mean that either side intends to adhere to its previous stand and to insist upon the complete capitulation of the other side. Such a concept would be inconsistent with the term ‘negotiation’. It would be the very opposite of what was intended. An undertaking to negotiate involves an understanding to deal with the other side with a view to coming to terms. Though the Tribunal does not conclude that Article 19 in connection with paragraph II of Annex I absolutely obligates either side to reach an agreement, it is of the opinion that the terms of these provisions require the parties to negotiate, bargain, and in good faith attempt to reach a result acceptable to both parties and thus bring an end to this long drawn out controversy...
The agreement to negotiate the disputed monetary claims, in this case, necessarily involves a willingness to consider a settlement. This is true, even though the dispute extends not only to the amount of the claims but to their existence as well. The principle of settlement is not thereby affected. Article 19 does not necessarily require that the parties resolve the various legal questions on which they have disagreed. For example, it does not contemplate that both sides are expected to see eye to eye on certain points separating them, such as whether the disputed claims legally exist or not, or whether they are government or private claims. As to these points, the parties, in effect, have agreed to disagree but, notwithstanding their contentions with regard to them, they did commit themselves to pursue negotiations as far as possible with a view to concluding an agreement on a settlement...
The Tribunal considers that the underlying principle of the North Sea Continental Shelf Cases is pertinent to the present dispute. As enunciated by the International Court of Justice, it confirms and gives substance to the ordinary meaning of ‘negotiation’. To be meaningful, negotiations have to be entered into with a view to arriving at an agreement. Though, as we have pointed out, an agreement to negotiate does not necessarily imply an obligation to reach an agreement, it does imply that serious efforts towards that end will be made.”
THE LAW
I. THE GOVERNMENTS’ PRELIMINARY OBJECTIONS
51. The Serbian, Slovenian and Macedonian Governments maintained at the admissibility stage that the applicants had failed to exhaust all domestic remedies. The Court noted that this question went to the heart of the Article 13 complaint and that it would be more appropriately examined at the merits stage (see paragraph 4 above). Accordingly, the parties’ submissions and the Court’s assessment in that regard are set out in paragraphs 76-90 below.
52. The Court notes that the Governments of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia have advanced further submissions in support of their objection raised at the admissibility stage to the compatibility ratione personae of the application. However, the Court, having studied these submissions, finds that they do not give rise to any grounds for re-opening the conclusion it reached in the admissibility decision in this case, namely that the respondent States have accepted that “old” foreign-currency savings were part of the SFRY’s financial liabilities which they should share (see paragraphs 38 and 58 of that decision). The Court will only have regard to these submissions insofar as they have any bearing on the merits of the issues raised under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
53. The Court would confine itself to stressing that the qualification of this issue as a succession issue requires only, having regard to the applicable international law, that an overall outcome of a division of property and debts of a predecessor State be fair. Provided that is the case, States can decide freely the actual terms of a settlement agreement, using the mechanisms they themselves consider appropriate, concerning among other issues, the repayment of “old” foreign-currency savings. This task cannot be done by the Strasbourg Court.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
54. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
55. The applicants submitted that the respondent States, as the successor States of the SFRY, should pay back their “old” foreign-currency savings in view of the fact that they had failed to settle this remaining succession issue.
2. The Bosnian-Herzegovinian Government
56. The Government disagreed with the Court’s finding that the issue of “old” foreign-currency savings in the Sarajevo branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and the Tuzla branch of Investbanka was a succession issue (see the admissibility decision in this case, § 58). In this connection, they argued that the question of the SFRY guarantees of “old” foreign-currency savings, dealt with under Annex C to the Agreement on Succession Issues, should be distinguished from the question of “old” foreign-currency savings as such. Furthermore, while acknowledging that “old” foreign-currency savings had not been expressly mentioned in Annex G to the Agreement on Succession Issues dealing with private property and acquired rights, the Government argued that it was more important that they had not been expressly excluded either. They asserted that the relationship between savers and banks was of a private-law nature, despite the SFRY guarantees of “old” foreign-currency savings, and that the savers of the above-mentioned branches were in such a private-law relationship not with the branches themselves but rather with the parent banks (that is, Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and Investbanka). Given that Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana was based in Slovenia and Investbanka in Serbia and, more importantly, that most of the funds of their branches in all probability ended up in Slovenia and Serbia respectively (see paragraphs 21 and 27 above), this Government maintained that Slovenia and Serbia should hence be held liable in the present case. In this regard, they referred to the decisions of the Slovenian courts mentioned in paragraph 38 above and the decision of the Serbian courts mentioned in Šekerović v. Serbia (dec.), no. 32472/03, 4 January 2007. They further referred to decision AP 164/04 of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 1 April 2006, § 68, holding that Bosnia and Herzegovina was not responsible for “old” foreign currency savings in the branches under consideration in the present case.
57. As to the obligation set out in Article 7 of Annex C to the Agreement on Succession Issues to negotiate the issue of the SFRY guarantees of “old” foreign-currency savings, the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Government claimed that they had made serious efforts towards reaching an agreement, whereas Serbia and Slovenia had all the time insisted upon their respective positions without contemplating any modifications thereof. It is true that Bosnia and Herzegovina had been expected to convene the next meeting of the Standing Joint Committee in Sarajevo since 2010. However, the Government argued that this was due to the fact that the successor States had not yet agreed on an agenda of the meeting (pursuant to Rule 5 of the Rules of Procedure of that Committee a meeting cannot be held unless an agenda has been agreed upon). The Bosnian-Herzegovinian Government added that their delegations had raised the issue of “old” foreign-currency savings in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch on various occasions at bilateral meetings with their Slovenian counterparts. The Slovenian side had allegedly refused any talks simply because succession negotiations in that regard had not yet been concluded.
3. The Croatian Government
58. The Croatian Government submitted that Serbia and Slovenia should be held liable in the present case. Their reasons were along the lines of those of the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Government (see paragraph 56 above). As to the obligation to negotiate set out in Article 7 of Annex C to the Agreement on Succession Issues, this Government maintained that they had negotiated in good faith, whereas the Serbian and Slovenian Governments had shown no willingness to abandon earlier positions.
4. The Serbian Government
59. After a long analysis of international practice concerning a pactum de negotiando, the Serbian Government submitted that they had negotiated in good faith. As to the conduct of the other successor States, they criticised in particular Croatia for notifying the BIS of their willingness to continue negotiations concerning this issue only in 2010 (see paragraph 44 above). If the Court was to consider that Serbia interfered with the “possessions” of Mr Šahdanović for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Serbian Government argued that the interference was justified as it simply froze his savings in the Tuzla branch of Investbanka pending succession negotiations (see paragraph 34 above). Lastly, they asserted that Bosnia and Herzegovina had benefitted the most from “old” foreign-currency savings in the Tuzla branch of Investbanka; it should therefore be held liable in the present case. In support of their position, they submitted a contract pursuant to which a certain E.M. from Tuzla had obtained a dinar loan from the Tuzla branch of Investbanka in exchange for his foreign-currency deposit.
5. The Slovenian Government
60. The Slovenian Government submitted that the issue of “old” foreign currency savings in the Sarajevo branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and the Tuzla branch of Investbanka was a succession issue. They further argued that Slovenia had at all times worked to find a solution to the distribution of the SFRY guarantees of “old” foreign-currency savings and that their efforts had failed because of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s and Croatia’s frustration of the negotiations. Notably, the Slovenian Government criticised Croatia for having refused to resolve the issue by IMF arbitration in 1999; for having refused to discuss it in the meetings of the Standing Joint Committee; for having agreed to continue BIS negotiations, allegedly under the pressure of the EU, only in 2010 (see paragraph 44 above); for having reneged on that offer after the closure of the EU accession negotiations in 2011; and, lastly, for making it impossible for Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Zagreb branch to engage in regular banking activities and thus generate additional assets. The Slovenian Government criticised Bosnia and Herzegovina for having taken a series of unilateral measures, shortly after the conclusion of the BIS negotiations, designed to improve its negotiating position towards Slovenia: on 15 July 2002 the FBH Government adopted a decision requiring the Ministry of Justice to propose an amendment to the Companies Register Act 2000 to retroactively extend the statute of limitations for the deletion of the 1993 entry in the companies register regarding the domestic Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo and requiring the management board of that bank, which had been appointed by the Ministry of Finance, to apply for the deletion of that entry (see paragraph 24 above). In conclusion, they argued that Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia should be held liable in the present case.
61. As regards the transfers of foreign currency from Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch to the National Bank of Slovenia, the Slovenian Government showed that a part of those funds had afterwards been shipped back to Sarajevo. They argued that the remaining funds had been forwarded to the NBY. However, while they showed that those funds had indeed been recorded as a claim of the Sarajevo branch against the NBY, they failed to show that they had been physically transferred to the NBY (see paragraph 11 above). In this regard, the Slovenian Government invited the Court not to accept any theory according to which physical cash would be more valuable than book entry cash (that is, paper transactions).
6. The Macedonian Government
62. The Macedonian Government submitted that they did not violate the applicants’ property rights as they had negotiated this issue in good faith.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Applicable rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
63. As the Court has stated on numerous occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of property and subjects it to conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among other authorities, Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999-II).
64. It has not been contested before the Court that the present applicants’ claims have never been extinguished, but that they have nevertheless been unable to freely dispose of their “old” foreign-currency savings for many years. Therefore, the Court will examine the present case, like other similar cases (see Trajkovski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (dec.), no. 53320/99, ECHR 2002 IV, and Suljagić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 27912/02, 3 November 2009), under the third rule of this Article.
2. General principles
65. The general principles of the interpretation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (the principle of lawfulness, the principle of a legitimate aim and the principle of a fair balance) were restated in Suljagić, cited above, §§ 40-44.
3. Application of the general principles to the present case
66. The Court is ready to accept that the principle of lawfulness and that of a legitimate aim were respected in this case (see Trajkovski, cited above, and Suljagić, cited above). It will therefore proceed to examine the core issue, namely whether a fair balance has been struck between the general interest and the applicants’ rights guaranteed by this Article.
67. By depositing foreign currency with banks, foreign-currency savers acquired an entitlement to collect at any time their deposits, together with accumulated interest, from the banks. Their claims against the banks have survived the dissolution of the SFRY (see the admissibility decision in this case, §§ 53-54). While it is true that all “old” foreign-currency savings were guaranteed by the State, that guarantee could have been activated only at the request of a bank and none of the banks in issue made such a request (see paragraph 9 above). Liability, therefore, did not shift from those banks to the SFRY. It should also be noted that the branches of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana and Investbanka did not have separate legal personality at the time of the dissolution of the SFRY; pursuant to the companies register, they acted on behalf and for the account of the parent banks.
Having regard to the foregoing, the Court finds that Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, based in Slovenia, and Investbanka, based in Serbia, remained liable for “old” foreign-currency savings in their branches, irrespective of their location, until the dissolution of the SFRY. The Court will examine the period after the dissolution of the SFRY below.
68. As to Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, the Slovenian Government first nationalised it and then transferred most of its assets to a new bank; at the same time, it confirmed that the old Ljubljanska Banka retained liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in its branches in the other successor States and the related claims against the NBY. The Court has already held that a Contracting State may be liable for debts of a State-owned company, even if the company is a separate legal entity, providing that the company does not enjoy “sufficient institutional and operational independence from the State” (see Mykhaylenky and Others v. Ukraine, nos. 35091/02 et al., § 43-45, ECHR 2004 XII). It is clear that Slovenia is the sole shareholder of the old Ljubljanska Banka and that a Government agency administers this bank. In addition, the State is responsible, to a large extent, for the bank’s inability to service its debts (as it transferred, by virtue of law, most of its assets to another bank). The Court finally notes that most of the funds of the Sarajevo branch of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana in all probability ended up in Slovenia (see paragraph 21 above). Considering all those factors, the Court concludes that there are sufficient grounds to deem Slovenia liable for the bank’s debt to Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak in the special circumstances of the present case.
69. The Court has noted the Slovenian Government’s argument that the status of the clients of Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch was far from being clear in the period 1992-2004 because of inconsistencies in law and practice in Bosnia and Herzegovina (see paragraphs 16 and 22-24 above). However, the situation has meanwhile changed: it has been shown that since 2004 Bosnia and Herzegovina has no intention to reimburse those savers. In those circumstances, the Court agrees with the Slovenian courts that those past inconsistencies are now irrelevant (see paragraph 38 above).
70. As to Investbanka, it had remained liable for “old” foreign-currency savings at its branches in the other successor States until 3 January 2002. On that date, the competent Serbian court made a bankruptcy order against that bank and the State guarantee of “old” foreign-currency savings in the bank and its branches was activated (see paragraph 35 above). The Court further notes that Investbanka is either entirely or to a large extent socially owned. It has held in comparable cases against Serbia that the State is liable for debts of socially-owned companies as they are closely controlled by a Government agency (see, notably, R. Kačapor and Others v. Serbia, nos. 2269/06 et al., §§ 97-98, 15 January 2008, concerning a company mainly comprised of socially-owned capital, and Rašković and Milunović v. Serbia, nos. 1789/07 and 28058/07, § 71, 31 May 2011, as to a company comprised of both socially- and State-owned capital). The Court sees no reason to depart from that jurisprudence. Having regard also to the fact that most of the funds of Investbanka’s Tuzla branch most likely ended up in Serbia (see paragraph 27 above) and that Serbia sold all premises of that branch located in Bosnia and Herzegovina (see paragraph 28 above), the Court concludes that there are sufficient grounds to deem Serbia liable for the bank’s debt to Mr Šahdanović in the special circumstances of the present case.
71. The Court has noted the Serbian Government’s view, shared by the Slovenian Government, that Bosnia and Herzegovina benefited the most from “old” foreign-currency savings in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s and Investbanka’s branches in its territory in view of the fact that companies based in that country were granted dinar loans on very favourable terms in return for foreign currency shipped to Slovenia and Serbia (see paragraph 12 above). However, given the hyperinflation in the former SFRY and then, during the war, in Bosnia and Herzegovina, those dinar loans rapidly lost all their value, in contrast to “old” foreign-currency savings.
72. Having established that Slovenia is liable for “old” foreign-currency savings in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch and that Serbia is liable for “old” foreign-currency savings in Investbanka’s Tuzla branch, the Court must lastly examine whether the applicants’ inability to freely dispose of their “old” foreign-currency savings in those branches since 1991/92 has amounted to a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by those States.
The explanation of the Serbian and Slovenian Governments for the delay essentially comes down to their duty to negotiate this question in good faith together with other successor States, as required by international law. Any unilateral solution would, in their view, be contrary to that duty.
73. However, the Court disagrees. The duty to negotiate does not prevent the successor States from adopting interim measures aimed at protecting the interests of savers. The Croatian Government have repaid a large part of its citizens’ “old” foreign-currency savings in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Zagreb branch (see paragraph 32 above) and the Macedonian Government have repaid the total amount of “old” foreign currency savings in the Skopje branch of that bank (see paragraph 39 above). At the same time, those two Governments have never abandoned their position that the Slovenian Government should eventually be held liable and have continued to claim compensation for the amounts paid at the inter-State level (notably, within the context of the succession negotiations). Although certain delays may be justified in exceptional circumstances (see, by analogy, Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 69, ECHR 1999 V), the Court considers that the applicants’ continued inability to freely dispose of their savings despite the 2002 collapse of the BIS negotiations conducted under the Agreement on Succession Issues and a lack of any meaningful negotiations concerning this issue thereafter is nevertheless contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
74. Therefore, a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by Slovenia with regard to Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak and by Serbia with regard to Mr Šahdanović should be found, unless the applicants have failed to exhaust all domestic remedies (for the Court’s final conclusion as to this Article, see paragraph 91 below). As regards the other respondent States, no breach of that Article should be found (ibid.).
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
75. Article 13 of the Convention provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
76. The applicants maintained that they did not have at their disposal in any of the respondent States an effective remedy for their complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. The respondent Governments
77. The Slovenian Government submitted that the applicants had at their disposal the following remedies. First, they could have brought an action against the old Ljubljanska Banka in the Slovenian courts. That Government referred to a number of domestic judgments which had either become final before the 1997 stay of proceedings relating to the old Ljubljanska Banka’s branches in the other successor States or had been rendered after the 2009 decision declaring the stay of proceedings unconstitutional (see paragraph 38 above). Furthermore, the applicants could have brought an action against the Republic of Slovenia. In case of a negative decision on the merits or a procedural decision to stay proceedings, they would have been able to lodge a constitutional appeal. In addition, the applicants could have petitioned the Slovenian Constitutional Court to initiate abstract constitutionality review proceedings as regards the 1997-2009 stay of proceedings and/or the failure of the State to assume liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in the old Ljubljanska Banka’s Sarajevo branch. Otherwise, the applicants could have brought an action against the old Ljubljanska Banka in the Croatian courts: more than 500 clients of the old Ljubljanska Banka’s Zagreb branch had obtained judgments and 63 of them had so far been paid their “old” foreign-currency savings from a forced sale of assets of that bank located in Croatia (see paragraph 32 above).
78. The Serbian Government were also of the opinion that the applicants had at their disposal various remedies. They maintained that Mr Šahdanović should have registered his claim against Investbanka’s Tuzla branch in the bankruptcy proceedings. At the same time, that Government acknowledged that none of the clients of Investbanka’s branches situated in Bosnia and Herzegovina had been paid back their “old” foreign-currency savings within the context of those bankruptcy proceedings. They further submitted that Mr Šahdanović should have pursued civil proceedings against Investbanka in the Serbian courts. Lastly, they argued that he should have made an attempt to withdraw his savings on humanitarian grounds (see paragraph 33 above).
79. The Macedonian Government submitted that the applicants should have exhausted all domestic remedies in Serbia and Slovenia, without going into any details.
80. In contrast, the Governments of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia maintained that there were no effective remedies at the applicants’ disposal, given the stay on all proceedings concerning “old” foreign-currency savings in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s and Investbanka’s branches located in the other successor States (see paragraphs 34 and 38 above). Moreover, even if the applicants obtained decisions ordering the old Ljubljanska Banka to pay them their savings, they would most likely not be enforced because the 1994 legislation had left that bank with limited assets (see paragraph 37 above).
B. The Court’s assessment
81. The Court has held on many occasions that Article 13 guarantees the availability at national level of a remedy to enforce the substance of the Convention rights in whatever form they may happen to be secured in the domestic legal order. The effect of Article 13 is thus to require the provision of a domestic remedy to deal with the substance of an “arguable complaint” under the Convention and to grant appropriate relief. Although the scope of the Contracting States’ obligations under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant’s complaint, the remedy required by Article 13 must be effective in practice as well as in law. The “effectiveness” of a “remedy” within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant. Nor does the “authority” referred to in that provision necessarily have to be a judicial authority; but if it is not, its powers and the guarantees which it affords are relevant in determining whether the remedy before it is effective. Also, even if a single remedy does not by itself entirely satisfy the requirements of Article 13, the aggregate of remedies provided for under domestic law may do so (see Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 157, ECHR 2000 XI). It should be reiterated that, although there may be exceptions justified by particular circumstances of a case, the assessment of whether domestic remedies have been exhausted is normally carried out with reference to the date on which the application was lodged with the Court (see Baumann v. France, no. 33592/96, § 47, ECHR 2001-V, and Babylonová v. Slovakia, no. 69146/01, § 44, ECHR 2006 VIII). Lastly, as a general rule, applicants living outside the jurisdiction of a Contracting State are not exempted from exhausting remedies within that State (see, by analogy, Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (dec.) [GC], nos. 46113/99, 3843/02, 13751/02, 13466/03, 10200/04, 14163/04, 19993/04 and 21819/04, § 98, ECHR 2010).
82. Turning to the present case, the Court will first examine whether an action against the old Ljubljanska Banka or the Republic of Slovenia in the Slovenian courts, a petition to the Slovenian Constitutional Court to initiate abstract constitutionality review proceedings and an action against the old Ljubljanska Banka in the Croatian courts, taken separately or together, can be considered effective domestic remedies for the inability of Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak to freely dispose of their “old” foreign-currency savings at the old Ljubljanska Banka’s Sarajevo branch. It will then proceed to determine whether a claim to the competent bankruptcy court in Serbia, a civil action against Investbanka in the Serbian courts and an application for withdrawal on humanitarian grounds, taken separately or together, can be considered effective domestic remedies for the inability of Mr Šahdanović to freely dispose of his “old” foreign-currency savings at Investbanka’s Tuzla branch.
1. As regards the Sarajevo branch of the old Ljubljanska Banka
(a) Civil action against the old Ljubljanska Banka in the Slovenian courts
83. The Court notes that the Ljubljana District Court has rendered many judgments ordering the old Ljubljanska Banka to pay back “old” foreign currency savings in its Sarajevo and Zagreb branches, together with interest, and that at least one such judgment, concerning exactly the Sarajevo branch, has already become final (see paragraph 38 above). However, given the fact that the 1994 legislation had left that bank with limited assets, it is uncertain whether those judgments will be enforced (see paragraph 37 above). Indeed, the Slovenian Government have failed to demonstrate that at least one such judgment has been enforced. There is therefore no evidence as of now that this remedy was capable of providing appropriate and sufficient redress to the applicants.
(b) Civil action against the Republic of Slovenia in the Slovenian courts
84. A number of clients of the Sarajevo and Zagreb branches of the old Ljubljanska Banka have pursued civil proceedings against the Republic of Slovenia. Since none of them have so far been successful (see paragraph 38 above), the Court finds that this remedy did not offer reasonable prospects of success to the applicants (see, by analogy, E.O. and V.P. v. Slovakia, nos. 56193/00 and 57581/00, § 97, 27 April 2004).
(c) Petition to the Slovenian Constitutional Court
85. The Court notes that under section 24 of the Constitutional Court Act 2007 any individual who demonstrates legal interest may petition that abstract constitutionality review proceedings be initiated (see paragraph 36 above). In the present case it is not necessary to rule on the effectiveness of this remedy in general. Even assuming that it could be effective in another context, it was not capable of providing appropriate and sufficient redress to the present applicants for the following reasons.
As to the effectiveness of a petition to the Slovenian Constitutional Court to initiate constitutionality review of the 1997-2009 stay of proceedings, it is true that such a petition of two Croatian savers has been successful in the sense that the Slovenian Constitutional Court has declared the stay of proceedings unconstitutional enabling the continuation of all civil proceedings regarding this issue (see paragraph 38 above). However, they were not awarded any compensation or any other redress. Furthermore, the fact that their civil proceedings have then resumed is not sufficient in itself to render a petition to the Constitutional Court an effective remedy since the Court has already found (see paragraphs 83 and 84 above) that civil proceedings were either not capable of providing appropriate and sufficient redress or did not offer reasonable prospects of success to the applicants.
As to the effectiveness of a petition to the Slovenian Constitutional Court to initiate constitutionality review of the provision limiting the State’s liability to “old” foreign-currency savings in the old Ljubljanska Banka’s domestic branches, that provision is incorporated in the Basic Constitutional Charter Constitutional Act 1991 which is not subject to a review by that court (see paragraph 36 above).
(d) Civil action against the old Ljubljanska Banka in the Croatian courts
86. The Court has earlier held that in cases concerning the redistribution of liability for “old” foreign-currency savings among the successor States of the SFRY, such as the present case, claimants can reasonably be expected to seek redress in fora where other claimants have been successful located in any of the successor States (see Kovačić and Others, cited above, § 265). It is true that some savers at the Zagreb branch of the old Ljubljanska Banka have been paid back their “old” foreign-currency savings from a forced sale of that bank’s assets located in Croatia (see paragraph 32 above). However, the Slovenian Government have not been able to demonstrate that any saver at the Sarajevo branch has been successful in the Croatian courts. The Court therefore considers that neither this remedy offered reasonable prospects of success to the applicants.
2. As regards the Tuzla branch of Investbanka
(a) Claim to the competent bankruptcy court in Serbia
87. Although hundreds of clients of Bosnian-Herzegovinian branches of Investbanka lodged such claims with the competent bankruptcy court, none of them has so far been successful (see paragraph 35 above). Accordingly, it follows that this remedy did not offer reasonable prospects of success to Mr Šahdanović.
(b) Civil action against Investbanka in the Serbian courts
88. While it is true that in the early 1990s a small number of savers at branches of Serbian-based banks located outside Serbia obtained judgments in the Serbian courts ordering the banks to pay their “old” foreign-currency savings (see the facts in Šekerović v. Serbia (dec.), no. 32472/03, 4 January 2006), the Serbian Government have failed to show that any such judgment had in fact been enforced before the statutory termination of all enforcement proceedings concerning this issue in 1998. Therefore, this remedy was not capable of providing appropriate and sufficient redress to Mr Šahdanović.
(c) Application for withdrawal on humanitarian grounds
89. The Court notes that “old” foreign-currency savings may have been withdrawn in the early 1990s on limited grounds, notably to cover medical or funerary expenses (see paragraph 33 above). As there is no indication, let alone proof, that Mr Šahdanović had any such expenses at the relevant time, this remedy was not available to him.
3. Conclusion
90. Having regard to the above, the applicants had no effective remedy at their disposal for their complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. As Slovenia is liable for “old” foreign-currency savings in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Sarajevo branch and Serbia for “old” foreign-currency savings in Investbanka’s Tuzla branch (see paragraphs 68 and 70 above), the Court finds that there has been a breach of Article 13 by Slovenia with regard to Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak and by Serbia with regard to Mr Šahdanović. As a result, it dismisses the Governments’ objections in respect of the applicants’ failure to exhaust domestic remedies (see paragraph 51 above). As regards the other respondent States, the Court finds that there has been no breach of Article 13.
IV. FINAL CONCLUSION AS TO ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
91. In the light of the preliminary conclusion as to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 set out in paragraph 74 above and the conclusion as to the applicants’ alleged failure to exhaust all domestic remedies set out in paragraph 90 above, the Court concludes that there has been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by Slovenia with regard to Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak and by Serbia with regard to Mr Šahdanović. The Court further concludes that there has been no breach of that Article by any of the other respondent States.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
92. Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
93. The applicants alleged a breach of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, relying in essence on the considerations underlying their complaints under the latter provisions taken alone. Having examined the Governments’ observations and having regard to its conclusions regarding Article 13 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in paragraphs 90-91 above, the Court considers that there is no need to examine the matter under Article 14 taken in conjunction with those Articles as regards Serbia and Slovenia and that there has been no violation of Article 14 as regards the other respondent States.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
94. The relevant part of Article 46 of the Convention reads as follows:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution. ...”
A. The parties’ submissions
95. The Serbian, Slovenian and Macedonian Governments as well as the applicants objected to the application of the pilot-judgment procedure in this case. The Bosnian-Herzegovinian Government argued that the present case was suitable for that procedure as it concerned around 130,000 savers at the Sarajevo branch of the old Ljubljanska Banka, around 132,000 savers at the Zagreb branch of that bank who had not transferred their savings to Croatian banks (see paragraph 32 above) and around 132,000 savers at Investbanka’s branches in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Croatian Government maintained that it was difficult to tell, at this stage, whether the case was suitable for the pilot-judgment procedure or not.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. General principles
96. The Court reiterates that Article 46 of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of Article 1, imposes on the respondent States a legal obligation to apply, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to secure the applicants’ rights which the Court found to be violated. Such measures must also be taken in respect of other persons in the applicants’ position, notably by solving the problems that have led to the Court’s findings (see Lukenda v. Slovenia, no. 23032/02, § 94, ECHR 2005 X). This obligation was consistently emphasised by the Committee of Ministers in the supervision of the execution of the Court’s judgments (see ResDH(97)336, IntResDH(99)434, IntResDH(2001)65 and ResDH(2006)1).
97. In order to facilitate effective implementation of its judgments, the Court may adopt a pilot-judgment procedure allowing it to clearly identify structural problems underlying the breaches and to indicate measures to be applied by the respondent States to remedy them (see Rule 61 of the Rules of Court and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, §§ 189-94, ECHR 2004 V). The aim of that procedure is to facilitate the speediest and most effective resolution of a dysfunction affecting the protection of the Convention rights in question in the national legal order (see Wolkenberg and Others v. Poland (dec.), no. 50003/99, § 34, ECHR 2007 XIV). While the respondent State’s action should primarily aim at the resolution of such a dysfunction and at the introduction, if necessary, of effective domestic remedies in respect of the violations in issue, it may also include ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers in line with the Convention requirements. The Court may decide to adjourn the examination of similar cases, thus giving the respondent States an opportunity to settle them in such various ways (see, among many authorities, Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 127, ECHR 2009). If, however, the respondent State fails to adopt such measures following a pilot judgment and continues to violate the Convention, the Court will have no choice but to resume the examination of all similar applications pending before it and to take them to judgment in order to ensure effective observance of the Convention (see E.G. v. Poland (dec.), no. 50425/99, § 28, ECHR 2008).
2. Application of the principles to the present case
98. The violations which the Court has found in this case affect many people. There are more than 1,650 similar applications, introduced on behalf of more than 8,000 applicants, pending before the Court. Accordingly, the Court considers it appropriate to apply the pilot-judgment procedure in this case, notwithstanding the parties’ objections in this regard.
99. While it is in principle not for the Court to determine what remedial measures may be appropriate to satisfy the respondent States’ obligations under Article 46 of the Convention, in view of the systemic situation which it has identified, the Court would observe that general measures at national level are undoubtedly called for in the execution of the present judgment.
Notably, Slovenia should undertake all necessary measures within six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in order to allow Ms Ališić, Mr Sadžak and all others in their position to be paid back their “old” foreign-currency savings under the same conditions as those who had such savings in domestic branches of Slovenian banks. Within the same time-limit, Serbia should undertake all necessary measures in order to allow Mr Šahdanović and all others in his position to be paid back their “old” foreign-currency savings under the same conditions as Serbian citizens who had such savings in domestic branches of Serbian banks.
As regards the past delays, the Court does not find it necessary, at present, to order that adequate redress be awarded to all persons affected. If, however, either Serbia or Slovenia fails to apply the general measures indicated above and continues to violate the Convention, the Court may reconsider the issue of redress in an appropriate future case against the State in question (see, by analogy, Suljagić, cited above, § 64).
100. It must be emphasised that the above orders do not apply to persons who, although in the same position as the present applicants, have been paid their entire “old” foreign-currency savings by other successor States, such as those who were able to withdraw their “old” foreign-currency savings on humanitarian grounds (see paragraphs 17 and 33 above), or to use them in the privatisation process (see paragraph 22 above), and those who were paid their savings in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana’s Zagreb and Skopje branches by the Croatian and Macedonian Governments (see paragraphs 32 and 39 above). Serbia and Slovenia may therefore exclude such persons from their repayment schemes. However, if only a part of one’s “old” foreign-currency savings has thus been paid, Serbia and Slovenia are now liable for the rest (Serbia for “old” foreign-currency savings in all branches of Serbian banks and Slovenia for such savings in all branches of Slovenian banks, regardless of the location of a branch and of the citizenship of a depositor concerned).
101. Lastly, the Court adjourns the examination of all similar cases for six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final (see, by analogy, Suljagić, cited above, § 65). This decision is without prejudice to the Court’s power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list in accordance with the Convention.
VII. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
102. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
103. The applicants claimed the payment of their “old” foreign-currency savings with interest in respect of pecuniary damage. The Court has already made orders in this regard in paragraph 99 above.
104. Each of the applicants further claimed 4,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage. The Bosnian-Herzegovinian, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian Governments argued that the claims were unjustified. The Court, however, accepts that the applicants sustained some non-pecuniary loss arising from the violations of the Convention found in this case. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, it awards the amounts claimed (that is, EUR 4,000 to Ms Ališić and the same amount to Mr Sadžak to be paid by Slovenia and EUR 4,000 to Mr Šahdanović to be paid by Serbia).
B. Costs and expenses
105. The applicants also claimed EUR 59,500 for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court. The Bosnian-Herzegovinian, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian Governments maintained that the claim was excessive and unsubstantiated. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. That is, the applicant must have paid them, or be bound to pay them, pursuant to a legal or contractual obligation, and they must have been unavoidable in order to prevent the violation found or to obtain redress. The Court requires itemised bills and invoices that are sufficiently detailed to enable it to determine to what extent the above requirements have been met. Since no bill of costs has been submitted in the present case, the Court rejects this claim.
C. Default interest
106. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Dismisses by six votes to one the Governments’ objections as to the applicants’ failure to exhaust domestic remedies;

2. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by Serbia with regard to Mr Šahdanović;

3. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by Slovenia with regard to Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak;

4. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the other respondent States;

5. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention by Serbia with regard to Mr Šahdanović;

6. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention by Slovenia with regard to Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak;

7. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention by the other respondent States;

8. Holds unanimously that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 with regard to Serbia and Slovenia and that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 with regard to the other respondent States;

9. Holds unanimously that the failure of the Serbian and Slovenian Governments to include the present applicants and all others in their position in their respective schemes for the repayment of “old” foreign currency savings represents a systemic problem;

10. Holds unanimously that Serbia must undertake all necessary measures within six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention in order to allow Mr Šahdanović and all others in his position to be paid back their “old” foreign-currency savings under the same conditions as Serbian citizens who had such savings in domestic branches of Serbian banks;

11. Holds by six votes to one that Slovenia must undertake all necessary measures within six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention in order to allow Ms Ališić, Mr Sadžak and all others in their position to be paid back their “old” foreign-currency savings under the same conditions as those who had such savings in domestic branches of Slovenian banks;

12. Decides unanimously to adjourn, for six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final, the examination of all similar cases, without prejudice to the Court’s power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list in accordance with the Convention;

13. Holds unanimously
(a) that Serbia is to pay Mr Šahdanović, within three months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 4,000 (four thousand euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

14. Holds by six votes to one
(a) that Slovenia is to pay Ms Ališić and Mr Sadžak, within three months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 4,000 (four thousand euros) each in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

15. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 6 November 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President

In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Zupančič is annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
T.L.E.

DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE ZUPANČIČ
I regret that I cannot follow the majority judgment. For a number of reasons, only some of which are outlined in this dissent, it is my considered opinion that the outcome of this judgment by the ad hoc Chamber will, before the Grand Chamber, most certainly prove not to be in accordance with the letter and the spirit of the Convention.
If we begin with the Protocol No. 1, Article 1, paragraph 1 provision of the Convention, we see that its purpose is to protect bona fide possessions, legitimate expectations, arguable claims, etc. However, in this case we are, in the final analysis, safeguarding the speculative impact and the defects of a Communist state-run pyramid scheme of state-wide proportions. The scheme had been set up by the now defunct Yugoslav regime—then in dire need of hard currency funds. More importantly and from the moral point of view, since the LB bank and/or the Republic of Slovenia had not set up this Ponzi scheme, they are decidedly not the Madoffs of the story!
In the worst case scenario, in which the LB Bank and by implication the Republic of Slovenia were to be liable for the, to put it bluntly, “theft” of the depositors’ money –, it would still not make sense to reimburse the depositors with the absurd 12% on the initial deposits. Ethically speaking, this share of the reimbursement claim had been a speculation of the naïve, as usual, investors in the said Communist Ponzi scheme.
In banking and in similar succession situations, the territorial principle applied and implemented in order to reimburse debts owed in a particular country, mirrors the well-known economic consideration that the moneys received from depositors’ deposits are invested, in terms of the so-called ‘book money’, in the very territory in which the bank had been functioning as a debtor vis-à-vis the bank’s depositors, but especially as a creditor vis-à-vis numerous enterprises that the same bank had concurrently financed through its loans. The majority judgment, to put it differently, is in violation of the territorial principle.
The territorial principle maintains that the creditors – i.e., the savers of the bank – are to be reimbursed for their deposits in the region, area or territory in which the compounded commercial loans derived from their deposits were in fact extended to different enterprises. As put in the oft-cited and seminal article on the Yugoslav succession: “[...] the territorial principle clearly serves as the general rule on state succession related to tangible movable property.” (see, Carsten Stahn, Agreement on Succession Issues of the Former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, 96 Am. J. Int’l L. 379 (2002)). We shall see straightaway why this is logical and therefore fair.
One must understand that all banks have always been functioning in this mode of speculative assessment of their future risks, based on which the depositors’ money is multiplied in a virtual fashion in extending the loans far beyond the capital of initial deposits (‘book money’). ‘Virtual’ here means that the ‘book money’ is literally borrowed from the future and is in this sense ‘virtual money’.
Thus the hard-currencies deposited and converted into the ‘book money’ were extended as credit to enterprises in the territory or to the individual in the territory that were willing and capable of repaying and to paying a normal interest rate on the loan they were taking from the bank. Of course, the interest paid may never be as high as 12%. This tends to prove that the said pyramid scheme – was just that.
This well-known mode of banking, however, is to be seen in the light of the then moribund Marković government and in the light of the impending financial and federal state breakdown, of which the very Communist hard-currency Ponzi scheme had been a clear warning sign for all to see and to take into account.
It is also obvious that any ‘run on the bank’ will immediately end in the bankruptcy of the bank. Every bank is essentially a speculative delay operation as is also true of every pyramid scheme, Ponzi scheme, etc. — except that in honest banking the loan–repayment cycle is realistic. Thus, for example, the Tudjman regime in Croatia abruptly closed down the LB Bank on its territory, which had implied – as it would for any bank – an immediate liquidation of the LB Bank. In such a situation, all the debts of all the depositors are instantly called in, whereas the loans are still in the long-term process of repayment. In other words, the closing of the bank by the fiat of the regime will cause an immediate default of the bank – especially vis-à-vis its individual depositors, creditors.
The territorial principle denotes the dynamic view of the banking function: it is guided by the idea that the determinative aspect of the bank’s function is its continual placement of its own loans in a particular territory. When the territory in question is therefore considered to be the main criterion for repayment, this has its own justified logic that cannot be comprehended from the simple private law perspective of Article 1, paragraph 1 of Protocol No. 1.
In the event that the bank is unable to repay its depositors, only depositors from that territory, irrespective of their citizenship, etc. will be covered by the state guarantee –, for the obvious macroeconomic reason that the book money originally derived from the depositors’ deposits has in fact been invested and has stayed in the territory in question. There it had stimulated economic activity, etc.
It thus makes sense, when the talk is of succession, that the successor states likewise cover their territories with their guarantees as the central authority, in this case the Central Bank in Belgrade, had not fulfilled its own guaranteeing function. If such is the logic, it is easy to understand that it also makes sense for the six successor States to underwrite their depositors’ claims – each one on its own territory.
This is in fact what happened at least to some extent, i.e., in so far as Croatia has largely reimbursed the depositors of the LB Bank on its territory. One might ask the question whether the State of Croatia has done this out of pure good heartedness vis-à-vis their own citizens –, or has there perhaps been in this move a built-in macroeconomic justice, which the Croatian state when coming into being has duly taken into consideration. In other words, were it not for the logic of the territorial principle in the first place, why would the Croatian state take over part of the debt of LB Bank for all those citizens who wished to be reimbursed by the Croatian state?
In any event, the logic of the territorial principle is obvious on both sides of this case. We wish to reiterate the simple idea that individualised justice, as considered by Protocol No. 1, has its fully compatible complement in Aristotle’s distributive justice built into the territorial principle.
In pectore, I have for many years harboured another question because there is another travesty in this case: viz. the issue in the present adversary setting is thoroughly miscomprehended. The dispute is confused because this is not, as it ought to be, an interstate case. Unmistakeably, the atypical private law issue would in the interstate adversary backdrop have rightly developed into an expected, natural, and logical interstate succession issue. This would result in a far clearer perspective on the case. Why is it that not one of the respondent States has filed, in the European Court of Human Rights, an interstate action against the Republic of Slovenia? Why is it that the respondent States hide behind the individual complainants when everything points to the fact that these are succession questions? I think the answer is clear.
Another of my major objections to this majority judgment derives from the actual composition of the present ad hoc Chamber, in which four of the members, i.e., a simple majority at least, are from the creditor states, one of the members is from a fellow debtor state, whereas there are only two other members of the panel who are not, in one sense or another, national judges in the case. We understand perfectly well the usual procedural logic of the Convention to the effect that the national judge of the country concerned must in all cases be a member of the panel in order to facilitate the assessment of the case. However, in a situation in which we have seven successor States addressing what is essentially a succession problem, the logic of the presence of the national judge in each particular case will result in an ad hoc composition, as in the present one, in which the plaintiffs’ ‘representatives’ have a clear majority over the influence of the defendants’ ‘representatives’. This is absurd since it was discernible from the very beginning that the interests of the plaintiffs will instruct the outcome of the ad hoc casu majority judgment. Fortunately, the Convention’s sacrosanct separate opinion philosophy will here save the day in as much as the case clearly must be examined in the Grand Chamber. In the Grand Chamber, the composition with the presence of all national judges will be attenuated in the group of 17 judges, i.e., the bearing of the plaintiff’s interests will likewise be less decisive. I wish to emphasise, that I have no doubts about my colleagues’ impartiality, while keeping in mind of course that conscious impartiality when it comes to contemplating national interests has its own objective confines. However, even if it were not for the numeric prevalence in the ad hoc casu panel as such, the so-called ‘appearances’ will make it obvious that such a panel will not, to the outside world, appear objective and impartial.
For years I have maintained, and still do, that the issue in this case is best documented in the now famous Professor Jürgen’s Report (Repayment of the deposits of foreign exchange made in the offices of the Ljubljanska Banka not on the territory of Slovenia, 1977-1991, Doc. 10135, 14 April 2004, Report, Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights, Rapporteur: Mr Erik Jürgens, Netherlands). The sense of the report, at 20 & 21, is as follows:
“The economic conclusion must be that the original deposits had, in 1991, in fact ceased to exist. The depositors had, attracted by the high interest rates, run a risk by depositing their money in banks within the SFRY. When this risk was recognised, they were reassured by the guarantee given by the SFRY government that the deposits would be repaid with accumulated interest. But this guarantee evaporated at the moment the SFRY was dissolved, unless and inasmuch the successor states were willing to take over this guarantee. This was duly realised, but the different successor states did it in different ways. Slovenia [...] took over the guarantee for FE savings deposited in banks on its territory, expecting the other republics to do the same.”
The timing of this judgment is particularly bad because negotiations between Slovenia and Croatia at least are now moving forward and are run by expert bankers of the two countries who understand the problem. The judgment will be misunderstood as final and it will be as a matter of course and on both sides politically misinterpreted.
If one considers paragraph 58 of the judgment in which the Slovenian government criticised Croatia for having refused to resolve the issue by IMF arbitration in 1999; for having refused to discuss it in the standing joint committee; for having agreed to continue Bank for International Settlements negotiations, allegedly under the pressure of the EU only in 2010; for having reneged on that offer after the closure of the EU accession negotiations in 2011; and lastly for making it impossible for LB Bank Zagreb Branch to engage in regular banking activities and thus generate additional assets (see para. 58 of the majority judgment). These allegations of the Slovenian government have not been properly answered by the Croatian government, neither have they been addressed by the majority judgment. It follows inexorably that the villain in this story is not Slovenia, because Slovenia has tried at least five times to decently negotiate this succession problem with Croatia – but to no avail. Of course, it is impossible to know whether this time, despite everything, the Croatian government is serious or not. One would hope at least that this time the negotiations could in fact move forward because, as pointed out above, they are now run by two experts who understand the problem. Moreover, Croatia’s entry into the European Union is conditioned upon the success of these negotiations. We reiterate that the judgment is badly timed because it will create a political impression as to who is now in the winning position, despite the fact that the case might be going to the Grand Chamber, and needs no longer to show benevolence and a constructive attitude in the ongoing negotiations.
In this context, we must call attention to the essence of the Kovačič case judgment, which was before the Grand Chamber on a pure technicality, and carries its real message in the concurring opinion of the former judge, Professor George Ress, a world-renowned specialist in international law, i.e., a specialist on succession. In Kovačič, the question had not been addressed in the judgment, but Professor Ress had articulated the message in his concurring opinion. That message was essentially the same as the one found in the Jürgen report, i.e., that the issue cannot be properly resolved by a judgment between private parties and the State. Unless this was to be an interstate case, it can only be resolved by negotiations in the context of a future succession agreement.

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Eccezione preliminare respinse (Articolo 35-1 - l'Esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali) il Resto inammissibile
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) (Serbia)
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) (la Slovenia)
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parà. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà) (Bosnia e Herzegovina) (Croatia) (la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia)
Violazione di Articolo 13 - Diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva (Articolo 13 - via di ricorso Effettiva) (Serbia)
Violazione di Articolo 13 - Diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva (Articolo 13 - via di ricorso Effettiva) (la Slovenia)
Nessuna violazione di Articolo 13 - Diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva (Articolo 13 - via di ricorso Effettiva) (Bosnia e Herzegovina) (Croatia) (la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia)
Stato rispondente per prendere misure di un carattere generale (Articolo 46 - sentenza di Pilota
Problema sistematico
Articolo 46-2 - Misure di un carattere generale)
Stato rispondente per prendere misure di un carattere generale (Articolo 46 - sentenza di Pilota
Problema sistematico Articolo 46-2 - Misure di un carattere generale)
Danno non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione



QUARTA SEZIONE






CAUSA ALIŠIĆ ED ALTRI C. BOSNIA E HERZEGOVINA, CROAZIA, SERBIA, SLOVENIA EX REPUBBLICA IUGOSLAVA DELLA MACEDONIA

(Richiesta n. 60642/08)






SENTENZA



STRASBOURG

6 novembre 2012



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Ališić ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente
Lech Garlicki,
Nina Vajić,
Boštjan M. Zupančič,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Dragoljub Popović,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, judges,and Lorenzo Early, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 11 ottobre 2012,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 60642/08) contro Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia depositò con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con tre cittadini di Bosnia e Herzegovina, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 30 luglio 2005. Il primo richiedente è anche un cittadino tedesco.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Germania. Il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian, croato, serbo, sloveno e Governi macedoni (“i Governi”) fu rappresentato coi loro Agenti, il Sig.ra M. Mijić, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik, il Sig. S. Carić, il Sig.ra N. Pintar Gosenca ed il Sig. K. Bogdanov rispettivamente.
3. I richiedenti addussero che loro ancora non erano in grado ritirare loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta dai loro conti al Sarajevo ramificano di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed il Tuzla ramifichi di Investbanka.
4. Con una decisione di 17 ottobre 2011, la Corte congiunse ai meriti il problema dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali e dichiarò la richiesta ammissibile.
5. Le parti registrarono inoltre osservazioni scritto sui meriti (l'Articolo 59 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte). La Camera che ha deciso, dopo avere consultato le parti che nessuna udienza sui meriti è stata richiesta (l'Articolo 59 § 3), le parti risposero per iscritto all'un l'altro osservazioni.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero nel 1976, 1949 e 1952, rispettivamente e vive in Germania.
7. Di fronte alla risoluzione della Repubblica Federale e Socialista dell'Iugoslavia (“il SFRY”), il Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak depositarono valuta estera nel poi Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo ed il Sig. Šahdanović nel Tuzla ramificano di Investbanka. Sembrerebbe che l'equilibrio nei loro conti č 4,715.56 marchi tedeschi (DEM), DEM 129,874.30 e DEM 63,880.44, rispettivamente. Il Sig. Šahdanović ha anche 73 dollari Stati Uniti (USD) e 4 schillings austriaci nei suoi conti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Il SFRY
8. Sino alle 1989/90 riforme economiche, il sistema tecnico bancario e commerciale consistè di di base ed associò banche. Banche di base erano come un articolo fondato e controllato con società socialmente possedute basate nella stessa unità territoriale (quel è, in una delle Repubbliche-Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia e la Slovenia-o Province Autonome-Kosovo e Vojvodina). I fondatori di Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo erano così 16 societŕ socialmente possedute di Bosnia e Herzegovina (come Energoinvest Sarajevo, Gorenje Bira Bihać, Šipad Sarajevo, Velepromet Visoko Đuro Salaj Mostar) ed il kombinat di Pamučni Vranje da Serbia. Almeno due banche di base potrebbero formare una banca associata, mentre preservando la loro personalità legale e separata. In 1978 Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, Ljubljanska Banka Zagreb, Ljubljanska Banka Skopje e delle altre banche di base così fondò una banca associata-Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana. In 1978 Investbanka ed un numero di altre banche di base l'udružena di Beogradska fondarono similmente, Banka Beograd. Nel SFRY erano approssimativamente 150 di base e 9 banche associate (Jugobanka Beograd, Beogradska Udružena Banka, Privredna Banka Sarajevo Vojvođanska Banka Novi Triste, Kosovska Banka Priština, Udružena Banka Hrvatske Zagreb, Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, Stopanska Banka Skopje ed Investiciona Banka Titograd).
9. Essendo duro-pigiato per valuta forte, il SFRY lo fece attraente per suo espatria e gli altri cittadini per depositare valuta estera con le sue banche. Simile depositi guadagnarono interesse alto (il tasso di interesse annuale eccedè 10% spesso). Inoltre, loro furono garantiti con lo Stato (veda sezione 14(3) delle Estero-valuta Operazioni Atto 1985 e sezione 76(1) delle Banche e gli Altri Istituti di credito 1989 Agiscono). La garanzia statale sarebbe attivata in causa del fallimento o “l'insolvenza manifesta” di una banca alla richiesta della banca (sezione 18 delle Banche e l'Altra Istituti di credito Insolvenza Atto 1989 e la legislazione secondaria ed attinente). Nessune delle banche sotto la considerazione nella causa presente fece tale richiesta. Si dovrebbe enfatizzare che salvatori non potessero richiedere l'attivazione della garanzia da soli. Loro furono concessi ciononostante, nella conformità con gli Obblighi Civili Atto 1978, raccogliere i loro depositi a qualsiasi tempo, insieme con interesse maturato da banche di base (veda sezioni 1035 e 1045 di che Atto).
10. Cominciando nel mezzo anni settanta, le banche commerciali incorsero in perdite di estero-cambio perché il cambio di dinar deprezzò. In risposta, il SFRY preparò un sistema per “il redepositing” di valuta estera, concedendo banche commerciali trasferire cittadini l'estero-valuta di ' deposita alla Banca Nazionale dell'Iugoslavia (“il NBY”) che finto il rischio di valuta (veda sezione 51(2) delle Estero-valuta Operazioni Atto 1977). Benché il sistema era banche opzionali, commerciali non avevano un'altra scelta siccome loro non fu concesso per mantenere conti di estero-valuta con banche estere, siccome era necessario per fare all'estero pagamenti, né loro fu concesso per accordare prestiti di estero-valuta. Virtualmente tutta valuta estera era perciò redeposited col NBY. Comunque, dovrebbe essere enfatizzato che solamente una frazione di che soldi fu trasferito fisicamente al NBY (veda Kovačić ed Altri c. la Slovenia [GC], N. 44574/98, 45133/98 e 48316/99 §§ 36 e 39, 3 ottobre 2008; veda anche decisione AP 164/04 della Corte Costituzionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina di 1 aprile 2006, § 53).
11. Con riguardo ad a Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, lo schema di redepositing funzionò, siccome segue. Facendo seguito ad una serie di accordi fra che banca, Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, la Banca Nazionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina e la Banca Nazionale della Slovenia Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo doveva inviare su una base mensile qualsiasi la differenza fra valuta estera depositò e valuta estera ritirata alla Banca Nazionale della Slovenia. La valuta estera così inviò fu registrato come una rivendicazione di Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo contro il NBY. Il Governo di sloveno sostenne nella causa presente che la Banca Nazionale della Slovenia ha inviato poi tutti quelli finanziamenti al NBY, ma loro non riuscirono a prevedere qualsiasi la prova in quel riguardo a. Loro provarono solamente che una parte di quelli finanziamenti era stata inviata posteriore a Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo alla richiesta di che banca per riunire la sua liquidità ha bisogno (di periodo quando più valuta estera fu ritirata che depositò). Le cifre esatte sono: in 1984 DEM 57,389, 894 furono inviati di nuovo a Ljubljana e DEM 150,187 a Sarajevo; nel 1985 DEM 59,465,398 fu inviato di nuovo a Ljubljana e DEM 71,270 a Sarajevo, nel 1986 DEM 19,794,416 fu inviato di nuovo a Ljubljana e DEM 1,564,823 a Sarajevo, e così su. Fra il 1984 ed il 1991 DEM 244,665,082 fu inviato a Ljubljana e DEM 41,469,528 in totale, (quel è, meno che 17%) indietro a Sarajevo.
12. Un altro fattore attinente è che banche di base furono accordate dinar presta (inizialmente, libero da interessi) col NBY in ritorno per il valore della valuta estera di redeposited. Il dinars così ricevette fu usato con banche di base per dare crediti, a tassi di interesse sotto il tasso di inflazione a società basate, come un articolo nella stessa unità territoriale (per istanza, nella causa di Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo simile crediti furono dati a Polietilenka Bihać, Gorenje Bira Bihać Šipad Šator Glamoč, Bilećanka Bileća UPI Sarajevo, Soko Komerc Mostar Rudi Čajavec Banja Luka, Velepromet Visoko e così su).
13. Nel 1988 il sistema di redepositing fu portato ad una fine (con virtù di sezione 103 delle Estero-valuta Operazioni Atto 1985, corretto 15 ottobre 1988). Banche fu data permesso per aprire conti di estero-valuta con banche estere. Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo, come le altre banche sequestrò che l'opportunità e depositò in USD 13.5 milione totale con banche estere di periodo da ottobre 1988 sino a dicembre 1989.
14. All'interno della struttura delle 1989/90 riforme, il SFRY abolì il sistema di di base ed associò banche descritte sopra di. Questo turno nelle regolamentazioni tecniche bancarie permise a delle banche di base di optare per un status indipendente, mentre le altre banche di base divennero rami (senza la personalità legale) del precedente banche alle quali loro avevano appartenuto precedentemente associarono. Sul 1990 Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo di 1 gennaio così divenne un ramo (senza la personalità legale) di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed il secondo prese i diritti precedenti, attività e passività. Investbanka divenne una banca indipendente con la sua sede centrale in Serbia ed un numero di rami in Bosnia e Herzegovina con contrasto, (incluso il ramo di Tuzla al quale il Sig. Šahdanović aveva conti). Inoltre, la convertibilitŕ del dinar fu dichiarata e cambi molto favorevoli furono fissati col NBY. Condusse ad un ritiro massiccio di valuta estera da banche commerciali. Il SFRY ricorse perciò a misure emergenza che restringono ad una grande misura i ritiri di depositi di estero-valuta. Per esempio, come di dicembre 1990, quando sezione 71 delle Estero-valuta Operazioni che Atto 1985 è stato corretto, salvatori potrebbero usare solamente i loro risparmi per pagare per beni importati o servizi per il loro proprio o vicino parenti ' ha bisogno, acquistare estero-valuta collega, costituire regali testamentari fini scientifici o umanitari, o pagare per assicurazione sulla vita con una compagnia di assicurazioni locale (loro potrebbero usare anche prima, i loro depositi per pagare all'estero per beni e servizi). In oltre, sezione 3 di una decisione del Governo di SFRY di aprile 1991 che era in vigore sino a 8 febbraio 1992 e sezione 17c di una decisione del NBY di gennaio 1991 che la Corte Costituzionale del SFRY dichiarò incostituzionale 22 aprile 1992, limitò l'importo che salvatori potrebbero ritirare o potrebbero usare per i fini sopra a DEM 500 ad un tempo, ma non più di DEM 1,000 per mese.
15. Il SFRY disintegrò nel 1991/92. Nel successore gli Stati, valuta estera depositata in anticipo è assegnata consuetamente a come “vecchio” o “gelato” risparmi di estero-valuta.
B. Bosnia e Herzegovina
1. Legge e pratica riguardando “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta
16. In 1992 Bosnia e Herzegovina prese sulla garanzia legale per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta dal SFRY (veda sezione 6 della SFRY Legislazione Richiesta Atto 1992). Benché le disposizioni legali ed attinenti non fossero chiare in che riguardo a, la Banca Nazionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina sostenne che la garanzia coprì “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in banche nazionali solamente (veda il suo rapporto 63/94 di 8 agosto 1994).
17. Mentre durante la guerra tutti “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta rimasero gelato, ai ritiri fu concesso insolitamente su motivi umanitari ed in delle altre cause speciali (veda la legislazione secondaria ed attinente).
18. Dopo la guerra del 1992-95, ognuno delle Entità (la Federazione di Bosnia e Herzegovina-“il FBH”-ed il Republika Srpska) decretò la sua propria legislazione su “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta. Solamente la legislazione di FBH è attinente nella causa presente, determinato che i rami in problema sono situati in quel l'Entità. Nel 1997 il FBH presunse la responsabilità per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in banche e rami messi nel suo territorio (veda sezione 3(1) del Rivendicazioni Accordo Atto 1997 ed i Non-residente ' Rivendicazioni Accordo Decreto 1999). Simile risparmi rimasero gelato, ma loro si potrebbero usare per acquistare appartamenti Statali e società sotto le certe condizioni (sezione 18 del Rivendicazioni Accordo Atto 1997, corretto ad agosto 2004).
19. Nel 2004 il FBH decretò legislazione nuova. Si impegnò rimborsare “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in banche nazionali in che l'Entità, nonostante la cittadinanza del depositante riguardata. La sua responsabilità per simile risparmi nei rami di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed Investbanka fu esclusa espressamente (veda sezione 9(2) dell'Accordo di Debito Nazionale Atto 2004).
20. Nel 2006 la responsabilità per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in banche nazionali passate dalle Entità allo Stato. La responsabilità per simile risparmi ai rami locali di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed Investbanka è esclusa di nuovo espressamente, ma lo Stato deve aiutare i clienti di quelli rami ad ottenere il pagamento dei loro risparmi da Slovenia e Serbia, rispettivamente (veda sezione 2 dei Vecchi Estero-valuta Risparmi Atto 2006). In oltre, tutti i procedimenti che riguardano “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta cessati con virtù di legge (veda sezione 28 di che Atto; che disposizione fu dichiarata costituzionale con decisione U 13/06 della Corte Costituzionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina di 28 marzo 2008, § 35). La Corte Costituzionale ha esaminato azioni di reclamo individuali e numerose dell'insuccesso di Bosnia e Herzegovina e le sue Entità per pagare di nuovo “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta ai rami nazionali di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed Investbanka: contenne che né Bosnia e Herzegovina né le sue Entità erano responsabili ed ordinarono invece lo Stato per aiutare i clienti di quelli rami a recuperare i loro risparmi da Slovenia e Serbia, rispettivamente (veda, per esempio, decisioni AP 164/04 di 1 aprile 2006, AP 423/07 di 14 ottobre 2008 ed AP 14/08 di 21 dicembre 2010).
2. Status del ramo di Sarajevo di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana
21. In 1990 Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo un ramo, senza la personalità legale divenne di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed il secondo prese i diritti precedenti, attività e passività. Facendo seguito al registro di società, il ramo di Sarajevo agì su conto e per il conto della banca di genitore. 31 dicembre 1991 l'importo di risparmi di estero-valuta al ramo di Sarajevo era verso DEM 250,000,000, ma sembrerebbe che meno che DEM 350,000 era nella volta del ramo di Sarajevo su quel la data. Mentre è poco chiaro che che accadde con la somma rimanente, è probabile che la maggior parte di finì in Slovenia (veda paragrafo 11 sopra).
22. Una banca nazionale, Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo fu esposta su nel 1993. Presunse Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana la responsabilità per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta al ramo di Sarajevo. Nel 1994 la Banca Nazionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina eseguì un'ispezione e molti difetti celebri. La sua gestione non era stata nominata in modo appropriato prima di tutti, e non era chiaro chi i suoi azionisti erano. La Banca Nazionale nominò perciò un direttore di Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo. Come una banca nazionale, Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo non poteva presumere in secondo luogo, la responsabilità di una banca estera per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta, come questo obblighi finanziari e nuovi imporrebbero sullo Stato (come lo Stato il garante legale era per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in tutte le banche nazionali). La Banca Nazionale ordinò che un ultimo rendiconto patrimoniale per il Sarajevo ramifica di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana come a 31 marzo 1992 sia disegnato su urgentemente e che le sue relazioni con la banca di genitore siano definite. Secondo il registro di società, Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo era rimasto comunque, responsabile per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta a Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramifica sino a novembre 2004 (veda paragrafo 24 sotto). Di conseguenza, continuò ad amministrare i risparmi di clienti del Sarajevo ramifichi; quelli risparmi furono usati nell'elaborazione di privatizzazione nel FBH (veda paragrafo 18 sopra); ed un ordine della corte nazionale Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo per pagare quelli risparmi in una causa (veda Višnjevac c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (il dec.), n. 2333/04, 24 ottobre 2006).
23. Nel 2003 il FBH che AGENZIA Tecnica bancaria ha messo che banca nazionale sotto la sua amministrazione provvisoria per la ragione che aveva relazioni indefinite col Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana estero.
24. Con la virtù di un emendamento al Società Registro Atto 2000, nel 2003 il Parlamento di FBH prolungato il tempo-limite legale per la cancellatura di entrate di guerra-tempo nelle società registra fino a 10 aprile 2004. Brevemente da allora in poi, a novembre 2004 il Sarajevo che Corte Municipale ha deciso che il Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo nazionale non era il successore del ramo di Sarajevo del Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana estero; che non era responsabile per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in che ramo; e che, di conseguenza, l'entrata del 1993 nel registro di società che afferma altrimenti deve essere cancellata.
25. Nel 2006 il Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo nazionale vendè i suoi beni ed affittò fuori locali ed attrezzatura che appartengono a Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramifica ad una società croata che, in ritorno, si impegnò pagare debiti di Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo. Mentre girando che accordo, il Governo di FBH enfatizzò che tutti i locali ed archivio di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramo rimase la cura del Governo di FBH durante la definitivo determinazione dello status di sotto quel il ramo.
26. Nel 2010 la corte competente avviò procedimenti fallimentari contro il Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo nazionale. Loro ancora sono pendenti.
3. Status del ramo di Tuzla di Investbanka
27. I Tuzla ramificano di Investbanka ha avuto lo status di un ramo senza la personalità legale sempre. La taglia di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta a che ramo era verso USD 67 milione (verso DEM 100 milione) 31 dicembre 1991. Il ramo chiuse 1 giugno 1992 e non ha ripreso mai le sue attività. È poco chiaro che che accadde coi suoi finanziamenti, ma determinato la maniera nella quale fu amministrato lo schema di redepositing (veda paragrafo 11 sopra), è probabile che la maggior parte di loro finirono in Serbia.
28. Nel 2002 la corte competente in Serbia fece un fallimento ordina contro Investbanka. Le autorità serbe venderono poi i locali dei rami di FBH di Investbanka (quelli nel Republika Srpska erano stati venduti nel 1999). I procedimenti fallimentari ancora sono pendenti.
29. Nel 2010 il Governo di FBH messo i locali ed archivio del FBH ramifica di Investbanka sotto la sua cura, ma sembrerebbe che Investbanka non ha più qualsiasi locali o archivio nel FBH.
30. In 2011, alla richiesta delle autorità di FBH le autorità serbe avviarono un'indagine penale nella maniera nella quale l'archivio del ramo di Tuzla era stato trasferito al territorio serbo nel 2008.
C. Croatia
31. Il Governo croato dibattè che loro avevano rimborsato “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in banche nazionali ed i loro rami esteri, nonostante la cittadinanza del depositante riguardata. Effettivamente, è chiaro che loro rimborsarono simile risparmi di Bosniaco-Herzegovinian i cittadini in Bosniaco-Herzegovinian rami di banche croate. Comunque, il Governo di sloveno offrì decisioni della Corte Suprema di Croatia (Entusiasmi 3015/1993-2 di 1994, Entusiasmi 3172/1995-2 di 1996 ed Entusiasmi 1747 /1995-2 di 1996) sostenendo che il termine usò in che legislazione (il građanin) intese un cittadino croato e dibattè che non fu escluso che il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian cittadini in problema erano anche cittadini croati o che un ad accordo di hoc era stato concluso.
32. Croatia rimborsò anche i suoi cittadini ' “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta che erano stati trasferiti da Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Zagreb ramificano a banche nazionali alla richiesta dei depositanti riguardata (veda sezione 14 dei Vecchi Estero-valuta Risparmi Atto 1993 e la legislazione secondaria ed attinente). Apparentemente, approssimativamente due terzo di tutti i clienti di che ramo usò quel la possibilità. Come ai suoi clienti rimanenti cui “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta presumibilmente l'importo a verso DEM 300 milione, alcuni di loro hanno intrapreso procedimenti civili nelle corti croate e 63 di loro ha ottenuto loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta da una forzata vendita dei beni di che ramo localizzò in Croatia (decisioni dell'Osijek Corte Municipale del 2005 e 15 giugno 2010 di 8 aprile). Alcuni altri stanno intraprendendo procedimenti civili nelle corti di sloveno (veda paragrafo 38 sotto).
D. Serbia
33. Nella conseguenza diretta della risoluzione del SFRY, “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in banche nazionali rimaste gelato, ma ai ritiri fu concesso insolitamente su motivi umanitari nonostante la cittadinanza del depositante riguardata (veda la legislazione secondaria ed attinente).
34. Nel 1998 e poi di nuovo nel 2002 Serbia fu d'accordo a rimborsare “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in rami nazionali di banche nazionali dei suoi cittadini e di cittadini di ogni Stati altro che il successore Stati del SFRY. Tutti i risparmi di cittadini del successore di SFRY Stati e tutti i risparmi in nazionale deposita denaro rami di ' localizzati in quelli Stati rimasero negoziazioni di successione pendenti e gelato. Inoltre, tutti i procedimenti che riguardano “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta cessati con virtù di legge in conformità con sezioni 21 e 22 dei Vecchi Estero-valuta Risparmi Atto 1998 e sezioni 21 e 36 dei Vecchi Estero-valuta Risparmi Atto 2002.
35. A gennaio 2002 la corte competente in Serbia fece un fallimento ordina contro Investbanka. Di conseguenza, la garanzia statale su “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta furono attivati (sezione 18 delle Banche e l'Altra Istituti di credito Insolvenza Atto 1989 e sezione 135 delle Estero-valuta Operazioni Atto 1995). 322 clienti di Bosniaco-Herzegovinian rami di Investbanka inutilmente fecero domanda essere pagati di nuovo all'interno del contesto dei procedimenti fallimentari; 20 di loro intrapresero poi procedimenti civili contro Investbanka, ma inutilmente. I procedimenti fallimentari ancora sono pendenti.
L'E. Slovenia
36. Nel 1991 Slovenia presunse la garanzia legale dal SFRY per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in rami nazionali di tutte le banche, nonostante la cittadinanza del depositante riguardata (veda Articolo 19 § 3 dello Statuto Costituzionale e Di base Atto 1991 Costituzionale e sezione 1 dei Vecchi Estero-valuta Risparmi Atto 1993). Mentre, come un articolo, chiunque che mostra interesse legale può ricorso che procedimenti di revisione di costituzionalità astratti siano iniziati (sezione 24 della Corte Costituzionale Atto 2007), gli sloveno che Corte Costituzionale ha sostenuto che lo Statuto Costituzionale e Di base Atto 1991 Costituzionale non era soggetto a tale revisione (veda le sue decisioni N. U-io-332/94 di 11 aprile 1996 ed U-io-184/96 di 20 giugno 1996).
37. Dopo futile tenta di registrare il Sarajevo ramifichi di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana come una banca separata (veda la corrispondenza fra il NBY e la Banca Nazionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina di ottobre 1991 che sottolinea l'illegalità di simile proposte come la Slovenia era divenuto nel frattempo un Stato indipendente e Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana una banca estera), Slovenia nazionalizzò e poi, nel 1994, Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ristrutturato sé. Una banca nuova, Nova Ljubljanska Banka, prese Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana l'attività e passività nazionale. La vecchia banca trattenne la responsabilità per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nei suoi rami nell'altro successore Stati e le rivendicazioni relative contro il NBY.
38. Nel 1997 tutti i procedimenti che riguardano “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nei rami del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka nell'altro successore Stati furono sospesi durante la conseguenza delle negoziazioni di successione. A dicembre 2009 la Corte Costituzionale della Slovenia, su un ricorso costituzionale di due salvatori croati dichiarò che misura incostituzionale. La Corte distrettuale di Ljubljana ha reso da allora in poi sentenze numerose che ordinano il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka pagare “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel suo Sarajevo e Zagreb ramifica insieme con interesse. Contenne che la relazione fra i vecchi Ljubljanska Banka ed i suoi clienti a quelli rami era di una natura di privato-legge. Il fatto che alcuna valuta estera era stata inviata presumibilmente al NBY e che negoziazioni di successione erano pendenti fu considerato irrilevante. Similmente, considerò irrilevante le decisioni riguardo allo status del ramo di Sarajevo esposto fuori in paragrafi 22-24 sopra. Almeno uno simile sentenza, riguardo al Sarajevo ramifichi, è divenuto definitivo (la sentenza P 119/1995-io di 16 novembre 2010). Un numero di clienti dei Sarajevo ed i rami di Zagreb ha intrapreso anche procedimenti civili contro la Repubblica della Slovenia, ma invano. La Corte distrettuale di Ljubljana ha respinto simile rivendicazioni in tre cause (come nessuno ricorsi è stato depositato, quelle decisioni sono divenute definitivo). Circa il 10 cause simili evidentemente ancora sono pendenti.
F. La Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia
39. Pagò di nuovo “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in banche nazionali e rami locali di banche estere, come il ramo di Skopje di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, nonostante la cittadinanza del depositante riguardata.
III. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. diritto internazionale Attinente riguardo a successione Statale
40. La questione di successione Statale è regolata con articoli consueti, in parte codificò nella Convenzione di Vienna del 1978 su Successione degli Stati in riguardo di Trattati e la Convenzione di Vienna del 1983 su Successione degli Stati in riguardo di Proprietà Statale, Archivio e Debiti. Benché il trattato secondo non sia ancora in vigore ed i solamente tre Stati rispondenti è parti a sé come di oggi (Croatia, Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia), è un principio ben stabilito di diritto internazionale che, anche se un Stato non ha ratificato un trattato, può essere legato finora entro una delle sue disposizioni in come che disposizione riflette diritto internazionale consueto, mentre lo codifica o formando un articolo consueto e nuovo (veda Cudak c. la Lituania [GC], n. 15869/02, § 66, ECHR 2010, e sentenza della Corte di giustizia Internazionale nel Mare del Nord Mensola Cause Continentali di 20 febbraio 1969, § 71).
41. L'articolo fondamentale è che Stati devono stabilire insieme tutti gli aspetti di successione con accordo (veda Opinione N.ro 9 della Commissione di Arbitrato della Conferenza Internazionale sull'Iugoslavia Precedente, ed Articolo 6 dei 2001 Principi che Guidano su Successione Statale nelle Questioni di Proprietà e Debiti dell'Istituto di Diritto internazionale). Se uno degli Stati rifiutasse di cooperare, sarebbe in violazione di che obbligo e sarebbe internazionalmente responsabile (l'Opinione N.ro 12 della Commissione di Arbitrato). Mentre non è richiesto che ogni categoria di proprietà e debiti di un predecessore Stato sia divisa in proporzioni eque, una conseguenza complessiva deve essere una divisione equa (Articolo 41 della Convenzione di Vienna del 1983; l'Opinione N.ro 13 della Commissione di Arbitrato; Articoli 8, 9 e 23 dei Principi che Guidano).
Accordo di B. su Successione Problemi
42. Questo Accordo era il risultato di quasi dieci anni di negoziazioni sotto gli auspici della Conferenza Internazionale sull'Iugoslavia precedente ed il Rappresentante Alto (un amministratore internazionale nominato sotto Annette 10 all'Accordo della Struttura del Generale per la Pace in Bosnia e Herzegovina). Fu firmato 29 giugno 2001 ed entrò in vigore fra Bosnia e Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia ed il Montenegro (più tardi succedè con Serbia), Slovenia e la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia 2 giugno 2004.
43. Il problema di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta erano un contenzioso uno. Il successore Stati avevano prospettive diverse come a se che problema dovrebbe essere dato con come una responsabilità del SFRY sotto Annetta C (Attività e passività Finanziaria) o come un problema di privato-legge sotto Annetta G (Proprietà Privata e Diritti Acquisiti). Né poteva quelli Stati concordi se le garanzie del SFRY di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta dovrebbero essere presi finiti con lo Stato nel quale la banca di genitore in problema aveva la sua sede centrale o con lo Stato nel quale davvero era stato reso il deposito. Le disposizioni seguenti furono incluse infine in Annetta C all'Accordo:
Articolo 2 § 3 (un)
“Le altre responsabilità finanziarie [del SFRY] includa:
(un) garantisce col SFRY o la sua Banca Nazionale di Iugoslavia di risparmi di valuta forte depositata in una banca commerciale e qualsiasi dei suoi rami in qualsiasi successore Stato di fronte alla data sul quale proclamò l'indipendenza;...”
Articolo 7
“Garantisce col SFRY o il suo NBY di risparmi di valuta forte depositò in una banca commerciale e qualsiasi dei suoi rami in qualsiasi successore Stato di fronte alla data sul quale proclamò la sua indipendenza sarà negoziato senza ritardo che prende in considerazione in particolare la necessità di proteggere i risparmi di valuta forte di individui. Questa negoziazione avrà luogo sotto gli auspici della Banca per Accordi Internazionali.”
44. In 2001/2 quattro tondi di negoziazioni riguardo alla distribuzione delle garanzie del SFRY di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta furono contenuti. Siccome il successore Stati non potevano giungere ad un accordo, a settembre 2002 la Banca per Accordi Internazionali (“il Bis”) li informò che l'esperto, il Sig. Meyer aveva deciso di terminare il suo coinvolgimento nella questione e che il Bis non aveva nessun ulteriore ruolo per giocare in questo riguardo a. Concluse siccome segue:
“Se, comunque, ogni successore del cinque Stati siano decidere ad un più tardi stadio per entrare in negoziazioni nuove di garanzie di depositi di risparmi di valuta forte ed era chiedere il Bis l'assistenza di ' in questo riguardo a, il Bis sarebbe preparato per dare la considerazione ad offrendo simile assistenza, sotto le condizioni per essere concordato.”
Sembra che quattro successore gli Stati (tutti ma Croatia) notificò il Bis della loro buona volontà per continuare brevemente da allora in poi le negoziazioni. Croatia faceva così ad ottobre 2010 e ricevette una risposta a novembre 2010 quale, in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
“... il Bis riconsideri recentemente questo problema e creda che il suo contributo a qualsiasi tondo nuovo di negoziazioni, come parte di un buon ruolo di uffici non poteva portare valore aggiunto, mentre tenendo presente anche l'importo di tempo che cadde fin dallo scorso tondo di negoziazioni, così come le sue priorità correnti nel campo della stabilità valutaria e finanziaria. Gradiremmo comunque, enfatizzare che l'organizzazione delle riunioni bi-mensili in offerte di Basel l'opportunità pratica per i governatori del successore Stati per discutere questa questione fra loro su una base informale al Bis.”
45. Si dovrebbe notare che un problema comparabile delle garanzie del SFRY di risparmi depositò con la Posto Ufficio Risparmi Banca ed i suoi rami erano stati stabiliti fuori delle negoziazioni dell'Accordo su Successione Emette, in che ognuno degli Stati aveva preso sulle garanzie come ai rami nel suo territorio.
46. Nella conformità con Articolo 4 dell'Accordo su Successione Emette, un Comitato Unito ed Eretto di rappresentanti senior del successore Stati furono stabiliti esaminare l'attuazione effettiva dell'Accordo e notificare come un foro nel quale potrebbero essere discussi problemi che sorgono nel corso della sua attuazione. Ha soddisfatto finora tre volte: nel 2005, nel 2007 e nel 2009.
47. Le disposizioni seguenti di questo Accordo sono anche attinenti in questa causa:
Articolo 5
“(1) differenze che possono derivare sull'interpretazione e la richiesta di questo Accordo possono, nel primo posto, sia risolto in discussione fra gli Stati riguardò.
(2) se le differenze non possono essere risolte in simile discussioni entro un mese della prima comunicazione nella discussione gli Stati riguardarono uno
(un) si riferisca la questione ad una persona indipendente della loro scelta, con una prospettiva ad ottenendo una determinazione veloce ed autorevole della questione che sarà rispettata e quale può, come appropriato, indichi gli specifici tempo-limiti per azioni per essere preso; o
(b) si riferisca la questione al Comitato Unito ed Eretto stabilito con Articolo 4 di questo Accordo per decisione.
(3) differenze che possono sorgere su in pratica l'interpretazione dei termini usarono in questo Accordo o in qualsiasi accordo susseguente chiamò per in attuazione dell'Annette a questo Accordo, inoltre, sia assegnato all'iniziativa di qualsiasi Stato riguardò a soluzione competente e vincolante, condusse con un solo esperto (chi non saranno un cittadino di qualsiasi parte a questo Accordo) essere nominato con accordo fra le parti in controversia o, nell'assenza di accordo, col Presidente della Corte della Conciliazione e l'Arbitrato all'interno dell'OSCE. L'esperto determinerà tutte le questioni di procedura, dopo avere consultato le parti che chiedono simile soluzione competente se l'esperto lo considera appropriato fare così, con l'intenzione fissa di garantire una decisione veloce ed effettiva della differenza.
(4) la procedura previde per in paragrafo (3) di questo Articolo sarà limitato severamente all'interpretazione di termini usata negli accordi in oggetto e sarà potuto in nessuno circostanze permetta l'esperto per determinare la richiesta pratica di qualsiasi di quegli accordi. In particolare la procedura assegnata a non farà domanda
(un) L'Appendice a questo Accordo;
(b) Articoli 1, 3 e 4 di Annetta B;
(il c) gli Articoli 4 e 5(1) di Annetta C;
(d) Articolo 6 di Annetta D.
(5) nulla nei paragrafi precedenti di questo Articolo colpirà i diritti od obblighi delle Parti all'Accordo presente sotto qualsiasi approvvigiona in rilegatura di vigore loro con riguardo ad all'accordo di controversie.”
Articolo 9
“Questo Accordo sarà implementato col successore Stati in buon fede in conformità allo Statuto delle Nazioni Unito e nella conformità con diritto internazionale.”
C. pratica Internazionale riguardo ad un negotiando di de di pactum in cause di inter-stato
48. All'obbligo che fluisce da un negotiando di de di pactum, negoziare con una prospettiva a concludendo un accordo deve essere adempiuto in buon fede secondo il principio pacta sunt servanda fondamentale.
49. La Corte di giustizia Internazionale affermò nella sua sentenza di 20 febbraio 1969 nel Mare del Nord Mensola Cause Continentali (§ 85):
“... le parti sono sotto un obbligo per entrare in negoziazioni con una prospettiva ad arrivando ad un accordo, e non soltanto superare un'elaborazione formale di negoziazione come un genere della condizione precedente per la richiesta automatica di un certo metodo di delimitazione nell'assenza di accordo; loro sono sotto un obbligo così condurrsi che le negoziazioni sono significative che non sarà la causa quando entrambi loro insistono sulla sua propria posizione senza contemplare qualsiasi modifiche di sé...”
50. La decisione del Tribunale di Arbitral per l'Accordo su Debiti Esterni tedeschi nella causa della Grecia c. la Repubblica Federale di Germania del 1972 letture di 26 gennaio, in finora come attinente, siccome segue (§§ 62-65):
“Un negotiando di de di pactum non è anche comunque, senza conseguenze legali. Vuole dire che sia lati farebbero un sforzo, in buon fede provocare una soluzione mutuamente soddisfacente con modo di un compromesso, anche se quel intese l'abbandono di posizioni fortemente sostenute più primo preso. Implica una buona volontà per il fine di negoziazione per abbandonare le più prime posizioni e soddisfare l'altro modo di parte di lato. La lingua dell'Accordo non può essere costruita per volere dire che entrambi lato intende di aderire al suo banco precedente ed insistere sulla capitolazione completa dell'altro lato. Tale concetto sarebbe incoerente col termine la negoziazione di ‘'. Sarebbe il molto opposto di che che fu proporsi. Un'impresa per negoziare comporta una comprensione per trattare con l'altro lato con una prospettiva a venendo a termini. Sebbene il Tribunale non conclude che Articolo 19 nel collegamento con paragrafo II di Annetta io completamente obbligo entrambi lato a giungere ad un accordo, è dell'opinione che i termini di queste disposizioni costringono le parti a negoziare, contratti, ed in buon fede giungere ad un risultato accettabile a tenta sia le parti e così porta una fine a questo lungo sfoderato controversia...
L'accordo per negoziare le rivendicazioni valutarie e contestate, in questa causa necessariamente comporta una buona volontà per considerare un accordo. Questo è vero, anche se la controversia non solo prolunga all'importo delle rivendicazioni ma alla loro esistenza come bene. Il principio di accordo non è colpito con ciò. Articolo 19 non richiede necessariamente che le parti chiariscano i vari quesiti legali sui quali loro non sono stati d'accordo. Per esempio, non contempla, che sia lati si sono aspettati di vedere occhio per guardare su certi punti che li disgiungono, come se le rivendicazioni contestate esistono giuridicamente o non, o se loro sono rivendicazioni statali o private. Come a questi punti, le parti, in effetto sono state d'accordo a non essere d'accordo ma, nonostante le loro contese con riguardo ad a loro, loro li commisero per intraprendere il più lontano possibile negoziazioni con una prospettiva a concludendo un accordo su un accordo...
Il Tribunale considera che il principio fondamentale del Mare del Nord Mensola Cause Continentali sono pertinenti alla controversia presente. Siccome enunciato con la Corte di giustizia Internazionale, conferma e dà sostanza al significato ordinario della negoziazione di ‘'. Essere significativo, negoziazioni dovevano essere entrate in con una prospettiva ad arrivando ad un accordo. Sebbene, siccome noi abbiamo indicato, un accordo per negoziare non implica necessariamente un obbligo per giungere ad un accordo, implica che sforzi seri verso che fine sarà resa.”
LA LEGGE
IO. I GOVERNI ' ECCEZIONI PRELIMINARI
51. Il serbo, sloveno e Governi macedoni sostennero allo stadio di ammissibilità che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire tutte le via di ricorso nazionali. La Corte notò che questa questione andò al cuore dell'Articolo 13 azione di reclamo e che sarebbe esaminato più propriamente ai meriti insceni (veda paragrafo 4 sopra). Di conseguenza, le parti le osservazioni di ' e la valutazione della Corte in che riguardo a sia esposto fuori in paragrafi 76-90 sotto.
52. La Corte nota che i Governi di Bosnia e Herzegovina e Croatia hanno avanzato le ulteriori osservazioni in appoggio della loro eccezione sollevato allo stadio di ammissibilità al personae di ratione di compatibilità della richiesta. Comunque, la Corte, avendo studiato queste osservazioni i costatazione che loro non danno aumento a qualsiasi i motivi per re-aprire la conclusione sé giunsero alla decisione di ammissibilità in questa causa, vale a dire che gli Stati rispondenti hanno accettato che “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta erano parte delle responsabilità finanziarie del SFRY che loro dovrebbero dividere (veda divide in paragrafi 38 e 58 di che decisione). La Corte avrà solamente riguardo ad a queste osservazioni pertanto siccome loro hanno qualsiasi nascendo sui meriti dei problemi sollevò sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
53. La Corte si confinerebbe a sottolineando che la qualifica di questo problema come un problema di successione richiede solamente, mentre ha riguardo ad al diritto internazionale applicabile, che una conseguenza complessiva di una divisione di proprietà e debiti di un predecessore Stato è equa. Purché quel è la causa, Stati possono decidere liberamente i termini effettivi di un accordo di accordo, mentre usa i meccanismi loro loro considerano appropriati, mentre riguardando fra gli altri problemi, il rimborso di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta. Questo compito non può essere fatto con la Corte di Strasbourg.
II. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1
54. Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
1. I richiedenti
55. I richiedenti presentarono che gli Stati rispondenti, come il successore Stati del SFRY, dovrebbe pagare di nuovo loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in prospettiva del fatto che loro non erano riusciti a stabilire questo problema di successione rimanente.
2. Il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian il Governo
56. Il Governo non stato d'accordo con la Corte sta trovando che il problema di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel Sarajevo ramificano di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed il Tuzla ramifichi di Investbanka era un problema di successione (veda la decisione di ammissibilità in questa causa, § 58). In questo collegamento, loro dibatterono, che la questione del SFRY garantisce di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta, diede con sotto Annetta C all'Accordo su Successione Emette, dovrebbe essere distinto dalla questione di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta come così. Inoltre, mentre ammettendo che “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta non erano stati menzionati espressamente in Annetta G all'Accordo su Successione Emette distribuzione con proprietà privata e diritti acquisiti, il Governo dibattè che era più importante che loro non erano stati esclusi espressamente uno. Loro asserirono che la relazione fra salvatori e banche era di una natura di privato-legge, nonostante le garanzie di SFRY di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta, e che i salvatori dei rami summenzionati non erano in tale relazione di privato-legge coi rami loro ma piuttosto con le banche di genitore (quel è, Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed Investbanka). Dato che Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana fu basato in Slovenia ed Investbanka in Serbia e, più importantemente, che la maggior parte dei finanziamenti dei loro rami in ogni probabilità terminata rispettivamente su in Slovenia e Serbia (veda divide in paragrafi 21 e 27 sopra), questo Governo sostenne che Slovenia e Serbia dovrebbero essere sostenuti responsabili nella causa presente da adesso. In questo riguardo a, loro si riferirono alle decisioni delle corti di sloveno menzionate in paragrafo 38 sopra e la decisione delle corti serbe menzionò in Šekerović c. Serbia (il dec.), n. 32472/03, 4 gennaio 2007. Loro si riferirono inoltre a decisione AP 164/04 della Corte Costituzionale di Bosnia e Herzegovina di 1 aprile 2006, § 68 sostenendo che Bosnia e Herzegovina non erano responsabili per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nei rami sotto la considerazione nella causa presente.
57. Come al set di obbligo fuori in Articolo 7 di Annetta C all'Accordo su Successione Emette negoziare il problema del SFRY garantisce di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta, il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian Governo affermò che loro avevano fatto sforzi seri verso giungendo ad un accordo, mentre Serbia e la Slovenia avevano tutto il tempo insistito sulle loro rispettive posizioni senza contemplare qualsiasi le modifiche al riguardo. È vero che Bosnia e Herzegovina si erano stati aspettati di convenire la prossimo riunione del Comitato Unito ed Eretto in Sarajevo fin da 2010. Comunque, il Governo dibattè che questo era dovuto al fatto che il successore Stati non avevano concordato ancora su un'agenda della riunione (facendo seguito Decidere 5 degli Articoli di Procedura di che Comitato che una riunione non può essere contenuta a meno che un'agenda è stata concordata su). Il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian Governo aggiunse che le loro delegazioni avevano sollevato il problema di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramifica su varie occasioni a riunioni bilaterali con le loro cose uguale di sloveno. Il lato di sloveno aveva rifiutato presumibilmente qualsiasi parla semplicemente perché negoziazioni di successione in che riguardo a non era stato concluso ancora.
3. Il Governo croato
58. Il Governo croato presentò che Serbia e la Slovenia dovrebbero essere sostenute responsabili nella causa presente. Le loro ragioni erano lungo le linee di quelli del Bosniaco-Herzegovinian il Governo (veda paragrafo 56 sopra). Come all'obbligo negoziare espose fuori in Articolo 7 di Annetta C all'Accordo su Successione Emette, questo Governo sostenne che loro avevano negoziato in buon fede, mentre il serbo e Governi di sloveno non avevano mostrato nessuna buona volontà per abbandonare le più prime posizioni.
4. Il Governo serbo
59. Dopo un'analisi lunga di pratica internazionale riguardo ad un negotiando di de di pactum, il Governo serbo presentò, che loro avevano negoziato in buon fede. Come alla condotta dell'altro successore gli Stati, loro criticarono in particolare Croatia per notificare il Bis della loro buona volontà per continuare solamente negoziazioni riguardo a questo problema nel 2010 (veda paragrafo 44 sopra). Se la Corte fosse considerare che Serbia interferě col “le proprietŕ” del Sig. Šahdanović per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il Governo serbo dibattè che l'interferenza fu giustificata semplicemente come sé gelò i suoi risparmi nel Tuzla ramifichi di Investbanka negoziazioni di successione pendenti (veda paragrafo 34 sopra). Infine, loro asserirono che Bosnia e Herzegovina avevano benefitted il più più da “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel Tuzla ramificano di Investbanka; dovrebbe essere contenuto perciò responsabile nella causa presente. In appoggio della loro posizione, loro presentarono un contratto facendo seguito a che un certo E.M. da Tuzla un prestito di dinar aveva ottenuto dal ramo di Tuzla di Investbanka in cambio per il suo deposito di estero-valuta.
5. Il Governo di sloveno
60. Il Governo di sloveno presentò che il problema di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel Sarajevo ramificano di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed il Tuzla ramifichi di Investbanka era un problema di successione. Loro dibatterono inoltre che Slovenia aveva lavorato trovare una soluzione alla distribuzione del SFRY sempre garantisce di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta e che i loro sforzi erano andati a vuoto a causa di Bosnia e la frustrazione di Herzegovina e Croatia delle negoziazioni. Notevolmente, il Governo di sloveno criticò Croatia per avere rifiutato di chiarire il problema con arbitrato di Fmi nel 1999; per avere rifiutato di discuterlo nelle riunioni del Comitato Unito ed Eretto; per essere stato d'accordo a continuare Bis negoziazioni, presumibilmente sotto la pressione dell'EU solamente nel 2010 (veda paragrafo 44 sopra); per avere reneged su che offre dopo la chiusura delle negoziazioni di accessione di EU nel 2011; e, per costituirlo impossibile Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Zagreb prendere parte in attività tecniche bancarie e regolari e così generare i beni supplementari ramificano infine. Il Governo di sloveno criticò Bosnia e Herzegovina per avere preso una serie di misure unilaterali, brevemente dopo la conclusione del Bis negoziazioni, progettate per migliorare la sua posizione che negozia verso la Slovenia: 15 luglio 2002 il Governo di FBH adottò una decisione costringendo il Ministero della Giustizia a proporre un emendamento al Società Registro Atto 2000 prolungare retroattivamente la prescrizione per la cancellatura dell'entrata del 1993 nel registro di società riguardo al Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo nazionale e richiedendo l'asse di gestione di che banca che era stata nominata col Ministero di Finanza per fare domanda per la cancellatura di che entrata (veda paragrafo 24 sopra). In conclusione, loro dibatterono, che Bosnia e Herzegovina e Croatia dovrebbero essere sostenuti responsabili nella causa presente.
61. Come riguardi i trasferimenti di valuta estera da Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramifica alla Banca Nazionale della Slovenia, il Governo di sloveno mostrò che una parte di quelli finanziamenti era stata inviata dopo posteriore a Sarajevo. Loro dibatterono che i finanziamenti rimanenti erano stati spediti al NBY. Comunque, mentre loro mostrarono che quelli finanziamenti erano stati registrati davvero come una rivendicazione del ramo di Sarajevo contro il NBY, loro non riuscirono a mostrare che loro erano stati trasferiti fisicamente al NBY (veda paragrafo 11 sopra). In questo riguardo, il Governo di sloveno invitò la Corte a non accettare qualsiasi teoria secondo la quale soldi fisici sarebbe più prezioso di soldi di entrata di libro (quel è, tappezzi operazioni).
6. Il Governo macedone
62. Il Governo macedone presentò che loro non violarono i richiedenti diritti di proprietà di ' siccome loro avevano negoziato questo problema in buon fede.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Articolo applicabile di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
63. Siccome la Corte ha affermato su occasioni numerose, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli: il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti nella luce del principio generale enunciata nel primo articolo (veda, fra le altre autorità, Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 55 ECHR 1999-II).
64. Non è stato contestato di fronte alla Corte che i richiedenti presenti che le rivendicazioni di ' non sono state estinte mai, ma che loro non sono stati ciononostante capaci di disporre liberamente di loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta per molti anni. Perciò, la Corte esaminerà la causa presente, come le altre cause simili (veda Trajkovski c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia (il dec.), n. 53320/99, ECHR 2002-IV, e Suljagić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 27912/02, 3 novembre 2009), sotto il terzo articolo di questo Articolo.
2. Principi Generali
65. I principi generali dell'interpretazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (il principio della legalità, il principio di un scopo legittimo ed il principio di un equilibrio equo) fu riaffermato in Suljagić, citato sopra, §§ 40-44.
3. La richiesta dei principi generali alla causa presente
66. La Corte è pronta accettare che il principio della legalità e che di un scopo legittimo fu rispettato in questa causa (veda Trajkovski, citato sopra, e Suljagić, citato sopra). Procederà perciò esaminare il problema di centro, vale a dire se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra l'interesse generale ed i richiedenti che i diritti di ' hanno garantito con questo Articolo.
67. Depositando valuta estera con banche, salvatori di estero-valuta acquisirono un diritto per raccogliere a qualsiasi il tempo i loro depositi, insieme con interesse accumulato, dalle banche. Le loro rivendicazioni contro le banche hanno scampato la risoluzione del SFRY (veda la decisione di ammissibilità in questa causa, §§ 53-54). Mentre è vero che tutti “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta furono garantiti con lo Stato che garanzia sarebbe potuta essere attivata solamente alla richiesta di una banca e nessuno delle banche in problema fece tale richiesta (veda paragrafo 9 sopra). La responsabilità, perciò non spostò da quelle banche al SFRY. Si dovrebbe notare anche che i rami di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed Investbanka non avevano la personalità legale e separata al tempo della risoluzione del SFRY; facendo seguito al registro di società, loro agirono su conto e per il conto delle banche di genitore.
Avendo riguardo ad al precedente, la Corte trova, che Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, basato in Slovenia, ed Investbanka, basato in Serbia, rimasto responsabile per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nei loro rami, irrispettoso della loro ubicazione, sino alla risoluzione del SFRY. La Corte esaminerà il periodo dopo la risoluzione del SFRY sotto.
68. Come a Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana, il Governo di sloveno prima lo nazionalizzò e poi trasferì la maggior parte dei suoi beni ad una banca nuova; allo stesso tempo, confermò, che il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka trattenne la responsabilità per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nei suoi rami nell'altro successore Stati e le rivendicazioni relative contro il NBY. La Corte già ha sostenuto che un Stato Contraente può essere responsabile per debiti di una società Statale, anche se la società è una persona giuridica separata, mentre prevede che la società non gode “l'indipendenza istituzionale ed operativa sufficiente dallo Stato” (veda Mykhaylenky ed Altri c. l'Ucraina, N. 35091/02 et al., § 43-45, ECHR 2004-XII). È chiaro che Slovenia è il risuoli azionista del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka e che un'agenzia Statale amministra questa banca. In oltre, lo Stato è responsabile, ad una grande misura, per l'incapacità della banca per riparare i suoi debiti (come sé trasferì, con virtù di legge, la maggior parte dei suoi beni ad un'altra banca). La Corte infine nota che la maggior parte dei finanziamenti del Sarajevo ramificano di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana in ogni probabilità terminata su in Slovenia (veda paragrafo 21 sopra). In considerazione di tutti quelli fattori, la Corte conclude che ci sono i motivi sufficienti per ritenere Slovenia responsabile per il debito della banca al Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak nelle circostanze speciali della causa presente.
69. La Corte ha notato l'argomento del Governo di sloveno che lo status dei clienti di Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramo era lontano dall'essere chiaro di periodo 1992-2004 a causa di discordanze in legge e pratica in Bosnia e Herzegovina (veda divide in paragrafi 16 e 22-24 sopra). La situazione è cambiata nel frattempo comunque,: è stato mostrato che fin dalla 2004 Bosnia e Herzegovina non ha nessuna intenzione di rimborsare quelli salvatori. In quelle circostanze, la Corte si confa con le corti di sloveno che quelle discordanze passate ora sono irrilevanti (veda paragrafo 38 sopra).
70. Come ad Investbanka, era rimasto responsabile per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta ai suoi rami nell'altro successore Stati sino a 3 gennaio 2002. Su che data, la corte serba e competente fece un fallimento ordinare contro che banca e la garanzia statale di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nella banca ed i suoi rami furono attivati (veda paragrafo 35 sopra). La Corte nota inoltre che Investbanka o è completamente o ad una grande misura socialmente-posseduta. Ha contenuto in cause comparabili contro Serbia che lo Stato è responsabile per debiti di società socialmente-possedute siccome loro sono da vicino controllati con un'agenzia Statale (veda, notevolmente, R. Kačapor ed Altri c. Serbia, N. 2269/06 et al., §§ 97-98, 15 gennaio 2008 riguardo ad una società principalmente comprised di capitale socialmente-posseduto, e Rašković e Milunović c. Serbia, N. 1789/07 e 28058/07, § 71, 31 maggio 2011 come ad un comprised della società di sia socialmente - e capitale Statale). La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di abbandonare da quel la giurisprudenza. Avendo riguardo ad anche al fatto che la maggior parte dei finanziamenti del Tuzla di Investbanka ramificano più probabili finì in Serbia (veda paragrafo 27 sopra) e che Serbia vendè tutti i locali di che ramo localizzò in Bosnia e Herzegovina (veda paragrafo 28 sopra), la Corte conclude che ci sono i motivi sufficienti per ritenere Serbia responsabile per il debito della banca al Sig. Šahdanović nelle circostanze speciali della causa presente.
71. La Corte ha notato la prospettiva del Governo serbo, divise col Governo di sloveno che Bosnia e Herzegovina hanno tratto profitto il più più da “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed i rami di Investbanka nel suo territorio in prospettiva del fatto che società basarono in che paese fu accordato prestiti di dinar su termini molto favorevoli in ritorno per valuta estera inviata a Slovenia e Serbia (veda paragrafo 12 sopra). Comunque, determinato l'iperinflazione nel SFRY precedente e durante la guerra, in Bosnia e Herzegovina quelli dinar presta poi, perso rapidamente tutto il loro valore, in contrasto a “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta.
72. Avendo stabilito che Slovenia è responsabile per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramifica e che Serbia è responsabile per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel Tuzla di Investbanka ramificano, la Corte deve esaminare infine se i richiedenti l'incapacità di ' per disporre liberamente di loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in quelli rami poiché 1991/92 hanno corrisposto ad una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 con quelli gli Stati.
Il chiarimento del serbo e Governi di sloveno per il ritardo essenzialmente viene in giù al loro dovere di negoziare insieme questa questione in buon fede con l'altro successore Stati, come richiesto con diritto internazionale. Qualsiasi soluzione unilaterale può, nella loro prospettiva, sia contrario a quel il dovere.
73. Comunque, la Corte non è d'accordo. Il dovere di negoziare non impedisce al successore Stati di adottare misure provvisorie mirate a proteggendo gli interessi di salvatori. Il Governo croato ha rimborsato una grande parte dei suoi cittadini ' “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Zagreb ramifica (veda paragrafo 32 sopra) ed il Governo macedone ha rimborsato l'importo totale di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nello Skopje ramificano di che banca (veda paragrafo 39 sopra). Allo stesso tempo, quelli due Governi non hanno abbandonato mai la loro posizione che il Governo di sloveno dovrebbe essere sostenuto infine responsabile e ha continuato a chiedere il risarcimento per gli importi pagata al livello di inter-stato (notevolmente, all'interno del contesto delle negoziazioni di successione). Benché i certi ritardi possano essere giustificati in circostanze eccezionali (veda, con analogia, Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 69 il 1999-V di ECHR), la Corte considera che i richiedenti ' continuò l'incapacità a sbarazzarsi liberamente dei loro risparmi nonostante il crollo del 2002 del Bis negoziazioni condotte sotto l'Accordo su Successione Emettono ed una mancanza di qualsiasi negoziazioni significative riguardo a questo problema sono da allora in poi ciononostante contrarie ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
74. Perciò, una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 della Slovenia con riguardo ad al Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak e con Serbia con riguardo ad al Sig. Šahdanović dovrebbe essere trovato, a meno che i richiedenti non sono riusciti ad esaurire tutte le via di ricorso nazionali (per la definitivo conclusione della Corte come a questo Articolo, veda paragrafo 91 sotto). Come riguardi gli altri Stati rispondenti, nessuna violazione di che Articolo dovrebbe essere trovato (l'ibid.).
III. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 13 Di La Convenzione
75. Articolo 13 della Convenzione prevede:
“Ognuno cui diritti e le libertà come insorga avanti [il] Convenzione è violata avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante che la violazione è stata commessa con persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
1. I richiedenti
76. I richiedenti sostennero che loro non avevano alla loro disposizione in qualsiasi degli Stati rispondenti una via di ricorso effettiva per le loro azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. I Governi rispondenti
77. Il Governo di sloveno presentò che i richiedenti avevano alla loro disposizione le via di ricorso seguenti. Prima, loro avrebbero potuto portare un'azione contro il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka nelle corti di sloveno. Che Governo si riferì ad un numero di sentenze nazionali che o erano divenute definitivo di fronte alla sospensione del 1997 di procedimenti relativo ai rami del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka nell'altro successore Stati o erano state rese dopo la decisione del 2009 che dichiara la sospensione di procedimenti incostituzionale (veda paragrafo 38 sopra). Inoltre, i richiedenti avrebbero potuto portare un'azione contro la Repubblica della Slovenia. In causa di una decisione negativa sui meriti o una decisione procedurale loro sarebbero stati in grado depositare un ricorso costituzionale per sospendere procedimenti. In oltre, i richiedenti potrebbero avere petitioned gli sloveno Corte Costituzionale iniziare procedimenti di revisione di costituzionalità astratti come riguardi la sospensione del 1997-2009 di and/or dei procedimenti l'insuccesso dello Stato per presumere la responsabilità per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel vecchio Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo il ramo. Altrimenti, i richiedenti avrebbero potuto portare un'azione contro il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka nelle corti croate: più di 500 clienti del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka Zagreb ramo aveva ottenuto sentenze e 63 di loro erano stati pagati finora loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta da una forzata vendita dei beni di che banca localizzò in Croatia (veda paragrafo 32 sopra).
78. Il Governo serbo sia anche dell'opinione che i richiedenti avevano alla loro disposizione le varie via di ricorso. Loro sostennero che il Sig. Šahdanović avrebbe dovuto registrare la sua rivendicazione contro il Tuzla di Investbanka ramifichi nei procedimenti fallimentari. Allo stesso tempo al quale Governo ha dato credito che nessuni dei clienti dei rami di Investbanka situò in Bosnia e Herzegovina era stato pagato di nuovo loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta all'interno del contesto di quelli procedimenti fallimentari. Loro presentarono inoltre che il Sig. Šahdanović avrebbe dovuto intraprendere procedimenti civili contro Investbanka nelle corti serbe. Infine, loro dibatterono che lui avrebbe dovuto fare un tentativo di ritirare i suoi risparmi su motivi umanitari (veda paragrafo 33 sopra).
79. Il Governo macedone presentò che i richiedenti avrebbero dovuto esaurire tutte le via di ricorso nazionali in Serbia e la Slovenia, senza andare in qualsiasi i dettagli.
80. In contrasto, i Governi di Bosnia e Herzegovina e Croatia sostennero, che non c'erano via di ricorso effettive ai richiedenti la disposizione di ', determinato la sospensione su tutti i procedimenti che riguardano “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana ed i rami di Investbanka localizzati nell'altro successore Stati (veda divide in paragrafi 34 e 38 sopra). Inoltre, anche se i richiedenti ottennero decisioni che ordinano il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka pagarli i loro risparmi, loro possono più probabili non sia eseguito perché la legislazione del 1994 aveva lasciato che banca con beni limitati (veda paragrafo 37 sopra).
B. la valutazione di La Corte
81. La Corte ha sostenuto su molte occasioni che l'Articolo 13 garanzie la disponibilità a livello di cittadino di una via di ricorso per eseguire la sostanza dei diritti di Convenzione in forma purchessia loro possono accadere di essere garantiti nell'ordine legale e nazionale. L'effetto di Articolo 13 deve costringere così la disposizione di una via di ricorso nazionale a trattare con la sostanza di un “azione di reclamo difendibile” sotto la Convenzione ed accordare il sollievo appropriato. Benché la sfera degli Stati Contraenti gli obblighi di ' sotto Articolo 13 variano dipendendo dalla natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente, la via di ricorso richiesta con Articolo 13 deve essere effettiva in pratica così come in legge. Il “l'efficacia” di un “la via di ricorso” all'interno del significato di Articolo 13 non dipenda dalla certezza di una conseguenza favorevole per il richiedente. Né fa il “l'autorità” assegnò ad in che necessariamente approvvigiona debba essere un'autorità giudiziale; ma se non è, i suoi poteri e le garanzie che riconosce sono attinenti nel determinare se la via di ricorso prima che è effettivo. Anche, anche se una sola via di ricorso non soddisfa da solo completamente i requisiti di Articolo 13, l'aggravamento di via di ricorso previsto per sotto diritto nazionale può fare così (veda Kudła c. la Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 157 ECHR 2000-XI). Dovrebbe essere reiterato che, benché ci possono essere eccezioni giustificate con le particolari circostanze di una causa, la valutazione di se via di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite è eseguito con riferimento alla data sulla quale la richiesta fu depositata con la Corte normalmente (veda Baumann c. la Francia, n. 33592/96, § 47, il 2001-V di ECHR, e Babylonová c. la Slovacchia, n. 69146/01, § 44 ECHR 2006-VIII). Come un articolo generale, richiedenti che vivono fuori della giurisdizione di un Stato Contraente non sono esentati infine, dall'esaurire via di ricorso entro che Stato (veda, con analogia, Demopoulos ed Altri c. la Turchia (il dec.) [GC], N. 46113/99, 3843/02 13751/02, 13466/03 10200/04, 14163/04 19993/04 e 21819/04, § 98 ECHR 2010).
82. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte prima esaminerà se un'azione contro il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka o la Repubblica della Slovenia negli sloveno corteggia, un ricorso agli sloveno Corte Costituzionale per iniziare procedimenti di revisione di costituzionalità astratti ed un'azione contro il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka nelle corti croate, preso separatamente o insieme può essere considerata via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive per l'incapacitŕ del Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak per disporre liberamente di loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta al vecchio Ljubljanska Banka Sarajevo il ramo. Procederà poi determinare se una rivendicazione al tribunale fallimentare competente in Serbia, un'azione civile contro Investbanka nelle corti serbe ed una richiesta per ritiro su motivi umanitari, preso separatamente o insieme, puň essere considerato via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive per l'incapacitŕ del Sig. Šahdanović per disporre liberamente di suo “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta al ramo di Tuzla di Investbanka.
1. Come riguardi i Sarajevo ramificano del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka
(un) azione Civile contro il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka nelle corti di sloveno
83. La Corte nota che la Corte distrettuale di Ljubljana ha reso molte sentenze che ordinano il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka pagare di nuovo “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel suo Sarajevo e Zagreb ramifica, insieme con interesse, e che almeno uno simile sentenza, concernendo precisamente che il Sarajevo, ramifica, già è divenuto definitivo (veda paragrafo 38 sopra). Comunque, determinato il fatto che la legislazione del 1994 aveva lasciato che banca con beni limitati, è incerto se quelle sentenze saranno eseguite (veda paragrafo 37 sopra). Effettivamente, il Governo di sloveno è andato a vuoto a dimostrare che almeno uno che simile sentenza è stata eseguita. Non c'è perciò ora prova come di che questa via di ricorso era capace di offrire compensazione appropriata e sufficiente ai richiedenti.
(b) azione Civile contro la Repubblica della Slovenia nelle corti di sloveno
84. Un numero di clienti del Sarajevo e Zagreb ramifica del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka ha intrapreso procedimenti civili contro la Repubblica della Slovenia. Poiché nessuno di loro ha avuto successo finora (veda paragrafo 38 sopra), i costatazione di Corte che questa via di ricorso non propose prospettive ragionevoli del successo ai richiedenti (veda, con analogia, E.O. e V.P. c. la Slovacchia, N. 56193/00 e 57581/00, § 97 27 aprile 2004).
(il c) Ricorso agli sloveno Corte Costituzionale
85. La Corte nota che sotto sezione 24 della Corte Costituzionale Atto 2007 qualsiasi individuo che dimostra interesse legale può ricorso che procedimenti di revisione di costituzionalità astratti siano iniziati (veda paragrafo 36 sopra). Al giorno d'oggi la causa non è necessario per decidere sull'efficacia di questa via di ricorso in generale. Presumendo anche che potesse essere effettivo in un altro contesto, non era capace di offrire compensazione appropriata e sufficiente ai richiedenti presenti per le ragioni seguenti.
Come all'efficacia di un ricorso agli sloveno Corte Costituzionale per iniziare revisione di costituzionalità della sospensione del 1997-2009 di procedimenti, è vero che tale ricorso di due salvatori croati ha avuto successo nel senso che gli sloveno Corte Costituzionale ha dichiarato la sospensione di procedimenti abilitando incostituzionale la continuazione di tutti i procedimenti civili riguardo a questo problema (veda paragrafo 38 sopra). Comunque, loro non furono assegnati qualsiasi il risarcimento o qualsiasi l'altra compensazione. Inoltre, il fatto che i loro procedimenti civili hanno ricapitolato poi non è in se stesso sufficiente per rendere un ricorso alla Corte Costituzionale una via di ricorso effettiva poiché la Corte già ha trovato (veda divide in paragrafi 83 e 84 sopra) che procedimenti civili non erano uni capace di offrire compensazione appropriata e sufficiente o non proposero prospettive ragionevoli del successo ai richiedenti.
Come all'efficacia di un ricorso agli sloveno Corte Costituzionale per iniziare revisione di costituzionalità della disposizione che limita la responsabilità dello Stato a “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nei rami nazionali del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka che disposizione è incorporata nello Statuto Costituzionale e Di base Atto 1991 Costituzionale quale non sono soggetto ad una revisione con che corte (veda paragrafo 36 sopra).
(d) azione Civile contro il vecchio Ljubljanska Banka nelle corti croate
86. La Corte ha più prima sostenuto che in cause riguardo alla redistribuzione della responsabilità per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta fra il successore Stati del SFRY, come la causa presente che rivendicatori possono essere aspettatisi ragionevolmente di chiedere compensazione in fora dove hanno avuto successo localizzato gli altri rivendicatori in qualsiasi del successore gli Stati (veda Kovačić ed Altri, citato sopra, § 265). È vero che dei salvatori allo Zagreb ramificano del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka è stato pagato di nuovo loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta da una forzata vendita di che i beni di banca localizzarono in Croatia (veda paragrafo 32 sopra). Comunque, il Governo di sloveno non è stato in grado dimostrare che qualsiasi salvatore al ramo di Sarajevo è stato riuscito nelle corti croate. La Corte considera perciò che né questa via di ricorso propose prospettive ragionevoli del successo ai richiedenti.
2. Come riguardi i Tuzla ramificano di Investbanka
(un) Rivendicazione al tribunale fallimentare competente in Serbia
87. Benché centinaio di clienti di Bosniaco-Herzegovinian rami di Investbanka depositarono simile rivendicazioni col tribunale fallimentare competente, nessuno di loro ha avuto successo finora (veda paragrafo 35 sopra). Di conseguenza, segue che questa via di ricorso non propose prospettive ragionevoli del successo al Sig. Šahdanović.
(b) azione Civile contro Investbanka nelle corti serbe
88. Mentre è vero che nei primi 1990s un piccolo numero di salvatori a rami di banche Serbo-basate localizzati fuori di Serbia ottenne sentenze nell'ordinazione di corti serba le banche pagare loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta (veda i fatti in Šekerović c. Serbia (il dec.), n. 32472/03, 4 gennaio 2006), il Governo serbo è andato a vuoto a mostrare che qualsiasi simile sentenza aveva infatti stato eseguito di fronte alla conclusione legale di tutti i procedimenti di esecuzione riguardo a questo problema nel 1998. Perciò, questa via di ricorso non era capace di offrire compensazione appropriata e sufficiente al Sig. Šahdanović.
(il c) la Richiesta per ritiro su motivi umanitari
89. La Corte nota che “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta sono potuti essere ritirati nei primi 1990s su motivi limitati, notevolmente coprire spese mediche o funebri (veda paragrafo 33 sopra). Come lŕ nessuna indicazione č, affitti prova che il Sig. Šahdanović aveva da solo qualsiasi simile spese al tempo attinente, questa via di ricorso non era disponibile a lui.
3. Conclusione
90. Avendo riguardo ai richiedenti non avevano via di ricorso effettiva alla loro disposizione per le loro azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo al sopra, N.ro 1. Siccome Slovenia è responsabile per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Sarajevo ramifica e Serbia per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta nel Tuzla di Investbanka ramificano (veda divide in paragrafi 68 e 70 sopra), i costatazione di Corte con che c'č stata una violazione di Articolo 13 con la Slovenia riguardo ad al Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak e con Serbia con riguardo ad al Sig. Šahdanović. Respinge i Governi le eccezioni di ' in riguardo dei richiedenti l'insuccesso di ' per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali di conseguenza, (veda paragrafo 51 sopra). Come riguardi gli altri Stati rispondenti, i costatazione di Corte che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 13.
IV. Definitivo Conclusione Come Ad Articolo 1 Di Protocollo N.ro 1
91. Nella luce della conclusione preliminare come ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 set fuori in paragrafo 74 sopra e la conclusione come ai richiedenti ' addusse insuccesso per esaurire tutte le via di ricorso nazionali esposto fuori in paragrafo 90 sopra, la Corte conclude che c'č stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 della Slovenia con riguardo ad al Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak e con Serbia con riguardo ad al Sig. Šahdanović. La Corte conclude inoltre che non c'è stata violazione di che Articolo con qualsiasi degli altri Stati rispondenti.
C. Addusse Violazione Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione
92. Articolo 14 della Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
93. I richiedenti addussero una violazione di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, appellandosi che in essenza sulle considerazioni che sono posto sotto alle loro azioni di reclamo sotto le disposizioni seconde, preso da solo. Avendo esaminato i Governi le osservazioni di ' ed avendo riguardo ad alle sue conclusioni riguardo ad Articolo 13 ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in paragrafi 90-91 sopra, la Corte considera che c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare la questione sotto Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con quegli Articoli come riguarda Serbia e la Slovenia e che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 come riguardi gli altri Stati rispondenti.
VI. La richiesta Di Articolo 46 Di La Convenzione
94. La parte attinente di Articolo 46 della Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“1. Le Parti Contraenti ed Alte si impegnano attenersi alla definitivo sentenza della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La definitivo sentenza della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato di Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione. ...”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
95. Il serbo, sloveno e Governi macedoni così come i richiedenti obiettarono alla richiesta della procedura di pilota-sentenza in questa causa. Il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian Governo dibattè che la causa presente era appropriata per che procedura come sé riguardò circa 130,000 salvatori al Sarajevo ramifichi del vecchio Ljubljanska Banka, circa il 132,000 salvatori allo Zagreb ramificano di che banca che non aveva trasferito i loro risparmi a banche croate (veda paragrafo 32 sopra) e circa 132,000 salvatori ai rami di Investbanka in Bosnia e Herzegovina. Il Governo croato sostenne che era difficile dire, a questo stadio, se la causa era appropriata per la procedura di pilota-sentenza o non.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Principi Generali
96. La Corte reitera che Articolo 46 della Convenzione, siccome interpretato nella luce di Articolo 1, impone sugli Stati rispondenti un obbligo legale per fare domanda, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato di Ministri and/or generale ed appropriato misure individuali per garantire i richiedenti diritti di ' che la Corte fondò essere violata. Simile misure devono essere prese anche in riguardo di altre persone nei richiedenti che ' posiziona, notevolmente con risolvendo i problemi che hanno condotto alle sentenze della Corte (veda Lukenda c. la Slovenia, n. 23032/02, § 94 ECHR 2005-X). Questo obbligo fu enfatizzato costantemente col Comitato di Ministri nella soprintendenza dell'esecuzione delle sentenze della Corte (veda ResDH(97)336, IntResDH(99)434, IntResDH(2001)65 e ResDH(2006)1).
97. Per facilitare attuazione effettiva delle sue sentenze la Corte può adottare una procedura di pilota-sentenza che gli concede chiaramente identificare problemi strutturali che sono posto sotto alle violazioni ed indicare misure per essere fatto domanda con gli Stati rispondenti per rimediarli a (veda Articolo 61 degli Articoli di Corte e Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, §§ 189-94 il 2004-V di ECHR). Lo scopo di che procedura è facilitare il più veloce e la maggior parte di decisione effettiva di una disfunzione che colpisce la protezione dei diritti di Convenzione in oggetto nell'ordine legale e nazionale (veda Wolkenberg ed Altri c. la Polonia (il dec.), n. 50003/99, § 34 ECHR 2007-XIV). Mentre l'azione dello Stato rispondente dovrebbe mirare primariamente alla decisione di tale disfunzione ed all'introduzione, se necessario, di via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive in riguardo delle violazioni in problema, può includere anche, ad soluzioni di hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatore ed unilaterali in linea coi requisiti di Convenzione. La Corte può decidere di aggiornare l'esame di cause simili, mentre dando così gli Stati rispondenti un'opportunità di stabilirli in modi così vari (veda, fra molte autorità, Burdov c. la Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 127 ECHR 2009). Comunque, se gli errori Statali e rispondenti per adottare simile misure seguente una sentenza di pilota e continua a violare la Convenzione, la Corte avrà nessuna alternativa ma riprendere l'esame di tutte le richieste simili pendente di fronte a sé e portarli a sentenza per assicurare osservanza effettiva della Convenzione (veda E.G. c. la Polonia (il dec.), n. 50425/99, § 28 ECHR 2008).
2. La richiesta dei principi alla causa presente
98. Le violazioni che la Corte ha trovato in questa causa colpiscono molte persone. Ci sono più delle 1,650 richieste simili, introdotte in favore di più di 8,000 richiedenti pendente di fronte alla Corte. Di conseguenza, la Corte lo considera appropriato fare domanda la procedura di pilota-sentenza in questa causa, nonostante le parti le eccezioni di ' in questo riguardo a.
99. Mentre non è in principio per la Corte per determinare che cosa possono essere appropriate soddisfare gli Stati rispondenti gli obblighi di ' sotto Articolo 46 della Convenzione, in prospettiva della situazione sistematica che ha identificato misure riparatore la Corte osserverebbe che misure generali a livello di cittadino sono richieste indubbiamente nell'esecuzione della sentenza presente.
Notevolmente, Slovenia dovrebbe intraprendere tutte le misure necessarie entro sei mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo a per concedere il Sig.ra Ališić, il Sig. Sadžak e tutti altri nella loro posizione per essere pagato di nuovo loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta sotto le stesse condizioni come quelli che avevano simile risparmi in rami nazionali delle banche di sloveno. All'interno dello stesso tempo-limite, Serbia dovrebbe intraprendere tutte le misure necessarie per concedere il Sig. Šahdanović e tutti altri nella sua posizione per essere pagato di nuovo loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta sotto le stesse condizioni come cittadini serbi che avevano simile risparmi in rami nazionali di banche serbe.
Come riguardi i ritardi passati, la Corte non lo trova necessario, attualmente, ordinare che compensazione adeguata sia assegnata a tutte le persone colpite. Comunque, se Serbia o Slovenia va a vuoto a fare domanda le misure generali indicate sopra di e continua a violare la Convenzione, la Corte può riconsiderare il problema di compensazione in una causa futura ed appropriata contro lo Stato in oggetto (veda, con analogia, Suljagić, citato sopra, § 64).
100. Si deve enfatizzare che gli ordini sopra non fanno domanda a persone che, benché nella stessa posizione come i richiedenti presenti, è stato pagato loro intero “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta con l'altro successore gli Stati, come quelli che erano in grado ritirare loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta su motivi umanitari (veda divide in paragrafi 17 e 33 sopra), o usarli nell'elaborazione di privatizzazione (veda paragrafo 22 sopra), e quelli che furono pagati i loro risparmi in Ljubljanska Banka Ljubljana Zagreb e Skopje ramifica coi Governi croati e macedoni (veda divide in paragrafi 32 e 39 sopra). Serbia e la Slovenia possono escludere perciò simile persone dai loro schemi di rimborso. Comunque, se solamente una parte di uno “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta sono stati pagati così, Serbia e la Slovenia ora sono responsabili per il resto (Serbia per “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta in tutti i rami di banche serbe e la Slovenia per simile risparmi in tutti i rami delle banche di sloveno, nonostante l'ubicazione di un ramo e della cittadinanza di un depositante riguardata).
101. Infine, la Corte aggiorna l'esame di tutte le cause simili per sei mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo (veda, con analogia, Suljagić, citato sopra, § 65). Questa decisione è senza pregiudizio al potere della Corte a qualsiasi momento per dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi simile causa o colpirlo del suo ruolo in conformità con la Convenzione.
VII. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
102. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
103. I richiedenti chiesero il pagamento di loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta con interesse in riguardo di danno patrimoniale. La Corte già ha fatto ordini in questo riguardo ad in paragrafo 99 sopra.
104. Ognuno dei richiedenti chiese inoltre 4,000 euros (EUR) in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. Il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian, croato, serbo e Governi macedoni dibatterono che le rivendicazioni erano ingiustificate. Comunque, la Corte accetta che i richiedenti subirono della perdita non-patrimoniale che sorge dalle violazioni della Convenzione trovata in questa causa. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto con Articolo 41 della Convenzione, assegna gli importi chiesti (quel è, EUR 4,000 al Sig.ra Ališić e lo stesso importo al Sig. Sadžak per essere pagato con Slovenia ed EUR 4,000 al Sig. Šahdanović per essere pagato con Serbia).
Costi di B. e spese
105. I richiedenti chiesero anche EUR 59,500 per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alla Corte. Il Bosniaco-Herzegovinian, croato, serbo e Governi macedoni sostennero che la rivendicazione era eccessiva e non comprovata. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Quel è, il richiedente li ha dovuti pagare, o sia legato per pagarli, facendo seguito ad un obbligo legale o contrattuale, e loro sono dovuti essere inevitabili per ostacolare la violazione trovata od ottenere compensazione. La Corte richiede conti particolareggiati e fatture che sufficientemente sono dettagliate per abilitarlo per determinare a che misura i requisiti sopra sono state soddisfatte. Poiché nessuna nota spese è stata presentata nella causa presente, la Corte respinge questa rivendicazione.
Interesse di mora di C.
106. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Respinge con sei voti ad uno i Governi le eccezioni di ' come ai richiedenti l'insuccesso di ' per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali;

2. Sostiene unanimamente che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione di Serbia con riguardo ad al Sig. Šahdanović;

3. Sostiene con sei voti ad uno che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione della Slovenia con riguardo ad al Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak;

4. Sostiene unanimamente che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione degli altri Stati rispondenti;

5. Sostiene unanimamente che c'č stata una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione con Serbia con riguardo ad al Sig. Šahdanović;

6. Sostiene con sei voti ad uno col quale c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione con la Slovenia riguardo ad al Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak;

7. Sostiene unanimamente che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione con gli altri Stati rispondenti;

8. Sostiene unanimamente che c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 con riguardo ad a Serbia e la Slovenia e che c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 con riguardo ad agli altri Stati rispondenti;

9. Sostiene unanimamente che l'insuccesso del serbo e Governi di sloveno per includere i richiedenti presenti e tutti altri nella loro posizione nei loro rispettivi schemi per il rimborso di “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta rappresentano un problema sistematico;

10. Sostiene unanimamente che Serbia deve intraprendere tutte le misure necessarie entro sei mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo in conformitŕ con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione per concedere il Sig. Šahdanović e tutti altri nella sua posizione per essere pagato di nuovo loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta sotto le stesse condizioni come cittadini serbi che avevano simile risparmi in rami nazionali di banche serbe;

11. Sostiene con sei voti ad uno che Slovenia deve intraprendere tutte le misure necessarie entro sei mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo in conformitŕ con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione per concedere il Sig.ra Ališić, il Sig. Sadžak e tutti altri nella loro posizione per essere pagato di nuovo loro “vecchio” risparmi di estero-valuta sotto le stesse condizioni come quelli che avevano simile risparmi in rami nazionali delle banche di sloveno;

12. Decide unanimamente di aggiornare, per sei mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo l'esame di tutte le cause simili, senza pregiudizio al potere della Corte a qualsiasi momento per dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi simile causa o colpirlo del suo ruolo in conformità con la Convenzione;

13. Sostiene unanimamente
(un) che Serbia è pagare il Sig. Šahdanović, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 4,000 (quattro mila euros) in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

14. Sostiene con sei voti ad uno
(un) che Slovenia è pagare il Sig.ra Ališić ed il Sig. Sadžak, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo in conformitŕ con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 4,000 (quattro mila euros) ognuno in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, piů qualsiasi tassa che puň essere addebitabile;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

15. Respinge unanimamente il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 6 novembre 2012, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente

Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudice Zupančič č annessa a questa sentenza.
N.B.
T.L.E.

OPINIONE CHE DISSENTE DI GIUDICE ZUPANČIČ
Io pento che io non posso seguire la sentenza di maggioranza. Per un numero di ragioni solamente alcuni/e dei/lle quali sono delineate in questo dissenso è la mia opinione considerata che la conseguenza di questa sentenza con l'ad la volontà di Camera di hoc, di fronte alla Grande Camera più certamente prova non essere in conformità con la lettera e lo spirito della Convenzione.
Se noi cominciamo col Protocollo N.ro 1, Articolo 1 divide in paragrafi 1 disposizione della Convenzione, noi vediamo che il suo fine è proteggere proprietà in buona fede, le aspettative legittime, rivendicazioni difendibili ecc. in questa causa noi siamo Comunque, nella definitivo analisi, salvaguardando l'impatto speculativo ed i difetti di un schema di piramide stato-corso e Comunista di proporzioni stato-ampie. Lo schema era stato esposto su con l'ora il defunto regime—then iugoslavo in bisogno pressante di finanziamenti di valuta forte. Più importantemente e fin dall'and/or di banca di LB la Repubblica della Slovenia non aveva preparato questo schema di Ponzi dal punto di vista morale, loro non sono chiaramente i Madoffs della storia!
Nello scenario di causa peggiore in che la Banca di LB e con implicazione la Repubblica della Slovenia debba essere responsabile per il, metterlo bruscamente, “il furto” dei depositanti i soldi di '-, ancora non avrebbe senso per rimborsare i depositanti con l'assurdo 12% sui depositi iniziali. Parlando eticamente, questa quota della rivendicazione di rimborso era stata una speculazione dell'ingenuo, come al solito investitori nello schema di Ponzi Comunista e detto.
Nel depositare denaro ed in situazioni di successione simili, il principio territoriale fece domanda, ed implementò per rimborsare debiti dovuti in un particolare paese, specchi la considerazione economica e notoria che i denari hanno ricevuto da depositanti i depositi di ' è investita, in termini del così definito ‘prenoti soldi ', nel molto territorio nel quale la banca stava funzionando come un vis-à-vis di debitore i depositanti della banca ma specialmente come un vis-à-vis di creditore imprese numerose che la stessa banca aveva finanziato concomitantemente per i suoi prestiti. La sentenza di maggioranza, metterlo differentemente è in violazione del principio territoriale.
Il principio territoriale sostiene che i creditori-cioé., i salvatori della banca-sarà rimborsato per i loro depositi nella regione, area o territorio nei quali i prestiti commerciali e combinati derivarono dai loro depositi era infatti steso ad imprese diverse. Siccome fissato negli oft-citarono ed articolo seminale sulla successione iugoslava: “[...] il principio territoriale chiaramente notifica come l'articolo generale su successione statale riferita a proprietà mobile e tangibile.” (veda, Carsten Stahn, Accordo su Successione Emette della Repubblica Federale Socialista e Precedente dell'Iugoslavia, 96 di mattina. J. Int'l L. 379 (2002)). Noi vedremo diritti perché questo è logico e perciò correttamente.
Uno deve capire che tutte le banche stanno funzionando in questa maniera di valutazione speculativa dei loro rischi futuri sempre, basato su che i depositanti i soldi di ' è moltiplicato in una maniera virtuale nel prolungare i prestiti ben oltre il capitale di depositi iniziali (‘prenota soldi '). ‘' Virtuale qui vuole dire che i ‘prenotano soldi ' letteralmente è preso in prestito dal futuro e è in questo senso ‘soldi virtuali '.
Così le duro-valute depositarono e convertirono nei soldi di libro di ‘' fu prolungato come credito ad imprese nel territorio o all'individuo nel territorio che era disposto e capace di rimborsare ed a pagando un tasso di interesse normale sul prestito loro stavano prendendo dalla banca. L'interesse pagato non può essere mai chiaramente, alto come 12%. Questo tende a provare che lo schema di piramide detto-era equo che.
Comunque, questa maniera notoria di depositare denaro sarà vista nella luce del poi governo di Marković moribondo e nella luce del guasto di stato finanziario e federale che incombe di che la duro-valuta molto Comunista lo schema di Ponzi era stato un segnale di avvertimento chiaro per tutti per vedere e prendere in considerazione.
È anche ovvio che qualsiasi ‘corre sulla banca ' immediatamente terminerà nel fallimento della banca. Ogni banca essenzialmente è un'operazione di ritardo speculativa siccome è anche vero di ogni schema di piramide, schema di Ponzi ecc.—a meno che nel depositare denaro onesto il ciclo di prestito-rimborso è realistico. Così, per esempio, il regime di Tudjman in Croatia bruscamente chiuso in giù la Banca di LB sul suo territorio che aveva implicato-come sé per qualsiasi la banca-una liquidazione immediata della Banca di LB. In tale situazione, tutti i debiti di tutti i depositanti sono chiamati immediatamente in, mentre i prestiti sono ancora nell'elaborazione a lungo termine di rimborso. Nelle altre parole, la chiusura della banca col decreto del regime provocherà una contumacia immediata della banca-specialmente il vis-à-vis i suoi depositanti individuali, creditori.
Il principio territoriale denota la prospettiva dinamica della funzione tecnica bancaria: è guidato con l'idea che l'aspetto di determinative della funzione della banca è la sua disposizione continua di suoi propri prestiti in un particolare territorio. Quando il territorio in oggetto si considera perciò che sia il criterio principale per rimborso, questo ha la sua propria logica allineato che non può essere compresa dalla semplice prospettiva di legge privata di Articolo 1, divida in paragrafi 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Nell'evento che la banca non è capace di rimborsare i suoi depositanti, solamente depositanti da che territorio, irrispettoso della loro cittadinanza, ecc. sarà coperto con la garanzia statale-, per la ragione macroeconomica ed ovvia che i soldi di libro è derivato originalmente dai depositanti i depositi di ' ha infatti stato investito e ha sospeso nel territorio in oggetto. Là aveva incentivato attività economica, ecc.
Ha così senso, quando il discorso è di successione che il successore afferma similmente copra i loro territori con le loro garanzie come l'autorità centrale, in questa causa la Banca Centrale in Belgrade, non aveva adempiuto alla sua propria funzione che garantisce. Se simile è la logica, è facile capire che ha anche senso per il successore del sei Stati sottoscrivere i loro depositanti ' chiede-ogni uno su suo proprio territorio.
Questo è infatti che che accadde almeno a della misura, cioé., in finora come Croatia ha rimborsato grandemente i depositanti della Banca di LB sul suo territorio. È probabile che uno faccia la questione se lo Stato di Croatia ha fatto fuori questo di buono vis-à-vis di heartedness puro i loro propri cittadini-, o è stato là forse in questa mossa una giustizia macroeconomica ed incorporata che lo stato croato quando entrando in essendo ha preso debitamente nell'esame. Sia non per la logica del principio territoriale nel primo posto nelle altre parole, perché lo stato croato prenderebbe su parte del debito di Banca di LB per tutti quelli cittadini che desiderarono essere rimborsati con lo stato croato?
In qualsiasi l'evento, la logica del principio territoriale è ovvia su sia lati di questa causa. Noi desideriamo reiterare la semplice idea che ha individualizzato la giustizia, come considerato con Protocollo N.ro 1, ha il suo complemento completamente compatibile nella giustizia distributiva di Aristotele costruita nel principio territoriale.
In pectore, io ho per molti harboured degli anni un'altra questione perché c'è un altro travestimento burlesco in questa causa: viz. il problema nel setting avversario e presente è completamente miscomprehended. La controversia si confonde perché questo non è, come sé dovrebbe essere, una causa interstatale. Unmistakeably, il problema di legge privato ed atipico può nel fondale avversario ed interstatale si è sviluppato esattamente in un aspettato, naturale, e logico problema di successione interstatale. Questo risulterebbe in un lontano prospettiva più chiara sulla causa. Perché è che nessuni degli Stati rispondenti ha registrato, nella Corte europea di Diritti umani, un'azione interstatale contro la Repubblica della Slovenia? Perché è che gli Stati rispondenti nascondono dietro ai reclamanti individuali quando tutto aguzza al fatto che questi questioni di successione sono? Io penso che la risposta è chiara.
Un'altra di eccezioni notevoli mie a questa sentenza di maggioranza deriva dalla composizione effettiva del presente ad hoc Camera in che quattro dei membri, cioé., una semplice maggioranza almeno, è dagli stati di creditore, uno dei membri è da un stato di debitore di individuo, mentre ci sono solamente due altri membri del pannello che non è, in un senso o un altro, giudici nazionali nella causa. Noi capiamo perfettamente bene la logica procedurale e solita della Convenzione all'effetto che il giudice nazionale del paese concernito debba in tutte le cause sia un membro del pannello per facilitare la valutazione della causa. Comunque, in una situazione nella quale noi abbiamo sette successore Stati che rivolgono che che essenzialmente è un problema di successione, la logica della presenza del giudice nazionale in ogni particolare causa risulterà in un ad composizione di hoc, come nel presente in che i querelanti ' i rappresentanti di ‘' ha una maggioranza chiara sull'influenza degli imputati ' i rappresentanti di ‘'. Questo è assurdo poiché era discernibile dal molto inizio che gli interessi dei querelanti istruiranno la conseguenza dell'ad hoc casu maggioranza sentenza. Fortunatamente, il sacrosanct della Convenzione la filosofia di opinione separata salverà qui il giorno in tanto quanto la causa chiaramente deve essere esaminato nella Grande Camera. Nella Grande Camera, la composizione con la presenza di tutti i giudici nazionali sarà attenuata nel gruppo di 17 giudici, cioé., il portante degli interessi del querelante sarà similmente meno decisivo. Io desidero enfatizzare, che io non ho dubbi dei miei colleghi l'imparzialità di ', mentre ricorda chiaramente che l'imparzialità consapevole quando viene a contemplando interessi nazionali ha i suoi propri confini obiettivi. Comunque, anche se non sia per la generalità numerica nell'ad hoc casu rivestono di pannelli come così, le così definite comparizioni di ‘che ' gli renderà ovvio che tale pannello non vuole, al mondo di fuori, sembri obiettivo ed imparziale.
Da anni io sostengo, ed ancora fa, che il problema in questa causa è documentato meglio nell'ora la Relazione di Professore famoso Jürgen (Rimborso dei depositi di cambio estero non rese negli uffici del Ljubljanska Banka sul territorio della Slovenia, 1977-1991, Doc. 10135, 14 aprile 2004 Relazione, Comitato su Affari Legali e Diritti umani il Relatore: Il Sig. Erik Jürgens, i Paesi Bassi). Il senso del rapporto, a 20 & 21, è siccome segue:
“La conclusione economica deve essere che i depositi originali avevano, nel 1991, infatti cessò esistere. I depositanti avevano, attirò coi tassi di interesse alti, amministrati un rischio con depositando i loro soldi in banche all'interno del SFRY. Quando questo rischio fu riconosciuto, loro furono riassicurati con la garanzia data col governo di SFRY che i depositi sarebbero rimborsati con interesse accumulato. Ma questa garanzia evaporò al momento che il SFRY si è stato sciolto, a meno che ed in quanto gli stati di successore erano disposti a prendere questa garanzia. Di questo si fu reso conto debitamente, ma gli stati di successore diversi lo facevano in modi diversi. La Slovenia [...] prese la garanzia per risparmi di Fe depositati in banche sul suo territorio, mentre aspettandosi che le altre repubbliche facessero la stesse.”
Il tempismo di questa sentenza è particolarmente cattivo perché negoziazioni fra Slovenia e Croatia stanno muovendosi almeno ora in avanti e sono amministrate con banchieri competenti dei due paesi che capiscono il problema. La sentenza sarà incomprenssa come definitivo e sé sarà naturalmente e su sia parteggia interpretato male politicamente.
Se uno considera paragrafo 58 della sentenza nel quale il governo di sloveno criticò Croatia per avere rifiutato di chiarire il problema con arbitrato di Fmi nel 1999; per avere rifiutato di discuterlo nella commissione mista eretta; per essere stato d'accordo a continuare Banca per negoziazioni di Accordi Internazionali, presumibilmente sotto la pressione dell'EU solamente nel 2010; per avere reneged su che offre dopo la chiusura delle negoziazioni di accessione di EU nel 2011; ed infine per costituirlo impossibile Banca di LB Ramo di Zagreb prendere parte in attività tecniche bancarie e regolari e così generare i beni supplementari (veda parà. 58 della sentenza di maggioranza). A queste dichiarazioni del governo di sloveno non sono state risposte in modo appropriato col governo croato, né loro sono stati rivolti con la sentenza di maggioranza. Segue inesorabilmente che il briccone in questa storia non è Slovenia, perché Slovenia ha tentato almeno cinque volte di negoziare decentemente questo problema di successione con Croatia-ma inutilmente. Chiaramente, è impossibile per sapere se questa volta, nonostante tutto il governo croato è serio o non. Uno spererebbe almeno che questa volta le negoziazioni potevano infatti si muova in avanti perché, come indicato sopra, loro ora sono amministrati con due esperti che capiscono il problema. Inoltre, l'entrata di Croatia nell'Unione europea è condizionata sul successo di queste negoziazioni. Noi reiteriamo che la sentenza è calcolata male perché creerà un'impressione politica come a chi ora è nella posizione vincente, nonostante il fatto che è probabile che la causa stia andando alla Grande Camera, e ha bisogno di mostrare più benevolenza ed un atteggiamento positivo nelle negoziazioni in corso.
In questo contesto, noi dobbiamo chiamare attenzione all'essenza della sentenza di causa di Kovačič che era di fronte alla Grande Camera su una tecnicità pura e porta la sua vera comunicazione nell'opinione concordante del giudice precedente, Professore Giorgio Ress, un specialista mondo-rinomato in diritto internazionale cioé., un specialista su successione. In Kovačič, la questione non era stata rivolta nella sentenza, ma Professore Ress aveva articolato la comunicazione nella sua opinione concordante. Che comunicazione essenzialmente era la stessa come il trovato nel rapporto di Jürgen, cioé., che il problema non può essere risolto in modo appropriato con una sentenza fra parti private e lo Stato. A meno che questo doveva essere una causa interstatale, può essere risolto solamente con negoziazioni nel contesto di un accordo di successione futuro.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.