Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF JEHOVAS ZEUGEN IN ÖSTERREICH v. AUSTRIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 14, 09, P1-1

NUMERO: 27540/05/2012
STATO: Austria
DATA: 25/09/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions:
Violation of Article 14+9 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) (Article 9 - Freedom of thought conscience and religion
Article 9-1 - Freedom of religion)
Violation of Article 14+P1-1 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 14 - Discrimination) (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property
Article 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Secure the payment of taxes)
Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed
Non-pecuniary damage - finding of violation sufficient



FIRST SECTION






CASE OF JEHOVAS ZEUGEN IN ÖSTERREICH v. AUSTRIA

(Application no. 27540/05)









JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

25 September 2012




This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of Jehovas Zeugen in Österreich v. Austria,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nina Vajić, President,
Peer Lorenzen,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 September 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 27540/05) against the Republic of Austria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by Jehovas Zeugen, a religious community established in Austria under the Religious Communities Act 1998 (“the applicant community”), on 20 July 2005.
2. The applicant community was represented by Mr R. Kohlhofer, a lawyer practising in Vienna. The Austrian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ambassador H. Tichy, Head of the International Law Department at the Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs.
3. The applicant community alleged, in particular, that it had been discriminated against in the exercise of its rights under Article 9 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, as it had been subject to laws concerning the employment of foreigners and tax from which recognised religious societies had been exempted.
4. On 19 January 2009 the application was communicated to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant community was at the time of the events complained of a registered religious community established in Austria under the Religious Communities Act 1998. Since 7 May 2009 it has had the status of a religious society, a status conferred by statute.
A. Proceedings for a declaratory decision under the Employment of Aliens Act
6. In 2002 the applicant community wished to employ a couple, G.V. and V.T., who were both ministers belonging to the Religious Order of Jehovah’s Witnesses (Orden der Sondervollzeitdiener der Zeugen Jehovas) and who were Tagalog speaking citizens of the Philippines, for the benefit of its Tagalog speaking members in Austria.
7. In order to obtain a residence permit (Aufenthaltsgenehmigung) or a settlement permit (Niederlassungsbewilligung), the couple had to have a work permit or be able to show that they were not subject to the provisions of the Employment of Aliens Act (“the EA Act”). On 16 April 2002 the applicant community therefore applied to the Währinger Gürtel Labour Market Service (Arbeitsmarktservice) in Vienna for a declaratory decision that the pastoral work the couple would exercise was exempt from the provisions of the EA Act. It submitted that, since the entry into force of the Religious Communities Act 1998, section 1(2) of the EA Act had to be understood as referring to all persons doing pastoral work for religious communities and not only as referring to ministers of recognised churches and religious societies. In any event, it submitted that the tasks which would be assigned to G.V. and V.T. would not constitute employment within the terms of the EA Act.
8. On 1 July 2002 the Labour Market Service dismissed the application and, on 21 October 2002, an appeal panel of the Labour Market Service confirmed the decision. Both authorities found that only ministers performing pastoral duties belonging to a recognised religious society were exempt from the provisions of the EA Act, but not members of a registered religious community, which was the status of the applicant community. In addition, the boards held that pastoral work had the typical features of employment within the meaning of the EA Act, as it was exercised within a hierarchical structure, subject to the instructions of a superior and involved economic dependence.
9. On 3 December 2002 the applicant community filed a complaint with the Constitutional Court, in which it argued that the decisions of the administrative authorities had violated its rights under Article 9 read alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention.
10. On 10 October 2003 the Constitutional Court dismissed the complaint. It found that any employment contracts the applicant community concluded with aliens concerning pastoral work as ministers would be subject to the provisions of the EA Act, because the exemption in section 1(2) of the EA Act only applied to churches or religious societies recognised by law.
11. The Constitutional Court held that even though the pastoral work of ministers clearly fell within the scope of protection of Article 9, which also comprised the conclusion of employment contracts by a religious group with persons engaging in such activities, and even though labour-market regulations, in particular the employment of aliens, might constitute an interference with the rights protected by Article 9, such interference was justified under paragraph 2 of Article 9. The difference between the employment of foreigners as ministers performing pastoral work by a religious society and employment by a registered religious community made by the EA Act was in conformity with the Federal Constitution. Through recognition as a religious society, that religious group acquired a legal status, more closely defined in the relevant Act, which would allow it to participate in the shaping of public life in the State (an der Gestaltung des staatlichen öffentlichen Lebens teilzunehmen). As this status could, and indeed had to, be granted to all churches and religious societies provided the conditions established by law were met, the distinction between recognised religious societies and other communities did not give rise to doubts as to its constitutionality.
12. On 15 December 2004 the Administrative Court dismissed the complaint, which had been transferred to it. The applicant community argued that section 1(1) of the EA Act was discriminatory. However, the Administrative Court found that this matter had been exhaustively examined by the Constitutional Court in its above decision. This decision was served on the applicant community’s lawyer on 20 January 2005.
B. The proceedings for inheritance and gift tax
13. In October 1999 the applicant community received a donation.
On 2 May 2001 the Vienna Tax Office for Fees and Transaction Taxes (Finanzamt für Gebühren und Verkehrssteuern) ordered the applicant community to pay inheritance and gift tax in the amount of 14% on the sum received. It found that the applicant community could not rely on section 15(1)(14) of the Inheritance and Gift Tax Act 1955 (“the 1955 Act”), which provided an exemption from tax liability for certain donations to religious institutions, because this tax privilege was reserved to churches and religious societies recognised by law.
14. On 7 May 2001 the applicant community appealed. It argued that, as a result of the entry into force of the Religious Communities Act on 10 January 1998, the exemption from tax liability under section 15(1)(14) of the 1955 Act also extended to registered religious communities such as itself.
15. On 25 January 2005 the Independent Finance Panel (Unabhängiger Finanzsenat) dismissed the appeal. It noted that section 15(1)(14) of the 1955 Act clearly referred to religious societies and there was no doubt that this did not mean a registered religious community. Referring to the case law of the Constitutional Court, in particular its decision of 10 October 2003 (see above), it found that the difference in treatment between religious societies and religious communities was in accordance with the Federal Constitution. Further, none of the other exemption clauses under this provision applied to the applicant community.
16. On 3 March 2005 the applicant community filed a complaint with the Constitutional Court, arguing that the impugned decision had violated its right to equal treatment, right to the peaceful enjoyment of its property and right not to be discriminated against on the basis of religion.
17. On 26 September 2005 the Constitutional Court declined to deal with the complaint for a lack of prospects of success, considering that insofar as the applicant community’s complaints concerned matters of constitutional law they had been sufficiently dealt with in its previous case law.
18. On 5 December 2005, following a request by the applicant community, it remitted the case to the Administrative Court. On 13 January 2006 the applicant community supplemented its complaint before the Administrative Court.
19. On 27 April 2006 the Administrative Court dismissed the complaint as unfounded. It found that the applicant community was not a religious society and could not, therefore, rely on a privilege reserved to such an institution. Moreover, it was also not a charitable institution (gemeinnützige Körperschaft) within the meaning of the 1955 Act, as charitable goals were only those which consisted of promoting the interests of the general public (nur solche Zwecke sind durch deren Erfüllung die Allgemeinheit gefördert wird). As the applicant community, according to its constitutional documents, essentially addressed its activities to its members alone, it addressed itself to a more restricted group than the general public.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
20. Section 1(2) of the Employment of Aliens Act provides, insofar as relevant, as follows:
“The provisions of this federal act do not apply to:
...
(d) aliens in respect of pastoral work they exercise as part of a church or religious society recognised by law; ...”
21. Section 15(1) of the Inheritance and Gift Tax Act 1955, which was still in force at the relevant time, reads, insofar as relevant, as follows:
“[The following] are also exempt from taxation:
...
(14) donations between living persons of movable objects or sums of money to
- domestic legal persons which pursue exclusively charitable, benevolent or ecclesiastical purposes;
- domestic churches or religious societies recognised by law;
- political parties.”
22. For a detailed description of the legal situation concerning religious societies and religious communities in Austria, see the case of Religions-gemeinschaft der Zeugen Jehovas and Others v. Austria, no. 40825/98, §§ 37-55, 31 July 2008.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 9 AS REGARDS THE PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS ACT
23. The applicant community complained under Article 14 read in conjunction with Article 9 of the Convention that the domestic authorities’ refusal to issue a declaratory decision under the Employment of Aliens Act (“the EA Act”) that the employment of G.V. and V.T. by the applicant community was exempt from the provisions of that Act on the grounds that the applicant community was not a recognised religious society had violated its rights under these provisions.
Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 9 of the Convention reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.
2. Freedom to manifest one’s religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
24. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
25. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
26. The applicant community argued that if the relevant domestic legislation provided for an exemption from its provisions governing the employment of aliens it should do so without any discrimination. The fact that the applicant community had been subject to this regime if it wished to employ ministers who were not Austrian citizens in order to care for the specific needs of certain groups of its believers, whereas other religious communities which had the status of religious societies had not been subject to the regime, had constituted discrimination on account of religion which was prohibited by the Convention.
27. The Government submitted that the difference in treatment under the EA Act as regards the pastoral work of religious communities recognised as religious societies and other religious communities was reasonably and objectively justified as, in the light of the regulatory intention of the EA Act, an abuse of the exemption for pastoral work could not be easily excluded. The status of a recognised religious society, as a requirement for an exemption from the scope of application of the EA Act, was thus a necessary instrument for the control of the employment of foreigners and the labour market.
28. As the Court has consistently held, Article 14 of the Convention complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. It has no independent existence, as it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. Although the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of those provisions – and to this extent it is autonomous – there can be no room for its application unless the facts in issue fall within the ambit of one or more of those provisions (see, among many other authorities, Van Raalte v. the Netherlands, 21 February 1997, § 33, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-I, and Camp and Bourimi v. the Netherlands, no. 28369/95, § 34, ECHR 2000-X).
29. Further, the freedom of religion as guaranteed by Article 9 entails, inter alia, the freedom to hold religious beliefs and to practise a religion. While religious freedom is primarily a matter of individual conscience, it also implies the freedom to manifest one’s religion, alone and in private, or in community with others, in public and within the circle of those whose faith one shares. Article 9 lists the various forms which manifestation of one’s religion or belief may take, namely worship, teaching, practice and observance (see, as a recent authority, Leyla Şahin v. Turkey [GC], no. 44774/98, §§ 104-5, ECHR 2005-XI, with further references).
30. In the Court’s view, the privilege in issue – namely the exemption granted to religious societies from the provisions of the EA Act as regards the employment of aliens in respect of pastoral activities – shows the significance which the legislature attached to the specific function these representatives of religious groups fulfil within such groups. Observing that religious communities traditionally exist in the form of organised structures, the Court has repeatedly found that the autonomous existence of religious communities is indispensable for pluralism in a democratic society and is, thus, an issue at the very heart of the protection which Article 9 affords (see Hasan and Chaush v. Bulgaria [GC], no. 30985/96, § 62, ECHR 2000-XI).
31. As the privilege in issue is intended to ensure the proper functioning of religious groups as communities of individuals, and thus promotes a goal protected by Article 9 of the Convention, the exemption from the provisions governing the employment of aliens granted to specific representatives of religious societies comes within the scope of that provision. It follows that Article 14 read in conjunction with Article 9 is applicable in the instant case.
32. According to the Court’s case-law, a difference in treatment is discriminatory for the purposes of Article 14 of the Convention if it “has no objective and reasonable justification”: that is, if it does not pursue a “legitimate aim” or if there is not a “reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised”. The Contracting States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify different treatment (see, among other authorities, Willi v. United Kingdom, no. 36042/97, § 39, ECHR 2002-IV).
33. In the instant case, the Court observes that the exemption from the scope of application of the EA Act was, according to section 1(2)(d) of that Act, exclusively linked to the employment of aliens for pastoral work as part of a church or religious society recognised by law. However, at the time it applied for a declaratory decision, the applicant community was a registered religious community and not a religious society, and there was thus no room for it to be granted an exemption under the aforementioned legislation.
34. The Court has to examine whether the difference in treatment between the applicant community, which was not a religious society within the meaning of the Recognition Act 1874, and a religious body which was such a society had an objective and reasonable justification.
35. In the cases of Lang v. Austria (no. 28648/03, 12 March 2009), Gütl v. Austria (no. 49686/99, 12 March 2009) and Löffelman v. Austria (no. 42967/98, 12 March 2009) the Court had to examine whether the authorities’ refusal to exempt the applicants from alternative civilian service in lieu of compulsory military service was in breach of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 9. The applicants had complained that the difference in treatment between them as ministers of the Jehovas Witnesses, who therefore did not belong to a recognised religious society, and others who fulfilled a comparable function within a recognised religious society was unjustified. In the case of Lang (cited above, §§ 29 31) the Court held as follows:
“29. The Court has to examine whether the difference in treatment between the applicant, who does not belong to a religious group which is a religious society within the meaning of the 1874 Recognition Act, and a person who belongs to such a group has an objective and reasonable justification.
30. In doing so the Court refers to the case of Religionsgemeinschaft der Zeugen Jehovas and Others v. Austria (no. 40825/98, 31 July 2008), in which the first applicant, the Jehovah’s Witnesses in Austria, had been granted legal personality as a registered religious community, a private-law entity, but wished to become a religious society under the 1874 Recognition Act – that is, a public-law entity. The Court observed that under Austrian law, religious societies enjoyed privileged treatment in many areas, including, inter alia, exemption from military service and civilian service. Given the number of these privileges and their nature, the advantage obtained by religious societies was substantial. In view of these privileges accorded to religious societies, the obligation under Article 9 of the Convention incumbent on the State’s authorities to remain neutral in the exercise of their powers in this domain required therefore that if a State set up a framework for conferring legal personality on religious groups to which a specific status was linked, all religious groups which so wished must have a fair opportunity to apply for this status and the criteria established must be applied in a non-discriminatory manner (ibid., § 92). The Court found, however, that in the case of the Jehovah’s Witnesses one of the criteria for acceding to the privileged status of a religious society had been applied in an arbitrary manner and concluded that the difference in treatment was not based on any “objective and reasonable justification”. Accordingly, it found a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 9 (ibid., § 99).
31. In the present case, the refusal of exemption from military and alternative civilian service was likewise based on the ground that the applicant was not a member of a religious society within the meaning of the 1874 Recognition Act. Given its above-mentioned findings in the case of Religionsgemeinschaft der Zeugen Jehovas and Others, the Court considers that in the present case the very same criterion – whether or not a person applying for exemption from military service is a member of a religious group which is constituted as a religious society – cannot be understood differently and its application must inevitably result in discrimination prohibited by the Convention.”
36. The Court considers that in the present case the refusal of the authorities to grant an exemption from the provisions of the EA Act was also based on the fact that the applicant community was not a recognised religious society. Given the Court’s findings in the cases of Lang (cited above, §§ 29-31), Gütl (cited above, §§ 29-31) and Löffelmann (cited above, §§ 29-31), based on the case of Religionsgemeinschaft der Zeugen Jehovas and Others, the same criterion identified in those cases – whether or not the applicant community was a recognised religious society – cannot be understood differently in the present case and its application inevitably resulted in discrimination prohibited by the Convention.
37. The Court therefore concludes that section 1(2)(d) of the EA Act, which provides for exemptions from the scope of application of that Act in respect of the employment of aliens for pastoral work as part of a recognised religious society, is discriminatory and that the applicant community was discriminated against on the basis of religion as a result of the application of this provision. There has therefore been a violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 9 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 9 OF THE CONVENTION AS REGARDS THE PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS ACT
38. The applicant community also relied on Article 9 of the Convention taken alone in complaining of the refusal of the Labour Market Service to issue a declaratory decision confirming its exemption from the provisions of the EA Act, in contrast to religious communities recognised as religious societies.
39. In the circumstances of the present case, the Court considers that the substance of this complaint has been sufficiently taken into account in its assessment above that led to the finding of a violation of Article 14 read in conjunction with Article 9 of the Convention. It follows that, whereas the complaint must be declared admissible, there is no cause for separate examination of the same facts from the standpoint of Article 9 of the Convention alone.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 PROTOCOL No. 1 AS REGARDS THE PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE INHERITANCE AND GIFT TAX ACT
40. The applicant community complained that the fact that it had not been exempted from liability to inheritance and gift tax, unlike religious communities recognised as religious societies, constituted discrimination on the basis of religion, prohibited by Article 14 of the Convention taken together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
41. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
42. The applicant community argued that there had been no reasonable justification for the difference in treatment as regards inheritance and gift tax between a recognised religious society, which had been exempt from tax, and a registered religious community, which had not. That difference in treatment had been in clear violation of Article 14 read in conjunction with Article 1 Protocol No. 1, and it was irrelevant that inheritance and gift tax had ceased to be levied from 1 August 2008, as the exemption of religious societies was still part of the law and there had been a substantial amount of public debate on the reintroduction of this tax.
43. The Government submitted that the basic provisions of the Inheritance and Gift Tax Act 1955 (the “1955 Act”) had been quashed by the Constitutional Court. As a result, the difference between religious societies and other religious communities had lost its practical significance, as inheritance and gift tax had ceased to be collected after 31 July 2008. In any event, the applicant community had been recognised as a religious society on 7 May 2009 and now enjoyed all of the privileges linked to that status.
44. The Court observes that in 2001 the Vienna Tax Office ordered the applicant community to pay inheritance and gift tax in respect of a donation it had received in 1999, as the tax office had found that the applicant community could not rely on section 15(1) of the 1955 Act, which provided for an exemption from tax liability for certain donations to religious institutions, because this tax exemption was reserved for churches and religious societies recognised by law. These findings were confirmed in subsequent appeal proceedings.
45. The Court must therefore examine whether the difference in treatment under Austrian tax law at the time between the applicant community, as a registered religious community which was not entitled to the tax exemption, and a religious society had an objective and reasonable justification.
46. As regards the applicability of Article 14 of the Convention to the inheritance and gift tax proceedings, the Court finds that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, second paragraph, establishes that the duty to pay tax falls within its field of application. Accordingly, Article 14 is also applicable (see, Darby v. Sweden, 23 October 1990, § 30, Series A no. 187).
47. As regards compliance with Article 14, the Court observes that the Government has not given any reason justifying the difference in treatment regarding the liability to inheritance and gift tax between the applicant community and religious communities recognised as religious societies and merely indicated that inheritance and gift tax had ceased to be collected after 31 July 2008.
48. The Court observes further that the refusal to grant an exemption from inheritance and gift tax was based on the grounds that the applicant community was not a recognised religious society. It finds that, also in this respect, the same criterion used in the previous cases examined by the Court cited in paragraph 35 above – whether or not the applicant community was a recognised religious society – cannot be understood differently in the present case and its application inevitably resulted in discrimination prohibited by the Convention.
49. The Court therefore concludes that section 15(1) of the 1955 Act, as applicable at the time, which provided for exemptions from taxation of donations to religious societies recognised by law, was discriminatory and that the applicant community was discriminated against on the basis of religion as a result of the application of this provision. There has therefore been a violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 Protocol No. 1.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 9 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN ALONE AND IN COJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14 AS REGARDS THE PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE INHERITANCE AND GIFT TAX ACT
50. The applicant community also relied on Article 9 of the Convention alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention in complaining of the refusal of the tax authorities to apply the exemption from inheritance and gift tax granted under section 15(1) of the 1955 Act, in contrast to religious communities recognised as religious societies.
51. The Court considers that – although admissible – in view of its findings under Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 Protocol No. 1, there is no need to also examine the complaint from the point of view of Article 9 read alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
52. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
53. The applicant community claimed 15,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage. It submitted that any award should compensate the hardship suffered by its Tagalog speaking members, who had been deprived of a minister speaking their language. In respect of pecuniary damage it claimed the amount of EUR 1,002.16 plus statutory interest, which corresponded to the inheritance and gift tax it had had to pay.
54. The Government considered that the finding of a violation in itself would constitute sufficient and appropriate redress in the present case. They submitted that in the case of Religionsgemeinschaft der Zeugen Jehovas and Others the Court had granted the applicants compensation in the amount of EUR 10,000 for damage resulting from the violation of their rights to the free exercise of their religion under Article 9 in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention (cited above, § 129). In any event, they submitted that the amount of non-pecuniary damage claimed was excessive and the sum claimed as pecuniary damage would in any event be refunded to the applicant community following a judgment of the Constitutional Court of 2 July 2009 (B 1397/08), in which it had found, in a subsequent case brought by the applicant community, that the levying of inheritance and gift tax on the applicant community was unconstitutional.
55. As regards the applicant community’s claim for pecuniary damage, the Court observes that the applicant community has not disputed the Government’s contention that, following the judgment of the Constitutional Court of 2 July 2009 – albeit relations to different proceedings – it is entitled to a refund of the inheritance and gift tax paid. The Court therefore considers that no award can be made under this head.
56. As regards the claim for non-pecuniary damage, the Court observes that in the case of Religionsgemeinschaft der Zeugen Jehovas and Others it found as follows:
“129. As to non-pecuniary damage, the Court considers that the violations it has found must undoubtedly have caused the applicants some prejudice under this head. In assessing the amount, the Court takes into account the fact that the applicants have not shown that at any instant they were actually hindered in pursuing their religious aims. Accordingly the Court awards, on an equitable basis, EUR 10,000 under this head.”
57. Given that the present case is narrower in scope than that of the above-quoted case, which involved a broader complaint under Article 14 read in conjunction with Article 9 of the Convention about discrimination in the State’s refusal to grant the status of a recognised religious society, the Court considers that in these circumstances the finding of a violation constitutes sufficient reparation in respect of any non-pecuniary damage suffered.
B. Costs and expenses
58. The applicant community also claimed EUR 7,682.40 plus value added tax (VAT) for costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and EUR 5,152.05 plus VAT for those incurred before the Court. The claim for costs incurred at the domestic level related only to the proceedings before the Constitutional Court and the Administrative Court.
59. The Government considered the amount claimed by the applicant community excessive and submitted that the submissions before the Constitutional Court and the Court were largely identical, which ought to lead to a reduced award.
60. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers the amounts claimed by the applicant community reasonable and awards them in full, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant community on that amount.
C. Default interest
61. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 9 of the Convention as regards the proceedings under the Employment of Aliens Act;

3. Holds that it is not necessary to examine the complaint about the proceedings under the Employment of Aliens Act under Article 9 taken alone;

4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 Protocol No. 1 as regards the proceedings under the Inheritance And Gift Tax Act;

5. Holds that it is not necessary to examine the complaint about the proceedings under the Inheritance and Gift Tax Act under Article 9 taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention;

6. Holds that in respect of non-pecuniary damage the finding of a violation constitutes sufficient just satisfaction;

7. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 12,834.45 (twelve thousand eight hundred and thirty-four Euros and forty-five cents), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant community, in respect of costs and expenses;

(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

8. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant community’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 25 September 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Nina Vajić
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni:
Violazione di Articolo 14+9 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - la Discriminazione) (Articolo 9 - la Libertà di coscienza di pensiero e religione
Articolo 9-1 - la Libertà di religione)
Violazione di Articolo 14+P1-1 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 14 - la Discriminazione) (Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà
Articolo 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Garantisca il pagamento di tasse)
Danno patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinse
Danno non-patrimoniale - trovando di violazione sufficiente



PRIMA SEZIONE






CAUSA JEHOVAS ZEUGEN IN ÖSTERREICH C. AUSTRIA

(Richiesta n. 27540/05)









SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

25 settembre 2012




Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.
Nella causa di Jehovas Zeugen in Österreich c. l'Austria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Nina Vajić, Presidente
Pari Lorenzen,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse, judges,and
Søren Nielsen, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 4 settembre 2012,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 27540/05) contro la Repubblica dell'Austria depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con Jehovas Zeugen, una comunità religiosa stabilita in Austria sotto le Comunità Religiose Agisce 1998 (“la comunità di richiedente”), 20 luglio 2005.
2. La comunità di richiedente fu rappresentata col Sig. R. Kohlhofer, un avvocato che pratica a Vienna. Il Governo austriaco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, Ambasciatore H. Tichy Capo del Diritto internazionale Settore al Ministero Federale per europeo ed Affari Internazionali.
3. La comunità di richiedente addusse, in particolare, che era stato discriminato contro nell'esercizio dei suoi diritti sotto Articolo 9 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, come sé era stato soggetto a leggi riguardo al lavoro di stranieri ed aveva tassato da che riconobbe società religiose era stato esentato.
4. 19 gennaio 2009 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
5. La comunità di richiedente era al tempo degli eventi si lamentò di una comunità religiosa e registrata stabilita in Austria sotto le Comunità Religiose Agisca 1998. Da 7 maggio 2009 ha lo status di una società religiosa, un status conferito con statuto.
Procedimenti di A. per una decisione dichiaratoria sotto il Lavoro di Estrania Atto
6. Nel 2002 la comunità di richiedente augurò assumere una coppia, G.V. e V.T. che era sia ministri che appartengono all'Ordine Religioso dei Testimoni di Geova (der di Orden il der di Sondervollzeitdiener Zeugen Jehovas) e che era Tagalog cittadini oratoria della Filippine, per il beneficio del suo Tagalog membri oratoria in Austria.
7. Per ottenere un permesso di soggiorno (Aufenthaltsgenehmigung) o una licenza di accordo (Niederlassungsbewilligung), la coppia aveva avere un permesso di lavoro o essere in grado a show che loro non erano soggetto alle disposizioni del Lavoro di Estrania Atto (“l'EA Act”). 16 aprile 2002 la comunità di richiedente fece domanda perciò al Währinger Gürtel Labour Mercato Servizio (Arbeitsmarktservice) a Vienna per una decisione dichiaratoria che il lavoro pastorale la coppia eserciterebbe era esente dalle disposizioni dell'Atto di EA. Presentò che, fin dall'entrata in vigore delle Comunità Religiose Atto 1998, sezione 1(2) dell'Atto di EA doveva essere capito siccome riferendosi a tutte le persone che fanno lavoro pastorale per le comunità religiose e non solo siccome riferendosi a ministri di chiese riconosciute e società religiose. In qualsiasi l'evento, presentò che i compiti che sarebbero assegnati a G.V. e V.T. non costituirebbe lavoro all'interno dei termini dell'Atto di EA.
8. 1 luglio 2002 il Lavori Mercato Servizio respinse la richiesta e, 21 ottobre 2002, un pannello di ricorso del Lavori Mercato Servizio confermò la decisione. Ambo le autorità fondarono che solamente ministri che compiono doveri pastorali che appartengono ad una società religiosa e riconosciuta erano esenti dalle disposizioni dell'EA Act, ma non membri di una comunità religiosa e registrata che era lo status della comunità di richiedente. In oltre, gli assi contennero che lavoro pastorale aveva le caratteristiche tipiche di lavoro all'interno del significato dell'Atto di EA, come sé fu esercitato all'interno di una struttura gerarchica, soggetto alle istruzioni di una dipendenza economica e superiore e coinvolta.
9. 3 dicembre 2002 la comunità di richiedente registrò un'azione di reclamo con la Corte Costituzionale nella quale dibattè che le decisioni delle autorità amministrative avevano violato i suoi diritti sotto Articolo 9 lettura da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
10. 10 ottobre 2003 la Corte Costituzionale respinse l'azione di reclamo. Fondò che qualsiasi lavoro contrae la comunità di richiedente concluse con estrania riguardo a lavoro pastorale come ministri sarebbe soggetto alle disposizioni dell'EA Act, perché l'esenzione in sezione 1(2) dell'Atto di EA solamente fatto domanda a chiese o società religiose riconosciute con legge.
11. La Corte Costituzionale sostenne che anche se il lavoro pastorale di ministri chiaramente incorse all'interno della sfera di protezione di Articolo 9 che anche il comprised la conclusione di contratti di lavoro con un gruppo religioso con persone che prendono parte in simile attività, ed anche se regolamentazioni di lavorare-mercato, in particolare il lavoro di estrania, costituirebbe un'interferenza coi diritti protegguti con Articolo 9, simile interferenza fu giustificata sotto paragrafo 2 di Articolo 9. La differenza fra il lavoro di stranieri come ministri che compiono lavoro pastorale con una società religiosa e lavoro con una comunità religiosa e registrata resi con l'Atto di EA era in conformità alla Costituzione Federale. Per riconoscimento come una società religiosa, che gruppo religioso acquisì una condizione giuridica, definì più da vicino nell'Atto attinente che gli concederebbe partecipare nell'il plasmare della vita pubblica nello Stato (un der Gestaltung des staatlichen öffentlichen il teilzunehmen di Lebens). Siccome poteva questo status, e davvero aveva a, sia accordato a tutte le chiese e società religiose previste che le condizioni stabilite con legge sono state soddisfatte, la distinzione fra società religiose e riconosciute e le altre comunità non generò dubbi come alla sua costituzionalità.
12. 15 dicembre 2004 la Corte amministrativa respinse l'azione di reclamo che era stata trasferita a sé. La comunità di richiedente dibattè che sezione 1(1) dell'Atto di EA era discriminatorio. Comunque, la Corte amministrativa fondò che questa questione era stata esaminata esaurientemente con la Corte Costituzionale nella sua decisione sopra. Questa decisione fu notificata sull'avvocato della comunità di richiedente 20 gennaio 2005.
B. I procedimenti per eredità e tassa di regalo
13. Ad ottobre 1999 la comunità di richiedente ricevette una donazione.
In 2 maggio 2001 il Vienna Tassa Ufficio per Parcelle ed Operazione Tassa (für di Finanzamt l'und di Gebühren Verkehrssteuern) ordinò la comunità di richiedente per pagare eredità e tassa di regalo nell'importo di 14% sulla somma ricevette. Fondò che la comunità di richiedente non potesse appellarsi su sezione 15(1)(14) dell'Eredità e Regalo Tassa Atto 1955 (“l'Atto del 1955”) che purché un'esenzione dalla responsabilità di tassa per certe donazioni ad istituzioni religiose, perché questo diritto di tassa fu riservato a chiese e società religiose riconosciute con legge.
14. In 7 maggio 2001 la comunità di richiedente piacque. Dibattè che, come un risultato dell'entrata in vigore dell'Atto di Comunità Religioso 10 gennaio 1998, l'esenzione dalla responsabilità di tassa sotto sezione 15(1)(14) dell'Atto del 1955 anche prolungato alle comunità religiose e registrate come sé.
15. 25 gennaio 2005 il Finanza Pannello Indipendente (Unabhängiger Finanzsenat) respinse il ricorso. Notò che sezione 15(1)(14) dell'Atto del 1955 chiaramente si riferito a società religiose e c'era senza dubbio che questo non intese una comunità religiosa e registrata. Riferendosi alla causa-legge della Corte Costituzionale, in particolare la sua decisione di 10 ottobre 2003 (veda sopra), fondò che la differenza in trattamento fra società religiose e le comunità religiose era in conformità con la Costituzione Federale. Inoltre, nessune delle altre clausole esonerative sotto questa disposizione fatta domanda alla comunità di richiedente.
16. 3 marzo 2005 la comunità di richiedente registrò un'azione di reclamo con la Corte Costituzionale, mentre dibattendo che la decisione contestata aveva violato il suo diritto all'uguaglianza di trattamento, diritto al godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà e diritto per non essere discriminato contro sulla base di religione.
17. 26 settembre 2005 la Corte Costituzionale declinò trattare con l'azione di reclamo per una mancanza di prospettive del successo, mentre considerando che pertanto come le azioni di reclamo della comunità di richiedente concernè le questioni di legge costituzionale che loro sufficientemente erano stati dati con nella sua causa-legge precedente.
18. 5 dicembre 2005, seguendo una richiesta con la comunità di richiedente, rinviò la causa alla Corte amministrativa. 13 gennaio 2006 la comunità di richiedente completò la sua azione di reclamo di fronte alla Corte amministrativa.
19. 27 aprile 2006 la Corte amministrativa respinse l'azione di reclamo come infondato. Fondò che la comunità di richiedente non era una società religiosa e non poteva, perciò, si appelli su un diritto riservato a tale istituzione. Non era anche inoltre, un'istituzione caritatevole (il gemeinnützige Körperschaft) all'interno del significato dell'Atto del 1955, siccome mete caritatevoli erano solamente quelle che consisterono di promuovere gli interessi del pubblico generale (nur solche Zwecke sind durch deren Erfüllung muore wird di gefördert di Allgemeinheit). Come la comunità di richiedente, secondo i suoi documenti costituzionali essenzialmente rivolse le sue attività ai suoi membri da solo, si rivolse ad un gruppo più limitato che il pubblico generale.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
20. Sezione 1(2) del Lavoro di Estrania Atto prevede, pertanto come attinente, siccome segue:
“Le disposizioni di questo atto federale non fanno domanda:
...
(d) estrania in riguardo di lavoro pastorale loro esercitano come parte di una chiesa o società religiosa riconosciuta con legge;...”
21. Sezione 15(1) dell'Eredità e Regalo Tassa Atto 1955 che era ancora in vigore al tempo attinente, letture, pertanto come attinente, siccome segue:
“[Il seguente] è anche esente da tassazione:
...
(14) donazioni fra persone viventi di oggetti mobili o somme di soldi a
- soggetti giuridici nazionali che intraprendono fini esclusivamente caritatevoli, benevoli o ecclesiastici;
- chiese nazionali o società religiose riconosciute con legge;
- i partiti politici.”
22. Per una descrizione particolareggiata della situazione legale che concerne società religiose e le comunità religiose in Austria, veda la causa del ¬ der di Religionsgemeinschaft Zeugen Jehovas ed Altri c. l'Austria, n. 40825/98, §§ 37-55, 31 luglio 2008.
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione Lesse In Concomitanza Con Articolo 9 Come Riguardi I Procedimenti Sotto Il Lavoro Di Estrania Atto
23. La comunità di richiedente si lamentò Articolo 14 lettura in concomitanza con Articolo 9 della Convenzione sotto che le autorità nazionali il rifiuto di ' per emettere una decisione dichiaratoria sotto il Lavoro di Estrania Atto (“l'EA Act”) che il lavoro di G.V. e V.T. con la comunità di richiedente era esente dalle disposizioni di che Atto per motivi che la comunità di richiedente non era una società religiosa e riconosciuta aveva violato i suoi diritti sotto queste disposizioni.
Articolo 14 della Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
Articolo 9 della Convenzione legge siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà di pensiero, coscienza e religione; questo diritto include la libertà per cambiare la sua religione o credenza e la libertà, o da solo o nella comunità con altri ed in pubblico o privato, manifestare la sua religione o credenza, in adorazione insegnando, pratica e l'osservanza.
2. La libertà per manifestare la religione di uno o credenze saranno solamente soggette a simile limitazioni siccome è prescritto con legge e è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza pubblica, per la protezione di ordine pubblico, salute o morale o per la protezione dei diritti e le libertà di altri.”
24. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
Ammissibilità di A.
25. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
26. La comunità di richiedente dibattè che se la legislazione nazionale ed attinente prevedesse per un'esenzione dalle sue disposizioni che governano il lavoro di estrania dovrebbe fare così senza qualsiasi la discriminazione. Il fatto che la comunità di richiedente era stata soggetto a questo regime se desiderasse assumere ministri che non erano cittadini austriaci per gradirebbe le specifiche necessità di certi gruppi dei suoi credenti, mentre altre comunità religiose che avevano lo status di società religiose non erano state soggetto al regime, aveva costituito la discriminazione su conto di religione che fu proibita con la Convenzione.
27. Il Governo presentò che la differenza in trattamento sotto l'EA Act come riguardi il lavoro pastorale delle comunità religiose riconosciuto come società religiose e le altre comunità religiose era ragionevolmente ed obiettivamente giustificato come, nella luce dell'intenzione regolatore dell'Atto di EA, un abuso dell'esenzione per lavoro pastorale non poteva essere escluso facilmente. Lo status di una società religiosa e riconosciuta, come un requisito per un'esenzione dalla sfera di applicazione dell'Atto di EA, era così un strumento necessario per il controllo del lavoro di stranieri e l'operi mercato.
28. Siccome ha sostenuto costantemente la Corte, Articolo 14 della Convenzione completa le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente, come sé effetto ha solamente in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. Benché la richiesta di Articolo 14 non presupponga una violazione di quelle disposizioni-ed a questa misura è autonomo-non ci può essere stanza per richiesta sua a meno che i fatti in problema incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di uno o più di quelle disposizioni (veda, fra molte altre autorità, Van Raalte c. i Paesi Bassi, 21 febbraio 1997, § 33 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-io, e Campo e Bourimi c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 28369/95, § 34 ECHR 2000-X).
29. Inoltre, la libertà di religione come garantito con Articolo 9 comporta, inter l'alia, la libertà per sostenere credenze religiose e praticare una religione. Mentre la libertà religiosa è primariamente una questione di coscienza individuale, implica anche la libertà per manifestare la religione di uno, da solo ed in privato, o nella comunità con altri, in pubblico ed all'interno del cerchio di quegli il cui fede uno divide. Articolo 9 ruoli le varie forme che può prendere manifestazione della religione di uno o credenza, vale a dire adori, mentre insegnando, pratichi e l'osservanza (veda, come una recente autorità, Leyla Şahin c. la Turchia [GC], n. 44774/98, §§ 104-5 ECHR 2005-XI, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
30. Nella prospettiva della Corte, il diritto in problema-vale a dire l'esenzione accordò a società religiose dalle disposizioni dell'EA Act come riguardi il lavoro di estrania in riguardo delle attività pastorali-gli show il significato che la legislatura allegò alla specifica funzione questi rappresentanti di gruppi religiosi adempie all'interno di simile gruppi. Osservando che le comunità religiose esistono tradizionalmente nella forma di strutture organizzate, la Corte ha trovato ripetutamente che l'esistenza autonoma delle comunità religiose è indispensabile per il pluralismo in una società democratica e è, così, un problema al molto cuore della protezione che riconosce Articolo 9 (veda Hasan e Chaush c. la Bulgaria [GC], n. 30985/96, § 62 ECHR 2000-XI).
31. Come il diritto in problema si intende che assicuri il corretto funzionando di gruppi religiosi come comunità di individui, e così promuove una meta protegguta con Articolo 9 della Convenzione, l'esenzione dalle disposizioni che governano il lavoro di estrania concessa agli specifici rappresentanti di società religiose viene all'interno della sfera di quel la disposizione. Segue che Articolo 14 lettura in concomitanza con Articolo 9 è applicabile nella causa presente.
32. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, una differenza in trattamento è discriminatoria per i fini di Articolo 14 della Convenzione se sé “non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole”: quel è, se non persegue un “scopo legittimo” o se non c'è un “relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso.” Gli Stati Contraenti godono un certo margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili trattamento diverso e giustificato (veda, fra le altre autorità, Willi c. il Regno Unito, n. 36042/97, § 39 ECHR 2002-IV).
33. Nella causa presente, la Corte osserva, che l'esenzione dalla sfera di applicazione dell'Atto di EA era, secondo sezione 1(2)(d) di che Atto, collegò esclusivamente al lavoro di estrania per lavoro pastorale come parte di una chiesa o società religiosa riconosciuta con legge. Al tempo fece domanda comunque, per una decisione dichiaratoria, la comunità di richiedente era una comunità religiosa e registrata e non una società religiosa, e non c'era così stanza per sé per essere accordato un'esenzione sotto la legislazione summenzionata.
34. La Corte deve esaminare se la differenza in trattamento fra la comunità di richiedente che non era una società religiosa all'interno del significato del Riconoscimento Atto 1874 ed un corpo religioso che era tale società aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole.
35. Nelle cause di Lang c. l'Austria (n. 28648/03, 12 marzo 2009), Gütl c. l'Austria (n. 49686/99, 12 marzo 2009) e Löffelman c. l'Austria (n. 42967/98, 12 marzo 2009) la Corte doveva esaminare se le autorità il rifiuto di ' per esentare i richiedenti da servizio di civile alternativo al posto di servizio militare ed obbligatorio era in violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta in concomitanza con Articolo 9. I richiedenti si erano lamentati che la differenza in trattamento fra loro come ministri dei Testimoni di Jehovas che perciò non appartennero ad una società religiosa e riconosciuta ed altri che adempierono ad una funzione comparabile all'interno di una società religiosa e riconosciuta erano ingiustificati. Nella causa di Lang (citò sopra, §§ 29-31) la Corte sostenne siccome segue:
“29. La Corte deve esaminare se la differenza in trattamento fra il richiedente che non appartiene ad un gruppo religioso che è una società religiosa all'interno del significato del Riconoscimento Atto del 1874 ed una persona che appartiene a tale gruppo ha una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole.
30. Nel fare così la Corte si riferisce alla causa del der di Religionsgemeinschaft Zeugen Jehovas ed Altri c. l'Austria (n. 40825/98, 31 luglio 2008) in che il primo richiedente, i Testimoni del Geova in Austria era stato accordato la personalità legale come una comunità religiosa e registrata, un'entità di privato-legge ma era stato desiderato divenire una società religiosa sotto il Riconoscimento Atto del 1874-quel è, un'entità di pubblico-legge. La Corte osservò che sotto legge austriaca, società religiose goderono trattamento privilegiato in molte aree, incluso, inter alia, esenzione da servizio militare e servizio civile. Dato il numero di questi diritti e la loro natura, il vantaggio ottenuto con società religiose era sostanziale. In prospettiva di questi diritti concessa a società religiose, l'obbligo sotto Articolo 9 della Convenzione in carica sulle autorità dello Stato rimanere neutrale nell'esercizio dei loro poteri in questo dominio richiese perciò che se un set Statale su una struttura per conferire la personalità legale su gruppi religiosi ai quali fu collegato un specifico status, tutti i gruppi religiosi che così desiderò deve avere un'opportunità equa di fare domanda per questo status ed il criterio stabilito deve essere fatto domanda in una maniera non-discriminatoria (l'ibid., § 92). Comunque, la Corte fondò che nella causa dei Testimoni uno del Geova del criterio per acconsentire allo status privilegiato di una società religiosa era stato fatto domanda in una maniera arbitraria e concluse che la differenza in trattamento non fu basata su qualsiasi “obiettivo e la giustificazione ragionevole.” Di conseguenza, trovò una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 9 (l'ibid., § 99).
31. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il rifiuto di esenzione da servizio civile e militare ed alternativo fu basato similmente sulla base che il richiedente non era un membro di una società religiosa all'interno del significato del Riconoscimento Atto del 1874. Dato le sue sentenze summenzionate nella causa del der di Religionsgemeinschaft Zeugen Jehovas ed Altri, la Corte considera che nella causa presente il criterio molto stesso-se o non una persona che fa domanda per esenzione da servizio militare è un membro di un gruppo religioso che è costituito come una società religiosa-non può essere capito differentemente e la sua richiesta deve dare luogo inevitabilmente a discriminazione proibita con la Convenzione.”
36. La Corte considera che nella causa presente il rifiuto delle autorità per accordare un'esenzione dalle disposizioni dell'Atto di EA fu basato anche sul fatto che la comunità di richiedente non era una società religiosa e riconosciuta. Dato le sentenze della Corte nelle cause di Lang (citò sopra, §§ 29-31), Gütl (citò sopra, §§ 29-31) e Löffelmann (citò sopra, §§ 29-31), basato sulla causa del der di Religionsgemeinschaft Zeugen Jehovas ed Altri, lo stesso criterio identificò in quelle cause-se o non la comunità di richiedente era una società religiosa e riconosciuta-non può essere capito differentemente nella causa presente e la sua richiesta diede luogo inevitabilmente a discriminazione proibita con la Convenzione.
37. La Corte conclude perciò che sezione 1(2)(d) dell'Atto di EA del quale prevede per esenzioni dalla sfera di applicazione che Atto in riguardo del lavoro di estrania per lavoro pastorale come parte di una società religiosa e riconosciuta, è discriminatorio e che la comunità di richiedente fu discriminata contro sulla base di religione come un risultato della richiesta di questa disposizione. C'è stata perciò una violazione di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 9 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DI ARTICOLO 9 DI LA CONVENZIONE COME RIGUARDI I PROCEDIMENTI SOTTO IL LAVORO DI ESTRANIA ATTO
38. La comunità di richiedente si appellò anche su Articolo 9 della Convenzione preso nel lamentarsi del rifiuto di da solo l'Operi Mercato Servizio per emettere una decisione dichiaratoria che conferma la sua esenzione dalle disposizioni dell'EA Act, in contrasto a comunità religiose riconosciute come società religiose.
39. Nelle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte considera, che la sostanza di questa azione di reclamo sufficientemente è stata presa in considerazione nella sua valutazione sopra quel condusse alla sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 14 lettura in concomitanza con Articolo 9 della Convenzione. Segue che, mentre l'azione di reclamo deve essere dichiarata ammissibile, non c'è da solo causa per esame separato degli stessi fatti dal posto d'osservazione di Articolo 9 della Convenzione.
III. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 14 Di La Convenzione Lesse In Concomitanza Con Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1 Come Riguardi I Procedimenti Sotto L'Eredità Ed Atto della Tassa del Regalo
40. La comunità di richiedente si lamentò che il fatto che non era stato esentato dalla responsabilità ad eredità e tassa di regalo, diversamente da comunità religiose riconosciute come società religiose, discriminazione costituita sulla base di religione proibite con Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 letture siccome segue:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Ammissibilità di A.
41. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merits
42. La comunità di richiedente dibattè che non c'era stata giustificazione ragionevole per la differenza in trattamento come eredità di riguardi e tassa di regalo fra una società religiosa e riconosciuta che era stata esente da tassa ed una comunità religiosa e registrata che non aveva. Che la differenza in trattamento era stata in violazione chiara di Articolo 14 lettura in concomitanza con Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1, ed era irrilevante che eredità e tassa di regalo avevano cessato essere imposte da 1 agosto 2008, come l'esenzione di società religiose parte della legge ancora era e c'era stato un importo sostanziale di dibattito pubblico sulla reintroduzione di questa tassa.
43. Il Governo presentò che le disposizioni di base dell'Eredità e Regalo Tassa Atto 1955 (il “1955 Atto”) era stato annullato con la Corte Costituzionale. Di conseguenza, la differenza fra società religiose e le altre comunità religiose aveva perso il suo significato pratico, come eredità e tassa di regalo aveva cessato essere raccolto dopo 31 luglio 2008. In qualsiasi l'evento, la comunità di richiedente era stata riconosciuta come una società religiosa in 7 maggio 2009 ed ora era stata goduta tutti i diritti collegati a quel lo status.
44. La Corte osserva che nel 2001 il Vienna Tassa Ufficio ordinò la comunità di richiedente per pagare eredità e tassa di regalo in riguardo di una donazione aveva ricevuto nel 1999, siccome aveva trovato l'ufficio di tassa che la comunità di richiedente non potesse appellarsi su sezione 15(1) dell'Atto del 1955 che previde per un'esenzione dalla responsabilità di tassa per certe donazioni ad istituzioni religiose perché questa esenzione dalle imposte fu riservata per chiese e società religiose riconosciute con legge. Queste sentenze furono confermate in procedimenti di ricorso susseguenti.
45. La Corte deve esaminare perciò se la differenza in trattamento sotto diritto tributario austriaco al tempo fra la comunità di richiedente, come una comunità religiosa e registrata che non fu concessa all'esenzione dalle imposte ed una società religiosa aveva una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole.
46. Come riguardi l'applicabilità di Articolo 14 della Convenzione all'eredità e procedimenti di tassa di regalo, i costatazione di Corte che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, secondo paragrafo stabilisce che il dovere di pagare tassa incorre all'interno del suo campo della richiesta. Articolo 14 è anche di conseguenza, applicabile (veda, Darby c. la Svezia, 23 ottobre 1990, § 30 la Serie Un n. 187).
47. Come ottemperanza di riguardi con Articolo 14, la Corte osserva, che il Governo non ha dato qualsiasi ragione che giustifica la differenza in trattamento riguardo alla responsabilità ad eredità e tassa di regalo fra la comunità di richiedente e le comunità religiose riconobbero come società religiose e soltanto indicò che eredità e tassa di regalo avevano cessato essere raccolte dopo 31 luglio 2008.
48. La Corte osserva inoltre che il rifiuto per accordare un'esenzione da eredità e tassa di regalo fu basato per motivi che la comunità di richiedente non era una società religiosa e riconosciuta. Trova che, anche in questo riguardo, lo stesso criterio usò nelle cause precedenti esaminate con la Corte citata in paragrafo 35 sopra-se o non la comunità di richiedente era una società religiosa e riconosciuta-non può essere capito differentemente nella causa presente e la sua richiesta diede luogo inevitabilmente a discriminazione proibita con la Convenzione.
49. La Corte conclude perciò che sezione 15(1) dell'Atto del 1955, come applicabile al tempo che previde per esoneri fiscali di donazioni a società religiose riconosciuto con legge, era discriminatorio e che la comunità di richiedente fu discriminata contro sulla base di religione come un risultato della richiesta di questa disposizione. C'è stata perciò una violazione di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1.
IV. Violazione allegato Di Articolo 9 Di La Convenzione Presa Da solo Ed In COJUNCTION Con Articolo 14 Come Riguardi I Procedimenti Sotto L'Eredità Ed Atto della Tassa del Regalo
50. La comunità di richiedente si appellò anche da solo su Articolo 9 della Convenzione ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione nel lamentarsi del rifiuto delle autorità fiscali per fare domanda l'esenzione da eredità e tassa di regalo accordò sotto sezione 15(1) dell'Atto del 1955, in contrasto a comunità religiose riconosciute come società religiose.
51. La Corte considera che-benché ammissibile-in prospettiva delle sue sentenze sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1, non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare anche da solo l'azione di reclamo dal punto di vista di Articolo 9 lettura ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
C. la Richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
52. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
53. La comunità di richiedente chiese 15,000 euros (EUR) in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. Presentò che qualsiasi assegnazione dovrebbe compensare la fatica subì col suo Tagalog membri oratoria che erano stati privati di un ministro che parla la loro lingua. In riguardo di danno patrimoniale chiese l'importo di EUR 1,002.16 interesse legale positivo che corrispose all'eredità e tassa di regalo sé aveva dovuto pagare.
54. Il Governo considerò che la sentenza di una violazione avrebbe costituito in se stesso compensazione sufficiente ed appropriata nella causa presente. Loro presentarono che nella causa del der di Religionsgemeinschaft Zeugen Jehovas ed Altri la Corte aveva accordato il risarcimento di richiedenti nell'importo di EUR 10,000 per danno che dà luogo dalla violazione dei loro diritti all'esercizio gratis della loro religione sotto Articolo 9 a concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione (citò sopra, § 129). In qualsiasi l'evento, loro presentarono che l'importo di danno non-patrimoniale chiesto era eccessivo e la somma chiese come danno patrimoniale in qualsiasi evento sia risarcito alla comunità di richiedente che segue una sentenza della Corte Costituzionale di 2 luglio 2009 (B 1397/08) in che aveva trovato, in una causa susseguente portata con la comunità di richiedente che l'imporre di eredità e tassa di regalo sulla comunità di richiedente era incostituzionale.
55. Come riguardi la rivendicazione della comunità di richiedente per danno patrimoniale, la Corte osserva che la comunità di richiedente non ha contestato la contesa del Governo che, seguendo la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale di 2 luglio 2009-benché relazioni a procedimenti diversi-è concesso ad un risarcimento dell'eredità e tassa di regalo pagato. La Corte considera perciò che nessuna assegnazione può essere resa sotto questo capo.
56. Come riguardi la rivendicazione per danno non-patrimoniale, la Corte osserva che nella causa del der di Religionsgemeinschaft Zeugen Jehovas ed Altri che ha fondato siccome segue:
“129. Come a danno non-patrimoniale, la Corte considera, che le violazioni che ha trovato hanno dovuto provocare indubbiamente i richiedenti del pregiudizio sotto questo capo. Nel valutare l'importo, la Corte prende in considerazione il fatto che i richiedenti non hanno mostrato che a qualsiasi istante che loro davvero sono stati impediti nell'intraprendere i loro scopi religiosi. Di conseguenza la Corte assegna, su una base equa, EUR 10,000 sotto questo capo.”
57. Dato che la causa presente è narrower in sfera che che della causa sopra-citata che comportò un'azione di reclamo più larga sotto Articolo 14 lettura in concomitanza con Articolo 9 della Convenzione della discriminazione nel rifiuto dello Stato la Corte considera accordare lo status di una società religiosa e riconosciuta, che in queste circostanze la sentenza di una violazione costituisce riparazione sufficiente in riguardo di qualsiasi danno non-patrimoniale subì.
Costi di B. e spese
58. La comunità di richiedente chiese anche EUR 7,682.40 vantaggio valore-aggiunse tassa (IVA) per costi e spese incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali ed EUR 5,152.05 più IVA per quegli incorsi in di fronte alla Corte. La rivendicazione per costi incorsi in al livello nazionale riferito solamente ai procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale e la Corte amministrativa.
59. Il Governo considerò l'importo chiesto con la comunità di richiedente eccessivo e presentato che le osservazioni di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale e la Corte sia estesamente identica che dovrebbe condurre ad un'assegnazione ridotto.
60. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte considera gli importi chiesti con la comunità di richiedente ragionevole e li assegna in pieno, più qualsiasi tassa sulla quale può essere a carico della comunità di richiedente quel l'importo.
Interesse di mora di C.
61. La Corte lo considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 9 della Convenzione come riguardi i procedimenti sotto il Lavoro di Estrania Atto;

3. Sostiene che non è necessario per esaminare l'azione di reclamo dei procedimenti sotto il Lavoro di Estrania Atto Articolo 9 preso da solo sotto;

4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1 come riguardi i procedimenti sotto l'Eredità Ed Atto della Tassa del Regalo;

5. Sostiene che non è necessario per esaminare l'azione di reclamo dei procedimenti sotto l'Eredità ed Atto della Tassa del Regalo Articolo 9 sotto preso da solo ed in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione;

6. Sostiene che in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale la sentenza di una violazione costituisce la soddisfazione equa e sufficiente;

7. Sostiene
(un) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 12,834.45 (dodici mila ottocento e trenta-quattro Euros e quaranta-cinque cento), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico della comunità di richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;

(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

8. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della comunità di richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 25 settembre 2012, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Nina Vajić
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.