Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BEZRUKOVY v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 34616/02/2012
STATO: Russia
DATA: 10/05/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Remainder inadmissible Violation of Article 6 - Right to a fair trial (Article 6 - Civil proceedings Article 6-1 - Fair hearing)
Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Article 1 par. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions)
Pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage)
Non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non-pecuniary damage)



FIRST SECTION






CASE OF BEZRUKOVY v. RUSSIA

(Application no. 34616/02)








JUDGMENT

This version was rectified on 14 May 2012
under Rule 81 of the Rules of Court.


STRASBOURG

10 May 2012


This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Bezrukovy v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nina Vajić, President,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 17 April 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 34616/02) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Russian nationals, OMISSIS (“the first applicant”) and OMISSIS (“the second applicant”), on 9 September 2002. The first and second applicants are together referred to as “the applicants”.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Voronezh. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr P. Laptev and Mr G. Matyushkin, the successive Representatives of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the final and enforceable domestic judgment in their favour had not been enforced in a timely manner and that the time-limit for appealing against that judgment had been extended, thus allowing its subsequent quashing.
4. On 15 September 2005 the application was communicated to the Government. It was also decided to consider the admissibility and merits of the case together.
5. On 24 November 2009, in view of the developments in the case, the Government was invited to submit additional observations pursuant to Rule 54 § 2 (c) of the Rules of Court. The applicants submitted their observations in reply.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The first applicant was born in 1950. The second applicant is the first applicant’s daughter, born in 1976. They live in Voronezh.
A. The applicants’ lawsuit against the SBS-AGRO Bank
7. In July and August 1998 the applicants made various monetary deposits with the Voronezh branch of the SBS-Agro Bank (“СБС-Агро”). In September 1998, during a financial crisis in Russia and rapid currency devaluation, they requested the bank to refund the capital with interest, but the bank refused. On 4 August 1999 the Zheleznodorozhniy District Court of Voronezh (“the District Court”) allowed the applicants’ claim against the bank. The first and second applicant were awarded 24,490 and 32,931 United States dollars (USD) respectively.
8. The bailiffs started enforcement proceedings on 22 August 2000. Meanwhile, the bank became insolvent. On 10 July 2001 the enforcement proceedings were discontinued. The judgment of 4 August 1999 remained unenforced.
B. The applicants’ lawsuit against the ARKO and the Central Bank
9. On 16 August and 15 September 1999 the Central Bank of Russia (“the Central Bank”) declared a moratorium until 17 November 1999 on the execution of all creditors’ demands against the SBS-Agro Bank (“the bank”). The moratorium was later prolonged. On 16 November 1999 the management of the bank was taken over temporarily by the “Agency on Restructuring of Lending Agencies” (“ARKO”), set up by the State in accordance with the Law on Restructuring of Lending Agencies.
10. On 9 November 2001 the applicants sued the Central Bank and the ARKO for damages on the ground that the bank remained under the ARKO’s effective control since 16 November 1999. The District Court held a hearing in the applicants’ case on 5 December 2001. The ARKO filed written observations but was not represented at the hearing. The Central Bank did not file observations, nor was it represented at the hearing. In its judgment delivered on the same date the District Court noted that the bank was being managed by the ARKO at the material time and found the latter responsible for the bank’s obligations, including its debt owed to the applicants. It held that the ARKO was to pay the first and second applicants USD 24,490 and USD 32,931 respectively.
11. The Voronezh Regional Court (“the Regional Court”) allowed the ARKO’s appeal on 12 March 2002 and set aside the District Court’s judgment of 5 December 2001.
12. Following another remittal, on 20 December 2004 the District Court again found for the applicants, in terms similar to those of its judgment of 5 December 2001. The applicants were awarded the same amounts, payable by the ARKO. The judgment also held that the ARKO had to pay an amount of USD 20,841.68 to another plaintiff, Mr Kravchenko. The judgment specified that it was subject to appeal before the Voronezh Regional Court within ten days.
13. The ARKO lodged an appeal against the judgment of 20 December 2004. The Central Bank joined the appellate proceedings. On 25 February 2005 the ARKO was closed.
14. On 19 July 2005 the Regional Court heard the ARKO’s appeal against the District Court’s judgment of 20 December 2004. The representative of the Central Bank took part in the hearing as a co defendant. The Regional Court observed that the ARKO had been closed and discontinued the appellate proceedings. The District Court’s judgment of 20 December 2004 in the applicants’ favour accordingly became binding and enforceable.
15. On 2 August 2005 the District Court issued a writ of execution in respect of its judgment of 20 December 2004, which had acquired legal force on 19 July 2005.
16. On 6 December 2005 the Central Bank lodged an appeal with the Regional Court against the judgment of 20 December 2004. They also requested that the ten-day time-limit for appeal be extended on the ground that they had been deprived of the opportunity to have the lawfulness of the judgment of 20 December 2004 reviewed by the Regional Court.
17. On 2 March 2006 the Regional Court extended the time-limit for appeal as requested by the Central Bank. It noted that the Central Bank “had joined” the ARKO’s appeal against the judgment of 20 December 2004 which had been dismissed without being considered on its merits. The Regional Court concluded that the Central Bank had been deprived of its statutory right to appeal against the judgment of 20 December 2004.
18. On 9 March 2006 the Regional Court considered the Central Bank’s appeal against the District Court’s judgment of 20 December 2004. It heard the same representative of the Central Bank who took part in the hearing held by the same court on 19 July 2005 to consider the ARKO’s appeal which was then joined by the Central Bank. The court observed that both the ARKO and the Central Bank were co-defendants in the case and that the ARKO had been closed. The Regional Court concluded that its earlier decision of 19 July 2005 was based on an incorrect application of the relevant legal provisions, set aside the judgment of 20 December 2004 in the applicants’ favour and discontinued the proceedings.
C. The Court’s judgment in the case of Kravchenko and subsequent developments
19. On 2 April 2009 the European Court of Human Rights delivered a judgment in respect of Mr Kravchenko (Kravchenko v. Russia, no. 34615/02, 2 April 2009), who was at a certain stage the applicants’ co plaintiff in the domestic proceedings (see paragraph 12 above). In February 2002 he had obtained a separate judgment awarding him an amount of 30,919.40 Russian roubles (RUB), payable by the ARKO (see Kravchenko, cited above, §§ 44-49). The Court found a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that the Regional Court had quashed in May 2002 the binding and enforceable judgment in Mr Kravchenko’s favour by way of supervisory review.
20. Following the Court’s judgment of 2 April 2009, the applicants lodged an application for review of the Regional Court’s judgment of 9 March 2006, relying on Articles 392-394 of the Code of Civil Procedure. On 15 June 2011 the Presidium of the Voronezh Regional Court dismissed their application.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
21. Under the Russian Code of Civil Procedure (“the CCP”), a competent court may extend an expired time-limit for procedural actions, such as lodging an appeal, if the court finds that a party has a valid excuse for failure to comply with that time-limit (Article 112).
22. An appellate court shall set aside the judgments and discontinue the proceedings if a legal entity which is a party to the proceedings has been liquidated (Article 365 in conjunction with Article 220 of the CCP).
23. A final judgement in a case may be reviewed, inter alia, on the ground that the European Court of Human Rights found a violation of the Convention on account of the domestic judicial proceedings or decisions taken in that case (Article 392 of the CCP). Articles 393-394 set out a procedure for reopening of domestic judicial proceedings in any such case.
24. The ARKO was a State corporation (Article 28 of the Law No. 144 FZ of 8 July 1999 on Restructuring of Lending Agencies), that is, a non-commercial organisation established by the Russian State in order to exercise certain social, administrative or other socially beneficial functions (Article 7.1 of the Law No. 7-FZ of 12 January 1996 on Non Commercial Organisations, as amended by the Law No. 144-FZ of 8 July 1999).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF THE NON-ENFORCEMENT AND QUASHING OF THE JUDGMENT OF 20 DECEMBER 2004
25. The applicants complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the unjustified extension of the time limit for appeal which led to the quashing of the binding and enforceable judgment of 20 December 2004 in their favour. They also complained under the same provisions of the authorities’ failure to enforce that judgment in a timely manner. The respective provisions, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...
Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions”
A. The parties’ submissions
26. The Government contended that the relevant procedure had fully complied with the requirements of both Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They emphasised that the Central Bank had duly joined the appeal initially lodged by the ARKO. The closing of the ARKO, in the Government’s submission, should have, under the applicable procedural rules, led to the setting aside of the District Court’s judgment and the discontinuation of the proceedings as a whole and not simply the discontinuation of the appellate proceedings effectively leading to the District Court’s judgment against a now non-existent ARKO acquiring binding force.
27. In their additional observations, the Government extensively relied on the Court’s decision in the Shestakov case (Shestakov v. Russia (dec.), no. 48757/99, 18 June 2002), arguing that the applicants’ situation as creditors of the SBS-Agro Bank was very similar and their complaints should likewise be declared ill-founded. They insisted inter alia that the State was unable to pay the SBS-Agro bank’s debts to its creditors in the context of the acute financial crisis starting from August 1998. The Government concluded that the District Court’s judgment of 20 December 2004 in the applicants’ favour had been flawed and rightly quashed on appeal. The applicants’ complaints under the Convention should, therefore, be rejected as should have been those brought by other applicants in two previous cases (Kravchenko, cited above, and Margushin v. Russia, no. 11989/03, 1 April 2010). They emphasised, finally, that the domestic judgment at issue in the present case was quashed by way of ordinary appeal and not through supervisory review as in Kravchenko and Margushin.
28. The applicants disagreed with the Government’s interpretation of the Court’s decision in Shestakov. They argued that the situation of the latter applicant was quite different and so was the domestic judgment delivered in his favour. They insisted that the Court’s position in Kravchenko should be followed in the present case and regretted that the Voronezh Regional Court had failed to grant their application for review following the Kravchenko judgment.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
29. The Court considers that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. Nor is it inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
30. At the outset, the Court will distinguish the Convention issue at stake in the present case from that raised in the Shestakov case relied upon by the Government. While the original facts relating to the SBS-Agro Bank’s failure to pay back the applicants’ deposits during the financial crisis of 1998 were similar, the issue brought by the applicants before the Court in the present case is different. In Shestakov the central issue was the State’s failure to discharge its positive obligations to assist in enforcement of a domestic judgment in the applicant’s favour against a private debtor. In the present case the applicants complained of a breach of the legal certainty requirement on account of the quashing of the final judgment in their favour a long time after the expiry of the statutory time-limit for appeal.
31. The Court reiterates that the principles insisting that a final judicial decision must not be called into question and should be enforced represent two aspects of the same general concept, namely the right to a court (see Kondrashov and Others v. Russia, nos. 2068/03 et al., § 27, 8 January 2009). This does not mean, however, that those respective issues are identical or necessarily overlapping. Indeed, the Court’s finding that the State has done what it could and should to assist in enforcement of a final judgment in favour of one creditor as in Shestakov (cited above), did not lead it to conclude that the quashing of another final judgment in favour of another creditor by way of supervisory review complied with the legal certainty requirement (see Kravchenko, cited above). The Court observes that the issue raised by the present case is similar to the latter as the applicants’ reliance on a final judgment was allegedly frustrated by its quashing, which they found to be abusive. This issue must be considered by the Court on its merits and cannot be discarded on account of the findings made in the context of the enforcement proceedings in the Shestakov case.
32. The right to a fair hearing before a tribunal as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which declares, among other things, the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States. One of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law is the principle of legal certainty, which requires, inter alia, that where the courts have finally determined an issue, their ruling should not be called into question (see Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999 VII). A departure from that principle is justified only when made necessary by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character, such as correction of fundamental defects or miscarriage of justice (see, among numerous authorities, Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003-IX, and Margushin, cited above, § 31).
33. In previous cases against Russia the Court has upheld the principle of legal certainty in so far as legal procedures of supervisory review (see Ryabykh, cited above) and reconsideration owing to newly discovered circumstances (see Pravednaya v. Russia, no. 69529/01, 18 November 2004) were concerned. Furthermore, the Court has considered it appropriate to follow the same logic when this fundamental principle was undermined through other procedural mechanisms, such as the extension of the time-limit for an appeal. Thus, the Court found a violation of Article 6 in a case against Ukraine as the time-limit for an appeal was extended after a considerable lapse of time without any need for correction of serious judicial errors, but merely for the purpose of a rehearing and a fresh decision of the case (see Ponomaryov v. Ukraine, no. 3236/03, §§ 41 42, 3 April 2008).
34. The Court has no doubt that it is reasonable to provide for a possibility of extending procedural time-limits, including the time-limits for lodging an appeal, and notes that the legal systems of the States parties contain special provisions to that effect. While the extension of the time limit for an appeal remains primarily within the domestic courts’ discretion, they should, in the Court’s view, verify whether the reasons for any such extension justify the interference with the principle of res judicata, especially when the domestic legislation does not limit the courts’ discretion either on the length or the grounds for the renewal of the time-limits (ibid., § 41).
35. The Court notes that Russian law does not contain any prohibitive limit in this respect (see paragraph 18 above). In these circumstances, an allegation of abusive extension of the time-limit for an appeal against a final judgment calls for close supervision by the Court. Its task is thus to assess the particular circumstances of the case at hand and the manner in which the pertinent domestic regulations were actually applied (see Ashingdane v. the United Kingdom, 28 May 1985, § 57, Series A no. 93).
36. Furthermore, the Court considers that, as in the case of quashing by way of supervisory review, a successful litigant’s legitimate reliance on res judicata may be frustrated in a very similar manner by waiving the time limits for appeal (see, mutatis mutandis, Kulkov and Others v. Russia, nos. 25114/03 et al., § 27, 8 January 2009). Such departures from the principle of legal certainty are justified only when made necessary by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character (see Salov v. Ukraine, no. 65518/01, § 93, ECHR 2005-VIII; Protsenko v. Russia, no. 13151/04, § 26, 31 July 2008; and Kravchenko v. Russia, cited above, § 45). In particular, legal certainty can be set aside not for the sake of legal purism but in order to rectify “an error of fundamental importance to the judicial system” (Sutyazhnik v. Russia, no. 8269/02, § 38, 23 July 2009).
37. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court observes at the outset that the District Court’s judgment of 20 December 2004 in the applicants’ favour became final on 19 July 2005 following the Voronezh Regional Court’s decision to discontinue the appeal proceedings (see paragraph 14 above). However, on 2 March 2006 the Regional Court granted the Central Bank’s application for extension of the statutory time limit for appeal and on 9 March 2006 quashed the judgment (see paragraphs 17 and 18 above).
38. The Court observes that the Central Bank had previously “joined” the appeal lodged by the defendant ARKO against the District Court’s judgment of 20 December 2004 in the applicants’ favour and that the representative of the Central Bank had attended the appellate hearing of 19 July 2005. However, there is no indication that the Central Bank’s representative raised at that time any objection against the Regional Court’s decision to discontinue the appellate proceedings on the ground that the ARKO had been closed. It was only four months later that the Central Bank came back to the same court and challenged the final judgment of 20 December 2004. The Court finds no explanation for this behaviour, noting especially that the Central Bank was constantly involved in the proceedings as a co-defendant (see, mutatis mutandis, Margushin, cited above, § 34).
39. Moreover, the Court notes that the Regional Court granted the request for extension of the time-limit by reference to the Central Bank’s initial intention to “join” the appeal lodged by the ARKO and the ensuing failure to lodge its own appeal against the judgment within the statutory time limit. The Government on their part argued that the Regional Court’s decision to discontinue the appeal proceedings should never have led to the upholding of the judgment of 20 December 2004 in the applicants’ favour as the respondent agency had been closed by the time of the appeal hearing (see paragraph 26 above). However, even assuming that the Regional Court’s judgment contained an error, the Court does not discern in the above explanations any circumstance of substantial and compelling character which would justify the Regional Court’s extension of the time limit for appeal and the subsequent quashing of the final judgment in the applicants’ favour.
40. First, the Court does not find that the procedural reasons referred to by the Regional Court and by the Government were of a fundamental nature. It considers it unfair that possible procedural errors by the Central Bank or the Regional Court itself were corrected solely to the applicants’ detriment a long time after the judgment in their favour became final.
41. Second, the mere fact that the judicial award was payable by the ARKO which was later closed, does not necessarily relieve the State of its responsibility to enforce that judgment, given both the ARKO’s status as a State corporation (see paragraph 24 above) and the role of co-defendant played by the Central Bank in the proceedings at issue. The Court notes in this connection that the applicants consistently directed their action against both the ARKO and the Central Bank in view of the latter’s implication in the matters concerned and that the Regional Court consistently associated the Central Bank to the proceedings as a co-defendant. At the same time, the domestic courts have never clarified the Central Bank’s responsibility, either direct or subsidiary, in respect of the applicants’ grievances. This issue became crucial after the closing of the ARKO on 25 February 2005 but still remained unresolved by the Regional Court.
42. In this context the Court considers that the applicants could reasonably rely on the final judgment in their favour and expect that the judgment debt would be honoured even after the closing of the ARKO. This attitude is also in line with the Court’s constant view that the closure of a respondent State organ does not, in principle, absolve the State of the obligation to pay its debts under a binding and enforceable judgment, especially taking into account that changing needs force the State to make frequent changes in its organisational structure, including by forming new organs and closing old ones (mutatis mutandis, Nikitina v. Russia, no. 47486/07, § 19, 15 July 2010). The Court cannot, therefore, accept the argument that the closure of the ARKO constituted in itself a circumstance justifying the departure from the principle of legal certainty in the applicants’ case.
43. Finally, as regards the Government’s argument concerning the objective obstacles to payment of the Bank’s debts in the context of a large scale financial crisis, the Court does not put it into question that a comprehensive solution for repayment of debts to the creditors was needed. However, this could not prevent the applicants from bringing their claims to domestic courts and it was open to the authorities including the Central Bank to defend their position in court proceedings before the judgment became final and enforceable. As to the need to correct judicial errors and to ensure a uniform application of the domestic law, the Court considers that these must not be achieved at any cost and notably with disregard for the applicants’ legitimate reliance on res judicata. The authorities must strike a fair balance between the interests of the applicants and the need to ensure the proper administration of justice (see Nikitin v. Russia, no. 50178/99, § 59, ECHR 2004 VIII, and Kulkov and Others, cited above, § 27).
44. In view of the foregoing, the Court concludes that by extending the time-limit for the Central Bank’s appeal against the District Court’s judgment of 20 December 2004 the Regional Court infringed the principle of legal certainty and the applicants’ right to court under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
45. Turning to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court reiterates that a judgment debt may be regarded as a “possession” for the purposes of that provision and that setting such a judgment aside in violation of Article 6 may also constitute an interference with the judgment beneficiary’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possession (see Ryabykh, cited above, § 61). As the Court has already found that the applicants were arbitrarily deprived of their right to court (see paragraph 44 above), it follows that there has also been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that respect (see Margushin, cited above, § 40).
46. To sum up, the Court concludes that the extension of the time-limit for an appeal against the final judgment in the applicants’ favour and the subsequent quashing of that judgment by the Regional Court violated Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
47. Having regard to that finding, the Court does not find it necessary to examine separately the issue of non-enforcement of the judgment of 20 December 2004 by the authorities (see Boris Vasilyev v. Russia, no. 30671/03, §§ 41-42, 15 February 2007; Sobelin and Others v. Russia, nos. 30672/03 et al., §§ 67-68, 3 May 2007; Kulkov and Others, cited above, § 35; and Kazakevich and 9 other “Army Pensioners” cases v. Russia, nos. 14290/03 et al., § 32, 14 January 2010).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF THE NON-ENFORCEMENT OF THE JUDGMENT OF 4 AUGUST 1999
48. The applicants complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that there had been no full and timely enforcement of the District Court’s judgment of 4 August 1999.
49. The Court observes that the judgment in issue was rendered in the applicants’ favour against a commercial bank which was declared insolvent and that the enforcement proceedings were discontinued on 10 July 2001. The application was lodged with the Court on 9 September 2002, that is more than six months after those events. The complaint is therefore inadmissible pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
50. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
51. The applicants claimed repayment of the judgment debts they had legitimately expected to receive before the judgment in their favour was quashed, i.e. the amounts of 24,490 United States dollars (USD) and USD 32,931 respectively. They further claimed 583,548.24 Russian roubles (RUB) and RUB 784,680.56 respectively representing interest on the judgment debts (lucrum cessans) for the period from 5 December 2001 to 29 July 2011. They also claimed 5,000 euros (EUR) each for non pecuniary damage.
52. The Government submitted that the applicants’ claims were excessive and ill-founded. They contested the method of calculation of interest on the judgment debts, including the rate applied by the applicants and the period of time for which interest was due. As regards non-pecuniary damage, the Government argued that in any event the Court should not grant more than EUR 2,000, an amount awarded in the Kravchenko case.
53. The Court notes that in the present case it has found a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that the final judgment in the applicants’ favour had been quashed in breach of the legal certainty requirement and that the applicants had not been able to receive the judicial awards as a result of the quashing of that judgment. The most appropriate form of redress in respect of a violation of Article 6 is to ensure that the applicant is put, as far as possible, in the position he would have been had the requirements of Article 6 not been disregarded (see Piersack v. Belgium (Article 50), judgment of 26 October 1984, Series A no. 85, p. 16, § 12, and, mutatis mutandis, Gençel v. Turkey, no. 53431/99, § 27, 23 October 2003). The Court finds that in the present case this principle applies as well, having regard to the nature of the violations found (see Kravchenko, cited above, § 56). The Court therefore considers it appropriate to award the applicants the amounts which they would have received, had the final judgment of 20 December 2004 not been quashed, i.e. USD 24,490 and USD 32,931 respectively.
54. As to the claim concerning interest on the judgment debts, the Court, like the Government, has doubts as to the method of calculation used by the applicants. They did not provide sufficient factual elements to substantiate their approach. The Court further notes that the depreciation of the judgment debt over the relevant period was limited since the awards were made in the US currency which was not affected by inflation at the same rate as the Russian national currency. In these circumstances the Court dismisses the applicants’ claim for interest.
55. The Court further considers that the applicants must have suffered distress and frustration resulting from the quashing of the final judgment in breach of the legal certainty requirement. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards EUR 2,000 to each applicant in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on those amounts.
B. Costs and expenses
56. The applicants claimed RUB 35,000 for legal costs and attached the lawyer’s bill in support of their claims. The Government did not dispute the amount paid to the lawyer and considered that it could be granted, should the Court find a violation of the Convention. The Court therefore awards the applicants EUR 880 for costs and expenses.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints concerning the quashing of the judgment of 20 December 2004 in the applicants’ favour after the extension of the time-limit for appeal and the non enforcement of that judgment admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the quashing of the judgment in the applicants’ favour;

3. Holds that it is not necessary to examine separately the issue of non enforcement of that judgment;

4. Holds that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention:
(a) the awards made by the domestic court in the applicants’ favour, that is USD 24,490 (twenty-four thousand four hundred and ninety United States dollars) to the first applicant and USD 32,931 (thirty-two thousand nine hundred and thirty-one United States dollars) to the second applicant in respect of pecuniary damage;
(b) EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros) to each applicant in respect of non pecuniary damage, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of the settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants on that amount;
(c) EUR 880 (eight hundred and eighty euros) jointly to both applicants in respect of costs and expenses, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of the settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount;
(d) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 10 May 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Nina Vajić
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto Violazione inammissibile di Articolo 6 - Diritto ad un processo equanime (Articolo 6 - procedimenti Civili Articolo 6-1 - l'udienza equa)
Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (l'Articolo 1 parità. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo di proprietà)
Danno patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale)
Danno non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Non-patrimoniale)



PRIMA SEZIONE






CAUSA BEZRUKOVY C. RUSSIA

(Richiesta n. 34616/02)








SENTENZA

Questa versione fu rettificata in 14 maggio 2012
sotto Decida 81 degli Articoli di Corte.


STRASBOURG

10 maggio 2012


Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Bezrukovy c. Russia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Nina Vajić, Presidente
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse, judges,and
André Wampach, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato 17 aprile 2012,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 34616/02) contro la Federazione russa depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con due cittadini russi, OMISSIS (“il primo richiedente”) ed OMISSIS (“il secondo richiedente”), 9 settembre 2002. I primo e secondo richiedenti sono assegnati insieme a come “i richiedenti.”
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Voronezh. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col Sig. P. Laptev ed il Sig. G. Matyushkin, i Rappresentanti successivi della Federazione russa alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che il definitivo e sentenza nazionale ed esecutiva nel loro favore non erano state eseguite in una maniera opportuna e che il tempo-limite per fare appello contro che sentenza era stata prolungata, mentre concedendo così il suo annullando susseguente.
4. 15 settembre 2005 la richiesta fu comunicata al Governo. Fu deciso anche di considerare insieme l'ammissibilità e meriti della causa.
5. In prospettiva degli sviluppi nella causa, il Governo fu invitato per presentare osservazioni supplementari, 24 novembre 2009, facendo seguito Decidere 54 § 2 (il c) degli Articoli di Corte. I richiedenti presentarono le loro osservazioni in replica.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
6. Il primo richiedente nacque nel 1950. Il secondo richiedente è la figlia del primo richiedente, nato nel 1976. Loro vivono in Voronezh.
A. I richiedenti il processo di ' contro la Banca di SBS-AGRO
7. In luglio ed agosto 1998 i richiedenti fatti i vari depositi valutari col Voronezh ramificano della Banca di SBS-Agro (“СБС-Агро”). Durante una crisi finanziaria in Russia e la svalutazione di valuta rapida, loro richiesero la banca per risarcire il capitale con interesse a settembre 1998, ma la banca rifiutò. 4 agosto 1999 la Corte distrettuale di Zheleznodorozhniy di Voronezh (“la Corte distrettuale”) permise i richiedenti che ' chiede contro la banca. Il primo e secondo richiedente fu assegnato 24,490 e 32,931 dollari di Stati Uniti (USD) rispettivamente.
8. Gli ufficiali giudiziari avviarono procedimenti di esecuzione 22 agosto 2000. Nel frattempo, la banca divenne insolvente. 10 luglio 2001 i procedimenti di esecuzione furono cessati. La sentenza del 1999 unenforced rimasti di 4 agosto.
B. I richiedenti il processo di ' contro l'ARKO e la Banca Centrale
9. 16 agosto e 15 settembre 1999 la Banca Centrale della Russia (“la Banca Centrale”) dichiarò una moratoria sino a 17 novembre 1999 sull'esecuzione di tutti i creditori ' richiede contro la Banca di SBS-Agro (“la banca”). La moratoria fu prolungata più tardi. 16 novembre 1999 la gestione della banca fu presa su temporaneamente col “AGENZIA su Ristrutturare di Prestito AGENZIA” (“ARKO”), esponga su con lo Stato in conformità con la Legge su Ristrutturare di Prestito AGENZIA.
10. 9 novembre 2001 i richiedenti chiamarono in giudizio la Banca Centrale e l'ARKO per danni sulla base che la banca è rimasta il controllo effettivo dell'ARKO fin da 16 novembre 1999 sotto. La Corte distrettuale sostenne un'udienza nei richiedenti la causa di ' 5 dicembre 2001. L'ARKO registrò osservazioni scritto ma non fu rappresentato all'udienza. La Banca Centrale non registrò osservazioni, né fu rappresentato all'udienza. Nella sua sentenza consegnata sulla stessa data la Corte distrettuale notata che la banca era maneggiata con l'ARKO al materiale calcoli e fondi il secondo responsabile per gli obblighi della banca, incluso il suo debito dovuto ai richiedenti. Contenne che l'ARKO era pagare rispettivamente i primo e secondo richiedenti USD 24,490 ed USD 32,931.
11. Il Voronezh Corte Regionale (“la Corte Regionale”) concedè il ricorso dell'ARKO 12 marzo 2002 ed accantonò la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 5 dicembre 2001.
12. Seguendo un altro rinvio, 20 dicembre 2004 che la Corte distrettuale trovata di nuovo per i richiedenti, in termini simile a quelli della sua sentenza di 5 dicembre 2001. I richiedenti furono assegnati gli stessi importi, pagabile con l'ARKO. La sentenza contenne anche che l'ARKO aveva pagare un importo di USD 20,841.68 ad un altro querelante, il Sig. Kravchenko. La sentenza specificò che era soggetto a ricorso di fronte al Voronezh Corte Regionale entro dieci giorni.
13. L'ARKO depositò un ricorso contro la sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004. La Banca Centrale si unì ai procedimenti di appello. 25 febbraio 2005 l'ARKO fu chiuso.
14. 19 luglio 2005 la Corte Regionale ascoltò il ricorso dell'ARKO contro la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 20 dicembre 2004. Il rappresentante della Banca Centrale prese parte nell'udienza come un co-imputato. La Corte Regionale osservò che l'ARKO era stato chiuso ed era stato cessato i procedimenti di appello. La sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 20 dicembre 2004 nei richiedenti il favore di ' divenne di conseguenza legando ed esecutivo.
15. 2 agosto 2005 la Corte distrettuale emise un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza in riguardo della sua sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 che aveva acquisito vigore legale 19 luglio 2005.
16. 6 dicembre 2005 la Banca Centrale depositò un ricorso con la Corte Regionale contro la sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004. Loro richiesero anche che il tempo-limite di dieci-giorno per ricorso sia prolungato sulla base che loro erano stati privati dell'opportunità di avere la legalità della sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 fatta una rassegna con la Corte Regionale.
17. 2 marzo 2006 la Corte Regionale prolungò il tempo-limite per ricorso siccome richiesto con la Banca Centrale. Notò che la Banca Centrale “aveva congiunto” il ricorso dell'ARKO contro la sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 quale era stato respinto senza essere considerato sui suoi meriti. La Corte Regionale concluse che la Banca Centrale era stata privata del suo diritto legale per fare appello contro la sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004.
18. 9 marzo 2006 la Corte Regionale considerò il ricorso della Banca Centrale contro la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 20 dicembre 2004. Ascoltò lo stesso rappresentante della Banca Centrale che prese parte nell'udienza sostenuto con la stessa corte 19 luglio 2005 per considerare il ricorso dell'ARKO che fu congiunto poi con la Banca Centrale. La corte osservò che sia l'ARKO e la Banca Centrale erano co-imputate nella causa e che l'ARKO era stato chiuso. La Corte Regionale concluse che la sua più prima decisione di 19 luglio 2005 fu basata su una richiesta incorretta delle disposizioni legali ed attinenti, fu accantonata la sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 nei richiedenti il favore di ' e fu cessata i procedimenti.
C. la sentenza di La Corte nella causa di Kravchenko e sviluppi susseguenti
19. 2 aprile 2009 la Corte europea di Diritti umani consegnò una sentenza in riguardo del Sig. Kravchenko (Kravchenko c. la Russia, n. 34615/02, 2 aprile 2009) che era ad un certo stadio i richiedenti il co-querelante di ' nei procedimenti nazionali (veda paragrafo 12 sopra). A febbraio 2002 lui aveva ottenuto una sentenza separata che gli assegna un importo di 30,919.40 rubli russi (Strofini), pagabile con l'ARKO (veda Kravchenko, citato sopra, §§ 44-49). La Corte trovò una violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in che la Corte Regionale aveva annullato in maggio 2002 la rilegatura e sentenza esecutiva nel favore del Sig. Kravchenko con modo di revisione direttiva.
20. Seguendo la sentenza della Corte di 2 aprile 2009, i richiedenti depositarono una richiesta per revisione della sentenza della Corte Regionale di 9 marzo 2006, mentre appellandosi su Articoli 392-394 del Codice di Procedura Civile. 15 giugno 2011 il Presidium del Voronezh Corte Regionale respinse la loro richiesta.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
21. Sotto il Codice russo di Procedura Civile (“il CCP”), una corte competente può prolungare un tempo-limite scaduto per azioni procedurali, come depositando un ricorso se i costatazione di corte che una parte ha una scusa valida per inosservanza con che tempo-limite (Articolo 112).
22. Una corte di appello accantonerà le sentenze e cessa i procedimenti se una persona giuridica che è una parte ai procedimenti è stata liquidata (Articolo 365 in concomitanza con Articolo 220 del CCP).
23. Una sentenza definitiva in una causa può essere fatta una rassegna, inter l'alia, sulla base che la Corte europea di Diritti umani trovata una violazione della Convenzione su conto dei procedimenti giudiziali e nazionali o decisioni presa in che causa (Articolo 392 del CCP). Articoli 393-394 set fuori una procedura per riaprire di procedimenti giudiziali e nazionali in qualsiasi simile causa.
24. L'ARKO era una società per azioni Statale (Articolo 28 della Legge N.ro 144-FZ 8 luglio 1999 su Ristrutturare di Prestito AGENZIA), quel è, un'organizzazione non-commerciale stabilita con lo Stato russo per esercitare le certe funzioni socialmente che dà beneficio sociali, amministrative o altre (Articolo 7.1 della Legge N.ro 7-FZ 12 gennaio 1996 su Organizzazioni Non-commerciali, corretto con la Legge N.ro 144-FZ 8 luglio 1999).
LA LEGGE
IO. Violazione allegato Di La Convenzione Su Conto Di La Non-esecuzione Ed Annullando Di La Sentenza Di 20 dicembre 2004
25. I richiedenti si lamentarono Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 della proroga ingiustificata del tempo-limite per ricorso che condusse all'annullare della rilegatura e sentenza esecutiva di 20 dicembre 2004 nel loro favore. Loro si lamentarono anche sotto le stesse disposizioni delle autorità l'insuccesso di ' per eseguire che sentenza in una maniera opportuna. Le rispettive disposizioni, in finora come attinente, legga siccome segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è concesso ad una fiera... ascolti... con [un]... tribunale...
Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà”
A. Le parti le osservazioni di '
26. Il Governo contese che la procedura attinente si era attenuta pienamente coi requisiti di ambo l'Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro enfatizzarono che la Banca Centrale si era unita debitamente inizialmente al ricorso depositato con l'ARKO. La chiusura dell'ARKO, nell'osservazione del Governo dovrebbe avere, sotto gli articoli procedurali ed applicabili, condusse all'accantonare della sentenza della Corte distrettuale e l'interruzione dei procedimenti nell'insieme e non semplicemente l'interruzione dei procedimenti di appello che conducono efficacemente alla sentenza della Corte distrettuale contro un ora ARKO non-esistente che acquisisce vigore vincolante.
27. Nelle loro osservazioni supplementari, il Governo si appellò estensivamente sulla decisione della Corte nella causa di Shestakov (Shestakov c. la Russia (il dec.), n. 48757/99, 18 giugno 2002), dibattendo che i richiedenti la situazione di ' come creditori della Banca di SBS-Agro era molto simile e le loro azioni di reclamo dovrebbero essere dichiarate similmente mal-fondato. Loro insisterono inter l'alia che lo Stato non era capace di pagare i debiti della banca di SBS-Agro ai suoi creditori nel contesto della crisi finanziaria ed acuta che comincia da agosto 1998. Il Governo concluse che la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 20 dicembre 2004 nei richiedenti il favore di ' era stato crepato ed era stato annullato esattamente su ricorso. I richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' sotto la Convenzione devono, perciò, sia respinto siccome sarebbe dovuto essere quelli portati con gli altri richiedenti in due cause precedenti (Kravchenko, citato sopra, e Margushin c. la Russia, n. 11989/03, 1 aprile 2010). Loro enfatizzarono, infine, che la sentenza nazionale in questione nella causa presente fu annullato con modo di ricorso ordinario e non per revisione direttiva come in Kravchenko e Margushin.
28. I richiedenti non furono d'accordo con l'interpretazione del Governo della decisione della Corte in Shestakov. Loro dibatterono che la situazione del richiedente secondo era piuttosto diversa e così era la sentenza nazionale consegnata nel suo favore. Loro insisterono che la posizione della Corte in Kravchenko dovesse essere seguita nella causa presente e dovrebbe essere pentita che il Voronezh che Corte Regionale era andata a vuoto ad accordare la loro richiesta per revisione seguente la sentenza di Kravchenko.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Ammissibilità
29. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Né è sé inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
30. La Corte distinguerà il problema di Convenzione in pericolo nella causa presente da all'inizio, che sollevò nella causa di Shestakov si appellata su col Governo. Mentre i fatti originali relativo all'insuccesso della Banca di SBS-Agro per pagare di nuovo i richiedenti che ' deposita durante la crisi finanziaria di 1998 erano simili, il problema portato coi richiedenti di fronte alla Corte nella causa presente è diverso. In Shestakov il problema centrale era l'insuccesso dello Stato per assolvere i suoi obblighi positivi per assistere in esecuzione di una sentenza nazionale nel favore del richiedente contro un debitore privato. Al giorno d'oggi causa che i richiedenti si sono lamentati di una violazione del requisito di certezza legale su conto dell'annullare della definitivo sentenza nel loro favore un tempo lungo dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite legale per ricorso.
31. La Corte reitera che i principi che insistono che una definitivo decisione giudiziale non dovuta essere chiamata in questione e dovrebbe essere eseguita rappresenti due aspetti dello stesso concetto generale, vale a dire il diritto ad una corte (veda Kondrashov ed Altri c. la Russia, N. 2068/03 et al., § 27, 8 gennaio 2009). Comunque, questo non vuole dire che quelli rispettivi problemi sono identici o necessariamente ricoprendo. Effettivamente, la Corte sta trovando che lo Stato ha fatto che che poteva e deve assistere in esecuzione di una definitivo sentenza in favore di un creditore come in Shestakov (citò sopra), non lo condusse a concludere che gli annullare di un'altra definitivo sentenza in favore di un altro creditore con modo di revisione direttiva si attennero col requisito di certezza legale (veda Kravchenko, citato sopra). La Corte osserva che il problema sollevò con la causa presente è simile al secondo come i richiedenti l'affidamento di ' su una definitivo sentenza fu frustrato presumibilmente con suo annullando che loro fondarono essere abusivi. Questo problema deve essere considerato con la Corte sui suoi meriti e non può essere scartato su conto delle sentenze reso nel contesto dei procedimenti di esecuzione nella causa di Shestakov.
32. Il diritto ad un'udienza corretta di fronte ad un tribunale come garantito con Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione deve essere interpretato nella luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che dichiara fra le altre cose, l'articolo di legge per essere parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti. Uno degli aspetti fondamentali dell'articolo di legge è il principio di certezza legale che richiede inter l'alia che dove le corti infine hanno determinato un problema, la loro direttiva non dovrebbe essere chiamata in questione (veda Brumărescu c. la Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61 ECHR 1999-VII). Una partenza da che principio è giustificato solamente quando rese necessario con circostanze di un carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile, come correzione di difetti fondamentali o errore giudiziario (veda, fra autorità numerose, Ryabykh c. la Russia, n. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003-IX, e Margushin citato sopra, § 31).
33. In cause precedenti contro la Russia la Corte ha sostenuto finora il principio della certezza legale in come procedure legali di revisione direttiva (veda Ryabykh, citato sopra) e revisione che deve a circostanze di recente scoperte (veda Pravednaya c. la Russia, n. 69529/01, 18 novembre 2004) riguardò. Inoltre, la Corte l'ha considerato appropriato seguire la stessa logica quando questo principio fondamentale fu minato per gli altri meccanismi procedurali, come la proroga del tempo-limite per un ricorso. Così, la Corte trovò una violazione di Articolo 6 in una causa contro l'Ucraina come il tempo-limite per un ricorso fu prolungato dopo un decorso del tempo considerevole senza qualsiasi bisogno per correzione di errori giudiziali e seri, ma soltanto per il fine di un riesame ed una decisione nuova della causa (veda Ponomaryov c. l'Ucraina, n. 3236/03, §§ 41-42 3 aprile 2008).
34. La Corte senza dubbio ha che è ragionevole prevedere per una possibilità di prolungare tempo-limiti procedurali, incluso i tempo-limiti per depositare un ricorso e nota che gli ordinamenti giuridici delle parti di Stati contengono disposizioni speciali a quel l'effetto. Mentre la proroga del tempo-limite per un ricorso rimane primariamente entro il nazionale corteggia la discrezione di ', loro devono, nella prospettiva della Corte, verifichi se le ragioni per qualsiasi simile proroga giustificato l'interferenza col principio di res judicata, specialmente quando la legislazione nazionale non limita o le corti la discrezione di ' sulla lunghezza o i motivi per il rinnovamento dei tempo-limiti (l'ibid., § 41).
35. La Corte nota che legge russa non contiene qualsiasi limite proibitivo in questo riguardo (veda paragrafo 18 sopra). In queste circostanze, una dichiarazione di proroga abusiva del tempo-limite per un ricorso contro una definitivo sentenza manda a chiamare soprintendenza vicina con la Corte. Il suo compito deve valutare così le particolari circostanze della causa a mano e la maniera nelle quali davvero furono fatte domanda le regolamentazioni nazionali e pertinenti (veda Ashingdane c. il Regno Unito, 28 maggio 1985, § 57 la Serie Un n. 93).
36. Inoltre, la Corte considera che, come nella causa di annullare con modo di revisione direttiva, l'affidamento legittimo di un contendente riuscito su res judicata può essere frustrato in una maniera molto simile con rinunciando ai tempo-limiti per ricorso (veda, mutatis mutandis, Kulkov ed Altri c. la Russia, N. 25114/03 et al., § 27, 8 gennaio 2009). Simile partenze dal principio della certezza legale sono giustificate solamente quando rese necessario con circostanze di un carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile (veda Salov c. l'Ucraina, n. 65518/01, § 93 ECHR 2005-VIII; Protsenko c. la Russia, n. 13151/04, § 26 31 luglio 2008; e Kravchenko c. la Russia, citato sopra, § 45). In particolare, legale certezza non può essere accantonato nell'interesse del purismo legale ma per rettificare “un errore dell'importanza fondamentale al sistema giudiziale” (Sutyazhnik c. la Russia, n. 8269/02, § 38 23 luglio 2009).
37. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della causa presente, la Corte osserva all'inizio che la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 20 dicembre 2004 nei richiedenti il favore di ' divenne definitivo 19 luglio 2005 che fa seguire la decisione di Corte Regionale per cessare i procedimenti di ricorso il Voronezh (veda paragrafo 14 sopra). 2 marzo 2006 la Corte Regionale accordò comunque, la richiesta della Banca Centrale per proroga del tempo-limite legale per ricorso e 9 marzo 2006 annullò la sentenza (veda divide in paragrafi 17 e 18 sopra).
38. La Corte osserva che la Banca Centrale prima aveva “congiunse” il ricorso depositato con l'imputato ARKO contro la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 20 dicembre 2004 nei richiedenti il favore di ' e che il rappresentante della Banca Centrale aveva frequentato l'udienza di appello di 19 luglio 2005. Non c'è comunque, nessuna indicazione alla quale il rappresentante della Banca Centrale ha sollevato che tempo qualsiasi eccezione contro la decisione della Corte Regionale per cessare i procedimenti di appello sulla base che l'ARKO era stato chiuso. Era solamente quattro mesi più tardi che la Banca Centrale ritornò alla stessa corte ed impugnò la definitivo sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004. La Corte non trova chiarimento per questo comportamento, mentre specialmente notando che la Banca Centrale fu comportata nei procedimenti come un co-imputato continuamente (veda, mutatis mutandis, Margushin citato sopra, § 34).
39. Inoltre, la Corte nota che la Corte Regionale accordò la richiesta per proroga del tempo-limite con riferimento all'intenzione iniziale della Banca Centrale a “congiunga” il ricorso depositato con l'ARKO e l'insuccesso che consegue per depositare il suo proprio ricorso contro la sentenza all'interno del tempo-limite legale. Il Governo sulla loro parte dibattuta che la decisione della Corte Regionale di cessare i procedimenti di ricorso non avrebbe dovuto condurre mai al sostenere della sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 nei richiedenti il favore di ' come l'agenzia rispondente era stato chiuso col tempo del ricorso ascolti (veda paragrafo 26 sopra). Comunque, presumendo anche che la sentenza della Corte Regionale contenne un errore, la Corte non discerne nei chiarimenti sopra qualsiasi circostanza di carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile che giustificerebbe la proroga della Corte Regionale del tempo-limite per ricorso ed il susseguente annullando della definitivo sentenza nei richiedenti il favore di '.
40. Prima, la Corte non trova che le ragioni procedurali assegnarono a con la Corte Regionale e col Governo era di una natura fondamentale. Lo considera ingiusto che possibili errori procedurali della Banca Centrale o la Corte Regionale stessa fu corretta solamente ai richiedenti il danno di ' un tempo lungo dopo che la sentenza nel loro favore divenne definitivo.
41. Secondo, il fatto mero che l'assegnazione giudiziale era pagabile con l'ARKO che fu chiuso più tardi, non allevi necessariamente lo Stato della sua responsabilità per eseguire che sentenza, determinato sia lo status dell'ARKO come una società per azioni Statale (veda paragrafo 24 sopra) ed il ruolo di co-imputato giocò con la Banca Centrale nei procedimenti in questione. La Corte nota in questo collegamento che i richiedenti diressero costantemente la loro azione contro sia l'ARKO e la Banca Centrale in prospettiva dell'implicazione seconda nelle questioni riguardate e che la Corte Regionale associò costantemente la Banca Centrale ai procedimenti come un co-imputato. Allo stesso tempo, le corti nazionali non hanno chiarificato mai la responsabilità della Banca Centrale, o diretto o assistente, in riguardo dei richiedenti i danni di '. Questo problema divenne cruciale dopo la chiusura dell'ARKO 25 febbraio 2005 ma ancora rimase irresoluto con la Corte Regionale.
42. In questo contesto la Corte considera che i richiedenti potessero appellarsi ragionevolmente sulla definitivo sentenza nel loro favore e si aspetta che il debito di sentenza sarebbe onorato anche dopo la chiusura dell'ARKO. Questo atteggiamento è anche in linea con la prospettiva continua della Corte che la chiusura di un organo Statale e rispondente non fa, in principio assolve lo Stato dell'obbligo per pagare i suoi debiti sotto una rilegatura e sentenza esecutiva, mentre prendendo in considerazione che cambiando le necessità costringe lo Stato a fare cambi frequenti nel suo organisational specialmente struttura, incluso con formando organi nuovi e vecchi uni che chiude (mutatis mutandis, Nikitina c. la Russia, n. 47486/07, § 19 15 luglio 2010). La Corte non può, perciò, accetta l'argomento che la chiusura dell'ARKO costituì in se stesso una circostanza che giustifica la partenza dal principio della certezza legale nei richiedenti la causa di '.
43. Infine, come riguardi l'argomento del Governo riguardo agli ostacoli obiettivi a pagamento dei debiti della Banca nel contesto di una crisi finanziaria e di grande potenza, la Corte non lo mette in questione che una soluzione comprensiva per rimborso di debiti ai creditori fu avuta bisogno. Comunque, questo non poteva impedire ai richiedenti di portare le loro rivendicazioni a corti nazionali ed era aperto alle autorità incluso la Banca Centrale difendere la loro posizione in atti di fronte alla sentenza divenne definitivo ed esecutivo. Come al bisogno la Corte considera correggere errori giudiziali ed assicurare una richiesta di uniforme del diritto nazionale, che questi non devono essere realizzati a qualsiasi costò e notevolmente con noncuranza per i richiedenti ' affidamento legittimo su res judicata. Le autorità devono prevedere un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi dei richiedenti ed il bisogno di assicurare l'amministrazione corretta della giustizia (veda Nikitin c. la Russia, n. 50178/99, § 59, ECHR 2004-VIII, e Kulkov ed Altri, citato sopra, § 27).
44. In prospettiva del precedente, la Corte conclude, che prolungando il tempo-limite per il ricorso della Banca Centrale contro la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 20 dicembre 2004 la Corte Regionale il principio della certezza legale ed i richiedenti infranse il diritto di ' per corteggiare sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
45. Rivolgendosi ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte reitera che un debito di sentenza può essere riguardato come un “la proprietà” per i fini di che approvvigiona e che accantonando tale sentenza in violazione di Articolo 6 può costituire anche un'interferenza col diritto del beneficiario di sentenza al godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà (veda Ryabykh, citato sopra, § 61). Siccome già ha trovato la Corte che i richiedenti furono privati arbitrariamente del loro diritto per corteggiare (veda paragrafo 44 sopra), segue che c'è stata anche una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in che riguardo (veda Margushin, citato sopra, § 40).
46. La Corte conclude sommare su, che la proroga del tempo-limite per un ricorso contro la definitivo sentenza nei richiedenti il favore di ' ed il susseguente che annullano di che sentenza della Corte Regionale violò Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
47. Avendo riguardo ad a che trovando, la Corte non lo trova necessario esaminare separatamente il problema di non-esecuzione della sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 con le autorità (veda Boris Vasilyev c. la Russia, n. 30671/03, §§ 41-42 15 febbraio 2007; Sobelin ed Altri c. la Russia, N. 30672/03 et al., §§ 67-68, 3 maggio 2007; Kulkov ed Altri, citato sopra, § 35; e Kazakevich e 9 altro “Esercito Pensionati” le cause c. la Russia, N. 14290/03 et al., § 32, 14 gennaio 2010).
II. Violazione allegato Di La Convenzione Su Conto Di La Non-esecuzione Di La Sentenza Di 4 Augusto 1999
48. I richiedenti si lamentarono Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 che non c'era stata nessuna piena ed opportuna esecuzione della sentenza della Corte distrettuale di 4 agosto 1999.
49. La Corte osserva che la sentenza in problema fu resa nei richiedenti il favore di ' contro una banca commerciale che fu dichiarata insolvente e che i procedimenti di esecuzione furono cessati 10 luglio 2001. La richiesta fu depositata con la Corte 9 settembre 2002, quel è più di sei mesi dopo quegli eventi. L'azione di reclamo è perciò inammissibile facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
III. La richiesta Di Articolo 41 Di La Convenzione
50. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Damage
51. I richiedenti chiesero rimborso dei debiti di sentenza che loro legittimamente si erano aspettati di ricevere di fronte alla sentenza nel loro favore fu annullato, cioé. gli importi di 24,490 dollari di Stati Uniti (USD) ed USD 32,931 rispettivamente. Loro dissero inoltre 583,548.24 rubli russi (Strofini) e Strofina 784,680.56 interesse rispettivamente rappresentando sui debiti di sentenza (lucrum cessans) per il periodo dal 2001 a 29 luglio 2011 di 5 dicembre. Loro dissero anche 5,000 euros (EUR) ognuno per danno non-patrimoniale.
52. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti le rivendicazioni di ' erano eccessive e mal-fondate. Loro contestarono il metodo del calcolo di interesse sui debiti di sentenza, incluso il tasso fatto domanda coi richiedenti ed il periodo di tempo per il quale interesse era dovuto. Come riguardi danno non-patrimoniale, il Governo dibattè che in qualsiasi l'evento la Corte non dovrebbe accordare più di EUR 2,000, un importo assegnò nella causa di Kravchenko.
53. La Corte nota che nella causa presente ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in che la definitivo sentenza nei richiedenti il favore di ' era stato annullato in violazione del requisito di certezza legale e che i richiedenti non erano stati in grado ricevere le assegnazioni giudiziali come un risultato dell'annullare di quel la sentenza. La forma più appropriata di compensazione in riguardo di una violazione di Articolo 6 è assicurare che il richiedente è fissato, nella posizione lui sarebbe stato avuto il più lontano possibile, i requisiti di Articolo 6 non stato trascurato (veda Piersack c. il Belgio (Articolo 50), sentenza di 26 ottobre 1984, Serie Un n. 85, p. 16, § 12 e, mutatis mutandis, Gençel c. la Turchia, n. 53431/99, § 27 23 ottobre 2003). I costatazione di Corte che nella causa presente questo principio fa domanda come bene, mentre avendo riguardo ad alla natura delle violazioni trovata (veda Kravchenko, citato sopra, § 56). La Corte lo considera perciò appropriato assegnare gli importi che loro avrebbero ricevuto i richiedenti, aveva la definitivo sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 non stato annullato, cioé. USD 24,490 ed USD 32,931 rispettivamente.
54. Come alla rivendicazione riguardo ad interesse sui debiti di sentenza, la Corte, come il Governo ha dubbi come al metodo del calcolo usato coi richiedenti. Loro non offrirono elementi che riguarda i fatti e sufficienti per provare il loro approccio. La Corte nota inoltre che il deprezzamento del debito di sentenza sul periodo attinente fu limitato poiché le assegnazioni furono rese nella valuta Stati Uniti che non fu colpita con inflazione allo stesso tasso come la valuta nazionale russa. In queste circostanze la Corte respinge i richiedenti che ' chiede per interesse.
55. La Corte considera inoltre che i richiedenti hanno dovuto soffrire dell'angoscia e la frustrazione che sono il risultato dell'annullare della definitivo sentenza in violazione del requisito di certezza legale. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto con Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna EUR 2,000 ad ogni richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quegli importi.
Costi di B. e spese
56. I richiedenti chiesti Strofinano 35,000 per spese processuali ed attaccato il conto dell'avvocato in appoggio delle loro rivendicazioni. Il Governo non contestò l'importo pagato all'avvocato e considerato che potrebbe essere accordato, debba il costatazione di Corte una violazione della Convenzione. La Corte assegna perciò EUR 880 i richiedenti per costi e spese.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo all'annullare della sentenza di 20 dicembre 2004 nei richiedenti il favore di ' dopo la proroga del tempo-limite per ricorso e la non-esecuzione di che sentenza ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 su conto dell'annullare della sentenza nei richiedenti il favore di ';

3. Sostiene che non è necessario per esaminare separatamente il problema di non-esecuzione di quel la sentenza;

4. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente è pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione:
(un) le assegnazioni rese con la corte nazionale nei richiedenti favore di ' che è USD 24,490 (ventiquattro mila quattrocento e novanta dollari di Stati Uniti) al primo richiedente ed USD 32,931 (trenta-due mila novecento e trentuno dollari di Stati Uniti) al secondo richiedente in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(b) EUR 2,000 (due mila euros) ad ogni richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale, essere convertito in rubli russi al tasso applicabile alla data dell'accordo, più qualsiasi tassa sulla quale può essere a carico dei richiedenti quel l'importo;
(il c) EUR 880 (ottocento ed ottanta euros) congiuntamente ad ambo i richiedenti in riguardo di costi e spese, essere convertito in rubli russi al tasso applicabile alla data dell'accordo, più qualsiasi tassa sulla quale può essere addebitabile quel l'importo;
(d) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

5. Respinge il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto in 10 maggio 2012, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
André Wampach Nina Vajić
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 11/07/2020.