Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VUCKOVIC AND OTHERS v. SERBIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, P1-1

NUMERO: 17153/11/2012
STATO: Serbia
DATA: 28/08/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions : Remainder inadmissible
Violation of Article 14+P1-1-1 - Prohibition of discrimination (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful enjoyment of possessions
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property)
Respondent State to take measures of a general character (Article 46-2 - Measures of a general character)
Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed Non-pecuniary damage - claim dismissed



SECOND SECTION





CASE OF VUČKOVIĆ AND OTHERS v. SERBIA
(Application no. 17153/11 and the 29 others listed in the Annex to the attached judgment)









JUDGMENT




STRASBOURG

28 August 2012


This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of Vučković and Others v. Serbia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Danutė Jočienė,
Dragoljub Popović,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
András Sajó,
Işıl Karakaş,
Guido Raimondi, judges,
and Françoise Elens-Passos, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 10 July 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in thirty separate applications against Serbia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) on 14 February 2011. The applicants’ were all Serbian nationals, and their further personal details are set out in the Annex to this judgment.
2. The applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Niš. The Serbian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr S. Carić.
3. The applicants complained about discrimination and inconsistent domestic case-law as regards the payment of per diems granted to all reservists who had served in the Yugoslav Army between March and June 1999.
4. On 24 August 2011 the applications were communicated to the Government. It was also decided to rule on their admissibility and merits at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
A. The context and the proceedings brought by the applicants
6. The applicants were all reservists who had been drafted by the Yugoslav Army in connection with the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation’s intervention in Serbia. They remained in military service between March and June 1999, and were thus entitled to a certain per diem, as recognised in a number of decisions and orders of April 1999 signed by the then Chief of Staff of the Yugoslav Army. These decisions and orders were themselves based on the relevant bylaws adopted in accordance with the armed services legislation, specifically the Army Rules on the Reimbursement of Expenses (Pravilnik o naknadi putnih i drugih troškova u Vojsci Jugoslavije) as amended in March 1999.
7. However, following the demobilisation the Government refused to honour their obligation to the reservists, including the applicants.
8. The reservists subsequently organised a series of public protests, some of which ended in open confrontation with the police. Ultimately, following protracted negotiations, on 11 January 2008 the Government reached an agreement with some of the reservists, in particular those residing in the municipalities of Kuršumlija, Lebane, Bojnik, Žitorađa, Doljevac, Prokuplje and Blace, whereby the latter were guaranteed payment in six monthly instalments. This payment was to be effected through their respective municipalities, aggregate sums having been specified per each municipality. The said municipalities were chosen because of their “underdeveloped” status, implying the reservists’ indigence. For their part, the reservists in question accepted to renounce all of their outstanding claims based on their military service in 1999 which were still pending before the civil courts, as well as any other claims in this connection. It was, lastly, stipulated that the criteria for the distribution of the “financial aid” in question shall be set out by a Commission consisting of local government representatives and the representatives of the reservists themselves.
9. The applicants, just like all other reservists without a registered residence in the listed municipalities, could not benefit from the agreement of 11 January 2008.
10. On 26 March 2009 the applicants therefore filed a civil claim against the respondent State, seeking payment of their per diems and alleging discrimination.
11. On 8 July 2010 the Court of First Instance (Osnovni sud) in Niš ruled against the applicants. In so doing, it acknowledged the valid legal basis of their claim but noted that, as pointed out by the respondent, the applicable prescription period had been three years as of their demobilisation, in accordance with Article 376 § 1 of the Obligations Act. The applicants’ claim had thus been filed out of time.
12. On 16 November 2010 the Appeals Court (Apelacioni sud) in Niš upheld this judgment on appeal, and it thereby became final. In its reasoning the Appeals Court noted that both the three-year and the five-year prescription periods provided in Article 376 §§ 1 and 2 of the Obligations Act had already elapsed before the applicants filed their civil claim (see paragraph 40 below).
13. Having been served with the Appeals Court’s decision, on 21 January 2011 the applicants lodged a further appeal with the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud). Therein they maintained, inter alia, that the impugned judgment of the Appeals Court in Niš was inconsistent with numerous judgments adopted by the other appellate courts in Serbia – i.e. the district courts (okružni sudovi) while they existed, as well as the high courts and the appeals courts (viši i apelacioni sudovi) thereafter – which on the same facts applied a longer, ten-year, prescription period and thus ruled in favour of the plaintiffs (see Article 371 of the Obligations Act at paragraph 39 below). The applicants also referred to the agreement concluded between the Government and some of the reservists of 11 January 2008, which agreement excluded all of the remaining reservists including themselves.
14. The proceedings before the Constitutional Court are still pending.
B. Other civil suits
15. Between 2002 and early March 2009 the first instance and appellate courts across Serbia ruled both in favour of the reservists in a situation such as the applicants’ and against them, relying on the three-year/five-year or the ten-year prescription periods respectively.
16. In the meantime, in 2003 and 2004, the Supreme Court adopted two legal opinions (pravna shvatanja), both of which implied that the applicable prescription period should be three/five years pursuant to Article 376 §§ 1 and 2 of the Obligations Act (see paragraphs 40, 43 and 44 below).
17. It was also alleged by the Government that the Supreme Court had adopted a further legal opinion on the matter in 2009, to the same effect but in more specific terms, but no such opinion has ever been published in its official Bulletin (Bilten sudske prakse).
18. Between 25 February 2010 and 15 September 2011 various appellate courts substantively ruled in compliance with the Supreme Court’s opinions of 2003 and 2004 (see, for example, the decisions of the High Court in Kraljevo, Gž. 1476/11 of 15 September 2011; the High Court in Valjevo, Gž. 252/10 of 25 February 2010, 806/10 of 27 May 2010, 1301/10 of 30 September 2010, 1364/10 of 4 November 2010 and 355/11 of 24 March 2011; the High Court in Kruševac, Gž. 38/11 of 27 January 2011, 282/11 of 7 April 2011 and 280/11 of 26 April 2011; as well as the Appeals Court in Niš, Gž. 2396/10 of 23 June 2010, 3379/2010 of 2 July 2010, 2373/2010 of 21 July 2010 and 4117/2010 of 30 November 2010).
19. Between 17 June 2009 and 23 November 2011 there were also a number of decisions where the appellate courts ruled against the reservists, albeit on a different ground. Specifically, their claims, unlike the claims of the applicants in the present case, were rejected as administrative in nature, and as such outside the competence of the civil courts (see the decision of the District Court in Belgrade Gž. 7773/09 of 17 June 2009, as well as the decisions of the High Court in Belgrade Gž. 11139/10, 11636/10 and 10897/10 of 17 November 2010, 23 November 2011 and 23 November 2011 respectively).
20. On 17 July 2010 the Court of First Instance in Leskovac adopted a default judgment in favour of a reservist (P.br. 1745/07). According to the information provided by the parties, there is no evidence that this judgment had ever become final.
C. Additional facts as regards the agreement of 11 January 2008
21. On 17 January 2008 the Government endorsed the agreement of 11 January 2008, and decided to pay to the municipalities in question the amounts specified therein.
22. On 28 August 2008 the Government set up a working group tasked with addressing the requests of all other reservists, i.e. those not resident in the said seven municipalities. However, having discussed the issue with various groups of reservists, this working group ultimately concluded that their demands were not acceptable, inter alia, because: (i) they had not harmonised or specified their requests; (ii) some of their representatives had had dubious standing to represent them; (iii) there had been a lack of State funds which could be used for this purpose; and (iv) in most cases, war per diems had already been paid to the reservists.
23. On 26 July 2011 the Commissioner for the Protection of Equality (Poverenica za zaštitu ravnopravnosti), an Ombudsman-type office established on the basis of the Prohibition of Discrimination Act (published in OG RS no. 22/09), considered the complaints brought by an organisation representing the interests of reservists in a situation such as the applicants’. In so doing, she concluded that they had been discriminated against on the basis of their registered residence, i.e. as non-residents of the seven privileged municipalities, and recommended to the Government to take all necessary measures in order to ensure that all reservists be afforded the payments recognised by their decision of 17 January 2008. The Government was also invited to provide the Commissioner with an appropriate “action plan” within a period of thirty days. In its reasoning, the Commissioner’s decision noted, inter alia, that the payments in question were per diems, notwithstanding that the Government had chosen to consider them as social benefits awarded to persons in need (socijalna pomoć), and that this was best exemplified by the fact that the reservists in question had had to renounce their legal claims concerning the per diems as well as the fact that the individual reservists resident in the seven municipalities at issue were never under an obligation to prove their indigence (imovinsko stanje i socijalnu ugroženost). This being so, there was clearly no objective and reasonable justification for the differential treatment of reservists merely on the basis of their residence.
24. On 7 December 2011 the Ministry for Labour and Social Affairs (Ministarstvo rada i socijalne politike) noted that the discussions should continue with the various groups of reservists and that, if possible, financial support should be offered to the most indigent among them.
D. The memorandum of 16 March 2009
25. On 16 March 2009 the Ministry of Economy and Regional Development (Ministarstvo ekonomije i regionalnog razvoja) sent a memorandum to the Ministry of Justice (Ministarstvo pravde), stating, inter alia, that there were numerous employment-related civil suits, brought against current or former socially-owned companies, which could endanger the country’s economic stability. It thus urged the Ministry of Justice to review the possibility of advising the courts to suspend certain types of these suits until the end of 2009, as well as to desist from the enforcement of any final judgments already adopted in these proceedings. According to numerous media reports, having received it, the Ministry of Justice forwarded the memorandum to the Supreme Court (Vrhovni sud), which then faxed it to the presidents of the appellate courts for information.
26. On 23 March 2009 the Supreme Court informed the public that it had rejected the recommendation of the Ministry of Economy and Regional Development. In so doing, it noted, inter alia, that the Serbian judiciary was independent of the executive as well as the legislative branches of Government.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Constitution of the Republic of Serbia (Ustav Republike Srbije; published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Serbia – OG RS – no. 98/06)
27. The relevant provisions of the Constitution read as follows:
Article 21 §§ 2 and 3
“Everyone shall have the right to equal legal protection, without discrimination.
All direct or indirect discrimination based on any grounds, particularly on the grounds of race, sex, national or social origin, birth, religion, political or other opinion, property status, culture, language, age, mental or physical disability shall be prohibited.”
Article 32 § 1
“Everyone shall have the right to ... [a fair hearing before a] ... tribunal ... [in the determination] ... of his [or her] rights and obligations ...”
Article 36 § 1
“Equal protection of rights before the courts of law ... shall be guaranteed.”
Article 170
“A constitutional appeal may be lodged against individual decisions or actions of State bodies or organisations exercising delegated public powers which violate or deny human or minority rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution, if other legal remedies for their protection have already been exhausted or have not been prescribed.”
B. The Constitutional Court’s case-law
28. On 9 June 2010 and 17 February 2011 the Constitutional Court rejected two separate constitutional appeals lodged by reservists who were in a situation such as the applicants’. The said court noted, inter alia, that the civil courts’ decisions rendered against them, respectively, had been “based on the applicable domestic legislation”. The appellants, however, never specifically complained about the inconsistency of the relevant case-law or being discriminated against (Už. 460/08 and Už. 2293/10).
29. On 17 February 2011, in another case such as the applicants’, the Constitutional Court, inter alia, effectively ignored a complaint about the differential treatment of the two groups of reservists stemming from the agreement of 11 January 2008. In particular, it offered no substantive assessment of the issue raised by the appellants, noting further that they had not offered adequate proof as regards the existence of inconsistent case-law on the matter (Už. 2901/10).
30. On 7 April 2011, in yet another case such as the applicants’, the Constitutional Court ruled against the appellants as regards their complaint about the outcome of their case before the lower courts. There was no reference in the decision itself to the agreement of 11 January 2008 and it remains unclear as to whether this issue was ever raised by the appellants (Už. 4421/10).
31. On 8 March 2012, in a case such as the applicants’ but where the civil courts had rejected the reservists claims as being outside of their competence ratione materiae (see, for example, paragraph 19 above), the Constitutional Court ruled in favour of the appellants who had alleged inconsistent case-law (between the judgments adopted in their cases and several other judgments adopted by the courts in 2002) and ordered that the impugned civil proceedings be re-opened. As regards the appellants’ discrimination complaint, the Constitutional Court reasoned that the said inconsistency did not amount to discrimination since the impugned court decisions had not been rendered on the basis of the appellants’ personal status (ličnog svojstva). There was also no reference in the court’s reasoning to the agreement of 11 January 2008 (Už. 2289/09).
32. In decision Už. 61/09, adopted on 3 March 2011, and decisions Už. 553/09, 703/09 and 792/09, all adopted on 17 March 2011, as well as in decisions Už. 2133/09, 1928/09, 1888/09, 1695/09, 1578/09, 1575/09, 1524/09, 1318/09 and 1896/09, rendered between 7 October 2010 and 23 February 2012, the Constitutional Court noted the existence of inconsistent domestic case-law in the civil context and then went on to find that this had been in breach of the principle of judicial certainty as an integral part of the appellants’ right to a fair trial. The appellants’ complaints to the effect that the same situation had also resulted in discrimination against them, was rejected by the Constitutional Court as manifestly ill-founded, since the impugned court decisions had not been rendered on the basis of the appellants’ personal status. No re-opening of the proceedings was ordered. The above-cited decisions concerned matters which were factually unrelated to the applicants’ situation in the present case.
C. The Civil Procedure Act (Zakon o parničnom postupku; published in OG RS nos. 125/04 and 111/09)
33. Article 2 § 1 provides, inter alia, that all parties shall be entitled to the equal protection of their rights.
34. Article 476 sets out the circumstances in which a default judgment (presuda zbog izostanka) may be adopted, based on, inter alia, the respondent’s failure to appear before the court despite being duly served with the summons.
35. Article 422.10 provides that a case may be reopened if the European Court of Human Rights has in the meantime rendered a judgment in respect of Serbia concerning the same or a similar legal issue.
D. The Courts Organisation Act (Zakon o uređenju sudova; published in OG RS nos. 63/01, 42/02, 27/03, 29/04, 101/05 and 46/06)
36. Article 40 §§ 2 and 3 provides, inter alia, that a meeting of a division (sednica odeljenja) of the Supreme Court shall be held if there is an issue as regards the consistency of its case-law. Any opinions (pravna shvatanja) adopted thereupon shall be binding for the panels (veća) of the division in question.
E. The Army Rules on the Reimbursement of Expenses (Pravilnik o naknadi putnih i drugih troškova u Vojsci Jugoslavije, published in the Official Military Gazette nos. 38/93, 23/93, 3/97, 11/97, 12/98, 6/99 and 7/99)
37. These Rules set out the relevant details concerning the reimbursement of expenses incurred in connection with military service.
F. The Obligations Act (Zakon o obligacionim odnosima, published in the Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 29/78, 39/85, 45/89, 57/89 and the Official Gazette of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia no. 31/93)
38. Article 360 § 3 provides that courts may not, in the course of proceedings before them, take into account negative prescription periods unless an objection to this effect has been made by the debtor.
39. Article 371 states that the general negative prescription period for civil claims shall be ten years, unless provided otherwise.
40. Article 376 §§ 1 and 2 provides, inter alia, that the negative prescription period for seeking civil compensation shall be three years as of when the claimant learned of the damage in question, but that, in any event, the absolute deadline shall be five years as of when the damage occurred.
41. Articles 387 and 388 provide, inter alia, that the running of a negative prescription period shall be interrupted by the debtor’s acceptance of the claim at issue, directly or indirectly, as well as by the claimant’s lodging of a civil action in this respect.
42. Article 392 §§ 1-3 provides, inter alia, that the effect of such an interruption shall be that the applicable period shall start running anew as of the debtor’s acceptance of the claim in question and the conclusion of the civil suit, respectively.
G. The legal opinions adopted by the Supreme Court
43. On 26 May 2003 the Supreme Court held, inter alia, that, quite apart from the competence of the administrative authorities in respect of the reservists’ claims concerning their per diems, civil courts shall have jurisdiction to rule on the merits in all related cases where they seek damages (see paragraph 40 above) based on the State’s alleged malfeasance (pravno shvatanje Građanskog odeljenja Vrhovnog suda Srbije utvrđeno na sednici od 26. maja 2003. godine, published in the Supreme Court’s Bulletin no. 1/04).
44. On 6 April 2004 the Supreme Court essentially reaffirmed the opinion of 26 May 2003, extending its application to certain other “military entitlements”. It also noted that there have been some inconsistencies before the courts in the meantime (pravno shvatanje Građanskog odeljenja Vrhovnog suda Srbije utvrđeno na sednici od 6. aprila 2004. godine, published in the Supreme Court’s Bulletin no. 1/04).
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
45. The Court considers that, in accordance with Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court, the applications should be joined, given their similar factual and legal background.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
46. Under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, the applicants complained about the inconsistent case-law of the Serbian courts, in particular the rejection of their own claims by the Appeals Court in Niš and the acceptance by other civil courts of identical claims filed by their fellow reservists based on a different interpretation of the applicable prescription periods.
47. Article 6 § 1, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. The parties’ submissions
48. The Government stated that the Constitutional Court had to date ruled in twenty-three cases such as the applicants’. In twenty-one of those cases, in the relevant part, it had rejected the complaints on their merits, and in the remaining two it had dismissed the complaints on procedural grounds. The Government maintained, however, that none of the appellants in those cases had properly argued and/or documented their complaints of inconsistent case-law (see, for example, paragraphs 28-30 above).
49. The Government further provided the Court with a copy of the Constitutional Court’s decision of 8 March 2012 (see paragraph 31 above), which, they argued, exemplified the effectiveness of the constitutional appeal, albeit in a slightly different context.
50. Since the applicants’ appeal was still pending before the Constitutional Court, the Government maintained that their complaints were premature within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
51. In the alternative, the Government contended that the facts of the present case clearly disclosed no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. In particular: (i) the Supreme Court had adopted two legal opinions, in 2003 and 2004 respectively, indicating that the applicable prescription periods should be three/five years; (ii) in 2009 it had adopted a specific opinion to this effect, removing any residual uncertainty; (iii) as of that time the domestic case-law on the issue has been consistent, i.e. the first and second instance courts universally applying the three/five-year prescription periods, except for the odd default judgment rendered at fist instance where the competent civil court could not take prescription into account because of the respondent’s failure to raise this objection before it. The Government concluded that it should therefore have been obvious to the applicants from the outset that their claims would be rejected as time-barred.
52. Finally, the Government stated that the recommendation contained in the memorandum issued by the Ministry of Economy on 16 March 2009 was never implemented (see paragraphs 25 and 26 above). It was therefore of no relevance to the present case.
53. The applicants’ observations, following the communication of their case to the Government, were submitted after the expiration of the time-limit set by the Court. The President of the Chamber, therefore decided, pursuant to Rule 38 § 1 of the Rules of Court, that they should not be included in the case file for the Court’s consideration (see also paragraph 20 of the Practice Direction on Written Pleadings). All factual updates, however, were admitted to the file and transmitted to the Government for information.
B. The Court’s assessment
54. In its recent Grand Chamber judgment in Nejdet Şahin and Perihan Şahin v. Turkey ([GC], no. 13279/05, 20 October 2011), the Court reiterated the main principles applicable in cases concerning the issue of conflicting court decisions (§§ 49-58). These can be summarised as follows:
(i) It is not the Court’s function to deal with errors of fact or law allegedly committed by a national court unless and in so far as they may have infringed rights and freedoms protected by the Convention (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 28, ECHR 1999 I). Likewise, it is not its function, save in the event of evident arbitrariness, to compare different decisions of national courts, even if given in apparently similar proceedings, as the independence of those courts must be respected (see Ādamsons v. Latvia, no. 3669/03, § 118, 24 June 2008);
(ii) The possibility of conflicting court decisions is an inherent trait of any judicial system which is based on a network of trial and appeal courts with authority over the area of their territorial jurisdiction. Such divergences may also arise within the same court. That, in itself, cannot be considered contrary to the Convention (see Santos Pinto v. Portugal, no. 39005/04, § 41, 20 May 2008, and Tudor Tudor, cited above, § 29);
(iii) The criteria that guide the Court’s assessment of the conditions in which conflicting decisions of different domestic courts ruling at last instance are in breach of the fair trial requirement enshrined in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention consist in establishing whether “profound and
long-standing differences” exist in the case-law of the domestic courts, whether the domestic law provides for machinery for overcoming these inconsistencies, whether that machinery has been applied and, if appropriate, to what effect (see Iordan Iordanov and Others, cited above, §§ 49-50; see also Beian (no. 1), cited above, §§ 34 40; Ştefan and Ştef v. Romania, nos. 24428/03 and 26977/03, §§ 33-36, 27 January 2009; Schwarzkopf and Taussik, cited above, 2 December 2008; Tudor Tudor, cited above, § 31; and Ştefănică and Others, cited above, § 36);
(iv) The Court’s assessment has also always been based on the principle of legal certainty which is implicit in all the Articles of the Convention and constitutes one of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law (see, amongst other authorities, Beian (no. 1), cited above, § 39; Iordan Iordanov and Others, cited above, § 47; and Ştefănică and Others, cited above, § 31);
(v) The principle of legal certainty guarantees, inter alia, a certain stability in legal situations and contributes to public confidence in the courts. The persistence of conflicting court decisions, on the other hand, can create a state of legal uncertainty likely to reduce public confidence in the judicial system, whereas such confidence is clearly one of the essential components of a State based on the rule of law (see Paduraru v. Romania, § 98, no. 63252/00, ECHR 2005-XII (extracts); Vinčić and Others v. Serbia, nos. 44698/06 and others, § 56, 1 December 2009; and Ştefănică and Others, cited above, § 38);
(vi) However, the requirements of legal certainty and the protection of the legitimate confidence of the public do not confer an acquired right to consistency of case-law (see Unédic v. France, no. 20153/04, § 74, 18 December 2008). Case-law development is not, in itself, contrary to the proper administration of justice since a failure to maintain a dynamic and evolutive approach would risk hindering reform or improvement (see Atanasovski v. “the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, no. 36815/03, § 38, 14 January 2010).
55. Turning to the present case, the Court firstly notes that the applicants complained about the rejection of their own claims by the Appeals Court in Niš and the acceptance by other civil courts of identical claims filed by their fellow reservists based on a different interpretation of the applicable prescription periods.
56. Secondly, there had clearly been conflicting case-law between 2002 and early March 2009 on this issue, and perhaps beyond that, but as of February 2010 it would appear to have been effectively harmonised at second instance in accordance with the Supreme Court’s opinions of 2003 and 2004, i.e. by consistent application of the three/five-year prescription periods rather than the general ten-year deadline (see paragraphs 15-18, 39 and 40 above). It is in this context of little relevance as to whether an additional opinion was adopted by the Supreme Court in 2009 (see paragraph 17 above).
57. Thirdly, the applicants filed their claim on 26 March 2009, whilst the Court of First Instance ruled against them on 8 July 2010, applying the three-year prescription period (see paragraphs 10 and 11 above). It follows therefore that the relevant appellate case-law had been harmonised less than a year after the introduction of the applicants’ claim and, in any event, more than four months before the adoption of the first instance judgment in their case.
58. Fourthly, it is noted that on 17 July 2010 the Court of First Instance in Leskovac adopted a default judgment in favour of a reservist, i.e. a judgment based on the respondent’s failure to appear in court despite being duly summoned (see paragraph 34 above). However, according to the information provided by the parties, there is no evidence that this judgment had ever become final (see paragraph 20 above). It is further noted that, as pointed out by the Government, Article 360 § 3 of the Obligations Act provides that civil courts may not, in the course of proceedings before them, take prescription into account unless a specific objection to this effect has been made by the debtor (see paragraph 38 above). There is no indication that in the case at issue the debtor/respondent had actually done so. The Court lastly notes that it is the said judgment of the Court of First Instance in Leskovac that could be considered as an exception to the case-law which had already been harmonised by February 2010, rather than the other way round (see, mutatis mutandis, Tomić and Others v. Montenegro, nos. 18650/09 and others, § 57, 17 April 2012, not yet final).
59. Fifthly, however regrettable its content may be, the memorandum of 16 March 2009, prepared by the Ministry of Economy, was irrelevant to the applicants’ complaints since it referred to a different type of case and was, in any event, never implemented (see paragraphs 25 and 26 above).
60. In such circumstances, it cannot be said, at least in so far as the applicants are concerned, that there had been “profound and long-standing differences” in the relevant case-law, nor that this had resulted in judicial uncertainty, during the period in question. The Court therefore considers that the applicants’ complaints in this respect are manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
61. The Court further finds that in the light of this conclusion it is not necessary to rule on the Government’s objection as to whether the same complaints should be rejected as premature.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
62. The applicants further complained about discrimination against them stemming from the agreement of 11 January 2008 (see paragraphs 8 and 21 above). In so doing, they relied on Article 14 of the Convention.
63. The Court communicated these complaints to the Government under Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
64. The said two provisions read as follows:
Article 14 of the Convention
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
65. The Government maintained that the applicants’ complaints should be rejected as premature since their appeal was still pending before the Constitutional Court.
66. In this respect they referred to the Constitutional Court’s decision Už. 2901/10 of 17 February 2011, noting that it did not compare the appellants’ situation to that of the reservists who had benefited from the agreement of 11 January 2008 since there had been no evidence that the appellants had ever sought to conclude an agreement of this sort with the Government (see paragraph 29 above). However, in numerous other cases the Constitutional Court had repeatedly ruled in favour of the appellants (see paragraphs 31 and 32 above).
67. In their submissions prior to the communication of the present case to the Government, the applicants maintained that, despite making use of it, the constitutional appeal could not, in the specific circumstances of their case, be considered as an effective domestic remedy.
68. The Court reiterates that under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, it may only deal with an application after all domestic remedies have been exhausted. The purpose of Article 35 is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court (see, for example, Mifsud v. France (dec.) [GC], no. 57220/00, § 15, ECHR 2002-VIII). The obligation to exhaust domestic remedies requires an applicant to make normal use of remedies which are effective, sufficient and accessible in respect of his or her Convention grievances. To be effective, a remedy must be capable of remedying directly the impugned state of affairs (see Balogh v. Hungary, no. 47940/99, § 30, 20 July 2004).
69. In terms of the burden of proof, it is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one, available in theory and in practice at the relevant time (see, inter alia, Vernillo v. France, judgment of 20 February 1991, Series A no. 198, pp. 11–12, § 27, and Dalia v. France, judgment of 19 February 1998, Reports 1998-I, pp. 87-88, § 38). Once this burden has been satisfied, it falls to the applicant to establish that the remedy advanced by the Government was in fact exhausted, or was for some reason inadequate and ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case, or that there existed special circumstances absolving him or her from this requirement (see Dankevich v. Ukraine, no. 40679/98, § 107, 29 April 2003).
70. As regards legal systems which provide constitutional protection for fundamental human rights and freedoms, the Court notes that, in principle, it is incumbent on the aggrieved individual to test the extent of that protection (see Vinčić and Others v. Serbia, cited above, § 51).
71. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the applicants’ complaints before it concern discrimination stemming from the agreement of 11 January 2008, which are to be distinguished from possible separate complaints to the effect that the impugned inconsistent case-law had resulted in discrimination against the reservists before the civil courts themselves (see, for example, paragraphs 31 and 32 above).
72. Further, according to the information which has been made available to the Court, the complaints such as the applicant’s were specifically made by the appellants in case Už. 2901/10, but on 17 February 2011 the Constitutional Court effectively ignored them, offering no substantive assessment of the issue whatsoever (see paragraph 29 above). Indeed, the Government in their observations admit as much, but maintain that there was no evidence that the appellants in those cases had ever sought to conclude an agreement such as the one of 11 January 2008. However, this assertion, even assuming its relevance to the applicants in the present case, is not born out by the facts since there had been extensive negotiations between the Government and the reservists in general, albeit to no avail, on extending the principles accepted on 11 January 2008 to everyone else, and the applicants personally had clearly shown their adherence to this position by bringing their own civil case on 26 March 2009 (see paragraphs 8, 23 and 10 above, in that order).
73. Finally, the remaining Constitutional Court jurisprudence referred to by the Government is irrelevant since it concerned the inconsistent case-law and/or any discrimination resulting from this inconsistency only, or matters which were entirely unrelated to the applicants’ situation in the present case. In any event, even in those cases no discrimination had been established by the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 31 and 32 above).
74. In such circumstances, it is clear that notwithstanding the fact that “a constitutional appeal should, in principle, be considered as an effective domestic remedy within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention in respect of all applications introduced [against Serbia] as of 7 August 2008” (see Vinčić and Others v. Serbia, cited above, § 51), this particular avenue of redress cannot be deemed effective as regards cases involving complaints such as the ones put forth by the applicants.
75. The Court, therefore, rejects the Government’s objection in this respect. It finds, moreover, that the applicants’ complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. No other grounds for declaring them inadmissible have been established. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
76. The Government maintained that the applicants had not been discriminated against.
77. Firstly, the agreement of 11 January 2008 concerned a sort of social benefit rather than the payment of per diems. Secondly, Government’s resources were finite, which was why it was decided to support those reservists in the greatest need of assistance, i.e. those residing in the most underdeveloped municipalities in Serbia. Thirdly, these reservists had had to renounce any and all of their legal claims concerning their military service whilst the applicants, as well as all other persons in their situation, had retained the possibility to turn to the civil courts for redress.
78. In view of the above, accepting that the applicants had indeed been treated differently compared to their colleagues with a registered residence in one of the seven municipalities, the Government argued that there was a reasonable and objective justification for this course of action.
79. As already noted above, the applicants’ observations following the communication of their case to the Government were submitted after the expiration of the time-limit set by the Court. The President of the Chamber therefore decided, pursuant to Rule 38 § 1 of the Rules of Court, that they should not be included in the case file for the Court’s consideration (see also paragraph 20 of the Practice Direction on Written Pleadings). All factual updates, however, were admitted to the file and transmitted to the Government for information.
2. The relevant principles
80. The Court recalls that Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and the Protocols, but has no independent existence since it applies solely in relation to the “enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. The application of Article 14 does not necessarily presuppose the violation of one of the substantive Convention rights. It is sufficient – and also necessary – for the facts of the case to fall “within the ambit” of one or more of the Convention Articles (see Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 58, ECHR 2008 ). The prohibition of discrimination in Article 14 thus extends beyond the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms which the Convention and Protocols require each State to guarantee. It applies also to those additional rights, falling within the general scope of any Convention article, for which the Contracting State has voluntarily decided to provide. This principle is well entrenched in the Court’s case-law. It was expressed for the first time in the Case “relating to certain aspects of the laws on the use of languages in education in Belgium” v. Belgium (Merits) (judgment of 23 July 1968, Series A no. 6, § 9).
81. The Court has also established in its case-law that only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14 (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen and Pedersen v. Denmark, 7 December 1976, § 56, Series A no. 23). Moreover, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007; Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], cited above, § 60). Such a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification, in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is no reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. The Contracting State enjoys a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment (Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], cited above, § 60).
3. The Court’s assessment
(a) Applicability of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
82. The Court notes that the applicants’ per diems had been formally recognised as the respondent State’s outstanding pecuniary obligation as of 1999 (see paragraph 6 above). The Court also notes that the payments referred to in the agreement of 11 January 2008, i.e. the applicants’ exclusion therefrom, were themselves connected to the said entitlements (see paragraphs 8 and 21 above). It follows, therefore, that the applicants’ complaints concern rights which are of a “sufficiently pecuniary” nature to fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Willis v. United Kingdom, no. 36042/97, § 36, ECHR 2002 IV).
83. The Court considers further that, since the applicants were allegedly discriminated against on a ground of distinction covered by Article 14 of the Convention, namely their registered residence (see, mutatis mutandis, Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 66, ECHR 2010, respectively), that provision must also be applicable to their complaints.
(b) Compliance with Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
84. The Court notes that the payments referred to in the agreement of 11 January 2008 and endorsed by the Government on 17 January 2008, were clearly per diems, not social benefits awarded to persons in need. In this respect it fully endorses the reasoning offered by the Serbian Commissioner for the Protection of Equality described at paragraph 23 above.
85. Further, the said agreement provided that the reservists residing in the municipalities of Kuršumlija, Lebane, Bojnik, Žitorađa, Doljevac, Prokuplje and Blace would be guaranteed gradual payment of a part of their entitlements. These municipalities were apparently chosen because of their “underdeveloped status”, which implied the reservists’ indigence. The reservists themselves, however, were never under an obligation to provide any proof in this regard, whilst the applicants in the present case, just like all other reservists without a registered residence in these municipalities, could not benefit from the agreement, i.e. the Government’s subsequent decision endorsing it, irrespective of their means. Hence, even though the Government’s submission regarding their limited resources is not to be taken lightly, in the context of a possible “legitimate aim”, their response to the entire situation was nothing short of arbitrary (see paragraph 23 above).
86. Finally, the Government’s suggestion that, unlike the reservists with a residence in one of the said seven municipalities, the applicants had an opportunity to turn to the civil courts for redress is a circular one since this is exactly what the applicants attempted to do, but to no avail.
87. In view of the foregoing and notwithstanding the State’s margin of appreciation, the Court cannot but conclude that there was no “objective and reasonable justification” for the differential treatment of the applicants merely on the basis of their residence. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 12
88. The applicants’ discrimination complaints were also communicated by the Court to the Government under Article 1 of Protocol No. 12.
89. However, having regard to its finding under Article 14 above, the Court declares these complaints admissible but considers that they need not be examined separately on their merits (see, mutatis mutandis, Savez crkava “Riječ života” and Others v. Croatia, no. 7798/08, §§ 114 and 115, 9 December 2010).
V. ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
90. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
91. Each applicant claimed EUR 3,000 for the pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage suffered, as well as EUR 250 for the costs and expenses incurred in connection with the proceedings before the Court. The applicants also noted that the civil proceedings at issue could be re-opened (see paragraph 35 above).
92. The Government maintained that these claims were belated.
93. The Court notes that the applicants’ just satisfaction claims were set out on the application form but were only resubmitted (posted) on 5 March 2012, four days after the expiry of their time-limit for so doing, which time-limit had itself been imposed upon the Court’s transmission of the Government’s initial observations. The applicants have therefore failed to comply with Rule 60 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court, as well as paragraph 5 of the Practice Direction on Just Satisfaction Claims, which, in so far as relevant, provides that the Court “will also reject claims set out on the application form but not resubmitted at the appropriate stage of the proceedings and claims lodged out of time”. The applicants’ just satisfaction claims must therefore be dismissed.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
94. Article 46 of the Convention provides:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
95. Given these provisions, it follows, inter alia, that a judgment in which the Court finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation not just to pay those concerned any sums awarded by way of just satisfaction, but also to choose, subject to supervision by the Committee of Ministers, the general and/or, if appropriate, individual measures to be adopted in their domestic legal order to put an end to the violation found by the Court and to redress, in so far as possible, the effects thereof (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000-VIII).
96. In view of the above, as well as more than 3,000 applications currently pending before the Court raising the same discrimination issue (directly or indirectly), the respondent Government must, within six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, take all appropriate measures to secure non-discriminatory payment of the war per diems in question to all those entitled. It is understood that certain reasonable and speedy factual and/or administrative verification procedures may be necessary in this regard.
97. As regards many similar applications already pending before it, the Court decides to adjourn them during the said interval. This decision is without prejudice to the Court’s power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list in accordance with the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Decides unanimously to join the applications;

2. Declares by a majority the complaints under Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as well as the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 12, admissible;

3. Declares unanimously the remaining complaints inadmissible;

4. Holds by 6 votes to 1 that there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

5. Holds unanimously that there is no need to examine separately the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 12;

6. Holds by 6 votes to 1 that the respondent Government must, within six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, take all appropriate measures to secure non-discriminatory payment of the war per diems in question to all those entitled, it being understood that certain reasonable and speedy factual and/or administrative verification procedures may be necessary in this regard;

7. Decides by a majority to adjourn, for six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final, all similar applications already pending before the Court, without prejudice to the Court’s power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list of cases in accordance with the Convention;

8. Dismisses unanimously the applicants’ claims for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 28 August 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Françoise Elens-Passos Françoise Tulkens
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Sajó is annexed to this judgment.
F.T.
F.E.P.

PARTLY CONCURRING AND PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE SAJÃ’
I am in full agreement with my colleagues regarding their conclusion that the complaints with regard to the alleged violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be rejected. However, to my regret I have to dissent regarding the finding of a violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. I voted against the admissibility of the complaint submitted in that regard, partly in view of the facts established in the context of the admissibility of the Article 6 § 1 complaint.
The applicant’s appeal is pending before the Constitutional Court. In respect of Serbia a constitutional appeal is considered a generally effective remedy to be exhausted (Vinčić and Others v. Serbia, nos. 44698/06 and others, December 2009). In that case the Court stated that “a constitutional appeal should, in principle, be considered an effective domestic remedy ... in respect of all applications” (paragraph 51). The present judgment argues that it is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one at the relevant time. This position disregards the fact that Vinčić reversed that burden. Moreover, one cannot prove a negative. As the Government have demonstrated, the Constitutional Court dealt with decisions concerning other reservists, considering inconsistencies in the case law. In a case decided on 17 February 2011 where the applicants also referred to discrimination (paragraph 29) the Constitutional Court accepted that the complaint could be related to the right to equal protection, but it stated that the issue was the statute of limitations. These considerations apply to the applicants’ claims both under Article 6 and under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
It seems that the Court is of the opinion that the 2008 Agreement on the payment to some groups of reservists created a right that is not subject to the statute of limitations. Of course, the legal nature of the Agreement and its applicability to the applicants are matters intimately related to the interpretation of domestic law. It is not for an international court to offer its interpretation of this law in the absence of domestic interpretation, especially where the Constitutional Court is considering the matter.
Even assuming that the application is admissible, I am not convinced that Article 14 is applicable as there is no possession right in the present case that would trigger the applicability of Article 14. The Court notes, in paragraph 82 of the judgment, that “the applicants’ per diems had been formally recognised as the respondent State’s outstanding pecuniary obligation as of 1999 (see paragraph 6 above)”, and states that the applicants’ complaints concern rights which are of a “sufficiently pecuniary” nature to fall within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Willis v. the United Kingdom, no. 36042/97, § 36, ECHR 2002 IV). In Willis, however, the amount and the conditions of applicability of a statutorily defined benefit were not contested, only that the applicant was not entitled to it on discriminatory grounds. The present case is different. A “claim” can constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 if it is sufficiently established to be enforceable (Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301 B). No court ever established an enforceable claim in respect of the applicants, whose entitlement remains unrecognised; nor do they have a recognised specific claim that is not enforceable only because of the statute of limitations. No court ever recognised a specific claim. The court of first instance recognised the claim only in the sense that it had the legal nature of a damage compensation claim, but it could not rule on the merits (that is, whether the applicants were or were not entitled to a given amount of compensation) because it was barred from doing so by its correct finding that the statute of limitations applied. Therefore the applicants’ claim for damages remains speculative.
One could, of course, argue that the applicants had a legitimate expectation under the Agreement. In that context, at least arguably, the statute of limitations would not apply. In that case, however, the Court should have waited for the final judgment of the Constitutional Court, also in view of the fact that in so far as the Agreement was applicable to the applicants (a disputed matter) it was certainly to be implemented gradually. There is a working group tasked with addressing the requests of all reservists, though it is not clear that the group is charged to act ex gratia or in recognition of specific claims. Given the prima facie more favourable handling of the claims of some other reservists, I fully respect and understand the position of my colleagues, but I find that in the circumstances of the case, even in view of the troubling delays, considerations of subsidiarity should have prevailed.


Annex
OMISSIS

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Resto inammissibile
Violazione dell’ Articolo 14+P1-1-1 - Proibizione della discriminazione (Articolo 1 par. 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - godimento Tranquillo della proprietà Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà)
Stato rispondente deve prendere misure di carattere generale (Articolo 46-2 - Misure di carattere generale)
Danno patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinta danno Non-patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinta



SECONDA SEZIONE





CAUSA VUČKOVIĆ ED ALTRI C. SERBIA
(Richiesta n. 17153/11 ed i 29 altri elencarono nell'Annetta alla sentenza attaccata)









SENTENZA




STRASBOURG

28 agosto 2012


Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.
Nella causa di Vučković ed Altri c. Serbia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente
Danutė Jočienė,
Dragoljub Popović,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
András Sajó,
Işıl Karakaş,
Guido Raimondi, judges,and Françoise Elens-Passos, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato 10 luglio 2012,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nata da in trenta richieste separate contro Serbia depositate presso la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) 14 febbraio 2011. I richiedenti ' sia tutti i cittadini serbi, ed i loro ulteriori dettagli personali sono insorti fuori l'Annetta a questa sentenza.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Niš. Il Governo serbo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig. S. Carić.
3. I richiedenti si lamentarono della discriminazione e giurisprudenzanazionale ed incoerente come riguardi il pagamento di per diems accordato a tutti i riservisti che avevano notificato nell'Esercito iugoslavo fra marzo e giugno 1999.
4. 24 agosto 2011 le richieste furono comunicate al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sulla loro ammissibilità e meriti allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato con le parti, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
A. Il contesto ed i procedimenti introdotti dai richiedenti
6. I richiedenti erano tutti i riservisti che erano stati redatti con l'Esercito iugoslavo in collegamento col nord l'intervento di Atlantico Trattato Organizzazione in Serbia. Loro rimasero in servizio militare fra marzo e giugno 1999, e fu concesso così ad un certo al giorno, siccome riconosciuto in un numero di decisioni ed ordini di aprile 1999 firmato col poi Capo di Personale dell'Esercito iugoslavo. Queste decisioni ed ordini si erano basati sulle leggi locale attinenti adottate in conformità con la legislazione di servizi armata, specificamente l'Esercito Decide sul Rimborso di Spese (Pravilnik putnih di naknadi di o troškova di drugih degli u Vojsci Jugoslavije) corretto a marzo 1999.
7. Comunque, facendo seguire il Governo il de mobilizzazione rifiutò di onorare il loro obbligo ai riservisti, incluso i richiedenti.
8. I riservisti organizzarono successivamente una serie di proteste pubbliche alcuni/e dei/lle quali terminarono in confronto aperto con la polizia. Ultimamente, seguendo negoziazioni prolungate, 11 gennaio 2008 il Governo giunse ad un accordo con alcuni dei riservisti, in particolare quelli che risiedono nei municipi di Kuršumlija, Lebane, Bojnik, Žitorađa, Doljevac, Prokuplje e Blace, da che cosa i secondi furono garantiti pagamento in sei rate mensili. Questo pagamento sarebbe effettuato per i loro rispettivi municipi, somme globali state state specificate per ogni municipio. I municipi detti furono scelti a causa di loro “sottosviluppato” status, implicando i riservisti l'indigenza di '. Per la loro parte, i riservisti in oggetto accettò cedere tutti i loro crediti arretrati basati sul loro servizio militare nel 1999 quale ancora era pendente di fronte alle corti civili, così come qualsiasi le altre rivendicazioni in questo collegamento. Infine, fu convenuto che il criterio per la distribuzione del “l'assistenza finanziaria” in oggetto sarà esposto fuori con una Commissione che consiste di rappresentanti di governo locale ed i rappresentanti dei riservisti loro.
9. I richiedenti, equo come tutti gli altri riservisti senza una residenza registrata nei municipi elencati, non poteva trarre profitto dall'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008.
10. 26 marzo 2009 i richiedenti registrarono perciò una rivendicazione civile contro lo Stato rispondente, mentre chiedendo pagamento di loro per diems ed adducendo la discriminazione.
11. 8 luglio 2010 il Giudice di prima istanza (sud di Osnovni) in Niš decise contro i richiedenti. Nel fare così, diede credito alla base legale e valida della loro rivendicazione ma notò che, come indicato col convenuto, il periodo di prescrizione applicabile era stato tre anni come del loro demobilisation, nella conformità con Articolo 376 § 1 dell'Obblighi Atto. I richiedenti che la rivendicazione di ' era stata registrata così fuori termini.
12. 16 novembre 2010 i Ricorsi Corteggiano (sud di Apelacioni) in Niš questa sentenza sostenne su ricorso, e divenne con ciò definitivo. Nell'il suo discutere i Ricorsi Corteggi notato che sia il tre-anno ed i periodi di prescrizione quinquennali previdero in Articolo 376 §§ che 1 e 2 dell'Obblighi Atto già era passato prima i richiedenti registrarono la loro rivendicazione civile (vedere paragrafo 40 sotto).
13. Stato stato notificato con la decisione della Ricorsi Corte, 21 gennaio 2011 i richiedenti depositarono un ulteriore ricorso con la Corte Costituzionale (sud di Ustavni). Therein che loro hanno sostenuto, inter alia che la sentenza contestata dei Ricorsi Corteggia in Niš era incoerente con sentenze numerose adottate con le altre corti di appello in Serbia-cioé. le corti distrettuali (okružni sudovi) mentre loro esisterono, così come le corti alte ed i ricorsi corteggiano (il viši sudovi di apelacioni dei) da allora in poi-quale sugli stessi fatti fatti domanda un più lungo, dieci-anno, periodo di prescrizione e così decise in favore dei querelanti (vedere Articolo 371 degli Obblighi Agire a paragrafo 39 sotto). I richiedenti si riferirono anche all'accordo concluso fra il Governo ed alcuni dei riservisti di 11 gennaio 2008 che accordo escluse tutti i riservisti rimanenti incluso loro.
14. I procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale ancora sono pendenti.
B. Le altre cause civili
15. Fra 2002 e marzo inizio 2009 la prima istanza e corti di appello attraverso Serbia decisero sia in favore dei riservisti in una situazione come i richiedenti ' e contro loro, appellandosi rispettivamente nei periodi di prescrizionone di tre/cinque e dieci anni.
16. Nel 2003 e 2004, la Corte Suprema adottò nel frattempo, due opinioni giuridiche (pravna shvatanja), sia di che implicito che il periodo di prescrizione applicabile dovrebbe essere anni di three/five facendo seguito ad Articolo 376 §§ 1 e 2 degli Obblighi Agiscono (vedere divide in paragrafi 40, 43 e 44 sotto).
17. Fu addotto anche col Governo che la Corte Suprema aveva adottato un'ulteriore opinione giuridica sulla questione nel 2009, allo stesso effetto ma nei più specifici termini, ma nessuno simile opinione mai è stata pubblicata nel suo Bollettino ufficiale (prakse di sudske di Bilten).
18. Fra 25 febbraio 2010 ed il 2011 varie corti di appello di 15 settembre effettivamente decise in ottemperanza con le opinioni della Corte Suprema di 2003 e 2004 (vedere, per esempio, le decisioni della Corte Alta in Kraljevo, Gž. 1476/11 15 settembre 2011; la Corte Alta in Valjevo, Gž. 252/10 25 il 2010 febbraio 806/10 di 27 maggio 2010, 1301/10 30 il 2010 settembre 1364/10 di 4 novembre 2010 e 355/11 di 24 marzo 2011; la Corte Alta in Kruševac, Gž. 38/11 27 il 2011 gennaio 282/11 di 7 aprile 2011 e 280/11 di 26 aprile 2011; così come i Ricorsi Corteggiano in Niš, Gž. 2396/10 23 il 2010 giugno 3379/2010 di 2 il 2010 luglio 2373/2010 di 21 luglio 2010 e 4117/2010 di 30 novembre 2010).
19. Fra il 2009 e 23 novembre 2011 di 17 giugno era anche un numero di decisioni dove le corti di appello decisero contro i riservisti, benché su una base diversa. Specificamente, le loro rivendicazioni, diversamente da rivendicazioni dei richiedenti nella causa presente furono respinte come amministrativo in natura, e come simile fuori della competenza delle corti civili (vedere la decisione della Corte distrettuale in Belgrade Gž. 7773/09 17 giugno 2009, così come le decisioni della Corte Alta in Belgrade Gž. 11139/10, 11636/10 e 10897/10 17 novembre 2010 il 2011 e 23 novembre 2011 di 23 novembre rispettivamente).
20. 17 luglio 2010 il Giudice di prima istanza in Leskovac adottò una sentenza contumaciale in favore di un riservista (P.br. 1745/07). Secondo le informazioni previste con le parti, non è prova che questa sentenza mai era divenuta definitivo.
C. Fatti Supplementari riguardo all'accordo dell’ 11 gennaio 2008
21. 17 gennaio 2008 il Governo girò l'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008, e decise di pagare ai municipi in oggetto gli importi specificò in questo.
22. 28 agosto 2008 il Governo creò un gruppo di lavoro con il compito di occuparsi delle richieste di tutti gli altri riservisti, cioè quelli non residente nei sette municipi detti. Comunque, avendo discusso il problema coi vari gruppi di riservisti, questo gruppo di lavoro concluse ultimamente che le loro richieste non erano accettabili, inter alia, perché: (i) loro non avevano armonizzato o avevano specificato le loro richieste; (l'ii) alcuni dei loro rappresentanti avevano avuto stando in piedi equivoco per rappresentarli; (l'iii) c'era stata una mancanza di finanziamenti Statali che potrebbero essere usati per questo fine; e (l'iv) in più cause, guerreggi per diems già era stato pagato ai riservisti.
23. 26 luglio 2011 il Commissario per la Protezione dell'Uguaglianza (Poverenica za zaštitu ravnopravnosti), un ufficio di Difensore civile*-tipo stabilì sulla base della Proibizione di Atto di Discriminazione (pubblicò in OG RS n. 22/09), considerato le azioni di reclamo portate con un'organizzazione che rappresenta gli interessi di riservisti in una situazione come i richiedenti '. Nel fare così, lei concluse, che loro erano stati discriminati contro sulla base della loro residenza registrata, cioé. come non-residente dei sette municipi privilegiati, e raccomandato al Governo per prendere tutte le misure necessarie per assicurare che tutti i riservisti siano riconosciuti i pagamenti riconosciuti con la loro decisione di 17 gennaio 2008. Il Governo fu invitato anche per offrire il Commissario con un appropriato “piano di azione” entro un periodo di trenta giorni. Nel suo ragionamento, la decisione del Commissario notò, inter alia che i pagamenti in oggetto era per diems, nonostante che il Governo aveva scelto di considerarli come benefici sociali assegnò a persone in bisogno (socijalna pomoæ), e che questo fu esemplificato meglio col fatto che i riservisti in oggetto aveva dovuto cedere le loro rivendicazioni legali riguardo al per diems così come il fatto che i riservisti individuali residente nei sette municipi in questione non era mai sotto un obbligo per provare la loro indigenza (imovinsko stanje ugroženost di socijalnu dei). Questo essere così, non c'era chiaramente soltanto giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole per il trattamento differenziale di riservisti sulla base della loro residenza.
24. 7 dicembre 2011 il Ministero per Lavori ed Affari Sociali (rada di Ministarstvo politike di socijalne dei) celebre che le discussioni dovrebbero continuare coi vari gruppi di riservisti e che, se il possibile, finanziario appoggio dovesse essere proposto al più indigente fra loro.
D. Il memorandum di 16 marzo 2009
25. 16 marzo 2009 il Ministero di Economia e Sviluppo Regionale (ekonomije di Ministarstvo razvoja di regionalnog dei) spedì un memorandum al Ministero della Giustizia (pravde di Ministarstvo), affermando, inter alia che c'erano abiti civili lavoro-relativi e numerosi portarono contro corrente o società socialmente-possedute e precedenti che potrebbero mettere in pericolo la stabilità economica del paese. Esortò così il Ministero della Giustizia a fare una rassegna la possibilità di consigliare le corti di sospendere i certi tipi di questi abiti sino alla fine di 2009, così come desistere dall'esecuzione di qualsiasi definitivo sentenze già adottarono in questi procedimenti. Secondo rapporti di media numerosi, l'avendo ricevuto, il Ministero della Giustizia spedì il memorandum alla Corte Suprema (sud di Vrhovni) che poi lo faxò ai presidenti delle corti di appello per informazioni.
26. 23 marzo 2009 la Corte Suprema informò il pubblico che aveva respinto la raccomandazione del Ministero di Economia e Sviluppo Regionale. Nel fare così, notò, inter alia, che l'ordinamento giudiziario serbo era indipendente dal dirigente d'azienda così come i rami legislativi di Governo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. La Costituzione della Repubblica di Serbia (Ustav Republike Srbije; pubblicò nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi della Repubblica di Serbia-OG RS-n. 98/06)
27. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 21 §§ 2 e 3
“Ognuno avrà diritto ad uguagliare tutela giuridica, senza la discriminazione.
La discriminazione del tutto diretta o indiretta basò su qualsiasi i motivi, particolarmente per motivi di razza, sesso, cittadino od origine sociale, nascita, religione, opinione politica o altra status di proprietà, cultura lingua, età l'invalidità mentale o fisica sarà proibita.”
Articolo 32 § 1
“Ognuno avrà il diritto a... [un'udienza corretta di fronte ad un]... tribunale... [nella determinazione]... di suo [o lei] diritti ed obblighi...”
Articolo 36 § 1
“Protezione uguale di diritti di fronte alle corti di legge... sarà garantito.”
Articolo 170
“Un ricorso costituzionale può essere depositato contro decisioni individuali o azioni di corpi Statali od organizzazioni che esercitano poteri pubblici e delegati che violano o negano creatura umana o diritti delle minoranze e le libertà garantite con la Costituzione, se le altre via di ricorso legali per la loro protezione già sono state esaurite o non sono state prescritte.”
B. La giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale
28. Il 2010 e 17 febbraio 2011 di 9 giugno la Corte Costituzionale respinse due ricorsi costituzionali separati depositati con riservisti che erano in una situazione come i richiedenti '. La corte detta notò, inter aliache il civile corteggia decisioni di ' rese contro loro, rispettivamente erano state “basato sulla legislazione nazionale ed applicabile.” Gli appellanti mai specificamente si lamentarono comunque, della discordanza della giurisprudenzaattinente o essendo discriminato contro (Už. 460/08 ed Už. 2293/10).
29. 17 febbraio 2011, in un'altra causa come i richiedenti ', la Corte Costituzionale inter alia, ignorò efficacemente un'azione di reclamo del trattamento differenziale dei due gruppi di riservisti che scaturiscono dall'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008. In particolare, offrì nessuna valutazione effettiva del problema sollevata con gli appellanti, mentre notando inoltre che loro non avevano offerto prova adeguata come riguardi l'esistenza di giurisprudenza incoerente sulla questione (Už. 2901/10).
30. 7 aprile 2011, in ancora un'altra causa come i richiedenti ', la Corte Costituzionale decise contro gli appellanti come riguardi la loro azione di reclamo della conseguenza della loro causa di fronte alle corti più basse. Non c'era riferimento nella decisione stessa all'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008 e rimane poco chiaro come a se questo problema mai fu sollevato con gli appellanti (Už. 4421/10).
31. 8 marzo 2012, in una causa come quella dei richiedenti ma dove le corti civili avevano respinto le rivendicazioni di riservisti come essendo fuori del loro materiae di ratione di competenza (vedere, per esempio, divida in paragrafi 19 sopra), la Corte Costituzionale decise in favore degli appellanti che avevano addotto giurisprudenza incoerente (fra le sentenze adottate nelle loro cause e molte altre sentenze adottate con le corti nel 2002) ed ordinò che i procedimenti civili e contestati siano re-aperti. Come riguardi gli appellanti azione di reclamo di discriminazione di ', la Corte Costituzionale ragionò che la discordanza detta non corrispose alla discriminazione poiché le decisioni di corte contestate non erano state rese sulla base degli appellanti ' status personale (liènog svojstva). Non c'era anche riferimento nella corte sta ragionando all'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008 (Už. 2289/09).
32. In decisione Už. 61/09, adottò 3 marzo 2011, e decisioni Už. 553/09, 703/09 e 792/09 che tutti hanno adottato 17 marzo 2011, così come in decisioni Už. 2133/09, 1928/09, 1888/09 1695/09, 1578/09 1575/09, 1524/09 1318/09 e 1896/09, resi fra il 2010 e 23 febbraio 2012 di 7 ottobre la Corte Costituzionale notò l'esistenza di giurisprudenza nazionale ed incoerente nel contesto civile e poi seguì a trovare che questo era stato in violazione del principio della certezza giudiziale come una parte integrante degli appellanti il diritto di ' ad un processo equanime. Gli appellanti le azioni di reclamo di ' all'effetto che la stessa situazione aveva dato luogo anche a discriminazione contro loro, fu respinto manifestamente con la Corte Costituzionale come mal-fondò, poiché le decisioni di corte contestate non erano state rese sulla base degli appellanti ' status personale. Nessuna re-apertura dei procedimenti fu ordinata. Le decisioni sopra-citate concernerono questioni che erano effettivamente non correlate ai richiedenti la situazione di ' nella causa presente.
C. Atto sul Procedimento Civile (Zakon o parničnom postupku; published in OG RS nos. 125/04 and 111/09)
33. Articolo che 2 § 1 offre, inter alia che tutte le parti saranno concesse alla protezione uguale dei loro diritti.
34. Articolo 476 set fuori le circostanze in che una sentenza contumaciale (izostanka di zbog di presuda) può essere adottato, basato su, inter alia, la contumacia del convenuto di fronte alla corte nonostante essendo notificato debitamente con la citazione.
35. Articolo 422.10 prevede che una causa può essere riaperta se la Corte europea di Diritti umani ha reso nel frattempo una sentenza in riguardo di Serbia riguardo allo stesso o un problema legale e simile.
D. L'Atto dell'Organizzazione delle Corti (Zakon o uređenju sudova; published in OG RS nos. 63/01, 42/02, 27/03, 29/04, 101/05 and 46/06)
36. Articolo 40 §§ 2 e 3 prevedono, inter aliache una riunione di una divisione (sednica odeljenja) della Corte Suprema sarà sostenuto se c'è un problema come riguardi la consistenza della sua causa-legge. Qualsiasi le opinioni (pravna shvatanja) adottò quindi legherà per i pannelli (il veća) della divisione in oggetto.
E. Le Regole dell'Esercito sul Rimborso di Spese Pravilnik o naknadi putnih i drugih troškova u Vojsci Jugoslavije, published in the Official Military Gazette nos. 38/93, 23/93, 3/97, 11/97, 12/98, 6/99 and 7/99)
37. Questi Articoli esposero fuori i dettagli attinenti riguardo al rimborso di spese incorso in in collegamento con servizio militare.
F. L’Atto sugli Obblighi (Zakon o obligacionim odnosima, published in the Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 29/78, 39/85, 45/89, 57/89 and the Official Gazette of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia no. 31/93)
38. Articolo che 360 § 3 offre che corti non possono, nel corso di procedimenti di fronte a loro, prende in considerazione periodi di prescrizione negativi a meno che un'eccezione a questo effetto è stata resa col debitore.
39. Articolo 371 stati che il periodo di prescrizione negativo e generale per rivendicazioni civili sarà dieci anni, a meno che previde altrimenti.
40. Articolo 376 §§ che 1 e 2 offre, inter alia, che il periodo di prescrizione negativo per chiedere il risarcimento civile sarà tre anni come di quando il rivendicatore seppe del danno in oggetto, ma che in qualsiasi l'evento, il termine massimo assoluto sarà cinque anni come di quando accadde il danno.
41. Articoli che 387 e 388 offrono, inter alia in questione il quale la gestione di un periodo di prescrizione negativo sarà interrotta con l'accettazione del debitore della rivendicazione, direttamente o indirettamente così come col rivendicatore sta depositando di un'azione civile in questo riguardo.
42. Articolo che 392 §§ 1-3 offre, inter alia che l'effetto di tale interruzione sarà che il periodo applicabile comincerà a correre di nuovo come dell'accettazione del debitore della rivendicazione in oggetto e la conclusione dell'abito civile, rispettivamente.
G. Le opinioni giuridiche adottate dalla Corte Suprema
43. In 26 maggio 2003 la Corte Suprema sostenne, inter aliache, piuttosto separatamente dalla competenza delle autorità amministrative in riguardo dei riservisti ' chiede riguardando loro per diems, corti civili avranno giurisdizione per decidere sui meriti in tutte le cause relative dove loro chiedono danni (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra) basato sulla condotta disonesta allegato dello Stato (pravno shvatanje l'odeljenja di Graðanskog il suda di Vrhovnog Srbije utvrðeno na sednici od 26. maja 2003. godine, pubblicò nel Bollettino della Corte Suprema n. 1/04).
44. 6 aprile 2004 la Corte Suprema essenzialmente riaffermò l'opinione di 26 maggio 2003, mentre prolungando la sua richiesta a certo altro “diritti militari.” Notò anche che ci sono state nel frattempo delle discordanze di fronte alle corti (pravno shvatanje l'odeljenja di Graðanskog il suda di Vrhovnog Srbije utvrðeno na sednici od 6. aprila 2004. godine, pubblicò nel Bollettino della Corte Suprema n. 1/04).
LA LEGGE
I. RIUNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
45. La Corte considera che, nella conformità con Articolo 42 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte, le richieste dovrebbero essere congiunte, determinato il loro sfondo che riguarda i fatti e legale simile.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
46. Sotto l'Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, i richiedenti si lamentarono della giurisprudenza incoerente delle corti serbe, in particolare il rifiuto di loro proprie rivendicazioni dei Ricorsi Corteggia in Niš e l'accettazione con le altre corti civili di rivendicazioni identiche registrate coi loro amico riservisti basati su un'interpretazione diversa dei periodi di prescrizione applicabili.
47. Articolo 6 § 1, in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
48. Il Governo affermò che la Corte Costituzionale doveva datare deciso in ventitré cause come i richiedenti '. In ventuno di quelle cause, nella parte attinente aveva respinto le azioni di reclamo sui loro meriti, e nell'il rimanere due sé le azioni di reclamo avevano respinto su motivi procedurali. Comunque, il Governo sostenne che nessuno degli appellanti in quelle cause in modo appropriato aveva dibattuto and/or documentarono le loro azioni di reclamo di giurisprudenza incoerente (vedere, per esempio, divide in paragrafi 28-30 sopra).
49. Il Governo fornì inoltre alla Corte una copia della decisione della Corte Costituzionale di 8 marzo 2012 (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra) che, loro dibatterono, esemplificò l'efficacia del ricorso costituzionale, benché in un contesto lievemente diverso.
50. Fin dai richiedenti il ricorso di ' ancora era pendente di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, il Governo sostenne che le loro azioni di reclamo erano premature all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
51. Nell'alternativa, il Governo contese, che i fatti della causa presente chiaramente non rivelarono nessuna violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. In particolare: (i) la Corte Suprema aveva adottato due opinioni giuridiche, nel 2003 e 2004 rispettivamente, indicando che i periodi di prescrizione applicabili dovrebbero essere di tre/cinque anni; (ii) nel 2009 aveva adottato una specifica opinione a questo effetto, mentre rimuovendo qualsiasi l'incertezza rimanente; (iii) come di che tempo la giurisprudenza nazionale sul problema è stata coerente, cioè i primo e secondo giudici di prima istanza che fanno domanda universalmente i periodi di prescrizione di tre/cinque anni, a parte la sentenza contumaciale dispari resa ad istanza di pugno dove la corte civile e competente non potesse prendere prescrizione in considerazione a causa dell'insuccesso del convenuto per sollevare questa difficoltà di fronte a sé. Il Governo concluse che sarebbe dovuto essere perciò ovvio ai richiedenti dall'inizio come il quale le loro rivendicazioni sarebbero respinte tempo-sbarrato.
52. Infine, il Governo affermò che la raccomandazione contenne nel memorandum emesso col Ministero di Economia 16 marzo 2009 non fu implementato mai (vedere divide in paragrafi 25 e 26 sopra). Era perciò di nessuna attinenza alla causa presente.
53. I richiedenti le osservazioni di ', mentre seguendo la comunicazione della loro causa al Governo, fu presentato dopo che la scadenza del tempo-limite espose con la Corte. Il Presidente della Camera, perciò decise, facendo seguito Decidere 38 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte che loro non dovrebbero essere inclusi nell'archivio di causa per la considerazione della Corte (vedere anche paragrafo 20 della Pratica Direzione su Note Scritto). Comunque, tutti gli aggiornamenti che riguarda i fatti furono ammessi all'archivio e trasmisero al Governo per informazioni.
B. la valutazione della Corte
54. Nella sua recente Grande sentenza di Camera in Nejdet Şahin e Perihan Şahin c. la Turchia ([GC], n. 13279/05, 20 ottobre 2011), la Corte reiterò i principi principali applicabile in cause riguardo al problema di decisioni di corte contraddittorie (§§ 49-58). Questi possono essere riassunti siccome segue:
(i) non è la funzione della Corte per trattare con errori di fatto o legge commise presumibilmente con una corte nazionale a meno che ed in finora siccome loro possono fare proteggere diritti violati e le libertà con la Convenzione (vedere García Ruiz c. la Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 28 ECHR 1999-io). Similmente, non è la sua funzione, salvi nell'evento dell'arbitrarietà evidente, comparare decisioni diverse di corti nazionali anche se determinato in procedimenti evidentemente simili, come l'indipendenza di quelle corti deve essere rispettato (vedere Ādamsons c. la Lettonia, n. 3669/03, § 118 24 giugno 2008);
(l'ii) La possibilità di decisioni di corte contraddittorie è un tratto del volto inerente di qualsiasi sistema giudiziale che è basato su una rete di processo e corti di ricorso con autorità sull'area della loro giurisdizione territoriale. Simile divergenze possono sorgere anche all'interno della stessa corte. Che, in se stesso, non può essere considerato contrario alla Convenzione (vedere Santos Pinto c. il Portogallo, n. 39005/04, § 41, 20 maggio 2008, e Tudor Tudor citato sopra, § 29);
(l'iii) Il criterio che la guida la valutazione della Corte delle condizioni in che decisioni contraddittorie di direttiva di corti nazionale e diversa finalmente istanza è in violazione del requisito di processo equanime custodita in Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione consistono nello stabilire se “le
differenze profonde e di vecchia data” esista nella giurisprudenzadelle corti nazionali, se il diritto nazionale prevede per sistema per superare queste discordanze, se che sistema è stato fatto domanda e, se appropriato, a che effetto (vedere Iordan Iordanov ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 49-50; vedere anche Beian (n. 1), citato sopra, §§ 34-40; Ştefan e Ştef c. la Romania, N. 24428/03 e 26977/03, §§ 33-36 27 gennaio 2009; Schwarzkopf e Taussik, 2 dicembre 2008 sopra e citato; Tudor Tudor, citato sopra, § 31; e Ştefănică ed Altri, citato sopra, § 36);
(l'iv) la valutazione di La Corte è stata basata anche sempre sul principio di certezza legale che è implicito in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione e costituisce uno degli aspetti fondamentali dell'articolo di legge (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Beian (n. 1), citato sopra, § 39; Iordan Iordanov ed Altri, citato sopra, § 47; e Ştefănică ed Altri, citato sopra, § 31);
(v) Il principio della certezza legale garantisce, inter alia, una certa stabilità in situazioni legali e contribuisce alla fiducia pubblica nelle corti. La persistenza di decisioni di corte contraddittorie, d'altra parte può creare un stato dell'incertezza legale probabile ridurre la fiducia pubblica nel sistema giudiziale, mentre simile fiducia chiaramente è uno dei componenti essenziali di un Stato basato sull'articolo di legge (vedere Paduraru c. Romania, § 98 n. 63252/00, ECHR 2005-XII (gli estratti); Vinčić ed Altri c. Serbia, N. 44698/06 ed altri, § 56 1 dicembre 2009; e Ştefănică ed Altri, citato sopra, § 38);
(il vi) Comunque, i requisiti della certezza legale e la protezione della fiducia legittima del pubblico non conferiscono un diritto acquisito a consistenza di giurisprudenza(vedere Unédic c. la Francia, n. 20153/04, § 74 18 dicembre 2008). Sviluppo di giurisprudenza non è, in se stesso, contrari all'amministrazione corretta della giustizia poiché un insuccesso per sostenere un dinamico ed evolutive si avvicinano rischierebbe impedire riforma o miglioramento (vedere Atanasovski c. “la Repubblica iugoslava e Precedente del Macedonia”, n. 36815/03, § 38 14 gennaio 2010).
55. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte nota in primo luogo che i richiedenti si lamentarono del rifiuto di loro proprie rivendicazioni coi Ricorsi Corteggi in Niš e l'accettazione con le altre corti civili di rivendicazioni identiche registrate coi loro amico riservisti basati su un'interpretazione diversa dei periodi di prescrizione applicabili.
56. In secondo luogo, là chiaramente stava contrastando giurisprudenza fra 2002 e marzo inizio 2009 su questo problema, e forse oltre che, ma come di febbraio 2010 sembrerebbe essere stato armonizzato efficacemente a seconda istanza in conformità con le opinioni della Corte Suprema di 2003 e 2004, cioè con la richiesta coerente dei periodi di prescrizione di tre/cinque anni piuttosto che il termine massimo di dieci-anni generale (vedere divide in paragrafi 15-18, 39 e 40 sopra). È in questo contesto di piccola attinenza come a se un'opinione supplementare fu adottata con la Corte Suprema nel 2009 (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra).
57. In terzo luogo, i richiedenti registrarono la loro rivendicazione 26 marzo 2009, mentre il Giudice di prima istanza decise contro loro 8 luglio 2010, mentre facendo domanda il periodo di prescrizione di tre anni (vedere paragrafi 10 e 11 sopra). Segue perciò che la giurisprudenza di appello ed attinente era stata armonizzata meno che un anno dopo l'introduzione dei richiedenti ' chiede ed in qualsiasi l'evento, più di quattro mesi prima dell'adozione della prima sentenza di istanza in causa loro.
58. In quarto luogo, si nota che 17 luglio 2010 il Giudice di prima istanza in Leskovac adottò una sentenza contumaciale in favore di un riservista, cioé. una sentenza basò sulla contumacia del convenuto in corte nonostante essendo chiamato in causa debitamente (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra). Secondo le informazioni previste con le parti, non è comunque, prova che questa sentenza mai era divenuta definitivo (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). È notato inoltre che, come indicato col Governo, Articolo che 360 § 3 dell'Obblighi Atto offre che corti civili non possono, nel corso di procedimenti di fronte a loro, prende prescrizione in considerazione a meno che una specifica eccezione a questo effetto è stata resa col debitore (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra). Non c'è indicazione che nella causa in questione il debitore/rispondente davvero aveva fatto così. La Corte nota infine che è la sentenza detta del Giudice di prima istanza in Leskovac che potrebbe essere considerato come un'eccezione alla giurisprudenza che già era stata armonizzata in febbraio 2010, piuttosto che l'altro tondo di modo (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Tomić ed Altri c. il Montenegro, N. 18650/09 ed altri, § 57, 17 aprile 2012 non ancora definitivo).
59. In quinto luogo, comunque deplorevole il suo contenuto può essere, il memorandum di 16 marzo 2009, preparato dal Ministero di Economia era irrilevante per le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti poiché si riferì ad un tipo diverso di causa ed era in qualsiasi caso, mai implementata (vedere divide in paragrafi 25 e 26 sopra).
60. In simile circostanze, non può essere detto, almeno in finora come i richiedenti riguarda, che c'era stato “le differenze profonde e di vecchia data” nella giurisprudenza attinente, né che questo aveva dato luogo ad incertezza giudiziale, durante il periodo in oggetto. La Corte considera perciò che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' in questo riguardo sono mal-fondate manifestamente e devono essere respinte in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
61. La Corte gli ulteriori costatazione che nella luce di questa conclusione non è necessario per decidere sull'eccezione del Governo come a se le stesse azioni di reclamo dovrebbero essere respinte come premature.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
62. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre della discriminazione contro loro scaturendo dall'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008 (vedere divide in paragrafi 8 e 21 sopra). Nel fare così, loro si appellarono su Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
63. La Corte comunicò queste azioni di reclamo al Governo sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
64. Le due disposizioni dette lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 14 della Convenzione
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
65. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' dovrebbero essere respinte come premature poiché il loro ricorso ancora era pendente di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale.
66. In questo riguardo loro si riferirono alla decisione della Corte Costituzionale Už. 2901/10 17 febbraio 2011, notando che non comparò gli appellanti la situazione di ' a che dei riservisti che avevano tratto profitto dall'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008 poiché non c'era stata nessuna prova che gli appellanti mai avevano cercato di concludere un accordo di questo genere col Governo (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). In altre cause numerose la Corte Costituzionale aveva deciso ripetutamente comunque, in favore degli appellanti (vedere divide in paragrafi 31 e 32 sopra).
67. Nelle loro osservazioni prima della comunicazione della causa presente al Governo, i richiedenti sostennero, che, nonostante avvalendosi di sé, il ricorso costituzionale non poteva, nelle specifiche circostanze della loro causa, sia considerato come una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva.
68. La Corte reitera che sotto Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, può trattare solamente con una richiesta dopo che tutte le via di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite. Il fine di Articolo 35 è riconoscere gli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolando o mettere diritto le violazioni addotta contro loro prima che quelle dichiarazioni sono presentate alla Corte (vedere, per esempio, Mifsud c. la Francia (il dec.) [GC], n. 57220/00, § 15 ECHR 2002-VIII). L'obbligo per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali costringe un richiedente ad avvalersi normale di via di ricorso del quale sono effettive, sufficiente ed accessibile in riguardo suo o i suoi danni di Convenzione. Una via di ricorso deve essere capace di rimediare a direttamente lo stato contestato di affari per essere effettivo, (vedere Balogh c. l'Ungheria, n. 47940/99, § 30 20 luglio 2004).
69. In termini dell'onere della prova, è in carica sulla non-esaurimento che chiede Statale per soddisfare la Corte che la via di ricorso era un effettivo, disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente (vedere, inter alia, Vernillo c. Francia, sentenza di 20 febbraio 1991 la Serie Un n. 198, pp. 11–12, § 27, e Dalia c. Francia, sentenza di 19 febbraio 1998 le Relazioni 1998-io, pp. 87-88, § 38). Una volta questo carico è stato soddisfatto, incorre al richiedente per stabilire che la via di ricorso avanzò col Governo era infatti esausto, o era per della ragione inadeguato ed inefficace nelle particolari circostanze della causa, o che là esistè circostanze speciali che li assolvono lui o da questo requisito (vedere Dankevich c. l'Ucraina, n. 40679/98, § 107 29 aprile 2003).
70. Come riguarda ordinamenti giuridici che offrono protezione costituzionale per diritti umani fondamentali e le libertà, la Corte nota che, in principio, è in carica sull'individuo addolorato per esaminare la misura di che protezione (vedere Vinčić ed Altri c. Serbia, citato sopra, § 51).
71. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte nota che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' di fronte a sé discriminazione interessata che scaturisce dall'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008 che sarà distinto dalle possibili azioni di reclamo separate all'effetto che la giurisprudenzaincoerente e contestata aveva dato luogo a discriminazione contro i riservisti di fronte alle corti civili loro (vedere, per esempio, divide in paragrafi 31 e 32 sopra).
72. Inoltre, secondo le informazioni che sono state rese disponibile alla Corte, le azioni di reclamo come il richiedente specificamente fu reso con gli appellanti in causa Už. 2901/10, ma 17 febbraio 2011 la Corte Costituzionale li ignorò efficacemente, mentre non offrendo qualsiasi nessuna valutazione effettiva del problema (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). Il Governo nelle loro osservazioni ammette così tanto effettivamente, ma sostiene che non c'era nessuna prova che gli appellanti in quelle cause mai avevano cercato di concludere un accordo come quello di 11 gennaio 2008. Comunque, questa asserzione, mentre presumendo anche la sua attinenza ai richiedenti nella causa presente, non è nato fuori coi fatti poiché c'erano state negoziazioni estese fra il Governo ed i riservisti in generale, benché inutilmente, su prolungare i principi accettati 11 gennaio 2008 ad ognuno altro, ed i richiedenti avevano mostrato personalmente chiaramente la loro aderenza a questa posizione con portando il loro proprio giudizio civile 26 marzo 2009 (vedere divide in paragrafi 8, 23 e 10 sopra, in che ordine).
73. Infine, la giurisprudenza di Corte Costituzionale e rimanente assegnata a col Governo è irrilevante poiché riguardava e/o della giurisprudenza incoerente qualsiasi discriminazione che è il risultato di solamente questa discordanza, o questioni che erano completamente non correlate ai richiedenti la situazione di ' nella causa presente. In qualsiasi l'evento, anche in quelle cause nessuna discriminazione era stata stabilita con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 31 e 32 sopra).
74. In simile circostanze, è chiaro che nonostante il fatto che “un ricorso costituzionale deve, in principio, sia considerato come una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione in riguardo di tutte le richieste introdotto [contro Serbia] come di 7 agosto 2008” (vedere Vinčić ed Altri c. Serbia, citato sopra, § 51), questo particolare viale di compensazione non può essere ritenuto effettivo come riguarda cause che comportano azioni di reclamo come gli uni fissate avanti coi richiedenti.
75. La Corte, perciò respinge l'eccezione del Governo in questo riguardo. Trova, inoltre, che i richiedenti che le azioni di reclamo di ' non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nessuno altri motivi per dichiararli inammissibile sono stati stabiliti. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
76. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti non erano stati discriminati contro.
77. In primo luogo, l'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008 interessato un genere di beneficio sociale piuttosto che il pagamento di per diems. In secondo luogo, le risorse di Governo erano limitate che era perché fu deciso di sostenere quelli riservisti nel più grande bisogno di assistenza, cioè quelli che risiedono nei municipi più sottosviluppati in Serbia. Questi riservisti avevano dovuto in terzo luogo, rinunciare a qualsiasi e tutte le loro rivendicazioni legali che concernono il loro servizio militare mentre i richiedenti, così come tutte le altre persone nella loro situazione, aveva trattenuto la possibilità di rivolgersi alle corti civili per compensazione.
78. In prospettiva del sopra, accettando che i richiedenti erano stati trattati davvero comparato differentemente ai loro colleghi con una residenza registrata in uno dei sette municipi, il Governo dibatté che c'era una giustificazione ragionevole ed obiettiva per questo corso di azione.
79. Come già notato sopra, queste osservazioni dei richiedenti che seguono la comunicazione della loro causa al Governo sono state presentate dopo che la scadenza del tempo-limite espose con la Corte. Il Presidente della Camera decise perciò, facendo seguito Decidere 38 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte che loro non dovrebbero essere inclusi nell'archivio di causa per la considerazione della Corte (vedere anche paragrafo 20 della Pratica Direzione su Note Scritto). Comunque, tutti gli aggiornamenti che riguarda i fatti furono ammessi all'archivio e trasmisero al Governo per informazioni.
2. I principi attinenti
80. I richiami di Corte che l'Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i Protocolli, ma non ha esistenza indipendente poiché fa domanda solamente in relazione al “godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. La richiesta di Articolo 14 non presuppone necessariamente la violazione di uno dei diritti di Convenzione effettivi. È sufficiente-e d anche necessario -per i fatti della causa per incorrere “all'interno dell'ambito” di uno o più dei Convenzione Articoli (vedere Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 58 ECHR 2008 -). La proibizione della discriminazione in Articolo 14 prolunga così oltre il godimento dei diritti e le libertà che la Convenzione e Protocolli costringe ogni Stato a garantire. Fa domanda anche a quelli diritti supplementari, mentre incorrendo all'interno della sfera generale di qualsiasi articolo di Convenzione per il quale lo Stato Contraente ha deciso volontariamente di prevedere. Questo principio è trincerato bene nella giurisprudenza della Corte. Fu espresso nella Causa per la prima volta “relativo ai certi aspetti delle leggi sull'uso di lingue in istruzione in Belgio” c. il Belgio (i Meriti) (sentenza di 23 luglio 1968, Serie Un n. 6, § 9).
81. La Corte ha stabilito anche nella sua giurisprudenza che solamente differenzia in trattamento basata su una caratteristica identificabile, o “lo status”, è capace di corrispondere alla discriminazione all'interno del significato di Articolo 14 (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen e Pedersen c. la Danimarca, 7 dicembre 1976, § 56 la Serie Un n. 23). Inoltre, in ordine per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo, o in modo pertinente simile, situazioni (D.H. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 175 ECHR 2007; il Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], citato sopra, § 60). Tale differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha nessuna giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole, nelle altre parole se non intraprende un scopo legittimo o se non c'è nessuna relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Lo Stato Contraente gode un margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifichi un trattamento diverso (Burden c. il Regno Unito [GC], citato sopra, § 60).
3. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Applicabilità dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
82. La Corte nota che per diems dei richiedenti era stato riconosciuto formalmente come l'obbligo patrimoniale insoluto dello Stato rispondente come di 1999 (vedere paragrafo 6 sopra). La Corte nota anche che i pagamenti assegnarono a nell'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008, cioè l’esclusione dei richiedenti da questi, si era collegato ai diritti detti (vedere divide in paragrafi 8 e 21 sopra). Segue, perciò, che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' diritti interessati dei quali sono un “sufficientemente patrimoniale” natura per incorrere all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Willis c. il Regno Unito, n. 36042/97, § 36 ECHR 2002-IV).
83. La Corte considera inoltre che, poiché i richiedenti furono discriminati presumibilmente contro su una base di distinzione coperta con Articolo 14 della Convenzione, vale a dire la loro residenza registrata (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 66, ECHR 2010 rispettivamente), che disposizione deve essere anche applicabile alle loro azioni di reclamo.
(b) Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
84. La Corte nota che i pagamenti assegnarono a nell'accordo di 11 gennaio 2008 e girarono col Governo 17 gennaio 2008, chiaramente era per diems, benefici non sociale assegnarono a persone in bisogno. In questo riguardo pienamente gira il ragionamento offerto col Commissario serbo per la Protezione dell'Uguaglianza descritta a paragrafo 23 sopra.
85. Inoltre, l'accordo detto previde che i riservisti che risiedono nei municipi di Kuršumlija, Lebane, Bojnik, Žitorađa, Doljevac, Prokuplje e Blace sarebbero garantiti pagamento graduale di una parte dei loro diritti. Questi municipi apparentemente furono scelti a causa di loro “status sottosviluppato” che implicito i riservisti l'indigenza di '. I riservisti loro non erano mai comunque, sotto un obbligo per prevedere qualsiasi la prova in questo riguardo a, mentre i richiedenti nella causa presente, equo come tutti gli altri riservisti senza una residenza registrata in questi municipi, non poteva trarre profitto dall'accordo, cioé. la decisione susseguente del Governo che lo gira, irrispettoso di loro vuole dire. Da adesso, anche se l'osservazione del Governo che riguarda le loro risorse limitate non sarà presa leggermente, nel contesto di un possibile “scopo legittimo”, la loro risposta alla situazione intera non era nulla breve di arbitrario (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra).
86. Infine, il suggerimento del Governo che, diversamente da riservisti con una residenza in uno dei sette municipi detti, i richiedenti avevano, un'opportunità di rivolgersi alle corti civili per compensazione è un circolare poiché questo è precisamente ciò che i richiedenti tentarono di fare, ma inutilmente.
87. In prospettiva del precedente e nonostante il margine dello Stato della valutazione, la Corte non può, ma conclude che c'era nessuno “obiettivo e la giustificazione ragionevole” per il trattamento differenziale dei richiedenti soltanto sulla base della loro residenza. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 12
88. I richiedenti azioni di reclamo di discriminazione di ' furono comunicate anche con la Corte al Governo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 12.
89. Comunque, avendo riguardo ad alla sua sentenza sotto Articolo 14 sopra, la Corte dichiara queste azioni di reclamo ammissibile ma considera che loro non hanno bisogno di essere esaminati separatamente sui loro meriti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, il crkava di Savez “Riječ života” ed Altri c. Croatia, n. 7798/08, §§ 114 e 115, 9 dicembre 2010).
V. APPLICAZIONE DELL’ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
90. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
91. Ogni richiedente chiese EUR 3,000 per il patrimoniale e danno non-patrimoniale subiti, così come EUR 250 per i costi e spese incorse in in collegamento coi procedimenti di fronte alla Corte. I richiedenti notarono anche che i procedimenti civili in questione potrebbe essere re-aperto (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra).
92. Il Governo sostenne che queste rivendicazioni erano tarde.
93. La Corte nota che i richiedenti ' rivendicazioni di soddisfazione eque furono esposte fuori sul modulo di domanda ma erano solamente resubmitted (affisse) 5 marzo 2012, quattro giorni dopo la scadenza del loro tempo-limite per così fare che si aveva tempo-limite stati imposti sulla trasmissione della Corte delle osservazioni iniziali del Governo. I richiedenti non sono riusciti perciò ad attenersi con Articolo 60 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte, così come paragrafo 5 della Pratica Direzione su Soddisfazione Equa Chiede che, in finora come attinente, prevede che la Corte “respingerà anche rivendicazioni esposte fuori sul modulo di istanza ma non presentato allo stadio appropriato dei procedimenti e rivendicazioni depositato fuori termini.” Le rivendicazioni dei richiedenti di soddisfazione eque devono essere respinte perciò.
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
94. Articolo 46 della Convenzione prevede:
“1. Le Parti Contraenti ed Alte si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione.”
95. Dato queste disposizioni, segue, inter alia che una sentenza nella quale la Corte trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per non pagare quelli riguardarono qualsiasi somme assegnate con modo della soddisfazione equa, ma anche scegliere, soggetto a soprintendenza col Comitato di Ministri l'and/or generale, se misure appropriate, individuali per essere adottato nel loro ordine legale e nazionale per porre fine alla violazione trovassero con la Corte e compensare, in finora come possibile, gli effetti al riguardo (vedere Scozzari e Giunta c. l'Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000-VIII).
96. In prospettiva del sopra, così come più delle 3,000 richieste attualmente pendente di fronte all'alzata di Corte lo stesso problema di discriminazione (direttamente o indirettamente), il Governo rispondente deve, entro sei mesi dalla data sui quali la sentenza presente diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, prenda tutte le misure appropriate per garantire pagamento non-discriminatorio della guerra per diems in oggetto a tutti quelli concedè. È capito che certo and/or che riguarda i fatti ragionevole e veloce procedure di verifica amministrative possono essere necessarie in questo riguardo a.
97. Come riguarda molte richieste simili già pendente di fronte a sé, la Corte decide di aggiornarli durante l'intervallo detto. Questa decisione è senza pregiudizio al potere della Corte a qualsiasi momento per dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi simile causa o colpirlo del suo ruolo in conformità con la Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Decide all’unanimità di congiungere le richieste;

2. Dichiara con una maggioranza le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, così come le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 12, ammissibili;

3. Dichiara all’unanimità le azioni di reclamo rimanenti inammissibile;

4. Sostiene per 6 voti a 1 che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;

5. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare separatamente le azioni di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 12;

6. Sostiene per 6 voti a 1 che il Governo rispondente deve, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza presente diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, prendere tutte le misure appropriate per garantire il pagamento non-discriminatorio del per diems di guerra in oggetto a tutti quelli concessi, essendo inteso che certe verifiche ragionevoli che riguardano i fatti e/o procedure di verifica amministrative possono essere necessarie in questo riguardo;

7. Decide con una maggioranza per aggiornare, per sei mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza presente diviene definitivo tutte le richieste simili già pendente di fronte alla Corte, senza pregiudizio al potere della Corte a qualsiasi momento per dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi simile causa o colpirlo del suo ruolo di cause in conformità con la Convenzione;

8. Respinge all’unanimità la richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 28 agosto 2012, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Françoise Elens-Passos Françoise Tulkens
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata del Giudice Sajó è annessa a questa sentenza.
F.T.
F.E.P.

OPINIONE IN PARTE COINCIDENTE E IN PARTE DISSENTENDO DEL GIUDICE SAJÃ’
Io sono nel pieno accordo coi miei colleghi che riguardano la loro conclusione che le azioni di reclamo con riguardo ad alla violazione allegato di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione deve essere respinto. Al mio rammarico io devo comunque, dissentire riguardo alla sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Io votai contro l'ammissibilità dell'azione di reclamo presentata in che riguardo a, in parte in prospettiva dei fatti stabilita nel contesto dell'ammissibilità dell'Articolo 6 § 1 azione di reclamo.
Il ricorso del richiedente è pendente di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. In riguardo di Serbia un ricorso costituzionale è considerato una via di ricorso generalmente effettiva per essere esaurito (Vinčić ed Altri c. Serbia, N. 44698/06 ed altri, dicembre 2009). In che causa che la Corte ha affermato che “un ricorso costituzionale deve, in principio, sia considerato una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva... in riguardo di tutte le richieste” (paragrafo 51). La sentenza presente dibatte che è in carica sulla non-esaurimento che chiede Statale per soddisfare la Corte che la via di ricorso era un effettivo al tempo attinente. Questa posizione trascura il fatto che Vinčić revocò quel il carico. Inoltre, uno non può provare un negativo. Come il Governo ha dimostrato, la Corte Costituzionale trattò con decisioni che concernono gli altri riservisti, in considerazione di discordanze nel diritto giurisprudenziale. In una causa decisa 17 febbraio 2011 dove i richiedenti si riferirono anche alla discriminazione (paragrafo 29) la Corte Costituzionale accettò che l'azione di reclamo potrebbe essere riferita al diritto per uguagliare protezione, ma affermò che il problema era la prescrizione. Queste considerazioni fanno domanda ai richiedenti ' chiede sia sotto Articolo 6 e sotto Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Sembra che la Corte è dell'opinione che l'Accordo del 2008 sul pagamento a dei gruppi di riservisti creò un diritto che non è soggetto alla prescrizione. Chiaramente, la natura legale dell'Accordo e la sua applicabilità ai richiedenti è si importa riferito intimamente all'interpretazione di diritto nazionale. Non è per una corte internazionale per offrire la sua interpretazione di questa legge nell'assenza di interpretazione nazionale, specialmente dove la Corte Costituzionale sta considerando la questione.
Presumendo anche che la richiesta è ammissibile, io non sono convinto che Articolo 14 è applicabile come là non è diritto di proprietà nella causa presente che provocherebbe l'applicabilità di Articolo 14. La Corte nota, in paragrafo 82 della sentenza che “i richiedenti ' per diems era stato riconosciuto formalmente come l'obbligo patrimoniale insoluto dello Stato rispondente come di 1999 (vedere paragrafo 6 sopra)”, e stati che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' diritti interessati dei quali sono un “sufficientemente patrimoniale” natura per incorrere all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Willis c. il Regno Unito, n. 36042/97, § 36 ECHR 2002-IV). In Willis, comunque l'importo e le condizioni dell'applicabilità di un beneficio statutariamente definito non furono contestate, solamente che il richiedente non fu concesso a sé su motivi discriminatori. La causa presente è diversa. Un “la rivendicazione” può costituire un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 se sufficientemente è stabilito per essere esecutivo (Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. la Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 59 la Serie Un n. 301-B). Nessuna corte mai stabilì una rivendicazione esecutiva in riguardo dei richiedenti il cui diritto rimane non riconosciuto; né loro hanno una specifica rivendicazione riconosciuta che non è solamente esecutiva a causa della prescrizione. Nessuna corte mai riconobbe una specifica rivendicazione. Il giudice di prima istanza riconobbe solamente la rivendicazione nel senso che aveva la natura legale di una rivendicazione di risarcimento di danno, ma non poteva decidere sui meriti (quel è, se i richiedenti erano o non furono concessi ad un importo determinato del risarcimento) perché fu sbarrato dal fare così con la sua sentenza corretta che la prescrizione ha fatto domanda. Perciò i richiedenti che ' chiede per resti di danni speculativo.
Uno poteva, chiaramente, dibatte che i richiedenti avevano un'aspettativa legittima sotto l'Accordo. In che contesto, almeno discutibilmente, la prescrizione non farebbe domanda. In che causa, comunque che la Corte avrebbe dovuto aspettare la definitivo sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, anche in prospettiva del fatto che in finora come l'Accordo era applicabile ai richiedenti (una questione contestata) certamente sarebbe implementato gradualmente. C'è un tasked del gruppo di lavoro col rivolgendo le richieste di tutti i riservisti, sebbene non è chiaro che il gruppo è accusato per agire ex il gratia o in riconoscimento di specifiche rivendicazioni. Dato il prima facie maneggio più favorevole delle rivendicazioni di alcuni altri riservisti, io pienamente rispetto e capisco la posizione dei miei colleghi, ma io trovo che nelle circostanze della causa, le considerazioni di sussidiarietà avrebbero dovuto prevalere anche in prospettiva dei ritardi che agitano.


ANNESSO
OMISSIS


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è giovedì 02/04/2020.