CASO: CASE OF M. AND OTHERS v. ITALY AND BULGARIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF M. AND OTHERS v. ITALY AND BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 03, 34, 35

NUMERO: 40020/03/2012
STATO: Italia
DATA: 31/07/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusions: Preliminary objection partially dismissed (Article 34 - Victim)
Preliminary objection partially allowed (Article 34 - Victim)
Remainder inadmissible
No violation of Article 3 - Prohibition of torture (Article 3 - Inhuman treatment) (Substantive aspect) (Italy)
Violation of Article 3 - Prohibition of torture (Article 3 - Effective investigation) (Procedural aspect) (Italy)


SECOND SECTION






CASE OF M. AND OTHERS v. ITALY AND BULGARIA

(Application no. 40020/03)

JUDGMENT




STRASBOURG

31 July 2012










This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of M. and Others v. Italy and Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Danutė Jočienė,
Dragoljub Popović,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
András Sajó,
Guido Raimondi, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 July 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 40020/03) against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by four Bulgarian nationals, L.M., S.M., I.I., and K.L. (“the applicants”), on 11 December 2003
2. The applicants were represented by Mr S.S. Marinov, manager of Civil Association Regional Future, Vidin. The Italian Government were represented initially by their Co-Agent, Mr N. Lettieri, and subsequently by their Co-Agent, Ms P. Accardo. The Bulgarian Government were represented initially by their Agent, Ms N. Nikolova, and subsequently by their Agent, Ms M. Dimova.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that there had been a violation of Article 3 in respect of the lack of adequate steps to prevent the first applicant’s ill-treatment by a Serbian family by securing her swift release and the lack of an effective investigation into that alleged ill-treatment.
4. On 2 February 2010 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Italian and Bulgarian Governments. It also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
5. On 29 May 2012 the Section President decided to grant anonymity to the applicants of her own motion under Rule 47 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1985, 1959, 1958 and 1977 respectively and live in the village of Novo Selo in the Vidin region (Bulgaria). The applicants are of Roma ethnic origin. At the time of the events (May-June 2003), the first applicant was still a minor. The second and third applicants are her father and mother, and the fourth applicant is the first applicant’s sister in law.
A. The applicants’ version of the events
7. The facts of the case, as submitted by the applicants, may be summarised as follows.
8. The first, second and third applicants arrived in Milan on 12 May 2003 following a promise of work by X., a Roma man of Serbian nationality, residing in Italy, who accommodated them in a villa in the village of Ghislarengo, in the province of Vercelli, where he lived with his family. The third and the first applicants provided different versions on this point to the Italian authorities. In her declarations to the Italian police, on 24 May 2003, the third applicant maintained that she, her husband and her daughter, who lived in Bulgaria in a condition of extreme precariousness, moved to Italy in search of work; when they arrived in Milan they approached an individual who spoke their language, X., who proposed to them to work as domestic employees to take care of his big house. The first applicant, in her declarations to the public prosecutor on 11 June 2003, maintained that she had met X. in “Yugoslavia”, where she was with her mother in search of a job, and from there X. had driven them to Italy in his car after proposing a job. They remained in the villa for several days, during which time they undertook household chores. After a while, X. declared to the second applicant that Y., his nephew, wanted to marry his daughter (the first applicant). As the second and third applicants refused, X. threatened them with a loaded gun. Then the second and third applicants were beaten, threatened with death and forced to leave the first applicant in Italy and go back to Bulgaria. Although the applicants denied this, it seems from their initial submissions that the second and third applicants had been offered money to leave their daughter behind. On 18 May 2003, the second and third applicants went back to Bulgaria. On their return the second applicant was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which he alleged was a consequence of the stress endured.
9. The applicants submitted that during the month (following 18 May 2003) spent at the villa in Ghislarengo, the first applicant was kept under constant surveillance and was forced to steal against her will, was beaten, threatened with death and repeatedly raped by Y. while tied to a bed. During one of the robberies in which the first applicant was forced to participate, she had an accident and had to be treated in hospital. However, the Serbian family refused to leave her there to undergo treatment. The applicants submitted that they were not aware of the name and location of this hospital.
10. On 24 May 2003 the third applicant returned to Italy, accompanied by the first applicant’s sister in law (the fourth applicant), and lodged a complaint with the Italian police in Turin, reporting that she and her husband had been beaten and threatened and that the first applicant had been kidnapped. She further feared that her daughter might be led into prostitution. They were settled in a monastery near Turin. Subsequently, the police accompanied them with an interpreter to identify the house in Ghislarengo.
11. Apparently frustrated with the police’s slowness in responding to the complaint, the second applicant lodged written complaints with many other institutions. A letter of 31 May 2003, addressed to the Italian Prime Minister, the Italian Ministers for Foreign and Internal Affairs, the Italian Ambassador in Bulgaria, the Prefect of Turin, the Bulgarian Prime Minister, the Bulgarian Minister for Foreign Affairs and the Bulgarian Ambassador to Italy, is included in the file.
12. It has been shown that, eighteen days after the lodging of the complaint, on 11 June 2003, the police raided the house in Ghislarengo, found the first applicant there and made a number of arrests. At about 2 p.m. that day, she was taken to a police station in Vercelli and questioned, in the presence of an interpreter, by two female and two male police officers. The applicants alleged that she was treated roughly and threatened that she would be accused of perjury and libel if she did not tell the truth. Allegedly she was then forced to declare that she did not wish her supposed kidnappers to be prosecuted, to answer “yes” to all other questions, and to sign certain documents in Italian, which she did not understand and which were neither translated into Bulgarian nor given to her. They also alleged that the interpreter did not do her job properly and remained silent in the face of the treatment being inflicted. The applicants further alleged that Y. was present during certain parts of the first applicant’s questioning.
13. Later that day, the third applicant was questioned by the police in Vercelli in the presence of an interpreter. The third applicant alleged that she was also threatened that she would be accused of perjury and libel if she did not tell the truth, and that the interpreter did not do her job properly. She claimed that, as she refused to sign the record, the police treated her badly.
14. At about 10 p.m. on the same day the first applicant was questioned again. The applicants alleged that no interpreter or lawyer was present and that the first applicant was unaware of what was recorded. The first applicant was then taken to a cell and left there for four or five hours. On 12 June 2003 at about 4 a.m., she was transferred to a shelter for homeless persons, where she remained until 12.30 p.m.
15. On the same day, upon their request, the first, third and fourth applicants were taken by the police to the railway station in Vercelli and travelled back to Bulgaria. They submitted to the Court that the facts were then investigated by the Italian authorities, but that no criminal proceedings were instituted in Italy against the first applicant’s kidnappers, or at least that they were not informed, nor were they able to obtain information about any ongoing criminal investigation. They also complained that the Italian authorities did not seek to question the second applicant in order to establish the facts, by means of cooperation with the Bulgarian authorities.
16. It appears from the file that, after June 2003, the applicants sent several letters and e-mails, most of which were in Bulgarian, to the Italian authorities (such as the Italian Prime Minister, the Italian Ministers for Justice and Internal Affairs, the General Prosecutor attached to the Court of Appeal of Turin, the mayor of Ghislarengo and the Italian diplomatic authorities in Bulgaria), with a request to provide them with information about the police raid of 11 June 2003 and to start criminal proceedings against the first applicant’s alleged kidnappers. They also complained that they had suffered threats, humiliation and ill-treatment at the hands of the police. They asked those authorities to forward their complaints to the Public Prosecutor in Vercelli and to the police department of the same town.
17. At the same time, the applicants also wrote to the Prime Minister of Bulgaria, the Head of the Consular Relations Division of the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (CRD) and the Bulgarian Consulate in Rome, requesting them to protect their rights and assist them in obtaining information from the Italian authorities. The Bulgarian Consulate in Rome provided the applicants with certain information.
18. The applicants did not provide the Court with any document regarding their questioning and the subsequent criminal proceedings against them (see below). Their representative claimed that, considering the circumstances, including the alleged refusal of the Italian Embassy in Bulgaria, it was impossible to submit any document. Apart from copies of the letters sent to the Italian institutions, they only submitted two medical reports, one dated 22 June 2003 establishing that the first applicant was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and one dated 24 June 2003 establishing that the first applicant had a bruise on the head, a small wound on the right elbow and a broken rib. It further stated that she had lost her virginity and was suffering from a vaginal infection. The medical report concluded that these injuries could have been inflicted in the way the first applicant had reported.
B. The Italian Government’s version of the events
19. On 21 April 2009 and 30 July 2009, at the Court’s request, the Italian Government submitted a number of documents, among which the transcript of the first complaint lodged by the third applicant on 24 May 2003 with the Turin police, and the minutes of the interviews with the first applicant, the third applicant and some of the alleged kidnappers, which took place on 11 June 2003.
20. It appears from these documents that the transcript of the third applicant’s first complaint against the alleged kidnappers (lodged with the Italian police in Turin on 24 May 2003), as well as the applicants’ complaints sent by their representative to different Italian institutions, in the following days, were transmitted to the Italian police in Vercelli (on 26 May and 6 June 2003 respectively) and to the Public Prosecutor of the same town (on 4 and 13 June 2003 respectively).
21. More specifically, on 26 May 2003 the Turin Mobile Squad requested help from the Vercelli Mobile Squad to identify the location where the first applicant was allegedly being held. On 27 May 2003 the Vercelli Mobile Squad went to Ghislarengo to identify the location together with the third applicant. They inspected the location and the third applicant identified the villa she had mentioned in her complaint. On 4 June 2003 the Vercelli Police Headquarters transmitted the crime report (notizia di reato) to the Vercelli Public Prosecutor’s Office. From the communal registry it appeared that no person resided in the identified villa, but that it was owned by an individual who had a criminal record. In consequence, the police kept the place under surveillance. The police raided the villa on 11 June 2003, after having observed movement inside. During the search the police seized a number of cameras containing photographs of what appeared to be a wedding.
22. On 7, 11, 12 and 13 June 2003, the Ministry of Internal Affairs was informed by fax of developments in the case.
23. On 11 June 2003 at about 2.30 p.m., immediately after the raid, the first applicant was questioned by the Public Prosecutor of Vercelli, who was assisted by the police. As also transpires from the documents, the first applicant made allegations that showed a number of discrepancies with the complaint previously submitted by her mother, and which led the authorities to conclude that no kidnapping, but rather an agreement about a marriage, had in reality taken place between the two families. This conclusion was confirmed by photographs given to the police by X. after the raid, showing a wedding party at which the second applicant received a sum of money from X. When showed the photographs, the first applicant denied that her father had taken money as part of the agreement about the marriage.
24. At 8.30 p.m. the third applicant was questioned by the Public Prosecutor in Vercelli. She stated again that her daughter had not married Y. of her own free will, and claimed that the photographs were nothing but a fake, taken on purpose by the alleged kidnappers, who had threatened them with a gun, in order to undermine the credibility of their version of the facts. The Vercelli police also questioned X., Z. (a third party present at the wedding) and Y., who all stated that Y. had entered into a consensual marriage with the first applicant.
25. As a result of these interviews and on the basis of the photographs, the Public Prosecutor of Vercelli decided to turn the proceedings against unknown persons for kidnapping (1735/03 RGNR) into proceedings against the first and third applicants for perjury and libel. Later that evening, the first and third applicants were informed by the Vercelli and Turin police about the charges and invited to appoint a representative. They were then provided with a court-appointed lawyer. At about 11.30 p.m. the first applicant was transferred to a shelter for homeless people. On 12 June 2003 she was released into the custody of her mother. The applicants’ complaints sent to many Italian institutions during the following months were received by the Police Department in Vercelli, translated into Italian and forwarded to the Ministry of Internal Affairs.
26. Following information requests, the first dated 6 November 2003 by the Embassy of Bulgaria in Rome, the Italian authorities updated the Consul about the status of the criminal proceedings (mentioned below) on 7 and 19 November 2003, and 2 December 2003.
1. The criminal proceedings against the first applicant
27. On 11 July 2003, the Public Prosecutor attached to the Juvenile Court of Piedmont and Valle d’Aosta started criminal proceedings (1838/03 RGNR) against the first applicant for false accusations (calunnia) in so far as she claimed that X., Y. and Z. deprived her of her personal liberty by keeping her in the villa, thus accusing them of kidnapping while knowing they were innocent.
28. On 28 November 2003 the first applicant was invited for questioning by the Public Prosecutor, but she was in Bulgaria and did not appear.
29. On 26 January 2005 the Investigating Magistrate of the Juvenile Court decided not to proceed with the charges in so far as the offences committed were one-off and not serious, and therefore “socially irrelevant”.
2. The criminal proceedings against the third applicant
30. On 26 June 2003 the Public Prosecutor of Turin started criminal proceedings (18501/03 RGNR) against the third applicant for perjury and false accusations (calunnia) in so far as she claimed that X., Y. and Z. deprived her daughter of her personal liberty by keeping her in the villa, thus accusing them of kidnapping while knowing they were innocent.
31. On 22 July 2003 the Public Prosecutor of Turin concluded the investigation against the third applicant and sent the case to the Turin Criminal Court.
32. On 8 February 2006 the Turin Criminal Court acquitted the third applicant, on the ground that the facts of which she was accused did not subsist. The actual evidence consisting of the notes verbal of the questioning of the accused and her daughter, the photographic evidence and the policemen’s statements, were indicative and could not establish without doubt the guilt of the accused. The accused and her daughter’s statements were contradictory and the photos did not certify the circumstances in which they were taken. According to the police statements it could only be deduced that the daughter had been found at the villa and the persons who could have clarified the facts had availed themselves of the right to remain silent. The understanding of the facts was further complicated by the Roma tradition of selling, or paying a sum of money previously established to the family of the bride for the purposes of concluding a marriage, a matter which in the case of a dispute could have created consequences which it had been impossible to establish.
C. The Bulgarian Government’s version of the events
33. On the basis of the documents produced by the Italian Government, particularly the declarations made by X., Y. and Z., the Bulgarian Government considered the facts to be as follows.
On 12 May 2003 the first three applicants arrived in Italy and were accommodated in the nomad camp in Arluno. It was there that X., Y. and Z. met them and that Y. chose the first applicant as his spouse. The first applicant agreed and therefore Z. and the second applicant bargained over the price of the bride. The second applicant initially demanded EUR 20,000, but eventually they agreed on the sum of EUR 11,000. Z. paid the second applicant EUR 500 in advance. After festivities the newlyweds retired to the trailer where they consummated the marriage and Y. confirmed that the first applicant had been a virgin. The two families then went to the nomad camp of Kudzhiono where they celebrated the marriage. At the end of the wedding X. paid the second applicant the remainder of the amount due, namely EUR 10,500, in the presence of both families and other witnesses, as proven by the photographs. After the festivities the bride’s parents were accompanied to the railway station and left for Bulgaria on 18 May 2003.
34. Once in Bulgaria it was only on 31 May 2003, thirteen days after their departure from Italy, that the second applicant complained to the CRD of Bulgaria. Following this first notification, the Bulgarian authorities took immediate action and on 2 June 2003 the claim was forwarded to the Bulgarian Embassy in Rome. Contact was made with the Italian authorities and a successful raid by the Italian police which freed the first applicant was carried out on 11 June 2003.
35. Subsequently, the first and third applicants were questioned by a prosecutor specialised in interaction with minors, in the presence of an interpreter. Following an investigation by the Italian authorities, criminal proceedings against the first and third applicants for perjury were initiated. The applicants did not inform the Bulgarian authorities of the latter proceedings.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Relevant Italian Law
36. According to Article 50 sub-articles 1 and 2 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, the Public Prosecutor undertakes criminal proceedings when the conditions for archiving a case are not fulfilled. When the complaint of the injured party or an authorisation to proceed is not required, criminal proceedings are undertaken ex proprio motu. According to Article 408 of the Criminal Code of Procedure, a request to archive a case is made if the notice of the crime (notizia di reato) is unfounded. Such a request is transmitted together with the relevant file and documents to the judge for preliminary inquiry. Notice of such a request is given to any victim who has previously declared his or her wish to be informed of any such action. The latter notice includes information about the possibility to consult the case-file and to submit an objection (opposizione), together with a reasoned request to continue the preliminary investigation.
37. Article 55 (1) of the Code of Criminal Procedure provides that the judicial police must, even on their own initiative, receive notice of crimes, prevent further crimes, find the perpetrators of crimes, take any measures necessary to ensure the sources of evidence and the collection of any other relevant material which might be needed for the application of the criminal law.
38. According to the Italian Criminal Code, at the time of the relevant facts, assault/battery (percosse), wounding and wounding with intent (lesione personale, lesioni personali colpose), kidnapping (sequestro di persona), sexual violence (including rape but not only) (violenza sessuale), private violence (violenza privata), violence or threat for the purposes of forcing the commission of an offence (violenza o minaccia per costringere a commettere un reato), and threats (minaccia) are crimes punishable by imprisonment for periods ranging from one day to six months for the more minor offence and to five years to ten years for the more serious offence.
Moreover, some of these crimes are subject to higher prison sentences when the crime is committed against, inter alia, a descendant or wife, as for example in the case of kidnapping, or are subject to the application of aggravating circumstances when, as in the case of sexual violence, the victim is younger than fourteen years of age, the victim is younger than sixteen years of age and has been assaulted by an ascendant parent or tutor, or the victim was subject to limited personal liberty.
39. Article 572 of the Criminal Code provides for a prison sentence of up to five years for anyone found guilty of ill-treating a member of his or her family, a child under fourteen years of age, or a person under his or her authority or who has been placed in his or her care for the purposes of education, instruction, care, supervision or custody.
40. The Italian Criminal Code, at the time of the present case, also included specific provisions relating to minors, which, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Article 573
“Whoever takes away from the parent having parental authority or the curator, without the latter’s consent, a minor over fourteen years of age with his or her consent is punished by imprisonment of a period of a maximum of two years upon the complaint of the said parent or curator. The punishment is diminished if the purpose of the taking away is marriage and increased if it is lust.”
Article 609 – quarter (as amended in 2006)
“A term of imprisonment of five to ten years is applicable for the offence of sexual acts not covered by the offence of sexual violence when the victim is:
1) Under twelve years of age,
2) Under sixteen years of age, if the aggressor is the ascendant, parent, or the latter’s cohabitee, tutor or any other person having the victim’s care for the purposes of education, instruction, care, supervision or custody and with whom the victim cohabits.
Save for the circumstances provided for under the offence of sexual violence, the ascendant, parent, or the latter’s cohabitee, and the tutor who has abused his or her powers connected to his or her position and is guilty of sexual acts with a minor older than sixteen years of age, is punished by imprisonment of from three to six years.”
41. Law no. 154 of 2001 introduced a number of measures against violence in family relations. These included precautionary and permanent measures regarding the ousting of the accused from the family home upon a decree to this effect by a judge.
42. Italy adopted Law no. 228, namely the Law on Measures to Prevent Trafficking in Human Beings, on 11 August 2003. The latter has added a number of offences to the Criminal Code, which in so far as relevant read as follows:
Article 600 (to be held in slavery or servitude)
“Whoever exercises over a person powers corresponding to those of ownership, that is, whoever reduces or maintains a person in a state of continued subjection, forcing the person into labour or sexual services or begging, or in any event services involving exploitation, is punished by imprisonment of a period of eight to twenty years.
The holding of a person in a state of subjection occurs when such conduct is carried out by means of violence, threats, deception, abuse of authority or taking advantage of a situation of physical or mental inferiority or of a situation of need, or through the promise or the payment of a sum of money or other advantage to the individual who has authority over the person.
The punishment is increased by a third to a half if the facts mentioned in subparagraph one above are directed against a minor of less than eighteen years of age or if they are intended for the exploitation of prostitution or aimed at the removal of organs.”
Article 601 (human trafficking)
“Whoever commits human trafficking for the purposes of holding a person in servitude or slavery as mentioned in article 600 above and induces such person, by means of violence, threats, deception, abuse of authority or taking advantage of a situation of physical of mental inferiority or of a situation of need, or through the promise or donation of a sum of money or other advantages to the individual who has authority over the said person, to enter or stay or leave the territory of the state or to displace him or herself internally, is punished by imprisonment of a period of eight to twenty years.
The punishment is increased by a third to a half if the facts mentioned in subparagraph one above are directed against a minor of less than eighteen years of age or if they are intended for the exploitation of prostitution or aimed at the removal of organs.”
Article 602 (purchase and alienation of slaves)
“Whoever, save for the cases indicated in article 601, purchases, alienates or sells a person in the situation laid down in article 600, is punished by imprisonment of a period of eight to twenty years.
The punishment is increased by a third to a half if the facts mentioned in subparagraph one above are directed against a minor of less than eighteen years of age or if they are intended for the exploitation of prostitution or aimed at the removal of organs.”
43. Law no. 228 also included other changes to the Criminal Code in relation to the above articles when taken in conjunction with pre-existing ones, such as Article 416, whereby it provided for specific punishments if association to commit a crime was directed towards committing any of the crimes in articles 600 to 602. It further provided for administrative sanctions in respect of juridical persons, societies and associations for crimes against individual personality and made the relevant changes to the Criminal Code of Procedure, including its provisions regarding interception of conversations or communications and undercover agents, which became applicable to the new offences. Law no. 228 also created a fund for anti-trafficking measures and the institution of a special assistance programme for victims of the crimes under articles 600 and 601 of the Criminal Code, together with provision for preventive measures. In so far as relevant, articles 13 and 14 of the said law read as follows:
Article 13
“Save for the cases provided for under article 16-bis of legislative decree no. 8 of 15 January 1991, converted and modified by law no. 82 of 15 March 1991, and successive amendments, for the victims of the crimes under article 600 and 601 of the criminal code, as substituted by the present law, there shall be instituted ... a special assistance programme that guarantees temporary, adequate board and lodging conditions and health assistance. The programme is defined by regulation still to be adopted (...)”
Article 14
“In order to reinforce the effectiveness of the action on prevention of the crimes of slavery and servitude and crimes related to human trafficking, the Minister for Foreign Affairs defines policies of cooperation in respect of any States interested in/affected by such crimes, bearing in mind their collaboration and the attention given by such States to the problems of respecting human right. The said Minister must ensure, together with the Minister of Equal Opportunities, the organisation of international meetings and information campaigns, particularly in States from which most victims of such crime come. With the same aim, the Ministers of Interior, of Equal Opportunities, of Justice and of Labour and Social Policy, must organise where necessary training courses for personnel and any other useful initiative.”
44. Law No. 189 of 30 July 2002 amended earlier laws regarding immigration. Its Article 18 relates to stays for reasons of social protection and in so far as relevant reads as follows:
1. When the existence of situations of violence or serious exploitation in respect of a foreigner are established during police operations, investigations or proceedings regarding the crimes under article 3 of Law no. 75 of 20 February 1958 [crimes related to prostitution] or during assistance intervention by the local social services, and there appears to be a concrete peril for his or her safety as a result of his or her attempts to escape from the influence of the association engaging in any of the above-mentioned crimes, or the declarations made during the preliminary investigation or the proceedings, the Police Commissioner upon request of the Public Prosecutor or with a favourable suggestion by the said authority, releases a special residence permit to allow the foreigner to escape the said violence and influence of the criminal organisation and to participate in a programme of assistance and social integration.
2. The elements showing the subsistence of such conditions, particularly the gravity and imminence of the peril together with the relevance of the help offered by the foreigner for the identification and capture of those responsible for the said crimes, must be communicated to the Police Commissioner with the above mentioned request or suggestion. The procedure for participating in such a programme is communicated to the mayor.”
The text states that the permit released for such purposes has a duration of six months and may be renewed for one year or for as long as necessary in the interest of justice. It also provides the conditions on the basis of which the permit may be revoked, what it entails, and who may issue it.
45. According to a Report of the Expert Group Meeting organized by the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DAW/DESA), in collaboration with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (ODC), of November 2002 entitled Trafficking in Women and Girls (EGM/TRAF/2002/Rep.1), in the first two years of implementation of this provision, 1,755 people – mostly women and girls – have been accepted in the programmes of assistance and social integration, and about 1,000 have received a residence permit. A hotline has been established, and more than 5,000 people have received concrete help in terms of information, counselling and health care.
B. Relevant Bulgarian Law
46. The Bulgarian law on combating human trafficking entered into force on 20 May 2003. In so far as relevant the provisions read as follows:
Article 1
“This Law shall provide for the activities aimed at preventing and counteracting the illegal trafficking in human beings for the purposes of:
a. Providing protection and assistance to victims of such trafficking, especially to women and children, and in full compliance with their human rights;
b. Promoting co-operation between the governmental and municipal authorities as well as between them and NGOs for fighting the illegal trafficking in human beings and developing the national policy in this area.”
Article 16
“The diplomatic and consular posts of the Republic of Bulgaria abroad shall provide assistance and co-operation to Bulgarian nationals who have become victims of illegal trafficking for their return to the country in accordance with their powers and with the legislation of the relevant foreign country.”
Article 18
“(1) In compliance with the Bulgarian legislation and the legislation of the accepting country, the diplomatic and consular posts of the Republic of Bulgaria abroad shall distribute amongst the relevant individuals and the risk groups information materials about the rights of the victims of human trafficking.
(2) The diplomatic and consular posts of the Republic of Bulgaria abroad shall provide information to the bodies of the accepting country regarding the Bulgarian legislation on human trafficking.”
47. Article 174 (2) of the Bulgarian Code of Criminal Procedure in force at the time of the events read as follows:
“When aware of the commission of a criminal offence punishable by law, civil servants are duty bound to immediately inform the organ competent to undertake preliminary inquiries and to take the necessary measures to preserve the elements of the offence.”
48. Article 190 of the Bulgarian Code of Criminal Procedure states:
“There shall be considered to exist sufficient evidence for the institution of criminal proceedings where a reasonable supposition can be made that a crime might have been committed.”
49. In so far as relevant the Bulgarian Criminal Code reads as follows:
Article 177(1)
“Whoever coerces a person to contract a marriage, which is thereafter annulled on this ground, will be punished by imprisonment of a maximum period of three years.
(2) Whoever kidnaps a woman with a view to coercing her to marry, will be punished by imprisonment of a maximum period of three years; if the victim is a minor, the punishment will be imprisonment for a period of up to five years.”
Article 178
“(1) A parent or any other relative who receives a sum of money in order to authorise the marriage of his or her daughter or a relative, will be punished by imprisonment of a maximum period of one year or by a fine of between 100 to 300 levs (BGN) together with a public reprimand.
(2) the same punishment applies to whoever pays or negotiates the price.”
Article 190
“Whoever abuses his or her parental authority to coerce a child, not having attained sixteen years of age, to live as a concubine with another person, will be punished by imprisonment of a period of three years, or by a control measure without deprivation of liberty (пробация) together with a public reprimand.”
Article 191
“(1) All adults who without having contracted marriage are living as concubines with a female who has not attained sixteen years of age will be punished by imprisonment of a period of two years, or by a control measure without deprivation of liberty (пробация) together with a public reprimand. (...)”
Article 159a
“The persons who select, transport, hide or receive individuals or groups thereof with the aim of using such individuals for the purposes of prostitution, forced labour or the removal of organs, or to maintain them in a state of forced subordination, with or without their consent, are punished by imprisonment of a period of from one to eight years and by a fine of a maximum of 8,000 levs (BGN).
(2) When the offence in paragraph one above is committed 1) against an individual, who has not attained eighteen years of age, 2) with coercion or false pretences, 3) through kidnapping or illegal detention, 4) by taking advantage of a state of dependence, 5) by means of abuse of power, 6) through the promise, giving or receipt of benefits, the punishment is imprisonment for a period of two to ten years and a fine of a maximum of 10,000 levs (BGN).”
Article 159b
“Whoever selects, transports, hides or receives individuals or groups thereof and transfers them by crossing the border of the country with the aim mentioned in sub-paragraph 159 (a) above, will be punished by imprisonment for a period of three to eight years and by a fine of a maximum of 10,000 levs (BGN).
(2) if such an act takes place in the conditions mentioned in Article 159 (a) (2), the punishment will be imprisonment of a period of five to ten years and a fine of a maximum of 15,000 levs (BGN).”
Article 159c
“If the offences mentioned in Article 159 (a) and (b) above are committed by a recidivist or are ordered by a criminal organisation, the punishment is imprisonment for a period of five to fifteen years and a fine of a maximum of 20,000 levs (BGN); the tribunal may also order the seizure of part or the entirety of the possessions of the actor.”
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL TREATIES AND OTHER MATERIALS
A. General
50. The Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power adopted by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 40/34 of 29 November 1985, in so far as relevant reads as follows:
“1. “Victims” means persons who, individually or collectively, have suffered harm, including physical or mental injury, emotional suffering, economic loss or substantial impairment of their fundamental rights, through acts or omissions that are in violation of criminal laws operative within Member States, including those laws proscribing criminal abuse of power.
2. A person may be considered a victim, under this Declaration, regardless of whether the perpetrator is identified, apprehended, prosecuted or convicted and regardless of the familial relationship between the perpetrator and the victim. The term “victim” also includes, where appropriate, the immediate family or dependants of the direct victim and persons who have suffered harm in intervening to assist victims in distress or to prevent victimisation.”
B. Trafficking
51. An overview of the relevant international instruments pertaining to trafficking in human beings can be found in Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia, no. 25965/04, 7 January 2010.
52. The Palermo Protocol was ratified by Bulgaria on 5 December 2001 and by Italy on 2 August 2006, both States having previously signed the protocol in December 2000. The Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (“the Anti-Trafficking Convention”) was signed by Bulgaria on 22 November 2006 and ratified on 17 April 2007. It entered into force in respect of Bulgaria on 1 February 2008. It was signed by Italy on 8 June 2005, ratified on 29 November 2010 and entered into force in respect of Italy on 1 March 2011.
53. For easiness of reference the relevant definitions for the purposes of the Anti-Trafficking Convention are reproduced hereunder:
a “Trafficking in human beings” shall mean the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs;
b The consent of a victim of “trafficking in human beings” to the intended exploitation set forth in subparagraph (a) of this article shall be irrelevant where any of the means set forth in subparagraph (a) have been used;
c The recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a child for the purpose of exploitation shall be considered “trafficking in human beings” even if this does not involve any of the means set forth in subparagraph (a) of this article;
d “Child” shall mean any person under eighteen years of age;
e “Victim” shall mean any natural person who is subject to trafficking in human beings as defined in this article.
54. The explanatory report to the Anti-Trafficking Convention 16.V.2005 reveals further detail regarding the definition of trafficking. In particular in respect of “exploitation”, in so far as relevant, it reads as follows:
85. The purpose must be exploitation of the individual. The Convention provides: “Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs”. National legislation may therefore target other forms of exploitation but must at least cover the types of exploitation mentioned as constituents of trafficking in human beings.
86. The forms of exploitation specified in the definition cover sexual exploitation, labour exploitation and removal of organs, for criminal activity is increasingly diversifying in order to supply people for exploitation in any sector where demand emerges.
87. Under the definition, it is not necessary that someone have been exploited for there to be trafficking in human beings. It is enough that they have been subjected to one of the actions referred to in the definition and by one of the means specified “for the purpose of” exploitation. Trafficking in human beings is consequently present before the victim’s actual exploitation.
88. As regards “the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation”, it should be noted that the Convention deals with these only in the context of trafficking in human beings. The terms “exploitation of the prostitution of others” and “other forms of sexual exploitation” are not defined in the Convention, which is therefore without prejudice to how states Parties deal with prostitution in domestic law.
The explanatory report continues to list the other types of exploitation, namely forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs and gives their definition according to the relevant international instruments and the ECHR case-law where available.
C. Marriage
1. Convention on Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriage and Registration of Marriages
55. Following the General Assembly of the United Nations resolution 843 (IX) of 17 December 1954, declaring that certain customs, ancient laws and practices relating to marriage and the family were inconsistent with the principles set forth in the Charter of the United Nations and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and calling on states to develop and implement national legislation and policies prohibiting such practices, the Convention on Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriage and Registration of Marriages was opened for signature and ratification by General Assembly resolution 1763 A (XVII) of 7 November 1962. Italy signed the Convention on 20 December 1963, but has to date not ratified the Convention. The Bulgarian State has yet to sign the Convention.
56. The relevant provisions read as follows:
Article 1
“1. No marriage shall be legally entered into without the full and free consent of both parties, such consent to be expressed by them in person after due publicity and in the presence of the authority competent to solemnize the marriage and of witnesses, as prescribed by law.
2. Notwithstanding anything in paragraph 1 above, it shall not be necessary for one of the parties to be present when the competent authority is satisfied that the circumstances are exceptional and that the party has, before a competent authority and in such manner as may be prescribed by law, expressed and not withdrawn consent.”
Article 2
“States Parties to the present Convention shall take legislative action to specify a minimum age for marriage. No marriage shall be legally entered into by any person under this age, except where a competent authority has granted a dispensation as to age, for serious reasons, in the interest of the intending spouses.”
Article 3
“All marriages shall be registered in an appropriate official register by the competent authority.”
2. The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe Resolution 1468 (2005) – Forced marriages and child marriages
“1. The Parliamentary Assembly is deeply concerned about the serious and recurrent violations of human rights and the rights of the child which are constituted by forced marriages and child marriages.
2. The Assembly observes that the problem arises chiefly in migrant communities and primarily affects young women and girls.
3. It is outraged by the fact that, under the cloak of respect for the culture and traditions of migrant communities, there are authorities which tolerate forced marriages and child marriages although they violate the fundamental rights of each and every victim.
4. The Assembly defines forced marriage as the union of two persons at least one of whom has not given their full and free consent to the marriage.
5. Since it infringes the fundamental human rights of the individual, forced marriage can in no way be justified.
6. The Assembly stresses the relevance of United Nations General Assembly Resolution 843 (IX) of 17 December 1954 declaring certain customs, ancient laws and practices relating to marriage and the family to be inconsistent with the principles set forth in the Charter of the United Nations and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
7. The Assembly defines child marriage as the union of two persons at least one of whom is under 18 years of age.”
3. The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe Resolution 1740 (2010) – The situation of Roma in Europe and relevant activities of the Council of Europe
“24. The Assembly calls on the Roma community and its representatives to fight discrimination and violence against Roma women and girls in their own community. In particular, the problems of domestic violence and of forced and child marriages, which constitute a violation of human rights, need to be addressed also by the Roma community itself. Custom and tradition cannot be used as an excuse for human rights violations, but should instead be changed. The Assembly calls on member states to support Romani women activists who engage in debates within their community about the tensions between the preservation of a Romani identity and the violation of women’s rights including through early and forced marriages.”
4. The Strasbourg Declaration on Roma
57. More recently, at the Council of Europe High Level Meeting on Roma, Strasbourg, 20 October 2010, the member States of the Council of Europe agreed on a non-exhaustive list of priorities, which should serve as guidance for more focused and more consistent efforts at all levels, including through active participation of Roma. These included:
“Women’s rights and gender equality
(22) Put in place effective measures to respect, protect and promote gender equality of Roma girls and women within their communities and in the society as a whole.
(23) Put in place effective measures to abolish where still in use harmful practices against Roma women’s reproductive rights, primarily forced sterilisation.
Children’s rights
(24) Promote through effective measures the equal treatment and the rights of Roma children especially the right to education and protect them against violence, including sexual abuse and labour exploitation, in accordance with international treaties.
Combat trafficking
(29) Bearing in mind that Roma children and women are often victims of trafficking and exploitation, devote adequate attention and resources to combat these phenomena, within the general efforts aimed at curbing trafficking of human beings and organised crime, and, in appropriate cases, issue victims with residence permits.”
COMPLAINTS
58. The applicants raised different complaints under Articles 3, 4, 13 and 14 of the Convention and under many other international treaties.
59. They complain that the first applicant suffered ill-treatment, sexual abuse and forced labour, as did (to a lesser extent) the second and third applicants at the hands of the Roma family in Ghislarengo, and that the Italian authorities (especially the Public Prosecutor in Vercelli) failed to investigate the events adequately.
60. They also complain that the first and third applicants were ill-treated by Italian police officers during their questioning.
61. They complain that the first and third applicants were not provided with lawyers and/or interpreters during their interviews, were not informed in what capacity they were being questioned, and were forced to sign documents the content of which they were unaware.
62. They complain that their treatment by the Italian authorities was based on the fact that they were of Roma ethnic origin and Bulgarian nationality.
63. Finally, they complain that the Bulgarian authorities (notably the Bulgarian consular authorities in Italy) did not provide them with the required assistance in their dealings with the Italian authorities, but simply served as a channel of communication.
THE LAW
I. PRELIMINARY OBJECTIONS
A. The Bulgarian and Italian Governments’ objection as to abuse of the right of petition
64. The Bulgarian Government considered that there had been no violation in the present case since the available evidence indicated that the applicants’ stay in Italy had been voluntary, as was the marriage in accordance with the related ethnic rituals. Moreover, they considered the application an abuse of petition in view of the incorrect and unjustifiable abusive language used by the applicants’ representative in his submissions to the Court.
65. The Italian Government did not submit specific reasons in respect of their objection.
66. The applicants submitted that they had been subjected to violations of international law and that both the Italian and Bulgarian authorities had remained passive in the face of such events.
67. The Court recalls that, whilst the use of offensive language in proceedings before it is undoubtedly inappropriate, an application may only be rejected as abusive in extraordinary circumstances, for instance if it was knowingly based on untrue facts (see, for example, Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV, §§ 53-54; Varbanov v. Bulgaria, no. 31365/96, § 36, ECHR 2000-X; and Popov v. Moldova, no. 74153/01, § 49, 18 January 2005). Nevertheless, in certain exceptional cases the persistent use of insulting or provocative language by an applicant against the respondent Government may be considered an abuse of the right of petition within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention (see Duringer and Grunge v. France (dec.), nos. 61164/00 and 18589/02, ECHR 2003-II, and Chernitsyn v. Russia, no. 5964/02, § 25, 6 April 2006).
68. The Court considers that although some of the applicants’ representative’s statements were inappropriate, excessively emotive and regrettable, they did not amount to circumstances of the kind that would justify a decision to declare the application inadmissible as an abuse of the right of petition (see Felbab v. Serbia, no. 14011/07, § 56, 14 April 2009). In so far as an application can be found to be an abuse of the right of petition if it is based on untrue facts, the Court notes that the Italian domestic courts themselves considered that it was difficult to decipher the facts and the veracity of the situation (see paragraph 32 above). In such circumstances, the Court cannot consider that the version given by the applicants undoubtedly constitutes untrue facts.
69. It follows that the Governments’ plea must be dismissed.
B. The Bulgarian and Italian Governments’ objection as to lack of victim status
70. The Bulgarian Government submitted that there had been no transgression in the present case. Moreover, the second, third and fourth applicants had no direct connection with the alleged violations and were not directly or personally affected by them. Furthermore, the fourth applicant was not a next-of-kin of the first applicant but only the third applicant’s daughter-in-law who accompanied her to Italy.
71. The Italian Government submitted that the second and fourth applicants did not have locus standi in the proceedings since they had suffered no damage as a result of the alleged violations.
72. The applicants submitted that violations had indeed been committed and in consequence they had victim status. Moreover, the second, third and fourth applicants fell within the notion of “victims of crime” according to Articles 1 and 2 of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (see Relevant international texts above). They further contended that all the applicants had suffered prejudice in the form of physical ill-treatment at the hands of the aggressors and moral damage in the light of the authorities’ inaction, while the second, third and fourth applicants had been trying their best to protect the first applicant. This was evident particularly in so far as it concerned the parents of the first applicant.
73. The Court considers that the Governments’ objection mainly relates to the second, third and fourth applicants in so far as they claim that they are themselves victims of violations of the Convention in respect of the first applicant’s alleged subjection to trafficking in human beings and inhuman and degrading treatment at the hands of third parties.
74. The Court recalls that under Article 3, in respect of disappearance cases, whether a family member is a victim will depend on the existence of special factors which give the suffering of the applicant a dimension and character distinct from the emotional distress which may be regarded as inevitably caused to relatives of a victim of a serious human rights violation. Relevant elements will include the proximity of the family tie – in that context, a certain weight will attach to the parent-child bond –, the particular circumstances of the relationship, the extent to which the family member witnessed the events in question, the involvement of the family member in the attempts to obtain information about the disappeared person and the way in which the authorities responded to those enquiries. In these cases the essence of such a violation does not so much lie in the fact of the “disappearance” of the family member but rather concerns the authorities’ reactions and attitudes to the situation when it is brought to their attention. It is especially in respect of the latter that a relative may claim directly to be a victim of the authorities’ conduct (see, Kurt v. Turkey, 25 May 1998, §§ 130-134, Reports 1998 III; Timurtaş v. Turkey, no. 23531/94, §§ 91-98, ECHR 2000 VI; İpek v. Turkey, no. 25760/94, §§ 178-183, ECHR 2004 II (extracts); and conversely, Çakıcı v. Turkey [GC], no. 23657/94, § 99, ECHR 1999 IV).
75. The Court has also exceptionally considered that relatives had victim status of their own in situations where there was not a distinct long-lasting period during which they sustained uncertainty, anguish and distress characteristic to the specific phenomenon of disappearances but where the corpses of the victims had been dismembered and decapitated and where the applicants had been unable to bury the dead bodies of their loved ones in a proper manner, which according to the Court in itself must have caused them profound and continuous anguish and distress. The Court thus considered that in the specific circumstances of such cases the moral suffering endured by the applicants had reached a dimension and character distinct from the emotional distress which may be regarded as inevitably caused to relatives of a victim of a serious human rights violation (see, Khadzhialiyev and Others v. Russia, no. 3013/04, § 121, 6 November 2008 and Akpınar and Altun v. Turkey, no. 56760/00, § 86, 27 February 2007).
76. In this light, the Court considers that, although they witnessed some of the events in question, and were, each to a different extent, involved in the attempts to obtain information about the first applicant, the second, third and fourth applicants cannot be considered as victims themselves of the violations relating to the treatment of the first applicant and the investigations in that respect, since the moral suffering endured by them cannot be said to have reached a dimension and character distinct from the emotional distress which may be regarded as inevitably caused to relatives of a victim of a serious human rights violation.
77. The Court notes that this conclusion does not run contrary to the findings in the Rantsev case (Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia, no. 25965/04, 7 January 2010) since, in the present case, unlike in the Rantsev case, the first applicant who was subject to the alleged violations is not deceased and is a party to the current proceedings.
78. It follows that the Governments’ objection in respect of the second, third and fourth applicants’ victim status in relation to the complaints under Articles 3 and 4 of the Convention in respect of which the first applicant is the direct victim, including the alleged lack of an investigation in that respect, must be upheld.
79. Moreover, the Court considers that the fourth applicant cannot claim to be a direct victim of any of the alleged violations, while the second applicant can only claim to be a victim in respect of the treatment to which he was himself allegedly subjected by the Serbian family. As regards the third applicant in respect of the alleged ill-treatment she suffered at the hands of the Serbian family in Ghislarengo and the police, the Court considers that there is no element which at this stage could deprive her of victim status.
80. It follows that the Governments’ objection in relation to the fourth applicant in respect of all the complaints and to the second applicant, except in relation to the complaint about the treatment to which he was allegedly subjected by the Serbian family, must be upheld, whereas it must be dismissed in relation to the remaining complaints.
81. Accordingly, those complaints in respect of which the objection was upheld are incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
C. The Bulgarian Government’s objection as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
82. The Bulgarian Government submitted that the applicants had had the opportunity to bring proceedings in relation to the alleged offences. According to Articles 4 and 5 of the Bulgarian Penal Code, proceedings could have been brought against alien subjects who had committed crimes abroad against Bulgarian nationals even if such prosecution had already taken place in another State. Moreover, the applicants could have sought redress under the State Liability for Damage caused to Citizens Act, which was in force at the relevant time and provided that the State was liable for damage caused to citizens by illegal acts, actions or omissions of authorities and officials during or in connection with the performance of administrative activities. Furthermore, the applicants could also have sought redress under the general provisions of the Obligations and Contracts Act.
83. The applicants submitted that they had sent letters to the Prime Minister and the Minister for Foreign Affairs and complained to the Embassy of Bulgaria in Rome, which should have enabled the Bulgarian authorities to take action in accordance with Article 174 (2) of the Code of Criminal Procedure. Moreover, according to Bulgarian law, if a complaint reached an organ which was not competent to deal with the matter it was for that organ to transfer the request to the competent authority. As to an action under the State Liability for Damage caused to Citizens Act, the applicants considered that such an action would not be appropriate since no body had informed them of the means available to safeguard their rights under Article 3 of the same text.
84. For reasons which appear below in respect of the complaints against the Bulgarian State, the Court does not consider it necessary to examine whether the applicants have exhausted all available domestic remedies as regards their complaints against Bulgaria and consequently leaves this matter open (see, mutatis mutandis, Zarb v. Malta, no. 16631/04, § 45, 4 July 2006).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 3 OF THE CONVENTION
85. The applicants complained that the first applicant had suffered ill-treatment (including sexual abuse together with a subjection to forced labour), as had to a lesser extent the second and third applicants at the hands of the Roma family in Ghislarengo, and that the authorities (especially the Public Prosecutor in Vercelli) had failed to investigate the events adequately. They also complained that the first and third applicants had been ill-treated by Italian police officers during their questioning. Thus, the Italian and Bulgarian authorities’ actions and omissions were contrary to Article 3 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
A. The complaints concerning the lack of adequate steps to prevent the first applicant’s ill-treatment by the Serbian family by securing her swift release and the lack of an effective investigation into that alleged ill-treatment
1. The parties’ observations
(a) The applicants
86. The applicants insisted that their version of events was faithful and that the Governments’ submissions were entirely based on the witness statements of X., Y. and Z., which were contradictory and untruthful. One such example was the fact that X., Y. and Z.’s testimony did not correspond in respect of the venue where the alleged wedding celebrations had taken place. They also contended that any slight discrepancies in the first applicant’s testimony could only have been due to her anxiety as a result of the threats and ill-treatment she had been suffering. They further reiterated that the photos used as evidence had been obtained under threat and that the second applicant had been repeatedly beaten and forced at gun-point to pose in the said pictures. They also argued that the first applicant had been to discotheques and travelled in cars only within the ambit of the planning and actual robberies she was forced to participate in by the Serbian family. As to any medical records, they considered it was for the authorities to provide such materials.
87. In their view, the first applicant had clearly suffered a violation of Article 3 following the treatment she had endured at the hands of the Serbian family, in relation to which no effective investigation had been undertaken to establish the facts and prosecute the offenders.
88. The Italian authorities took seventeen days to free the first applicant, who was found to be in bad shape both physically and mentally. This notwithstanding, no medical examinations were carried out on the first applicant to establish the extent of her injuries. Indeed, to date, the truth had not been established and various items of evidence had been disregarded. The minutes of the search of the villa were incomplete, the substantial amounts of money seized during the raid had not been described, and certain facts had not been examined, such as the finding of multiple passports in the same name. Neither had the investigation examined the first applicant’s claim that she had been repeatedly raped by Y. while having her hands and feet tied to the bed. Nor had any research been done to establish the criminal records of the Serbian family, whose only means of income were the recurring robberies they organised, or in relation to the events, namely the promise of work which had led the applicants to move to Italy. It was evident in their view that the investigation had left room for dissimulation of the facts.
89. Furthermore, the applicants were not allowed access to the investigation file, no translations of the questioning were given to them, and no witness testimony by letters rogatory was taken from the applicants when they returned to Bulgaria, to enable the authorities to correctly establish the facts.
(b) The Italian Government
90. The Italian Government submitted that the facts as alleged by the applicants had been entirely disproved during domestic proceedings on the basis of documentary evidence. Moreover, they noted that one of the medical documents mentioned in the facts had not been transmitted to them and the other document had no bearing on the case. As to the injury to the first applicant’s rib, they noted that the third applicant in her complaint to the police in Turin had claimed that the first applicant had had a similar injury which dated back to a prior accident.
91. They noted that criminal investigations for the alleged kidnapping of the first applicant had been initiated immediately following the third applicant’s oral complaints to the police of Turin on 24 May 2003. The Government submitted that it took the authorities until 11 June 2003 to locate the villa where the first applicant was being held (since the third applicant had only provided a vague indication of the premises), to identify the occupants of the villa (no one officially resided there), to observe the happenings in the location and to make preparations for the necessary action leading to the arrest of the occupants and the release of the first applicant without casualties, as the third applicant had alleged that arms were held there.
92. The immediate investigation and arrest which ensued had shown a reality different from that announced by the third applicant in her initial complaint. It appeared that the first applicant had married Y. according to the customs and traditions of their ethnic group, for the price of EUR 11,000. This was evident from a number of photos which had been found at the venue, showing a wedding ceremony in which the first three applicants had participated and where, together with Y., they appeared contented and relaxed. Further photos showed the second applicant receiving money from Y.’s relatives. The conclusion that this consisted of a payment for the bride according to Roma customs and not a kidnapping was even more evident in the light of the numerous contradictions in the first and third applicants’ testimonies, together with the first applicant’s admission of a marriage contract. Moreover, no firearms were found during the raid, which disproved the third applicant’s allegation that they had been threatened by means of a firearm.
93. The Italian Government submitted that this version of events had been considered truthful by the judgment of the Turin Investigating Magistrate of 26 January 2005. It had also been considered probable by the Turin Tribunal in its judgment of 8 February 2006, which according to the Government’s interpretation, concluded that the problem was mainly an economic disagreement in relation to the marriage contract concluded. It was very probable that the marriage contract had not been respected either because of an economic disagreement or because of the treatment of the first applicant following the marriage, which she had related to the third applicant over the phone. The Government reiterated that Roma marriages were specific, as had been accepted by the Court in Muñoz Díaz v. Spain (no. 49151/07, ECHR 2009).
94. They further submitted that the investigation had been carried out immediately and without unnecessary delay and the judicial authorities had not spared any efforts to establish the facts. The scene of the events was isolated and preserved; relevant objects were identified and seized; the occupants of the premises were identified and arrested, and the first applicant was lodged in Caritas premises; the relevant actors and witnesses including the applicants were immediately heard and they were assisted by interpreters, lawyers and psychological experts. Having considered all the above, the judicial authorities had found it more likely that there had been a marriage contract. The Italian Government considered that in view of the evidence, it could not have been concluded otherwise. They further noted that it was not for the Court to establish the facts of the case, unless this was inevitable given the special circumstances, which was not so in the present case. Indeed, as had been proved by the Government, the official investigation had been carried out in depth, as shown by its detailed conclusions.
95. The Italian Government submitted that in the eighteen days between 24 May and 11 June 2003 the third applicant had the status of a witness and had access to the information collected during the investigation to a degree which sufficed to allow her an effective participation in the procedure. From 11 June 2003 onwards the first and third applicants had the status of accused, in relation to which the invoked provisions had no bearing.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Admissibility
96. The Court notes that it is confronted with a dispute over the exact nature of the alleged events. In this regard, it considers that it must reach its decision on the basis of the evidence submitted by the parties (see Menteşe and Others v. Turkey, no. 36217/97, § 70, 18 January 2005).
97. The Court considers that the medical records in respect of the first applicant dated 22 and 24 June 2003, submitted to the Court at the time of the lodging of the application (see paragraph 18 above), both transferred to the Government on 1 March 2010 and appearing on their secure site, even though not submitted to the investigating authorities, constitute sufficient prima facie evidence that the first applicant may have been subjected to some form of ill-treatment. In the specific circumstances of the case, the latter, together with the uncontested fact that a complaint was lodged with the authorities on 24 May 2003 giving a detailed account of the facts complained of, provides enough basis for the Court to consider that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention.
98. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
(b) Merits
i. General principles
99. The Court reiterates that Article 3 enshrines one of the most fundamental values of democratic society. It prohibits in absolute terms torture or inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. The obligation on High Contracting Parties under Article 1 of the Convention to secure to everyone within their jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 3, requires States to take measures designed to ensure that individuals within their jurisdiction are not subjected to torture or inhuman or degrading treatment, including such ill-treatment administered by private individuals (see A. v. the United Kingdom, 23 September 1998, § 22, Reports 1998-VI). These measures should provide effective protection, in particular, of children and other vulnerable persons and include reasonable steps to prevent ill-treatment of which the authorities had or ought to have had knowledge (see Z and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 29392/95, § 73, ECHR 2001 V).
100. The Court reiterates that Article 3 of the Convention requires the authorities to investigate allegations of ill-treatment when they are “arguable” and “raise a reasonable suspicion”, even if such treatment is administered by private individuals (see Ay v. Turkey, no. 30951/96, §§ 59-60, 22 March 2005, and Mehmet Ümit Erdem v. Turkey, no. 42234/02, § 26, 17 July 2008). The minimum standards applicable, as defined by the Court’s case-law, include the requirements that the investigation be independent, impartial and subject to public scrutiny, and that the competent authorities act with exemplary diligence and promptness (see, for example, Çelik and İmret v. Turkey, no. 44093/98, § 55, 26 October 2004). In addition, for an investigation to be considered effective, the authorities must take whatever reasonable steps they can to secure the evidence concerning the incident, including, inter alia, a detailed statement concerning the allegations from the alleged victim, eyewitness testimony, forensic evidence and, where appropriate, additional medical reports (see, in particular, Batı and Others v. Turkey, nos. 33097/96 and 57834/00, § 134, ECHR 2004-IV (extracts)).
ii. Application to the present case
101. The Court notes that the third applicant’s complaint lodged on 24 May 2003 was not supported by any medical records. However, the Court considers that this was logical and that medical evidence could not be expected given that according to that complaint the first applicant was being retained against her will by the Serbian family. In these circumstances, the Court considers that the third applicant’s testimony and the seriousness of the allegations made in the complaint lodged on 24 May 2003 raised a reasonable suspicion that the first applicant could have been subjected to ill-treatment as alleged. This suffices to attract the applicability of Article 3 of the Convention.
(a) The steps taken by the Italian authorities
102. As regards the steps taken by the Italian authorities, the Court notes that the police released the first applicant from her alleged captivity within two and a half weeks. It took them three days to locate the villa and a further two weeks to prepare the raid which led to the first applicant’s release. Bearing in mind that the applicants had claimed that the Serbian family was armed, the Court can accept that prior surveillance was necessary. Therefore, in its view, the intervention complied with the requirement of promptness and diligence with which the authorities should act in such circumstances.
103. It follows that the State authorities fulfilled their positive obligation of protecting the first applicant. There has therefore been no violation of Article 3 under this head.
(b) The investigation
104. As to the investigation following the first applicant’s release, the Court notes that the Italian authorities questioned X., Y., Z., the first applicant and the third applicant. It does not appear that any other efforts were made to question any third parties who could have witnessed the events at issue. Indeed, the Italian authorities considered that the photos collected at the venue corroborated the alleged assailants’ version of events. However, none of the other people in the photos was ever identified or questioned, a step which the Court considers was essential, given that the applicants maintained that they had been forced at gun-point to pose for such photos. Nor were any attempts made to hear the second applicant, who had been a major actor in the events at issue. Indeed, the Court notes that on the same day that the first applicant was released and heard, the criminal proceedings which had been instituted against the assailants were turned into criminal proceedings against the first and third applicants (see paragraph 25 above). The Court is struck by the fact that following the first applicant’s release it took the authorities less than a full day to reach their conclusions. In this light it stood to reason that the Turin Criminal Court considered it impossible to establish the facts clearly (see paragraph 32 above).
105. The Court also notes that, when released, the first applicant was not subject to a medical examination, notwithstanding the claims that she had been repeatedly beaten and raped. The Court further notes that even assuming that it was true that the events at issue amounted to a marriage in accordance with the Roma traditions, it was still alleged that in the month the first applicant stayed in Ghislarengo she had been beaten and forced to have sexual intercourse with Y. The Court notes that State authorities must take protective measures in the form of effective deterrence against serious breaches of an individual’s personal integrity also by a husband (see Opuz v. Turkey, no. 33401/02, §§ 160-176, 9 June 2009) or partner. It follows that any such allegation should also have required an investigation. However, no particular questioning took place in this respect, nor was any other test undertaken, whether strictly medical or merely scientific. It is of even greater concern that the first applicant was a minor at the time of the events at issue. Indeed, the Convention requires effective deterrence against grave acts such as rape, and children and other vulnerable individuals, in particular, are entitled to effective protection (see, mutatis mutandis, M.C. v. Bulgaria, no. 39272/98, § 150, ECHR 2003 XII). However, the Italian authorities chose not to investigate this aspect of the complaint.
106. Moreover, the Court notes that the applicants alleged that they had moved to Italy following a promise of work, although none ensued, and that the first applicant was threatened and forced to participate in robberies and private sexual activities during the period of time she remained in Ghislarengo. While this has not been established, the Court cannot exclude that the circumstances of the present case, as reported by the first applicant to the Italian authorities (see paragraph 8 above), had they been proved, could have amounted to human trafficking as defined in international conventions (see Relevant International Texts above), which undoubtedly also amounts to inhuman and degrading treatment under Article 3 of the Convention. In consequence, the Italian authorities had an obligation to look into the matter and to establish all the relevant facts by means of an appropriate investigation which required that this aspect of the complaint be also examined and scrutinized. This was not so, the Italian authorities having opined that the circumstances of the present case fell within the context of a Roma marriage. The Court cannot share the view that such a conclusion sufficed to remove any doubt that the circumstances of the case revealed an instance of human trafficking which required a particularly thorough investigation inter alia because a possible “Roma marriage” cannot be used as a reason not to investigate in the circumstances. Furthermore, the Court observes that the rapid decision of the Italian authorities not to proceed to a thorough investigation had, among other things, the consequence that medical evidence on the physical condition of the first applicant was not even sought.
107. In conclusion, the Court considers that the above elements suffice to demonstrate that, in the particular circumstances of this case, the investigation into the first applicant’s alleged ill-treatment by private individuals was not effective under Article 3 of the Convention.
108. There has therefore been a procedural violation of Article 3.
B. The complaint regarding the second and third applicant’s ill-treatment at the hands of the Roma family and the lack of an effective investigation by the Italian authorities in this respect
1. The parties’ observations
109. The applicants complained that the second and third applicants had also suffered ill-treatment and threats at the hands of the Serbian family. In particular, the second applicant had been repeatedly beaten and forced at gun-point to pose in the “wedding” pictures. However, the Italian authorities took no steps to question the second applicant as a victim of ill-treatment and threats, as a result of which they claimed he had been declared 100% invalid by the Vidin Medical Commission on 5 October 2010 (the applicants acknowledged that they had not submitted documents in proof of this). As a result of the stress and anxiety caused, the second applicant had been diagnosed with diabetes shortly after the events at issue.
110. The Italian Government submitted that criminal investigations in respect of threats against and injuries to the second and third applicants had been initiated immediately following the third applicant’s oral complaints to the police of Turin on 24 May 2003. However, it had not resulted from the investigation that their complaints were truthful. According to the Government, it was strange that the second and third applicants claimed to have been beaten on 18 May 2003 and yet they decided to go back to Bulgaria. Furthermore, no medical documents substantiating this claim had been submitted and no firearms had been found during the raid at the villa, which disproved the allegation that they had been threatened at gun-point.
2. The Court’s assessment
111. According to the Court’s case-law, allegations of ill-treatment must be supported by appropriate evidence. To assess this evidence, the Court adopts the standard of proof “beyond reasonable doubt”, although such proof may follow from the coexistence of sufficiently strong, clear and concordant inferences or of similar unrebutted presumptions of fact (see Ireland v. the United Kingdom, 18 January 1978, Series A no. 25, § 161 in fine; and Medova v. Russia, no. 25385/04, § 116, ECHR 2009 ....).
112. The Court notes that, even assuming that the second and third applicants had been previously kept under constraint, it is uncontested that this was no longer so after 18 May 2003. It follows that the second and third applicants, unlike in the case of the first applicant, could have sought medical assistance and acquired medical evidence in support of their claims. However, they did not provide the authorities with any form of medical report to accompany the complaint lodged by the third applicant on 24 May 2003. Moreover, to date, no evidence has been submitted to the Court indicating that the second and third applicants could have been subjected to ill-treatment at the hands of the Serbian family. In this light, the Court considers that there is no sufficient, consistent or reliable evidence to establish to the necessary degree of proof that they were subjected to such ill-treatment.
113. In consequence, the authorities were not given a reasonable cause for suspecting that the second and third applicants had been subjected to improper treatment, which would have required a fully fledged investigation.
114. It follows that the complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
C. The complaint regarding the first and third applicants’ ill-treatment at the hands of the police officers during their questioning
115. The first and third applicants complained about ill-treatment during their interrogation, namely that they were not provided with lawyers and interpreters during that time and that they were forced to sign documents the content of which they had not understood. They further complained about the criminal proceedings with which they were threatened and which were eventually instituted against them, noting that they had only been taken up in order for the authorities to apply pressure on them. They also contended that subsequently the court-appointed lawyer failed to safeguard their interests during the questioning, notably by failing to request that the Serbian family be kept outside the room, by not ensuring adequate interpreters and treatment without threats and most gravely by allowing the first applicant to be kept in a cell for hours following her questioning.
116. The Court firstly notes that the first and third applicants failed to press charges against any alleged offenders from the police force. No official complaint has ever been lodged with the Italian authorities in respect of this alleged ill-treatment. Neither has it been submitted that they attempted to make such a complaint in the context of the proceedings eventually instituted against them. It follows that the first and third applicants failed to exhaust domestic remedies in respect of this complaint.
117. Furthermore, the Court notes that the treatment described by the applicants does not attain the minimum level of severity to make it fall within the scope of Article 3. In particular, the Court considers that the fact that the first and third applicants were warned about the possibility of being prosecuted and imprisoned if they did not tell the truth may be considered to be part of the normal duties of the authorities when questioning an individual, and not an unlawful threat. Moreover, according to the documents submitted by the Italian Government, an interpreter or a lawyer or both accompanied the first and third applicants during the different stages of the interrogation.
118. For these reasons, this complaint must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention
D. The complaint regarding the lack of action and an effective investigation into the alleged events against Bulgaria
1. The parties’ observations
119. In respect of Bulgaria, the applicants complained about the delay in the treatment of the second applicant’s complaint of 31 May 2003 by the consular authorities. It took the authorities two days to take action in respect of the complaint, following the applicants’ representative’s aggressive criticisms. They contended that the Bulgarian Government had failed to explain in what way the CRD had assisted the applicants in their interests as required by Article 32 of the Regulations of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Indeed, they had not interfered in the choice of interpreters (who remained silent in the face of the treatment suffered by the two applicants during interrogation) or the court-appointed lawyer, nor had a consular representative been present during the questioning.
120. Similarly, no information had been submitted and nothing had been done by the Bulgarian authorities to repatriate the applicants and the National agency for the protection of infants had not been informed in order for it to be able to take the necessary measures. Neither had the Ministry or the Embassy of Bulgaria in Rome informed the Prosecutor’s Office in Bulgaria, which could have undertaken proceedings against the Serbian family. Moreover, the Bulgarian authorities had not informed the Italian authorities that according to Bulgarian law a marriage of a minor Bulgarian national, celebrated abroad, required the prior authorisation of the Bulgarian diplomatic or consular representative (Articles 12, 13 and 131 of the Bulgarian Family Code). In the present case no such request was made or granted. This requirement was valid for all Bulgarian citizens irrespective of their ethnicity and in any case ethnic traditions could not set aside the law.
121. The Bulgarian Government contended that in the absence of any specific allegation of any treatment contrary to Article 3 there could not be a violation of that provision. Moreover, any positive obligations on their part could only arise in respect of actions committed or ongoing in Bulgarian territory.
122. Without prejudice to the above, the Bulgarian Government submitted that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the CRD, the Ambassador and the Consul in Rome immediately reacted when notified of the case. They established contact with the Italian authorities and specified that the alleged victim was a minor and was being held against her will. The Bulgarian Ambassador maintained constant communication with the Italian authorities and transferred the information to the second applicant, who had expressed his gratitude in this respect. The fact that adequate and comprehensive measures had been taken by the Bulgarian CRD was also evident from the consular file in relation to the case, which was submitted to the Court. That file contained more than a hundred pages and, on 2 June 2003, it had been sent to the Embassy of Bulgaria in Rome with the instruction to take immediate action in cooperation with the Italian authorities for the release of the first applicant and her return to Bulgaria.
123. The second applicant again solicited the Bulgarian authorities on 11 June 2003 and the CRD again referred to the Embassy of Bulgaria in Rome on the same day. In turn the Embassy replied that the provincial unit of the carabinieri in Turin and the central management of the Vercelli Police had conducted a successful action to release the first applicant from the house; she was found to be in good condition and was under the protection of the public authorities. This information was immediately forwarded to the second applicant. By a letter dated 24 June 2003 the Bulgarian Embassy in Rome notified the CRD that, following a request by the second applicant, information had been received from the Head Office of the Criminal Police of Italy to the effect that the result of the inquiry and declaration of the first applicant indicated that her father had received money for a forthcoming wedding and therefore there were no grounds to institute criminal proceedings against the Serbian family. They further noted that the judicial authorities were considering the possibility of bringing proceedings against the first and third applicants for libel and perjury. The second applicant was informed of this by a letter of 1 July 2003. Subsequently correspondence was maintained between the Consular Section and the applicants and their representative, as well as with the Italian authorities. Thus, within their competence, the Bulgarian authorities had been fully cooperative.
2. The Court’s assessment
124. The Court reiterates that the engagement undertaken by a Contracting State under Article 1 of the Convention is confined to “securing” (“reconnaître” in the French text) the listed rights and freedoms to persons within its own “jurisdiction” (see Soering v. the United Kingdom, 7 July 1989, § 86, Series A no. 161). The Court’s case-law has defined various instances where the Convention provisions, read in conjunction with the State’s general duty under Article 1, impose an obligation on States to carry out a thorough and effective investigation (see for example Ay v. Turkey, cited above, §§ 59-60; Aksoy v. Turkey, 18 December 1996, § 98, Reports 1996-VI, and Assenov and Others v. Bulgaria, 28 October 1998, § 102, Reports 1998-VIII). However, in each case the State’s obligation applied only in relation to ill-treatment allegedly committed within its jurisdiction (see Al-Adsani v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 35763/97, § 38, ECHR 2001-XI, where the Court did not uphold the applicant’s claim that the Convention required the United Kingdom to assist one of its citizens in obtaining an effective remedy for torture against another State since it had not been contended that the alleged torture took place in the jurisdiction of the United Kingdom or that the United Kingdom authorities had any causal connection with its occurrence).
125. Similarly, in Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia (no. 25965/04, §§ 243-247, ECHR 2010 (extracts)), the Court noted that the direct victim’s death had taken place in Cyprus. Accordingly, since it could not be shown that there were special features in that case which required a departure from the general approach, the obligation to ensure an effective official investigation applied to Cyprus alone. Notwithstanding that Ms Rantseva was a Russian national, the Court concluded that there was no free-standing obligation incumbent on the Russian authorities under Article 2 of the Convention to investigate.
126. It follows from the above that in the circumstances of the present case, where the alleged ill-treatment occurred on Italian territory and where the Court has already found that it was for the Italian authorities to investigate the events, there cannot be said to have been an obligation on the part of the Bulgarian authorities to carry out an investigation under Article 3 of the Convention.
127. Moreover, the Convention organs have repeatedly stated that the Convention does not contain a right which requires a High Contracting Party to exercise diplomatic protection, or espouse an applicant’s complaints under international law or otherwise to intervene with the authorities of another State on his or her behalf (see for example, Kapas v the United Kingdom, no. 12822/87, Commission decision of 9 December 1987, Decision and Reports (DR) 54, L. v Sweden, no. 12920/87, Commission decision of 13 December 1988, and Dobberstein v Germany, no. 25045/94, Commission decision of 12 April 1996 and the decisions cited therein). Nevertheless, the Court notes that the Bulgarian authorities repeatedly pressed for action by the Italian authorities, as explained by the Bulgarian Government in their submissions and as shown from the documents submitted to the Court.
128. In conclusion, the Court considers that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 4 OF THE CONVENTION
129. The applicants contended that the treatment the first applicant had suffered at the hands of the Serbian family and the fact that she was forced to take part in organised crime constituted a violation of Article 4. According to the applicants, the violation of the said provision also arose in relation to the entire facts of the case which clearly concerned trafficking in human beings and was contrary to that provision, which reads as follows:
“1. No one shall be held in slavery or servitude.
2. No one shall be required to perform forced or compulsory labour.
3. For the purpose of this article the term ‘forced or compulsory labour’ shall not include:
(a) any work required to be done in the ordinary course of detention imposed according to the provisions of Article 5 of [the] Convention or during conditional release from such detention;
(b) any service of a military character or, in case of conscientious objectors in countries where they are recognised, service exacted instead of compulsory military service;
(c) any service exacted in case of an emergency or calamity threatening the life or well-being of the community;
(d) any work or service which forms part of normal civic obligations.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
130. The applicants noted that they had been led to believe that they would find work, but to the contrary the first applicant had been forced to steal and had suffered corporeal injuries as a result of the treatment she received, as proved by the medical documents submitted. They considered that, given the deceit by which they had been persuaded to move to Italy and the ensuing treatment suffered, particularly by the first applicant, the case undoubtedly concerned trafficking in human beings within the meaning of international treaties. They were of the view that both States were responsible for the alleged violation. It was degrading that the Governments were trying to cover up their failings by hiding behind the excuse of Roma customs, which had clearly not been the case, as repeatedly stated by the applicants. Moreover, the applicants failed to understand how the authorities considered that Roma traditions, which clearly amounted to a violation of the criminal law (see sections 177-78 and 190-91 of the Bulgarian Criminal Code, relevant domestic law above), could be overlooked and considered normal.
131. In respect of their complaint against Italy they reiterated their submissions put forward under Article 3.
132. In respect of Bulgaria, the applicants also reiterated their submissions under Article 3. They further noted that even though in Bulgaria a law against human trafficking had been enacted, in practice this had no effect. In fact, the Bulgarian Government had not been able to submit any statistics as to the number of people having been prosecuted under the Criminal Code provisions in this respect. As to prevention, the applicants contended that the Bulgarian Government should have been able to spot the dangers a family like the applicants would have faced when deciding to move to Italy following a suspicious promise of work. They insisted that no relevant questions had been set to the applicants at the border as though a risk for trafficking could have never existed.
2. The Italian Government
133. The Italian Government submitted that in the third applicant’s complaint to the Turin Police of 24 May 2003 there had been no allegation of forced labour of human trafficking, but only a fear that the first applicant could be forced into prostitution. They considered that the Trafficking Convention could not come to play in the circumstances of the case as established by the domestic courts. Moreover the Italian state had not signed or ratified the Trafficking Convention at the time of the events of the case and therefore it was not applicable to them.
134. Nevertheless, criminal investigations for the alleged kidnapping of the first applicant had been initiated immediately following the third applicant’s oral complaints to the police of Turin on 24 May 2003. They noted that a law in relation to human trafficking was only introduced in August 2003 (see Relevant domestic law). They further reiterated their submissions under Article 3, contending that an effective investigation into the circumstances of the case had taken place.
135. Lastly, they submitted that in so far as the Court wanted to examine the State’s conduct vis-á-vis marriage agreements in the Rom community, the Italian Government noted that the first applicant had in fact been freed and returned to Bulgaria. However, it was not for the state to judge the traditions of the Rom minority, their identity or way of life, particularly since the Court itself highlighted the importance of the Rom culture in Munoz Diaz.
3. The Bulgarian Government
136. The Government reiterated that the present case did not concern trafficking in human beings, as the facts did not fall under the definition of trafficking according to Article 4 of the Trafficking Convention. As confirmed by the excerpt of the border police (submitted to the Court) the applicants freely and voluntarily established themselves in Italy according to their right of freedom of movement. The first applicant, although a minor, left the borders of Bulgaria and arrived and resided in Italy with her parents, voluntarily and with their consent. The departure from Bulgarian territory was lawful and the authorities had no reason to prohibit it, allowing such a move according to Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention and European Union legislation. Moreover, there had been no evidence of trafficking in human beings on Bulgarian territory, an issue not alleged by the applicants. Indeed, the applicants, alone or through their representative, had not notified any of the Bulgarian institutions in charge of trafficking. Any allegations in this respect could be communicated to the State Agency for Child Protection, the National Committee to Combat Human Trafficking and the Council of Ministers, the Prosecution of the Republic of Bulgaria and the Ministry of Interior which had specific powers under the Criminal Code and the Code of Criminal Procedure to deal with such allegations.
137. They submitted that the present case regarded a personal relationship of a private legal nature in terms of the voluntary involvement in marriage and the related rituals in accordance with the particular ethnicity of the applicants. According to the investigation, the first applicant freely married Y. in accordance with their traditions. The accepted and practiced model of Roma marriages provided for early and ubiquitous marriages. Marriage age was governed by custom according to the group to which the persons belonged, and in practice was generally a young age. Roma marriages were considered concluded with a wedding in the presence of the community and it did not require a civil or religious procedure to be considered sacred and indissoluble. The traditional Roma marriage consisted of two phases. The first, the engagement, regulated the pre-requisites of marriage such as the fixing of the bride’s “price”/“ransom”/”dowry”, which is a bargaining made by the fathers in view of the fact that the bride will then be part of the family of the groom. The second is the wedding, which includes a set of rituals, the most important of which was the consummation of the marriage, bearing in mind that virginity was a pre-requisite to the marriage. The Bulgarian Government submitted that from the testimony of X. Y. and Z., as drawn up by the Italian Urgent Action Squad, the wedding ritual of the applicant to Y. conformed to this traditional practice.
138. Moreover, it had not been established that there had been any debasing or degrading attitudes or instances of forced labour. The Government submitted that in her testimony of 11 June 2003, the first applicant declared to have married Y. and did not claim that she was dissatisfied with her marriage or that herself or her parents had been ill-treated or forced to work. Thus, according to the Government, the facts of the case regarded a regular consummation of a marriage and the undertaking of usual household chores, which could not amount to treatment prohibited under Article 4, particularly since the first applicant admitted to having freely moved to Italy, travelled by car and attended discotheques.
139. The Government considered that when the Bulgarian Consular Section signalled a coercive holding of a minor-aged female, the Italian authorities gave full assistance and carried out an effective investigation, but after having established the above-mentioned facts, could not conclude that the case concerned trafficking in human beings. They noted that the Italian authorities “freed” the first applicant who was found to be in a good health and mental condition. She was questioned by staff specialised in interaction with minors and had access to an interpreter. Moreover, the authorities provided support to her and her relatives, including accommodation and payment of costs. The Italian authorities took all the relevant witness testimony and other measures to establish the facts and the applicants had ample opportunity to participate as witnesses in the investigation, throughout which they were provided with an interpreter. Thus, the relatives had also been directly involved in the investigation. Therefore, the criteria for an effective investigation according to the Court’s case-law (Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia, no. 25965/04, § 233, 7 January 2010) had been fulfilled.
140. As to the steps taken by the Bulgarian authorities, the Bulgarian Government reiterated their submissions under Article 3 (see paragraphs 121-123 above). Indeed both the Bulgarian and Italian authorities had reacted promptly. It followed that the actions of both States had been in accordance with Convention obligations (Rantsev, cited above, § 289).
141. They further submitted that in so far as the case could be considered under Article 4 the Bulgarian authorities had fulfilled their positive obligations in an adequate and timely manner. The Bulgarian Government noted that the Trafficking Convention entered into force in respect of Bulgaria in 2007 and therefore was not applicable at the time of the events in the present case. However, the Government submitted that Bulgaria had fulfilled its positive obligation and taken the necessary measures to establish a workable and effective legislation on the criminalisation of human trafficking.
142. They had further put in place an appropriate legislative and administrative framework. They noted that by 2003 the following legislation was applicable, in connection with the prevention, combating and criminalisation of trafficking:
- The United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime, adopted on 15 November 2000, ratified by Bulgaria in 2001
- The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in persons, Especially Women and Children of 15 November 2000
- Recommendation No. R (85) 11 to the Member States on the position of the victim in the framework of criminal law and procedure, adopted by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe on 28 June 1985
- Recommendation 1545 (2002) on the campaign against trafficking in women of January 21, 2002
- Council Directive 2004/81/EC of 29 April 2004 on the residence permit issued to third country nationals who are victims of trafficking in human beings or who have been the subject of an action to facilitate illegal immigration and who cooperate with the competent authorities.
- European Parliament resolutions related to exploitation of prostitution and trafficking in people.
Moreover, by means of amendments to the Criminal Code in 2002, human trafficking had been criminalised (see Relevant domestic law) and in 2003 a specific law on combating human trafficking establishing effective counter-action leverage was passed by parliament. Public information was also provided by the national media on the risks of trafficking in persons. Thus, the Bulgarian Government took all feasible positive measures on the creation of an effective domestic system for the prevention, investigation and prosecution of such offences. Moreover, the applicants had made no complaint in respect of this framework.
143. The Bulgarian Government also submitted that they had fulfilled their positive obligation to take protective measures. They submitted that there was no evidence that they had been particularly notified about any particular circumstances which could give rise to a justified and reasonable suspicion of a real and immediate risk to the first applicant before she left to Italy and later during her stay there. In consequence there had not been a positive obligation to take preliminary steps to protect her.
144. As to a procedural obligation to investigate potential trafficking, the Government reiterated that the applicants actions were voluntary, this notwithstanding that the Bulgarian and Italian joint efforts led to the desired result of the first applicant being released and returned to Bulgaria.
145. As to the forensic expertise presented, the Government noted that this could not be considered as valid evidence as it had not been produced according to the law, it having been compiled one month after the first applicant’s return to Bulgaria and not immediately at the time of the alleged events.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Application of Article 4 of the Convention
146. The Court has never considered the provisions of the Convention as the sole framework of reference for the interpretation of the rights and freedoms enshrined therein (see Demir and Baykara v. Turkey [GC], no. 34503/97, § 67, 12 November 2008). It has long stated that one of the main principles of the application of the Convention provisions is that it does not apply them in a vacuum (see Loizidou v. Turkey, 18 December 1996, Reports 1996-VI; and Öcalan v. Turkey [GC], no. 46221/99, § 163, ECHR 2005-IV). As an international treaty, the Convention must be interpreted in the light of the rules of interpretation set out in the Vienna Convention of 23 May 1969 on the Law of Treaties (see Rantsev, cited above, § 273).
147. Under that Convention, the Court is required to ascertain the ordinary meaning to be given to the words in their context and in the light of the object and purpose of the provision from which they are drawn (see Golder v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1975, § 29, Series A no. 18; Loizidou, cited above, § 43). The Court must have regard to the fact that the context of the provision is a treaty for the effective protection of individual human rights and that the Convention must be read as a whole, and interpreted in such a way as to promote internal consistency and harmony between its various provisions (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 48, ECHR 2005-X). Account must also be taken of any relevant rules and principles of international law applicable in relations between the Contracting Parties and the Convention should so far as possible be interpreted in harmony with other rules of international law of which it forms part (see Al-Adsani, cited above, § 55; Demir and Baykara, cited above, § 67; Saadi v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13229/03, § 62, ECHR 2008-...; and Ranstev, cited above, §§ 273-275).
148. The object and purpose of the Convention, as an instrument for the protection of individual human beings, requires that its provisions be interpreted and applied so as to make its safeguards practical and effective (see, inter alia, Soering, cited above, § 87; and Artico v. Italy, 13 May 1980, § 33, Series A no. 37).
149. In Siliadin, considering the scope of “slavery” under Article 4, the Court referred to the classic definition of slavery contained in the 1926 Slavery Convention, which required the exercise of a genuine right of ownership and reduction of the status of the individual concerned to an “object” (see Siliadin v. France, no. 73316/01, § 122, ECHR 2005 VII). With regard to the concept of “servitude”, the Court has held that what is prohibited is a “particularly serious form of denial of freedom” (see Van Droogenbroeck v. Belgium, Commission’s report of 9 July 1980, §§ 78-80, Series B no. 44). The concept of “servitude” entails an obligation, under coercion, to provide one’s services, and is linked with the concept of “slavery” (see Seguin v. France (dec.), no. 42400/98, 7 March 2000; and Siliadin, cited above, § 124). For “forced or compulsory labour” to arise, the Court has held that there must be some physical or mental constraint, as well as some overriding of the person’s will (see Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 34, Series A no. 70; Siliadin, cited above, § 117).
150. The Court is not regularly called upon to consider the application of Article 4 and, in particular, has had only two occasions to date to consider the extent to which treatment associated with trafficking fell within the scope of that Article (Siliadin and Rantsev, both cited above). In the latter case, the Court concluded that the treatment suffered by the applicant amounted to servitude and forced and compulsory labour, although it fell short of slavery. In the former, trafficking itself was considered to run counter to the spirit and purpose of Article 4 of the Convention such as to fall within the scope of the guarantees offered by that Article without the need to assess which of the three types of proscribed conduct was engaged by the particular treatment in the case in question.
151. In Rantsev, the Court considered that trafficking in human beings, by its very nature and aim of exploitation, is based on the exercise of powers attaching to the right of ownership. It treats human beings as commodities to be bought and sold and put to forced labour, often for little or no payment, usually in the sex industry but also elsewhere. It implies close surveillance of the activities of victims, whose movements are often circumscribed. It involves the use of violence and threats against victims, who live and work under poor conditions. It is described in the explanatory report accompanying the Anti-Trafficking Convention as the modern form of the old worldwide slave trade. In those circumstances, the Court concluded that trafficking itself, within the meaning of Article 3(a) of the Palermo Protocol and Article 4(a) of the Anti-Trafficking Convention, fell within the scope of Article 4 of the Convention (see Rantsev, cited above, §§ 281-282).
2. Application to the present case
152. The Court once again highlights that it is confronted with a dispute over the exact nature of the alleged events. The parties to the case have presented diverging factual circumstances and regrettably the lack of investigation by the Italian authorities has led to little evidence being available to determine the case. Having said that, the Court cannot but take its decisions on the basis of the evidence submitted by the parties.
153. In this light, in so far as an objection ratione materiae can be inferred from the Governments’ submissions the Court considers that it is not necessary to deal with this objection since it considers that the complaint, in its various branches, is in any event inadmissible for the following reasons.
(a) The complaint against Italy
1. The circumstances as alleged by the applicants
154. The Court has already held above that the circumstances as alleged by the applicants could have amounted to human trafficking. However, it considers that from the evidence submitted there is not sufficient ground to establish the veracity of the applicants’ version of events, namely that the first applicant was transferred to Italy in order to serve as a pawn in some kind of racket devoted to illegal activities. In consequence, the Court does not recognise the existence of circumstances capable of amounting to the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons for the purpose of exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs. It follows that the applicants’ allegation that there had been an instance of actual human trafficking has not been proved and therefore cannot be accepted by the Court.
155. Since it has not been established that the first applicant was a victim of trafficking, the Court considers that the obligations under Article 4 to penalise and prosecute trafficking in the ambit of a proper legal or regulatory framework cannot come into play in the instant case.
156. As to the Article 4 obligation on the authorities to take appropriate measures within the scope of their powers to remove the individual from that situation or risk, the Court notes that irrespective of whether or not there existed a credible suspicion that there was a real or immediate risk that the first applicant was being trafficked or exploited, the Court has already found under Article 3 of the Convention that the Italian authorities had taken all the required steps to free the applicant from the situation she was in (see paragraph 103 above).
157. In so far as Article 4 also provides for a procedural obligation to investigate situations of potential trafficking, the Court has already found in its assessment under the procedural aspect of Article 3 above (see paragraphs 107-108 above) that the Italian authorities failed to undertake an effective investigation into the circumstances of the present case.
158. In consequence the Court does not find it necessary to examine this limb of the complaint.
159. Given the above, the Court considers that the overall complaint under Article 4 against Italy based on the applicant’s version of events is inadmissible, as manifestly ill-founded pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
ii. The circumstances as established by the authorities
160. The Court notes that the authorities concluded that the facts of the case amounted to a typical marriage according to the Roma tradition. The first applicant, who was aged seventeen years and nine months at the time of the alleged marriage, never denied that she willingly married Y. She did, however, deny that any payment had been made to her father for the marriage. Nevertheless, the photos collected by the police appear to suggest that an exchange of money in fact took place. Little has been established in respect of any ensuing treatment within the household.
161. The Court therefore considers that in relation to the events as established by the authorities, again, there is not sufficient evidence indicating that the first applicant was held in slavery. Even assuming that the applicant’s father received a sum of money in respect of the alleged marriage, the Court is of the view that, in the circumstances of the present case, such a monetary contribution cannot be considered to amount to a price attached to the transfer of ownership, which would bring into play the concept of slavery. The Court reiterates that marriage has deep-rooted social and cultural connotations which may differ largely from one society to another (see Schalk and Kopf v. Austria, no. 30141/04, § 62, ECHR 2010). According to the Court, this payment can reasonably be accepted as representing a gift from one family to another, a tradition common to many different cultures in today’s society.
162. Neither is there any evidence indicating that the first applicant was subjected to “servitude” or “forced or compulsory” labour, the former entailing coercion to provide one’s services (see Siliadin, cited above § 124) and the latter bringing to mind the idea of physical or mental constraint. What there has to be is work “exacted ... under the menace of any penalty” and also performed against the will of the person concerned, that is work for which he or she “has not offered himself or herself voluntarily” (see Van der Mussele, cited above, § 34, and Siliadin, cited above § 117). The court observes that despite the first applicant’s testimony claiming that she was forced to work, the third applicant explained in her complaint of 24 May 2003 that her family had been employed to do housework.
163. Furthermore, according to the Court the post facto medical records submitted are not sufficient to determine beyond reasonable doubt that the first applicant actually suffered some form of ill-treatment or exploitation as understood in the definition of trafficking. Neither can the Court consider that the sole payment of a sum of money suffices to consider that there had been trafficking in human beings. Nor is there evidence suggesting that such a union was contracted for the purposes of exploitation, be it sexual or other. Thus, there is no reason to believe that the union was undertaken for purposes other than those generally associated with a traditional marriage.
164. The Court notes with interest the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe’s resolutions (see Relevant international texts above) showing concern in respect of Roma women in the context of forced and child marriages (the latter defined as the union of two persons at least one of whom is under 18 years of age) and it shares these apprehensions. The Court, however, notes that the resolutions airing such concerns and encouraging action in this respect are dated 2005 and 2010 and therefore at the time of the alleged events not only was there not any binding instrument, as remains the case to date, but in actual fact there was not enough awareness and consensus among the international community to condemn such actions. The prevailing document at the time (which was not ratified by Italy or Bulgaria) was the Convention on Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriage and Registration of Marriages (1962) which determined that it was for the States to decide on an age limit for contracting marriage and allowed a dispensation as to age to be given by a competent authority in exceptional circumstances. This trend is reflected in the legislation of many of the member States of the Council of Europe which consider eighteen years to be the age of consent for the purposes of marriage, and provide for exceptional circumstances whereby a court or other authority (often on consulting the guardians) may allow a marriage to be contracted by a person who is younger (for example, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Croatia, Italy, Hungary, Malta, San Marino, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden), the most common being at least sixteen years of age.
165. The Court notes that in 2003, when the first applicant appears to have undertaken this union, she was a few months away from adulthood. Indeed under Italian legislation, it is perfectly legal for a person aged sixteen or more to have consensual sexual intercourse (see by implication article 609 quarter in paragraph 40 above), even without the consent of the parent, and he or she may also leave the family home with the consent of the parents. Moreover, in the instant case there is not sufficient evidence indicating that the union was forced on the first applicant who had not testified that she had not consented to it and who emphasized that Y. had not forced her to have sexual intercourse with him. In this light it cannot be said that the circumstances as established by the authorities raise any issue under Article 4 of the Convention.
166. Accordingly, this part of the complaint under this provision, against Italy, is inadmissible as being manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected under Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
(b) The complaint against Bulgaria
167. The Court notes that had any alleged trafficking commenced in Bulgaria it would not be outside the Court’s competence to examine whether Bulgaria complied with any obligation it may have had to take measures within the limits of its own jurisdiction and powers to protect the first applicant from trafficking and to investigate the possibility that she had been trafficked (see Rantsev, cited above § 207). In addition, member States are also subject to a duty in cross-border trafficking cases to cooperate effectively with the relevant authorities of other States concerned in the investigation of events which occurred outside their territories (see Rantsev, cited above, § 289).
168. However, whether the matters complained of give rise to the Bulgarian’s State responsibility in the circumstances of the present case is a question which falls to be determined by the Court according to its examination of the merits of the complaint.
169. The Court has already established, above, that in respect of both the version of the events, the circumstances of the case did not give rise to human trafficking, a situation which would have engaged the responsibility of the Bulgarian State, had any trafficking commenced there. Moreover, the applicants did not complain that the Bulgarian authorities did not investigate any potential trafficking, but solely that the Bulgarian authorities did not provide them with the required assistance in their dealings with the Italian authorities. As suggested above in paragraph 119 in fine, the Court considers that the Bulgarian authorities assisted the applicants and maintained constant contact and co-operation with the Italian authorities.
170. It follows that the complaint under Article 4 against Bulgaria is also manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected under Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
171. The applicants further complained that the treatment they suffered was due to their Roma origin. They relied on Article 14 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
172. The applicants submitted that they had been discriminated against by the authorities in the handling of their case. They noted that the fact that the offenders they accused had also been Roma had no relevance, since Roma of Serbian origin were wealthy enough to get away scot free after having made arrangements with corrupt police agents.
173. The Italian Government considered that had the applicants been discriminated against, no investigation would have ensued. However, as explained above, a full investigation had been undertaken and the conclusions of the authorities had been justified on the basis of an objective and reasonable approach.
174. The Bulgarian Government submitted that their authorities had taken prompt, adequate and comprehensive measures to protect the interests of the applicants, as confirmed by the evidence provided by the CRD. They noted that the database of the Ministry of Foreign affairs did not store data in relation to ethnicity. Thus, there could be no allegation that the applicants had been subjected to discriminatory attitudes due to their ethnic origin. Moreover, they noted that the family accused by the applicants of such treatment was of the same ethnicity, which in itself dispelled any ideas of a difference in treatment.
175. The Court’s case-law on Article 14 establishes that discrimination means treating differently, without an objective and reasonable justification, persons in relevantly similar situations (see Willis v. the United Kingdom, no. 36042/97, § 48, ECHR 2002-IV). Racial violence is a particular affront to human dignity and, in view of its perilous consequences, requires from the authorities special vigilance and a vigorous reaction. It is for this reason that the authorities must use all available means to combat racism and racist violence, thereby reinforcing democracy’s vision of a society in which diversity is not perceived as a threat but as a source of its enrichment. (see Nachova and Others v. Bulgaria [GC], nos. 43577/98 and 43579/98, § 145, ECHR 2005-VII).
176. The Court further recalls that when investigating violent incidents, State authorities have the additional duty to take all reasonable steps to unmask any racist motive and to establish whether or not ethnic hatred or prejudice may have played a role in the events. Treating racially induced violence and brutality on an equal footing with cases that have no racist overtones would be turning a blind eye to the specific nature of acts that are particularly destructive of fundamental rights. A failure to make a distinction in the way in which situations that are essentially different are handled may constitute unjustified treatment irreconcilable with Article 14 of the Convention. Admittedly, proving racial motivation will often be extremely difficult in practice. The respondent State’s obligation to investigate possible racist overtones to a violent act is an obligation to use its best endeavours and is not absolute; the authorities must do what is reasonable in the circumstances of the case (see Nachova and others, cited above, § 160).
177. Faced with the applicants’ complaint under Article 14, the Court’s task is to establish first of all whether or not racism was a causal factor in the circumstances leading to their complaint to the authorities and in relation to this, whether or not the respondent State complied with its obligation to investigate possible racist motives. Moreover, the Court should also examine whether in carrying out the investigation into the applicants’ allegation of ill-treatment by the police, the domestic authorities discriminated against the applicants and, if so, whether the discrimination was based on their ethnic origin.
178. As to the first limb of the complaint, the Court notes that even assuming the applicants’ version of events was truthful, the treatment they claim to have suffered at the hands of third parties cannot be said in any way to have racist overtones or that it was instigated by ethnic hatred or prejudice because the alleged perpetrators belonged to the same ethnic group as the applicants. Indeed, the applicants did not make this allegation to the police when they complained about the events related to the Serbian family. It follows that there was no positive obligation on the State to investigate such motives.
179. As to the second limb, namely whether the domestic authorities discriminated against the applicants on the basis of their ethnic origin, the Court notes that while it has already held above that the Italian authorities failed to adequately investigate the applicants’ allegations, from the documents submitted, it does not transpire that such failure to act was a consequence of discriminatory attitudes. Indeed, there appears to be no racist verbal abuse by the police during the investigation, nor were any tendentious remarks made by the prosecutor in relation to the applicants’ Roma origin throughout the investigation or by the courts in the subsequent trials. Moreover, the applicants did not accuse the authorities of displaying anti-Roma sentiment at the relevant time.
180. Accordingly, in so far as the complaint is directed against Italy, it is manifestly ill-founded, and is to be rejected according to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
181. The Court considers that no such complaint has been directed against Bulgaria, and even if it were, the complaint is manifestly ill-founded and is to be rejected according to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
182. Lastly, the applicants complained that the first and third applicants were not provided with lawyers and interpreters during their questioning, were not informed in what capacity they were being questioned, and were forced to sign documents the content of which they were unaware. They invoked Article 13 of the Convention.
183. The Court considers that the complaint in so far as Article 13 is invoked is misconceived and would more appropriately be analysed under Article 6.
184. However, the Court reiterates that a person may not claim to be a victim of a violation of his right to a fair trial under Article 6 of the Convention which, according to him or her, took place in the course of proceedings in which he or she was acquitted or which were discontinued (see Osmanov and Husseinov v. Bulgaria (dec.), nos. 54178/00 and 59901/00, 4 September 2003, and the case-law cited therein).
185. The Court notes that the proceedings against the first applicant were discontinued (see paragraph 29 above) and that the third applicant was acquitted by a judgment of 8 February 2006 (see paragraph 32 above). The Court therefore considers that in these circumstances the two applicants cannot claim to be victims of a violation of their right to a fair trial under Article 6.
186. It follows that this complaint must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
187. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
188. Although a request for just satisfaction (EUR 200,000) was made when the applicants lodged their application, they did not submit a claim for just satisfaction when requested by the Court. Accordingly, the Court considers that there is no call to award them any sum on that account.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the complaints concerning the lack of adequate steps to prevent the first applicant’s ill-treatment by the Serbian family by securing her swift release and the lack of an effective investigation into that alleged ill-treatment, by the Italian authorities, admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds by 6 votes to 1 that there has not been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention in respect of the steps taken by the authorities to release the first applicant;

3. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention in so far as the investigation into the first applicant’s alleged ill-treatment by private individuals was not effective;
Done in English, and notified in writing on 31 July 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Francoise Tulkens
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Kalaydjieva is annexed to this judgment.
F.T.
S.H.N.


DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE KALAYDJIEVA
Together with my esteemed colleagues, I am “struck by the fact that following the first applicant’s release, it took the authorities less than a full day to reach their conclusions” (paragraph 104) and discontinue any further investigation into the applicants’ complaints. These complaints involved ill-treatment and non-consensual sexual acts with a minor, which allegedly lasted one month and took place in a villa owned by a person with a criminal record. The Court was unanimous in finding that “had they been proved, [some of the acts complained of] could have amounted to human trafficking” and -further on - that no investigation had taken place.
What I find even more striking in the present case is the fact that having raided the villa, where the first applicant was allegedly held against her will, and released her seventeen days after obtaining information that the mother feared that her daughter might be subjected to forced prostitution, the authorities decided not only to dismiss these complaints without any further enquiries, but also to immediately institute criminal proceedings against the seventeen-year-old girl and her mother for perjury and false accusations to the effect “that X., Y. and Z. [had] deprived [the minor] of her liberty by keeping her in the villa, thus accusing them of kidnapping while knowing they were innocent” (paragraph 30).
It appears somewhat illogical that having “opined that the circumstances of the present case concerned a Roma marriage”, the authorities nonetheless undertook protective measures by placing the girl in a Caritas shelter and then handing her into her mother’s care, instead of leaving her free to happily rejoin her “husband” after an action apparently regarded as an unnecessary interference in their peaceful family affairs.
I find it alarming that, after receiving further detailed and insistent complaints from the applicants (paragraphs 16 and 25) through the Bulgarian embassy in Rome, the Italian authorities insisted on proceeding with the accusations against the applicants rather than investigating the circumstances complained of. It is difficult to avoid the impression that this was done in an attempt to actively disprove not only the purposes for which the minor had allegedly been forcefully held in the villa, but also the very fact of the unlawful deprivation of liberty, from which they released her. Indeed, the respondent Italian Government relied on the proceedings instituted for perjury to convince the Court that “the facts as alleged by the applicants had been entirely disproved during domestic proceedings” (paragraph 90) and that the “traditional marriage” understanding of the events had been considered “truthful by the judgment of the Turin Investigating Magistrate” in discontinuing the proceedings against the first applicant as well as found “probable by the Turin Tribunal in its judgment of 2006” acquitting the third applicant (paragraphs 92 and 93). In fact, the judge of the Turin Tribunal found the photographs of the “marriage” to depict a scene that was rather grim for Roma traditions. Acting in proceedings in absentia, where the third applicant was neither summoned to appear, nor able to defend herself, or explain the circumstances, he dismissed the accusations of perjury and false accusations against her, noting also that X., Y. and Z. had availed themselves of their right to remain silent in the “false accusations of kidnapping”, allegedly raised by the mother.
The applicants’ allegations of ill-treatment by the Italian authorities were not limited to the failure to undertake timely action for the release and protection of a minor, as suggested by paragraphs 102-108 of the judgment. In this regard I see no reason to join the majority in their approval of the “promptness and diligence” (paragraph 102) displayed in an action which the national authorities themselves deemed unnecessary and caused by false assertions.
Nor were the applicants’ complaints about the manner in which they were allegedly questioned separated from those concerning the attitude of the Italian authorities – as examined in paragraphs 115-118. In this regard, the very fact that the criminal proceedings for perjury and false accusations were instituted a few hours after the allegedly threatening interrogations suffices to support a conclusion that the threats were quite realistic.
The applicants’ submissions about ill-treatment by the authorities concerned the overall approach of the Italian investigation authorities to their complaints. Seeing that they were not only dismissed without any enquiries, but were also followed by an attempt to actively disprove them, I cannot come to any explanation for this treatment other than an assumption on the part of the authorities that the applicants had been telling lies from the outset. This assumption transpires from the reluctance to organise the timely release of the minor, the manner in which she and her mother were hastily questioned under threat and the immediate (but unsuccessful) institution of proceedings for perjury in an attempt to establish that their complaints were nothing but false accusations, made while knowing that X., Y. and Z. were innocent.
This explanation appears to be more reasonable than that offered to the Court, namely, that the “Italian authorities opined that the circumstances of the present case fell within the context of a Roma marriage”. Even if correct (and I would venture to doubt it), such an “opinion” could not reasonably explain the manner in which the authorities dealt with the applicants’ complaints of ill-treatment, non-consensual sex, forced participation in criminal activities, etc., unless it is seen as an understanding that a Roma marriage constituted an agreement of the parents to sell a bride “for all purposes”.
I find myself unable to accept either of these two explanations for the manner in which the authorities dealt with the applicants’ complaints and find each of them to be based on equally inappropriate assumptions.

TESTO TRADOTTO


Conclusioni: Eccezione preliminare in parte respinta (Articolo 34 - Vittima)
Eccezione preliminare in parte accolta (Articolo 34 - Vittima)
Resto inammissibile
Nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 3 - Proibizione della tortura (Articolo 3 - trattamento Inumano) (aspetto Effettivo) (Italia)
Violazione dell’ Articolo 3 - Proibizione della tortura (Articolo 3 - indagine Effettiva) (aspetto Procedurale) (Italia)


SECONDA SEZIONE






CAUSA M. ED ALTRI C. ITALIA E BULGARIA

(Richiesta n. 40020/03)

SENTENZA




STRASBOURG

31 luglio 2012










Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.
Nella causa M. ed Altri c. Italia e Bulgaria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente
Danutė Jočienė,
Dragoljub Popović,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
András Sajó,
Guido Raimondi, judges,and
Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 3 luglio 2012,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 40020/03) contro la Repubblica italiana depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da quattro cittadini bulgari, L.M., S.M., I.I., e K.L. (“i richiedenti”), 11 dicembre 2003
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati col Sig. S.S. Marinov, direttore di Associazione Civile Futuro Regionale, Vidin. Il Governo italiano fu rappresentato inizialmente col loro Co-agente, il Sig. N. Lettieri e successivamente col loro Co-agente, il Sig.ra P. Accardo. Il Governo bulgaro fu rappresentato inizialmente col loro Agente, il Sig.ra N. Nikolova e successivamente col loro Agente, il Sig.ra M. Dimova.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che c'era stata una violazione di Articolo 3 in riguardo della mancanza di passi adeguati per ostacolare il mal-trattamento del primo richiedente con una famiglia serba con garantendo la sua liberazione rapida e la mancanza di un'indagine effettiva in quel addusse mal-trattamento.
4. 2 febbraio 2010 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta ai Governi italiani e bulgari. Decise anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
5. In 29 maggio 2012 il Sezione Presidente decise di accordare l'anonimia ai richiedenti di sua propria istanza sotto Articolo 47 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero in 1985, 1959 1958 e 1977 rispettivamente e vive nel villaggio di Novo Selo nella regione di Vidin (la Bulgaria). I richiedenti sono di Roma origine etnica. Al tempo degli eventi (maggio-giugno 2003), il primo richiedente ancora era un minore. Il secondo e terzi richiedenti sono suo padre e madre, ed il quarto richiedente è la cognata del primo richiedente.
A. La versione degli eventi dei richiedenti
7. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato coi richiedenti, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
8. Il primo, secondo e terzi richiedenti arrivarono a Milano in 12 maggio 2003 che segue una promessa di lavoro con X., un uomo di Roma della nazionalità serba, risiedendo in Italia che li accomodò in una villa nel villaggio di Ghislarengo nella provincia di Vercelli dove lui visse con la sua famiglia. I terzi ed i primi richiedenti offrirono versioni diverse su questo punto alle autorità italiane. Nelle sue dichiarazioni alla polizia italiana, il terzo richiedente sostenne in 24 maggio 2003, che lei, suo marito e sua figlia che vissero in Bulgaria in una condizione della precarietà estrema si trasferirono ad Italia in ricerca di lavoro; quando loro arrivarono a Milano loro si avvicinarono ad un individuo che parlò la loro lingua, X. che propose a loro per lavorare come impiegati nazionali per prendersi cura di grande alloggio suo. Il primo richiedente, nelle sue dichiarazioni all'accusatore pubblico 11 giugno 2003, sostenne che lei aveva incontrato X. in “l'Iugoslavia”, dove era con sua madre in ricerca di un lavoro lei, e da là X. li aveva guidati ad Italia nella sua macchina dopo avere proposto un lavoro. Loro rimasero nella villa per molti giorni durante che il tempo loro intrapresero lavoro domestico di famiglia. Dopo un po', X. dichiarò al secondo richiedente che Y., suo nipote ha voluto sposarsi sua figlia (il primo richiedente). Come il secondo e terzi richiedenti rifiutarono, X. li minacciò con una pistola caricata. Poi il secondo e terzi richiedenti furono colpiti, minacciò con morte e forzato lasciare il primo richiedente in Italia e ritornare in Bulgaria. Benché i richiedenti negassero questo, sembra dalle loro osservazioni iniziali che il secondo e terzi richiedenti erano stati offerti di lasciare loro figlia dietro a soldi. In 18 maggio 2003, il secondo e terzi richiedenti ritornarono in Bulgaria. Sul loro ritorno il secondo richiedente fu diagnosticato con tipo 2 diabete che lui addusse era una conseguenza dello stress sopportata.
9. I richiedenti presentarono che durante il mese (seguendo 18 maggio 2003) esausto alla villa in Ghislarengo, il primo richiedente fu tenuto sotto sorveglianza continua e fu costretto per rubare contro la sua volontà, fu colpito, fu minacciato con morte e fu stuprato ripetutamente con Y. mentre allacciò ad un letto. Durante uno dei furti nel quale il primo richiedente fu costretto per partecipare, lei aveva un incidente e doveva essere trattata in ospedale. Comunque, la famiglia serba rifiutò di lasciarla per subire trattamento là. I richiedenti presentarono che loro non erano consapevoli del nome ed ubicazione di questo ospedale.
10. In 24 maggio 2003 il terzo richiedente ritornò in Italia, accompagnò con la cognata del primo richiedente (il quarto richiedente), e presentò un reclamo con la polizia italiana a Torino, riportando che lei e suo marito erano stati colpiti ed erano stati minacciati e che il primo richiedente era stato rapito. Lei temeva inoltre che era probabile che sua figlia fosse condotta in prostituzione. Loro furono stabiliti in un convento Torino vicina. Successivamente, la polizia li accompagnò con un interprete per identificare l'alloggio in Ghislarengo.
11. Evidentemente frustrato con la lentezza della polizia nel rispondere all'azione di reclamo, il secondo richiedente presentò reclami scritto con molte altre istituzioni. Una lettera di 31 maggio 2003, rivolse al Primo Ministro italiano, i Ministri italiani per Affari Esteri ed Interni l'Ambasciatore italiano in Bulgaria, il Prefetto di Torino, il Primo Ministro bulgaro il Ministro bulgaro per Affari Esteri e l'Ambasciatore bulgaro ad Italia, è incluso nell'archivio.
12. È stato mostrato che, diciotto giorni dopo l'alloggio dell'azione di reclamo, 11 giugno 2003, la polizia fece scorrerie l'alloggio in Ghislarengo, trovò il primo richiedente là e fece un numero di arresti. Alle approssimativamente 2 di sera che giorno, lei fu portata ad una stazione di polizia in Vercelli e fu interrogata, nella presenza di un interprete, entro due femmina e due agenti di polizia maschi. I richiedenti addussero che lei fu trattata rudemente e minacciò che lei sarebbe stata accusata di spergiuro e diffamazione se lei non dicesse la verità. Presumibilmente lei fu costretta poi per dichiarare che lei non augurò essere perseguiti i suoi rapitori supposti, rispondere “sì” a tutte le altre questioni, e firmare i certi documenti in italiano che lei non capì e quali né furono tradotti nel bulgaro né determinato a lei. Loro addussero anche che l'interprete non faceva in modo appropriato il suo lavoro e rimase silenzioso di fronte al trattamento che è inflitto. I richiedenti addussero inoltre che Y. era presente durante le certe parti del primo richiedente sta interrogando.
13. Più tardi che giorno, il terzo richiedente fu interrogato con la polizia in Vercelli nella presenza di un interprete. Il terzo richiedente addusse che lei fu minacciata anche che lei sarebbe stata accusata di spergiuro e diffamazione se lei non dicesse la verità, e che l'interprete non faceva in modo appropriato il suo lavoro. Lei disse che, siccome lei rifiutò di firmare il documento, la polizia la trattò male.
14. Ad approssimativamente 10 di sera nello stesso giorno che il primo richiedente è stato messo in dubbio di nuovo. I richiedenti addussero che nessun interprete o avvocato erano presenti e che il primo richiedente non sapeva di ciò che fu registrato. Il primo richiedente fu portato poi ad una cella e lasciò per quattro o cinque ore là. 12 giugno 2003 alle approssimativamente 4 di mattina, lei fu trasferita ad un ricovero per persone senza casa, dove lei rimase sino a 12.30 di sera
15. Nello stesso giorno, sulla loro richiesta, il primo, terzo e quarto richiedenti furono ripresi con la polizia alla stazione ferroviaria in Vercelli e viaggiò verso la Bulgaria. Loro presentarono alla Corte che i fatti sono stati investigati poi con le autorità italiane, ma che nessuno procedimenti penali furono avviati in Italia contro i rapitori del primo richiedente, o almeno che loro non furono informati, né era loro in grado ottenere informazioni di qualsiasi indagine penale ed in corso. Loro si lamentarono anche che le autorità italiane non cercarono di interrogare il secondo richiedente per stabilire i fatti, con vuole dire della cooperazione con le autorità bulgare.
16. Sembra dall'archivio che, dopo giugno 2003, i richiedenti spedirono molte lettere ed e-mail la maggior parte di che erano in bulgaro alle autorità italiane (come il Primo Ministro italiano, i Ministri italiani per la Giustizia ed Affari Interni, il Generale Accusatore allegò alla Corte d'appello di Torino, il sindaco di Ghislarengo e le autorità diplomatiche italiane in Bulgaria), con una richiesta per offrirli con informazioni sull'incursione di polizia di 11 giugno 2003 ed avviare procedimenti penali contro i rapitori allegato del primo richiedente. Loro si lamentarono anche che loro avevano sofferto di minacce, umiliazione e mal-trattamento per causa della polizia. Loro chiesero a quelle autorità di spedire le loro azioni di reclamo all'Accusatore Pubblico in Vercelli ed al reparto di polizia della stessa città.
17. Allo stesso tempo, i richiedenti scrissero anche al Primo Ministro della Bulgaria, il Capo della Relazioni Divisione Consolare del Ministero bulgaro di Affari Esteri (CRD) ed il Consolato bulgaro a Roma, richiedendoli per proteggere i loro diritti ed assisterli nell'ottenere informazioni dalle autorità italiane. Il Consolato bulgaro a Roma fornì ai richiedenti le certe informazioni.
18. I richiedenti non offrirono la Corte con qualsiasi documento che riguarda il loro interrogatorio ed i procedimenti penali e susseguenti contro loro (vedere sotto). Il loro rappresentante chiese che, in considerazione delle circostanze, incluso il rifiuto allegato dell'Ambasciata italiana in Bulgaria era impossibile per presentare qualsiasi il documento. Loro presentarono solamente separatamente da copie delle lettere spedite alle istituzioni italiane, due referti medici, uno datò 22 giugno 2003 che stabilisce che il primo richiedente stava patendo disturbo di stress posto-traumatico ed uno datò 24 giugno 2003 che stabilisce che il primo richiedente aveva una contusione sul capo, una piccola ferita sul gomito corretto ed una costola rotta. Affermò inoltre che lei aveva perso la sua verginità e stava patendo un'infezione vaginale. Il referto medico concluse che questi danni sarebbero potuti essere inflitti nel modo il primo richiedente aveva riportato.
B. La versione del Governo italiano degli eventi
19. Alla richiesta della Corte, il Governo italiano presentò un numero di documenti fra il quale la trascrizione della prima azione di reclamo depositò col terzo richiedente in 24 maggio 2003 con la polizia di Torino il 2009 e 30 luglio 2009 di 21 aprile, ed i minuti dei colloqui col primo richiedente, il terzo richiedente ed alcuni dei rapitori allegato che ebbero luogo 11 giugno 2003.
20. Sembra da questi documenti che la trascrizione della prima azione di reclamo del terzo richiedente contro i rapitori allegato (depositò con la polizia italiana a Torino in 24 maggio 2003), così come i richiedenti azioni di reclamo di ' spedite col loro rappresentante ad istituzioni italiane e diverse, di giorni seguenti, fu trasmesso alla polizia italiana in Vercelli (26 maggio e 6 giugno 2003 rispettivamente) ed all'Accusatore Pubblico della stessa città (4 e 13 giugno 2003 rispettivamente).
21. Più specificamente, in 26 maggio 2003 la Torino Squadra Mobile richiese aiuto dal Vercelli Squadra Mobile identificare l'ubicazione dove il primo richiedente era sostenuto presumibilmente. In 27 maggio 2003 il Vercelli che Squadra Mobile è andata a Ghislarengo ad identificare insieme l'ubicazione col terzo richiedente. Loro ispezionarono l'ubicazione ed il terzo richiedente identificò la villa che lei aveva menzionato nella sua azione di reclamo. 4 giugno 2003 la Vercelli Polizia Sede centrale trasmise il rapporto delittuoso (reato di di di notizia) al Vercelli l'Ufficio di Accusatore Pubblico. Dalla cancelleria comunale sembrò che nessuna persona risiedeva nella villa identificata, ma che fu posseduto con un individuo che aveva un casellario giudiziale. In conseguenza, la polizia tenne il posto sotto sorveglianza. La polizia fece scorrerie la villa 11 giugno 2003, dopo avere osservato movimento in. Durante la ricerca la polizia prese un numero di macchine fotografiche che contengono fotografie di ciò che sembrò essere un matrimonio.
22. 7, 11, 12 e 13 giugno 2003 che il Ministero di Affari Interni è stato informato con fax di sviluppi nella causa.
23. 11 giugno 2003 ad approssimativamente 2.30 di sera, il primo richiedente fu interrogato immediatamente dopo l'incursione, con l'Accusatore Pubblico di Vercelli che fu assistito con la polizia. Come anche traspira dai documenti, il primo richiedente fece dichiarazioni che prima hanno mostrato un numero di discrepanze con l'azione di reclamo presentate con sua madre, e quale condusse le autorità a concludere che nessun rapimento, ma piuttosto un accordo di un matrimonio, aveva in realtà successa fra le due famiglie. Questa conclusione fu confermata con fotografie date alla polizia con X. dopo l'incursione, mostrando una parte di matrimonio alla quale il secondo richiedente ricevette una somma di soldi da X. Quando mostrò le fotografie, il primo richiedente negò che suo padre aveva preso soldi come parte dell'accordo sul matrimonio.
24. A 8.30 di sera il terzo richiedente fu interrogato con l'Accusatore Pubblico in Vercelli. Lei affermò di nuovo che sua figlia non si era sposata Y. di suo proprio spontanea volontà, ed affermò che le fotografie non erano nulla ma una contraffazione, presa apposta coi rapitori allegato che li avevano minacciati con una pistola per minare la credibilità della loro versione dei fatti. La polizia di Vercelli interrogò anche X., Z. (un terzo presente di parte al matrimonio) e Y. che tutti affermarono che Y. era entrato in un matrimonio consensuale col primo richiedente.
25. Come un risultato di questi colloqui e sulla base delle fotografie, l'Accusatore Pubblico di Vercelli decise di girare i procedimenti contro persone ignote per rapire (1735/03 RGNR) in procedimenti contro i primo e terzi richiedenti per spergiuro e diffamazione. Più tardi che sera, i primo e terzi richiedenti furono informati col Vercelli e polizia di Torino delle accuse ed invitarono a nominare un rappresentante. Loro furono offerti poi con un avvocato corte-nominato. Ad approssimativamente 11.30 di sera il primo richiedente fu trasferito ad un ricovero per persone senza casa. 12 giugno 2003 lei fu rilasciata nella custodia di sua madre. I richiedenti che azioni di reclamo di ' spedite a molte istituzioni italiane durante i mesi seguenti sono state ricevute col Polizia Settore in Vercelli, tradusse nell'italiano e spedì al Ministero di Affari Interni.
26. Informazioni seguenti richiedono, i primi datarono 6 novembre 2003 con l'Ambasciata della Bulgaria a Roma, le autorità italiane aggiornarono il Console dello status dei procedimenti penali (menzionò sotto) 7 e 19 novembre 2003, e 2 dicembre 2003.
1. I procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente
27. 11 luglio 2003, l'Accusatore Pubblico allegato al Tribunale per i minorenni di Piemonte ed il d'Aosta di Valle avviò procedimenti penali (1838/03 RGNR) contro il primo richiedente per le accuse false (la calunnia) in finora siccome lei disse che X., Y. e Z. la spogliarono della sua libertà personale tenendola nella villa, accusandoli così di rapimento mentre seppe loro erano innocenti.
28. 28 novembre 2003 il primo richiedente fu invitato per interrogare con l'Accusatore Pubblico, ma lei era in Bulgaria e non sembrò.
29. 26 gennaio 2005 il Magistrato Inquirente del Tribunale per i minorenni deciso di non procedere finora con le accuse in come i reati commesso sia uno-via e non serio, e perciò “socialmente irrilevante.”
2. I procedimenti penali contro il terzo richiedente
30. 26 giugno 2003 l'Accusatore Pubblico di Torino avviò procedimenti penali (18501/03 RGNR) contro il terzo richiedente per spergiuro e le accuse false (la calunnia) in finora siccome lei disse che X., Y. e Z. spogliarono sua figlia della sua libertà personale tenendola nella villa, mentre li accusò così di rapimento mentre seppe loro erano innocenti.
31. 22 luglio 2003 l'Accusatore Pubblico di Torino concluse l'indagine contro il terzo richiedente e spedì la causa al Tribunale penale di Torino.
32. 8 febbraio 2006 il Tribunale penale di Torino assolse il terzo richiedente, sulla base che i fatti dei quali lei fu accusata non si sostennero. La prova effettiva che consiste del nota verbale dell'interrogatorio dell'accusato e sua figlia, la prova fotografica e le dichiarazioni dei poliziotti, era indicativo e non poteva stabilire senza dubbio la colpa dell'accusato. L'accusato e le dichiarazioni di sua figlia erano contraddittorie e le fotografie non certificarono le circostanze nelle quali loro furono presi. Secondo le dichiarazioni di polizia potrebbe essere dedotto solamente che la figlia era stata trovata alla villa e le persone che avrebbero potuto chiarificare i fatti si era giovato a del diritto per rimanere silenzioso. La comprensione dei fatti fu complicata inoltre con la tradizione di Roma di vendere, o prima pagando una somma di soldi stabilita alla famiglia della sposa per i fini di concludere un matrimonio, una questione che nella causa di una controversia avrebbe potuto creare conseguenze che era stato impossibile per stabilire.
C. La versione del Governo bulgaro degli eventi
33. Sulla base dei documenti prodotta col Governo italiano, particolarmente le dichiarazioni rese con X., Y. e Z. il Governo bulgaro considerò i fatti per essere siccome segue.
In 12 maggio 2003 i primi tre richiedenti arrivarono in Italia e furono accomodati nel campo nomade in Arluno. Era là che X., Y. e Z. li soddisfecero e che Y. scelse il primo richiedente come il suo consorte. Il primo richiedente concordò e perciò Z. ed il secondo richiedente contrattarono sul prezzo della sposa. Il secondo richiedente esigeva inizialmente EUR 20,000, ma infine loro concordarono sulla somma di EUR 11,000. Z. pagò in anticipo il secondo richiedente EUR 500. Dopo che festività che gli appena sposati sono andati in pensione alla roulotte dove loro completarono il matrimonio e Y. confermò che il primo richiedente era stato una vergine. Le due famiglie andarono poi al campo nomade di Kudzhiono dove loro celebrarono il matrimonio. Alla fine del matrimonio X. pagò il secondo richiedente il resto dell'importo dovuto, vale a dire EUR 10,500, nella presenza di famiglie ed altri testimoni, come provato con le fotografie. Dopo che le festività i genitori della sposa furono accompagnati alla stazione ferroviaria e lasciarono per la Bulgaria in 18 maggio 2003.
34. Una volta in Bulgaria era solamente in 31 maggio 2003, tredici giorni dopo la loro partenza dall'Italia, che il secondo richiedente si lamentò al CRD della Bulgaria. Seguendo questa prima notificazione, le autorità bulgare intentarono causa immediata e 2 giugno 2003 che la rivendicazione è stata spedita all'Ambasciata bulgara a Roma. Contatto fu reso con le autorità italiane ed un'incursione riuscita con la polizia italiana che liberò il primo richiedente fu eseguito 11 giugno 2003.
35. Successivamente, i primo e terzi richiedenti furono interrogati con un accusatore si specializzato in interazione con minors, nella presenza di un interprete. Seguendo un'indagine con le autorità italiane, procedimenti penali contro i primo e terzi richiedenti per spergiuro furono iniziati. I richiedenti non informarono le autorità bulgare dei procedimenti secondi.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Legge italiana Attinente
36. Secondo Articolo 50 supplire-articoli 1 e 2 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale, l'Accusatore Pubblico intraprende procedimenti penali quando alle condizioni per archiviare una causa non sono adempiute. Quando l'azione di reclamo della vittima o un auorizzazione per procedere non è richiesta, procedimenti penali si sono impegnati ex proprio motu. Secondo Articolo 408 del Codice Penale di Procedura, una richiesta per archiviare una causa è resa, se l'avviso del crimine (reato di di di notizia) è infondato. Tale richiesta è trasmessa insieme con l'archivio attinente e documenti al giudice per indagine preliminare. Avviso di tale richiesta è dato a qualsiasi vittima che prima ha dichiarato suo o suo desideri essere informato di qualsiasi simile azione. L'avviso secondo include informazioni della possibilità per consultare la causa-archivio e presentare un'eccezione (l'opposizione), insieme con una richiesta ragionata continuare l'indagine preliminare.
37. Articolo 55 (1) del Codice di Diritto processuale penale prevede che la polizia giudiziale deve, anche su loro proprio iniziale, riceva avviso di crimini, ostacoli gli ulteriori crimini, trovi i perpetratore di crimini, prenda qualsiasi le misure necessario assicurare le fonti di prova e la raccolta di qualsiasi l'altro materiale attinente del quale sarebbe avuto bisogno per la richiesta del diritto penale.
38. Secondo il Codice Penale italiano, al tempo dei fatti attinenti le percosse (percosse), ferendo e ferendo con intenzione (lesione personale, lesioni personali colpose), rapimento (sequestro persona), la violenza sessuale (incluso stupro ma non solo) ( violenza sessuale), la violenza privata (violenza privata), la violenza o minaccia per i fini di costringere la perpetrazione di un reato (violenza o minaccia per costringere a commettere un reato), e minacce (la minaccia) è punibile di crimini con reclusione per periodi che variano da un giorno a sei mesi per il reato minore ed a cinque anni a dieci anni per il reato più serio.
Inoltre, alcuni di questi crimini sono soggetto a pene detentive più alte quando il crimine è commesso contro, inter alia, un discendente o moglie come per esempio nella causa di rapire, o è soggetto alla richiesta di circostanze aggravanti quando, come nella causa della violenza sessuale, la vittima è più giovane di quattordici anni maggiorenne, la vittima è più giovane di sedici anni maggiorenne e è stata assaltata con un genitore nascente o fa da tutore a, o la vittima era soggetto alla libertà personale e limitata.
39. Articolo 572 del Codice Penale prevede per una pena detentiva di su a cinque anni per chiunque trovato colpevole di seviziare un membro di suo o la sua famiglia, un figlio sotto quattordici anni maggiorenne, o una persona sotto suo o la sua autorità o in che è stato messo suo o la sua cura per i fini di istruzione, istruzione, cura, soprintendenza o custodia.
40. Il Codice Penale italiano, al tempo della causa presente specifiche disposizioni anche incluse relativo a minori che, in finora come attinente, legga siccome segue:
Articolo 573
“Chiunque toglie dal genitore che ha autorità parentale o l'amministratore, senza il beneplacito secondo un minore più di quattordici anni maggiorenne con suo o il suo beneplacito è punito con reclusione di un periodo di un massimo di due anni sull'azione di reclamo del genitore detto o amministratore. La punizione è diminuita se il fine della presa è andato via matrimonio ed aumentò se è concupiscenza.”
Articolo 609-il quartiere (corretto nel 2006)
“Un termine di reclusione di cinque a dieci anni è applicabile per il reato di atti sessuali non coperto col reato della violenza sessuale quando la vittima è:
1) sotto dodici anni maggiorenne,
2) sotto sedici anni maggiorenne, se l'aggressore è l'ascendente, genitore, o il cohabitee secondo, il tutore o qualsiasi l'altra persona che ha la cura della vittima per i fini di istruzione, istruzione, cura, soprintendenza o custodia e con chi la vittima coabita.
Salvi per le circostanze previste per sotto il reato della violenza sessuale, l'ascendente, genitore, o il cohabitee secondo, ed il tutore che hanno abusato suo o i suoi poteri connessero suo o la sua posizione e è colpevole di atti sessuali con un minore più vecchio di sedici anni maggiorenne, è punito con reclusione di da tre a sei anni.”
41. Legge n. 154 di 2001 introdussero un numero di misure contro la violenza in relazioni di famiglia. Questi inclusero misure precauzionali e permanenti riguardo al cacciare dell'accusato dalla casa di famiglia su un decreto a questo effetto con un giudice.
42. Italia adottò Legge n. 228, vale a dire la Legge su Misure per Ostacolare Traffico in Esseri Umani, 11 agosto 2003. Il secondo ha aggiunto un numero di reati al Codice Penale che in finora come lettura attinente siccome segue:
Articolo 600 (essere sostenuto in schiavitù o la servitù)
“Chiunque esercita su una persona motorizza corrispondendo a quelli di proprietà che è chiunque riduce o mantiene una persona in un stato di soggezione continuata, mentre costringendo la persona in lavora o servizi sessuali o implorando, o in qualsiasi evento ripara comportando lo sfruttamento, è punito con reclusione di un periodo di otto a venti anni.
Accade la partecipazione azionaria di una persona in un stato di soggezione quando simile condotta è portata fuori con vuole dire della violenza, minacce, la falsità, l'abuso di autorità o vantaggio di presa di una situazione dell'inferiorità fisica o mentale o di una situazione di bisogno, o per la promessa o il pagamento di una somma di soldi o l'altro vantaggio all'individuo che ha autorità sulla persona.
La punizione è aumentata entro un terzo ad una metà se i fatti menzionassero in subparagraph uno sopra è diretto contro un minore di meno che diciotto anni maggiorenne o se loro sono proporsi per lo sfruttamento di prostituzione o mirarono all'allontanamento di organi.”
Articolo 601 (creatura umana che traffica)
“Chiunque commette creatura umana che traffica per i fini di sostenere una persona in servitù o schiavitù siccome menzionato in articolo 600 sopra ed incitata simile persona, con vuole dire della violenza, minacce, la falsità, l'abuso di autorità o vantaggio di presa di una situazione di fisico dell'inferiorità mentale o di una situazione di bisogno, o per la promessa o donazione di una somma di soldi o gli altri vantaggi all'individuo che ha autorità sulla persona detta, entrare o sospendere o lascia il territorio dello stato o spostarli internamente lui o, è punito con reclusione di un periodo di otto a venti anni.
La punizione è aumentata entro un terzo ad una metà se i fatti menzionassero in subparagraph uno sopra è diretto contro un minore di meno che diciotto anni maggiorenne o se loro sono proporsi per lo sfruttamento di prostituzione o mirarono all'allontanamento di organi.”
Articolo 602 (acquisto e l'alienazione di schiavi)
“Chiunque, salvi per le cause indicate in articolo 601, acquisti aliena o vende una persona nella situazione posata in giù in articolo 600, è punito con reclusione di un periodo di otto a venti anni.
La punizione è aumentata entro un terzo ad una metà se i fatti menzionassero in subparagraph uno sopra è diretto contro un minore di meno che diciotto anni maggiorenne o se loro sono proporsi per lo sfruttamento di prostituzione o mirarono all'allontanamento di organi.”
43. Legge n. 228 altri cambi anche inclusi al Codice Penale in relazione agli articoli sopra quando preso in concomitanza con preesistendo uni, come Articolo 416 da che cosa previde per specifiche punizioni se l'associazione per commettere un crimine fosse diretta verso commettendo qualsiasi dei crimini in articoli 600 a 602. Previde inoltre per sanzioni amministrative in riguardo di persone giuridiche, società e le associazioni per crimini contro la personalità individuale e fece i cambi attinenti al Codice Penale di Procedura, incluso le sue disposizioni riguardo all'intercettamento di conversazioni o comunicazioni ed agenti segreti che divennero applicabili ai reati nuovi. Legge n. 228 crearono anche un finanziamento per anti-trafficare misure e l'istituzione di un programme dell'assistenza speciale per vittime dei crimini sotto articoli 600 e 601 del Codice Penale, insieme con disposizione per misure preventive. In finora come attinente, articoli 13 e 14 della lettura di legge detta siccome segue:
Articolo 13
“Salvi per le cause previste per sotto articolo 16-bis di decreto legislativo n. 8 15 gennaio 1991, convertì e cambiò con legge n. 82 15 marzo 1991, ed emendamenti successivi, per le vittime dei crimini sotto articolo 600 e 601 del codice penale, siccome sostituito con la legge presente, là sarà avviato... un programme dell'assistenza speciale che garantisce vitto ed alloggio provvisorio, adeguato condiziona ed assistenza di salute. Il programme ancora è definito con regolamentazione per essere adottato (...)”
Articolo 14
“Per rafforzare l'efficacia dell'azione su prevenzione dei crimini di schiavitù e la servitù e crimini riferì a creatura umana traffico, il Ministro per Affari Esteri definisce politiche della cooperazione in riguardo di qualsiasi Stati interessati /colpiti da simile crimini, mentre tenendo presente la loro collaborazione e l'attenzione data con simile Stati ai problemi di rispettare diritto umano. Il Ministro detto deve assicurare, insieme col Ministro delle Uguaglianze di opportunità, l'organizzazione di riunioni internazionali ed informazioni partecipa ad una campagna, particolarmente in Stati da che più vittime di così delittuoso venga. Con lo stesso scopo, i Ministri di Interno, delle Uguaglianze di opportunità, della Giustizia e di Lavori e Politica Sociale, deve organizzare dove corsi di addestramento necessari per personale e qualsiasi l'altra iniziativa utile.”
44. Legge N.ro 189 del 2002 più prime leggi corrette di 30 luglio riguardo all'immigrazione. Il suo Articolo 18 riferisce a sospensioni per ragioni di protezione sociale ed in finora come letture attinenti siccome segue:
1. Quando l'esistenza di situazioni della violenza o lo sfruttamento serio in riguardo di un straniero è stabilita durante operazioni di polizia, indagini o procedimenti riguardo ai crimini sotto articolo 3 di Legge n. 75 20 febbraio 1958 [crimini riferirono a prostituzione] o durante intervento di assistenza coi servizi sociali e locali, e là sembra essere un pericolo concreto per suo o la sua sicurezza come un risultato di suo o suo tenta di scappare dall'influenza dell'associazione che impegna in qualsiasi dei crimini summenzionati, o le dichiarazioni resero durante l'indagine preliminare o i procedimenti, il Polizia Commissario su richiesta dell'Accusatore Pubblico o con un suggerimento favorevole con l'autorità detta, rilascia un permesso di soggiorno speciale per permettere lo straniero di scappare la violenza detta e l'influenza dell'organizzazione penale e partecipare in un programma di assistenza e l'integrazione sociale.
2. Gli elementi che mostrano l'esistenza di simile condizioni, particolarmente la gravità e l'imminenza del pericolo insieme con l'attinenza dell'aiuto offerta con lo straniero per l'identificazione e cattura di quelli responsabile per i crimini detti, deve essere comunicato al Polizia Commissario col sopra menzionò richiesta o suggerimento. La procedura per partecipare in tale programma è comunicata al sindaco.”
Gli stati di testo che la licenza ha rilasciato per simile fini hanno una durata di sei mesi e possono essere rinnovati per un anno o per come lungo come necessario nell'interesse della giustizia. Offre anche le condizioni sulla base della quale può essere revocata la licenza che che comporta, e che può emetterlo.
45. Secondo una Relazione della Riunione Di gruppo e Competente organizzata con la Nazioni Divisione Unito per l'Avanzamento di Donne, Settore di Affari Economici e Sociali (DAW/DESA), in collaborazione col Nazioni Ufficio Unito su Droghe e Crimine (ODC), di novembre 2002 diede un titolo a Traffico in Donne e Ragazze (EGM/TRAF/2002/Rep.1), nei primi due anni di attuazione di questa disposizione, 1,755 persone-soprattutto donne e ragazze -è stato accettato nel programmi di assistenza e l'integrazione sociale, ed approssimativamente 1,000 hanno ricevuto un permesso di soggiorno. Una linea diretta è stata stabilita, e più di 5,000 persone hanno ricevuto aiuto concreto in termini di informazioni, counselling ed assistenza sanitaria.
B. Legge bulgara Attinente
46. La legge bulgara su combating creatura umana trafficare entrò in vigore in 20 maggio 2003. In finora come attinente le disposizioni lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 1
“Questa Legge prevedrà per le attività mirate ad ostacolando e contrattaccando l'illegale traffico in esseri umani per i fini di:
un. Protezione che prevede ed assistenza a vittime di simile trafficare, specialmente a donne e figli, e nella piena ottemperanza coi loro diritti umani;
b. Co-operazione che promuove fra i governativi ed autorità municipali così come fra loro e NGOs per lottare contro l'illegale traffico in esseri umani e sviluppando la politica nazionale in questa area.”
Articolo 16
“I diplomatici e posti consolare della Repubblica della Bulgaria offriranno all'estero assistenza e co-operazione a cittadini bulgari che sono divenuti vittime di trafficare illegale per il loro ritorno al paese in conformità coi loro poteri e con la legislazione del paese estero ed attinente.”
Articolo 18
“(1) in ottemperanza con la legislazione bulgara e la legislazione del paese che accetta, degli i diplomatici e dei posti consolare della Repubblica della Bulgaria all'estero distribuirà fra gli individui attinenti ed il rischio raggruppa materiali di informazioni dei diritti delle vittime di creatura umana trafficare.
(2) i diplomatici e posti consolare della Repubblica della Bulgaria offriranno all'estero informazioni ai corpi del paese che accetta riguardo alla legislazione bulgara su creatura umana che traffica.”
47. Articolo 174 (2) del Codice bulgaro di Diritto processuale penale in vigore al tempo degli eventi letto siccome segue:
“Quando consapevole del perpetrazione di un punibile di reato penale con legge, servitori civili sono confine di dovere per immediatamente informare l'organo competente intraprendere indagini preliminari e prendere le misure necessarie per preservare gli elementi del reato.”
48. Articolo 190 del Codice bulgaro di stati di Diritto processuale penale:
“Là si considererà che esista prova sufficiente per l'istituzione di procedimenti penali, dove una supposizione ragionevole può essere resa che un delittuoso sarebbe stato commesso.”
49. In finora come attinente il Codice Penale bulgaro legge siccome segue:
Articolo 177(1)
“Chiunque costringe una persona a contrarre un matrimonio che è annullato da allora in poi su questa base sarà punito con reclusione di un periodo di massimo di tre anni.
(2) chiunque rapisce una donna con una prospettiva a costringendola a sposarsi, sarà punito con reclusione di un periodo di massimo di tre anni; se la vittima è un minore, la punizione sarà reclusione per un periodo di su a cinque anni.”
Articolo 178
“(1) un genitore o qualsiasi l'altro parente che riceve una somma di soldi per autorizzare il matrimonio di suo o sua figlia o un parente, sarà punito con reclusione di un periodo di massimo di un anno o con una multa di fra 100 a 300 levs (BGN) insieme con un rabbuffo pubblico.
(2) la stessa punizione fa domanda a chiunque paga o negozia il prezzo.”
Articolo 190
“Chiunque abusa suo o la sua autorità parentale per costringere un figlio, dopo non avendo raggiunto sedici anni maggiorenne per vivere come una concubina con un'altra persona, sarà punito con reclusione di un periodo di tre anni, o con una misura di controllo senza privazione della libertà (l'пробация) insieme con un rabbuffo pubblico.”
Articolo 191
“(1) tutti gli adulti che senza avere contratto matrimonio stanno vivendo come concubine con una donna che non ha raggiunto sedici anni maggiorenne saranno puniti con reclusione di un periodo di due anni, o con una misura di controllo senza privazione della libertà (l'пробация) insieme con un rabbuffo pubblico. (...)”
Articolo 159a
“Le persone che selezionano, trasporti, nascondiglio o riceve al riguardo individui o gruppi con lo scopo di usare simile individui per i fini di prostituzione, costrinse lavori o l'allontanamento di organi, o mantenerli in un stato di forzata secondarietà, con o senza il loro beneplacito, è punito con reclusione di un periodo di da uno ad otto anni e con una multa di un massimo di 8,000 levs (BGN).
(2) quando il reato in paragrafo uno sopra è commesso 1) contro un individuo che non ha raggiunto diciotto anni maggiorenne 2) con coercizione o finzioni false, 3) per rapendo o la detenzione illegale, 4) con approfittando di un stato di dipendenza, 5) con vuole dire dell'abuso di potere, 6) per la promessa, dando o ricevuta di benefici, la punizione è reclusione per un periodo di due a dieci anni ed una multa di un massimo di 10,000 levs (BGN).”
Articolo 159b
“Chiunque seleziona, trasporti, nascondigli o riceve al riguardo individui o gruppi e li trasferisce con attraversando il confine del paese con lo scopo menzionò in supplire-paragrafo 159 (un) sopra, sarà punito con reclusione per un periodo di tre ad otto anni e con una multa di un massimo di 10,000 levs (BGN).
(2) se tale atto ha luogo nelle condizioni menzionate in Articolo 159 (un) (2), la punizione sarà reclusione di un periodo di cinque a dieci anni ed una multa di un massimo di 15,000 levs (BGN).”
Articolo 159c
“Se i reati menzionassero in Articolo 159 (un) e (b) sopra è commesso con un recidivo o è ordinato con un'organizzazione penale, la punizione è reclusione per un periodo di cinque a quindici anni ed una multa di un massimo di 20,000 levs (BGN); il tribunale può ordinare anche la confisca di parte o l'interezza delle proprietà dell'attore.”
III. TRATTATI INTERNAZIONALI ATTINENTI E ALTRI MATERIALI
A. Generale
50. La Dichiarazione di Principi Di base della Giustizia per Vittime di Crimine e l'Abuso di potere adottate con la Riunione del Generale delle Nazioni Unito decisione 40/34 di 29 novembre 1985, in finora come letture attinenti siccome segue:
“1. “Le vittime” intende persone che, individualmente o collettivamente, ha sofferto di danno, incluso danno fisico o mentale, la sofferenza emotiva, perdita economica o danneggiamento sostanziale dei loro diritti essenziali, per atti od omissioni che sono in violazione di diritti penale operativo all'interno di Membro Stati, incluso quelle leggi che proscrivono l'abuso di potere penale.
2. Una persona può essere considerata una vittima, sotto questa Dichiarazione nonostante se il perpetratore è identificato, apprese, perseguì o dichiarò colpevole e nonostante la relazione familiare fra il perpetratore e la vittima. Il termine “la vittima” anche include, dove appropriato, la famiglia immediata o persone a carico della vittima diretta e persone che hanno sofferto di danno nell'intervenire assistere vittime in angoscia od ostacolare la vittimizzazione .”
B. Traffico
51. Una veduta d'insieme degli strumenti internazionali ed attinenti che concernono a traffico in esseri umani può essere trovata in Rantsev c. Cipro e la Russia, n. 25965/04, 7 gennaio 2010.
52. Il Protocollo di Palermo fu ratificato con la Bulgaria 5 dicembre 2001 e con Italia 2 agosto 2006, ambo gli Stati che prima hanno firmato il protocollo a dicembre 2000. Il Consiglio di Convenzione di Europa su Azione contro Traffico in Esseri Umani (“la Convenzione che Anti-traffico”) fu firmato con la Bulgaria 22 novembre 2006 e ratificò 17 aprile 2007. Entrò in vigore in riguardo della Bulgaria 1 febbraio 2008. Fu firmato con l'Italia 8 giugno 2005, fu ratificato 29 novembre 2010 e fu entrato in vigore in riguardo dell'Italia 1 marzo 2011.
53. Per l'agevolezza di riferimento le definizioni attinenti per i fini della Convenzione che Anti-traffico sono riprodotte in virtù del presente atto:
un “Traffico in esseri umani” intenderà l'assunzione, trasporto, trasferimento, o accoglienza di persone, con vuole dire della minaccia o uso di vigore o le altre forme di coercizione, dell'abduzione di frode, della falsità dell'abuso di potere o di una posizione della vulnerabilità o del dando o ricevendo di pagamenti o benefici per realizzare il beneplacito di una persona che ha su controllo un'altra persona, per il fine dello sfruttamento. Lo sfruttamento includerà, ad un minimo, lo sfruttamento della prostituzione di altri o le altre forme dello sfruttamento sessuale, forzato lavori o servizi, schiavitù o pratiche simile a schiavitù, la servitù o l'allontanamento di organi;
b Il beneplacito di una vittima di “traffico in esseri umani” al set di sfruttamento intenzionale avanti in subparagraph (un) di questo articolo sarà irrilevante dove qualsiasi dei mezzi insorti avanti subparagraph (un) è usato;
c L'assunzione, trasporto, trasferimento, o accoglienza di un figlio per il fine dello sfruttamento saranno considerate “traffico in esseri umani” anche se questo non coinvolge qualsiasi dei mezzi insorti avanti subparagraph (un) di questo articolo;
d “il Figlio” vorrà dire qualsiasi persona sotto diciotto anni maggiorenne;
e “la Vittima” vorrà dire qualsiasi persona fisica che è soggetto a traffico in esseri umani come definita in questo articolo.
54. Il rapporto esplicativo alla Convenzione 16.V.2005 che Anti-traffico rivela l'ulteriore dettaglio riguardo alla definizione di trafficare. In particolare in riguardo di “lo sfruttamento”, in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
85. Il fine deve essere sfruttamento dell'individuo. La Convenzione prevede: “Lo sfruttamento includerà, ad un minimo, lo sfruttamento della prostituzione di altri o le altre forme dello sfruttamento sessuale, forzato lavori o servizi, schiavitù o pratiche simile a schiavitù, la servitù o l'allontanamento di organi.” Legislazione nazionale può designare come bersaglio perciò le altre forme dello sfruttamento ma deve coprire almeno i tipi dello sfruttamento menzionati come costituenti di trafficare in esseri umani.
86. Le forme dello sfruttamento specificarono nella coperta di definizione lo sfruttamento sessuale, operi lo sfruttamento e l'allontanamento di organi, per l'attività penale in modo crescente sta diversificando per provvedere persone per lo sfruttamento in qualsiasi il settore dove richiesta emerge.
87. Sotto la definizione, non è necessario che qualcuno è stato sfruttato per là per stare traffico in esseri umani. È abbastanza che loro sono stati sottoposti ad una delle azioni assegnato a nella definizione ed entro uno dei mezzi specificato “per il fine di” lo sfruttamento. Trafficare in esseri umani è di conseguenza presente di fronte allo sfruttamento effettivo della vittima.
88. Come riguardi “lo sfruttamento della prostituzione di altri o le altre forme dello sfruttamento sessuale”, si dovrebbe notare che la Convenzione tratta solamente con questi nel contesto di trafficare in esseri umani. I termini “lo sfruttamento della prostituzione di altri” e “le altre forme dello sfruttamento sessuale” non è definito nella Convenzione alla quale è perciò senza pregiudizio come quantità di Parti di stati con prostituzione in diritto nazionale.
Il rapporto esplicativo continua ad elencare gli altri tipi dello sfruttamento, vale a dire costrinse lavori o servizi, schiavitù o pratiche simile a schiavitù, la servitù o l'allontanamento di organi e dà la loro definizione secondo gli strumenti internazionali ed attinenti e la causa-legge di ECHR dove disponibile.
C. Matrimonio
1. Convenzione su Beneplacito a Matrimonio, Minima Età per Matrimonio e Registrazione di Matrimoni
55. Facendo seguire decisione 843 la Generale Riunione delle Nazioni Unito (IX) di 17 dicembre 1954, dichiarando che le certe dogane, leggi antiche e pratiche relativo a matrimonio e la famiglia erano avanti incoerenti col set di principi nello Statuto delle Nazioni Unito e nella Dichiarazione Universale di Diritti umani, e chiamando su stati per sviluppare ed implementare legislazione nazionale e politiche che proibiscono simile pratiche, la Convenzione su Beneplacito a Matrimonio, la Minima Età per Matrimonio e Registrazione di Matrimoni fu aperta per firma e ratifica con Generale Riunione decisione 1763 Un (XVII) di 7 novembre 1962. Italia firmò la Convenzione 20 dicembre 1963, ma deve datare non ratificato la Convenzione. Lo Stato bulgaro deve firmare ancora la Convenzione.
56. Le disposizioni attinenti lessero siccome segue:
Articolo 1
“1. Nessun matrimonio sarà entrato giuridicamente in senza il pieno e beneplacito gratis di sia le parti, simile beneplacito per essere espresso con loro in persona dopo pubblicità dovuta e nella presenza dell'autorità competente solennizzare il matrimonio e di testimoni, siccome prescritto con legge.
2. Ciononostante qualsiasi cosa in paragrafo 1 sopra, non sarà necessario per una delle parti per essere presente quando l'autorità competente è soddisfatta che le circostanze sono eccezionali e che la parte ha, di fronte ad un'autorità competente ed in simile maniera siccome può essere prescritto con legge, espresse e beneplacito non riservato.”
Articolo 2
“Parti di Stati alla Convenzione presente intenteranno causa legislativa per specificare una minima età per matrimonio. Nessun matrimonio sarà entrato giuridicamente in con qualsiasi persona sotto questa età, eccetto dove un'autorità competente ha accordato una dispensa come invecchiare, per ragioni serie nell'interesse dei consorti che proporsi.”
Articolo 3
“Tutti i matrimoni saranno registrati in un registro ufficiale ed appropriato con l'autorità competente.”
2. La Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa Decisione 1468 (2005)-i Forzati matrimoni e matrimoni di figlio
“1. La Riunione Parlamentare concerne profondamente dei seri e violazioni ricorrenti di diritti umani ed i diritti del figlio che è costituito coi forzati matrimoni e matrimoni di figlio.
2. La Riunione osserva che il problema sorge principalmente in comunità migranti e primariamente colpisce le giovani donne e ragazze.
3. È oltraggiato col fatto che, sotto il mantello di riguardo per la cultura e tradizioni delle comunità migranti, sono autorità che tollerano i forzati matrimoni e matrimoni di figlio benché loro violino i diritti essenziali di ognuno ed ogni vittima.
4. La Riunione definisce almeno il forzato matrimonio come l'unione di due persone uno di chi non ha dato il loro pieno e libero beneplacito al matrimonio.
5. Poiché infrange i diritti umani fondamentali dell'individuo, matrimonio costretto può in nessun modo sia giustificato.
6. La Riunione sottolinea l'attinenza di Riunione del Generale delle Nazioni Unito Decisione 843 (IX) del 1954 certe dogane che dichiarano di 17 dicembre, leggi antiche e pratiche relativo a matrimonio e la famiglia per essere avanti incoerente col set di principi nello Statuto delle Nazioni Unito e nella Dichiarazione Universale di Diritti umani.
7. La Riunione definisce almeno matrimonio di figlio come l'unione di due persone uno di chi è 18 anni maggiorenne sotto.”
3. La Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa Decisione 1740 (2010)-La situazione di Roma in Europa e le attività attinenti del Consiglio dell'Europa
“24. La Riunione chiama sulla comunità di Roma ed i suoi rappresentanti per lottare contro la discriminazione e la violenza contro le donne di Roma e ragazze in loro propria comunità. In particolare, i problemi della violenza domestica e di forzato e matrimoni di figlio che costituiscono una violazione di diritti umani hanno bisogno di essere rivolti anche con la comunità di Roma stessa. Costume e tradizione non possono essere usate come una scusa per violazioni di diritti umani, ma dovrebbe essere cambiato invece. La Riunione chiama su stati membro per sostenere attivisti di donne di Romani che prendono parte in dibattiti all'interno della loro comunità delle tensioni fra la conservazione di un'identità di Romani e la violazione di diritti della donna incluso per i primi e forzati matrimoni.”
4. La Dichiarazione di Strasburgo su Roma
57. Più recentemente, al Consiglio dell'Europa Livello Riunione Alta su Roma, Strasbourg, 20 ottobre 2010, il membro che Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa hanno concordato su un ruolo non-esauriente di priorità che dovrebbero notificare come guida per sforzi più focalizzati e più coerenti a tutti i livelli incluso per partecipazione attiva di Roma. Questi inclusero:
“I diritti di donne e l'uguaglianza di genere
(22) fissi in posto misure effettive per rispettare, protegga e promuova uguaglianza di genere delle ragazze di Roma e donne all'interno delle loro comunità e nella società nell'insieme.
(23) fissi in posto misure effettive per abolire dove ancora in uso pratiche dannose contro i diritti riproduttivi di donne di Roma, primariamente la sterilizzazione forzata.
I diritti di figli
(24) promuova per misure effettive l'uguaglianza di trattamento ed i diritti dei figli di Roma il diritto ad istruzione specialmente e li protegga contro la violenza, incluso l'abuso sessuale ed opera sfruttamento, in conformità con trattati internazionali.
Combattimento traffico
(29) tenendo presente che i figli di Roma e donne sono vittime di trafficare spesso e lo sfruttamento, dedici attenzione adeguata e risorse per combattere questi fenomeni, all'interno degli sforzi generali mirati a traffico che tiene a freno di esseri umani e malavita e, in cause appropriate, vittime di problema con permessi di soggiorno.”
AZIONI DI RECLAMO
58. I richiedenti sollevarono azioni di reclamo diverse sotto Articoli 3, 4 13 e 14 della Convenzione e sotto molti altri trattati internazionali.
59. Loro si lamentano che il primo richiedente soffrì di mal-trattamento, l'abuso sessuale e forzato lavori, siccome faceva (ad una minore misura) il secondo e terzi richiedenti per causa della famiglia di Roma in Ghislarengo, e che le autorità italiane (specialmente l'Accusatore Pubblico in Vercelli) non riuscì ad investigare adeguatamente gli eventi.
60. Loro si lamentano anche che i primo e terzi richiedenti furono seviziati con agenti di polizia italiani durante il loro interrogatorio.
61. Loro si lamentano che ai primo e terzi richiedenti non furono forniti interpreti di and/or di avvocati durante i loro colloqui, non furono informati in che veste che loro erano messi in dubbio, e furono costretti per firmare documenti il contenuto del quale loro non sapevano.
62. Loro si lamentano che il loro trattamento con le autorità italiane fu basato sul fatto che loro erano di Roma origine etnica e la nazionalità di bulgaro.
63. Infine, loro si lamentano che le autorità bulgare (notevolmente le autorità consolare bulgare in Italia) non li offra con l'assistenza richiesta nelle loro distribuzioni con le autorità italiane, ma semplicemente notificò come un canale di comunicazione.
LA LEGGE
I. ECCEZIONI PRELIMINARI
A. L’eccezione dei Governi bulgari ed italiani in merito all’ abuso del diritto di ricorso
64. Il Governo bulgaro considerò che non c'era stata violazione nella causa presente poiché la prova disponibile indicò che i richiedenti che ' sospende in Italia erano stati volontari, siccome era il matrimonio in conformità coi rituali etnici e relativi. Inoltre, loro considerarono la richiesta un abuso di ricorso in prospettiva dell'incorretto e lingua abusiva ed ingiustificabile usata coi richiedenti il rappresentante di ' nelle sue osservazioni alla Corte.
65. Il Governo italiano non presentò le specifiche ragioni in riguardo della loro eccezione.
66. I richiedenti presentarono che loro erano stati sottoposti a violazioni di diritto internazionale e che sia le autorità italiane e bulgare erano rimaste passive di fronte a simile eventi.
67. I richiami di Corte che, mentre l'uso di lingua offensiva in procedimenti prima che è indubbiamente improprio, una richiesta può essere respinta solamente come abusivo in circostanze straordinarie, per istanza se fosse basato di proposito su fatti falsi (vedere, per esempio, Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV §§ 53-54; Varbanov c. la Bulgaria, n. 31365/96, § 36 ECHR 2000-X; e Popov c. la Moldavia, n. 74153/01, § 49 18 gennaio 2005). Ciononostante, nelle certe cause eccezionali l'uso di persistente di insultare o lingua provocativa con un richiedente contro il Governo rispondente può essere considerata un abuso del diritto di ricorso all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere Duringer e Grunge c. la Francia (il dec.), N. 61164/00 e 18589/02, ECHR 2003-II, e Chernitsyn c. la Russia, n. 5964/02, § 25 6 aprile 2006).
68. La Corte considera che benché alcuni dei richiedenti le dichiarazioni di rappresentante di ' erano improprie, smodatamente emotivo e deplorevole, loro non corrisposero a circostanze di qualche genere che giustificerebbe una decisione di dichiarare la richiesta inammissibile come un abuso del diritto di ricorso (vedere Felbab c. Serbia, n. 14011/07, § 56 14 aprile 2009). In finora come una richiesta può essere trovato essere un abuso del diritto di ricorso se è basato su fatti falsi, la Corte nota che le corti nazionali italiane loro considerato che era difficile decifrare i fatti e la veracità della situazione (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra). In simile circostanze, la Corte non può considerare, che la versione data indubbiamente coi richiedenti costituisce fatti falsi.
69. Segue che i Governi che la dichiarazione di ' deve essere respinta.
B. L’eccezione dei Governi bulgari ed italiani l'eccezione in merito alla mancanza di status di vittima
70. Il Governo bulgaro presentò che non c'era stata trasgressione nella causa presente. Inoltre, il secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti non avevano collegamento diretto con le violazioni allegato e non erano colpito direttamente o personalmente con loro. Inoltre, il quarto richiedente non era una parente di sangue del primo richiedente ma la nuora di solamente il terzo richiedente che l'accompagnarono ad Italia.
71. Il Governo italiano presentò che il secondo e quarto richiedenti non avevano standi della località nei procedimenti poiché loro avevano sofferto di nessun danno come un risultato delle violazioni allegato.
72. I richiedenti presentarono che violazioni erano state commesse davvero ed in conseguenza loro avevano status di vittima. Inoltre, il secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti incorsero all'interno della nozione di “vittime di crimine” secondo Articoli 1 e 2 della Dichiarazione di Principi Di base della Giustizia per Vittime di Crimine e l'Abuso di potere (vedere testi internazionali ed Attinenti sopra). Loro contesero inoltre che tutti i richiedenti avevano sofferto di pregiudizio nella forma di mal-trattamento fisico per causa degli aggressori e danno morale nella luce delle autorità l'inazione di ', mentre il secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti stavano tentando loro meglio proteggere il primo richiedente. Questo era particolarmente finora evidente nella misura in cui riguardava i genitori del primo richiedente.
73. La Corte considera che l'eccezione dei Governi si riferisce principalmente al secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti in finora siccome loro dicono che loro si sono vittime di violazioni della Convenzione in riguardo della soggezione allegato del primo richiedente a traffico in esseri umani e trattamento inumano e degradante per causa di terze parti.
74. I richiami di Corte che sotto Articolo 3, in riguardo di cause di scomparsa se un membro di famiglia è una vittima dipenderà dall'esistenza di fattori speciali che danno la sofferenza del richiedente una dimensione e carattere distinti dall'angoscia emotiva che può essere considerata causata inevitabilmente a parenti di una vittima di una violazione di diritti umani seria. Elementi attinenti includeranno la prossimità della cravatta di famiglia-in che contesto, un certo peso allegherà all'obbligazione di genitore-figlio-, le particolari circostanze della relazione, la misura alla quale il membro di famiglia testimoniò agli eventi in oggetto, il coinvolgimento del membro di famiglia nei tentativi di ottenere informazioni della persona scomparsa ed il modo dove le autorità risposero a quegli enquiries. In queste cause l'essenza di tale violazione non fa così molta bugia nel fatto del “la scomparsa” del membro di famiglia ma piuttosto concerne le autorità le reazioni di ' ed atteggiamenti alla situazione quando è portato alla loro attenzione. È in riguardo del secondo specialmente che un parente può chiedere direttamente di essere una vittima delle autorità ' conduce (vedere, Kurt c. la Turchia, 25 maggio 1998, §§ 130-134 Relazioni 1998-III; Timurtaş c. la Turchia, n. 23531/94, §§ 91-98 ECHR 2000-VI; İpek c. la Turchia, n. 25760/94, §§ 178-183 ECHR 2004-II (gli estratti); ed al contrario., Çakıcı c. la Turchia [GC], n. 23657/94, § 99 ECHR 1999-IV).
75. La Corte ha considerato anche insolitamente che parenti avevano status di vittima di loro proprio in situazioni dove non c'era un periodo lungo-durevole e distinto durante il quale loro subirono incertezza, l'angoscia e caratteristica di angoscia allo specifico fenomeno di scomparse ma dove i cadaveri delle vittime erano stati smembrati ed erano stati decapitati e dove non erano stati capaci di seppellire i corpi morti dei loro uni amati in una maniera corretta che secondo la Corte li ha dovuti provocare in se stesso l'angoscia profonda e continua e l'angoscia i richiedenti. La Corte considerò così che nelle specifiche circostanze di simile cause la sofferenza morale sopportata coi richiedenti era giunta ad una dimensione e carattere distinto dall'angoscia emotiva che può essere considerata causata inevitabilmente a parenti di una vittima di una violazione di diritti umani seria (vedere, Khadzhialiyev ed Altri c. la Russia, n. 3013/04, § 121, 6 novembre 2008 ed Akpınar ed Altun c. la Turchia, n. 56760/00, § 86 27 febbraio 2007).
76. In questa luce, la Corte considera, che, benché loro testimoniassero ad alcuni degli eventi in oggetto, ed era, ognuno ad una misura diversa, coinvolse nei tentativi di ottenere informazioni sul primo richiedente, il secondo nei quali terzo e quarto richiedenti non possono essere considerati come vittime loro delle violazioni relativo al trattamento del primo richiedente e le indagini che riguardo, poiché la sofferenza morale sopportò con loro non si può dire che sia giunto ad una dimensione e carattere distinto dall'angoscia emotiva che può essere considerata, causò inevitabilmente a parenti di una vittima di una violazione di diritti umani seria.
77. La Corte nota che questa conclusione non funziona contrario alle sentenze nella causa di Rantsev (Rantsev c. Cipro e la Russia, n. 25965/04, 7 gennaio 2010) poiché, al giorno d'oggi la causa, diversamente da nella causa di Rantsev, il primo richiedente che era soggetto alle violazioni allegato non è deceduto, e è una parte ai procedimenti correnti.
78. Segue che i Governi l'eccezione di ' in riguardo del secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti status di vittima di ' in relazione alle azioni di reclamo sotto Articoli 3 e 4 della Convenzione in riguardo dei quali il primo richiedente è la vittima diretta, incluso la mancanza allegato di un'indagine in che riguardo, deve essere sostenuto.
79. Inoltre, la Corte considera che il quarto richiedente non può chiedere di essere una vittima diretta di qualsiasi delle violazioni allegato, mentre il secondo richiedente può chiedere solamente di essere una vittima in riguardo del trattamento al quale lui si era sottopose presumibilmente con la famiglia serba. Come riguardi il terzo richiedente in riguardo del mal-trattamento allegato lei subì per causa della famiglia serba in Ghislarengo e la polizia, la Corte considera che non c'è nessun elemento che a questo stadio potrebbe spogliarla di status di vittima.
80. Segue che i Governi l'eccezione di ' in relazione al quarto richiedente in riguardo di tutte le azioni di reclamo ed al secondo richiedente, eccetto in relazione all'azione di reclamo del trattamento alla quale lui fu sottoposto presumibilmente con la famiglia serba, deve essere sostenuto, mentre deve essere respinto in relazione alle azioni di reclamo rimanenti.
81. Di conseguenza, quelle azioni di reclamo in riguardo delle quali l'eccezione fu sostenuta sono ratione personae incompatibili con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 e devono essere respinte in conformità con Articolo 35 § 4.
C. l'eccezione del Governo bulgaro in merito al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
82. Il Governo bulgaro presentò che i richiedenti avevano avuto l'opportunità di portare procedimenti in relazione ai reati allegato. Secondo Articoli 4 e 5 del Codice penale bulgaro, procedimenti sarebbero potuti essere portati contro materie aliene che avevano commesso all'estero crimini contro cittadini bulgari anche se simile accusa già aveva avuto luogo in un altro Stato. Inoltre, i richiedenti avrebbero potuto chiedere compensazione sotto la Responsabilità per danni Statale causata a Cittadini Agisca che era in vigore al tempo attinente e purché che lo Stato era responsabile per danno causato a cittadini con atti illegali, azioni od omissioni di autorità ed ufficiali durante o nel collegamento con l'adempimento delle attività amministrative. I richiedenti avrebbero potuto chiedere anche inoltre, compensazione sotto le disposizioni generali degli Obblighi e Contratti Atto.
83. I richiedenti presentarono che loro avevano spedito lettere al Primo Ministro ed il Ministro per Affari Esteri e si erano lamentati all'Ambasciata della Bulgaria a Roma che avrebbe dovuto abilitare le autorità bulgare per intentare causa in conformità con Articolo 174 (2) del Codice di Diritto processuale penale. Inoltre, secondo legge bulgara, se un'azione di reclamo raggiungesse un organo che non era competente per trattare con la questione sé era per che organo per trasferire la richiesta all'autorità competente. Come ad un'azione sotto la Responsabilità per danni Statale causata a Cittadini Agisca, i richiedenti considerarono che tale azione non sarebbe stata appropriata poiché nessun corpo li aveva informati dei mezzi disponibile salvaguardare i loro diritti sotto Articolo 3 dello stesso testo.
84. Per ragioni che sembrano sotto in riguardo delle azioni di reclamo contro lo Stato bulgaro, la Corte non lo considera necessario esaminare se i richiedenti hanno esaurito via di ricorso nazionali e del tutto disponibili come riguardi le loro azioni di reclamo contro la Bulgaria e di conseguenza hanno lasciato questa questione aprire (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Zarb c. il Malta, n. 16631/04, § 45 4 luglio 2006).
II. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELL’ ARTICOLO 3 DELLA CONVENZIONE
85. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il primo richiedente aveva sofferto di mal-trattamento (incluso l'abuso sessuale insieme con una soggezione a forzato lavori), siccome avuto ad una minore misura il secondo e terzi richiedenti per causa della famiglia di Roma in Ghislarengo, e che le autorità (specialmente l'Accusatore Pubblico in Vercelli) non era riuscito ad investigare adeguatamente gli eventi. Loro si lamentarono anche che i primo e terzi richiedenti erano stati seviziati con agenti di polizia italiani durante il loro interrogatorio. Così, le autorità italiane e bulgare le azioni di ' ed omissioni erano contrarie ad Articolo 3 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Nessuno sarà sottoposto a torture o a trattamento inumani o degradanti o punizioni.”
A. Le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla mancanza di passi adeguati per ostacolare il mal-trattamento del primo richiedente con la famiglia serba con garantendo la sua liberazione rapida e la mancanza di un'indagine effettiva in quel addusse mal-trattamento
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) I richiedenti
86. I richiedenti insisterono che la loro versione di eventi fosse fedele e che i Governi che le osservazioni di ' sono state basate completamente sulle dichiarazioni di testimone di X., Y. e Z. che erano contraddittori e falsi. Uno simile esempio era il fatto che X., Y. e Z. ' che testimonianza di s non ha corrisposto in riguardo della sede dove le celebrazioni di matrimonio allegato avevano avuto luogo. Loro contesero anche che qualsiasi disdegna discrepanze nella testimonianza del primo richiedente sarebbe potuto essere solamente dovuto alla sua ansia come un risultato delle minacce e mal-trattamento del quale lei stava soffrendo. Loro reiterarono inoltre che le fotografie usarono come prova era stato ottenuto sotto minaccia e che il secondo richiedente era stato colpito ripetutamente e forzato a pistola-punto per posare nei ritratti detti. Loro dibatterono anche che il primo richiedente era stato solamente a discoteche e viaggiò in macchina all'interno dell'ambito della pianificazione e furti effettivi lei fu costretta per partecipare in con la famiglia serba. Come a qualsiasi documenti medici, loro considerarono era per le autorità per offrire simile materiali.
87. Nella loro prospettiva, il primo richiedente chiaramente aveva sofferto di una violazione di Articolo 3 che segue il trattamento che lei aveva sopportato per causa della famiglia serba, in relazione alla quale nessuna indagine effettiva era stata intrapresa stabilire i fatti e perseguire gli offensori.
88. Le autorità italiane impiegarono diciassette giorni per liberare il primo richiedente che fu trovato essere nella cattiva forma sia fisicamente e mentalmente. Questo nonostante, nessuno esame medico fu eseguito sul primo richiedente per stabilire la misura dei suoi danni. Effettivamente, la verità non era stata stabilita per datare, ed i vari articoli di prova erano stati trascurati. I minuti della ricerca della villa erano incompleti, gli importi sostanziali di soldi sequestrati durante l'incursione non erano stati descritti, ed i certi fatti non erano stati esaminati, come la sentenza di passaporti multipli nello stesso nome. Né l'indagine aveva esaminato la rivendicazione del primo richiedente che lei era stata stuprata ripetutamente con Y. mentre ebbe le sue mani e piedi allacciato al letto. Né aveva qualsiasi ricerca stata fatta per stabilire i casellari giudiziali della famiglia serba cui solamente vuole dire di reddito era i furti che rivanno che loro hanno organizzato, o in relazione agli eventi, vale a dire la promessa di lavoro che aveva condotto i richiedenti a trasferirsi ad Italia. Era evidente nella loro prospettiva che l'indagine aveva lasciato stanza per dissimulazione dei fatti.
89. Inoltre, ai richiedenti non fu concesso accesso all'archivio di indagine, nessuno traduzioni dell'interrogatorio furono date a loro, e nessuna testimonianza di testimone con lettere rogatoria fu preso dai richiedenti quando loro ritornarono in Bulgaria, abilitare le autorità per stabilire correttamente i fatti.
(b) Il Governo italiano
90. Il Governo italiano presentò che i fatti come addotto coi richiedenti era stato confutò completamente durante procedimenti nazionali sulla base di prova documentaria. Inoltre, loro notarono che uno dei documenti medici menzionò nei fatti non era stato trasmesso a loro e l'altro documento non aveva nascendo sulla causa. Come al danno alla costola del primo richiedente, loro notarono, che il terzo richiedente nella sua azione di reclamo alla polizia a Torino aveva chiesto che il primo richiedente aveva avuto un danno simile che datò di nuovo ad un incidente precedente.
91. Loro notarono che indagini penali per il rapimento allegato del primo richiedente che immediatamente avevano seguito le azioni di reclamo orali del terzo richiedente alla polizia di Torino in 24 maggio 2003 erano state iniziate. Il Governo presentò che prese le autorità finché 11 giugno 2003 per localizzare la villa dove il primo richiedente era sostenuto (poiché il terzo richiedente aveva offerto solamente un'indicazione vaga dei locali), identificare gli occupanti della villa (nessuno risiedeva ufficialmente là), osservare gli eventi nell'ubicazione e costituire preparazioni l'azione necessaria che conduce all'arresto degli occupanti e la liberazione del primo richiedente senza vittime, siccome aveva addotto il terzo richiedente che braccio furono contenute là.
92. L'indagine immediata ed arresto che conseguirono avevano mostrato una realtà diverso da quel annunciò col terzo richiedente nella sua azione di reclamo iniziale. Sembrò che il primo richiedente si era sposato Y. secondo le dogane e tradizioni del loro gruppo etnico, per il prezzo di EUR 11,000. Questo era evidente da un numero di fotografie che erano state trovate alla sede, mentre mostrando una cerimonia di matrimonio nella quale avevano partecipato i primi tre richiedenti e dove, insieme con Y., loro sembrarono contenti e rilassato. Inoltre fotografie mostrarono il secondo richiedente soldi riceventi da Y. ' parenti di s. La conclusione che questo è consistito di un pagamento per la sposa secondo le dogane di Roma e non un rapimento era anche più evidente nella luce delle contraddizioni numerose nei primo e terzi richiedenti le testimonianze di ', insieme con l'ammissione del primo richiedente di un contratto di matrimonio. Inoltre, nessuno arma da fuoco fu trovato durante l'incursione che confutò la dichiarazione del terzo richiedente con la quale loro era stato minacciato vuole dire di un'arma da fuoco.
93. Il Governo italiano presentò che questa versione di eventi era stata considerata veritiera con la sentenza della Torino Magistrato Inquirente di 26 gennaio 2005. Era stato considerato anche probabile col Tribunale di Torino nella sua sentenza di 8 febbraio 2006 che secondo l'interpretazione del Governo, concluse che il problema era principalmente un disaccordo economico in relazione al contratto di matrimonio concluso. Era molto probabile che il contratto di matrimonio non era stato rispettato o a causa di un disaccordo economico o a causa del trattamento del primo richiedente che segue il matrimonio che lei aveva riferito al terzo richiedente sul telefono. Il Governo reiterò che i matrimoni di Roma erano specifici, siccome era stato accettato con la Corte in Muñoz Díaz c. la Spagna (n. 49151/07, ECHR 2009).
94. Loro presentarono inoltre che l'indagine immediatamente era stata eseguita e senza ritardo non necessario e le autorità giudiziali non aveva risparmiato qualsiasi sforzi di stabilire i fatti. La scena degli eventi fu isolata e conservato; oggetti attinenti furono identificati e sequestrarono; gli occupanti dei locali furono identificati e furono arrestati, ed il primo richiedente fu depositato in locali di Caritas; gli attori attinenti e testimoni incluso i richiedenti immediatamente furono ascoltati e loro furono assistiti con interpreti, avvocati ed esperti psicologici. Avendo considerato tutto il sopra, le autorità giudiziali l'avevano trovato più probabile che c'era stato un contratto di matrimonio. Il Governo italiano considerò che in prospettiva della prova, non poteva essere concluso altrimenti. Loro notarono inoltre che non era per la Corte per stabilire i fatti della causa, a meno che questo era inevitabile determinato le circostanze speciali che non erano così nella causa presente. Effettivamente, siccome era stato provò col Governo, l'indagine ufficiale era stata eseguita in profondità, siccome mostrato con le sue conclusioni particolareggiate.
95. Il Governo italiano presentò che nei diciotto giorni fra 24 maggio e 11 giugno 2003 il terzo richiedente aveva lo status di un testimone ed aveva accesso alle informazioni raccolte durante l'indagine ad un grado che bastò concederla una partecipazione effettiva nella procedura. Dal 11 giugno 2003 in avanti i primo e terzi richiedenti avevano lo status di accusato, in relazione alla quale avevano le disposizioni invocate nessuno che porta.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) l'Ammissibilità
96. La Corte nota che è confrontato su con una controversia la natura esatta degli eventi allegato. In questo riguardo a, considera che deve giungere alla sua decisione sulla base della prova presentata con le parti (vedere Menteşe ed Altri c. la Turchia, n. 36217/97, § 70 18 gennaio 2005).
97. La Corte considera che gli archivi medici in riguardo del primo richiedente datarono 22 e 24 giugno 2003, presentò alla Corte al tempo dell'alloggio della richiesta (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra), sia trasferì al Governo 1 marzo 2010 e sembrando sul loro luogo sicuro, anche se non presentò alle autorità inquirenti, costituisca prova di facie di prima sufficiente che il primo richiedente è potuto essere sottoposto a della forma di mal-trattamento. Nelle specifiche circostanze della causa, il secondo, insieme col fatto incontestato che un reclamo fu presentato con le autorità in 24 maggio 2003 che dà un conto dettagliato dei fatti si lamentò di, offre abbastanza base per la Corte per considerare che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione.
98. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
(b) i Meriti
i. Principi Generali
99. La Corte reitera che Articolo 3 custodisce uno dei valori più fondamentali di società democratica. Proibisce in termini tortura assoluta o trattamento inumano o degradante o punizione. L'obbligo su Parti Contraenti ed Alte sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione per garantire ad ognuno all'interno della loro giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definite nella Convenzione, presa in concomitanza con Articolo 3 costringono Stati a prendere misure progettate per assicurare che individui all'interno della loro giurisdizione non siano sottoposti per torturare o trattamento inumano o degradante, incluso simile mal-trattamento amministrato con individui privati (vedere A. c. il Regno Unito, 23 settembre 1998, § 22 Relazioni 1998-VI). Queste misure dovrebbero offrire protezione effettiva, in particolare, di figli e le altre persone vulnerabile ed include passi ragionevoli per ostacolare mal-trattamento del quale le autorità avevano o avrebbero dovuto avere conoscenza (vedere Z ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 29392/95, § 73 il 2001-V di ECHR).
100. La Corte reitera che Articolo 3 della Convenzione costringe le autorità ad investigare dichiarazioni di mal-trattamento quando loro sono “difendibile” e “l'aumento un ragionevole sospetto”, anche se simile trattamento è amministrato con individui privati (vedere Ay c. la Turchia, n. 30951/96, §§ 59-60, 22 marzo 2005, e Mehmet Ümit Erdem c. la Turchia, n. 42234/02, § 26 17 luglio 2008). I minimi standard applicabile, come definito con la causa-legge della Corte, include i requisiti che l'indagine è indipendente, imparziale e soggetto a scrutinio pubblico, e che le autorità competenti agiscono con diligenza esemplare e la prontezza (vedere, per esempio, Çelik e İmret c. la Turchia, n. 44093/98, § 55 26 ottobre 2004). In oltre, per un'indagine le autorità devono prendere passi ragionevoli e per essere considerate effettivo loro possono garantire la prova riguardo all'incidente, incluso, inter alia, una dichiarazione particolareggiata riguardo alle dichiarazioni dalla vittima addotta, testimonianza di testimone oculare, prova forense e, dove referti medici appropriati, supplementari (vedere, in particolare, Batı ed Altri c. la Turchia, N. 33097/96 e 57834/00, § 134 ECHR 2004-IV (gli estratti)).
ii. L’applicazione alla causa presente
101. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo del terzo richiedente depositò in 24 maggio 2003 non fu sostenuto con qualsiasi documenti medici. Comunque, la Corte considera che questo era logico e che prova medica non poteva essere aspettatasi determinata che secondo che azione di reclamo che il primo richiedente era trattenuto contro la sua volontà con la famiglia serba. In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che la testimonianza del terzo richiedente e la serietà delle dichiarazioni resero nell'azione di reclamo depositata in 24 maggio 2003 allevò un ragionevole sospetto come il quale il primo richiedente sarebbe potuto essere sottoposto a mal-trattamento addotto. Questo basta attirare l'applicabilità di Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
(a) I passi presi dalle autorità italiane
102. Come riguardi i passi presi con le autorità italiane, la Corte nota che la polizia rilasciò il primo richiedente dalla sua prigionia allegato entro il settimane di due e mezza. Occrsero tre giorni per localizzare la villa ed un ulteriori due settimane per preparare l'incursione che condusse alla liberazione del primo richiedente. Tenendo presente che la famiglia serba fu armata, la Corte può accettare che sorveglianza precedente era necessaria. Nella sua prospettiva, l'intervento si attenne perciò, col requisito della prontezza e diligenza col quale le autorità dovrebbero agire in simile circostanze.
103. Segue che le autorità Statali adempierono al loro obbligo positivo di proteggere il primo richiedente. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione di Articolo 3 sotto questo capo.
(b) L'indagine
104. Come all'indagine che segue la liberazione del primo richiedente, la Corte nota, che le autorità italiane interrogarono X., Y., Z., il primo richiedente ed il terzo richiedente. Non sembra che qualsiasi gli altri sforzi furono resi per interrogare qualsiasi terze parti in questione che avrebbero potuto testimoniare agli eventi. Effettivamente, le autorità italiane considerarono che le fotografie raccolsero alla sede corroborò gli assalitori allegato la versione di ' di eventi. Nessune delle altre persone nelle fotografie mai fu identificato comunque, o fu interrogato, un passo che considera la Corte era essenziale, determinato che i richiedenti sostennero che loro erano stati costretti a pistola-punto a posare per simile fotografie. Né era qualsiasi tentativi resero ascoltare il secondo richiedente in questione che era stato un attore notevole negli eventi. Effettivamente, la Corte nota che nello stesso giorno che il primo richiedente fu rilasciato e fu ascoltato, i procedimenti penali che erano stati avviati contro gli assalitori furono trasformati in procedimenti penali contro i primo e terzi richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra). La Corte è prevista col fatto che facendo seguire sé la liberazione del primo richiedente prese le autorità meno che un pieno giorno per giungere alle loro conclusioni. In questa luce sostenne ragionare che il Tribunale penale di Torino lo considerò impossibile chiaramente stabilire i fatti (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra).
105. La Corte nota anche che, quando rilasciò, il primo richiedente non era soggetto ad un esame medico, nonostante le rivendicazioni che le era stato colpito ripetutamente ed era stata stuprata. La Corte nota inoltre che presumendo anche che era vero che gli eventi in questione corrispose ad un matrimonio in conformità con le tradizioni di Roma, ancora si addusse che nel mese che il primo richiedente ha sospeso in Ghislarengo le era stato colpito e forzato avere rapporto sessuale con Y. La Corte nota che autorità Statali devono prendere anche misure protettive nella forma di prevenzione effettiva contro violazioni serie dell'integrità personale di un individuo con un marito (vedere Opuz c. la Turchia, n. 33401/02, §§ 160-176 9 giugno 2009) o partner. Segue che qualsiasi simile dichiarazione avrebbe dovuto richiedere anche un'indagine. Comunque, nessun particolare interrogatorio ebbe luogo in questo riguardo, né era qualsiasi l'altra prova si impegnata, se severamente medico o soltanto scientifico. È di anche la più grande preoccupazione che il primo richiedente era un minore al tempo degli eventi in questione. Effettivamente, la Convenzione richiede prevenzione effettiva contro atti gravi come stupro, e figli e gli altri individui vulnerabile, in particolare, è concesso a protezione effettiva (vedere, mutatis mutandis, M.C. c. la Bulgaria, n. 39272/98, § 150 ECHR 2003-XII). Comunque, le autorità italiane scelsero di non investigare questo aspetto dell'azione di reclamo.
106. Inoltre, la Corte nota che i richiedenti addussero che loro si erano trasferiti ad Italia che segue una promessa di lavoro, benché nessuno conseguì, e che il primo richiedente fu minacciato e costrinse a partecipare in furti e le attività sessuali e private durante il periodo di tempo lei rimase in Ghislarengo. Mentre questo non è stato stabilito, la Corte non può escludere che le circostanze della causa presente, siccome riportato col primo richiedente alle autorità italiane (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra), li aveva stato provò, avrebbe potuto corrispondere a creatura umana che traffica come definita in convenzioni internazionali (vedere Testi Internazionali ed Attinenti sopra) che indubbiamente anche importi a trattamento inumano e degradante sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione. In conseguenza, le autorità italiane avute un obbligo per guardare nella questione e stabilire tutti i fatti attinenti con vogliono dire di un'indagine appropriata che richiese che questo aspetto dell'azione di reclamo sia esaminato anche e è scrutato. Questo non era così, le autorità italiane che hanno opinato che le circostanze della pelle di causa presente all'interno del contesto di un matrimonio di Roma. La Corte non può dividere la prospettiva che tale conclusione è bastata rimuovere qualsiasi dubita che le circostanze della causa rivelarono un'istanza di creatura umana che traffica quale richiesto un'indagine particolarmente completa inter alia perché un possibile “il matrimonio di Roma” non può essere usato come una ragione di non investigare nelle circostanze. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che la decisione rapida delle autorità italiane di non procedere ad un'indagine completa aveva, fra le altre cose, la conseguenza che prova medica sulla condizione fisica del primo richiedente non è stata chiesta anche.
107. In conclusione, la Corte considera, che gli elementi sopra bastano dimostrare che, nelle particolari circostanze di questa causa, l'indagine nel mal-trattamento allegato del primo richiedente con individui privati non era effettiva sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
108. C'è stata perciò una violazione procedurale di Articolo 3.
B. L'azione di reclamo riguardo al mal-trattamento del secondo e terzo richiedente per causa della famiglia di Roma e la mancanza di un'indagine effettiva con le autorità italiane in questo riguardo
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
109. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il secondo e terzi richiedenti avevano sofferto anche di mal-trattamento e minacce per causa della famiglia serba. In particolare, il secondo richiedente era stato colpito ripetutamente e forzato a pistola-punto per posare nel “sposando” i ritratti. Comunque, le autorità italiane non presero nessuno passi per interrogare il secondo richiedente come una vittima di mal-trattamento e minacce, come un risultato del quale loro dissero lui era stato dichiarato 100% nullo col Vidin Commissione Medica 5 ottobre 2010 (i richiedenti ammisero che loro non avevano presentato documenti in prova di questo). Come un risultato dello stress e l'ansia causato, il secondo richiedente era stato diagnosticato brevemente con diabete dopo gli eventi in questione.
110. Il Governo italiano presentò che indagini penali in riguardo di minacce contro e danni al secondo e terzi richiedenti che immediatamente avevano seguito le azioni di reclamo orali del terzo richiedente alla polizia di Torino in 24 maggio 2003 erano stati iniziati. Comunque, non era stato il risultato dell'indagine che le loro azioni di reclamo erano veritiere. Secondo il Governo, era strano che il secondo e terzi richiedenti chiesero di essere stati colpiti in 18 maggio 2003 ed ancora loro decisero di ritornare in Bulgaria. Inoltre, nessuno documenti medici che provano questa rivendicazione erano stati presentati e nessuno arma da fuoco erano state trovate durante l'incursione alla villa che confutò la dichiarazione che loro erano stati minacciati a pistola-punto.
2. La valutazione della Corte
111. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, le dichiarazioni di mal-trattamento devono essere sostenute con prova appropriata. Valutare questa prova, la Corte adotta lo standard di prova “oltre dubbio ragionevole”, benché simile prova possa seguire dalla coesistenza di inferenze sufficientemente forti, chiare e concordanti o di presunzioni di unrebutted simili di fatto (vedere Irlanda c. il Regno Unito, 18 gennaio 1978 la Serie Un n. 25, § 161 in multa; e Medova c. la Russia, n. 25385/04, § 116 ECHR 2009 -....).
112. La Corte nota che, presumendo anche che il secondo e terzi richiedenti prima erano stati tenuti sotto costrizione, è incontestato che questo non era più così dopo 18 maggio 2003. Segue che il secondo e terzi richiedenti, diversamente da nella causa del primo richiedente, avrebbe potuto chiedere assistenza medica e prova medica ed acquisita in appoggio delle loro rivendicazioni. Comunque, loro non offrirono le autorità con qualsiasi forma di referto medico per accompagnare l'azione di reclamo depositata col terzo richiedente in 24 maggio 2003. Datare, nessuna prova è stata presentata inoltre, alla Corte che indica che il secondo e terzi richiedenti sarebbero potuti essere sottoposti a mal-trattamento per causa della famiglia serba. In questa luce, la Corte considera, che non c'è nessuna prova sufficiente, coerente o affidabile per stabilire al grado necessario di prova che loro sono stati sottoposti a simile mal-trattamento.
113. In conseguenza, le autorità non furono date una causa ragionevole per sospettare che il secondo e terzi richiedenti erano stati sottoposti a trattamento improprio che avrebbe richiesto un pienamente indagine di fledged.
114. Segue che l'azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
C. L'azione di reclamo riguardo al mal-trattamento del primo e terzo richiedenti a causa degli agenti di polizia durante il loro interrogatorio
115. I primo e terzi richiedenti si lamentarono di mal-trattamento durante la loro interrogazione, vale a dire che loro non furono offerti con avvocati ed interpreti durante che tempo e che loro furono costretti per firmare documenti il contenuto del quale loro non avevano capito. Loro si lamentarono inoltre dei procedimenti penali coi quali loro furono minacciati e quali furono avviati infine contro loro, mentre notando che loro erano stati presi solamente su in ordine per le autorità per fare domanda pressione su loro. Loro contesero anche che successivamente l'avvocato corte-nominato non riuscì a salvaguardare i loro interessi durante l'interrogatorio, notevolmente non riuscendo a richiedere che la famiglia serba sia tenuta fuori della stanza, non assicurando interpreti adeguati e trattamento senza minacce e più seriamente permettendo il primo richiedente per essere tenuto in una cella per ore che seguono il suo interrogatorio.
116. La Corte nota in primo luogo che i primo e terzi richiedenti non riuscirono a pigiare accuse contro qualsiasi offensori allegato dal vigore di polizia. Nessun reclamo ufficiale mai è stato presentato con le autorità italiane in riguardo di questo mal-trattamento allegato. Neanche è che loro tentarono di fare tale azione di reclamo nel contesto dei procedimenti avviò infine contro loro. Segue che i primo e terzi richiedenti non riuscirono ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali in riguardo di questa azione di reclamo.
117. Inoltre, la Corte nota che il trattamento descrisse coi richiedenti non raggiunga il minimo livello della gravità per farlo incorrere all'interno della sfera di Articolo 3. In particolare, la Corte considera che il fatto che i primo e terzi richiedenti furono avvertiti sulla possibilità di essere perseguito e furono imprigionati se loro non dicessero si può considerare che la verità sia parte dei doveri normali delle autorità, quando mettendo in dubbio un individuo, e non una minaccia illegale. Inoltre, secondo i documenti presentati col Governo italiano, un interprete o un avvocato o sia accompagnò i primo e terzi richiedenti durante gli stadi diversi dell'interrogazione.
118. Per queste ragioni, questa azione di reclamo deve essere respinta come essendo mal-fondata manifestamente, facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione
D. L'azione di reclamo riguardo alla mancanza di azione ed un'indagine effettiva negli eventi addotti contro la Bulgaria
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
119. In riguardo della Bulgaria, i richiedenti si lamentarono del ritardo nel trattamento dell'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente di 31 maggio 2003 con le autorità consolare. Prese le autorità due giorni per intentare causa in riguardo dell'azione di reclamo, facendo seguire le critiche aggressive di rappresentante di ' i richiedenti. Loro contesero che il Governo bulgaro era andato a vuoto a spiegare in che modo il CRD aveva assistito i richiedenti nei loro interessi come richiesto con Articolo 32 delle Regolamentazioni del Ministero di Affari Esteri. Effettivamente, loro non avevano interferito nella scelta di interpreti (chi rimase silenzioso di fronte al trattamento subito coi due richiedenti durante interrogazione) o l'avvocato corte-nominato, né un rappresentante consolare era stato presente durante l'interrogatorio.
120. Similmente, nessuno informazioni erano state presentate e nulla era stato fatto con le autorità bulgare per rimpatriare i richiedenti e l'agenzia Nazionale per la protezione di infanti non era stato informato in ordine per sé per essere in grado prendere le misure necessarie. Né il Ministero o l'Ambasciata avute della Bulgaria a Roma informò l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore in Bulgaria che avrebbe potuto intraprendere procedimenti contro la famiglia serba. Inoltre, le autorità bulgare non avevano informato le autorità italiane che secondo legge bulgara un matrimonio di un cittadino bulgaro e minore, celebrò all'estero, richiesto l'autorizzazione precedente dei bulgaro rappresentante diplomatico o consolare (Articoli 12, 13 e 131 della Famiglia bulgara Programmano). Al giorno d'oggi la causa nessuno simile richiesta fu resa o accordò. Questo requisito era valido per tutti i cittadini bulgari irrispettoso del loro etnia ed in qualsiasi la causa tradizioni etniche non potevano accantonare la legge.
121. Il Governo bulgaro contese che nell'assenza di qualsiasi specifica dichiarazione di qualsiasi contrario di trattamento ad Articolo 3 non poteva essere una violazione di quel la disposizione. Inoltre qualsiasi obblighi positivi da parte loro potrebbero derivare solamente in riguardo di azioni commise o in corso in territorio bulgaro.
122. Senza pregiudizio al sopra, il Governo bulgaro presentò, che il Ministero di Affari Esteri, il CRD, l'Ambasciatore ed il Console a Roma immediatamente reagì quando notificò della causa. Loro stabilirono contatto con le autorità italiane e specificarono che la vittima allegato era un minore ed era stato sostenendo contro la sua volontà. L'Ambasciatore bulgaro mantenne comunicazione continua con le autorità italiane e trasferì le informazioni al secondo richiedente che aveva espresso la sua gratitudine in questo riguardo. Il fatto che misure adeguate e comprensive erano state prese col CRD bulgaro era anche evidente dall'archivio consolare in relazione alla causa che fu presentata alla Corte. Che archivio contenne più di cento pagine e, era stato spedito all'Ambasciata della Bulgaria a Roma con l'istruzione intentare causa immediata in cooperazione con le autorità italiane per la liberazione del primo richiedente ed il suo ritorno a Bulgaria 2 giugno 2003.
123. Il secondo richiedente di nuovo sollecitata di nuovo le autorità bulgare su 11 giugno 2003 ed il CRD si riferì all'Ambasciata della Bulgaria a Roma nello stesso giorno. A turno l'Ambasciata risposta che l'unità provinciale del carabinieri in Torino e la gestione centrale della Polizia di Vercelli aveva condotto un'azione riuscita per rilasciare il primo richiedente dall'alloggio; lei fu trovata essere in buon condizione ed era sotto la protezione delle autorità pubbliche. Queste informazioni immediatamente furono spedite al secondo richiedente. Con una lettera datata 24 giugno 2003 l'Ambasciata bulgara a Roma il CRD notificò che, seguendo una richiesta col secondo richiedente, informazioni erano state ricevute dal Capo Ufficio della Polizia Penale dell'Italia all'effetto che il risultato dell'indagine e dichiarazione del primo richiedente ha indicato che suo padre aveva ricevuto soldi per un matrimonio imminente e non c'erano perciò nessuno motivi per avviare procedimenti penali contro la famiglia serba. Loro notarono inoltre che le autorità giudiziali stavano considerando la possibilità di portare procedimenti contro i primo e terzi richiedenti per diffamazione e spergiuro. Il secondo richiedente fu informato di questo con una lettera di 1 luglio 2003. Successivamente corrispondenza fu sostenuta fra la Sezione Consolare ed i richiedenti ed il loro rappresentante, così come con le autorità italiane. All'interno della loro competenza, le autorità bulgare erano state così, completamente cooperative.
2. La valutazione della Corte
124. La Corte reitera che l'appuntamento si impegnato con un Stato Contraente sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione è confinato “riconoscere” (“reconnaître” nel testo francese) i diritti elencati e le libertà a persone entro la sua propria “giurisdizione” (vedere Soering c. il Regno Unito, 7 luglio 1989, § 86 la Serie Un n. 161). La causa-legge della Corte ha definito le varie istanze dove la Convenzione approvvigiona, legga in concomitanza col dovere generale dello Stato sotto Articolo 1, imponga un obbligo sugli Stati per eseguire un'indagine completa ed effettiva (vedere per esempio Ay c. la Turchia, citata sopra, §§ 59-60; Aksoy c. Turchia, 18 dicembre 1996, § 98, Relazioni 1996-VI, ed Assenov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, 28 ottobre 1998, § 102 Relazioni 1998-VIII). In ogni causa l'obbligo dello Stato fece domanda solamente comunque, in relazione a mal-trattamento commesso presumibilmente all'interno della sua giurisdizione (vedere Al-Adsani c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 35763/97, § 38 ECHR 2001-XI, dove la Corte non sostenne la rivendicazione del richiedente che la Convenzione costrinse il Regno Unito ad assistere uno dei suoi cittadini nell'ottenere una via di ricorso effettiva per tortura contro un altro Stato poiché non si aveva conteso che la tortura allegato ebbe luogo nella giurisdizione del Regno Unito o che le autorità di Regno Unito avevano qualsiasi il collegamento causale col suo avvenimento).
125. Similmente, in Rantsev c. Cipro e la Russia (n. 25965/04, §§ 243-247 ECHR 2010 (gli estratti)), la Corte notò che la morte della vittima diretta aveva avuto luogo in Cipro. Di conseguenza, poiché non si poteva mostrare che c'erano caratteristiche speciali in che causa che richiese una partenza dall'approccio generale, l'obbligo per assicurare un'indagine ufficiale ed effettiva fatta domanda a Cipro da solo. Ciononostante il Sig.ra Rantseva era un cittadino russo, la Corte concluse che non c'era obbligo auto stabile in carica sulle autorità russe sotto Articolo 2 della Convenzione investigare.
126. Segue dal sopra che nelle circostanze della causa presente, dove il mal-trattamento allegato accadde su territorio italiano e dove la Corte già ha trovato che era per le autorità italiane per investigare gli eventi, là non si può dire che sia stato un obbligo da parte delle autorità bulgare per eseguire un'indagine sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
127. Gli organi di Convenzione hanno affermato ripetutamente inoltre, che la Convenzione non contiene un diritto che costringe una Parte Contraente ed Alta ad esercitare protezione diplomatica, o si è sposato le azioni di reclamo di un richiedente sotto diritto internazionale o altrimenti intervenire con le autorità di un altro Statale su suo o il suo conto (vedere per esempio, Kapas v il Regno Unito, n. 12822/87, decisione di Commissione di 9 dicembre 1987, Decisione e Relazioni (DR) 54, L. v Svezia n. 12920/87, decisione di Commissione di 13 dicembre 1988 e la Dobberstein v Germania, n. 25045/94, decisione di Commissione di 12 aprile 1996 e le decisioni citata in essa). Ciononostante, la Corte nota che le autorità bulgare pigiarono ripetutamente per azione con le autorità italiane, siccome spiegato col Governo bulgaro nelle loro osservazioni e siccome mostrato dai documenti presentati alla Corte.
128. In conclusione, la Corte considera, che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 4 DELLA CONVENZIONE
129. I richiedenti contesero che il trattamento il primo richiedente aveva subito per causa della famiglia serba ed il fatto che lei fu costretta per prendere parte in malavita costituì una violazione di Articolo 4. Secondo i richiedenti, la violazione della disposizione detta sorse anche in relazione ai fatti interi della causa che riguardava chiaramente il traffico in esseri umani ed era contrario a questa disposizione che si legge come segue:
“1. Nessuno sarà contenuto in schiavitù o la servitù.
2. Nessuno sarà costretto a compiere lavori forzati od obbligatori .
3. Per il fine di questo articolo il termine lavori forzati od obbligatori non includerà:
(a) di qualsiasi lavoro costretto ad essere fatto nel corso ordinario della detenzione imposta secondo le disposizioni di Articolo 5 [della] Convenzione o durante la libertà condizionale da simile detenzione;
(b) qualsiasi servizio di un carattere militare o, in causa di obiettori di coscienza in paesi dove loro sono riconosciuti, servizio richiesto invece di servizio militare ed obbligatorio;
(il c) qualsiasi servizio richiesto in causa di un'emergenza o calamità che minacciano la vita o benessere della comunità;
(d) qualsiasi lavoro o servizio che formano parte di obblighi civici e normali.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. I richiedenti
130. I richiedenti notarono che loro erano stati condotti a credere che loro avrebbero trovato lavoro, ma al contrario il primo richiedente era stato costretto per rubare ed aveva sofferto di danni corporali come un risultato del trattamento che lei ha ricevuto, siccome provò coi documenti medici presentati. Loro considerarono che, determinato la falsità con la quale loro erano stati persuasi a muoversi ad Italia ed il trattamento che consegue subì, la causa concernè indubbiamente particolarmente col primo richiedente, traffico in esseri umani all'interno del significato di trattati internazionali. Loro erano della prospettiva che ambo gli Stati siano responsabili per la violazione allegato. Stava degradando che i Governi stavano tentando di coprire sulle loro debolezze con nascondendo dietro alla scusa di dogane di Roma che non erano state chiaramente la causa come affermò ripetutamente coi richiedenti. Inoltre, i richiedenti non riuscirono a capire come le autorità considerarono che tradizioni di Roma che chiaramente corrisposero ad una violazione del diritto penale (vedere sezioni 177-78 e 190-91 del Codice Penale bulgaro, diritto nazionale attinente sopra), potrebbe essere trascurato e potrebbe essere considerato normale.
131. In riguardo della loro azione di reclamo contro l'Italia loro reiterarono le loro osservazioni fissate spediscono sotto Articolo 3.
132. In riguardo della Bulgaria, i richiedenti reiterarono anche le loro osservazioni sotto Articolo 3. Loro notarono inoltre che anche se in Bulgaria una legge contro creatura umana traffico era stata decretata, in pratica questo non aveva effetto. Infatti, il Governo bulgaro non era stato in grado presentare qualsiasi le statistiche come al numero di persone stato stato perseguito sotto le disposizioni di Codice Penali in questo riguardo. Come a prevenzione, i richiedenti contesero, che il Governo bulgaro sarebbe dovuto essere in grado individuare i pericoli una famiglia come i richiedenti avrebbe affrontato quando decidendo di trasferirsi ad Italia che segue una promessa diffidente di lavoro. Loro insisterono che nessuno questioni attinenti fossero state esposte ai richiedenti al confine come se un rischio per trafficare non sarebbe potuto esistere mai.
2. Il Governo italiano
133. Il Governo italiano presentò che nell'azione di reclamo del terzo richiedente alla Polizia di Torino di 24 maggio 2003 non era stata dichiarazione di forzato lavori di creatura umana trafficare, ma solamente una paura che il primo richiedente potrebbe essere costretto in prostituzione. Loro considerarono che la Convenzione che Traffica non potesse venire a giocare nelle circostanze della causa come stabilito con le corti nazionali. Inoltre lo stato italiano non aveva firmato o aveva ratificato la Convenzione che Traffica al tempo degli eventi della causa e perciò non era applicabile a loro.
134. Ciononostante, indagini penali per il rapimento allegato del primo richiedente che immediatamente avevano seguito le azioni di reclamo orali del terzo richiedente alla polizia di Torino in 24 maggio 2003 erano state iniziate. Loro notarono che una legge in relazione a creatura umana traffico fu introdotta solamente ad agosto 2003 (vedere diritto nazionale Attinente). Loro reiterarono inoltre le loro osservazioni sotto Articolo 3, mentre contendendo che un'indagine effettiva nelle circostanze della causa aveva avuto luogo.
135. Infine, loro presentarono che in volle finora come la Corte esaminare i condotta vis-á-vis matrimonio accordi dello Stato nella comunità di Rom, il Governo italiano notò che il primo richiedente aveva infatti stato liberato e ritornò in Bulgaria. Comunque, non era per lo stato a giudice le tradizioni della minoranza di Rom, la loro identità o modo della vita, particolarmente poiché la Corte stessa accentuò l'importanza della cultura di Rom in Munoz Diaz.
3. Il Governo bulgaro
136. Il Governo reiterò che la causa presente non concernè traffico in esseri umani, siccome i fatti non incorsero la definizione di trafficare secondo Articolo 4 della Convenzione che Traffica sotto. Come confermato con l'estratto della polizia di confine (presentò alla Corte) i richiedenti si stabilirono liberamente e volontariamente in Italia secondo il loro diritto della libertà di circolazione. Il primo richiedente, benché un minore, sinistro i confini della Bulgaria ed arrivò e risiedeva in Italia coi suoi genitori, volontariamente e col loro beneplacito. La partenza da territorio bulgaro era legale e le autorità non avevano nessuna ragione di proibirlo, mentre concedendo tale mossa secondo Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione e legislazione di Unione europea. C'era stata inoltre, nessuna prova di trafficare in esseri umani su territorio bulgaro, un problema non addotto coi richiedenti. Effettivamente, i richiedenti, da solo o per il loro rappresentante, non aveva notificato qualsiasi delle istituzioni bulgare in accusa di trafficare. Qualsiasi le dichiarazioni in questo riguardo potrebbero essere comunicate all'AGENZIA Statale per la Protezione del Bambino, il Comitato Nazionale per Combattere Creatura umana che Traffica ed il Consiglio di Ministri, l'Accusa della Repubblica di Bulgaria ed il Ministero di Interno quale aveva gli specifici poteri sotto il Codice Penale ed il Codice di Diritto processuale penale per trattare con simile dichiarazioni.
137. Loro presentarono che la causa presente riguardò una relazione personale di una natura legale e privata in termini del coinvolgimento volontario in matrimonio ed i rituali relativi in conformità col particolare ethnicity dei richiedenti. Secondo l'indagine, il primo richiedente liberamente Y. sposato nella conformità con le loro tradizioni. Il modello accettato e praticò dei matrimoni di Roma previde per presto e matrimoni onnipresenti. Età di matrimonio fu governata con costume secondo il gruppo al quale appartennero le persone, ed in pratica una giovane età generalmente era. I matrimoni di Roma furono considerati concluso con un matrimonio nella presenza della comunità e non costrinse una procedura civile o religiosa ad essere considerato sacro ed indissolubile. Il matrimonio di Roma tradizionale consisteva in due fasi. I primi, l'appuntamento regolarono il pre-requisiti di matrimonio come la fissazione della sposa “il prezzo”/“prezzo del riscatto”/”dote” che è un mercanteggiamento rese coi padri in prospettiva del fatto che la sposa sarà poi parte della famiglia dello sposo. Il secondo è il matrimonio che include un set di rituali il più importante di che erano il completamento del matrimonio mentre tiene presente che la verginità era un pre-requisiti al matrimonio. Il Governo bulgaro presentò che dalla testimonianza di X. Y. e Z., siccome disegnato su con l'Azione Squadra Urgente italiana, il matrimonio rituale del richiedente a Y. adattò a questa pratica tradizionale.
138. Inoltre, non si aveva stabilito che c'era stato qualsiasi abbassando o atteggiamenti degradanti o istanze di forzato lavori. Il Governo presentò che nella sua testimonianza di 11 giugno 2003, il primo richiedente dichiarò essersi sposato Y. e non affermò che lei fu scontentata col suo matrimonio o che lei o i suoi genitori erano stati seviziati o erano stati costretti per lavorare. Secondo il Governo, i fatti della causa riguardarono così, un completamento regolare di un matrimonio e l'impresa di lavoro domestico di famiglia soliti che non potevano corrispondere a trattamento proibito sotto Articolo 4, particolarmente poiché il primo richiedente ammise si essendo trasferito liberamente ad Italia, travelled in macchina e frequentò discoteche.
139. Il Governo considerò che quando la Sezione Consolare bulgara segnalò una partecipazione azionaria coercitiva di una donna minorenne, le autorità italiane diedero la piena assistenza ed eseguirono un'indagine effettiva, ma dopo avere stabilito i fatti summenzionati, non poteva concludere che la causa riguardava traffico in esseri umani. Loro notarono che le autorità italiane “liberò” il primo richiedente che fu trovato essere in una buona salute e la condizione mentale. Lei fu interrogata con personale si specializzato in interazione con minori ed aveva accesso ad un interprete. Inoltre, le autorità previste sostengono a lei ed i suoi parenti, incluso alloggio e pagamento di costi. Le autorità italiane presero tutta la testimonianza di testimone attinente e le altre misure per stabilire i fatti ed i richiedenti avuti opportunità ampia di partecipare come testimoni nell'indagine in tutto la quale loro furono offerti con un interprete. I parenti erano stati comportati anche così, direttamente nell'indagine. Perciò, il criterio per un'indagine effettiva secondo la causa-legge della Corte (Rantsev c. Cipro e la Russia, n. 25965/04, § 233 7 gennaio 2010) era stato adempiuto.
140. Come ai passi presi con le autorità bulgare, il Governo bulgaro reiterò le loro osservazioni sotto Articolo 3 (vedere divide in paragrafi 121-123 sopra). Effettivamente sia le autorità bulgare ed italiane avevano reagito prontamente. Seguì che le azioni degli ambo gli Stati erano state in conformità con obblighi di Convenzione (Rantsev, citata sopra, § 289).
141. Loro presentarono inoltre che in finora come la causa potrebbe essere considerato sotto Articolo 4 le autorità bulgare aveva adempiuto ai loro obblighi positivi in una maniera adeguata ed opportuna. Il Governo bulgaro notò che la Convenzione che Traffica entrò in vigore in riguardo della Bulgaria nel 2007 e perciò non era applicabile al tempo degli eventi nella causa presente. Comunque, il Governo presentò che Bulgaria aveva adempiuto al suo obbligo positivo ed aveva preso le misure necessarie per stabilire una legislazione lavorabile ed effettiva sul criminalisation di creatura umana trafficare.
142. Loro avevano fissato inoltre in posto una struttura legislativa ed amministrativa appropriata. Loro notarono che entro 2003 la legislazione seguente era applicabile, in collegamento con la prevenzione, lotta e criminalizzazione del traffico:
- La Nazioni Convenzione Unito contro Malavita Transnazionale, adottò 15 novembre 2000, ratificato con la Bulgaria nel 2001
- Il Protocollo per Ostacolare, Sopprimere e Punire il Traffico in persone, Specialmente Donne e Figli di 15 novembre 2000
- La raccomandazione N.ro R (85) 11 al Membro Stati sulla posizione della vittima nella struttura di diritto penale e procedura, adottò col Comitato di Ministri del Consiglio dell'Europa 28 giugno 1985
- Raccomandazione 1545 (2002) sulla campagna contro traffico in donne del 21 gennaio 2002
- Direttiva 2004/81/EC Comunale di 29 aprile 2004 sul permesso di soggiorno emesso a terzi cittadini di paese che sono vittime di trafficare in esseri umani o che sono stati la materia di un'azione per facilitare l'immigrazione illegale e che coopera con le autorità competenti.
- Decisioni di Parlamento europee riferirono allo sfruttamento di prostituzione e traffico in persone.
Inoltre, con vuole dire di emendamenti al Codice Penale nel 2002, creatura umana traffico erano stati criminalizzati (vedere diritto nazionale Attinente) e nel 2003 una specifica legge su combating creatura umana trafficare stabilendo sistema di leve di cassa-azione effettivo fu passato con parlamento. Informazioni pubbliche furono offerte anche coi media nazionali sui rischi di trafficare in persone. Così, il Governo bulgaro prese misure positive e del tutto fattibili sulla creazione di un sistema nazionale ed effettivo per la prevenzione, indagine ed accusa di simile reati. Inoltre, i richiedenti non avevano fatto azione di reclamo in riguardo di questa struttura.
143. Il Governo bulgaro presentò anche che loro avevano adempiuto al loro obbligo positivo per prendere misure protettive. Loro presentarono che non c'era nessuna prova che loro era stato notificato particolarmente di qualsiasi le particolari circostanze che potrebbero generare un allineato e ragionevole sospetto di un vero ed immediato rischio al primo richiedente prima che lei lasciò ad Italia e più tardi durante la sua sospensione là. In conseguenza non era stato un obbligo positivo per prendere passi preliminari per proteggerla.
144. Come ad un obbligo procedurale il Governo reiterò investigare traffico potenziale, che le azioni di richiedenti erano volontarie, questo nonostante che gli sforzi uniti bulgari ed italiani condussero al risultato desiderato del primo richiedente che è rilasciato e ritornarono in Bulgaria.
145. Come all'expertise forense presentata, il Governo notò, che questo non poteva essere considerato come prova valida come sé non era stato prodotto a norma di legge, stato stato compilato un mese dopo il ritorno del primo richiedente a Bulgaria e non immediatamente al tempo degli eventi allegato.
B. la valutazione della Corte
1. L’applocazione di Articolo 4 della Convenzione
146. La Corte non ha considerato mai le disposizioni della Convenzione come il risuoli struttura di riferimento per l'interpretazione dei diritti e le libertà custodì therein (vedere Demir e Baykara c. la Turchia [GC], n. 34503/97, § 67 12 novembre 2008). Ha affermato da molto che uno dei principi principali della richiesta delle disposizioni di Convenzione è che non li fa domanda in un aspirapolvere (vedere Loizidou c. Turchia, 18 dicembre 1996 Relazioni 1996-VI; e Öcalan c. la Turchia [GC], n. 46221/99, § 163 ECHR 2005-IV). La Convenzione deve essere interpretata nella luce degli articoli di set di interpretazione fuori nella Convenzione di Vienna di 23 maggio 1969 sulla Legge di Trattati come un trattato internazionale, (vedere Rantsev, citata sopra, § 273).
147. Sotto che Convenzione, la Corte è costretta ad accertare il volere dire ordinario per essere data alle parole nel loro contesto e nella luce dell'oggetto e fine della disposizione dai quali loro sono dedotti (vedere Golder c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1975, § 29 la Serie Un n. 18; Loizidou, citata sopra, § 43). La Corte deve avere riguardo ad al fatto che il contesto della disposizione è un trattato per la protezione effettiva di diritti umani individuali e che la Convenzione deve essere letta nell'insieme, ed interpretò in tale modo come promuovere consistenza interna e l'armonia fra le sue varie disposizioni (vedere Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 48 ECHR 2005-X). Conto deve essere preso anche di qualsiasi articoli attinenti e principi di diritto internazionale applicabile in relazioni fra le Parti Contraenti e la Convenzione debba finora come possibile sia interpretato in armonia con gli altri articoli di diritto internazionale dei quali forma parte (vedere Al-Adsani, citata sopra, § 55; Demir e Baykara, citata sopra, § 67; Saadi c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13229/03, § 62 ECHR 2008 -...; e Ranstev, citata sopra, §§ 273-275).
148. L'oggetto e fine della Convenzione, come un strumento per la protezione di esseri umani ed individuali richiedono che le sue disposizioni siano interpretate e fecero domanda così come per fare le sue salvaguardie pratico ed effettivo (vedere, inter alia, Soering citata sopra, § 87; ed Artico c. l'Italia, 13 maggio 1980, § 33 la Serie Un n. 37).
149. In Siliadin, in considerazione della sfera di “la schiavitù” sotto Articolo 4, la Corte si riferì alla definizione classica di schiavitù contenuta nella Schiavitù Convenzione del 1926 che richiese l'esercizio di un diritto di proprietà genuino e riduzione dello status dell'individuo riguardata ad un “l'oggetto” (vedere Siliadin c. la Francia, n. 73316/01, § 122 ECHR 2005-VII). Con riguardo ad al concetto di “la servitù”, la Corte ha sostenuto che che che è proibito è un “forma particolarmente seria di rifiuto della libertà” (vedere Van Droogenbroeck c. il Belgio, il rapporto di Commissione di 9 luglio 1980, §§ 78-80 la Serie B n. 44). Il concetto di “la servitù” comporta un obbligo, sotto coercizione offrire i servizi di uno, e è collegato col concetto di “la schiavitù” (vedere Seguin c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 42400/98, 7 marzo 2000; e Siliadin, citata sopra, § 124). Per “forzato od obbligatorio lavori” la Corte ha sostenuto sorgere, che ci deve essere della costrizione fisica o mentale, così come alcuni che hanno la priorità della volontà della persona (vedere il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 34 la Serie Un n. 70; Siliadin, citata sopra, § 117).
150. La Corte non è chiamata su per considerare la richiesta di Articolo 4 regolarmente e, in particolare, ha avuto solamente due occasioni per datare considerare la misura alla quale trattamento associò col traffico pelle all'interno della sfera di che Articolo (Siliadin e Rantsev, sia citò sopra). Nella causa seconda, la Corte concluse, che il trattamento subì col richiedente corrisposto alla servitù e forzato ed obbligatorio lavora, benché incorresse brevemente di schiavitù. Era considerato che traffico si corresse cassa allo spirito e fine di Articolo 4 della Convenzione come incorrere all'interno della sfera delle garanzie nel precedente, offrì con che Articolo senza il bisogno di valutare quale dei tre tipi di condotta prescritta fu preso parte col particolare trattamento nella causa in oggetto.
151. In Rantsev, la Corte considerò, che traffico in esseri umani, con la sua molta natura e scopo dello sfruttamento è basato sull'esercizio di poteri che allegano al diritto di proprietà. Tratta esseri umani come merci per essere comprato e venduto e messo a lavori forzati, spesso per piccolo o nessun pagamento, di solito nell'industria di sesso ma anche altrove. Implica sorveglianza vicina delle attività di vittime i cui movimenti spesso sono circoscritti. Comporta l'uso della violenza e minacce contro vittime che vivono e lavorano le condizioni povere sotto. È descritto nel rapporto esplicativo che accompagna la Convenzione che Anti-traffico come la forma moderna del vecchio mestiere di schiavo mondiale. In quelle circostanze, la Corte concluse, che traffico si, all'interno del significato di Articolo 3(a) del Protocollo di Palermo ed Articolo 4(a) della Convenzione che Anti-traffico , incorra all'interno della sfera di Articolo 4 della Convenzione (vedere Rantsev, citata sopra, §§ 281-282).
2. L’applicazione alla causa presente
152. La Corte ancora una volta zona di massima luce che è confrontato su con una controversia la natura esatta degli eventi addotti. Le parti alla causa hanno presentato divergendo circostanze fattuale e spiacevolmente la mancanza di indagine con le autorità italiane ha condotto alla piccola prova che è disponibile per determinare la causa. Avendo detto che, la Corte non può ma prende le sue decisioni sulla base della prova presentata con le parti.
153. In questa luce, in finora come un materiae di ratione di eccezione può essere dedotto dai Governi osservazioni di ' che la Corte considera che non è necessario per trattare con questa eccezione poiché considera che l'azione di reclamo, nei suoi vari rami è in qualsiasi l'evento inammissibile per le ragioni seguenti.
(a) L'azione di reclamo contro l'Italia
1. Le circostanze come addotto coi richiedenti
154. La Corte già ha sostenuto sopra che le circostanze come addotto coi richiedenti avrebbe potuto corrispondere a creatura umana traffico. Comunque, considera che dalla prova presentata non è base sufficiente per stabilire la veracità dei richiedenti la versione di ' di eventi, vale a dire che il primo richiedente fu trasferito ad Italia per notificare come un pegno in qualche genere di racchetta dedicò alle attività illegali. In conseguenza, la Corte non riconosce l'esistenza di circostanze capace di corrispondere all'assunzione, trasporto, trasferimento, accoglienza di persone per il fine dello sfruttamento, forzato lavori o servizi, schiavitù o pratiche simile a schiavitù, la servitù o l'allontanamento di organi. Segue che i richiedenti che dichiarazione di ' che c'era stata un'istanza di creatura umana trafficare effettivo non è stata provarono e perciò non possono essere accettati con la Corte.
155. Poiché non è stato stabilito che il primo richiedente era una vittima di trafficare, la Corte considera che gli obblighi sotto Articolo 4 per penalizzare e perseguire traffico nell'ambito di una struttura legale o regolatore e corretta non possono venire in giochi nella causa presente.
156. Come all'Articolo 4 obbligo sulle autorità per prendere misure appropriate all'interno della sfera dei loro poteri per rimuovere l'individuo da che situazione o rischia, la Corte nota che irrispettoso di se o non là esisteva un sospetto credibile che c'era un vero o immediato rischio che il primo richiedente era trafficato o era stato sfruttando, la Corte già ha trovato sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione che le autorità italiane avevano preso tutti i passi richiesti per liberare il richiedente dalla situazione lei era in (vedere paragrafo 103 sopra).
157. In finora come Articolo 4 anche prevede per un obbligo procedurale per investigare situazioni di trafficare potenziale, la Corte già ha trovato nella sua valutazione sotto l'aspetto procedurale di Articolo 3 sopra (vedere divide in paragrafi 107-108 sopra) che le autorità italiane andarono a vuoto ad intraprendere un'indagine effettiva nelle circostanze della causa presente.
158. In conseguenza la Corte non lo trova necessario esaminare questo margine dell'azione di reclamo.
159. Dato il sopra, la Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo complessiva sotto Articolo 4 contro l'Italia basò sulla versione del richiedente di eventi è inammissibile, come manifestamente mal-fondò facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
ii. Le circostanze come stabilite dalle autorità
160. La Corte nota che le autorità conclusero che i fatti della causa corrisposero ad un matrimonio tipico secondo la tradizione di Roma. Il primo richiedente che fu invecchiato diciassette anni e nove mesi al tempo del matrimonio allegato non negò mai che lei si sposò volentieri Y. Lei faceva, comunque, neghi che qualsiasi pagamento era stato reso a suo padre per il matrimonio. Ciononostante, le fotografie raccolte con la polizia sembrano suggerire che un cambio di soldi infatti succedè. Poco è stato stabilito in riguardo di qualsiasi conseguendo trattamento all'interno della famiglia.
161. La Corte considera perciò che in relazione agli eventi come stabilito con le autorità, di nuovo non c'è prova sufficiente che indica che il primo richiedente fu sostenuto in schiavitù. Presumendo anche che il padre del richiedente ricevette una somma di soldi in riguardo del matrimonio allegato, la Corte è della prospettiva che, non si può considerare che tale contributo valutario corrisponda ad un prezzo, nelle circostanze della causa presente, allegò al trapasso di proprietà nel quale porterebbe giochi il concetto di schiavitù. La Corte reitera che matrimonio ha connotazioni sociali e culturali stabili che possono differire grandemente da una società ad un altro (vedere Schalk e Kopf c. l'Austria, n. 30141/04, § 62 ECHR 2010). Secondo la Corte, questo pagamento può essere accettato ragionevolmente, siccome rappresentando un regalo da una famiglia ad un altro, una tradizione comune a molte culture diverse nella società di oggi.
162. Nessuno è là qualsiasi prova che indica che il primo richiedente fu sottoposto “la servitù” o “forzato od obbligatorio” lavori, il precedente che comporta coercizione per offrire i servizi di uno (vedere Siliadin, § 124 sopra e citata) ed il secondo che porta per badare all'idea di costrizione fisica o mentale. Ciò che deve là essere è lavoro “voluto... sotto la minaccia di qualsiasi la sanzione penale” ed anche compiuto contro la volontà della persona riguardata, quel è lavoro per che lui o lei “non li ha offerte volontariamente lui o” (vedere il der di Van Mussele, citata sopra, § 34, e Siliadin, § 117 sopra e citata). La corte osserva che nonostante la testimonianza del primo richiedente che chiede che lei fu costretta per lavorare, il terzo richiedente spiegò nella sua azione di reclamo di 24 maggio 2003 che la sua famiglia aveva avuto un lavoro per fare faccende domestiche.
163. Inoltre, secondo la Corte il facto del posto archivi medici presentati non sono sufficienti per determinare oltre ragionevole dubita che il primo richiedente davvero soffrisse di della forma di mal-trattamento o lo sfruttamento siccome capito nella definizione di trafficare. Né inscatoli la Corte consideri che il risuoli pagamento di una somma di soldi basta considerare che là stava traffico in esseri umani. Né è prova che suggerisce là che tale unione fu contratta per i fini dello sfruttamento, sia sé sessuale o altro. Non c'è così, nessuna ragione di credere che l'unione si fu impegnata per fini altro che quegli associarono con un matrimonio tradizionale generalmente.
164. La Corte nota con interesse la Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio delle decisioni dell'Europa (vedere testi internazionali ed Attinenti sopra) mostrando interessato in riguardo delle donne di Roma nel contesto di forzato e matrimoni di figlio (il secondo definito come l'unione di due persone uno di chi è sotto almeno 18 anni maggiorenne) e divide queste apprensioni. Comunque, la Corte nota che le decisioni che aerano simile preoccupazioni ed azione incoraggiante in questo riguardo sono datate 2005 e 2010 e perciò al tempo degli eventi allegato non solo non erano là qualsiasi strumento vincolante, come resti la causa per datare, ma in fatto effettivo non erano abbastanza consapevolezza e consentimento fra la comunità internazionale per condannare simile azioni. Il documento prevalente al tempo (quale non fu ratificato con Italia o la Bulgaria) era la Convenzione su Beneplacito a Matrimonio, la Minima Età per Matrimonio e Registrazione di Matrimoni (1962) quale deciso che era per gli Stati per decidere su un limite di età per matrimonio contraente e permise ad una dispensa come invecchiare essere dato con un'autorità competente in circostanze eccezionali. Questo trend è riflesso nella legislazione di molto del membro Stati del Consiglio di Europa che considera diciotto anni per avere l'età di beneplacito per i fini di matrimonio, e prevede per circostanze eccezionali da che cosa una corte o l'altra autorità (spesso su consultare i guardiani) può permettere ad un matrimonio di essere contratto con una persona che è più giovane (per esempio, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria Croazia, Italia Ungheria, Malta San Marino, Serbia Slovenia, Spagna la Svezia), l'essere più comune almeno sedici anni maggiorenne.
165. La Corte nota che nel 2003, quando il primo richiedente sembra avere intrapreso questa unione, lei andava via alcuni mesi dalla maturità. È perfettamente effettivamente sotto legislazione italiana, legale per una persona invecchiò sedici o più per avere rapporto sessuale consensuale (vedere con articolo di implicazione 609 quartiere in paragrafo 40 sopra), anche senza il beneplacito del genitore, e lui o lei possono lasciare anche la casa di famiglia col beneplacito dei genitori. Nella causa presente non è inoltre, prova sufficiente che indica che l'unione fu costretta sul primo richiedente che non aveva testimoniato che lei non aveva acconsentito a sé e che enfatizzò che Y. non l'aveva costretta ad avere rapporto sessuale con lui. In questa luce non può essere detto che le circostanze come stabilito con l'aumento di autorità qualsiasi emette sotto Articolo 4 della Convenzione.
166. Di conseguenza, questa parte dell'azione di reclamo sotto questa disposizione, contro l'Italia è inammissibile come essendo mal-fondato manifestamente e deve essere respinta sotto Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
(b) L'azione di reclamo contro la Bulgaria
167. La Corte nota quel aveva qualsiasi traffico allegato cominciarono in Bulgaria sé non sarebbe fuori della competenza della Corte per esaminare se Bulgaria si attenne con qualsiasi l'obbligo ha potuto dovere prendere misure all'interno dei limiti di sua propria giurisdizione ed i poteri per proteggere il primo richiedente dal trafficare ed investigare la possibilità che le era stato trafficato (vedere Rantsev, § 207 sopra e citata). In oltre, membro Stati sono anche soggetto ad un dovere in croce-confine che traffica cause per cooperare efficacemente con le autorità attinenti degli altri Stati riguardato nell'indagine di eventi che accaddero fuori dei loro territori (vedere Rantsev, citata sopra, § 289).
168. Comunque, se le questioni si lamentarono di aumento determinato alla responsabilità di Stato del bulgaro nelle circostanze della causa presente è una questione che incorre essere determinata con la Corte secondo il suo esame dei meriti dell'azione di reclamo.
169. La Corte già ha stabilito, sopra, che in riguardo di sia la versione degli eventi, le circostanze della causa non generarono creatura umana traffico, una situazione che avrebbe impegnato la responsabilità dello Stato bulgaro aveva qualsiasi traffico cominciò là. Inoltre, i richiedenti non si lamentarono che le autorità bulgare non investigarono qualsiasi traffico potenziale, ma solamente che le autorità bulgare non li offrirono con l'assistenza richiesta nelle loro distribuzioni con le autorità italiane. Siccome suggerito sopra in paragrafo 119 in multa, la Corte considera che le autorità bulgare assisterono i richiedenti e mantennero contatto continuo e co-operazione con le autorità italiane.
170. Segue che l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 4 contro la Bulgaria è mal-fondata anche manifestamente e deve essere respinta sotto Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
171. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre che il trattamento del quale loro hanno sofferto era dovuto alla loro origine di Roma. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 14 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [la] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
172. I richiedenti presentarono che loro erano stati discriminati contro con le autorità nel maneggio della loro causa. Loro notarono che il fatto che gli offensori che loro hanno accusato erano stati anche Roma non aveva attinenza, dai tempi di Roma di origine serba era ricco abbastanza per trovare via scot liberi dopo avere fatto disposizioni con agenti di polizia corrotti.
173. Il Governo italiano considerò quel aveva i richiedenti stato discriminato contro, nessuna indagine avrebbe conseguito. Comunque, siccome spiegato sopra, una piena indagine si era stata impegnata e le conclusioni delle autorità erano state giustificate sulla base di un approccio obiettivo e ragionevole.
174. Il Governo bulgaro presentò che le loro autorità avevano preso misure pronte, adeguate e comprensive per proteggere gli interessi dei richiedenti, come confermato con la prova prevista col CRD. Loro notarono che il database del Ministero di affari Esteri non immagazzinò dati in relazione ad etnia. Non ci potrebbe essere così, nessuna dichiarazione che i richiedenti erano stati sottoposti ad atteggiamenti discriminatori a causa della loro origine etnica. Inoltre, loro notarono che la famiglia accusò coi richiedenti di simile trattamento era dello stesso etnia che in se stesso disperse qualsiasi le idee su una differenza in trattamento.
175. La causa-legge della Corte su Articolo 14 stabilisce che la discriminazione intende differentemente trattamento, senza una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole persone in situazioni in modo pertinente simili (vedere Willis c. il Regno Unito, n. 36042/97, § 48 ECHR 2002-IV). La violenza razziale è un particolare affronto alla dignità umana e, in prospettiva delle sue conseguenze pericolose, richiede dalle autorità vigilanza speciale ed una reazione vigorosa. È per questa ragione che le autorità devono usare del tutto disponibili vuole dire combattere razzismo e la violenza razzista, mentre rafforzando con ciò la visione di democrazia di una società nella quale la diversità non è percepita come una minaccia ma come una fonte del suo arricchimento. (vedere Nachova ed Altri c. la Bulgaria [GC], N. 43577/98 e 43579/98, § 145 ECHR 2005-VII).
176. La Corte gli ulteriori richiami che quando investigando incidenti violenti, autorità Statali hanno il dovere supplementare di prendere tutti i passi ragionevoli per smascherare qualsiasi il motivo razzista e stabilire se od odio non etnico o pregiudizio hanno potuto avere un ruolo negli eventi. La violenza razzialmente indotta che tratta e la brutalità su un appiglio uguale con cause che non hanno armonica superiore razziste starebbero rivolgendosi un occhio cieco alla specifica natura di atti che sono particolarmente distruttivi di diritti essenziali. Un insuccesso per fare una distinzione nel modo dove si sono occupate di situazioni che sono essenzialmente diverse può costituire trattamento ingiustificato irreconciliabile con Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Per ammissione, provare motivazione razziale sarà spesso estremamente difficile in pratica. L'obbligo dello Stato rispondente per investigare le possibili armonica superiore razziste ad un atto violento è un obbligo per usare i suoi migliori sforzi e non è assoluto; le autorità devono fare che che è ragionevole nelle circostanze della causa (vedere Nachova ed altri, citata sopra, § 160).
177. Affrontato coi richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' sotto Articolo 14, il compito della Corte è stabilire di tutti prima se o non il razzismo era un fattore causale nelle circostanze che conducono alla loro azione di reclamo alle autorità ed in relazione a questo, se o non lo Stato rispondente si attenne col suo obbligo per investigare i possibili motivi razzisti. La Corte dovrebbe esaminare anche inoltre, se nell'eseguire l'indagine nei richiedenti la dichiarazione di ' di mal-trattamento con la polizia, le autorità nazionali discriminarono contro i richiedenti e, in tal caso, se la discriminazione fu basata sulla loro origine etnica.
178. Come al primo margine dell'azione di reclamo, la Corte nota, che presumere anche i richiedenti la versione di ' di eventi era veritiero, il trattamento loro dicono di avere subito per causa di terze parti non può essere detto in qualsiasi modo di avere armonica superiore razziste o che fu istigato con odio etnico o pregiudizio perché i perpetratore allegato appartennero allo stesso gruppo etnico come i richiedenti. Effettivamente, i richiedenti non fecero questa dichiarazione alla polizia quando loro si lamentarono degli eventi riferiti alla famiglia serba. Segue che non c'era obbligo positivo sullo Stato per investigare simile motivi.
179. Come al secondo margine, vale a dire se le autorità nazionali discriminarono contro i richiedenti sulla base della loro origine etnica, la Corte nota che mentre già ha contenuto sopra che le autorità italiane andarono a vuoto ad investigare adeguatamente i richiedenti le dichiarazioni di ', dai documenti presentati non traspira che simile omissione di atto era una conseguenza di atteggiamenti discriminatori. Effettivamente, là sembra non essere abuso verbale e razzista con la polizia durante l'indagine, né era qualsiasi commenti tendenziosi resi con l'accusatore in relazione ai richiedenti ' l'origine di Roma in tutta l'indagine o con le corti nei processi susseguenti. Inoltre, i richiedenti non accusarono le autorità di esporre sentimento anti-Roma al tempo attinente.
180. Di conseguenza, in finora come l'azione di reclamo è diretto contro l'Italia, è mal-fondato manifestamente, e sarà respinto secondo Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
181. La Corte considera che nessuno simile azione di reclamo è stata diretta contro la Bulgaria, ed anche se sia, l'azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e sarà respinta secondo Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ALLEGATO DI LA CONVENZIONE
182. Infine, i richiedenti si lamentarono che ai primo e terzi richiedenti non furono forniti avvocati ed interpreti durante il loro interrogatorio, non furono informati in che veste che loro erano messi in dubbio, e furono costretti per firmare documenti il contenuto del quale loro non sapevano. Loro invocarono Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
183. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo in finora come Articolo 13 è invocato è giudicato male e sarebbe analizzato più propriamente sotto Articolo 6.
184. Comunque, la Corte reitera che una persona non può chiedere di essere una vittima di una violazione del suo diritto ad un processo equanime sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione che, secondo lui o lei, succedè nel corso di procedimenti nel quale lui o lei furono assolte o quali furono cessati (vedere Osmanov e Husseinov c. la Bulgaria (il dec.), N. 54178/00 e 59901/00, 4 settembre 2003, e la causa-legge citati therein).
185. La Corte nota che i procedimenti contro il primo richiedente furono cessati (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra) e che il terzo richiedente fu assolto con una sentenza di 8 febbraio 2006 (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra). La Corte considera perciò che in queste circostanze i due richiedenti non possono chiedere di essere vittime di una violazione del loro diritto ad un processo equanime sotto Articolo 6.
186. Segue che questa azione di reclamo deve essere respinta facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
V. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
187. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
188. Benché una richiesta per la soddisfazione equa (EUR 200,000) fu reso quando i richiedenti depositarono la loro richiesta, loro non presentarono una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa quando richiese con la Corte. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna chiamata per assegnarli qualsiasi la somma su quel il conto.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla mancanza di passi adeguati per ostacolare il maltrattamento del primo richiedente da parte della famiglia serba garantendo la sua liberazione rapida e la mancanza di un'indagine effettiva su quel maltrattamento addotto , da parte delle autorità italiane ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;

2. Sostiene per 6 voti a 1 che non c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione riguardo a dei passi preso dalle autorità per rilasciare il primo richiedente;

3. Sostiene all’unanimità che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 3 della Convenzione nella misura in cui l'indagine sul maltrattamento addotto del primo richiedente da individui privati non era effettiva;
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 31 luglio 2012, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Francoise Tulkens
Cancelliere Presidentessa
In conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata del Giudice Kalaydjieva è annessa a questa sentenza.
F.T.
S.H.N.


OPINIONE DISSIDENTE DEL GIUDICE KALAYDJIEVA
Insieme coi miei colleghi stimati, io sono “previde col fatto che seguendo la liberazione del primo richiedente, prese le autorità meno che un pieno giorno per giungere alle loro conclusioni” (paragrafo 104) e cessa qualsiasi l'ulteriore indagine nei richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di '. Queste azioni di reclamo comportarono mal-trattamento ed atti sessuali non-consensuali con un minore che durò presumibilmente un mese e succedè in una villa possedette con una persona con un casellario giudiziale. La Corte era unanime nel trovare che “li aveva stato provò, [alcuni degli atti si lamentarono di] avrebbe potuto corrispondere a creatura umana che traffica” e - inoltre su - che nessuna indagine aveva avuto luogo.
Cosa io trovo anche più prevedendo nella causa presente è il fatto che avendo fatto scorrerie la villa, dove il primo richiedente fu sostenuto presumibilmente contro volontà sua, e la rilasciò diciassette giorni dopo avere ottenuto informazioni che la madre ha temuto che è probabile che sua figlia sia sottoposta alla forzata prostituzione, le autorità non solo decisero di respingere queste azioni di reclamo senza qualsiasi l'ulteriore indagine, ma anche immediatamente avviare procedimenti penali contro la ragazza di diciassette anni e sua madre per spergiuro e le accuse false all'effetto “che X., Y. e Z. [aveva] deprivato [il minore] della sua libertà tenendola nella villa, accusandoli così di rapimento mentre seppe loro erano innocenti” (paragrafo 30).
Sembra piuttosto illogico che avendo “opinò che le circostanze della causa presente concernerono un matrimonio di Roma”, le autorità intrapresero nondimeno misure protettive con mettendo la ragazza in un ricovero di Caritas e dandola poi nella cura di sua madre, invece di lasciarla riunirla felicemente libera “il marito” dopo un'azione apparentemente considerata un'interferenza non necessaria nei loro affari di famiglia tranquilli.
Io lo trovo allarmando che, dopo avere ricevuto inoltre dettagliò ed azioni di reclamo insistenti dai richiedenti (divide in paragrafi 16 e 25) per l'ambasciata bulgara a Roma, le autorità italiane insistite su procedere con le accuse contro i richiedenti piuttosto che investigando le circostanze si lamentarono di. È difficile evitare l'impressione che questo era fatto in un tentativo di attivamente confutare non solo i fini per i quali i minori erano stati contenuti presumibilmente fortemente nella villa, ma anche il molto fatto della privazione illegale di libertà dalla quale loro la rilasciarono. Effettivamente, il Governo italiano e rispondente si appellò sui procedimenti avviati per spergiuro per convincere la Corte che “i fatti come addotto coi richiedenti era stato confutò completamente durante procedimenti nazionali” (paragrafo 90) e che il “matrimonio tradizionale” capendo degli eventi era stato considerato “veritiero con la sentenza della Torino Magistrato Inquirente” nel cessare i procedimenti contro il primo richiedente così come fondi “probabile col Tribunale di Torino nella sua sentenza di 2006” assolvendo il terzo richiedente (divide in paragrafi 92 e 93). Infatti, il giudice del Tribunale di Torino trovò le fotografie del “il matrimonio” dipingere una scena che era piuttosto arcigna per le tradizioni di Roma. Agendo in contumacia in procedimenti, dove il terzo richiedente né fu chiamato in causa per sembrare, né in grado difendersi, o spiega le circostanze, lui respinse le accuse di spergiuro e le accuse false contro lei, mentre notando anche che X., Y. e Z. si erano giovati a del loro diritto per rimanere silenzioso nel “le accuse false di rapire”, sollevò presumibilmente con la madre.
I richiedenti le dichiarazioni di ' di mal-trattamento con le autorità italiane non furono limitate all'insuccesso per intraprendere azione opportuna per la liberazione e protezione di un minore, siccome suggerito con paragrafi 102-108 della sentenza. In questo riguardo ad io non vedo nessuna ragione di congiungere la maggioranza nella loro approvazione del “la prontezza e diligenza” (paragrafo 102) espose in un'azione che le autorità nazionali loro ritennero non necessarie e causarono con asserzioni false.
Né era le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti della maniera nella quale loro furono interrogati separata presumibilmente da quelli riguardo all'atteggiamento delle autorità italiane -scome esaminato in paragrafi 115-118. In questo riguardo a, il molto fatto che i procedimenti penali per spergiuro e le accuse false furono avviati alcune ore dopo il presumibilmente interrogazioni minacciose bastano sostenere una conclusione che le minacce erano piuttosto realistiche.
I richiedenti le osservazioni di ' di mal-trattamento con le autorità concernerono l'approccio complessivo delle autorità di indagine italiane alle loro azioni di reclamo. Vedendo che loro non solo furono respinti senza qualsiasi indagine, ma fu seguito anche con un tentativo di attivamente confutarli, io non posso venire a qualsiasi chiarimento per questo trattamento altro che un'assunzione da parte delle autorità che i richiedenti stavano dicendo bugie dall'inizio. Questa assunzione traspira dalla riluttanza per organizzare la liberazione opportuna del minore, la maniera nella quale lei e sua madre furono messe in dubbio con fretta sotto minaccia e l'immediate (ma senza successo) istituzione di procedimenti per spergiuro in un tentativo di stabilire che le loro azioni di reclamo non erano nulla ma le accuse false, rese mentre seppe che X., Y. e Z. erano innocenti.
Questo chiarimento sembra essere più ragionevole ciò che propose alla Corte, vale a dire, che il “autorità italiane opinarono che le circostanze della pelle di causa presente all'interno del contesto di un matrimonio di Roma.” Anche se corretto (ed io mi azzarderei a dubitarne), tale “l'opinione” non poteva spiegare ragionevolmente la maniera nella quale le autorità trattarono le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti le di mal-trattamento, sesso non-consensuale la forzata partecipazione nelle attività penali, ecc. a meno che è considerato una comprensione che un matrimonio di Roma costituì un accordo dei genitori per vendere una sposa “per tutti i fini.”
Io mi trovo incapace accettare entrambi questi due chiarimenti per la maniera nella quale le autorità trattarono coi richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' e trovano ognuno di loro per essere basato su assunzioni ugualmente improprie.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 27/07/2021.