Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF LINDHEIM AND OTHERS v. NORWAY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 13221/08/2012
STATO: Norvegia
DATA: 12/06/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusions: Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection of property (Aricle 1 para. 2 of Protocol No. 1 - Control of the use of property) Pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage)
Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed (Article 41 - Pecuniary damage)


FOURTH SECTION






CASE OF LINDHEIM AND OTHERS v. NORWAY

(Applications nos. 13221/08 and 2139/10)









JUDGMENT


STRASBOURG

12 June 2012



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Lindheim and Others v. Norway,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Sverre Erik Jebens, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 21 June 2011 and 22 May 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the last mentioned date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in two applications (nos. 13221/08 and 2139/10) against the Kingdom of Norway lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by six Norwegian nationals (“the applicants”) on 14 March 2008 and 21 December 2009. OMISSIS lodged the first application. OMISSIS lodged the second application.
2. The first five applicants were initially represented by Mr F. Elgesem and by Mr S.O. Flaaten; therafter all six applicants were represented by the latter and by Mr G. Hika. The three lawyers were practising in Oslo. The Norwegian Government (“the Government”) were represented by OMISSIS of the Attorney General’s Office (Civil Matters) as their Agent.
3. The applicants were landowners who, as lessors, had entered into ground lease agreements regarding their plots of land, for either permanent homes or holiday homes. They complained that, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, under new legislation the lessees had been entitled to demand, and had demanded, an unlimited extension of the contracts on the same conditions as applied previously, once the agreed term of lease had expired.
4. On 4 June 2009 and 18 May 2010, respectively, the Court decided to give notice of the applications to the Government. It also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the applications at the same time (Article 29 § 1). On 9 May 2011 the Court decided to join the two applications and to invite the parties to a hearing on the admissibility and merits of the case.
5. A hearing took place in public in the Human Rights Building, Strasbourg, on 21 June 2011 (Rule 59 § 3).
There appeared before the Court:
(a) for the Government
Mr M. EMBERLAND, Attorney-General’s Office, Agent,
Ms A. SYSE, Adviser;
(b) for the applicants
OMISSIS
The Court heard addresses by Mr Emberland, OMISSIS.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants are:
OMISSIS
A. Factual background
7. The applicants are landowners and lessors who concluded ground lease contracts regarding their plots of lands for permanent homes or holiday homes prior to 1 January 1976. On that date, upon the entry into force of the Ground Lease Act 1975 (Tomtefesteloven), for the first time under Norwegian law, the rental or leasing of plots of land for permanent homes and holiday homes became the subject of special statutory regulation.
8. Prior to 1 January 1976 such agreements were governed by the general rules (statutory and other) on contracts. Ordinarily such contracts were concluded for a period of 99 years and often contained clauses giving the lessee a right to extension of the contract upon expiry. According to legal doctrine, where such clauses had not expressly been set out in the contract, there was a custom or implicit assumption that the lessee had a right to extension of the contract unless the lessor had an objective ground for refusing renewal. Some lease contracts contained clauses which gave the lessor a right to increase the rent at intervals, in order to compensate for inflation. However, pursuant to two Supreme Court judgments of 1988, such a right was granted even in the absence of any explicit contract clause to that effect.
9. In 1996 a new Ground Lease Act was enacted with effect from 1 January 2002.
10. Under both the 1975 Act and the 1996 Act the lessee was entitled to have the ground lease contract extended but the lessor had the right to introduce new conditions into the contract.
11. With effect from 1 November 2004 the Ground Lease Act was amended anew; inter alia, from that date its section 33 granted all lessees of plots for permanent homes and holiday homes the right to claim extension of their lease on the same conditions as previously and without limitation in time, when the agreed term of lease between the parties expired. The reason was a strongly felt concern across Parliament (Stortinget), with only one exception – the Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet), that lessees who were not able to afford the price of redemption would need the legislator’s protection in order to be able to extend the lease. The introduction of the disputed provision of section 33 of the Ground Lease Act was essentially motivated by social policy considerations (see paragraphs 47-51 below).
12. In order better to understand the rationale behind this amendment, it is important to bear in mind the underlying socio-economic factors in Norway. In the post-war area, limited resources for the purchase of real estate was one factor that made ground lease arrangements attractive for people who wanted to own a permanent home or a holiday home. For property owners, it was an expedient way of obtaining a steady income from their land without making any investments and an attractive alternative to selling the land, in a country with a small population on a vast territory and with moderate price levels. This might explain why such arrangements became so popular. There exist between 300,000 and 350,000 ground lease contracts (sixty percent for permanent homes and forty percent for holiday homes) in a population of 5 million people, the majority of contracts being for private homes (Proposal No. 41 to the Odelsting (2003-2004), p. 11).
13. From 1950 until 1980 the price level of the real-estate market developed more or less at a similar pace to general price inflation. However, this began to change around 1980, when real-estate prices started soaring. This was especially the case from the second half of the 1980s for property around the larger cities and in popular areas for recreation, but prices have continued to rise, in all parts of the country. A number of lessors then used the opportunity under the law to demand redemption, which resulted in many lessees being put in a difficult financial position (paragraph 46 of the Supreme Court’s judgment of 21 September 2007 in the leading case referred to at paragraph 16 below). Because of the dramatic increase in pressure on real-estate prices the legislator thought it necessary to intervene to protect the lessees’ interests. This was done in 2004 by regulating the level of possible rent increases so that they could only reflect general inflation, not the rising cost of land.
B. The leading case brought before the Supreme Court
14. In consequence thereof a lessor, who is not one of the applicants, lodged civil proceedings before the Oslo District Court (tingrett) against fifty-four lessees who had leased plots of land for permanent homes, claiming that the amended section 33 of the Ground Lease Act contravened Articles 97 or 105 of the Constitution, concerning respectively the prohibition of retroactive laws and the right to full compensation in case of expropriation, or Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
15. On 10 January 2007, the Oslo District Court passed judgment in favour of the lessor, finding that section 33 of the Ground Lease Act contravened both Article 97 and Article 105 of the Constitution.
16. On appeal, the case was brought directly before the Supreme Court (Høyesterett), which by judgment of 21 September 2007 (HR 2007 1593-P, case no. 2007/237) found against the lessor. It considered that section 33 of the Ground Lease Act should be examined exclusively in the light of Article 97 of the Constitution, with which it was compatible, and that there was no infringement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. In his reasoning, approved in the main by the other six Justices sitting in the case, the first voting judge, Mr Justice Matningsdal, stated in so far as relevant:
“(88) The lessee’s submission that the right to extension of the lease ‘on the same terms as previously’ represents a restriction can in my opinion not succeed. Ever since the judgment in the Concession Act case in the Supreme Court’s law reports (Norsk Retstidende - “R.t.”) 1918 I p. 403, the Supreme Court has taken as its point of departure that if, as stated by Assessor Siewers in Rt. 1914 p. 205, there is ‘a ceding on the part of the owner and an acquisition on the part of the State which wholly or in part transfers the owner’s disposal of the property to the State or others for further enjoyment for the same or other purposes’, it will follow from Article 105 that full compensation must be paid. Conversely, there will be a restriction on the use of property if ‘there is no ceding and acquisition but rather provisions that for the promotion of public interest considerations and in the interest of society aim to regulate the owner’s disposal of the property, without any transfer to third parties’.
(89) The right to extension provided for in section 33 must clearly be distinguished from a regulation of the owner’s disposal of the property. Section 33 grants the lessee a right to lease the plot for a longer period than provided for in the agreement. In other words, there is a transfer of rights in the property beyond the agreed period of time - which viewed in isolation could indicate that the situation is directly regulated by Article 105. In this context, I should note that the requirement as to ‘full compensation’ in Article 105 also applies in the case of expropriation of limited rights ...
(90) Although section 33 of the Ground Lease Act entails a transfer of the owner’s disposal of the property, I nevertheless have no doubt that the constitutionality of the right to an extension on unchanged conditions must be assessed in relation to Article 97 of the Constitution, rather than Article 105. This was also the view of the legislators, see Proposal No. 41 to the Odelsting (2003-2004), p. 55, quoted above, which assumes that the question of constitutionality must be decided by reference to Article 97. A central point in this context is that the rules on extension intervene with a regulatory effect in a situation created by the parties themselves through the contract of ground lease. The agreement makes it necessary for the lessees to be permitted to maintain their buildings on the plot for a very long period of time after the agreed term of lease has expired. The statutory provision represents a regulation – with retroactive effect – related directly to the agreement, or, more precisely, to the restrictions contained in the agreement. In our legal tradition a subsequent regulation of this nature relating to a contractual relationship between the parties is assessed in relation to Article 97 of the Constitution, not in relation to Article 105. This is the case even where a regulation has resulted in a transfer of rights and obligations between the parties. This view must also be applicable in a case such as ours, even though the intervention in the agreement entails a transfer of disposal.’
...
(98) The concrete assessment in relation to Article 97 of the Constitution
(99) ... An assessment must be made in full of the consequences of the act. In this assessment, on the one side weight must be accorded to the considerations of the lessees. The latter must be balanced against the act’s consequences for the lessors, and how protection-worthy their interests are.
(101) When it comes to a ground lease it is fundamental that one is confronted with a conflict of interests between two parties. The landowner owns the land, while the lessee owns the building or buildings which have been erected on the land. When balancing, it is of central importance that almost without exception the lessee’s economic interest is greater. Even if the example is not representative for buildings constructed for individual habitation or for holiday purposes, I note nevertheless that in the sales project regarding the fifty-four apartments in the present case, the prices were set at between NOK 140,000 and NOK 395,000 depending on size and position. The price for one of the most expensive apartments was thus higher than the price paid a few years previously for the whole plot of land. But also as regards buildings constructed for individual habitation and for holiday purposes, normally the lessee has paid the more significant financial contribution.
(102) In respect of a lease for permanent homes, the lessee’s essential right to housing for himself and his family must be protected – which was the principal reason behind the amendment of the act. In addition, for the majority of lessees it concerns their single largest investment. They have a well-founded expectation that the legislators will protect their factual situation. Moreover, this is illustrated by the fact that besides the area of ground leasing, we have several examples where the legislators have found it justified to protect rights of this kind, even when such interference may mean a certain form of transfer of rights:
(103) Firstly I note Act of 23 July 1920 no. 1 ...
(104) Secondly I note Act of 16 July 1939 concerning rent ...
(105) The regulation of rent is a third example, which illustrates the legislation’s endeavour to protect the right to housing ...
(106) The right to continue the lease contract on ‘the same terms as before’ has first and foremost significance for the lessor’s possibility to increase the rent. The examination above [103-105] shows that for a long time considerable legislative efforts have been made to protect the right to housing. This area of law has been strongly legislated, and the market mechanisms have to a large extent not been the deciding factor. Already, therefore, lessors must have been prepared for the law makers to follow developments closely and if necessary intervene in the ongoing lease relations in order to safeguard the lessee’s need to protect his home and his investments.
(107) Furthermore, as regards long-term agreements, like ground lease contracts, the parties must be prepared for developments to take a direction which increases the legislator’s need to intervene with legislation to secure a proper balance between the parties. This has not only benefited the lessees: the enactment of section 36 of the Agreement Act in 1983 gave lessors the possibility to adjust the lease upwards in contracts which did not contain a regulation clause, and where the rent had become unreasonably low because of a significant decrease in the value of money...
...
(109) [The lessors] have emphasised that as the contracts were entered into during a period of index linkage, they anticipated that price regulation would be lifted [at the expiry of the contract] and that, when extending the contract, they would be able to charge a rent which reflected the real value of the land. I note in this connection that it is questionable how strong this anticipation could have been. ... I refer to [a Supreme Court judgment, Rt. 2006 p.1547, in which the court stated among other things about the parties’ expectations] ... ‘[the lessors] have attached great weight to the fact that a clause was inserted in the contract stipulating that disputes as to the regulation of ground rent were to be decided in the light of an expert opinion. They maintain that the insertion of such a clause would have been unnecessary had they anticipated that price regulation would follow index linkage. In my view, however, much weight cannot be attached thereto. In the 1960s it was difficult to predict that the prices of plots of land for holiday houses would increase considerably more than general inflation would indicate. It is most likely that when entering into the contract, the parties did not have any clear conception of what the material basis for regulating the ground rent should be.’
(110) In addition to the quotation above, I note that in so far as the lessors had anticipated that price regulation would be lifted, they could not have had any legitimate anticipation that the legislator would accept an increase in ground rent which deviated significantly from the general price trend. Had the legislator not intervened, the price increase in recent years would almost have amounted to an ‘accidental profit’ – see Ot.prp.nr.41 (2003-204) p. 51, second column. Accordingly, it was not realistic to anticipate that the legislators would not intervene in the price increases we have had in recent years.
(111) Moreover, I observe that the present case concerns long-term contracts under which the landowner has received contractual ground rent for forty-five years. This also has its importance under Article 97 of the Constitution.
(112) The lessors have maintained that it is unreasonable that at the expiry of the contracts they will be in a [worse] position than lessors who enter new leasing contracts. In these situations, it follows that under section 11 of the Ground Lease Act the freedom of agreement is significant in that the agreed ground rent is valid as long as it is not ‘unreasonably high in relation to what is customarily paid in the locality on new leases on similar plots on similar contractual terms’. In my view, however, there is a crucial difference between the two situations: I refer to the elements already emphasised. In this connection, I especially note that concerning ground leases, such as those in question, where the life span of the building clearly exceeds the duration of the ground lease contract, the lessor has all along been aware that the extension of the contract would become an issue. When negotiating the terms of the extension of the contract, a lot would be at stake financially for the lessee. Despite the authority to expropriate in the Expropriation Act, there was a risk, as also indicated in Ot.prpr. no. 41 (2003-2004), p. 54, second column, that the lessor would impose some quite oppressive conditions on the lessee. In such cases the lessors could not expect the legislator to refrain from price regulation when renewing ground lease contracts. I recall that when the ground lease contracts at issue were entered into, the establishment of ground lease contracts was price-regulated, and an increase in the ground rent required approval from the Price Board [prisnemnda].
(113) Taking the [above circumstances into consideration,] there is a strong case for concluding that the provision which gives lessees the right to continue the ground lease on the same terms as before is not affected by the prohibition of retroactive laws set out in Article 97 of the Constitution. It is true that the provision means that the entire increase in the value of the land – to the extent that it exceeds increases in the consumer price index – can be said to accrue to the lessees after the extension of the lease. In other words, there is no apportioning of the increase in value that led to the legislative amendment. Nevertheless, I find that, given the situation which existed, it must lie within the freedom granted to the legislator under Article 97 of the Constitution to regulate matters in this way.
(114) When assessing [compliance with the constitution] the question arises whether the retroactive provision safeguards objective considerations of equality. [...]
(115) It is section 15 on the adjustment of the ground lease rent which in particular raises the question of whether considerations of equality have been sufficiently preserved. As a result of this provision the former provision on adjustment of the ground lease rent was repealed. Section 15 (1) provides:
...
(116) With regard to the one-off adjustment upon the entry into force of the Act on 1 January 2002, section 15 (2) provides:
...
(117) Section 15 of the Ground Lease Act thus provided for a possibility to factor into the calculation of the ground lease rent an increase in the value of the plot beyond the general inflation rate. But the possibility is limited to instances where such adjustments have ‘unequivocally’ been agreed to, and the requirement that the agreement be clear is particularly strict – see Norsk Rettstidende ‘R.t.’ 2006, at p. 1547. In view of this requirement as to clarity, and of the information available about adjustment clauses in ground lease contracts in general, a minority of contracts is covered by this provision. There are in addition important limitations also on the situations which are covered by the right under section 15 (2)(2) to include in the calculation an increase in values as mentioned. There is only provision for a one-off adjustment and there are limitations as to the amount.
(118) In my view, even though Article 97 of the Constitution hardly requires the exception provided for in section 15(2)(2), there is arguably an objective ground for giving these ground lease agreements a special status with regard to the possibility to adjust the ground lease rent. The basis for so doing is precisely that adjustment in accordance with the ground value here has been directly expressed and has therefore created a safer and closer expectation about adjustment on that ground. In the light of that I cannot see that the provision in section 15(2)(2) infringes the condition of equality and thus provides a ground for setting the section 33 right aside as being incompatible with Article 97 of the Constitution.
(119) I add that the fact that the redemption rules can offer a better financial result for the lessor than those on extension of the lease on unaltered conditions is not a ground for holding that section 33 is incompatible with Article 97 of the Constitution. Redemption is left to the lessee’s choice. The legislator should be free to decide that if the lessee wishes to avail himself or herself of this right, he or she will have to pay compensation beyond the constitutional minimum.
...
(121) Hereafter my conclusion is that section 33 of the Ground Lease Act does not contravene Article 97 of the Constitution. The provision is justified by weighty housing/social considerations. There was a clear need to protect a number of lessees and the lessors had no justified expectation to profit from the quite extraordinary increase of the value of plots of land for leasing.
...
(123) Finally, it is necessary to assess whether section 33 leads to results that contravene Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention ...
(125) The question is whether the fact that in the event of an extension the lessor does not have the right to regulate the ground lease upwards to an amount that reflects the actual land value means that the arrangement contravenes this Convention provision.
(126) The central decision in this context is the judgment by the European Court of Human Rights in Plenary Session of 21 February 1986 in James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, Series A no. 98. The case was occasioned by the enactment by the UK Parliament of a statute ‘The Leasehold Reform Act 1967’ which granted residents the right to redeem contracts for ‘building lease’ and ‘premium lease’. The former types of agreement had major similarities with Norwegian ground leases, the difference being that under these contracts, the house too belonged to the landowner. However, the residents had defrayed the cost of erection and paid a charge for the plot to the landowner. The new act provided that in the event of redemption, the residents should pay only for the value of the land. The plot would not be valued as a plot where a right of title to the house and land were grouped, but rather on the basis of what the landowner could be expected to sell it for with the encumbrance of a leasehold of at least 50 years’ duration, should anyone else purchase the plot. This amount was far lower than the market value of a released plot, and the plaintiffs claimed that they suffered a loss in the region of NOK 1.500.000 on individual conveyances. The Court did not find for the applicants.
(127) The applicants contended firstly that the ‘public interest’ test was satisfied only if the property had been taken ‘for a public purpose of benefit to the community generally’ (see James and Others, cited above, paragraph 39). This argument did not succeed (ibidem, paragraph 45):
‘For these reasons, the Court comes to the same conclusion as the Commission: a taking of property effected in pursuance of legitimate social, economic or other policies may be ‘in the public interest’, even if the community at large has no direct use or enjoyment of the property taken. The leasehold reform legislation is not therefore ipso facto an infringement of Article 1 (P1-1) on this ground. Accordingly, it is necessary to inquire whether in other respects the legislation satisfied the ‘public interest’ test and the remaining requirements laid down in the second sentence of Article 1 (P1-1).’
(128) In paragraph 46 the Court further underlines that the national courts ‘are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is ‘in the public interest’. The national authorities accordingly enjoy ‘a certain margin of appreciation’.
(129) The Court then discussed whether the aims sought to be pursued by the British Parliament were legitimate. In this regard, the Court held, inter alia (ibidem, paragraph 47):
‘Eliminating what are judged to be social injustices is an example of the functions of a democratic legislature. More especially, modern societies consider housing of the population to be a prime social need, the regulation of which cannot entirely be left to the play of market forces. The margin of appreciation is wide enough to cover legislation aimed at securing greater social justice in the sphere of people’s homes, even where such legislation interferes with existing contractual relations between private parties and confers no direct benefit on the State or the community at large. In principle, therefore, the aim pursued by the leasehold reform legislation is a legitimate one.’
(130) Thereafter, the Court emphasised that it would not be sufficient that the legislation pursue a ‘legitimate aim’ but ‘there must also be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised’ (ibidem, paragraph 50). On the proportionality assessment in the concrete case, the Court stated (paragraph 51):
‘According to the applicants, the security of tenure that tenants already had under the law in force ... provided an adequate response and the draconian nature of the means devised to give effect to the alleged moral entitlement, namely deprivation of property, went too far. This was said to be confirmed by the absence of any true equivalent to the 1967 Act in the municipal legislation of the other Contracting States and, indeed, generally in democratic societies. It is, so the applicants argued, only if there was no other less drastic remedy for the perceived injustice that the extreme remedy of expropriation could satisfy the requirements of Article 1 (P1-1).
This amounts to reading a test of strict necessity into the Article, an interpretation which the Court does not find warranted. The availability of alternative solutions does not in itself render the leasehold reform legislation unjustified; it constitutes one factor, along with others, relevant for determining whether the means chosen could be regarded as reasonable and suited to achieving the legitimate aim being pursued, having regard to the need to strike a ‘fair balance’. Provided the legislature remained within these bounds, it is not for the Court to say whether the legislation represented the best solution for dealing with the problem or whether the legislative discretion should have been exercised in another way ... .
The occupying leaseholder was considered by Parliament to have a ‘moral entitlement’ to ownership of the house, of which inadequate account was taken under the existing law ... . The concern of the legislature was not simply to regulate more fairly the relationship of landlord and tenant but to right a perceived injustice that went to the very issue of ownership. Allowing a mechanism for the compulsory transfer of the freehold interest in the house and the land to the tenant, with financial compensation to the landlord, cannot in itself be qualified in the circumstances as an inappropriate or disproportionate method for readjusting the law so as to meet that concern.’
(131) As to whether it is permissible to adopt legislation which does not guarantee full compensation, the Court held in paragraph 54:
‘The Court further accepts the Commission’s conclusion as to the standard of compensation: the taking of property without payment of an amount reasonably related to its value would normally constitute a disproportionate interference which could not be considered justifiable under Article 1 (P1-1). Article 1 (P1-1) does not, however, guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances. Legitimate objectives of ‘public interest’, such as pursued in measures of economic reform or measures designed to achieve greater social justice, may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value. Furthermore, the Court’s power of review is limited to ascertaining whether the choice of compensation terms falls outside the State’s wide margin of appreciation in this domain ... .’
(132) I cannot see that the Court has departed from the fundamental conclusions in this judgment in subsequent case-law. When the circumstances of the case and the considerations underlying the English legislation are compared with our case, it is clear to me that the application of section 33 of the Ground Lease Act does not contravene Norway’s obligations under international law.”
C. The specific circumstances underlying the applicants’ individual complaints
1. The first applicant
17. The first applicant, Ms Lindheim, owned agricultural property and had leased nine plots of land for holiday home purposes, all of which had been built upon. One of the leasing contracts was signed in September 1968 with the original ground rent amounting to NOK 200. The lease provided for adjustment of the ground rent in accordance with the Consumer Price Index every tenth year. The lease had a term of 40 years and accordingly expired in 2008. At the time of lodging the application the ground lease rent amounted to 1,622 Norwegian Krone (NOK) (approximately 200 euros (EUR)) per year. Since the applicant and the lessees could not reach an agreement as to an extension of the lease pursuant to section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, the first applicant brought the case before the Hallingdal District Court claiming that in the event of an extension of the lease, she should have the right to require the ground rent to be adjusted to the lawful market price. By a judgment of 3 February 2007, the Hallingdal District Court found in favour of the lessees.
18. The first applicant appealed against the judgment, and the case was brought directly before the Supreme Court, which heard it together with the leading case mentioned above. By a judgment of 21 September 2007 the Supreme Court found against the first applicant. In his reasoning, approved in the main by the five Justices sitting in the case, the first voting judge, Mr Justice Utgård, stated in so far as relevant:
“(13) I have arrived at the conclusion that the appeal cannot succeed on the grounds given in the [leading judgment] earlier today.
(14) It is true that this case concerns a holiday home property, whereas the case decided earlier today concerned leases for permanent home purposes. On some points, the Ground Lease Acts of the past have made distinctions between these purposes. The current section 32 does not distinguish between plots for permanent homes and plots for holiday homes. It must accordingly be assumed that the legislators intended that extensions of leases should be treated equally, irrespective of which of these purposes the plots were used for. This must carry considerable weight in our assessment here. Reference is made to the first voting judge’s comments [the leading judgment above] on the weighing of the political considerations by Parliament. I would nevertheless add that, although it is probably the case that social considerations would be of particular importance to permanent homes, having a holiday home also has considerable benefits in terms of well-being and welfare. It is illustrative of the assessment on this issue that counsel in the case has not attached noteworthy weight to distinctions regarding purpose.”
2. The second applicant
19. The second applicant, Mr Heian, owns agricultural property, of which the outlying fields have been parcelled out as plots. One plot was leased out for housing purposes for ninety-nine years, from 14 April 1909 to 14 April 2008. On 15 March 2007 the annual ground rent amounted to NOK 589 (approximately EUR 75). The contract did not provide for a right to claim an extension of the lease and was silent on the question of future adjustments of the ground lease rent. The leased plot is located in an area containing several housing properties and is approximately 2.3 dekar in size. The plot has a shoreline adjoining the Oslo Fjord. It appears that the lessee resides outside Norway and uses the property as a holiday home. Originally she claimed the right to redeem the plot with effect from the expiry of the agreed term of lease. For the purpose of determining the amount payable in redemption, the parties agreed that they should each appoint an assessor. Based on the values determined by these assessors, the amount payable in redemption would be fixed at forty per cent of the undeveloped plot value, as provided for in section 37 of the Ground Lease Act.
20. Each of the parties accordingly arranged for the plot to be valued. On 6 June 2007 the assessor appointed by the lessor estimated the market value of the undeveloped plot to be NOK 3,750,000 (approximately EUR 468,750), whereas the assessor appointed by the lessee on 20 September 2007 estimated the market value of the undeveloped plot to be NOK 3,400,000 (approximately EUR 425,000).
21. Subsequent to the Supreme Court passing judgments in the leading case and the case involving the first applicant on 21 September 2007, the lessee informed counsel for the second applicant that she was no longer in favour of redemption at forty per cent of the market value of the undeveloped plot. Instead, redemption was offered in an amount equal to the capitalised value of the ground rent based on a five per cent rate of interest on capitalisation, in other words compensation for redemption equal to twenty times the ground rent, rounded off to a total of NOK 14,000 (approximately EUR 1,750). On 23 October 2007 the lessee gave notice claiming an extension of the lease on the same conditions as previously, pursuant to section 33 of the Ground Lease Act. In a letter of 22 November 2007, the second applicant disputed the claim, referring to his intentions to bring the case before the Court.
3. The third and fourth applicants
22. The third and fourth applicants, Mrs and Mr Nilsen, own an agricultural property with few agricultural resources. The property has no fields and the outlying areas make up a total of 145 dekar, of which most consists of forest with little or no productivity. On 26 November 1956, the applicant spouses concluded a ground lease contract for fifty years in respect of a plot of land consisting of 990 sq. m, which had its own shoreline. It contained no clause regulating the future adjustment of the ground lease rent. The lessee built a holiday home on the plot. When the contract expired on 26 November 2006, the annual ground rent amounted to NOK 500 (approximately EUR 60).
23. It appears that the rent was the main regular source of income on the property. The third applicant receives a disability pension.
24. The contract contained no right to extension of the lease, but referring to the amended section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, the lessee claimed an extension of the lease on unchanged conditions. Since the applicants objected, the lessee brought civil proceedings against them before Larvik City Court on 23 November 2006, which on 29 January 2007 stayed the proceedings pending the outcome of the leading case before the Supreme Court.
25. By a judgment of 3 April 2008, the City Court upheld the lessee’s claim that she was entitled to extend the ground lease contract on the same terms as before. It observed inter alia:
“The question whether section 33 of the Ground Lease Act must be considered to lead to results which violate Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was decided by the Supreme Court in Rt. 2007/284. The Supreme Court held that section 33 of the Ground Lease Act does not violate the Convention with regard to permanent homes. Further, the Supreme Court in Rt. 2007/1306 established that the same applied with respect to holiday homes.
Subordinate courts must rely on the interpretations made by the Supreme Court and the City Court cannot therefore uphold the [third and fourth applicants’] submission.”
26. On 11 August 2008 the Agder High Court (lagmannsrett) found it clear that the third and fourth applicants’ appeal would not succeed and that it should therefore not be admitted for examination (section 29-13 (2) of the Code of Civil Procedure (tvisteloven).
27. In the meantime, on 11 February 2008 the applicant spouses had arranged for a valuation of the undeveloped plot, which was found to have an estimated value of NOK 2,500,000 (approximately EUR 312,500).
4. The fifth applicant
28. The fifth applicant, Ms Brandt-Kjelsen, is the landowner and lessor of twenty-one plots for permanent housing which were leased out with effect from 31 December 1947. The plots are located in one of the most expensive areas in Oslo. By way of illustration, she stated that in January 2007 a permanent home and the lease on one of the plots of land had been sold for NOK 10,250,000 (approximately EUR 1,281,250). The agreed term of lease is sixty years with a right for the lessees to claim an extension for thirty years on new conditions. Pursuant to the amended section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, however, all lessees have claimed extensions of their leases on unchanged conditions and unlimited in time.
29. On 31 October 2007 the fifth applicant initiated a conciliation complaint before the Oslo Conciliation Board, claiming that the lessees in question did not have the right to enjoy the same conditions as previously after extension of their leases. She submitted valuations of the undeveloped value of the various leased plots made on 4 December 2007, an overview of ground rents at the time of extension, as well as details of plot sizes, valuation amounts and ground rents as a percentage of the value of the individual plots. The values of the various undeveloped plots ranged from NOK 1,900,000 (approximately EUR 237,500) for the lowest to NOK 6,000,000 (approximately EUR 750,000) for the highest. The ground rents range from NOK 1,376 (approximately EUR 170) per year to NOK 7,116 (approximately EUR 900) per year.
30. On 14 February 2008 the Oslo Conciliation Board ruled that the dispute should be referred to the Oslo City Court.
31. By a judgment of 29 April 2009 the City Court found in favour of the lessees and against the fifth applicant and, on 27 August 2009, the Borgarting High Court refused to admit her appeal for examination, for similar reasons to the Larvik City Court and the Agder High Court in their respective judgment and decision mentioned above (see paragraphs 25 and 26 above)
5. The sixth applicant
32. The sixth applicant, Mr Henriksen, owns agricultural property of which the outlying fields have been parcelled into plots for several permanent homes and holiday homes. They are situated close to Oslo Fjord, over which they have a view.
33. The lessees of three plots for holiday homes and seven plots for permanent homes, with contracts entered into in the late 1950s which were about to expire, initiated proceedings against the applicant before the Tønsberg City Court claiming extension of the lease on the same conditions as previously and with no limitation in time, pursuant to section 33 of the Ground Lease Act. All the ground lease contracts in question had been entered into in 1950 for a term of 50 years. One of the contracts contained a provision for indexed regulation of the ground lease rent.
34. The values of the undeveloped plots ranged from NOK 1,200,000 (approximately EUR 150,500) to NOK 1,750,000, (approximately EUR 218,750). The ground rents ranged from NOK 1,900 (approximately EUR 240) per year to NOK 3,205 (approximately EUR 400) per year.
35. The applicant maintained that the real market value of the ten plots of land was NOK 13,900,000 (approximately EUR 1,737,500) and that as a consequence of section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, the total economic value of his legal position related to the ten plots in question would be NOK 526,760 (approximately EUR 65,850), which is the capitalised present value of the unchanged total ground rent of NOK 26,338 (approximately EUR 3,300).
36. Against this background, the applicant disputed the lessees’ claim and submitted that section 33 of the Ground Lease Act contravened Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
37. By a judgment of 14 October 2009 the City Court found in favour of the lessee and against the sixth applicant and, on 18 January 2010, the Borgarting High Court refused to admit his appeal for examination, for similar reasons to the Larvik City Court and the Agder High Court in their respective judgment and decisions mentioned above (see paragraphs 25 and 26 above)
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Ground Lease Act
38. The conclusion of ground lease contracts and the contractual relationship between the landowner/lessor and the lessee was regulated for the first time in a statute from 1975, which entered into force on 1 January 1976.
39. A new Ground Lease Act was enacted in 1996 and entered into force on 1 January 2002. Its section 15 contained rules on the regulation of rent for ground lease which were mainly based on changes in the consumer price index but allowed increases based on other parameters in some situations (see paragraph 43 below). The new Ground Lease Act also contained provisions granting the lessee the right to claim an extension when the agreed term of the lease expired (former section 32 for lessees of plots used for permanent homes and former section 33 for lessees of plots used for holiday homes), and the lessor the right to introduce new conditions into the extended contract of lease.
1. The provisions of the revised 1996 Act referred to in the present case
40. In its amended version as applicable at the material time, the 1996 Ground Lease Act read in so far as relevant:
Section 11
“A ground rent that is unreasonably high in relation to what is customarily paid in the locality on new leases on similar plots on similar contractual terms cannot be agreed or demanded.”
Section 15
“In a ground lease agreement concerning a main residence or a holiday home each party may require that the rent be adjusted in accordance with changes in the general price level [pengeverdien] since the conclusion of the agreement. If the rent has been adjusted, it is the rent that has been lawfully charged since the last adjustment that may be adjusted in accordance with the changes in prices that have occurred since that time. If the parties unequivocally agreed that the rent should remain unchanged, or agreed to a lower adjustment than that suggested by changes in the general price level, this agreement shall apply instead.
If a ground lease contract concerning a plot of land to be used for a main residence home or a holiday home was concluded before 1 January 2002, the following provisions apply for the first adjustment after 1 January 2002:
1. If the adjustment is to be made in accordance with changes in the general price level, the lessor may require that it be made in accordance with changes that have occurred since the ground lease contract was concluded, even if the rent has been adjusted before.
2. The lessor may require that the rent be adjusted in accordance with what has unequivocally been agreed upon. Nonetheless, if the lease contract was concluded on or before 26 May 1983, the lessor may not require that the annual rent be adjusted upwards beyond a maximum amount per dekar of ground or to an amount corresponding to inflation. The maximum amount according to the second sentence is NOK 9,000, adjusted every turn of the year after 1 January 2002 in accordance with inflation. This maximum also applies if the size of the plot is smaller than one dekar.
...”
Section 16, subsection 1, first sentence
“In the case of leases on plots for permanent homes and holiday homes, the lessee has the same physical enjoyment of the leased plot as an owner for use within the purposes of the lease, unless otherwise stipulated in what has been agreed between the parties. ...”
Section 17, subsection 1
“The lessee has the right to transfer the right to lease the plot to a third party unless otherwise stipulated in the agreement or the purpose of the lease.”
Section 18, subsection 1
“The lessee has the right to mortgage the lease and the buildings existing now or in the future on the plot, unless otherwise stipulated by statute or under an agreement limiting the right to transfer. The mortgage must apply both to the right to lease the plot and to present and future buildings.”
Section 19, subsection 1
“The lessee may establish any specific rights of disposal of the plot for third parties that with regard to type of use, scope and limitations in time lie within the lessee’s own right of disposal, save as otherwise agreed.”
Section 32
“The lessee may claim redemption of a plot for a permanent home or for a holiday home when thirty years of lease have passed, unless a shorter time has been agreed upon, or when the term of the lease expires. After thirty years of lease have passed, the lessee may then claim redemption of a plot for a permanent home at two-year intervals, and redemption of a plot for a holiday home at ten-year intervals.
On expiry of the lease for such a plot that has been leased for the life of the lessee, the following may claim redemption:
a) the spouse of the lessee, b) heirs to the lessee, c) a foster child who has the same position as an heir, d) someone who for the previous two years has shared the same home as the lessee. ...”
Section 33
“Instead of claiming redemption of a plot for a permanent home or a holiday home pursuant to section 32 when the term of the lease expires, the lessee, or those encompassed by section 32 second paragraph, may claim an extension of the lease on the same conditions as previously. In the case of leases thus extended, section 7, first paragraph, concerning the term of the lease, shall apply.”
[The reference to section 7, first paragraph, on the term of the lease, entails that an extension of the lease on the same conditions as previously will be without restrictions in terms of time.]
Section 37
“Upon redemption of a plot for a permanent home or a holiday home, the payment should be set at thirty times the yearly ground rent at the time of redemption, unless a lesser amount has been agreed upon. If nothing else has been agreed upon, the parties may nevertheless claim that the redemption sum should amount to forty per cent of the sales value of the undeveloped plot at the time of redemption, after deduction of any increase in value brought about by the lessee or others. The value of the plot must not be set higher than the price for which the land could have been sold, had it been permitted exclusively to erect the house or houses already erected on it.... “
2. The preparatory work relating to section 15
41. At Parliament’s request to the Government, an assessment of the Ground Lease Act 1996 was carried out, notably its section 15, two years after its entry into force on 1 January 2002. The Ministry of Justice received various submissions from private individuals who had experienced, or had been notified of, considerable increases in the annual rent payable. There had also been media coverage of rent increases following the entry into force of the Act. In the public review processes various organisations had pointed to the fact that a large number of plots were leased for a very low rent. A number of organisations had noted that the Act was difficult to understand and generated a high level of conflict. The need for a simpler legal regime was highlighted.
42. In 2002 the Ministry of Justice collected statistical material, the findings of which were summarised in the Bill (Ot.prp. nr. 41 (2003-2004) p.11), and carried out a survey aimed at lessees and lessors to establish sufficient facts for the proposed legal amendment (to section 15). The following findings were highlighted as being some of the most important:
“The ground lease rent is adjusted according to changes in the consumer price index in the majority of ground lease contracts.
Somewhat fewer than 30 per cent of the ground leases for permanent homes and between 10 and 20 per cent of the holiday home ground leases contain clauses providing for other means of rent adjustment. In most cases this involves adjustment according to changes in the value of land. The figures provided by the Norwegian Association of Commons show that 20 per cent of permanent home leases and more than 40 per cent of holiday home leases are subject to adjustment in other ways than by linkage to changes in the consumer price index.
Section 15 has resulted in a dramatic increase in rent in contracts with ground value clauses. The average annual level of rent in permanent home lease contracts containing such clauses, revised after the Act came into force, has increased from NOK 2,500 to around NOK 8,000-10,500 per ground lease contract. For holiday home ground leases the average increase is somewhere between NOK 5,000 and NOK 10,000 per contract (the figures provided by lessors and lessees are inconsistent). The figures provided by the Norwegian Association of Commons show an increase from approximately NOK 900 to NOK 3,800 per plot leased for holiday home purposes.
Somewhat more than 40 per cent of permanent home leases are subject to an annual rent below NOK 1,000, while 30 to 40 per cent are around NOK 1,000-3,000, and some 6 to 7 per cent are between NOK 3,000 and NOK 6,000. Between one and eleven per cent pay annual rent in excess of NOK 9,000 per dekar [1000 m²]. The figures from the Norwegian Association of Commons are incomplete in this regard, yet they suggest that approximately 70 per cent of ground leases are subject to annual rent of less than NOK 1,000. The average level of rent must, however, be seen in the light of the fact that a large number of contracts with ground value clauses are due to be adjusted in the coming 8 years (adjustment, as a rule, occurring every tenth year).
25 to 30 per cent of holiday home ground leases are subject to annual rent of less than NOK 1,000, while approximately 50 per cent are between NOK 1,000 and NOK 3,000. Somewhat less than ten per cent are between NOK 3,000 and NOK 6,000, and less than five per cent between NOK 6,000 and NOK 9,000. Approximately 0.5 per cent of lessees pay more than NOK 9,000 per dekar. In the main bulk of contracts reported to the Norwegian Association of Commons the rent lies between NOK 1,000 and NOK 6,000. Here, too, the figures must be read in light of the fact that a great number of contracts with ground value clauses are due to be adjusted in the coming 8 years.
Approximately 80 per cent of permanent home leases and more than 50 per cent of holiday ground leases were entered into prior to 1976. This has particular impact on the rules of redemption, as the conditions for redemption are linked to the time when the contract was entered into.
3.5 Main impressions from the assessment
Approximately 300,000 households in Norway lease ground for permanent or holiday home purposes. Approximately 75 per cent of permanent home leases are found in cities or other densely populated areas. These leases, and the holiday home leases in popular coastal areas, are increasingly marred by conflicts between lessees and landowners. A lot of the contracts are old and were entered into at a time when ground lease was a viable alternative for those individuals who were unable to finance the purchase of property, and prior to social development that forced real-estate prices in densely populated areas to unforeseen levels. Today leased plots must be considered as permanently restructured due to the lessees’ work on the land and their considerable investment in housing on the plot. Lessors comprise traditional lessors, for instance in agriculture, but ground is also leased by professional real-estate investors, who own a number of leased plots.
The Ministry is of the opinion that the assessment has shown, importantly, a clear need for making the rules of redemption simpler. ...”
43. Former section 15, which entered into force on 1 January 2002, contained a main rule enabling upward rent adjustment in accordance with changes in the consumer price index and an exception where it had unequivocally been agreed that there should be no adjustment of the rent, or where rent was to be adjusted by other means than by reference to the consumer price index. In such cases adjustment was to be done on the basis of the terms of the agreement in question. This applied in full for contracts entered into after 26 May 1983. For contracts entered into prior to 26 May 1983 the new rule was subject to the modification that a rent “ceiling” of NOK 9,000 per dekar was introduced for upward adjustment based on other parameters than correspondence with the consumer price index.
44. In the context of the revision of section 15, the Ministry of Justice considered eight alternative options, including whether to re-introduce a mandatory consumer-price-index-regulated adjustment system for ground lease contracts for permanent and holiday home purposes. There were several arguments in favour of this. After the former rent control system was repealed on 1 January 2002, many lessees had been faced with dramatic unexpected rent increases. Although the contracts had initially been entered into on the basis of possible upward adjustment of the ground lease rent to reflect increases in the value of the property, the long period with a system for public rent control in force had led to a situation where lessees were used to a gradual increase in rent in accordance with the consumer price index. The increasing discrepancy between ground lease rents subject to rent control and those indexed to the increase in property prices made dramatic inroads into the household budgets of numerous families and single people, subject to the regime introduced on 1 January 2002. This price trend was also seen in the rental market, but in the rental market the increase was more gradual, and there was at any rate a difference between the ordinary rental market and the ground lease market in that the lessee had built his or her own house upon the ground in question for his or her own use.
45. It was further observed that a minority of the contracts provided for adjustment by reference to factors other than the consumer price index and were concerned by this problem. For most of the contracts covered by the survey the rent level could be said to be high. Then the report went on to consider the arguments for and against introducing mandatory all-round rent control based on the consumer price index (Ot.prp. nr. 41 (2003-2004) pp. 21-22):
“What first and foremost militates against a compulsory scheme for rent adjustment in correspondence with the consumer price index is the principle of the freedom of contract. Limitations to the freedom of contract principle will be more noticeable in those older contracts containing ground value clauses. In most such contracts, which have been the subject of public regulation since the entry into force of the new Ground Lease Act 1 January 2002, the aforementioned proposed amendment to the act will entail downward adjustment of payable ground rent, bringing the rent back to its level at the time of the rent control scheme prior to 1 January 2002. A downward adjustment would undoubtedly be noticeable for lessors who have already adjusted the rent upwards to reflect the increase in property prices and also made arrangements accordingly. It should also be part of the overall consideration that section 15 of the Ground Lease Act has enabled more lessors to make profit on property that for years has accrued very low income in terms of ground lease rent because of the previous rent control scheme. The Ministry would also like to add that the survey undertaken in 2003 shows that the average level of rent charged, including rent subject to adjustment after 1 January 2002, corresponds to what was foreseen when section 15 was amended in 2000. The Ministry will therefore not support the introduction of a mandatory adjustment scheme linked to the consumer price index for older contracts on the basis of the rent charged at the time the contract was entered into.
At the same time the assessment of section 15 of the Ground Lease Act demonstrates that clauses linking rent adjustment to the increase in property prices are often conducive to disputes, and they may have ramifications unforeseen by the parties when the contract was entered into. Since the Ground Lease Act entered into force a number of disputes have arisen regarding the interpretation of adjustment provisions in ground lease contracts. Part of the problem seems to be that many contracts were entered into without any party having envisaged the possibility of the dramatic increase in property prices that has been seen in recent decades, and its consequences for rent levels. In older contracts entered into by non-professional parties in particular, the wording of the contracts appears often to be haphazard and imprecise and thus of little use in determining questions that were not anticipated at the time. Such cases can naturally be left to the decision of the judiciary, but from the perspective of social economics it seems unfortunate to allocate such substantial resources to the settlement of such disputes, in terms of free legal aid and the workload on the courts. As the cases concern a significant social asset, namely the permanent or holiday homes of the lessees, considerable uncertainty may also be a source of unnecessary personal strain.
In the Ministry’s opinion, the third option mentioned in the letter carrying the proposal submitted for public review (consumer price index regulation only in cases after the last adjustment has been made) covers aspects related to foreseeability and the avoidance of legal disputes. [...] Such random effects can be avoided by introducing a provision that entitles the lessor to adjust the rent upwards once in accordance with the original contract and subject to limitations already in force under section 15, before the consumer price index adjustment scheme comes into effect. In this way the rent charged in the transition period is brought, by way of a one-off operation, to a level higher than that established under the prior rent control scheme repealed when the Ground Lease Act entered into force 1 January 2002. For more recently agreed ground lease contracts it will still be possible to agree upon a rent that reflects the value and appreciation of the land, but rent adjustment will subsequently be linked to changes in the consumer price index. Such a provision for older contracts will respect what has been agreed upon, while at the same time helping to achieve a uniform system of rent adjustment based on the consumer price index over time. This, it must be assumed, will result in fewer legal disputes and not give rise to unforeseen radical upward adjustments of ground rent.
The Ministry proposes, then, this solution for ground lease contracts for permanent and holiday home purposes. The main rule of the proposal is a system of rent control linked to changes in prices. For the older contracts mentioned above, however, the Ministry proposes introducing a one-off operation in which what has been agreed upon between the parties will represent one factor. Any subsequent adjustment after this one-off operation should reflect price trends.
This solution does not, however, address the fact that ground lease rent has risen and will continue to rise in some ground lease contracts containing ground value clauses. This must be seen in context. The Ministry proposes the expansion and simplification of the rules of redemption. It is suggested that the price to be paid for redemption should be calculated having regard to the ground lease rent. A balancing of the interests of the lessors and the lessees suggests in the Ministry’s opinion that there should be no intervention in rent adjustment clauses in existing contracts more than what will follow from this proposal.” [Emphasis added.]
46. Chapter 6, on the “Calculation of the compensation for redemption”, included the following observations (Ot.prp. nr. 41 (2003-2004) p. 46):
“The Ministry of Justice considers that the provision on calculating compensation upon redemption must be seen in the light of the provisions on rent adjustment, the general conditions for redemption and the right to extend the lease. The Ministry assumes at the outset that these provisions, seen as a whole, must not substantially alter the present balance of interests in ground lease contracts. Several instances that have taken part in the public review process have also stressed this. In section 5.4 the Ministry proposes a considerable simplification of the conditions for redemption. At the same time, the Ministry favors the introduction of a one-off upward adjustment operation for contracts with ground value clauses, followed by the introduction of an adjustment scheme linked the consumer price index (see section 4.4). This gives due regard to what has been agreed between the parties. With this point of departure in mind, the Ministry considers that it is possible to introduce a balanced provision for the calculation of compensation for redemption.” [Emphasis added.]
3. The preparatory work relating to section 33
47. The proposal for the existing section 33 concerning the right for the lessee to claim an extension on the same conditions as previously without limitations in time was presented by the Ministry of Justice and Police Affairs (Det Kongelige Justis- og Politidepartement – hereinafter referred to as the Ministry of Justice) in the spring of 2004 (Ot.prpr. nr. 41 (2003 2004) - proposal no. 41 to the Odelsting, which is the larger division of Parliament), stating inter alia (at p. 54):
“The Ministry draws attention to the fact that the main aim of the proposal is to make it easier for more people to acquire ownership of the leased plots. In certain cases redemption would be such a heavy financial burden that the lessee should have other alternatives than terminating the lease agreement. Lessees who are not able to redeem the plot should, in the Ministry’s view, be secured a lasting right to dispose of the plot. This issue has not been of great interest until now, but this can be expected to change in the years to come as more lease contracts expire. In the absence of absolute rules, the lessors will be faced with the choice between redemption, termination or continuation [of the ground lease contract]. As the Ministry sees it, this is an untenable legal situation and it is therefore proposed that the lessee should have a right to prolong the ground lease agreement. The Ministry has considered whether the landowner should have a right to set new conditions in the agreement, but has found that the lessee should be able to continue the lease agreement on the same terms. According to the Ministry’s assessment, social policy considerations on the side of the lessee should be decisive. If the lessor were to have the possibility to adjust the ground lease rent up to the market level, the lessees would in principle find themselves in the same financial straits as in the event of redemption where the costs of a loan exceed the annual ground lease rent.”
48. As regards the issue of constitutionality of the provision in section 33, the Bill to Parliament stated (p. 55):
“The Bill entails some retroactive effect particularly for landowners who concluded ground leases before 1976, when no such right to extension existed. The Ministry has reasoned that the social considerations on the lessee’s side weigh heavier than those on the landowner’s side, and concludes that the proposal is consistent with Article 97 of the Constitution. The proposal is not considered to be more intrusive than the proposed rules on redemption, and on this point reference is made to Rt.1990-284 and the discussion of the relationship to the Constitution in para. 6.5. The Ministry also stresses, inter alia, the social considerations that will apply, and that these are rules that relate to a long-term contractual relationship between the parties.”
49. The Bill proposed that payment upon redemption should be set at thirty times the ground rent at the time of redemption, although the lessor should be able to claim a minimum of NOK 50,000, equal to EUR 6,250, for the plot (section 37), which was to apply to all ground lease contracts irrespective of the value of the plot, of when the contract had been concluded, and of whether the contract was limited or unlimited in time. In this connection the Ministry of Justice stated (p. 50):
“As noted above, the fundamental purpose of the rules on redemption is already to ensure that lessees of plots for permanent homes and holiday homes are secured a lasting right to use the plot. It is probably the case that many lessees will not be in a position to redeem the plot if the costs of borrowing are significantly higher than the annual ground rent. As noted above, the Bill will entail some increase in the expenses of the lessee, depending on the prevailing level of interest rates, but it is estimated that it nevertheless lies within what most lessees with limited economic means should be able to afford.”
50. The proposal concerning the minimum compensation of NOK 50,000 was later amended by Parliament to forty per cent of the sales value of the undeveloped plot at the time of redemption.
51. As regards the grounds given by Parliament in 2004 for supporting the proposed section 33 in the Bill granting the right for lessees to claim an extension on unchanged conditions instead of redemption, the recommendation presented to Parliament by the Standing Committee on Justice (Recommendation no. 105 to the Odelsting (2003 2004) p. 18) contained the following:
“The Committee majority, all except the members from The Progress Party, agree with the Ministry that lessees who are unable for financial reasons to purchase their plots under section 37 of the new Ground Lease Act should be secured a lasting right of disposal of the plot. The majority view is that a right of extension should be granted on the same conditions as referred to in the contract of lease. In assessing these matters, the majority has attached considerable weight to considerations of social policy in housing [boligsosiale hensyn]. The majority support the Ministry’s assessment of the situation with regard to the Constitution on this point as on other points, and also refer to the comments above on the subject of the relationship to the Constitution.”
B. The Constitution
52. The Norwegian Constitution read as follows, in so far as relevant:
Article 97
“No law must be given retroactive effect.”
Article 105
“If the welfare of the State requires that any person shall surrender his movable or immovable property for public use, he shall receive full compensation from the Treasury.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
53. The applicants complained that by virtue of the amendments to section 33 of the Ground Lease Act 1996 that entered into force on 1 November 2004, when the agreed term of their leases expired, lessees had been entitled to demand, and had demanded, an extension of their contracts for an indefinite period on the same conditions as applied previously. This amounted to an unjustified interference with the applicants’ right of property as protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
54. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
55. Initially the Government only accepted that the first applicant, OMISSIS, had exhausted domestic remedies, and maintained that the second to fifth applicants had not done so since they had failed to pursue the matter as far as the Supreme Court.
56. In reply, the third to fifth applicants referred to city court and high court rulings in their cases making it clear that they had no prospects of success, and the second applicant argued that a judicial appeal would have been futile in his case.
57. At a later stage, when faced with the same line of argument from the sixth applicant, the Government affirmed that they did not dispute that he had exhausted domestic remedies. At the oral hearing held on 21 June 2011 the Government did not dispute the admissibility of the applications.
58. The Court is satisfied in light of the clear terms of section 33 of the Ground Lease Act 1996 and of the national courts’ rulings (see paragraphs 18, 25, 26, 31, 37 and 40 above) that a judicial appeal by the second applicant and an appeal by the third to sixth applicants to the Supreme Court would have had no prospects of success and that, accordingly, all six applicants have exhausted domestic remedies for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention. The Court further considers that the applicants’ complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention and that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
59. It was not disputed that there had been an interference with the applicants’ possessions attracting the application of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Nor was it contested that the interference had been “lawful” for the purposes of this provision. On the other hand, the parties were in disagreement as to which of the rules embodied in the Article applied, whether and the extent to which the interference pursued a legitimate aim in the public or general interest and whether there was a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the interference and any such aim.
1. The applicable rule
60. The Court reiterates that under its case-law, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which guarantees in substance the right of property, comprises three distinct rules (see, for instance, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, §§ 37-38, Series A no. 98; Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 61-65, Series A no. 52; Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 44-46, ECHR 1999 V; and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 157, ECHR 2006 VIII). The first, which is expressed in the first sentence of the first paragraph and is of a general nature, lays down the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property. The second rule, in the second sentence of the same paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and makes it subject to certain conditions. The third, contained in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, among other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules, which are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property, must be construed in the light of the general principle laid down in the first rule (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999-II).
(a) The applicants’ submissions
61. The applicants argued that the compulsory extension of the relevant leases, without limitation in time and on the same terms as previously, constituted an interference amounting to expropriation or de facto expropriation. They referred to paragraph 89 of the Supreme Court’s judgment of 21 September 2007 in the parallel leading case (Case no. 2007/237 quoted at paragraph 16 above) and to a statement by the Ministry of Finance of 15 August 2008.
62. The Court had previously held that a restriction on an applicant’s right to terminate a tenant’s lease constituted control, for instance in Amato Gauci v. Malta (no. 47045/06, § 52, 15 September 2009), where the forced extension of a lease had been found to constitute a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
63. The applicants contended that there was, however, one significant difference between Amato Gauci and the present cases, which should have a decisive bearing as regards the applicable rule. Whereas in Amato Gauci there was uncertainty as to when the forced extension of the lease would end, in the present case there was no such uncertainty because the extension of the lease would never end – the lease was extended in perpetuity. Consequently, it was in reality not a restriction on the lessors’ rights but rather a deprivation of property.
64. Moreover, section 33 referred to section 7 of the Act, according to which the extension constituted a new lease contract which remained in force for ever. The underlying purpose was expressed in the preparatory work: “The leasing of land should as far as possible correspond to the sale of the plot.”
65. The view that section 33 entailed de facto deprivation was further substantiated by the following four arguments.
66. Firstly, the plenary Supreme Court had concluded that “[t]he right to extension provided for in section 33 must clearly be distinguished from a regulation of the owner’s disposal of the property”, and that the provision “entail[ed] a transfer of the owner’s disposal of the property” (see paragraphs 89 and 90 of the Supreme Court’s judgment of 21 September 2007 in the parallel leading case (Case no. 2007/237) quoted at paragraph 16 above).
67. Secondly, subsequent to the Supreme Court judgments, in order to have the tax legislation correspond with the underlying realities, the Ministry of Finance had made the lessee liable for the payment of net worth tax and real-estate tax on the plots. The political leadership at the Ministry of Finance had defended this change to the tax rules by simply stating that the lessee’s possession of the property was so long-term that it was tantamount to ownership. Nonetheless, in their submissions to the Court, the same Government had argued that the deprivation rule did not apply. Considerations of consistency suggested that the deprivation rule did apply.
68. Thirdly, in 1996, when the new Ground Lease Act had been enacted, the Government and a unanimous Parliament had explicitly expressed the view that forced extension constituted expropriation, which ought to give the lessor the right to require a new contract to be concluded reflecting market conditions. This was the state of the law from 1 January 2002 onwards.
69. Fourthly, in sum the Ground Lease Act granted the lessee all the essential rights of an owner, including the same physical disposal of the plot and the right to transfer the lease to third parties. The property rights of the landowner – the lessor – were in fact extinguished by virtue of the extension, the only rights remaining to the lessor being the formal title to the land and the right to receive the ground rent. An overall examination of the realities ought to lead to the conclusion that it was the second rule – the deprivation rule – that applied, even though the title had not formally been transferred to the lessee. As stated inter alia in Sporrong and Lönnroth (cited above, § 63): “the Court ... must look behind the appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of.”
70. In any event, should the Court not uphold this argument, the applicants maintained that there had been a violation of the rule on control of use or of the principle of peaceful enjoyment of possessions.
(b) The Government’s submissions
71. In the Government’s opinion, the rule on control of use was applicable to the present case. While the applicants continued to be able to sell the plots of land and to receive income from the land, the transfer of some rights did not entail a transfer of the property right as such. Not all meaningful use had been taken away and there had been no formal or even de facto dispossession. The Government relied on Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 160; Mellacher and Others v. Austria, 19 December 1989, §§ 42 44, Series A no. 169; and Fredin v. Sweden (no. 1), 18 February 1991, §§ 43 and 45, Series A no. 192.
72. On this point, notwithstanding the many similarities between the present case and that of James and Others (cited above, § 38), the Government distinguished the former from the latter, where it had been the act of acquisition permitted by the disputed legislation that had prompted the Commission to conclude that deprivation had taken place (the matter had not been disputed before the Court).
73. Whereas the leasehold reform laws in James and Others had concerned extensions as well as acquisitions of leases, only the rules that involved the transfer of property from the landlord to the leaseholder had been at issue. The situation in the present case was the reverse, in that the complaints under the Convention concerned the provisions of the Ground Lease Act that dealt with extensions of the lease, not those contained in section 32, for example, which provided for the transfer of property rights from the landowner to the lessee by way of redemption of the lease.
74. Should the Court not find the “control of use rule” applicable, the Government submitted that the interference complained of had in any event complied with the deprivation rule. In their view, the first rule (peaceful enjoyment of possessions) did not come into play.
(c) Assessment by the Court
75. The Court observes that the case under consideration concerns limitations imposed by law on the level of rent that the applicant property owners could demand from the ground lease holder and the indefinite extension of the ground lease contract on the same terms. The applicants continued to receive rent on the same terms they had freely agreed to when signing the ground lease contract, and, being at all times owners, were free to sell their plots of land, albeit subject to the lease attaching to the land.
76. The Court found the deprivation rule applicable in James and Others (cited above, 38) and in Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice v. Slovakia (no. 74258/01, § 116, ECHR 2007 ... (extracts) – in so far as transfer of ownership of the applicants’ plots of land was concerned). It held the rule on control of use applicable in Mellacher and Others (cited above, § 43), Hutten Czapska (cited above, §§ 160-161), Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice (cited above, § 140, in so far as compulsory letting of land was concerned) and also in Amato Gauci (cited above, § 52). The circumstances in the case now under review are more comparable to the latter situations.
77. The Court shares the applicants’ view that the low level of annual rents in their case (less than 0.25% of the plots’ alleged market value) and the indefinite duration of the impugned rent limitation interfered to a very significant degree with their enjoyment of their possessions. However, for the reasons stated above, the Court is not persuaded by their arguments that the application of section 33 of the Ground Lease Act to them amounted to expropriation or de facto expropriation, or that it meant that “all meaningful use” had been taken away (see Fredin cited above, § 45).
78. In light of these considerations, the Court finds that it is the rule on control of the use of property that applies in the present case.
2. Compliance with the conditions in the second paragraph
(a) Aim of the interference
(i) The applicants’ submissions
79. Although the State enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation, the applicants could discern no real “public interest” that could reasonably be held up as a justification for the contested interference with their property right.
80. From the preparatory work it appeared that, while the general level of compensation for redemption of ground lease contracts under section 37 was set at a level that should be affordable for lessees with limited financial means, the aim of section 33 had been to secure to lessees who did not even have such means a lasting right of disposal over the plot – a right of extension on the same conditions as in the lease contract. Weight had allegedly been attached to social policy considerations in housing aimed at protecting the latter group of lessees.
81. However, despite this alleged targeting of social housing needs, the provision had been made applicable to all of the approximately 300,000 lessees in Norway, in a society with a high degree of social equality and among a population which was generally particularly well off. It had repeatedly received the highest score (notably in terms of purchasing power) of the 182 countries in the United Nations Human Development Index. In other words, there was no ground for maintaining that lessees in general had such needs as stated in the justification given for the extension provision in section 33. Indeed, the Government did not argue the contrary. In fact, with very few exceptions, the lessees in the present case enjoyed a higher or considerably higher income than the average income in Norway.
82. In the applicants’ view, section 33 could not be said to have been aimed at correcting a defined and existing injustice, unlike the situation in such cases as, for instance, James and Others (cited above). They disputed the Government’s contention that “[s]ocial problems on a massive scale would probably have been the result had the legislature not intervened ...”. The entire Norwegian economy had evolved immensely over the last decades, and there had been a significant increase in the standard of living. As a result, the need for social housing schemes had decreased steadily, as illustrated, for instance, by the repeal in 2000 of the former Rent Control Act that provided for below-market-level rent for persons with special financial or social needs. This cast serious doubts over whether the social housing arguments presented in support of the Ground Lease Act were genuine. There was no reason to fear that applying a market ground rent would lead to the lessees’ losing their permanent homes or holiday homes.
83. In particular, no strong public interest could be said to apply to holiday homes since owning a second home by definition meant that the person’s need for accommodation had been fulfilled.
84. On this basis, it could be forcefully argued that section 33 in reality did not pursue a legitimate aim in the public interest.
85. Furthermore, whilst accepting in general that the margin of appreciation was wide in cases involving social and economic policies within housing, the applicants pointed to several considerations which in their opinion militated in favour of circumscribing the Norwegian authorities’ margin of appreciation in the present case. Unlike the cases of Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice and Hutten-Czapska, the present case was not one where fundamental changes in the respondent State’s political system formed a backdrop. Moreover, from Hirst v. the United Kingdom (no. 2) ([GC], no. 74025/01, ECHR 2005 IX) it could be deduced that the margin of appreciation would be narrower when Parliament had not analysed and carefully weighed the competing interests or assessed the proportionality of blanket rules. Nor had Parliament assessed section 33 in the light of the European Convention.
86. In reality section 33 only pursued a legitimate aim in the public interest in respect of a minority of lessees. Simply tagging a piece of legislation with the label “public interest” could not be deemed sufficient if that label did not correspond to the underlying reality.
87. The applicants concluded that, in any event, the public interest, should there be any, was weak and, bearing in mind the far-reaching scope of section 33, could not be given significant weight in the balancing of interests involved under the proportionality test (below).
(ii) The Government’s submissions
88. The Government pointed to the social considerations behind section 33 of the Ground Lease Act and invited the Court to find that the “public interest” requirement in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was satisfied in the present case. This applied not only to permanent homes but also to holiday homes, as pointed out in the Supreme Court’s judgment of 21 September 2007 in Mrs Lindheim’s case.
89. The Government considered that social problems on a massive scale would probably have been the result had the legislature not intervened to secure an appropriate regulation of ground lease contracts. A number of amendments to the Ground Lease Act had been proposed prior to the enactment of the current section 33. Underlying all the proposals had been the recognition of the need, in the face of socio-economic changes, to approach the matter of the ground lease system with due regard for both parties to the lease agreements and the relevant social issues and the need to find technically appropriate legislative solutions that did not generate large numbers of new ground lease disputes.
90. Referring to the Court’s ruling in James and Others (cited above), the Government argued that in implementing social and economic policies the national authorities enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to the existence of a problem of public concern and to the remedial action to be taken. The Court should further “respect the legislature’s judgment as to what was in the ‘public interest’ unless that judgment was manifestly without reasonable foundation”. Accordingly, the Court should approach the question of satisfaction of the legitimate aim criterion with considerable restraint. That this held particularly true in the present case, and regardless of the purpose of the lease and the leaseholder’s financial or social situation, was supported by the Grand Chamber judgment in Hutten Czapska (cited above):
“The notion of ‘public’ or ‘general’ interest is necessarily extensive. In particular, spheres such as housing, which modern societies consider a prime social need and which plays a central role in the welfare and economic policies of Contracting States, may often call for some form of regulation by the State. In that sphere decisions as to whether, and if so when, it may fully be left to the play of free-market forces or whether it should be subject to State control, as well as the choice of measures for securing the housing needs of the community [...], necessarily involve consideration of complex social, economic and political issues.”
91. It was further supported by the Grand Chamber judgment in J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 71, ECHR 2007 III), where the Court (referring to James and Others) had acknowledged an important additional reason for allowing a wide margin of appreciation with regard to the public interest criterion: when the issue to be subject to regulation involved “longstanding and complex” issues which also entailed regulation of contractual matters between individuals, the margin necessarily ought to be extensive.
92. In the Government’s view, this was so because such matters involved social, economic and political questions about which there would never be one ‘right’ solution in terms of chosen ends and means since the issues themselves were intrinsically contestable. The Court’s deference to domestic democratic discourse in such areas clearly called for a wide margin of appreciation with regard to the general interest criterion also in this case.
93. In its recommendation to Parliament the Standing Committee on Justice had referred to social policy considerations in the area of housing (“boligsosiale hensyn”) as one important rationale for the provision in section 33 and had agreed with the Ministry as to its constitutionality (see Recommendation no. 105, p. 18 cited above). As could be seen from these discussions, the aim of section 33 had been at least three fold: (1) to secure the position of “lessees who [were] unable for financial reasons to purchase their plots [under the redemption clause]”, thus securing “social justice in housing” (see paragraph 51 above); (2) to enact an all-embracing system for dealing with the increasing number of expiring ground lease contracts in order to minimise the impending flux of legal disputes that would otherwise be foreseeable when the leases expired by the lot (see the extract quoted at paragraph 51 above); (3) to treat on equal terms plots for holiday homes and permanent homes, as it was a social task to secure the possibility of leisure and because the boundaries in present times were increasingly blurred between the two types of homes, as also observed by the Supreme Court in its examination in 2007 of section 33’s compatibility with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraph 18 above).
94. The Government maintained that these aims – social justice in housing, the avoidance of legal disputes, and the acknowledgment of leisure in contemporary society – were all legitimate under the Convention. The Government also maintained that section 33 was a permissible means to realise those aims, especially having regard to the wide margin of appreciation afforded.
95. Finally, the Government pointed out that the lessees’ interests were also protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(iii) The Court’s assessment
96. As to the question whether the disputed interference was “in accordance with the general interest”, the Court reiterates the principles in its case-law as summarised in Hutten-Czapska (cited above):
“165. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the ‘general’ or ‘public’ interest. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures to be applied in the sphere of the exercise of the right of property. Here, as in other fields to which the safeguards of the Convention extend, the national authorities accordingly enjoy a margin of appreciation.
166. The notion of ‘public’ or ‘general’ interest is necessarily extensive. In particular, spheres such as housing, which modern societies consider a prime social need and which plays a central role in the welfare and economic policies of Contracting States, may often call for some form of regulation by the State. In that sphere decisions as to whether, and if so when, it may fully be left to the play of free market forces or whether it should be subject to State control, as well as the choice of measures for securing the housing needs of the community and of the timing for their implementation, necessarily involve consideration of complex social, economic and political issues.
Finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, the Court has on many occasions declared that it will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is in the ‘public’ or ‘general’ interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation. [...] (see Mellacher and Others, cited above, § 45; Scollo v. Italy, 28 September 1995, § 27, Series A no. 315-C; Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, § 49; and, mutatis mutandis, James and Others, cited above, §§ 46 47, and Broniowski, cited above, § 149).”
97. The Court observes that from the Parliamentary debates that preceded the adoption of the impugned provision in section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, it can be seen that the aim was to secure to lessees, who were financially unable to purchase their plots under section 37, a lasting right of disposal over the plot. The method adopted was the one set out in section 33 granting the lessee a right of extension of the lease contract indefinitely, on the same conditions as applied previously. It further appears that in adopting this solution Parliament attached considerable weight to social policy considerations in the area of housing.
98. Moreover, the Court notes that the Government also referred to the justifications presented in the Government Bill to Parliament with respect to section 15 of the New Ground Lease Act. That provision placed limitations on the lessors’ right to impose upward adjustments of the ground lease rent in those instances where it unequivocally followed from the ground lease contract – so-called ground value clauses that were not in issue here – that adjustments were to be made in accordance with developments in price levels in the property market. From a survey carried out by the Ministry of Justice and Police Affairs in 2002, it emerged that the repeal on 1 January 2002 of the rent control system under the former version of section 15 had resulted in many lessees seeing a dramatic, unexpected increase in the rent payable under contracts with ground value clauses. This had made drastic inroads into a number of families’ and single persons’ household budgets. It was further observed that clauses linking rent adjustment to the increase in property prices had often been conducive to conflict and might have ramifications unforeseen by the parties, hence the interest in avoiding legal disputes and ensuring foreseeability. Presumably, this experience in relation to section 15 was also capable of shedding light on the social policy considerations militating in favour of the introduction of section 33.
99. It is true, as the applicants pointed out, that section 33 was generally applicable to lease contracts among the estimated 300,000 to 350,000 lease contracts in Norway that were of a certain age and were up for renewal, irrespective of the financial means of the lessee concerned or of whether the land was used for a permanent home or a holiday home. It most likely had a much wider reach than merely addressing situations of potential financial hardship and social injustice and rather reflected social policy in a broad sense (compare James and Others, cited above, §§ 48-49; and Hutten Czapska, cited above, § 178).
100. Nonetheless, having regard to the above-mentioned observations made in the preparatory work, the Court does not find manifestly unreasonable the Norwegian Parliament’s view that, on grounds of social policy considerations, there was a legitimate need to protect, in the way provided for by section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, the interests of lease holders who lacked the financial means to exercise their right of redemption under section 37, whether the plots were used for permanent homes or for holiday homes. The Court concludes that the impugned interference may therefore be deemed to be in accordance with the general interest.
(b) Proportionality of the interference
(i) The applicants’ submissions
101. In arguing that the impugned interference was disproportionate, the applicants stressed that it was “extensive and perpetual”. The lease could not be terminated by the lessor and the effects of section 33 of the Ground Lease Act by far exceeded what could be deemed necessary in order to safeguard any alleged “considerations of social justice within housing”. The public interest at stake had been stronger and the impugned interference less intrusive in other cases previously dealt with by the Court.
102. The applicants claimed that they found support in James and Others (cited above) for the argument that full market value should be paid for the plot. Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice (cited above, § 144) underlined in their view the importance of whether compensation was reasonably related to the real value of the property concerned, and that if the compensation bore no relation to the actual value of the land there would be a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In Hutten-Czapska (cited above, § 225) the Court had held that the “burden cannot [...] be placed on one particular social group, however important the interests of the other group or the community as a whole”. The importance of market value was once again emphasised in Amato Gauci (cited above, §§ 58, 61-63), where “amounts of rent allowing only a minimal profit” was a situation found to exceed the State’s wide margin of appreciation.
103. The level of rents in the applicants’ cases – less than 0.25% of the land’s market value – was certainly low, in stark contrast with the market value of the plots, and was either equal to or lower than the statutory level of the real-estate tax on the plots (0.2%-0.7%), even though it was for the lessee to pay the tax, as if he or she owned the property.
104. The statutory right of redemption further added to the imbalance. The lessee might opt to redeem the plot in future – every other year for a main residence and every tenth year for a holiday home – at 40% of the undeveloped plot value. The lessee might then resell the plot at market price immediately thereafter and thus reap the benefit of the increase in market value. Similarly, if the lessee opted to sell the house with the lease-hold contract, he or she would also profit from the increase in market value of the plot.
105. The applicants also disputed the Government’s argument that nothing suggested that the applicants’ income from the ground lease had been reduced, which in the applicants’ view was clearly formalistic. The key point was that the landowners’ rights had been violated because the ground rent remained the same beyond, and despite the expiry of, the contracted period.
106. The Government’s argument that the price increase of the leased property was predominantly a result of the lessee’s and not the lessors’ efforts was untenable. It was rather the market value of the undeveloped plot that should be reflected in the new ground rent.
107. Contrary to what was argued by the Government, the applicants had borne an individual and excessive burden. They should be entitled to compensation for the full market value of the undeveloped plot.
108. The absence of any distinction between holiday homes and permanent homes in the disputed rules was a clear expression of the fact that social injustice and social problems did not constitute a genuine reason for those rules. The applicants disputed the Government’s argument that it lay within the margin of appreciation of the State to operate a general arrangement that did not distinguish between lessees who were in financial or social need and those who were not. With regard to holiday homes, it was especially clear that the “necessity test” had not been fulfilled.
109. Weight should be given to the fact that section 33 of the Ground Lease Act intervened in a situation already created by the parties themselves. A fundamental feature of that situation was that the lease contracts were limited in time. Had the parties proceeded as agreed, a new contract of lease would have been required in order for the lessee to lease the plot in the future, on new terms including market ground rent. Alternatively, the lessee could have purchased the plot at an agreed market price.
110. By having intervened in a situation already created by the parties section 33 had undermined legal certainty. The parties could not have foreseen that the contracts were to be compulsorily extended on the same terms as had been agreed upon at the outset. In view of the agreed limitation on the contract period, both the lessees and the lessors ought to have been able to expect that at the expiry of the lease contracts new contracts would be negotiated to reflect a fair market rent.
111. Finally, the law did not provide for procedural safeguards aimed at achieving a fair balance between the interests of the lessors and those of the lessees. It was a blanket law taking no account of individual circumstances and favouring to a large degree lessees in no pressing social need of housing protection.
112. In sum, the impugned legal scheme was so far-reaching as to exceed what was necessary in order to secure the public interest, and thus overstepped the State’s margin of appreciation.
(ii) The Government’s submissions
113. In the Government’s opinion the authorities of the respondent State had struck a fair balance (James and Others, cited above, §§ 46, 47, 50, Series A no. 98; Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, §§ 49, 59): there was no “excessive and individual burden”, the State enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation and the Court should respect the legislature’s judgment as to what was in the general interest unless that judgment was manifestly ill founded. The disputed legislation had been enacted in full awareness of obligations under the Convention, which also formed part of national law, and was the result of lengthy and continuing debate in Parliament and other bodies, including the Supreme Court. This was an area of great complexity with fluctuating social and market conditions (markt intern Verlag GmbH and Klaus Beermann v. Germany, 20 November 1989, Series A no. 165). The Ground Lease Act was “justifiable in principle and proportionate”. The applicants’ income from the ground lease contract had not been reduced and their income would remain the same as before.
114. That section 33 did not distinguish between ground lease for permanent homes and holiday homes should clearly fall within the margin of appreciation. The Government stressed the importance of respecting the legislature’s judgment as to what was in the general interest, and that that judgment in the instant case could not be viewed as manifestly unreasonable. In this regard, the Government relied on the Grand Chamber rulings in Mellacher and Immobiliare Saffi, both cited above.
115. While the Court had not explicitly stated the same with regard to policies affecting holiday homes, the Government did not see why the same very lenient standard of scrutiny ought not to apply here: the regulation of land to secure housing for leisure ought surely also to “play a central role in the welfare and economic policies of modern societies” within the meaning of that phrase as used by the Court in Immobiliare Saffi (cited above, § 49). It should be added, in this connection, that in Chassagnou and Others v. France [GC] (nos. 25088/94, 28331/95 and 28443/95, § 108, ECHR 1999 III) the Grand Chamber observed, as regards the value, under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, of protecting pure leisure activities such as hunting, that “the organisation and regulation of a leisure activity might also be a matter for which the State bore responsibility ...”.
116. The Government further invited the Court to have regard, in accordance with its own case-law, to the legitimate expectations of parties to ground lease agreements and to what had been reasonably foreseeable for the applicants. In the proportionality assessment, weight should be given to the fact that section 33 intervened in a situation already created by the parties themselves. The ground lease arrangement appeared to be a singular Norwegian legal phenomenon. It had come into being because Norway, at the time, was one of the poorest countries of Europe and a particularly rural society. Many individuals, who predominantly did not live in city dwellings, simply did not have the financial means to acquire real property as well as to erect houses on such land. The ground lease system had provided for long-term lease of land for a reasonable price, and had enabled the lessees to build houses on that land and to retain those buildings as their homes for the foreseeable future. Landowners received income in the form of rent from the lessees.
117. As the years passed, the market value of real property had increased dramatically in Norway – comparatively more so than in other Western European countries. This had surely not been anticipated by either party when concluding any ground lease contract; otherwise the contracts would have provided for a mechanism for continuous rent adjustment. That the authorities would eventually have to intervene and regulate an arrangement which had been created by the parties could not have been unforeseeable for the landowners. Upon the expiry of a ground lease, the lessee – who owned the house but not the ground on which it was built – could not simply terminate the lease and move the house. Faced with an exceptional increase in the value of real estate, the lessee might not even have the financial means to redeem the lease and acquire the ground. Nor could the landowners have legitimately expected that they would be the party to gain from the windfall profit that accrued because of the increase in property prices. The Court should bear in mind what the Grand Chamber had stated in J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd (cited above, § 83), namely:
“In James and Others, the possibility of ‘undeserving’ tenants being able to make ‘windfall profits’ did not affect the overall assessment of the proportionality of the legislation (James and Others judgment, referred to above, § 69), and any windfall for the Grahams [the third party in Pye] must be regarded in the same light in the present case.”
118. Finally, the Government recalled the Court’s deference to democratic processes. The issue of what should be done with the expiry of ground lease contracts established long ago had been the subject of at least eleven proposed amendments to the 1996 Ground Lease Act. There had been heated debate for many years among the leading political parties. In 2004, however, all but one of the parties represented in Parliament finally found a middle ground. Section 33 of the Ground Lease Act was one important part of that middle ground, the democratic bargain made in the Norwegian Parliament in 2004. In the Government’s submission, this significant political compromise should be taken into account by the Court, it being an example of democratic deliberation wholly in line with the ideal of an effective political democracy, which according to the Court in its 1998 judgment in the United Communist Party of Turkey and Others v. Turkey, (30 January 1998, § 45, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998 I) was “the only political model contemplated by the Convention, and, accordingly, the only one compatible with it”.
(iii) The Court’s assessment
119. The Court reiterates that in the above-cited Grand Chamber judgment in Hutten-Czapska, it stated the following principles:
“167. Not only must an interference with the right of property pursue, on the facts as well as in principle, a ‘legitimate aim’ in the ‘general interest’, but there must also be a reasonable relation of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measures applied by the State, including measures designed to control the use of the individual’s property. That requirement is expressed by the notion of a ‘fair balance’ that must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights.
The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a whole. In each case involving an alleged violation of that Article the Court must therefore ascertain whether by reason of the State’s interference the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden (see James and Others, cited above, § 50; Mellacher and Others, cited above, § 48; and Spadea and Scalabrino v. Italy, 28 September 1995, § 33, Series A no. 315-B).
168. In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are ‘practical and effective’. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. In cases concerning the operation of wide-ranging housing legislation, that assessment may involve not only the conditions for reducing the rent received by individual landlords and the extent of the State’s interference with freedom of contract and contractual relations in the lease market, but also the existence of procedural and other safeguards ensuring that the operation of the system and its impact on a landlord’s property rights are neither arbitrary nor unforeseeable. Uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State’s conduct. Indeed, where an issue in the general interest is at stake, it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner (see Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, § 54, and Broniowski, cited above, § 151).”
120. In the Court’s view, the above principles, although they were enunciated with regard to the particular situation governing tenancy agreements imposed by law (ibidem, § 152), are also pertinent for its assessment of the issue of proportionality in the present case. Like an ordinary tenancy agreement, a ground lease agreement of the kind in issue here would normally be entered into voluntarily at a rent reflecting the market level at the time when the agreement was concluded.
121. However, when considering the proportionality issue the Court will also have regard to the differences in nature between a ground lease contract and a tenancy contract with regard to both performance and duration. Whilst under the latter type of contract the tenant would pay a rent to occupy premises financed by the landlord, in the former type the situation would most frequently be the reverse: it would be the lessee who had invested in the buildings and constructions on the land. The landowner, the lessor, would do little more than make the ground available to the lessee against payment of a rent. In so doing the lessor would renounce the possibility of using the property for financial gain by any other means than by receiving the said rent. As a result of these differences, a ground lease contract would ordinarily be of a much longer duration than an ordinary tenancy agreement, usually 99 years, and in the present case between 40 and 60 years.
122. At the heart of the conflict of interests in the case under consideration is a contract of long and definite duration that once reflected the mutual interests of the contracting parties and which at its expiry was no longer perceived as being in their mutual interest.
123. From the lessor’s point of view, the ground rent he or she received, adjusted in keeping with inflation, had with time lost touch with price increases in the property market generally and the market for undeveloped properties specifically, and was out of tune with the drastic price increases in the real estate market generally since the 1980s. Had the lessor been free to negotiate the level of the rent of a new contract, the new rent, reflecting the market level, would have been far higher.
124. From the lessee’s point of view, because of the investments that he or she or their predecessors had made on the property, the lessee had a strong interest in maintaining the status quo of the contractual relationship at the expiry of the ground lease contract. Unlike a tenant, who could leave the rented premises with his or her movable property, the lessee would have a strong interest in preserving the possibility of keeping his or her immovable property on the rented ground. These were interests, it may be added, that were arguably also protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as pointed out by the Government, and by Article 8 of the Convention. For this reason, at the end of the lease period, the lessee would not be on an equal footing with the lessor in any negotiations about the rental terms of a new lease.
125. As can be seen from the above, the interests at stake on each side were markedly different in nature and difficult to reconcile and the issues with which the Norwegian Parliament was confronted were particularly complex. In view of the very large number of ground lease contracts in Norway, the Court further understands the need emphasised in the national legislative process for clear and foreseeable solutions and the need to avoid costly and time-consuming litigation on a massive scale before the national courts. This is the background against which the Court will examine whether in the instant case the national authorities acted within the wide margin of appreciation accorded to them under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
126. Turning to the concrete circumstances of the applicants’ case, the Court notes that when Parliament considered the disputed amendment to section 33 granting the lessee the option, upon expiry of the lease, to renew it indefinitely on the same conditions, a survey and assessment had been carried out with regard to the implementation of the Ground Lease Act 1996 after its entry into force on 1 January 2002, in particular its section 15 governing the adjustment of the ground lease rent. That version, like its successor, contained a general rule, according to which adjustments to the rent should take into account developments in the consumer price index, and an exception to that rule (for lease agreements concluded on or before 26 May 1983) providing for upward adjustment according to other factors, notably the value of the land (so-called ground rent clauses), where this had been expressly agreed on between the parties, and fixing ceilings to such upward adjustment. Experience had shown that, in the period thereafter, many lessees had seen a drastic upward adjustment of their ground lease rents for which they were unprepared. As mentioned above, as the gap between rents subject to rent control and price increases in the housing market widened over time, this (partial) lifting of rent control had made substantial inroads into the household budgets of many families and single persons. In the Bill to Parliament special attention was given to the particular provision in section 15 governing rent adjustment under contracts containing ground value clauses, which, it was observed, concerned a minority of ground lease contracts. The solution favoured by the Ministry and adopted by Parliament was a rule permitting a one-off upward adjustment for contracts with ground value clauses, followed by the introduction of an adjustment scheme linked to changes in the consumer price index. In the Ministry’s opinion balancing the interests of the lessors and those of the lessees required that there should be no intervention in rent adjustment clauses in existing contracts other than what would follow from this proposal.
127. In dealing with the provisions governing the calculation of compensation upon redemption, the Ministry of Justice suggested that these ought to be seen in the light of the provisions on rent adjustment, the general conditions governing redemption and the right to extend the lease. The Ministry considered that these provisions, seen as a whole, should not be framed in such a way as to substantially alter the balance of interests in the ground lease contracts. The aim of the above-mentioned solution, as expressed by the Ministry, had been to pay due regard to what had been agreed on between the parties and to make it possible to introduce a balanced provision on the calculation of compensation for redemption.
128. However, the Court has not been made aware, nor does it appear from the material submitted, that any specific assessment was made of whether the amendment to section 33 regulating the extension of the type of ground lease contracts at issue in the applicants’ case achieved a “fair balance” between the interests of the lessors, on the one hand, and those of the lessees, on the other hand.
129. The Court is further struck by the particularly low level of rent the applicants received under the terms of the various ground lease agreements as extended pursuant to section 33 of the Ground Lease Act. As quantified by the applicants, and as was undisputed by the Government, the level amounted to less than 0.25% of the plots’ market value and was either equal to or lower than the statutory level of the real-estate tax chargeable on the plots (0.2%-0.7%). Although it was for the lessee to pay the tax, as if he or she owned the property, the comparison nonetheless illustrates the striking contrast. Any adjustment to the rent would be limited to taking into account changes in the consumer price index. In the applicants’ case, there seem to have been no general interest demands sufficiently strong to justify such a low level of rent, bearing no relation to the actual value of the land (see Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice, cited above, § 144).
130. Indeed, as stated above, section 33 was generally applicable to contracts of a certain age that were up for renewal, irrespective of the financial means of the lessee concerned. It most likely had a much wider reach than merely addressing situations of potential financial hardship and social injustice and reflected social policy in a broad sense.
131. Moreover, the extension was for an indefinite duration without any possibility of upward adjustment in the light of factors other than the consumer price index (section 15(2)(1)), which excluded the possibility of taking account of the value of the land as a relevant factor. The same terms would continue in the event of transfer of the lease by the lessee to a third party or by the lessor to a third party. Only the lessee could opt to terminate the lease agreement, either by rescinding the contract or, more typically, by redeeming the plot in accordance with section 37. But for the lessee, continuing the lease would often be more attractive financially, as illustrated by the experience of the second applicant (see paragraph 21 above).
132. In the event that the lessee should sell the lease with dwellings to a third party, any increase resulting exclusively from changes in the value of the land, buildings exempted, would be reflected in the selling price and would accordingly accrue to the lessee. The same would not apply if the applicant lessor were to sell his or her rent entitlements according to the lease contract to a third party, in which case the price would reflect that the controlled rent would be kept at a low level indefinitely.
133. The Court accepts however that the applicants could entertain a legitimate expectation that the relevant lease contracts would expire as agreed according to their terms, independently of the intervening discussions on and adoption of legislative measures.
134. In these circumstances, it does not appear that there was a fair distribution of the social and financial burden involved but, rather, that the burden was placed solely on the applicant lessors (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 222, 224-225). The Court is therefore not satisfied that the respondent State, notwithstanding its wide margin of appreciation in this area, struck a fair balance between the general interest of the community and the property rights of the applicants, who were made to bear a disproportionate burden.
135. The Court appreciates the fact that the Norwegian Supreme Court has assessed the present case also from the angle of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraphs 125 to 132 of the judgment quoted at paragraph 16 above). However, in the first place, it is unable to share the latter’s view that the following question ought to be taken as the starting point for this assessment: "[W]hether the fact that in the event of an extension the lessor does not have the right to regulate the ground lease upwards to an amount that reflects the actual land value means that the arrangement contravenes this Convention provision" (paragraph 125 of the judgment). While this reflected a demand put forward by lessors in negotiations with lessees prior to the amendment of section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, it did not reflect the contents of this provision. This was so because section 33 in effect prohibited any rent increase (beyond what followed from consumer price index regulation in accordance with section 15). The lack of proportionality in this case was caused by the various factors highlighted in the Court’s reasoning in paragraphs 128 to 134 above, not by the fact that the lessors could not claim market rent in the case of an extension of the lease contract. Secondly, the Supreme Court’s analysis seems to have been based essentially on the Court’s judgment in James and Others (cited above). However, that judgment dealt with a situation which in many respects was different from that at issue in the instant case. In its reasoning above, the Court has relied on it only in so far as it has deemed it relevant to the concrete circumstances of the case and has had regard also to several more recent rulings referred to from its case-law, representing jurisprudential developments in the direction of a stronger protection under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
136. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ARTICLES 46 AND 41 OF THE CONVENTION
A. Article 46 of the Convention
137. Whilst in reaching the above conclusion the Court has focused on the particular circumstances of the applicants’ individual complaints, it adds by way of a general observation that the problem underlying the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerns the legislation itself and that its findings extend beyond the sole interests of the applicants in the instant case. This is a case where the Court considers that the respondent State should take appropriate legislative and/or other general measures to secure in its domestic legal order a mechanism which will ensure a fair balance between the interests of lessors on the one hand, and the general interests of the community on the other hand, in accordance with the principles of protection of property rights under the Convention. It is not for the Court to specify how lessors’ interests should be balanced against the other interests at stake. The Court has already identified the main shortcomings in the current legislation (see paragraphs 128 to 136 above). Under Article 46 the State remains free to choose the means by which it will discharge its obligations arising from the execution of the Court’s judgment (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 237 and 238).
B. Article 41 of the Convention
138. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
1. Damage
(a) Compensation for loss of income
139. The applicants sought compensation equal to the market value of the undeveloped plots, less the capitalised value of the rent that was actually payable according to section 33 of the Ground Lease Act, claiming the following amounts:
1) Ms Lindheim, 617,560 Norwegian Krone (corresponding to approximately 80,875 euros (EUR));
2) Mr Heian, NOK 3,563,220 (approximately EUR 466,650);
3-4) The spouses Mrs and Mr Georg Nilsen, NOK 2,490,000 (approximately EUR 326,100);
5) Ms Brandt-Kjelsen; NOK 62,339,540 (approximately EUR 8,164,000);
6) Mr Henriksen NOK 15,048,240 (approximately EUR 1,970,700).
140. The Government disputed the above claims, requested the Court to rule in equity and considered that it would be appropriate for the Court to reserve the matter for separate proceedings, under Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court.
141. The Court refers to its considerations above as to the particular complexity of the issues with which the Norwegian Parliament was confronted (see paragraph 125 above), to its finding that the respondent State should take appropriate legislative and/or other general measures to secure compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 137 above) and also to the principle of legal certainty inherent in the law of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Marckx v. Belgium, 13 June 1979, § 58, Series A no. 31, and Henryk Urban and Ryszard Urban v. Poland, no. 23614/08, § 65, 30 November 2010). In the particular circumstances of the instant case, the Court finds that the respondent State should be dispensed from liability with regard to legal acts or situations that antedate the present judgment (ibid.) and accordingly dismisses the applicants’ above-mentioned claims for compensation for pecuniary damage.
(b) Compensation for judicial costs
142. Mrs and Mr Nilsen, Ms Brandt-Kjelsen and Mr Henriksen further requested compensation for amounts totalling NOK 171, 475 (NOK 61,050, plus NOK 37,425, plus NOK 73,050), corresponding to approximately EUR 22,460, that they had been ordered to pay to the adversary parties for the latter’s costs in the domestic proceedings.
143. The Government stated that they had no comments to make on these claims and that they would leave the matter to the Court’s discretion.
144. The Court is satisfied that there is a causal link between the damage claimed and the violation of the Convention it has found, and awards Mrs and Mr Nilsen EUR 8,000, Ms Brandt-Kjelsen EUR 4,900 and Mr Henriksen EUR 9,570 under this head.
2. Costs and expenses
145. The applicants further sought the reimbursement of legal costs and expenses, totalling NOK 2,960,525 (approximately EUR 387,700), in respect of the following items:
(a) NOK 648,249 incurred for their own legal costs before the domestic courts;
(b) NOK 1,153,298 for the lawyers’ work in the proceedings before the Court until 21 December 2009;
(c) NOK 558,500 for the lawyers’ work for the period from 21 December 2009 to 29 May 2011;
(d) NOK 453,125 for the lawyers’ work to prepare and attend the oral hearing in Strasbourg on 21 June 2011;
(e) NOK 14,353 for travel expenses for counsel to attend the hearing;
(f) NOK 125,000 for translation costs;
(g) NOK 8,000 for estimated additional expenses for the translator.
The above amounts included value added tax (“VAT”).
146. The Government stated that they had no comments to make to these claims and that they would leave it to the Court’s discretion.
147. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award EUR 100,000 in respect of items (a), (e) and (f), whilst item (g) must be rejected as it is does not appear that it was actually incurred. The Court is not convinced that all the costs incurred in the Strasbourg proceedings were necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. Making an assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicants EUR 75,000 for item (b) and EUR 25,000 for items (c) and (d) (inclusive of VAT).
3. Default interest
148. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the applications admissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;

3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the national currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 8,000 (eight thousand euros) to Mrs and Mr Nilsen, EUR 4,900 (four thousand nine hundred euros) to Ms Brandt Kjelsen and EUR 9,570 (nine thousand five hundred and seventy euros) to Mr Henriksen, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 200,000 (two hundred thousand euros) to the applicants, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 12 June 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusioni: Violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione di proprietà (Aricle 1 parà. 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1 - Controlli dell'uso di proprietà) danno Patrimoniale - l'assegnazione (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale)
Danno patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinse (Articolo 41 - danno Patrimoniale)


QUARTA SEZIONE






CAUSA LINDHEIM ED ALTRI C. NORVEGIA

(Richieste N. 13221/08 e 2139/10)









SENTENZA


STRASBOURG

12 giugno 2012



Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Lindheim ed Altri c. la Norvegia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compota di:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente
Lech Garlicki,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Vincenzo A. De Gaetano,
Sverre Erik Jebens, judges,and
Lorenzo Early, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato nel 2011 e 22 maggio 2012 di 21 giugno,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata sulla scorsa data menzionata:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in due richieste (N. 13221/08 e 2139/10) contro il Regno della Norvegia depositato presso la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con sei cittadini norvegesi (“i richiedenti”) il 2008 e 21 dicembre 2009 di 14 marzo. OMISSIS depositò la prima richiesta. OMISSIS depositò la seconda richiesta.
2. I primi cinque richiedenti furono rappresentati inizialmente col Sig. F. Elgesem e col Sig. S.O. Flaaten; il therafter tutti i sei richiedenti furono rappresentati col secondi e col Sig. G. Hika. I tre avvocati stavano praticando in Oslo. Il Governo norvegese (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato con OMISSIS dell'Ufficio dell'Avvocato Generale (Questioni Civili) come il loro Agente.
3. I richiedenti erano possidenti che, come locatori, era entrato in accordi di contratto d'affitto di base che riguardano le loro aree di terra, per case permanenti o case di festa. Loro si lamentarono che, in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, sotto legislazione nuova gli affittuari erano stati concessi per richiedere, ed aveva richiesto, una proroga illimitata dei contratti sulle stesse condizioni siccome prima fatto domanda, una volta il termine convenuto di contratto d'affitto era scaduto.
4. Nel 2009 e 18 maggio 2010 di 4 giugno, la Corte decise rispettivamente, di dare avviso delle richieste al Governo. Decise anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1). In 9 maggio 2011 la Corte decise di congiungere le due richieste ed invitare le parti ad un'udienza sull'ammissibilità e meriti della causa.
5. Un'udienza ebbe luogo in pubblico nell'il Diritti umani Costruire, Strasbourg 21 giugno 2011 (l'Articolo 59 § 3).
Là sembrò di fronte alla Corte:
(a) per il GovernmentMr
M. Emberland, l'Ufficio di Avvocato-generale Agente,
Sig.ra A. Syse, Consulente;
(b) per l'applicantsOMISSIS

La Corte ascoltò indirizzi col Sig. Emberland, OMISSIS.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti sono:
OMISSIS
A. Background riguardante i fatti
7. I richiedenti sono possidenti e locatori che conclusero contratti di contratto d'affitto basi che riguardano le loro aree di terre per case permanenti o case di festa prima di 1 gennaio 1976. Su che data, sull'entrata in vigore del Contratto d'affitto Base Atto 1975 (Tomtefesteloven), per la prima volta sotto legge norvegese, il noleggio o affittando di aree di terra per case permanenti e case di festa divenne la materia di regolamentazione legale e speciale.
8. Prima di 1 gennaio 1976 simile accordi furono governati con gli articoli generali (legale ed altro) su contratti. Ordinariamente simile contratti furono conclusi per un periodo di 99 anni e spesso contennero clausole che danno l'affittuario un diritto a proroga del contratto su scadenza. Secondo dottrina legale, dove simile clausole non erano state esposte espressamente fuori nel contratto, c'erano un costume o assunzione implicita che l'affittuario aveva un diritto a proroga del contratto a meno che il locatore aveva una base obiettiva per rifiutare rinnovamento. Dei contratti di contratto d'affitto contennero clausole che diedero il locatore un diritto per aumentare l'affitto ad intervalli per compensare per l'inflazione. Comunque, facendo seguito a due sentenze di Corte Supreme di 1988, tale diritto fu accordato anche nell'assenza di qualsiasi clausola contraente ed esplicita a quel l'effetto.
9. Nel 1996 un Contratto d'affitto Atto Base e nuovo fu decretato con effetto da 1 gennaio 2002.
10. Sotto sia l'Atto del 1975 e l'Atto del 1996 l'affittuario fu concesso per avere il contratto di contratto d'affitto base prolungato ma il locatore aveva diritto ad introdurre le condizioni nuove nel contratto.
11. Con effetto da 1 novembre 2004 il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base fu corretto di nuovo; inter l'alia, da che data la sua sezione 33 concesso tutti gli affittuari di aree per case permanenti e case di festa il diritto per prima chiedere proroga del loro contratto d'affitto sulle stesse condizioni come e senza limitazione in tempo, quando il termine convenuto di contratto d'affitto fra le parti scadute. La ragione era un fortemente sentito interessato attraverso Parlamento (Stortinget), con solamente uno l'eccezione-i Progressi Festeggiano (Fremskrittspartiet), che affittuari che non erano in grado riconoscere il prezzo di rimborso avrebbero bisogno della protezione del legislatore per essere in grado prolungare il contratto d'affitto. L'introduzione della disposizione contestata di sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base essenzialmente fu motivata con considerazioni di politica sociali (vedere divide in paragrafi 47-51 sotto).
12. Capire la base razionale dietro a questo emendamento, è meglio importante per tenere presente i fattori socio-economici e fondamentali in Norvegia in ordine. Nell'area dopoguerra, risorse limitate per l'acquisto di beni immobili erano un fattore che ha costituito disposizioni di contratto d'affitto basi attraenti persone che vollero possedere una casa permanente o una casa di festa. Per proprietari di proprietà, era un modo conveniente di ottenere un consolidi reddito dalla loro terra senza rendere qualsiasi investimenti ed un'alternativa attraente a vendendo la terra, in un paese con una piccola popolazione su un territorio enorme e con livelli di prezzo di moderato. È probabile che questo spieghi perché simile disposizioni divennero così popolari. Là esista fra 300,000 e 350,000 contratti di contratto d'affitto di base (sessanta percento per case permanenti e quaranta percento per case di festa) in una popolazione di 5 milione di persone, la maggioranza di contratti che sono per case private (la Proposta N.ro 41 all'Odelsting (2003-2004), p. 11).
13. Da 1950 fino a 1980 il livello di prezzo del mercato di vero-appezzamento di terreno sviluppò più o meno ad un ritmo simile all'inflazione di prezzo generale. Comunque, questo cominciò a cambiare circa il 1980, quando prezzi di vero-appezzamento di terreno cominciarono a volare in alto. Questa era la causa dal secondo la metà degli anni ottanta per proprietà specialmente circa le più grandi città ed in aree popolari per ricreazione, ma fissa il prezzo di ha continuato a sorgere, in tutte le parti del paese. Un numero di locatori usò poi l'opportunità sotto la legge per esigere rimborso che diede luogo a molti affittuari che sono fissati in una posizione finanziaria e difficile (paragrafo 46 della sentenza della Corte Suprema di 21 settembre 2007 nella causa principale assegnata ad a paragrafo 16 sotto). A causa dell'aumento drammatico in pressione su vero-appezzamento di terreno fissa il prezzo del legislatore lo pensò necessario intervenire proteggere gli affittuari gli interessi di '. Questo era fatto nel 2004 con regolando il livello di possibili aumenti di affitto così che loro potrebbero riflettere inflazione solamente generale, non il costo sorgente di terra.
B. La causa principale portata di fronte alla Corte Suprema
14. In conseguenza al riguardo un locatore che non è nessuni dei richiedenti procedimenti civili e depositati di fronte alla Corte distrettuale di Oslo (il tingrett) contro cinquanta-quattro affittuari che avevano affittato aree di terra per case permanenti, mentre chiedendo che la sezione 33 corretta del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base contravvenne ad Articoli 97 o 105 della Costituzione, mentre concernendo rispettivamente la proibizione di leggi retroattive ed il diritto al pieno risarcimento in causa dell'espropriazione, o Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
15. 10 gennaio 2007, la Corte distrettuale di Oslo passò sentenza in favore del locatore, sentenza che sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base contravvenne ad Articolo 97 ed Articolo 105 della Costituzione.
16. Su ricorso, la causa fu portata direttamente di fronte alla Corte Suprema (Høyesterett) che con sentenza di 21 settembre 2007 (HR 2007-1593-P, causa n. 2007/237) fondi contro il locatore. Considerò che sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base dovrebbe essere esaminata esclusivamente nella luce di Articolo 97 della Costituzione col quale era compatibile, e che non c'era nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Nel suo ragionamento, approvato nel principale delle altre sei Giustizie che si riuniscono nella causa, il primo giudice di votazione, la Sig. Justice Matningsdal, determinato in finora come attinente:
“(88) l'osservazione dell'affittuario che il diritto a proroga del contratto d'affitto ‘sugli stessi termini come prima ' rappresenta una restrizione può nella mia opinione non succeda. Sin da allora la sentenza nella causa di Atto di Concessione nella legge della Corte Suprema riporta (Norsk Retstidende - “R.t.”) 1918 io p. 403, la Corte Suprema ha preso come il suo punto di partenza che se, come affermato con Funzionario del fisco Siewers in Rt. 1914 p. 205, c'è ‘un cedendo da parte del proprietario ed un'acquisizione da parte dello Stato che completamente o in trasferimenti di parte la disposizione del proprietario della proprietà allo Stato o altri per ulteriore godimento per gli stessi o gli altri fini ', seguirà da Articolo 105 che il pieno risarcimento deve essere pagato. Ci sarà al contrario., una restrizione sull'uso di proprietà se ‘non c'è cedendo e l'acquisizione ma piuttosto le disposizioni che per la promozione delle considerazioni di interesse pubbliche e nell'interesse di scopo di società per regolare la disposizione del proprietario della proprietà senza qualsiasi trasferisce a terzo festeggia '.
(89) il diritto a proroga prevista per in sezione 33 chiaramente deve essere distinto da una regolamentazione della disposizione del proprietario della proprietà. Sezione 33 concessioni l'affittuario un diritto per affittare l'area per un periodo più lungo che purché per nell'accordo. Nelle altre parole, è un trasferimento di diritti nella proprietà oltre il periodo convenuto di tempo - quale vide in isolamento potrebbe indicare che la situazione è regolata direttamente con Articolo 105. In questo contesto, io dovrei notare, che il requisito come a ‘il pieno risarcimento ' in Articolo 105 fa domanda anche nella causa dell'espropriazione di diritti limitati...
(90) benché sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base comporti un trasferimento della disposizione del proprietario della proprietà, io ho ciononostante senza dubbio che la costituzionalità del diritto ad una proroga su condizioni immutate deve essere valutata in relazione ad Articolo 97 della Costituzione, piuttosto che Articolo 105. Questa era anche la prospettiva dei legislatori, vedere Proposta N.ro 41 all'Odelsting (2003-2004), p. 55, citato sopra che presume che la questione della costituzionalità deve essere decisa con riferimento ad Articolo 97. Un punto centrale in questo contesto è che gli articoli su proroga intervengono con un effetto regolatore in una situazione creata con le parti stesse per il contratto di contratto d'affitto base. L'accordo lo costituisce necessario gli affittuari per essere permesso di mantenere i loro edifici sull'area per un periodo molto lungo di tempo dopo che il termine convenuto di contratto d'affitto è scaduto. La disposizione legale rappresenta una regolamentazione-con effetto retroattivo-riferì direttamente all'accordo, o, più precisamente, alle restrizioni contenute nell'accordo. Nella nostra tradizione legale una regolamentazione susseguente di questa natura relativo ad un vincolo contrattuale fra le parti è valutata in relazione ad Articolo 97 della Costituzione, non in relazione ad Articolo 105. Questa è anche la causa dove una regolamentazione ha dato luogo ad un trasferimento di diritti ed obblighi fra le parti. Questa prospettiva deve essere anche applicabile in una causa come il nostro, anche se l'intervento nell'accordo comporta un trasferimento di disposizione. '
...
(98) la valutazione concreta in relazione ad Articolo 97 della Costituzione
(99)... Una valutazione deve essere resa in pieno delle conseguenze dell'atto. In questa valutazione, sul peso di lato del uno deve essere concesso alle considerazioni degli affittuari. I secondi devono essere bilanciati contro le conseguenze dell'atto per i locatori, e come protezione-degno sono i loro interessi.
(101) quando viene ad un contratto d'affitto base è fondamentale che uno è confrontato con un conflitto di interessi fra due parti. Il possidente possiede la terra, mentre l'affittuario possiede l'edificio o edifici che sono stati eretti sulla terra. Quando bilanciando, è dell'importanza centrale che pressocché senza eccezione l'interesse economico dell'affittuario è più grande. Anche se l'esempio non è rappresentativo per edifici costruiti per l'abitazione individuale o per fini di festa, io noto ciononostante, che nel progetto di vendite riguardo ai cinquanta-quattro appartamenti nella causa presente, i prezzi furono esposti a fra NOK 140,000 e NOK 395,000 che dipendono da taglia e posizione. Il prezzo per uno degli appartamenti più costosi era così più alto che il prezzo prima pagò alcuni anni per l'area intera di terra. Ma anche siccome riguarda edifici costruiti per l'abitazione individuale e per fini di festa, l'affittuario normalmente ha pagato il contributo finanziario e più significativo.
(102) in riguardo di un contratto d'affitto per case permanenti, il diritto alla casa essenziale dell'affittuario per lui e la sua famiglia deve essere protegguta-quale era la ragione principale dietro all'emendamento dell'atto. In oltre, per la maggioranza di affittuari concerne il loro solo più grande investimento. Loro hanno un'aspettativa fondata che i legislatori proteggeranno la loro situazione che riguarda i fatti. Inoltre, questo è illustrato col fatto che inoltre l'area di leasing di base, noi abbiamo molti esempi dove i legislatori hanno trovato giustificò proteggere diritti di qualche genere, anche quando simile interferenza può intendere una certa forma di trasferimento di diritti:
(103) in primo luogo io noto Atto di 23 luglio 1920 n. 1...
(104) in secondo luogo io noto Atto di 16 luglio 1939 riguardo ad affitto...
(105) la regolamentazione di affitto è un terzo esempio che illustra lo sforzo della legislazione per proteggere il diritto alla casa...
(106) il diritto per continuare il contratto di contratto d'affitto su ‘gli stessi termini come prima che ' ha significato per la possibilità del locatore di aumentare l'affitto prima e primo. L'esame sopra [103-105] gli show che per molto tempo sforzi legislativi e considerevoli sono stati resi per proteggere il diritto alla casa. Questa area di legge è stata legiferata fortemente, ed i meccanismi di mercato hanno ad una grande misura non stato il fattore che decide. Locatori sono dovuti essere perciò, già, preparati per i creatori di legge per seguire da vicino sviluppi e se necessario intervenga nelle relazioni di contratto d'affitto in corso per salvaguardare il bisogno dell'affittuario di proteggere la sua casa ed i suoi investimenti.
(107) inoltre, come riguardi accordi a lungo termine, come contratti di contratto d'affitto di base le parti devono essere preparate per sviluppi per prendere una direzione che aumenta il bisogno del legislatore di intervenire con legislazione per garantire un equilibrio corretto fra le parti. Questo non solo ha tratto profitto gli affittuari: la promulgazione di sezione 36 dell'Accordo Agisce nel 1983 diede locatori la possibilità di aggiustare il contratto d'affitto in contratti che non contennero una clausola di regolamentazione verso l'alto, e dove l'affitto era divenuto irragionevolmente basso a causa di un calo significativo nel valore di soldi...
...
(109) [i locatori] ha enfatizzato che siccome i contratti furono entrati in durante un periodo di collegamento di indice, loro anticiparono che regolamentazione di prezzo sarebbe stata tolta [alla scadenza del contratto] e che, quando prolungando il contratto, loro sarebbero in grado accusare un affitto che riflettè il vero valore della terra. Io noto in questo collegamento che è discutibile come forte fosse potuta essere questa anticipazione. ... Io assegno [una sentenza di Corte Suprema, Rt. 2006 p.1547 nei quali la corte affermò fra le altre cose delle parti le aspettative di ']... ‘[i locatori] ha allegato il grande peso al fatto che una clausola fu inserita nell'il convenire contraente che controversie come alla regolamentazione di affitto base sarebbe deciso nella luce di un'opinione competente. Loro sostengono che l'inserzione di tale clausola sarebbe stata non necessaria li avuti anticipato che regolamentazione di prezzo seguirebbe collegamento di indice. Nella mia prospettiva, comunque molto peso non può essere allegato inoltre. Negli anni sessanta era difficile predire che i prezzi di aree di terra per alloggi di festa avrebbero aumentato notevolmente più che l'inflazione generale avrebbe indicato. È molto probabile che quando entrando nel contratto, le parti non avevano qualsiasi la concezione chiara di che che dovrebbe essere la base di materiale per regolare l'affitto base. '
(110) oltre alla quotazione sopra, io noto che in finora come i locatori aveva anticipato che regolamentazione di prezzo sarebbe tolta, loro non potevano avere qualsiasi l'anticipazione legittima che il legislatore accetterebbe un aumento in affitto di base che deviò significativamente dal trend di prezzo generale. Se il legislatore non fosse intervenuto, l'aumento di prezzo nei recenti anni pressocché avrebbe corrisposto ad un ‘profitto fortuito '-vedere Ot.prp.nr.41 (2003-204) p. 51, seconda colonna. Di conseguenza, non era realistico per anticipare che i legislatori non interverrebbero negli aumenti di prezzo noi abbiamo avuto nei recenti anni.
(111) inoltre, io osservo che la causa presente concerne contratti a lungo termine che il possidente riceve affitto di base contrattuale da quaranta-cinque anni sotto. Questo ha anche la sua importanza sotto Articolo 97 della Costituzione.
(112) i locatori hanno sostenuto che è irragionevole che alla scadenza dei contratti loro saranno in un [peggio] la posizione che locatori che digitano contratti di leasing nuovi. In queste situazioni, segue, che sotto sezione 11 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base la libertà di accordo è significativa in che l'affitto base e convenuto è valido come lungo come non è irragionevolmente ‘alto in relazione a che che è pagato consuetamente nella località su contratti d'affitto nuovi su aree simili su simile contrattuale chiama '. Nella mia prospettiva, comunque è una differenza cruciale fra le due situazioni: Io già mi riferisco agli elementi enfatizzati. In questo collegamento, io specialmente noto, che riguardo a contratti d'affitto di base, come quegli in oggetto, dove la spanna di vita dell'edificio chiaramente eccede la durata del contratto di contratto d'affitto base, il locatore ha tutti lungo stato consapevole che la proroga del contratto diverrebbe un problema. Quando negoziando i termini della proroga del contratto, molto sarebbe finanziariamente in pericolo per l'affittuario. Espropriare nell'Atto di Espropriazione, era un rischio nonostante l'autorità, come anche indicò in Ot.prpr. n. 41 (2003-2004), p. 54, seconda colonna che il locatore imporrebbe alcuni le condizioni piuttosto oppressive sull'affittuario. I locatori non potevano aspettarsi che il legislatore si freni da regolamentazione di prezzo in simile cause quando rinnovando contratti di contratto d'affitto basi. Io ricordo che quando i contratti di contratto d'affitto basi in questione fu entrato in, la costituzione di contratti di contratto d'affitto basi fu prezzo-regolata, ed un aumento nell'affitto base richiese approvazione dal Prezzo Consiglio [il prisnemnda].
(113) prendendo il [circostanze sopra nella considerazione,] c'è una causa forte per concludere che la disposizione che dà affittuari il diritto per continuare prima il contratto d'affitto base sugli stessi termini come non è colpita con la proibizione di leggi retroattive esposta fuori in Articolo 97 della Costituzione. È vero che la disposizione vuole dire che l'aumento intero nel valore della terra-alla misura che eccede aumenti nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo-si può dire che accumuli agli affittuari dopo la proroga del contratto d'affitto. Nelle altre parole, non è ripartendo dell'aumento in valore che ha condotto all'emendamento legislativo. Ciononostante, io trovo che, determinato la situazione che esistè, deve giacere all'interno della libertà accordata al legislatore sotto Articolo 97 della Costituzione per regolare così le questioni in.
(114) quando valutando [ottemperanza con la costituzione] la questione sorge se la disposizione retroattiva salvaguarda considerazioni obiettive dell'uguaglianza. [...]
(115) è sezione 15 sulla rettifica dell'affitto di contratto d'affitto base che nei particolari aumenti la questione di se le considerazioni dell'uguaglianza sufficientemente sono state preservate. Come un risultato di questa disposizione la disposizione precedente su rettifica dell'affitto di contratto d'affitto base fu abrogata. Sezione 15 (1) prevede:
...
(116) con riguardo ad all'uno-via rettifica sull'entrata in vigore dell'Atto 1 gennaio 2002, sezione 15 (2) prevede:
...
(117) sezione 15 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base così purché per una possibilità a fattore nel calcolo del contratto d'affitto base un aumento affittò nel valore dell'area oltre il tasso di inflazione generale. Ma la possibilità è limitata ad istanze dove simile rettifiche hanno inequivocabilmente ‘' stato concordato a, ed il requisito che l'accordo è chiaro è particolarmente severo-vedere Norsk Rettstidende ‘R.t.' 2006, a p. 1547. In prospettiva di questo requisito come alla chiarezza, e delle informazioni disponibile di clausole di rettifica in contratti di contratto d'affitto di base in generale, una minoranza di contratti è coperta con questa disposizione. C'è in oltre le importanti limitazioni anche sulle situazioni che sono coperte col diritto sotto sezione 15 (2)(2) includere nel calcolo un aumento nei valori siccome menzionato. C'è approvvigioni solamente per un uno-via rettifica e ci sono limitazioni come all'importo.
(118) nella mia prospettiva, anche se Articolo 97 della Costituzione non richiede proprio l'eccezione prevista per in sezione 15(2)(2), c'è discutibilmente una base obiettiva per dare questi accordi di contratto d'affitto basi un status speciale con riguardo ad alla possibilità di aggiustare l'affitto di contratto d'affitto base. La base per fare così è precisamente che rettifica nella conformità col valore base qui è stata espressa direttamente e ha creato perciò un'aspettativa più sicura e più vicina di rettifica su quel la base. Nella luce di che io non posso vedere che la disposizione in sezione 15(2)(2) infrange la condizione dell'uguaglianza e così offre una base per accantonare la sezione 33 diritto come essendo incompatibile con Articolo 97 della Costituzione.
(119) io aggiungo che il fatto che gli articoli di rimborso possono offrire un migliore risultato finanziario per il locatore che quelle su proroga del contratto d'affitto su condizioni inalterate non sono una base per sostenere che sezione 33 è incompatibile con Articolo 97 della Costituzione. Rimborso ha lasciato alla scelta dell'affittuario. Il legislatore dovrebbe essere libero per decidere che se l'affittuario desidera giovarli a lui o di questo diritto, lui o lei dovrà pagare il risarcimento oltre il minimo costituzionale.
...
(121) in futuro la mia conclusione è che sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base non contravviene ad Articolo 97 della Costituzione. La disposizione è giustificata con considerazioni di housing/social pesanti. C'era un bisogno chiaro di proteggere un numero di affittuari ed i locatori non aveva nessuna aspettativa allineato per trarre profitto dall'aumento piuttosto straordinario del valore di aree di terra per affittare.
...
(123) infine, è necessario per valutare se la sezione 33 piombi a risultati che contravvengono ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione...
(125) la questione è se il fatto che nell'evento di una proroga il locatore non ha diritto a regolare il contratto d'affitto base ad un importo che riflette il valore di terra effettivo verso l'alto vuole dire che la disposizione contravviene a questa disposizione di Convenzione.
(126) la decisione centrale in questo contesto è la sentenza con la Corte europea di Diritti umani nella Sessione Assoluta di 21 febbraio 1986 in James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986 la Serie Un n. 98. La causa fu causata con la promulgazione col Parlamento di Regno Unito di un statuto ‘Il Riforma Atto In affitto 1967 ' che residenti concessi il diritto per riscattare contratti per ‘che costruisce contratto d'affitto ' e ‘contratto d'affitto eccellente '. I tipi precedenti di accordo avevano somiglianze notevoli con contratti d'affitto di base norvegesi, l'essere di differenza che sotto questi contratti, l'alloggio appartenne al possidente anche. Comunque, i residenti avevano sostenuto le spese del costo di erezione e pagato un'accusa per l'area al possidente. L'atto nuovo previde che nell'evento di rimborso, i residenti dovrebbero pagare solamente per il valore della terra. L'area non sarebbe valutata come un'area dove un diritto di titolo all'alloggio e terra fu raggruppata, ma piuttosto sulla base di che che ci potrebbe aspettare che il possidente lo venda per con l'ingombro di un'affittanza di almeno il durata di ' di 50 anni, debba chiunque l'altro acquisto l'area. Questo importo era lontano più basso del valore di mercato di un'area rilasciata, ed i querelanti affermarono che loro soffrirono di una perdita nella regione di NOK 1.500.000 su trasporti individuali. La Corte non trovò per i richiedenti.
(127) i richiedenti contesero in primo luogo che il ‘interesse pubblico che la prova di ' è stata soddisfatta solamente se la proprietà fosse stata portata ‘per un scopo di pubblica utilità di beneficio alla comunità ' generalmente (vedere James ed Altri, citato sopra, divida in paragrafi 39). Questo argomento non succedè (l'ibidem, divida in paragrafi 45):
‘Per queste ragioni, la Corte viene alla stessa conclusione come la Commissione: una presa di proprietà effettuata nell'adempimento di politiche sociali, economiche o altre e legittime può essere ‘nell'interesse pubblico ', anche se la comunità a grande ha nessun uso diretto o godimento della proprietà preso. La legislazione di riforma in affitto non è perciò ipso facto una violazione di Articolo 1 (P1-1) su questa base. Di conseguenza, è necessario per chiedere se negli altri riguardi la legislazione soddisfece il ‘interesse pubblico ' esamina ed i requisiti rimanenti posarono in giù nella seconda frase di Articolo 1 (P1-1). '
(128) in paragrafo 46 la Corte le ulteriori sottolineature che il nazionale corteggia ‘è meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è ‘nell'interesse pubblico '. Le autorità nazionali godono di conseguenza ‘un certo margine della valutazione '.
(129) la Corte discusse poi se gli scopi cercarono di essere perseguiti col Parlamento britannico era legittimo. In questo riguardo a, la Corte sostenne, inter l'alia (l'ibidem, divida in paragrafi 47):
‘Eliminating che che è judged per essere le ingiustizie sociali è un esempio delle funzioni di una legislatura democratica. Più specialmente, società moderne considerano che alloggio della popolazione sia un primo bisogno sociale, la regolamentazione di che non può essere lasciato completamente al giochi di vigori di mercato. Il margine della valutazione è ampio abbastanza per coprire legislazione mirata a garantendo la più grande giustizia sociale nella sfera delle case di persone, anche dove simile legislazione interferisce con l'esistendo relazioni contrattuali fra parti private e non conferisce beneficio diretto sullo Stato o la comunità a grande. In principio, perciò lo scopo perseguito con la legislazione di riforma in affitto è un legittimo. '
(130) da allora in poi, la Corte enfatizzò che non sarebbe stato sufficiente che la legislazione intraprende un ‘scopo legittimo ' ma ‘ci deve essere anche una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere resosi conto di ' (l'ibidem, divida in paragrafi 50). Sulla valutazione di proporzionalità nella causa concreta, la Corte affermò, (paragrafo 51):
‘secondo i richiedenti, la sicurezza di tenuta che inquilini già avevano sotto il diritto vigente... purché una risposta adeguata e la natura di draconian dei mezzi concepirono dare effetto al diritto morale ed allegato, vale a dire la privazione di proprietà andò troppo lontano. Questo fu detto per essere confermato con l'assenza di qualsiasi vero equivalente all'Atto del 1967 nella legislazione municipale degli altri Stati Contraenti e, davvero, generalmente in società democratiche. È, così i richiedenti dibatterono, solamente se non c'era altra via di ricorso meno drastica per l'ingiustizia percepita che la via di ricorso estrema dell'espropriazione potrebbe soddisfare i requisiti di Articolo 1 (P1-1).
Questo corrisponde a leggendo una prova della necessità severa nell'Articolo, un'interpretazione che la Corte non trova garantita. La disponibilità di soluzioni alternative non rende in se stesso la legislazione di riforma in affitto ingiustificato; costituisce un fattore, insieme ad altri attinente per determinare se l'eletto di mezzi potrebbe essere riguardato come ragionevole ed andò bene a realizzando l'essere di scopo legittimo perseguito, mentre avendo riguardo ad al bisogno di prevedere un equilibrio di fiera di ‘'. Purché la legislatura rimase all'interno di questi confini, non è per la Corte per dire se la legislazione rappresentò la migliore soluzione per trattare col problema o se la discrezione legislativa sarebbe dovuta essere esercitata in un altro modo... .
L'affittuario che occupa fu considerato con Parlamento per avere un ‘diritto morale ' a proprietà dell'alloggio della quale conto inadeguato fu preso sotto la legge vigente... . La preoccupazione della legislatura non dovette regolare semplicemente più equamente la relazione di padrone di casa ed inquilino ma a diritto un'ingiustizia percepita che è andata al molto problema di proprietà. Lasciando spazio un meccanismo al trasferimento obbligatorio dell'interesse di allodio nell'alloggio e la terra all'inquilino, con risarcimento finanziario al padrone di casa non può essere qualificato in se stesso nelle circostanze come un metodo improprio o sproporzionato per riaggiustare così la legge come incontrare che interessato. '
(131) come a se è lecito per adottare legislazione che non garantisce il pieno risarcimento, la Corte sostenne in paragrafo 54:
‘che La Corte accetta inoltre la conclusione della Commissione come allo standard del risarcimento: la presa di proprietà senza pagamento di un importo ragionevolmente riferito al suo valore costituirebbe un'interferenza sproporzionata che non poteva essere considerata giustificabile sotto Articolo 1 normalmente (P1-1). Articolo 1 (P1-1) non fa, comunque, garantisca un diritto al pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze. Obiettivi legittimi di ‘interesse pubblico ', come perseguì in misure di riforma economica o misure progettò per realizzare la più grande giustizia sociale, può richiedere meno che rimborso del pieno valore di mercato. Inoltre, il potere della Corte di revisione è limitato ad accertando se la scelta di termini di risarcimento incorre fuori del margine ampio dello Stato della valutazione in questo dominio... . '
(132) io non posso vedere che la Corte ha abbandonato dalle conclusioni fondamentali in questa sentenza in causa-legge susseguente. Quando le circostanze della causa e le considerazioni che sono posto sotto alla legislazione inglese sono comparate con la nostra causa, è chiaro a me che la richiesta di sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base non contravviene agli obblighi della Norvegia sotto diritto internazionale.”
C. Le specifiche circostanze sottostanti sotto le azioni di reclamo individuali dei richiedenti
1. Il primo richiedente
17. Il primo richiedente, OMISSIS proprietà agricola e posseduta ed aveva affittato nove aree di terra per fini di casa di festa su tutti di che erano stati costruiti. Uno dei contratti di leasing fu firmato a settembre 1968 con l'affitto base ed originale che corrisponde a NOK 200. Il contratto d'affitto previde per rettifica dell'affitto base in conformità con l'Indice dei prezzi al consumo ogni decimo anno. Il contratto d'affitto aveva un termine di 40 anni e scadde di conseguenza nel 2008. Al tempo di depositare la richiesta l'affitto di contratto d'affitto base corrisposto a 1,622 Krone norvegesi (NOK) (approssimativamente 200 euro (EUR)) per anno. Fin dal richiedente e gli affittuari non potevano giungere ad un accordo come ad una proroga del contratto d'affitto facendo seguito a sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base, il primo richiedente portò la causa di fronte alla Corte distrettuale di Hallingdal che chiede che nell'evento di una proroga del contratto d'affitto, lei dovrebbe avere diritto a costringere l'affitto base ad essere adattatosi al prezzo di mercato legale. Con una sentenza di 3 febbraio 2007, la Corte distrettuale di Hallingdal trovata in favore degli affittuari.
18. Il primo richiedente fece appello contro la sentenza, e la causa fu portata direttamente di fronte alla Corte Suprema che l'ascoltò insieme con la causa principale menzionata sopra di. Con una sentenza di 21 settembre 2007 la Corte Suprema trovata contro il primo richiedente. Nel suo ragionamento, approvato nel principale delle cinque Giustizie che si riuniscono nella causa, il primo giudice di votazione, la Sig. Justice Utgård, determinato in finora come attinente:
“(13) io sono arrivato alla conclusione che il ricorso non può succedere per motivi determinato nel [sentenza principale] più primo oggi.
(14) è vero che questa causa concerne una proprietà di casa di festa, mentre la causa decise i più primi contratti d'affitto oggi riguardati per fini di casa permanenti. Su dei punti, i Contratto d'affitto Atti Basi del passato hanno fatto distinzioni fra questi fini. La sezione 32 corrente non distingue fra aree per case permanenti ed aree per case di festa. Si deve presumere di conseguenza che i legislatori proporsi che proroghe di contratti d'affitto dovrebbero essere trattate ugualmente, irrispettoso di che di questi fini le aree furono usate per. Questo deve portare peso considerevole nella nostra valutazione qui. Riferimento è reso ai commenti del primo giudice di votazione [la sentenza principale sopra] sul pesare delle considerazioni politiche con Parlamento. Io aggiungerei ciononostante che, benché probabilmente sia la causa che le considerazioni sociali sarebbero della particolare importanza a case permanenti, mentre avendo anche una casa di festa ha benefici considerevoli in termini di benessere e welfare. È illustrativo della valutazione su questo problema che consiglia nella causa non ha allegato peso notevole a distinzioni riguardo a fine.”
2. Il secondo richiedente
19. Il secondo richiedente, il Sig. Heian possiede proprietà agricola della quale i campi esterni sono stati parcelled fuori come aree. Un'area fu affittata fuori per fini di alloggio per novanta-nove anni, dal 1909 a 14 aprile 2008 di 14 aprile. 15 marzo 2007 l'affitto base ed annuale corrispose a NOK 589 (verso EUR 75). Il contratto non previde per un diritto per chiedere una proroga del contratto d'affitto ed era silenzioso sulla questione di rettifiche future dell'affitto di contratto d'affitto base. L'area affittata è localizzata in un'area che contiene molte proprietà di alloggio e è approssimativamente 2.3 dekar in taglia. L'area ha una costa che confina col Fiordo di Oslo. Sembra che l'affittuario risiede fuori Norvegia ed usi la proprietà come una casa di festa. Originalmente lei disse il diritto per riscattare l'area con effetto dalla scadenza del termine convenuto di contratto d'affitto. Per il fine di determinare l'importo pagabile in rimborso, le parti concordarono, che loro se ognuno dovesse nominare un funzionario del fisco. Basato sui valori determinati con questi funzionari del fisco, l'importo pagabile in rimborso sarebbe fissato a quaranta per cento del valore di area non sviluppato, come previsto per in sezione 37 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base.
20. Ognuno delle parti sistemate di conseguenza per l'area per essere valutato. 6 giugno 2007 il funzionario del fisco nominato col locatore valutò il valore di mercato dell'area non sviluppata per essere NOK 3,750,000 (verso EUR 468,750), mentre il funzionario del fisco nominò con l'affittuario 20 settembre 2007 valutò il valore di mercato dell'area non sviluppata per essere NOK 3,400,000 (verso EUR 425,000).
21. Susseguente alla Corte Suprema sentenze passeggere nella causa principale e la causa che comporta il primo richiedente 21 settembre 2007, l'affittuario informato consiglia per il secondo richiedente che lei non era più in favore di rimborso a quaranta per cento del valore di mercato dell'area non sviluppata. Invece, rimborso fu offerto in un importo uguale al valore capitalizzato dell'affitto base basato un cinque per tasso degli interessi di cento su capitalisation, nell'altro risarcimento di parole per rimborso uguale a venti volte l'affitto base, rotondo via ad un totale di NOK 14,000 (verso EUR 1,750). 23 ottobre 2007 l'affittuario diede avviso che chiede come prima una proroga del contratto d'affitto sulle stesse condizioni, facendo seguito a sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base. In una lettera di 22 novembre 2007, il secondo richiedente contestò la rivendicazione, mentre riferendosi alle sue intenzioni di portare la causa di fronte alla Corte.
3. I terzo e quarto richiedenti
22. I terzo e quarto richiedenti, OMISSIS, possieda una proprietà agricola con le poche risorse agricole. La proprietà non ha nessuno campi e le aree esterne costituire un totale di 145 dekar del quale la maggior parte consiste di foresta con piccolo o nessuna produttività. 26 novembre 1956, i consorti di richiedente conclusero un contratto di contratto d'affitto base per cinquanta anni in riguardo di un'area di terra che consiste di 990 sq. metro che aveva la sua propria costa. Non contenne nessuna clausola che regola la rettifica futura dell'affitto di contratto d'affitto base. L'affittuario costruì una casa di festa sull'area. Quando il contratto scadde 26 novembre 2006, l'affitto base ed annuale corrispose a NOK 500 (verso EUR 60).
23. Sembra che l'affitto era la fonte di reddito regolare e principale sulla proprietà. Il terzo richiedente riceve una pensione di invalidità.
24. Il contratto contenne nessuno diritto a proroga del contratto d'affitto, ma riferendosi alla sezione 33 corretta del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base, l'affittuario chiese una proroga del contratto d'affitto su condizioni immutate. Poiché i richiedenti obiettarono, l'affittuario portò procedimenti civili contro loro di fronte a Larvik Città Corte 23 novembre 2006 che 29 gennaio 2007 sospese i procedimenti durante la conseguenza della causa principale di fronte alla Corte Suprema.
25. Con una sentenza di 3 aprile 2008, la Corte Urbana sostenne la rivendicazione dell'affittuario che lei è stata concessa per prolungare come prima il contratto di contratto d'affitto base sugli stessi termini. Osservò inter l'alia:
“La questione se si deve considerare che sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base conduca a risultati che violano Articolo 1 di Protocollo, N.ro 1 fu deciso con la Corte Suprema in Rt. 2007/284. La Corte Suprema sostenne che sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base non viola la Convenzione con riguardo ad a case permanenti. Inoltre, la Corte Suprema in Rt. 2007/1306 stabilito che gli stessi fecero domanda riguardo a case di festa.
Corti subordinate devono appellarsi sulle interpretazioni rese con la Corte Suprema e la Corte Urbana non può sostenere perciò il [terzo e quarto richiedenti '] l'osservazione.”
26. 11 agosto 2008 l'Agder Corte Alta (il lagmannsrett) lo trovò chiaro che i terzo e quarto richiedenti che ' piace non sarebbero successi e che non dovrebbe essere ammesso perciò per esame (sezione 29-13 (2) del Codice di Procedura Civile (il tvisteloven).
27. 11 febbraio 2008 i consorti di richiedente avevano sistemato nel frattempo, per una valutazione dell'area non sviluppata che fu trovata avere un valore di stima di NOK 2,500,000 (verso EUR 312,500).
4. Il quinto richiedente
28. Il quinto richiedente, il Sig.ra Brandt-Kjelsen è il possidente e locatore di ventun aree per alloggio permanente che fu affittato fuori con effetto da 31 dicembre 1947. Le aree sono localizzate in una delle aree più costose in Oslo. Con modo di illustrazione, lei affermò, che a gennaio 2007 una casa permanente ed il contratto d'affitto una delle aree di terra erano stati venduti per NOK 10,250,000 (verso EUR 1,281,250). Il termine convenuto di contratto d'affitto è sessanta anni con un diritto per gli affittuari chiedere una proroga per trenta anni su condizioni nuove. Facendo seguito alla sezione 33 corretta del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base, comunque tutti gli affittuari hanno chiesto proroghe dei loro contratti d'affitto su condizioni immutate ed illimitato in tempo.
29. 31 ottobre 2007 il quinto richiedente iniziò un'azione di reclamo di conciliazione di fronte all'Oslo Conciliazione Consiglio, mentre chiedendo che gli affittuari in oggetto non abbia diritto a prima godere delle stesse condizioni come dopo proroga dei loro contratti d'affitto. Lei presentò valutazioni del valore non sviluppato del vario affittarono aree rese 4 dicembre 2007, una veduta d'insieme di affitti basi al tempo di proroga così come dettagli di taglie di area, valutazione corrisponde ed affitti basi come una percentuale del valore delle aree individuali. I valori delle varie aree non sviluppate variarono da NOK 1,900,000 (verso EUR 237,500) per il più basso a NOK 6,000,000 (verso EUR 750,000) per il più alto. La serie di affitti base da NOK 1,376 (verso EUR 170) per anno a NOK 7,116 (verso EUR 900) per anno.
30. 14 febbraio 2008 l'Oslo Conciliazione Consiglio decise che la controversia dovrebbe essere riferitasi all'Oslo Corte Urbana.
31. Con una sentenza di 29 aprile 2009 la Corte Urbana trovata in favore degli affittuari e contro il quinto richiedente e, 27 agosto 2009, il Borgarting che Corte Alta ha rifiutato di ammettere il suo ricorso per esame per ragioni simili alla Larvik Città Corte e l'Agder Corte Alta nella loro rispettiva sentenza e decisione menzionò sopra di (vedere divide in paragrafi 25 e 26 sopra)
5. Il sesto richiedente
32. Il sesto richiedente, il Sig. Henriksen possiede proprietà agricola della quale i campi esterni sono stati parcelled in aree per molte case permanenti e case di festa. Loro sono situati vicini a Fiordo di Oslo sul quale loro hanno una prospettiva.
33. Gli affittuari di tre aree per case di festa e sette aree per case permanenti, con contratti entrati in nei tardi 1950s che quale stava quasi per scadere procedimenti iniziati contro il richiedente di fronte alla Tønsberg Città Corte che prima chiede proroga del contratto d'affitto sulle stesse condizioni come e senza limitazione in tempo, facendo seguito a sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base. Tutti i contratti di contratto d'affitto basi in oggetto era stato entrato in nel 1950 per un termine di 50 anni. Uno dei contratti contenne una disposizione per regolamentazione schedata dell'affitto di contratto d'affitto base.
34. I valori delle aree non sviluppate variarono da NOK 1,200,000 (verso EUR 150,500) a NOK 1,750,000, (verso EUR 218,750). Gli affitti basi variarono da NOK 1,900 (verso EUR 240) per anno a NOK 3,205 (verso EUR 400) per anno.
35. Il richiedente sostenne che il vero valore di mercato delle dieci aree di terra era NOK 13,900,000 (verso EUR 1,737,500) e che come una conseguenza di sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base, il valore economico e totale della sua posizione legale riferito alle dieci aree in oggetto sarebbe NOK 526,760 (verso EUR 65,850) che è il valore attuale capitalizzato della base totale ed immutata affitti di NOK 26,338 (verso EUR 3,300).
36. Contro questo sfondo, il richiedente contestò gli affittuari ' chiede e presentò che sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base contravvenne ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
37. Con una sentenza di 14 ottobre 2009 la Corte Urbana trovata in favore dell'affittuario e contro il sesto richiedente e, 18 gennaio 2010, il Borgarting che Corte Alta ha rifiutato di ammettere il suo ricorso per esame per ragioni simili alla Larvik Città Corte e l'Agder Corte Alta nella loro rispettiva sentenza e decisioni menzionarono sopra di (vedere divide in paragrafi 25 e 26 sopra)
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base
38. La conclusione di contratto d'affitto base contrae ed il vincolo contrattuale fra il proprietario/che affitta e l'affittuario fu regolato in un statuto da 1975 che entrarono in vigore 1 gennaio 1976 per la prima volta.
39. Un Contratto d'affitto Atto Base e nuovo fu decretato nel 1996 ed entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2002. La sua sezione 15 articoli contenuti sulla regolamentazione di affitto per contratto d'affitto di base che fu basato principalmente su cambi nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo ma accolse aumenti basato su altri parametri in delle situazioni (vedere paragrafo 43 sotto). Il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base e nuovo contenne anche disposizioni che accordano l'affittuario il diritto per chiedere una proroga quando il termine convenuto del contratto d'affitto scadde (sezione 32 precedente per affittuari di aree usati per case permanenti e sezione 33 precedente per affittuari di aree usati per case di festa), ed il locatore il diritto per introdurre le condizioni nuove nel contratto steso di contratto d'affitto.
1. Le disposizioni dell'Atto riveduto del 1996 a cui si fa riferimento nella causa presente
40. Nella sua versione corretta come applicabile al tempo di materiale, l'Atto del Contratto d'affitto della Base del 1996 lesse finora in come attinente:
Sezione 11
“Un affitto base che è irragionevolmente alto in relazione a ciò che è pagato consuetamente nella località su contratti d'affitto nuovi su aree simili su termini contrattuali e simili non può essere concordato o può essere richiesto.”
Sezione 15
“In un accordo di contratto d'affitto base riguardo ad una residenza principale o una casa di festa ogni parte può richiedere che l'affitto sia aggiustato in conformità con cambi nel livello di prezzo generale [il pengeverdien] fin dalla conclusione dell'accordo. Se l'affitto è stato aggiustato, è l'affitto che è stato accusato legalmente fin dalla scorsa rettifica che può essere aggiustata in conformità coi cambi in prezzi che sono accaduti da allora quel il tempo. Se le parti concordassero inequivocabilmente che l'affitto dovrebbe rimanere immutato, o convenuto ad una rettifica più bassa che quel suggerì con cambi nel livello di prezzo generale, questo accordo farà domanda invece.
Se un contratto di contratto d'affitto base riguardo ad un'area di terra per essere usato per una casa di residenza principale o una casa di festa fu conclusa prima 1 gennaio 2002, le disposizioni seguenti fanno domanda per la prima rettifica dopo 1 gennaio 2002:
1. Se la rettifica sarà resa in conformità con cambi nel livello di prezzo generale, il locatore può richiedere che sia reso in conformità con cambi che sono accaduti poiché il contratto di contratto d'affitto base fu concluso, anche se l'affitto è stato aggiustato prima.
2. Il locatore può richiedere che l'affitto sia aggiustato in conformità con che su che è stato concordato inequivocabilmente. Nondimeno, se il contratto di contratto d'affitto fosse concluso su o prima 26 maggio 1983, il locatore non può richiedere che l'affitto annuale sia aggiustato oltre un importo di massimo per dekar di base verso l'alto o ad un importo che corrisponde all'inflazione. L'importo di massimo secondo la seconda frase è NOK 9,000, aggiustò ogni svolta dell'anno dopo 1 gennaio 2002 in conformità con inflazione. Questo massimo fa domanda anche se la taglia dell'area è più piccola di un dekar.
...”
Sezione 16, sottosezione 1, prima la frase
“L'affittuario ha lo stesso godimento fisico dell'area affittata come un proprietario per uso all'interno dei fini del contratto d'affitto nella causa di contratti d'affitto su aree per case permanenti e case di festa, a meno che altrimenti convenne in che che è stato concordato fra le parti. ...”
Sezione 17, sottosezione 1
“L'affittuario ha diritto a trasferire il diritto per affittare l'area ad una terza parte a meno che altrimenti convenne nell'accordo o il fine del contratto d'affitto.”
Sezione 18, sottosezione 1
“L'affittuario ha diritto ad ipotecare il contratto d'affitto e gli edifici che ora esistono o nel futuro sull'area, a meno che altrimenti convenne con statuto o sotto un accordo che limita il diritto per trasferire. L'ipoteca deve fare domanda sia al diritto per affittare l'area e presentare ed edifici futuri.”
Sezione 19, sottosezione 1
“L'affittuario può stabilire qualsiasi gli specifici diritti di disposizione dell'area per terze parti che con riguardo a dattilografare di uso, sfera e limitazioni in bugia di tempo all'interno del proprio diritto dell'affittuario di disposizione, salvi altrimenti come concordò.”
Sezione 32
“L'affittuario può chiedere rimborso di un'area per una casa permanente o per una casa di festa quando trenta anni di contratto d'affitto sono passati, a meno che un tempo più breve è stato concordato su, o quando il termine del contratto d'affitto scade. Dopo che trenta anni di contratto d'affitto sono passati, l'affittuario può chiedere poi rimborso di un'area per una casa permanente ad intervalli di due-anno, e rimborso di un'area per una casa di festa ad intervalli di dieci-anno.
Su scadenza del contratto d'affitto per tale area che è stata affittata per la vita dell'affittuario, il seguente può chiedere rimborso:
un) il consorte dell'affittuario, b) eredi all'affittuario, c) un figlio adottivo che ha la stessa posizione come un erede, d) qualcuno che per i due anni precedenti ha diviso la stessa casa come l'affittuario. ...”
Sezione 33
“Invece di chiedere rimborso di un'area per una casa permanente o una casa di festa facendo seguito a sezione 32 quando il termine del contratto d'affitto scade, l'affittuario, o quegli inclusero con sezione 32 secondo paragrafo, può chiedere come prima una proroga del contratto d'affitto sulle stesse condizioni. Nella causa di contratti d'affitto così steso, sezione 7, prima divida in paragrafi, riguardo al termine del contratto d'affitto, farà domanda.”
[Il riferimento a sezione 7, prima divida in paragrafi, sul termine del contratto d'affitto, comporta che una proroga del contratto d'affitto sulle stesse condizioni come prima sarà senza restrizioni in termini di tempo.]
Sezione 37
“Su rimborso di un'area per una casa permanente o una casa di festa, il pagamento dovrebbe essere esposto a trenta volte l'affitto base ed annuale al tempo di rimborso, a meno che un minore importo è stato concordato su. Se nulla altro è stato concordato su, le parti possono affermare ciononostante che la somma di rimborso dovrebbe corrispondere a quaranta per cento del valore di vendite dell'area non sviluppata al tempo di rimborso, dopo deduzione di qualsiasi aumento nel valore provocò con l'affittuario o altri. Il valore dell'area non deve essere esposto più alto del prezzo per che sarebbe potuta essere venduta la terra, l'aveva stato permesso esclusivamente di erigere l'alloggio o alloggi già eressero su sé.... “
2. Il lavoro preparatorio relativo a sezione 15
41. Alla richiesta di Parlamento al Governo, una valutazione del Contratto d'affitto Base fuori la quale Atto 1996 è stato portato, notevolmente la sua sezione 15 due anni dopo la sua entrata in vigore 1 gennaio 2002. Il Ministero della Giustizia ricevette le varie osservazioni da individui privati che avevano esperimentato, o era stato notificato di, aumenti considerevoli nell'annuale affittò pagabile. C'era stata anche copertura di media di aumenti di affitto seguente l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto. Nella revisione pubblica tratta le varie organizzazioni aveva aguzzato al fatto che un gran numero di aree furono affittate per un affitto molto basso. Un numero di organizzazioni aveva notato che l'Atto era difficile capire e generò un livello alto di conflitto. Il bisogno per un regime legale e più semplice fu accentuato.
42. Nel 2002 il Ministero della Giustizia raccolse materiale statistico, le sentenze di che fu riassunto nel Bill (Ot.prp. nr. 41 (2003-2004) p.11), ed eseguì un esame mirato ad affittuari e locatori a stabilire fatti sufficienti per l'emendamento legale e proposto (a sezione 15). Le sentenze seguenti furono accentuate come essendo alcuno del più importante:
“L'affitto di contratto d'affitto base è aggiustato secondo cambi nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo nella maggioranza di contratti di contratto d'affitto basi.
Piuttosto meno che 30 per cento dei contratti d'affitto basi per case permanenti e fra 10 e 20 per cento della casa di festa contratti d'affitto basi contengono clausole che prevedono per altro vuole dire di rettifica di affitto. In più cause questo comporta rettifica secondo cambi nel valore di terra. Le cifre previste con l'Associazione norvegese di show di Terreni di proprietà comune che 20 per cento di casa permanente affittano e più di 40 per cento di contratti d'affitto di casa di festa sono soggetto a rettifica negli altri modi che con collegamento a cambi nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo.
Sezione 15 ha dato luogo ad un aumento drammatico in affitto in contratti con clausole di valore di base. Il livello annuale e medio di affitto in contratti di contratto d'affitto di casa permanenti che contengono simile clausole, riveduto dopo che l'Atto entrò in vigore, ha aumentato da NOK 2,500 a circa NOK 8,000-10,500 per contratto di contratto d'affitto di base. Per casa di festa contratti d'affitto basi l'aumento medio è in qualche luogo fra NOK 5,000 e NOK 10,000 per contratto (le cifre previste con locatori ed affittuari sono incoerenti). Le cifre previste con l'Associazione norvegese di show di Terreni di proprietà comune un aumento da verso NOK 900 a NOK 3,800 per area affittata per fini di casa di festa.
Piuttosto più di 40 per cento di contratti d'affitto di casa permanenti sono soggetto ad un affitto annuale sotto NOK 1,000, mentre 30 a 40 per cento sono circa NOK 1,000-3,000, e dei 6 a 7 per cento sono fra NOK 3,000 e NOK 6,000. Fra uno ed undici per cento paghi affitto annuale in eccesso di NOK 9,000 per dekar [1000 m²]. Le cifre dall'Associazione norvegese di Terreni di proprietà comune sono incomplete in questo riguardo a, ancora loro suggeriscono che approssimativamente 70 per cento di contratti d'affitto basi sono soggetto ad affitto annuale di meno che NOK 1,000. Il livello medio di affitto deve, comunque, sia visto nella luce del fatto che un gran numero di contratti con clausole di valore di base sono dovuti per essere aggiustato nell'arrivo 8 anni (rettifica, come un articolo che accade ogni decimo anno).
25 a 30 per cento di casa di festa contratti d'affitto basi sono soggetto ad affitto annuale di meno che NOK 1,000, mentre approssimativamente 50 per cento sono fra NOK 1,000 e NOK 3,000. Piuttosto meno che dieci per cento sono fra NOK 3,000 e NOK 6,000, e meno che cinque per cento fra NOK 6,000 e NOK 9,000. Approssimativamente 0.5 per cento di affittuari pagano più di NOK 9,000 per dekar. Nella massa principale di contratti riportata all'Associazione norvegese di Terreni di proprietà comune che l'affitto giace fra NOK 1,000 e NOK 6,000. Le cifre devono essere lette qui anche, in luce del fatto che un grande numero di contratti con clausole di valore di base è dovuto per essere aggiustato nell'arrivo 8 anni.
Approssimativamente 80 per cento di casa permanente affittano e più di 50 per cento di festa contratti d'affitto basi furono entrati in prima di 1976. Questo ha il particolare impatto sugli articoli di rimborso, come le condizioni per rimborso è collegato al tempo quando il contratto fu entrato in.
3.5 impressioni principali dalla valutazione
Approssimativamente 300,000 famiglie in base di contratto d'affitto di Norvegia per permanente o fini di casa di festa. Approssimativamente 75 per cento di contratti d'affitto di casa permanenti sono trovati in città o le altre aree densamente popolate. Questi contratti d'affitto, ed i contratti d'affitto di casa di festa in aree litoranee e popolari, in modo crescente è danneggiato con conflitti fra affittuari e possidenti. Molto i contratti sono vecchi e furono entrati in ad un tempo quando contratto d'affitto base era un'alternativa vitale per quegli individui che non erano capaci di finanziare l'acquisto di proprietà, e prima di sviluppo sociale che ha costretto prezzi di vero-appezzamento di terreno in aree densamente popolate a livelli imprevisti. Aree oggi affittate devono essere considerate come quota permanentemente ristrutturata agli affittuari che ' lavora sulla terra ed il loro investimento considerevole in alloggio sull'area. Locatori comprendono locatori tradizionali, per istanza in agricoltura ma base è affittata anche con investitori di vero-appezzamento di terreno professionali che possiedono un numero di aree affittate.
Il Ministero è dell'opinione che la valutazione ha mostrato, importantemente un bisogno chiaro per fare gli articoli di rimborso più semplice. ...”
43. Sezione 15 precedente che entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2002 contenne un articolo principale che abilita rettifica di affitto diretta verso l'alto in conformità con cambi nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo ed un'eccezione dove era stato concordato inequivocabilmente che non ci dovrebbe essere nessuna rettifica dell'affitto, o dove affitto sarebbe aggiustato con altro vuole dire che con riferimento all'indice dei prezzi al consumo. In simile rettifica di cause sarebbe fatto sulla base dei termini dell'accordo in oggetto. Questo fece domanda in pieno per contratti entrati in dopo 26 maggio 1983. Per contratti entrati in prima di 26 maggio 1983 l'articolo nuovo era soggetto alla modifica che un affitto “il soffitto” di NOK 9,000 per dekar fu introdotto per rettifica diretta verso l'alto basata su altri parametri che corrispondenza con l'indice dei prezzi al consumo.
44. Nel contesto della revisione di sezione 15, il Ministero della Giustizia considerò otto scelte alternative, incluso se re-introdurre un sistema di rettifica consumatore-prezzo-indice-regolato ed obbligatorio per contratti di contratto d'affitto di base per permanente e fini di casa di festa. C'erano molti argomenti in favore di questo. Dopo che il sistema di controllo di affitto precedente fu abrogato 1 gennaio 2002, molti affittuari erano stati affrontati con aumenti di affitto inaspettati e drammatici. Benché i contratti fossero stati entrati inizialmente in sulla base di possibile rettifica diretta verso l'alto del contratto d'affitto base affitti riflettere aumenti nel valore della proprietà, il periodo lungo con un sistema per controllo di affitto pubblico in vigore aveva condotto ad una situazione dove affittuari furono usati ad un aumento graduale in affitto in conformità con l'indice dei prezzi al consumo. La discrepanza in aumento fra affitti di contratto d'affitto di base soggetto a controllo di affitto e quelli schedarono all'aumento in prezzi di proprietà fece incursioni drammatiche nei bilanci familiari di famiglie numerose e le sole persone, soggetto al regime introdotto 1 gennaio 2002. Questo trend di prezzo fu visto anche nel mercato di noleggio, ma nel mercato di noleggio l'aumento era più graduale, e c'era in ogni caso una differenza fra il mercato di noleggio ordinario ed il mercato di contratto d'affitto base in che l'affittuario aveva costruito suo o il suo proprio alloggio sulla base in oggetto per suo o il suo proprio uso.
45. Si osservò inoltre che una minoranza dei contratti previde per rettifica con riferimento a fattori altro che l'indice dei prezzi al consumo e riguardò con questo problema. Per la maggior parte dei contratti coperti con l'esame che si potrebbe dire che il livello di affitto sia alto. Poi il rapporto seguì a considerare gli argomenti per e contro introducendo controllo di affitto tutto-rotondo ed obbligatorio basato sull'indice dei prezzi al consumo (Ot.prp. nr. 41 (2003-2004) il pp. 21-22):
“Che che prima e primo milita contro un schema obbligatorio per rettifica di affitto in corrispondenza con l'indice dei prezzi al consumo è il principio della libertà di contratto. Limitazioni alla libertà di principio contraente saranno più ben visibile in quelli più vecchi contratti che contengono clausole di valore basi. Nella maggior parte simile contratti che sono stati la materia di regolamentazione pubblica fin dall'entrata in vigore del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base e nuovo 1 gennaio 2002 che i summenzionati hanno proposto emendamento all'atto comporteranno rettifica discendente di affitto di base pagabile, mentre ritornando l'affitto al suo livello al tempo dello schema di controllo di affitto prima di 1 gennaio 2002. Una rettifica discendente sarebbe indubbiamente ben visibile per locatori che già hanno aggiustato verso l'alto l'affitto per riflettere l'aumento in proprietà fissa il prezzo di ed anche fece di conseguenza disposizioni. Dovrebbe essere anche parte della considerazione complessiva che sezione 15 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base ha abilitato più locatori per fare profitto su proprietà che per anni ha accumulato il molto reddito basso in termini di contratto d'affitto base affitti a causa dello schema di controllo di affitto precedente. Al Ministero piacerebbe aggiungere anche che l'esame si impegnato in 2003 show che il livello medio di affitto ha accusato, incluso affitto soggetto a rettifica dopo 1 gennaio 2002, corrisponde a che che fu previsto quando sezione 15 fu corretta nel 2000. Il Ministero non sosterrà perciò l'introduzione di un schema di rettifica obbligatorio collegata all'indice dei prezzi al consumo per più vecchi contratti sulla base dell'affitto aggredita il tempo nel quale il contratto è stato entrato.
Allo stesso tempo la valutazione di sezione 15 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base dimostra che clausole che collegano rettifica di affitto all'aumento in prezzi di proprietà sono spesso contribuente a controversie, e loro possono avere ramificazioni imprevisto con le parti quando il contratto fu entrato in. Poiché il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base entrò in vigore un numero di controversie è sorto riguardo all'interpretazione di disposizioni di rettifica in contratti di contratto d'affitto di base. Parte del problema sembra essere che molti contratti furono entrati in senza qualsiasi parte che ha previsto la possibilità dell'aumento drammatico in prezzi di proprietà che sono stati visti nelle recenti decadi, e le sue conseguenze per livelli di affitto. Nei più vecchi contratti entrati in con parti non-professionali in particolare, l'enunciazione dei contratti spesso sembra essere accidente ed impreciso e così di piccolo uso nel determinare questioni che non sono state anticipate al tempo. Simile cause possono essere lasciate naturalmente alla decisione dell'ordinamento giudiziario, ma dalla prospettiva di economie sociali sembra sfortunato assegnare risorse così sostanziali all'accordo di simile controversie, in termini di patrocinio gratuito gratis ed il carico di lavoro sulle corti. Siccome le cause concernono un bene sociale e significativo, vale a dire i permanenti o case di festa degli affittuari l'incertezza considerevole può essere anche una fonte di sforzo personale e non necessario.
Nell'opinione del Ministero, la terza scelta menzionò nella lettera che porta la proposta presentata per revisione pubblica (regolamentazione di indice dei prezzi al consumo solamente in cause dopo che la scorsa rettifica è stata resa) copre aspetti riferiti a prevedibilità e l'evitare di liti giudiziarie. [...] Effetti così casuali possono essere evitati con introdurre una disposizione che dà un titolo al locatore per aggiustare verso l'alto una volta l'affitto in conformità col contratto originale e soggetto a limitazioni già in vigore sotto sezione 15, di fronte allo schema di rettifica di indice dei prezzi al consumo entra in vigore. In così l'affitto accusato di periodo di transizione è portato, con modo di un uno-via operazione, ad un livello più alto che che stabilì sotto lo schema di controllo di affitto precedente abrogato quando il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2002. Per contratti di contratto d'affitto basi e recentemente concordati ancora sarà possibile concordare su un affitto che riflette il valore e la valutazione della terra, ma rettifica di affitto sarà collegata successivamente a cambi nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo. Tale disposizione per più vecchi contratti rispetterà che su che è stato concordato, mentre allo stesso tempo che aiuta a realizzare un sistema di uniforme di rettifica di affitto basato col tempo sull'indice dei prezzi al consumo. Questo, deve essere presunto, darà luogo a meno liti giudiziarie ed aumento non determinato a rettifiche dirette verso l'alto integrali ed impreviste di affitto base.
Il Ministero propone, poi, questa soluzione per contratti di contratto d'affitto di base per permanente e fini di casa di festa. L'articolo principale della proposta è un sistema di controllo di affitto collegato a cambi in prezzi. Per i più vecchi contratti menzionati sopra di, comunque il Ministero propone introdurre un uno-via operazione in che che che è stato concordato su fra le parti rappresenterà un fattore. Qualsiasi rettifica susseguente dopo questo uno-via operazione dovrebbe riflettere trend di prezzo.
Comunque, questa soluzione non rivolge il fatto che affitto di contratto d'affitto base è sorto e continuerà a sorgere in dei contratti di contratto d'affitto di base che contengono clausole di valore basi. Questo deve essere visto in contesto. Il Ministero propone l'espansione e la semplificazione degli articoli di rimborso. Si suggerisce che il prezzo per essere pagato per rimborso che ha dovrebbe essere calcolato riguardo ad all'affitto di contratto d'affitto base. Un bilanciamento degli interessi dei locatori e gli affittuari suggerisce nell'opinione del Ministero che non ci dovrebbe essere intervento in clausole di rettifica di affitto in esistente contrae più che che che seguirà da questa proposta.” [Enfasi aggiunse.]
46. Capitolo 6, sul “il Calcolo del risarcimento per rimborso”, incluso le osservazioni seguenti (Ot.prp. nr. 41 (2003-2004) p. 46):
“Il Ministero della Giustizia considera che la disposizione sul risarcimento calcolatore su rimborso deve essere vista nella luce delle disposizioni su rettifica di affitto, le condizioni generali per rimborso ed il diritto per prolungare il contratto d'affitto. Il Ministero presume all'inizio che queste disposizioni, viste nell'insieme non devono alterare sostanzialmente l'equilibrio presente di interessi in contratti di contratto d'affitto di base. Molte istanze che hanno preso parte nell'elaborazione di revisione pubblica hanno sottolineato anche questo. In sezione 5.4 il Ministero propone una semplificazione considerevole delle condizioni per rimborso. Allo stesso tempo, il Ministero favorisce l'introduzione di un uno-via operazione di rettifica diretta verso l'alto per contratti con clausole di valore di base, seguì con l'introduzione di un schema di rettifica collegò l'indice dei prezzi al consumo (vedere sezione 4.4). Questo dà dovuto riguardo ad a che che è stato concordato fra le parti. Con questo punto di partenza in mente, il Ministero considera, che è possibile introdurre una disposizione equilibrata per il calcolo del risarcimento per rimborso.” [Enfasi aggiunse.]
3. Il lavoro preparatorio relativo a sezione 33
47. La proposta per la sezione 33 esistente riguardo al diritto per l'affittuario per prima chiedere una proroga sulle stesse condizioni come senza limitazioni in tempo fu presentata col Ministero della Giustizia e Polizia Affari (Det Kongelige Justis - l'og Politidepartement-in seguito assegnò a come il Ministero della Giustizia) nella primavera di 2004 (Ot.prpr. nr. 41 (2003-2004) - la proposta n. 41 all'Odelsting che è la più grande divisione di Parlamento), affermando inter l'alia (a p. 54):
“Il Ministero attrae attenzione al fatto che lo scopo principale della proposta è costituirlo più facile più persone acquisire proprietà delle aree affittate. Nel certo rimborso di cause sarebbe tale carico finanziario e pesante che l'affittuario dovrebbe avere le altre alternative che terminando l'accordo di contratto d'affitto. Affittuari che non sono in grado riscattare l'area devono, nella prospettiva del Ministero, sia garantito un diritto durevole per sbarazzarsi dell'area. Questo problema ora non è stato di grande interesse sino a, ma questo può essere aspettatosi di cambiare di anni venire come più contratti di contratto d'affitto scada. Nell'assenza di articoli assoluti, i locatori saranno affrontati con la scelta fra rimborso, conclusione o la continuazione [del contratto di contratto d'affitto base]. Siccome il Ministero lo vede, questa è una situazione legale ed indifendibile e si propone perciò che l'affittuario dovrebbe avere diritto a prolungare l'accordo di contratto d'affitto base. Il Ministero ha considerato se il possidente dovrebbe avere diritto ad esporre le condizioni nuove nell'accordo, ma ha trovato che l'affittuario dovrebbe essere in grado continuare l'accordo di contratto d'affitto sugli stessi termini. Secondo la valutazione del Ministero, le considerazioni di politica sociali sul lato dell'affittuario dovrebbero essere decisive. Se il locatore fosse avere la possibilità di aggiustare il contratto d'affitto base lacerato su al livello di mercato, gli affittuari possono in costatazione di principio loro nelle stesse ristrettezze finanziarie come nell'evento di rimborso dove i costi di un prestito eccedono il contratto d'affitto base ed annuale affittato.”
48. Come riguardi il problema della costituzionalità della disposizione in sezione 33, il Bill a Parlamento affermato (p. 55):
“Il Bill comporta particolarmente dell'effetto retroattivo per possidenti che conclusero prima contratti d'affitto basi 1976, quando nessuno così diritto a proroga esistita. Il Ministero ha ragionato che le considerazioni sociali sul peso di lato dell'affittuario più pesante di quelli sul lato del possidente, e conclude che la proposta è coerente con Articolo 97 della Costituzione. Non si considera che la proposta sia più intrusiva degli articoli proposti su rimborso, e su questo riferimento di punto è reso a Rt.1990-284 e la discussione della relazione alla Costituzione in parà. 6.5. Il Ministero sottolinea anche, inter alia, le considerazioni sociali che faranno domanda e che questi sono articoli che riferiscono ad un vincolo contrattuale a lungo termine fra le parti.”
49. Il Bill propose che pagamento su rimborso dovrebbe essere esposto a trenta volte l'affitto base al tempo di rimborso, benché il locatore dovesse essere in grado chiedere un minimo di NOK 50,000, uguagli ad EUR 6,250, per l'area (sezione 37) che era fare domanda a tutti i contratti di contratto d'affitto di base irrispettoso del valore dell'area di quando il contratto era stato concluso, e di se il contratto fu limitato o illimitato in tempo. In questo collegamento il Ministero della Giustizia affermò (p. 50):
“Come notato sopra, il fine fondamentale degli articoli su rimborso già deve assicurare che affittuari di aree per case permanenti e case di festa sono garantiti un diritto durevole per usare l'area. Probabilmente è la causa che molti affittuari non saranno in una posizione per riscattare l'area se i costi di prendere in prestito sono significativamente più alti dell'affitto base ed annuale. Come notato sopra, il Bill comporterà dell'aumento nelle spese dell'affittuario, mentre dipendendo dal livello prevalente di tassi di interesse, ma è valutato che giace ciononostante all'interno di che più affittuari con limitato economico vuole dire dovrebbe essere in grado riconoscere.”
50. La proposta riguardo al minimo risarcimento di NOK 50,000 fu corretta più tardi con Parlamento a quaranta per cento del valore di vendite dell'area non sviluppata al tempo di rimborso.
51. Come riguardi i motivi dati con Parlamento nel 2004 per sostenere la sezione 33 proposta nel Bill che accorda il diritto per affittuari per chiedere una proroga su condizioni immutate invece di rimborso, la raccomandazione presentò a Parlamento col Comitato Eretto su Giustizia (la Raccomandazione n. 105 all'Odelsting (2003-2004) p. 18) contenne il seguente:
“La maggioranza di Comitato, tutti eccetto i membri da Il Progresso Festeggiano, conviene col Ministero che affittuari che sono incapaci per ragioni finanziarie di acquistare le loro aree sotto sezione 37 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base e nuovo dovrebbero essere garantiti un diritto durevole di disposizione dell'area. La prospettiva di maggioranza è che un diritto di proroga dovrebbe essere accordato sulle stesse condizioni siccome assegnato a nel contratto di contratto d'affitto. Nel valutare queste questioni, la maggioranza ha allegato peso considerevole alle considerazioni di politica sociale in alloggio [boligsosiale hensyn]. L'appoggio di maggioranza la valutazione del Ministero della situazione con riguardo ad alla Costituzione su questo punto come su altri punti, ed anche si riferisce ai commenti sopra sulla materia della relazione alla Costituzione.”
B. La Costituzione
52. La Costituzione norvegese lesse siccome segue, in finora come attinente:
Articolo 97
“Nessuna legge deve essere data effetto retroattivo.”
Articolo 105
“Se il welfare dello Stato richiede che qualsiasi persona cederà alla sua proprietà mobile o immobile per uso pubblico, lui riceverà il pieno risarcimento dalla Tesoreria.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
53. I richiedenti si lamentarono che con la virtù degli emendamenti a sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Base Atto 1996 quel entrò in vigore 1 novembre 2004, quando il termine convenuto dei loro contratti d'affitto scadde, affittuari erano stati concessi per richiedere, ed aveva richiesto, una proroga dei loro contratti per un periodo indefinito sulle stesse condizioni siccome prima fatto domanda. Questo corrisposto ad un'interferenza ingiustificata coi richiedenti il diritto di ' di proprietà come protegguto con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che le letture:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste per con legge e coi principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggia il diritto di un Stato per eseguire simile leggi come sé ritiene necessario controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
54. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
55. Inizialmente il Governo accettò solamente che il primo richiedente, OMISSIS aveva esaurito via di ricorso nazionali, e sostenne che il secondo a quinto richiedenti non aveva fatto così poiché loro non erano riusciti ad intraprendere come lontano come la Corte Suprema la questione.
56. In replica, i terzo a quinto richiedenti si riferirono a corte di città e direttive di corte alte nelle loro cause che lo fanno chiaro che loro non avevano nessuno prospettive del successo, ed il secondo richiedente dibattè che un ricorso giudiziale sarebbe stato futile nella sua causa.
57. Ad un più tardi lo stadio, quando affrontò con la stessa linea di argomento dal sesto richiedente, il Governo affermò che loro non contestarono che lui aveva esaurito via di ricorso nazionali. All'udienza orale sostenuta 21 giugno 2011 il Governo non contestò l'ammissibilità delle richieste.
58. La Corte è soddisfatta in luce dei termini chiari di sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Base Atto 1996 e del nazionale corteggia le direttive di ' (vedere divide in paragrafi 18, 25 26, 31 37 e 40 sopra) che un ricorso giudiziale col secondo richiedente ed un ricorso coi terzo a sesto richiedenti alla Corte Suprema non avrebbe avuto nessuno prospettive del successo e che, di conseguenza, tutti i sei richiedenti hanno esaurito via di ricorso nazionali per i fini di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione. La Corte considera inoltre che i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione e che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Merit
59. Non si contestò che c'era stata un'interferenza coi richiedenti proprietà di ' che attirano la richiesta di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Né si contestò che l'interferenza era stata “legale” per i fini di questa disposizione. D'altra parte le parti erano in disaccordo come a che degli articoli incarnati nell'Articolo fatti domanda, se e la misura alla quale l'interferenza intraprese un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico o generale e se c'era una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra l'interferenza e qualsiasi simile scopo.
1. L'articolo applicabile
60. La Corte reitera che sotto la sua causa-legge, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che garantisce in sostanza il diritto di proprietà comprende tre articoli distinti (vedere, per istanza, James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, §§ 37-38 la Serie Un n. 98; Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 61-65 la Serie Un n. 52; Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 44-46 il 1999-V di ECHR; e Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, § 157 ECHR 2006-VIII). Il primo che è espresso nella prima frase del primo paragrafo e è di una natura generale, posa in giù il principio di godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Il secondo articolo, nella seconda frase dello stesso paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e lo fa soggetto alle certe condizioni. Il terzo, contenuto nel secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo e terzi articoli che concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà devono essere costruiti nella luce del principio generale posata in giù nel primo articolo (vedere Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 55 ECHR 1999-II).
(a) Le osservazioni dei richiedenti
61. I richiedenti dibatterono che la proroga obbligatoria dei contratti d'affitto attinenti, senza limitazione in tempo e sugli stessi termini come prima, costituì un'interferenza che corrisponde all'espropriazione o l'espropriazione de facto. Loro assegnarono dividere in paragrafi 89 della sentenza della Corte Suprema di 21 settembre 2007 nella causa principale e parallela (la Causa n. 2007/237 citarono a paragrafo 16 sopra) ed ad una dichiarazione del Ministero di Finanza di 15 agosto 2008.
62. La Corte prima aveva sostenuto che una restrizione sul diritto di un richiedente per terminare il contratto d'affitto di un inquilino costituito controllo, per istanza in Amato Gauci c. il Malta (n. 47045/06, § 52 15 settembre 2009), dove la forzata proroga di un contratto d'affitto era stata trovata costituire una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
63. I richiedenti contesero che c'era, comunque, l'una differenza significativa fra Amato Gauci e le cause presenti che dovrebbero avere un portante decisivo come riguardi l'articolo applicabile. Mentre in Amato Gauci era incertezza come a quando la forzata proroga del contratto d'affitto terminerebbe, al giorno d'oggi la causa c'era nessuno simile incertezza perché la proroga del contratto d'affitto non terminerebbe mai-il contratto d'affitto fu prolungato per sempre. Non era di conseguenza, in realtà una restrizione sui locatori i diritti di ' ma piuttosto una privazione di proprietà.
64. Inoltre, sezione 33 si riferì a sezione 7 dell'Atto secondo la quale la proroga costituì un contratto di contratto d'affitto nuovo per il quale mai rimase in vigore. Il fine fondamentale fu espresso nel lavoro preparatorio: “Il leasing di terra deve il più lontano possibile corrisponda alla vendita dell'area.”
65. La prospettiva che sezione che la 33 privazione de facto comportata è stata provata inoltre col seguente quattro argomenti.
66. In primo luogo, la Corte Suprema ed assoluta aveva concluso che “[diritto di t]he a proroga prevista per in sezione 33 chiaramente deve essere distinto da una regolamentazione della disposizione del proprietario della proprietà”, e che la disposizione “l'entail[ed] un trasferimento della disposizione del proprietario della proprietà” (vedere divide in paragrafi 89 e 90 della sentenza della Corte Suprema di 21 settembre 2007 nella causa principale e parallela (la Causa n. 2007/237) citò a paragrafo 16 sopra).
67. In secondo luogo, susseguente alle sentenze di Corte Supreme per avere la legislazione di tassa corrisponda con le realtà fondamentali, il Ministero di Finanza aveva costituito l'affittuario responsabile il pagamento di tassa di valore netta e tassa di vero-appezzamento di terreno sulle aree. Il comando politico al Ministero di Finanza aveva difeso questo cambio alla tassa decide con affermando semplicemente che la proprietà dell'affittuario della proprietà era così a lungo termine che era uguale a proprietà. Nelle loro osservazioni alla Corte, lo stesso Governo aveva dibattuto nondimeno, che l'articolo di privazione non fece domanda. Le considerazioni di consistenza suggerirono che l'articolo di privazione fece domanda.
68. In terzo luogo, nel 1996, quando il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base e nuovo era stato decretato, il Governo ed un Parlamento unanime avevano espresso esplicitamente la prospettiva che costrinse proroga costituì espropriazione che dovrebbe dare il locatore il diritto per costringere un contratto nuovo ad essere concluso le condizioni di mercato riflettenti. Questo era lo stato della legge dal 2002 onwards di 1 gennaio.
69. Fourthly, in somma il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base accordò l'affittuario tutti i diritti essenziali di un proprietario, incluso la stessa disposizione fisica dell'area ed il diritto per trasferire il contratto d'affitto a terze parti. I diritti di proprietà del possidente-il locatore-era infatti estinse con la virtù della proroga, i diritti soli che rimangono al locatore che è il titolo formale alla terra ed il diritto per ricevere l'affitto base. Un esame complessivo delle realtà dovrebbe condurre alla conclusione che era il secondo articolo-l'articolo di privazione-quel fece domanda, anche se il titolo non era stato trasferito formalmente all'affittuario. Come affermato inter alia in Sporrong e Lönnroth (citò sopra, § 63): “la Corte... debba guardare dietro alle comparizioni e debba investigare le realtà della situazione si lamentarono di.”
70. In qualsiasi l'evento, se la Corte non dovesse sostenere questo argomento, i richiedenti sostennero che c'era stata una violazione dell'articolo su controllo di uso o del principio di godimento tranquillo di proprietà.
(b) Le osservazioni del Governo
71. Nell'opinione del Governo, l'articolo su controllo di uso era applicabile alla causa presente. Mentre i richiedenti continuarono ad essere in grado vendere le aree di terra e ricevere reddito dalla terra, il trasferimento di alcuni diritti non comportò un trasferimento del diritto di proprietà come così. Non ogni uso significativo era stato portato via e là non era stato espropriazione di facto di de formale o pari. Il Governo si appellò su Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 160; Mellacher ed Altri c. l'Austria, 19 dicembre 1989, §§ 42-44 la Serie Un n. 169; e Fredin c. la Svezia (n. 1), 18 febbraio 1991, §§ 43 e 45, Serie Un n. 192.
72. Su questo punto, nonostante le molte somiglianze fra la causa presente e che di James ed Altri (citò sopra, § 38), il Governo distinse il precedente dal secondo, dove era stata l'atto dell'acquisizione permesso con la legislazione contestata che aveva incitato la Commissione a concludere che la privazione aveva avuto luogo (la questione non era stata contestata di fronte alla Corte).
73. Mentre le leggi di riforma in affitto in James ed Altri avevano concernito proroghe così come le acquisizioni di contratti d'affitto, solamente gli articoli che hanno comportato il trasferimento di proprietà dal padrone di casa all'affittuario erano stati in questione. La situazione nella causa presente era il rovescio, in che le azioni di reclamo sotto la Convenzione concernerono le disposizioni del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base che ha trattato con proroghe del contratto d'affitto, non quelli contennero in sezione 32, per esempio che previde per il trasferimento di diritti di proprietà dal possidente all'affittuario con modo di rimborso del contratto d'affitto.
74. Non debba la Corte costatazione il “controlli di articolo di uso” applicabile, il Governo presentò che l'interferenza si lamentò di aveva in qualsiasi evento si attenne con l'articolo di privazione. Nella loro prospettiva, il primo articolo (godimento tranquillo di proprietà) non venga in giochi.
( c) Valutazione della Corte
75. La Corte osserva che la causa sotto la considerazione concerne limitazioni imposte con legge sul livello di affitto che i proprietari di proprietà di richiedente potrebbero richiedere dal possessore di contratto d'affitto base e la proroga indefinita del contratto di contratto d'affitto base sugli stessi termini. I richiedenti continuarono a ricevere affitto sugli stessi termini loro avevano concordato liberamente quando firmando il contratto di contratto d'affitto base, e, essendo proprietari sempre, era libero per vendere le loro aree di terra, benché soggetto al contratto d'affitto che allega alla terra.
76. La Corte trovò l'articolo di privazione applicabile in James ed Altri (citò sopra, 38) ed in Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice c. la Slovacchia (n. 74258/01, § 116 ECHR 2007 -... (gli estratti)-in finora come trapasso di proprietà dei richiedenti che ' disegna di terra riguardò). Contenne l'articolo su controllo di uso applicabile in Mellacher ed Altri (citò sopra, § 43), Hutten Czapska (citò sopra, §§ 160-161), Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice (citò sopra, § 140, in finora come affitto obbligatorio di terra riguardò) ed anche in Amato Gauci (citò sopra, § 52). Le circostanze nella causa sono ora sotto revisione più comparabili alle situazioni seconde.
77. La Corte divide i richiedenti la prospettiva di ' che il livello basso di affitti annuali nella loro causa (meno che 0.25% delle aree ' addusse valore di mercato) e la durata indefinita della limitazione di affitto contestata interferì ad un grado molto significativo col loro godimento delle loro proprietà. Per le ragioni affermate sopra di, la Corte non è persuasa comunque, coi loro argomenti che la richiesta di sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base a loro ha corrisposto all'espropriazione o l'espropriazione de facto, o che volle dire che “ogni uso significativo” era stato portato via (vedere Fredin citò sopra di, § 45).
78. In luce di queste considerazioni, i costatazione di Corte che è l'articolo su controllo dell'uso di proprietà che fa domanda nella causa presente.
2. Ottemperanza con le condizioni nel secondo paragrafo
(a) Scopo dell'interferenza
(i) Le osservazioni dei richiedenti
79. Benché lo Stato godesse un margine ampio della valutazione, i richiedenti potrebbero discernere nessuno vero “interesse pubblico” quel potrebbe essere sostenuto ragionevolmente su come una giustificazione per l'interferenza contestata col loro diritto di proprietà.
80. Dal lavoro preparatorio sembrò che, mentre il livello generale del risarcimento per rimborso di contratto d'affitto base contrae sotto sezione 37 sia esposto ad un livello che dovrebbe essere economico per affittuari con limitato finanziario vuole dire, lo scopo di sezione 33 era stato garantire ad affittuari che non avevano anche simile mezzi un diritto durevole di disposizione sull'area-un diritto di proroga sulle stesse condizioni come nel contratto di contratto d'affitto. Peso era stato allegato presumibilmente alle considerazioni di politica sociali in alloggio mirato a proteggendo il gruppo secondo di affittuari.
81. Nonostante questo designando come bersaglio allegato delle necessità di alloggio sociali, la disposizione era stata resa comunque, applicabile a tutti l'approssimativamente 300,000 affittuari in Norvegia, in una società con un grado alto dell'uguaglianza sociale e fra una popolazione fuori dalla quale generalmente era particolarmente bene. Aveva ricevuto ripetutamente il risultato più alto (notevolmente in termini del potere d'acquisto) dei 182 paesi nelle Nazioni Unito Sviluppo Indice Umano. C'erano nelle altre parole, nessuno base per sostenere che affittuari in generale aveva simile necessità come affermato nella giustificazione data per la disposizione di proroga in sezione 33. Effettivamente, il Governo non dibattè il contrario. Infatti, con eccezioni molto poche, gli affittuari nella causa presente goderono un reddito più alto o notevolmente più alto che il reddito medio in Norvegia.
82. Nell’ottica dei richiedenti, non si poteva dire che sezione 33 sia stata mirata a correggendo un'ingiustizia definito ed esistente, diversamente da situazione in simile cause come, per istanza, James ed Altri (citò sopra). Loro contestarono la contesa del Governo che “[problemi di s]ocial su una scala massiccia probabilmente sarebbero stati il risultato faceva non intervenire la legislatura....” L'economia norvegese ed intera aveva evoluto immensamente sulle scorse decadi, e c'era stato un aumento significativo nello standard di vita. Di conseguenza, il bisogno per schemi di alloggio sociali era decresciuto fermamente, siccome illustrato, per istanza, con l'abrogazione in 2000 dell'Atto del Controllo dell'Affitto precedente che ha previsto per sotto-mercato-livello affittò per persone con necessità finanziarie o sociali e speciali. Questo gettò su dubbi seri se gli argomenti di alloggio sociali presentarono in appoggio del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base era genuino. Non c'era nessuna ragione di temere che facendo domanda un affitto di base di mercato avrebbe condotto agli affittuari ' che perde le loro case permanenti o case di festa.
83. In particolare, si potrebbe dire che nessun interesse pubblico e forte faccia domanda villeggiare case fin da possedendo una seconda casa con definizione volle dire, che al bisogno della persona per alloggio era stato adempiuto.
84. Su questa base, potrebbe essere dibattuto fortemente, che sezione 33 in realtà non intraprese un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico.
85. Inoltre, mentre accettando in generale che il margine della valutazione era ampio in cause che comportano politiche sociali ed economiche all'interno di alloggio, i richiedenti aguzzati a molte considerazioni che nella loro opinione militarono in favore di circoscrivere le autorità norvegesi ' provvedono d'un margine della valutazione nella causa presente. Diversamente da cause di Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice e Hutten-Czapska, la causa presente non era nessuna dove cambi fondamentali nel sistema politico dello Stato rispondente formarono un fondale. Inoltre, da Hirst c. il Regno Unito (n. 2) ([GC], n. 74025/01, ECHR 2005-IX) si potrebbe dedurre che il margine della valutazione sarebbe narrower quando Parlamento non aveva analizzato ed aveva pesato attentamente gli interessi che competono o potrebbe essere valutato la proporzionalità di articoli di coperta. Né Parlamento aveva valutato sezione 33 nella luce della Convenzione europea.
86. In realtà sezione 33 intraprese solamente un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico in riguardo di una minoranza di affittuari. Mettendo un'etichetta semplicemente un pezzo di legislazione con l'etichetta “interesse pubblico” non poteva essere ritenuto sufficiente se che etichetta non corrispose alla realtà fondamentale.
87. I richiedenti conclusero che in qualsiasi evento, l'interesse pubblico dovrebbe essere là qualsiasi, era debole e, tenendo presente la sfera di vasta portata di sezione 33, non poteva essere dato peso significativo nel bilanciamento di interessi coinvolto sotto la prova di proporzionalità (sotto).
(ii) le osservazioni del Governo
88. Il Governo aguzzò alle considerazioni sociali dietro a sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base ed invitò la Corte a trovare che il “interesse pubblico” requisito in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 fu soddisfatto nella causa presente. Questo non solo fece domanda a case permanenti ma anche villeggiare case, come indicato nella sentenza della Corte Suprema di 21 settembre 2007 nella causa del OMISSIS.
89. Il Governo considerò che problemi sociali su una scala massiccia probabilmente sarebbero stati il risultato faceva non intervenire la legislatura garantire una regolamentazione appropriata di contratti di contratto d'affitto basi. Un numero di emendamenti al Contratto d'affitto Atto Base era stato proposto prima della promulgazione della sezione 33 corrente. Essere posto sotto a tutte le proposte era stato il riconoscimento del bisogno, di fronte a cambi socio-economici avvicinarsi alla questione del sistema di contratto d'affitto base con dovuto riguardo a per sia parti agli accordi di contratto d'affitto ed i problemi sociali ed attinenti ed il bisogno di trovare soluzioni legislative e tecnicamente appropriate che non hanno generato i grandi numeri di controversie di contratto d'affitto di base nuove.
90. Riferendosi alla Corte sta decidendo in James ed Altri (citò sopra), il Governo dibattè che nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche le autorità nazionali un margine ampio della valutazione godè con riguardo a sia all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica ed all'azione riparatore per essere preso. La Corte deve inoltre “il riguardo la sentenza della legislatura come a che che era nel ‘interesse pubblico ' a meno che che sentenza era manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole.” Di conseguenza, la Corte dovrebbe avvicinarsi alla questione della soddisfazione del criterio di scopo legittimo con limitazione considerevole. Che questo contenne particolarmente vero nella causa presente, e nonostante il fine del contratto d'affitto e la situazione finanziaria o sociale dell'affittuario, fu sostenuto con la Grande sentenza di Camera in Hutten-Czapska (citò sopra):
“La nozione di ‘' pubblico o ‘interesse di ' generale necessariamente è esteso. In particolare, sfere come alloggio che società moderne considerano un primo bisogno sociale e quale ha un ruolo centrale nel welfare e politiche economiche degli Stati Contraenti, può mandare a chiamare della forma di regolamentazione con lo Stato spesso. In che decisioni di sfera come a se, ed in tal caso quando, può essere lasciato pienamente il giochi di vigori di libero-mercato o se dovrebbe essere soggetto a controllo di Stato, così come la scelta di misure per garantire le necessità di alloggio della comunità [...], necessariamente comporti considerazione di complesso problemi sociali, economici e politici.”
91. Fu sostenuto inoltre con la Grande sentenza di Camera in J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) la Terra Ltd c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 71 ECHR 2007-III), dove la Corte (riferendosi a James ed Altri) aveva dato credito ad un'importante ragione supplementare per concedere un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo ad al criterio di interesse pubblico: quando il problema per essere soggetto a regolamentazione coinvolse “di vecchia data e complesso” problemi che anche comportarono regolamentazione delle questioni contrattuali fra individui, il margine necessariamente dovrebbe essere esteso.
92. Nella prospettiva del Governo, questo era, così perché simile questioni comportarono questioni sociali, economiche e politiche di che ci non sarebbero mai uno ‘soluzione di ' corretta in termini di fini elette e vorrebbe dire poiché i problemi loro erano intrinsecamente contestabili. Il riguardo della Corte a dissertazione democratica e nazionale in simile aree chiaramente mandate a chiamare un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo ad al criterio di interesse generale anche in questa causa.
93. Nella sua raccomandazione a Parlamento il Comitato Eretto su Giustizia si era riferito alle considerazioni di politica sociali nell'area di alloggio (“boligsosiale hensyn”) come un'importante base razionale per la disposizione in sezione 33 ed aveva accettato col Ministero come la sua costituzionalità (vedere Raccomandazione n. 105, p. 18 citato sopra). Siccome potrebbe essere visto da queste discussioni, lo scopo di sezione 33 era stato almeno tre piega: (1) garantire la posizione di “gli affittuari che [era] incapace per ragioni finanziarie di acquistare le loro aree [sotto la clausola di rimborso]”, garantendo così “la giustizia sociale in alloggio” (vedere paragrafo 51 sopra); (2) decretare un sistema che tutto-abbraccia per trattare col numero in aumento di scadere contratti di contratto d'affitto basi per minimizzare il flusso imminente di liti giudiziarie che sarebbero altrimenti prevedibili quando i contratti d'affitto scaddero col destino (vedere l'estratto citato a paragrafo 51 sopra); (3) come sé per trattare su termini aree uguali per case di festa e case permanenti, un compito sociale era garantire la possibilità di agio e perché i confini in tempi presenti in modo crescente furono macchiati fra i due tipi di case, come anche osservò con la Corte Suprema nel suo esame in 2007 di sezione la 33 compatibilità con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra).
94. Il Governo sostenne che questi scopi-la giustizia sociale in alloggio, l'evitare di liti giudiziarie, ed il riconoscimento di agio in società contemporanea-era del tutto legittimo sotto la Convenzione. Il Governo sostenne anche che sezione 33 era un lecito vuole dire rendersi conto di quelli scopi, mentre specialmente avendo riguardo ad al margine ampio della valutazione riconosciuto.
95. Infine, il Governo indicò che gli affittuari gli interessi di ' furono protegguti anche con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(l'iii) la valutazione di La Corte
96. Come alla questione se l'interferenza contestata era “nella conformità con l'interesse generale”, la Corte reitera i principi nella sua causa-legge siccome riassunto in Hutten-Czapska (citò sopra):
“165. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è nel ‘' generale o ‘interesse di ' pubblico. Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure per essere fatto domanda nella sfera dell'esercizio del diritto di proprietà. Qui, come negli altri campi ai quali prolungano le salvaguardie della Convenzione, le autorità nazionali godono di conseguenza un margine della valutazione.
166. La nozione di ‘' pubblico o ‘interesse di ' generale necessariamente è esteso. In particolare, sfere come alloggio che società moderne considerano un primo bisogno sociale e quale ha un ruolo centrale nel welfare e politiche economiche degli Stati Contraenti, può mandare a chiamare della forma di regolamentazione con lo Stato spesso. In che decisioni di sfera come a se, ed in tal caso quando, può essere lasciato pienamente il giochi di vigori di libero-mercato o se dovrebbe essere soggetto a controllo di Stato, così come la scelta di misure per garantire le necessità di alloggio della comunità e del tempismo per la loro attuazione, necessariamente comporti considerazione di complesso problemi sociali, economici e politici.
Trovandolo naturale che il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere un ampio, la Corte ha su molte occasioni dichiarate che rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che che è nel ‘' pubblico o ‘' generale interessi a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole. [...] (vedere Mellacher ed Altri, citato sopra, § 45; Scollo c. l'Italia, 28 settembre 1995, § 27 la Serie Un n. 315-C; Immobiliare Saffi, citato sopra, § 49; e, mutatis mutandis, James ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 46-47, e Broniowski, citato sopra, § 149).”
97. La Corte osserva che dai dibattiti Parlamentari che hanno preceduto l'adozione della disposizione contestata in sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base, può essere visto, che lo scopo era garantire ad affittuari che non erano finanziariamente capaci di acquistare le loro aree sotto sezione 37 un diritto durevole di disposizione sull'area. Il metodo adottato era l'esposto fuori in sezione 33 che accorda indefinitamente l'affittuario un diritto di proroga del contratto di contratto d'affitto, sulle stesse condizioni siccome prima fatto domanda. Sembra inoltre che nell'adottare questo soluzione Parlamento allegato peso considerevole alle considerazioni di politica sociali nell'area di alloggio.
98. Inoltre, la Corte nota che il Governo si riferì anche al justifications presentato nel Bill Statale a Parlamento riguardo a sezione 15 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base e Nuovo. Che disposizione mise limitazioni sui locatori il diritto di ' imporre rettifiche dirette verso l'alto del contratto d'affitto base affittate in quelle istanze dove seguì inequivocabilmente dal contratto di contratto d'affitto base-le così definite clausole di valore di base che non erano in problema qui-che rettifiche sarebbero rese in conformità con sviluppi in livelli di prezzo nel mercato di proprietà. Da un esame eseguito col Ministero della Giustizia e Polizia Affari nel 2002, emerse, che l'abrogazione 1 gennaio 2002 del sistema di controllo di affitto sotto la versione precedente di sezione 15 aveva dato luogo a molti affittuari che vedono un aumento drammatico, inaspettato nell'affitto pagabile sotto contratti con clausole di valore di base. Questo aveva fatto incursioni drastiche in un numero di famiglie ' e le sole persone i bilanci familiari di '. Si osservò inoltre che clausole che collegano rettifica di affitto all'aumento in prezzi di proprietà erano state spesso contribuente per contrastare ed avrebbero ramificazioni imprevisto con le parti, da adesso l'interesse nell'evitando liti giudiziarie ed assicurare prevedibilità. Presumibilmente, questo esperimenta in relazione a sezione 15 era anche capace di luce di spargimento sulle considerazioni di politica sociali che militano in favore dell'introduzione di sezione 33.
99. È vero, siccome indicarono i richiedenti, che sezione 33 era generalmente applicabile per affittare contratti fra i valutarono 300,000 a 350,000 contratti di contratto d'affitto in Norvegia che era di una certa età ed era su per rinnovamento, irrispettoso del finanziario vuole dire dell'affittuario riguardato o di se la terra fu usata per una casa permanente o una casa di festa. Sé più probabile aveva una portata molto più ampia che rivolgendo soltanto situazioni della fatica finanziaria e potenziale e l'ingiustizia sociale e politica sociale e piuttosto riflessa in un senso largo (compari James ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 48-49; e Hutten-Czapska, citato sopra, § 178).
100. Nondimeno, avendo riguardo ad alle osservazioni summenzionate rese nel lavoro preparatorio, la Corte non trova manifestamente irragionevole la prospettiva del Parlamento norvegese che, sui motivi delle considerazioni di politica sociali, era un bisogno legittimo di proteggere, nel modo previsto per con sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base gli interessi di possessori di contratto d'affitto che mancarono il finanziario vogliono dire esercitare il loro diritto di rimborso sotto sezione 37, se le aree furono usate per case permanenti o per case di festa. La Corte conclude che l'interferenza contestata può essere ritenuta perciò per essere in conformità con l'interesse generale.
(b) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
(i) Le osservazioni dei richiedenti
101. Nel dibattere che l'interferenza contestata era sproporzionata, i richiedenti sottolinearono che era “esteso e perpetuo.” Il contratto d'affitto non poteva essere terminato di gran lunga col locatore e gli effetti di sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base ecceduti che che potrebbe essere ritenuto necessario per salvaguardare qualsiasi allegato “le considerazioni della giustizia sociale all'interno di alloggio.” L'interesse pubblico in pericolo era stato più forte e l'interferenza contestata meno intrusivo nelle altre cause prima date dalla Corte.
102. I richiedenti chiesero che loro fondarono sostenga in James ed Altri (citò sopra) per l'argomento che il pieno valore di mercato dovrebbe essere pagato per l'area. Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice (citò sopra, § 144) sottolineò nella loro prospettiva l'importanza di se il risarcimento fu riferito ragionevolmente al vero valore della proprietà riguardato, e che se il risarcimento non annoiasse relazione al valore effettivo della terra ci sarebbe una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. In Hutten-Czapska (citò sopra, § 225) la Corte aveva sostenuto che il “carico non può [...] sia messo su un particolare gruppo sociale, comunque importante gli interessi dell'altro gruppo o la comunità nell'insieme.” L'importanza di valore di mercato ancora una volta fu enfatizzata in Amato Gauci (citò sopra, §§ 58, 61-63), dove “importi di affitto che concede solamente un minimo profitto” era una situazione fondò eccedere il margine ampio dello Stato della valutazione.
103. Il livello di affitti nei richiedenti le cause di '-meno che 0.25% del valore di mercato della terra-era certamente basso, in contrasto rigido col valore di mercato delle aree, ed o era uguale ad o abbassa che il livello legale della tassa di vero-appezzamento di terreno sulle aree (0.2%-0.7%), anche se era per l'affittuario per pagare la tassa, come se lui o lei possedessero la proprietà.
104. Il diritto legale di rimborso aggiunse inoltre allo squilibrio. È probabile che l'affittuario opti riscattare l'area in futuro-ogni altro anno per una residenza principale ed ogni decimo anno per una casa di festa-a 40% del valore di area non sviluppato. È probabile che l'affittuario rivenda poi immediatamente da allora in poi e così l'area a prezzo di mercato mieta il beneficio dell'aumento in valore di mercato. Similmente, se l'affittuario optasse di vendere l'alloggio col contratto d'affitto*-sostenga contratto, lui o lei trarrebbe profitto anche dall'aumento in valore di mercato dell'area.
105. I richiedenti contestarono anche l'argomento del Governo che nulla ha suggerito che i richiedenti il reddito di ' dal contratto d'affitto base era stato ridotto che nei richiedenti la prospettiva di ' chiaramente era formalistica. Il punto chiave era che i possidenti che i diritti di ' erano stati violati perché l'affitto base rimase lo stesso oltre, e nonostante la scadenza di, il periodo contratto.
106. L'argomento del Governo che l'aumento di prezzo della proprietà affittata prevalentemente era un risultato dell'affittuario e non i locatori gli sforzi di ' erano indifendibili. Era piuttosto il valore di mercato dell'area non sviluppata che dovrebbe essere riflessa nell'affitto base e nuovo.
107. Contrari a che che fu dibattuto col Governo, i richiedenti avevano sopportato un carico individuale ed eccessivo. Loro dovrebbero essere concessi al risarcimento per il pieno valore di mercato dell'area non sviluppata.
108. L'assenza di qualsiasi distinzione fra case di festa e case permanenti negli articoli contestati era un'espressione chiara del fatto che l'ingiustizia sociale e problemi sociali non costituirono una ragione genuina per quegli articoli. I richiedenti contestarono l'argomento del Governo che ha posato all'interno del margine della valutazione dello Stato per azionare una disposizione generale che non ha distinto fra affittuari che erano in bisogno finanziario o sociale e quelli che non erano. Con riguardo ad era specialmente chiaro per villeggiare case, che il “prova di necessità” non era stato adempiuto.
109. Peso dovrebbe essere dato al fatto che sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base già intervenne in una situazione creata con le parti stesse. Una caratteristica fondamentale di che situazione era che i contratti di contratto d'affitto furono limitati in tempo. Aveva le parti procederono come concordate, un contratto nuovo di contratto d'affitto sarebbe stato costretto in ordine per l'affittuario ad affittare l'area nel futuro, su termini nuovi incluso mercato affitto base. Alternativamente, l'affittuario avrebbe potuto acquistare l'area ad un prezzo di mercato convenuto.
110. Con già essendo intervenuto in una situazione creò con le parti sezione 33 aveva minato la certezza legale. Le parti non potevano prevedere che i contratti erano essere prolungati obbligatoriamente sugli stessi termini siccome era stato concordato su all'inizio. In prospettiva della limitazione convenuta nel periodo contraente, sia gli affittuari ed i locatori sarebbero dovuti essere in grado aspettarsi che alla scadenza del contratto d'affitto contrae contratti nuovi sarebbero negoziati per riflettere un affitto di mercato equo.
111. Infine, la legge non previde per salvaguardie procedurali mirate a realizzando un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi dei locatori e quelli degli affittuari. Era una legge di coperta che non porta nessun conto di circostanze individuali e favouring ad un grandi affittuari di grado in nessun bisogno sociale ed incalzante di protezione di alloggio.
112. In somma, lo schema legale e contestato era così di vasta portata come eccedere che che era necessario per garantire l'interesse pubblico, e così oltrepassò il margine dello Stato della valutazione.
(ii) le osservazioni del Governo
113. Nell'opinione del Governo le autorità dello Stato rispondente avevano previsto un equilibrio equo (James ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 46, 47, 50 la Serie Un n. 98; Immobiliare Saffi, citato sopra, §§ 49, 59): c'era nessuno “carico eccessivo ed individuale”, lo Stato godè un margine ampio della valutazione e la Corte dovrebbe rispettare la sentenza della legislatura come a che che era nell'interesse generale a meno che che sentenza fu mal-fondata manifestamente. La legislazione contestata era stata decretata nella piena consapevolezza di obblighi sotto la Convenzione che anche formò parte di legge nazionale ed era lungo il risultato di e continuando dibattito in Parlamento e gli altri corpi, incluso la Corte Suprema. Questa era un'area della grande complessità col fluttuando sociale e le condizioni di mercato (markt internano Verlag GmbH e Klaus Beermann c. Germania, 20 novembre 1989 la Serie Un n. 165). Il Contratto d'affitto Atto Base era “giustificabile in principio e proporzionato.” Il reddito dei richiedenti dal contratto di contratto d'affitto base non era stato ridotto ed il loro reddito rimarrebbe come prima lo stesso.
114. Che sezione 33 non distinse fra contratto d'affitto di base per case permanenti e case di festa chiaramente dovrebbe incorrere all'interno del margine della valutazione. Il Governo sottolineò l'importanza di rispettare la sentenza della legislatura come a ciò che era nell'interesse generale, e che che sentenza nella causa presente non poteva essere vista manifestamente come irragionevole. In questo riguardo a, il Governo si appellò sulle Grandi direttive di Camera in Mellacher ed Immobiliare Saffi, sia citò sopra.
115. Mentre la Corte non aveva affermato esplicitamente lo stessa con riguardo ad a politiche case di festa toccanti, il Governo non vide perché lo stesso standard molto clemente di scrutinio non dovrebbe fare domanda qui: la regolamentazione di terra per garantire alloggio per agio deve certamente anche “abbia un ruolo centrale nel welfare e politiche economiche di società moderne” all'interno del significato di che frase come usato con la Corte in Immobiliare Saffi (citò sopra, § 49). Dovrebbe essere aggiunto, in questo collegamento che in Chassagnou ed Altri c. la Francia [GC] (N. 25088/94, 28331/95 e 28443/95, § 108 ECHR 1999-III) la Grande Camera osservò, come riguardi il valore, sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, di proteggere le attività di agio pure come cacciando che “è probabile che l'organizzazione e regolamentazione di un'attività di agio siano anche una questione per che la responsabilità di foro Statale....”
116. Il Governo invitò inoltre la Corte ad avere riguardo a, nella conformità con la sua propria causa-legge, alle aspettative legittime di parti per incagliare accordi di contratto d'affitto ed a che che era stato ragionevolmente prevedibile per i richiedenti. Nella valutazione di proporzionalità, peso dovrebbe essere dato al fatto che sezione 33 già intervenne in una situazione creata con le parti stesse. La disposizione di contratto d'affitto base sembrò essere un fenomeno legale norvegese e singolare. Era entrato in essendo perché Norvegia, al tempo era uno dei paesi più poveri di Europa ed una società particolarmente rurale. Molti individui che prevalentemente non vissero in abitazioni di città non avevano semplicemente il finanziario vuole dire acquisire beni immobili così come erigere alloggi su simile terra. Il sistema di contratto d'affitto base aveva previsto per contratto d'affitto a lungo termine di terra per un prezzo ragionevole, ed aveva abilitato gli affittuari per costruire alloggi su che terra e trattenere quegli edifici come le loro case per il futuro prevedibile. Possidenti ricevettero reddito nella forma di affitto dagli affittuari.
117. Siccome passarono gli anni, il valore di mercato di beni immobili aveva aumentato drammaticamente in Norvegia-comparatamente più così di negli altri paesi di europeo Occidentali. Questo non era stato anticipato certamente con entrambi parte quando concludendo qualsiasi contratto di contratto d'affitto base; altrimenti i contratti avrebbero previsto per un meccanismo per rettifica di affitto continua. Che le autorità dovrebbero intervenire infine e regolare una disposizione che era stata creata con le parti non poteva essere imprevedibile per i possidenti. Sulla scadenza di un contratto d'affitto base, l'affittuario-chi possedette l'alloggio ma non la base sulla quale fu costruito-non poteva terminare semplicemente il contratto d'affitto e potrebbe trasportare l'alloggio. Affrontato con un aumento eccezionale nel valore di beni immobili, è probabile che l'affittuario non abbia anche il finanziario intende di riscattare il contratto d'affitto ed acquisire la base. Né i possidenti legittimamente si sarebbero potuti aspettare che loro sarebbero la parte per guadagnare dall'utile inatteso che ha accumulato a causa dell'aumento in prezzi di proprietà. La Corte dovrebbe tenere presente che che la Grande Camera aveva affermato in J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) la Terra Ltd (citò sopra, § 83), vale a dire:
“In James ed Altri, la possibilità di ‘inquilini di ' immeritevoli che sono in grado fare gli utili inattesi di ‘' non colpirono la valutazione complessiva della proporzionalità della legislazione (James ed Altri sentenza, assegnata a sopra § 69), e qualsiasi frutto abbattuto dal vento per il Grahams [la terza parte in Pye] deve essere riguardato nella stessa luce nella causa presente.”
118. Infine, il Governo richiamò il riguardo della Corte a processi democratici. Il problema di che che dovrebbe essere fatto con la scadenza di contratto d'affitto base contrae stabilito tempo fa era stato la materia di almeno undici emendamenti proposti all'Atto del Contratto d'affitto della Base del 1996. Là era scaldato dibattito dal molti anni fra i partiti politici principali. In 2004, comunque tutti ma una delle parti infine rappresentata in Parlamento trovò una base media. Sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base era un'importante parte di che base media, l'affare democratico rese nel Parlamento norvegese nel 2004. Nell'osservazione del Governo, questo compromesso politico e significativo dovrebbe essere preso in considerazione con la Corte, sé che è completamente un esempio della deliberazione democratica in linea con l'ideale di una democrazia politica ed effettiva che secondo la Corte nella sua sentenza del 1998 nel Partito comunista Unito di Turchia ed Altri c. la Turchia, (30 gennaio 1998, § 45 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-io) era “il modello politico e solo contemplato con la Convenzione, e, di conseguenza, il solamente uno compatibile con sé.”
(iii) La valutazione della Corte
119. La Corte reitera che nella Grande sentenza di Camera sopra-citata in Hutten-Czapska, affermò i principi seguenti:
“167. Non solo debba un'interferenza col diritto di proprietà persegua, sui fatti così come in principio, un ‘scopo legittimo ' nel ‘interesse generale ', ma ci deve essere anche una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo chiese di essere compreso con qualsiasi misure fecero domanda con lo Stato, incluso misure controllare l'uso della proprietà dell'individuo disegnò. Che requisito è espresso con la nozione di un equilibrio di fiera di ‘' che deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo.
La preoccupazione per realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nell'insieme. In ogni causa che comporta una violazione allegato di che Articolo la Corte deve accertare perciò se con ragione dell'interferenza dello Stato la persona riguardata dovuto per sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo (vedere James ed Altri, citato sopra, § 50; Mellacher ed Altri, citato sopra, § 48; e Spadea e Scalabrino c. l'Italia, 28 settembre 1995, § 33 la Serie Un n. 315-B).
168. Nel valutare ottemperanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve fare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in problema, mentre tenendo presente. Deve guardare dietro a comparizioni e deve investigare le realtà della situazione si lamentarono di. In cause riguardo all'operazione di ampio-variare legislazione di alloggio, che valutazione non solo può comportare le condizioni per ridurre l'affitto ricevette con padroni di casa individuali e la misura dell'interferenza dello Stato con libertà di contratto e relazioni contrattuali nel mercato di contratto d'affitto, ma anche l'esistenza di salvaguardie procedurali ed altre che assicurano che l'operazione del sistema ed il suo impatto sui diritti di proprietà di un padrone di casa è né arbitraria né imprevedibile. Incertezza-sia sé legislativo, amministrativo o sorgendo da pratiche fece domanda con le autorità-è un fattore per essere preso in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato. Effettivamente, dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale, è in carica sulle autorità pubbliche per agire nel buon tempo, in una maniera appropriata e coerente (vedere Immobiliare Saffi, citato sopra, § 54, e Broniowski, citato sopra, § 151).”
120. Nella prospettiva della Corte, i principi sopra, benché loro fossero enunciati con riguardo ad alla particolare situazione accordi di affitto governante imposti con legge (l'ibidem, § 152), è anche pertinente per la sua valutazione del problema della proporzionalità nella causa presente. Come un accordo di affitto ordinario, un accordo di contratto d'affitto base di qualche genere in problema qui normalmente sarebbe entrato volontariamente in ad un affitto che riflette il livello di mercato al tempo quando l'accordo fu concluso.
121. Comunque, quando in considerazione del problema di proporzionalità la Corte avrà anche riguardo ad alle differenze in natura fra un contratto di contratto d'affitto base ed un contratto di affitto con riguardo ad all'adempimento e la durata. Mentre sotto il tipo secondo di contratto l'inquilino pagherebbe un affitto per occupare locali finanziati col padrone di casa, nel tipo precedente la situazione il più delle volte sarebbe il rovescio: sarebbe l'affittuario che aveva investito negli edifici e costruzioni sulla terra. Il possidente, il locatore farebbe poco più che faccia la base disponibile all'affittuario contro pagamento di un affitto. Nel fare così il locatore cederebbe la possibilità di usare la proprietà per guadagno finanziario con qualsiasi altro vuole dire che con ricevendo l'affitto detto. Come un risultato di queste differenze, un contratto di contratto d'affitto base ordinariamente sarebbe di una durata molto più lunga che un accordo di affitto ordinario, di solito 99 anni e nella causa presente fra 40 e 60 anni.
122. Al cuore del conflitto di interessi nella causa sotto la considerazione è un contratto di durata lunga e definito che una volta ha riflesso gli interessi reciproci delle parti contraenti e quali alla sua scadenza non fu percepito più come essendo nel loro interesse reciproco.
123. Dal punto di vista del locatore, l'affitto base che lui o lei hanno ricevuto, aggiustato nel tenere con inflazione aveva con tempo perso tocco con aumenti di prezzo nella proprietà generalmente introduce sul mercato ed il mercato per proprietà non sviluppate specificamente, ed era fuori del motivo con gli aumenti di prezzo drastici nel beni immobili introduca sul mercato fin dagli anni ottanta generalmente. Se il locatore fosse stato libero negoziare il livello dell'affitto di un contratto nuovo, l'affitto nuovo mentre riflettendo il livello di mercato, sarebbe stato lontano più alto.
124. Dal punto di vista dell'affittuario, a causa degli investimenti che lui o lei o i loro predecessori avevano reso sulla proprietà l'affittuario aveva un interesse forte nel mantenere il quo di status del vincolo contrattuale alla scadenza del contratto di contratto d'affitto base. Diversamente da inquilino con che potrebbe lasciare i locali affittati suo o la sua proprietà mobile, l'affittuario avrebbe un interesse forte nel preservare la possibilità di tenere suo o il suo patrimonio immobiliare sulla base affittata. Questi erano interessi, può essere aggiunto, che fu protetto discutibilmente anche con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, come indicato col Governo, e con Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Per questa ragione, alla fine del periodo di contratto d'affitto l'affittuario non sarebbe su un appiglio uguale col locatore in qualsiasi negoziazioni dei termini di noleggio di un contratto d'affitto nuovo.
125. Siccome può essere visto dal sopra, gli interessi a gioco su ogni lato erano marcatamente diversi in natura e difficile da riconciliare ed i problemi coi quali fu confrontato il Parlamento norvegese erano particolarmente complessi. In prospettiva del numero molto grande di contratto d'affitto base contrae in Norvegia, la Corte capisce inoltre il bisogno enfatizzato nell'elaborazione legislativa e nazionale per soluzioni chiare e prevedibili ed il bisogno di evitare la causa costosa e lunga su una scala massiccia di fronte alle corti nazionali. Questo è lo sfondo contro il quale esaminerà la Corte se nella causa presente le autorità nazionali agirono all'interno del margine ampio della valutazione concesso a loro sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
126. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze concrete dei richiedenti la causa di ', la Corte nota che quando Parlamento considerò l'emendamento contestato a sezione 33 che accorda l'affittuario la scelta, su scadenza del contratto d'affitto rinnovarlo indefinitamente sulle stesse condizioni, un esame e valutazione erano state portate fuori con riguardo ad all'attuazione del Contratto d'affitto Base Atto 1996 dopo la sua entrata in vigore 1 gennaio 2002, in particolare la sua sezione 15 che governa la rettifica dell'affitto di contratto d'affitto base. Che versione, come il suo successore contenne un articolo generale secondo il quale rettifiche all'affitto dovrebbero prendere in sviluppi di conto nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo, ed un'eccezione a quell'articolo (per accordi di contratto d'affitto conclusi su o prima 26 maggio 1983) prevedendo per rettifica diretta verso l'alto secondo gli altri fattori, notevolmente il valore della terra (le così definite clausole di affitto di base), dove questo era stato concordato espressamente su fra le parti, e fissando soffitti a rettifica così diretta verso l'alto. L'esperienza aveva mostrato che, di periodo molti affittuari avevano visto da allora in poi, una rettifica diretta verso l'alto e drastica dei loro affitti di contratto d'affitto basi per la quale loro erano non preparati. Siccome menzionato sopra, come l'apertura fra affitti soggetto a controllo di affitto ed aumenti di prezzo nel mercato di alloggio allargato col tempo, questo (parziale) togliendo di controllo di affitto aveva fatto incursioni sostanziali nei bilanci familiari di molte famiglie e le sole persone. Nel Bill a Parlamento attenzione speciale fu data alla particolare disposizione in sezione 15 rettifica di affitto governante sotto contratti che contengono clausole di valore basi che, fu osservato, interessato una minoranza di contratti di contratto d'affitto basi. Il favoured della soluzione del Ministero ed adottò con Parlamento era un articolo che permette un uno-via rettifica diretta verso l'alto per contratti con clausole di valore di base, seguì con l'introduzione di un schema di rettifica collegata a cambi nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo. Nell'opinione del Ministero che bilancia gli interessi dei locatori e quelli degli affittuari richiesta che non ci dovrebbe essere intervento in clausole di rettifica di affitto in contratti esistenti altro che che che seguirebbe da questa proposta.
127. Nel trattare con le disposizioni che governano il calcolo del risarcimento su rimborso, il Ministero della Giustizia suggerì, che questi dovrebbero essere visti nella luce delle disposizioni su rettifica di affitto, le condizioni generali rimborso governante ed il diritto per prolungare il contratto d'affitto. Il Ministero considerò che queste disposizioni, viste nell'insieme non dovrebbero essere incorniciate in tale modo come alterare sostanzialmente l'equilibrio di interessi nei contratti di contratto d'affitto basi. Lo scopo della soluzione summenzionata, siccome espresso col Ministero, era stato pagare dovuto riguardo ad a che che era stato concordato su fra le parti e rendere possibile sé introdurre una disposizione equilibrata sul calcolo del risarcimento per rimborso.
128. Comunque, la Corte non è stata resa consapevole, né sembra dal materiale presentato, che di qualsiasi la specifica valutazione fu resa se l'emendamento a sezione 33 che regola la proroga del tipo di contratto d'affitto base contrae in questione nei richiedenti causa di ' realizzata un “equilibrio equo” fra gli interessi dei locatori, sulla mano del un'e quelli degli affittuari, sull'altra mano.
129. La Corte è prevista inoltre col livello particolarmente basso di affitto i richiedenti ricevuti sotto i termini dei vari accordi di contratto d'affitto basi come prolungati facendo seguito a sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base. Siccome quantificato coi richiedenti, e siccome era incontrastato col Governo, il livello corrispose a meno che 0.25% delle aree il valore di mercato di ' ed o era uguale ad o abbassa che il livello legale della tassa di vero-appezzamento di terreno addebitabile sulle aree (0.2%-0.7%). Benché fosse per l'affittuario per pagare la tassa, come se lui o lei possedessero la proprietà, il paragone illustra nondimeno il contrasto impressionante. Qualsiasi rettifica all'affitto sarebbe limitata a prendendo in considerazione cambia nell'indice dei prezzi al consumo. Nei richiedenti la causa di ', là sembri non essere stati interesse generale richiede sufficientemente forte di giustificare tale livello basso di affitto, mentre non sopportando relazione al valore effettivo della terra (vedere Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice, citato sopra, § 144).
130. Effettivamente, come affermato sopra, sezione 33 era generalmente applicabile a contratti di una certa età che era su per rinnovamento, irrispettoso del finanziario vuole dire dell'affittuario riguardato. Sé più probabile aveva una portata molto più ampia che rivolgendo soltanto situazioni della fatica finanziaria e potenziale e l'ingiustizia sociale e politica sociale e riflessa in un senso largo.
131. Inoltre, la proroga era per una durata indefinita senza qualsiasi possibilità di rettifica diretta verso l'alto nella luce di fattori altro che l'indice dei prezzi al consumo (sezione 15(2)(1)) che escluse la possibilità di prendere conto del valore della terra come un fattore attinente. Gli stessi termini continuerebbero nell'evento di trasferimento del contratto d'affitto con l'affittuario ad una terza parte o col locatore ad una terza parte. Solamente l'affittuario potrebbe optare di terminare l'accordo di contratto d'affitto, o con rescindendo il contratto o, più tipicamente, con riscattando l'area in conformità con sezione 37. Ma per l'affittuario, continuare il contratto d'affitto sarebbe finanziariamente spesso più attraente, siccome illustrato con l'esperienza del secondo richiedente (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra).
132. Nell'evento che l'affittuario dovrebbe vendere il contratto d'affitto con abitazioni ad una terza parte qualsiasi aumento che dà luogo esclusivamente da cambi al valore della terra, edifici esentarono, sarebbero riflessi nel prezzo di vendita ed accumulerebbero di conseguenza all'affittuario. Gli stessi non farebbero domanda se il locatore di richiedente fosse vendere suo o i suoi diritti di affitto secondo il contratto di contratto d'affitto ad una terza parte in che la causa il prezzo rifletterebbe che l'affitto controllato sarebbe tenuto indefinitamente ad un livello basso.
133. La Corte accetta comunque che i richiedenti potessero accogliere un'aspettativa legittima come la quale i contratti di contratto d'affitto attinenti scadrebbero concordata secondo i loro termini, indipendentemente delle discussioni che s'interpone su e l'adozione di misure legislative.
134. In queste circostanze, non sembra, che c'era una distribuzione equa del sociale e carico finanziario coinvolta ma, piuttosto, che il carico fu messo solamente sui locatori di richiedente (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, §§ 222, 224-225). La Corte non si soddisfa perciò che lo Stato rispondente, nonostante il suo margine ampio della valutazione in questa area previde un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale della comunità ed i diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti che furono resi per sopportare un carico sproporzionato.
135. La Corte aumenta di valore il fatto che la Corte Suprema norvegese ha valutato anche la causa presente dall'angolo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere divide in paragrafi 125 a 132 della sentenza citati a paragrafo 16 sopra). Nel primo posto, non è comunque, capace di dividere la prospettiva seconda che la questione seguente dovrebbe essere presa come il punto iniziale per questa valutazione: "[Se] il fatto che nell'evento di una proroga il locatore non ha diritto a regolare il contratto d'affitto base ad un importo che riflette il valore di terra effettivo verso l'alto vuole dire che la disposizione contravviene a questa disposizione" di Convenzione (paragrafo 125 della sentenza). Mentre questo rifletteva una richiesta fissata in avanti con locatori in negoziazioni con affittuari prima dell'emendamento di sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base, non riflettè i contenuti di questa disposizione. Questo era così perché sezione 33 in effetto proibito qualsiasi aumento di affitto (oltre che che seguì da regolamentazione di indice dei prezzi al consumo in conformità con sezione 15). La mancanza della proporzionalità in questa causa fu causata coi vari fattori accentuati nella Corte sta ragionando in paragrafi 128 a 134 sopra, non col fatto che i locatori non potessero chiedere mercato affittato nella causa di una proroga del contratto di contratto d'affitto. In secondo luogo, l'analisi della Corte Suprema sembra essenzialmente essere stata basata sulla sentenza della Corte in James ed Altri (citò sopra). Comunque, che sentenza trattò con una situazione che in molti riguardi era diverso da che in questione nella causa presente. Nel suo ragionamento sopra, la Corte si è appellata solamente finora su sé in come sé l'ha ritenuto attinente alle circostanze concrete della causa e ha avuto riguardo ad anche a molte più recenti direttive assegnate a dalla sua causa-legge, mentre rappresentando sviluppi della giurisprudenza nella direzione di una protezione più forte sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
136. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. ARTICOLI 46 E 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Articolo 46 della Convenzione
137. Mentre nel giungere alla conclusione sopra la Corte si è concentrato sulle particolari circostanze dei richiedenti ' azioni di reclamo individuali, aggiunge con modo di un'osservazione generale che il problema che è posto sotto alla violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preoccupazioni la legislazione stessa e che le sue sentenze prolungano oltre il risuoli interessi dei richiedenti nella causa presente. Questa è una causa dove la Corte considera che lo Stato rispondente dovrebbe prendere and/or legislativi ed appropriati le altre misure generali per garantire nel suo ordine legale e nazionale un meccanismo che assicurerà un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi di locatori sulla mano del una, e gli interessi generali della comunità d'altra parte nella conformità coi principi di protezione di diritti di proprietà sotto la Convenzione. Non è per la Corte per specificare come locatori che gli interessi di ' dovrebbero essere bilanciati contro gli altri interessi in pericolo. La Corte già ha identificato i difetti principali nella legislazione corrente (vedere divide in paragrafi 128 a 136 sopra). Sotto Articolo 46 i resti Statali libero scegliere i mezzi con che assolverà i suoi obblighi che sorgono dall'esecuzione della sentenza della Corte (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citato sopra, §§ 237 e 238).
B. Articolo 41 della Convenzione
138. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o i Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna della Parte Contraente ed Alta riguardasse permette a riparazione solamente parziale di essere resa, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosca la soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
1. Danno
(un) il Risarcimento per perdita di utili
139. I richiedenti chiesero il risarcimento uguale al valore di mercato delle aree non sviluppate, meno il valore capitalizzato dell'affitto che era davvero pagabile secondo sezione 33 del Contratto d'affitto Atto Base, mentre chiedendo gli importi seguenti:
1) OMISSIS, 617,560 Krone norvegesi (corrispondendo ad approssimativamente 80,875 euro (EUR));
2) OISSIS, NOK 3,563,220 (verso EUR 466,650);
3-4) i consorti OMISSIS, NOK 2,490,000 (verso EUR 326,100);
5) OMISSIS; NOK 62,339,540 (verso EUR 8,164,000);
6) OMISSIS NOK 15,048,240 (verso EUR 1,970,700).
140. Il Governo contestò le rivendicazioni sopra, richiese la Corte per decidere in equità e considerato che sarebbe appropriato per la Corte per riservare la questione per procedimenti separati, sotto Decida 75 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte.
141. La Corte si riferisce alle sue considerazioni sopra come alla particolare complessità dei problemi con la quale il Parlamento norvegese fu confrontato (vedere paragrafo 125 sopra), alla sua sentenza che lo Stato rispondente dovrebbe prendere and/or legislativi ed appropriati le altre misure generali per garantire ottemperanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 137 sopra) ed anche al principio della certezza legale inerente nella legge della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Marckx c. il Belgio, 13 giugno 1979, § 58 la Serie Un n. 31, e Henryk Urban e Ryszard Urban c. la Polonia, n. 23614/08, § 65 30 novembre 2010). Nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente, i costatazione di Corte con che lo Stato rispondente dovrebbe essere dispensato dalla responsabilità riguardo ad ad atti legali o situazioni che antidatano la sentenza presente (l'ibid.) e di conseguenza respinge i richiedenti ' rivendicazioni summenzionate per il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale.
(b) il Risarcimento per costi giudiziali
142. OMISSIS richiesero inoltre il risarcimento per importo totale di importi NOK 171, 475 (NOK 61,050, più NOK 37,425, più NOK 73,050), corrispondendo a verso EUR 22,460, che loro erano stati ordinati per pagare alle parti avversario per i costi secondi nei procedimenti nazionali.
143. Il Governo affermò che loro non avevano nessuno commenti per rendere su queste rivendicazioni e che loro lascerebbero la questione alla discrezione della Corte.
144. La Corte si soddisfa che c'è un collegamento causale fra il danno chiesto e la violazione della Convenzione che ha trovato, ed assegnazioni Sig.ra ed il Sig. Nilsen EUR 8,000, OMISSIS EUR 4,900 ed il OMISSIS EUR 9,570 sotto questo capo.
2. Costi e spese
145. I richiedenti chiesero inoltre il rimborso di spese processuali e spese, importo totale NOK 2,960,525 (verso EUR 387,700), in riguardo degli articoli seguenti:
(un) NOK 648,249 incorse in per loro proprie spese processuali di fronte alle corti nazionali;
(b) NOK 1,153,298 per gli avvocati ' lavora nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte sino a 21 dicembre 2009;
(il c) NOK 558,500 per gli avvocati ' lavora per il periodo dal 2009 a 29 maggio 2011 di 21 dicembre;
(d) NOK 453,125 per gli avvocati ' lavora preparare e frequentare l'udienza orale in Strasbourg 21 giugno 2011;
(e) NOK 14,353 per spese di viaggio per consiglio per frequentare l'udienza;
(f) NOK 125,000 per costi di traduzione;
(il grammo) NOK 8,000 per costi addizionali valutati per il traduttore.
Gli importi sopra inclusero valore aggiunse tassa (“IVA”).
146. Il Governo affermò che loro non avevano nessuno commenti per rendere a queste rivendicazioni e che loro lo lascerebbero alla discrezione della Corte.
147. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare EUR 100,000 in riguardo di articoli (un), (e) e (f), mentre l'articolo (il grammo) deve essere respinto come sé è non sembra che davvero fu incorso in. La Corte non si convince che tutti i costi incorsero in nei procedimenti di Strasbourg necessariamente furono incorsi in ed erano ragionevole come a quantum. Facendo una valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 75,000 i richiedenti per articolo (b) ed EUR 25,000 per articoli (il c) e (d) (incluso di IVA).
3. Interesse di mora
148. La Corte considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a che dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti di percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le richieste ammissibile;

2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;

3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, essere convertito nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo:
(i) EUR 8,000 (otto mila euro) a OMISSIS, EUR 4,900 (quattro mila novecento euro) al Sig.ra OMISSIS ed EUR 9,570 (nove mila cinquecento e settanta euro) al OMISSIS, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 200,000 (duecento mila euro) ai richiedenti, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;

4. Respinge il resto dei richiedenti che ' chiede per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 12 giugno 2012, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 05/04/2021.