Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GRUDIC v. SERBIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 46

NUMERO: 31925/08/2012
STATO: Serbia
DATA: 17/04/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Protection Of Property (Article 1 para. 1 of Protocol No. 1 - Peaceful Enjoyment Of Possessions ; Prescribed By Law) ; Remainder inadmissible ; Respondent State to take measures of a general character (Article 46 - General Measures) ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (Article 41 - Non Pecuniary Damage ; Pecuniary Damage)
SECOND SECTION
CASE OF GRUDIĆ v. SERBIA
(Application no. 31925/08)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
17 April 2012
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Grudić v. Serbia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Dragoljub Popović,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
András Sajó,
Guido Raimondi,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Helen Keller, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 27 March 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 31925/08) against Serbia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Serbian nationals of Bosniak origin, OMISSIS, formerly OMISSIS, (“the first applicant”) and OMISSIS (“the second applicant”), on 24 June 2008.
2. The applicants, who had been granted legal aid, were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Novi Pazar. The Serbian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr S. Carić.
3. The President of the Second Section gave priority to the application in accordance with Rule 41 of the Rules of Court.
4. The applicants alleged that they had not been paid their disability pensions for more than a decade, and, further, that they had been discriminated against on the basis of their ethnic minority status.
5. On 3 March 2010 the President of the Second Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (former Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1952 and 1948, respectively, and are married to each other.
7. In 1995 and 1999, respectively, the applicants were granted disability pensions by the Serbian Pensions and Disability Insurance Fund (Republički fond za penzijsko i invalidsko osiguranje zaposlenih; hereinafter “the SPDIF”) – Branch Office in Kosovo1.
8. Having lived in Kosovska Mitrovica for many years, in 2005 they moved to Novi Pazar, Serbia proper (i.e. the territory of Serbia excluding Kosovo), as documented in their personal identity cards issued by the respondent State’s Ministry of Internal Affairs (Ministarstvo unutrašnjih poslova).
A. The pension-related proceedings
9. The first and second applicants regularly received their pensions until 9 June 1999 and 15 January 2000, respectively, when the monthly payments stopped without any explanation having been provided by the SPDIF.
10. On 22 May 2003 the applicants sought that the payment of their pensions be resumed.
11. On 1 March 2005 and 17 May 2004, the SPDIF adopted formal decisions to suspend payment of the applicants’ pensions as of 9 June 1999 and 15 January 2000, retroactively. In so doing, it noted that Kosovo was now under international administration which was why the pensions could no longer be paid.
12. By two separate judgments of 11 July 2006 the District Court (Okružni sud) in Novi Pazar annulled (poništio) the impugned decisions, noting, inter alia, that they did not refer to the relevant domestic law or provide a satisfactory explanation as to why the payment of the applicants’ pensions should be suspended. In respect of the latter, the District Court effectively re-stated parts of the Supreme Court’s Opinion of 15 November 2005, but did not formally cite it (see paragraph 31 below).
13. The SPDIF thereafter filed two separate appeals on points of law (dva zasebna zahteva za vanredno preispitivanje presude) in respect of the District Court’s rulings of 11 July 2006. In its appeal as regards the second applicant the SPDIF, inter alia, stated that, since the respondent State has been unable to collect any pension insurance contributions in Kosovo as of 1999, persons who had already been granted SPDIF pensions in this territory could not continue receiving them. In support of this position the SPDIF cited the Opinion of the Ministry for Social Affairs (Ministarstvo za socijalna pitanja) of 7 March 2003 (see paragraph 29 below) and noted that it considered this opinion binding.
14. On 13 September 2007 and 26 February 2008 the Supreme Court (Vrhovni sud Srbije) rejected the said appeals on points of law. Whilst the appeal as regards the second applicant was rejected as incomplete, the same remedy concerning the first applicant was rejected on its merits. In the latter case, the Supreme Court confirmed the impugned decision of the District Court.
15. By means of two separate decisions of 3 April 2008 the SPDIF suspended the proceedings instituted on the basis of the applicants’ requests for the resumption of payment of their pensions until such time, as stated in the operative provisions, when the entire issue shall be resolved between the Serbian authorities and the international administration in Kosovo. The SPIDF decisions had an appearance of printed templates where merely the applicants’ names, their place of residence and case identification data were entered by hand.
16. The applicants maintain that they filed administrative appeals against these decisions. The Government contests this claim. The applicants have provided the Court with copies of postal certificates indicating that correspondence of some sort had been sent to the SPDIF, as well as the Ministry for Labour, Employment and Social Policy (Ministarstvo rada, zapošljavanja i socijalne politike), but have not supplied the Court with copies of the appeals in question.
17. Without formally deciding to resume the stayed proceedings, on 7 April 2008 the SPDIF requested (zaključkom o obezbeđenju dokaza) the applicants to provide them with the decisions granting their pensions. It would appear that the applicants complied with this request. They have also provided this Court with copies of the decisions in question.
18. There seem to have been no procedural developments thereafter.
B. Other relevant facts
19. In June 1999 Kosovo was placed under international administration.
20. The applicants submitted that all ethnically Serbian pensioners from Kosovo had continued receiving their pensions normally, as have many Bosniaks, Roma, Turks and Albanians. They further contended that they also could have solved their pension problem had they been willing to “bribe those in charge”.
21. On 18 June 2004 the Serbian Ministry for Work, Employment and Social Policy, in response to a prior query, informed Kosovo’s Ombudsman that the pension system in Serbia was based on the concept of “ongoing financing”. Specifically, pensions were secured through current pension insurance contributions. It followed that since the Serbian authorities have been unable to collect any such contributions in Kosovo as of 1999, persons who had already been granted SPDIF pensions in Kosovo also could not expect, for the time being, to continue receiving them. Further, the Ministry noted the adoption of Regulation 2001/35 on pensions in Kosovo, providing for a separate pension system for persons living in the territory (see paragraph 39 below).
22. In 2005, following the destruction of their house, the applicants moved from Kosovska Mitrovica to Novi Pazar located in Serbia proper.
23. On 2 April 2008 the SPDIF certified, inter alia, that the first applicant’s maiden family name had been Klapija.
24. Both applicants are suffering from serious heart-related conditions, and are living under very difficult financial circumstances. They maintain, however, that they have never applied for pensions in Kosovo.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Pensions and Disability Insurance Act (Zakon o penzijskom i invalidskom osiguranju; published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Serbia – OG RS – nos. 34/03, 64/04, 84/04, 85/05, 101/05, 63/06, 5/09, 107/09, 30/10 and 101/10)
25. Article 104 provides, inter alia, that administrative proceedings before the SPDIF may be reopened, at the request of the insured person or ex proprio motu, if new relevant facts or evidence become known or if in the original proceedings such facts or evidence were not presented.
26. Article 110 provides, inter alia, that ones’ pension and disability rights shall be terminated if it transpires that one no longer meets the original statutory requirements. However, should an entitled pensioner secure an additional pension before another pension and disability insurance fund established by one of the other States formed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia, his or her pension paid by the SPDIF, unless stipulated otherwise by an international agreement, shall be reassessed (recalculated) based on the pensionable employment period (penzijski staž) already taken into account by the former.
27. Article 169 provides, inter alia, that the SPDIF’s assets consist of: pension and disability insurance contributions; its own property; earmarked sums in the States’ budget; subsidies and donations, return on various investments; and a certain portion of the funds obtained through the privatisation of State-owned and socially-owned capital.
B. The Decisions of the SPDIF concerning jurisdictional issues adopted on 19 August 1999 and 22 March 2007, respectively (Odluka o privremenom načinu ostvarivanja prava iz penzijskog i invalidskog osiguranja osiguranika i lica sa područja AP Kosovo i Metohija od 19. avgusta 1999. i Odluka o privremenoj nadležnosti za ostvarivanje prava iz penzijskog i invalidskog osiguranja za osiguranike i lica sa područja AP Kosovo i Metohija od 22. marta 2007)
28. These decisions set out details concerning the procedural competence of various branches of the SPDIF as regards the entitlements of insured persons from Kosovo.
C. The Opinion of the Ministry for Social Affairs (Mišljenje Ministarstva za socijalna pitanja) no. 181-01-126/2003 of 7 March 2003, and the Opinion of the Ministry for Labour, Employment and Social Policy (Mišljenje Ministarstva rada, zapošljavanja i socijalne politike) no. 182-02-20/2004-07 of 18 June 2004
29. These Opinions state, inter alia, that the pension system in Serbia is based on the concept of “ongoing financing”. Specifically, pensions are secured through current pension insurance contributions. Since the Serbian authorities have been unable to collect any such contributions in Kosovo as of 1999, persons who have been granted SPDIF pensions in Kosovo also cannot expect, for the time being, to continue receiving them. Further, it is noted that Regulation 2001/35 on pensions in Kosovo, adopted by the United Nations Interim Administration Mission, provides for a separate pension system for persons living in the territory, which in itself amounts to a serious issue (see paragraph 39 below).
D. The Constitutional Court’s case-law
30. The Serbian Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Srbije) has consistently held that Opinions and Instructions issued by various Government ministries do not amount to legislation (ne predstavljaju propis ili opšti pravni akt), and are instead merely meant to facilitate the implementation thereof (see, for example, IU-293/2004 of 29 June 2006 and IUo-275/2009 of 19 November 2009).
E. The Opinion adopted by the Supreme Court’s Civil Division on 15 November 2005 (Pravno shvatanje Građanskog odeljenja Vrhovnog sud Srbije, sa obrazloženjem, utvrdjeno na sednici od 15. novembra 2005. godine, Bilten sudske prakse br. 3/05)
31. In response to the situation in Kosovo, this Opinion states, inter alia, that one’s recognised right to a pension may only be restricted on the basis of Article 110 of the Pensions and Disability Insurance Act (see paragraph 26 above). In view of Article 169 of the said Act, one’s recognised pension rights cannot either depend on whether or not current pension insurance contributions can be collected in a given territory (see paragraph 27 above).
32. The Opinion further explains that administrative proceedings (upravni postupak) and, if needed, judicial review proceedings (upravni spor) would be the appropriate avenue to challenge any restriction of one’s pension rights.
33. Lastly, the Opinion notes that the civil courts shall, in this context, only be competent to adjudicate cases involving claims of malfeasance (nezakonit i nepravilan rad) on the part of the SPDIF.
F. The Administrative Disputes Act (Zakon o upravnim sporovima; published in the Official Gazette of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia – OG FRY – no. 46/96)
34. Articles 5 and 6 provide, inter alia, that judicial review proceedings may be brought against an administrative decision issued by a competent State body or public authority.
35. Article 24 provides that should a second instance administrative body fail to decide on an appeal filed more than 60 days earlier, and should it again fail to do so in another 7 days, upon receipt of the claimant’s repeated request to this effect, the latter may directly institute a judicial review suit, i.e. as if his or her appeal had been rejected.
36. Article 41 § 3 provides that the competent court may not only quash the impugned administrative act but may also rule on the merits of the plaintiff’s claim, should the facts of the case and the very nature of the dispute in question allow for this particular course of action.
G. The Statutory Interest Act (Zakon o visini stope zatezne kamate; published in OG FRY no. 9/01 and OG RS no. 31/11)
37. Article 1 provides that statutory interest shall be paid as of the date of maturity of a recognised monetary claim in Serbian dinars until the date of its settlement.
38. Article 2 states that such interest shall be calculated on the basis of the official consumer price index plus another 0.5% monthly.
III. RELEVANT LAW IN KOSOVO
A. Regulation 2001/35 on pensions in Kosovo and Regulation 2005/20 amending Regulation 2001/35, both regulations having been adopted by the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo
39. These regulations provide for a separate pension system whereby, inter alia, all persons “habitually residing” in Kosovo, aged 65 or above, shall have the right to a “basic pension”.
B. The Amendments and Additions Act to Regulations 2001/35 and 2005/20 adopted by the Kosovan Assembly
40. On 13 June 2008 the Kosovan Assembly adopted this Act which, essentially, endorsed the pension system as set up by the two Regulations cited above but transferred the functional competencies from the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo to the Kosovan authorities.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
41. The applicants did not rely on a specific provision of the Convention or of any of the Protocols thereto. In substance, however, they complained about not being paid their disability pensions for more than a decade.
42. It being the “master of the characterisation” to be given in law to the facts of any case before it (see Akdeniz v. Turkey, no. 25165/94, § 88, 31 May 2005), the Court considers that these complaints fall to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which provision reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ arguments
43. The Government maintained that the applicants had failed to exhaust all effective domestic remedies.
44. In particular, they had not lodged an appeal against the SPDIF’s decision of 3 April 2008 nor, for that matter, subsequently requested a re-opening of the proceedings in accordance with Article 104 of the Pensions and Disability Insurance Act (see paragraphs 15 and 25 above).
45. As regards the judicial review proceedings (see paragraphs 34-36 above), the Government noted that it was impossible for the courts to rule on the merits of pension claims such as the applicants’. The reason for this was the destroyed or missing documentation, lack of co-operation between the competent institutions in Kosovo and in Serbia, frequent abuse of pension rights, and the need to have the entire problem resolved through negotiations. In most cases the courts thus refused even to quash the impugned decisions adopted by the SPDIF, essentially endorsing the reasoning contained in the Opinions of the two ministries of 7 March 2003 and 18 June 2004 (see paragraph 29 above). To this effect the Government provided copies of more than a dozen court decisions rendered throughout the country.
46. The applicants maintained that they had complied with the exhaustion requirement. Specifically, they had filed an appeal against the SPDIF’s decision of 3 April 2008 (see paragraph 16 above). However, a request for the re-opening of the administrative proceedings, or indeed a judicial review action, would have been clearly ineffective. The applicants, lastly, expressed doubts as regards the alleged destruction of the pension-related documentation in question since, for example, many persons from the northern part of Kosovska Mitrovica, a town in which they lived until 2005, have continued receiving their pensions.
2. The Court’s assessment
47. The Court reiterates that the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies referred to in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention requires applicants first to use the remedies provided by the national legal system, thus dispensing States from answering before the Court for their acts before they have had an opportunity to put matters right through their own legal system. The rule is based on the assumption that the domestic system provides an effective remedy in respect of the alleged breach. The burden of proof is on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that an effective remedy was available in theory and in practice at the relevant time; that is to say, that the remedy was accessible, capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant’s complaints and offered reasonable prospects of success. However, once this burden of proof has been satisfied it falls to the applicant to establish that the remedy advanced by the Government was in fact exhausted or was for some reason inadequate and ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case or that there existed special circumstances absolving him or her from the requirement (see Mirazović v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 13628/03, 6 May 2006).
48. The exhaustion rule is also inapplicable where an administrative practice consisting of a repetition of acts incompatible with the Convention and official tolerance by the State authorities has been shown to exist, and is of such a nature as to make proceedings futile or ineffective (Aksoy v. Turkey, 18 December 1996, § 52, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI).
49. The Court has recognised that Article 35 § 1 (formerly Article 26) must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism (see, for example, Cardot v. France, judgment of 19 March 1991, § 34, Series A no. 200). The rule of exhaustion is neither absolute nor capable of being applied automatically; in reviewing whether it has been observed it is essential to have regard to the particular circumstances of each individual case (see, for example, Van Oosterwijk v. Belgium, judgment of 6 November 1980, § 35, Series A no. 40). This means, amongst other things, that it must take realistic account not only of the existence of formal remedies in the legal system of the Contracting Party concerned but also of the general context in which they operate as well as the personal circumstances of the applicants (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey [GC], 16 September 1996, § 69, Reports 1996-IV).
50. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the SPDIF has unequivocally expressed its view that the payment of pensions to all persons in a situation such as the applicants’ should be suspended (see paragraph 13 above). It did so on the basis of the Opinion of the Ministry for Social Affairs of 7 March 2003, which Opinion was itself reaffirmed by the subsequent Opinion of the Ministry for Labour, Employment and Social Policy of 18 June 2004 (see paragraphs 13 and 29 above). Both of these Opinions stated, inter alia, that the pension system in Serbia was based on the concept of “ongoing financing”. This meant that since the Serbian authorities have been unable to collect any pension insurance contributions in Kosovo as of 1999, persons who had already been granted SPDIF pensions in Kosovo also could not continue receiving them. The Court therefore considers that no administrative remedy within the competence of the SPDIF at various levels, be it an appeal or a request for the re-opening of proceedings, or, indeed, any other remedy addressed to the said ministries, could be deemed effective in the specific circumstances of the present case. It is irrelevant, in this context, that a number of persons in the applicants’ situation would appear to have continued receiving their SPDIF pensions, given that this seems to have occurred on a non-transparent basis.
51. As regards the judicial review procedure, the Government themselves conceded that it was “impossible” for the Serbian judiciary to rule on the merits of pension claims such as the applicants’. The courts instead, for the most part, upheld the impugned administrative decisions, accepting the reasoning contained in the above-mentioned Opinions (see paragraphs 45 and 29 above, in that order). Again, in such very specific circumstances, the applicants could not have been expected to make use of yet another avenue of, at best, theoretical redress.
52. In view of the above, as well as this Court’s cited case-law, the Government’s objection as regards the non-exhaustion of effective domestic remedies must be rejected.
53. The Court notes that the complaints in question are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ arguments
(a) The applicants’ arguments
54. The applicants reaffirmed their complaints.
55. In so doing, they maintained that the respondent State was clearly unwilling to resume payment of their pensions. The SPDIF’s decision of 3 April 2008 to suspend the payment thereof simply ignored the District Court’s ruling of 11 July 2006 (see paragraphs 15 and 12 in that order).
56. The pension entitlements in question were acquired rights (stečena prava) and could not be lawfully revoked or suspended except in cases provided for by the Pensions and Disability Insurance Act (see paragraph 26 above). The Kosovo conflict was of no relevance in this respect. In any event, many persons residing in Kosovo continued receiving their pensions, mostly Serbs but also a number of others, including Bosniaks.
57. The notion that current pensions are only being paid from ongoing pensions’ insurance contributions is without merit, because if this were indeed the case, and given the number of companies which have been unable to pay these contributions throughout Serbia, hardly any pensions could have been paid.
58. The applicants have never sought or been granted pensions by the Kosovo institutions, and the impugned suspension of their pensions can no longer be described as temporary, since more than ten years have elapsed in the meantime. Many persons in the applicants’ situation have already died without this issue having been resolved.
59. Despite their house having been destroyed, the applicants lived in Kosovska Mitrovica until May 2005. During this period they stayed with their relatives. In May 2005 they moved to Novi Pazar in Serbia proper and formally registered their residence in this town.
60. The applicants were told by the Social Care Centre in Novi Pazar that they were not entitled to receive any social assistance, “being recipients of disability pensions”, which is why they never filed a formal request to this effect. The applicants could not have survived all these years without the financial support of their children.
61. The applicants addressed the SPDIF repeatedly, in writing and in person, but to no avail. Irrespective of various political considerations, the applicants insisted that they were entitled to their pensions.
(b) The Governments arguments
62. The Government noted that as of 1992 a new pensions and disability insurance system had been put in place. From the outset, however, it encountered major funding issues, which frequently caused delayed payment of pensions throughout the country. Some of the reasons for this situation included armed conflict in the territory of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, ongoing political crisis, economic sanctions imposed on Serbia and the overall weakness of the Serbian economy, as well as the increased number of pensioners combined with fewer employees paying their contributions into the system.
63. As a result of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation’s (hereinafter “NATO”) intervention in Serbia, in 1999, specifically the aerial bombings and the developments thereafter, most relevant documentation concerning the entitled pensioners in Kosovo was either destroyed or seized by others, and was thus no longer available to the SPDIF.
64. In June 1999 Kosovo was placed under international administration, and the Serbian pensions system ceased to operate in the territory.
65. The current Serbian pension system is based on the principle of “pay as you go”, whereby pensions are funded through current pension insurance contributions, whilst as of 2001 a separate pension system, based on a different approach, has been set up in Kosovo (see paragraphs 39 and 40 above). According to information compiled by the Kosovan authorities, as of November 2008 there were 137,792 persons receiving such pensions.
66. As of 1999 persons employed in Kosovo had ceased paying their insurance contributions to the SPDIF. There has never been any co-ordination between the two pension systems. In a situation of this sort, the Serbian authorities essentially had no choice but to suspend the payment of pensions in the province. They did so by adopting Opinions to this effect (see paragraph 29 above). Serbia, however, never adopted legislation aimed at discriminating against any particular ethnic group. The Government further provided the Court with an indicative list of 32 persons of non-Serbian ethnic origin who continued receiving the SPDIF pension in question. They also noted that there were many others, but that such statistics would be difficult to produce since they were never collected and classified on the basis of ethnicity.
67. The SPDIF continued paying pensions to internally displaced persons from Kosovo, as well as, exceptionally, to those still living in Kosovo but where the local branches of the SPDIF were still operational, and where possibilities for abuse were excluded (the pensioners identity, status and residence being verifiable). The latter is all the more significant in view of the amounts in question. For example, in 2009 the respondent State spent 40% of its budget on pensions and other social benefits. The payment of pensions to persons whose residence was dubious, however, and who had not registered with the SPDIF prior to the establishment of the parallel pensions system in Kosovo could not be resumed. Clearly, it would have been unacceptable for certain persons to be receiving two pensions on the same basis.
68. The applicants maintained that they had remained in Kosovo following the NATO intervention until 2005 when they moved to Novi Pazar. It is, however, unclear where exactly they lived during this period. Following the communication of the present application to the Government, and upon the Agent’s own initiative, the Serbian police provided information to the effect that the applicants only occasionally lived at their address in Novi Pazar. At the time of verification they were in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, for medical reasons, and had authorised Ms Z.F. to receive their mail in Novi Pazar.
69. The Government strongly suspect that the applicants are receiving a pension from the competent international institutions in Kosovo. They tried to verify this by contacting these institutions, but to no avail. An argument to this effect is that the applicants only asked for the resumption of payment of their pensions in 2003, even though they claim to have lived in the northern part of Kosovska Mitrovica where there was a functioning branch of the SPDIF. It is strange that they waited for almost four years following the suspension to do so. The applicants also never sought any other social assistance until the resolution of their case. The Government provided a copy of the certificate issued by the Novi Pazar Social Care Centre to this effect. There were likewise serious abuse issues concerning the submission of false information as regards the residence of numerous pensioners, particularly those claiming to be residents of Novi Pazar. In this respect the Government submitted a memorandum produced by the SPDIF, stating that many such persons had initially registered their residence in Novi Pazar but had then returned to live in Kosovo, having authorised others to continue receiving their correspondence in Novi Pazar.
70. In any event, the subject matter of the present application is a political issue which requires a political solution, through negotiations. It cannot be resolved unilaterally by Serbia. The Agent had informed all competent Government bodies about the importance of dealing with the situation urgently. On 19 May 2010, inter alia, the Minister of Finance endorsed the general approach of the SPDIF to the matter, but personally committed herself to organising a meeting with the Government bodies concerned immediately following the conclusion of discussions with the International Monetary Fund.
71. The Government noted that the total amount of the respondent State’s potential debt involving situations such as the applicants’ would be very high indeed, and would significantly undermine the country’s financial stability. To this effect the Government referred to official data provided by the SPDIF indicating that the sum in question had been estimated at 1,008,358,614 Euros (“EUR”), whilst the Ministry of Finance had itself set this sum at EUR 1,050,468,312, i.e. less than 10% of the total foreign currency reserves of Serbia.
2. The Court’s assessment
72. The principles which apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are equally relevant when it comes to pensions (see Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 77, 18 February 2009, and, more recently, Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 82, 7 July 2011). Thus, that provision does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see, among other authorities, Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 48, Series A no. 70; Slivenko v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II; and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, among other authorities, Müller v. Austria, no. 5849/72, Commission’s report of 1 October 1975, Decisions and Reports (DR) 3, p. 25; T. v. Sweden, no. 10671/83, Commission decision of 4 March 1985, DR 42, p. 229; Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Kuna v. Germany (dec.), no. 52449/99, ECHR 2001-V (extracts); Lenz v. Germany (dec.), no. 40862/98, ECHR 2001-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX; Apostolakis v. Greece, no. 39574/07, § 36, 22 October 2009; Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 57, 8 December 2009; Poulain v. France (dec.), no. 52273/08, 8 February 2011; and Maggio and Others v. Italy, nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, § 55, 31 May 2011). However, where a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a pension – whether or not conditional on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation has to be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 64, ECHR 2010-...). The reduction or the discontinuance of a pension may therefore constitute an interference with peaceful enjoyment of possessions that needs to be justified (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40; Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 57).
73. The first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see The Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, §§ 79 and 82, ECHR 2000-XII) and that it should pursue a legitimate aim “in the public interest”.
74. As regards lawfulness, it requires in the first place the existence of and compliance with adequately accessible and sufficiently precise domestic legal provisions (see, amongst other authorities, the Malone judgment of 2 August 1984, §§ 66-68, Series A no. 82; and Lithgow and Others v. the United Kingdom, 8 July 1986, § 110, Series A no. 102).
75. According to the Court’s case-law, the national authorities, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the Convention system, it is thus for those authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. Moreover, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws concerning pensions or welfare benefits involves consideration of various economic and social issues. The Court accepts that in the area of social legislation including in the area of pensions States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation, which in the interests of social justice and economic well-being may legitimately lead them to adjust, cap or even reduce the amount of pensions normally payable to the qualifying population. However, any such measures must be implemented in a non-discriminatory manner and comply with the requirements of proportionality. Therefore, the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in the choice of policies should be a wide one, and its judgment as to what is “in the public interest” should be respected unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see, for example, Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], cited above, § 61; Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], cited above, § 83; as well as Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 61, 15 September 2009).
76. Any interference must also be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised. In other words, a “fair balance” must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The requisite balance will not be found if the person or persons concerned have had to bear an individual and excessive burden (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 50, Series A no. 98; and Wieczorek, cited above, §§ 59-60, with further references). Of course, the issue of whether a fair balance has indeed been struck becomes relevant only if and when it has been established that the interference in question has satisfied the aforementioned requirement of lawfulness and was not arbitrary (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
77. Turning to the present case, the Court considers that the applicants’ existing pension entitlements constituted a possession within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Further, the SPDIF’s suspension of payment of the pensions in question clearly amounted to an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
78. As regards the requirement of lawfulness, the Court notes that Article 110 of the Pensions and Disability Insurance Act states that ones’ pension and disability rights shall only be terminated if it transpires that one no longer meets the original statutory requirements, a ground patently inapplicable to the applicants. There is also no reference to a possible indefinite suspension of pensions in this provision, and the recalculation of pensions referred to concerns very specific circumstances which are likewise not relevant to the present case (see paragraph 26 above).
79. It is further noted that the impugned suspensions were instead based on the Opinions of the Ministry for Social Affairs and the Ministry for Labour, Employment and Social Policy of 7 March 2003 and 18 June 2004, respectively, wherein it was stated, inter alia, that the pension system in Serbia was based on the concept of “ongoing financing”. According to these Opinions, for which there is no evidence that they have ever been published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Serbia, since the Serbian authorities have been unable to collect any pension insurance contributions in Kosovo as of 1999, persons who had already been granted SPDIF pensions in Kosovo also could not expect, for the time being, to continue receiving them. The Government themselves accepted that the suspension of the applicants’ pensions has been based on the said Opinions (see paragraph 66 above).
80. At the same time, however, the Constitutional Court, in its decisions of 2006 and 2009, held that such Opinions do not amount to legislation, and are instead merely meant to facilitate the implementation thereof, whilst the Supreme Court, in its Opinion of 15 November 2005, concerning the situation in Kosovo, specifically noted that one’s recognised right to a pension may only be restricted on the basis of Article 110 of the Pensions and Disability Insurance Act. Further, in view of Article 169 of the said Act, recognised pension rights could not depend on whether or not current pension insurance contributions can be collected in a given territory (see paragraphs 30 and 31 above).
81. In such circumstances, the Court cannot but conclude that the interference with the applicants’ “possessions” was not in accordance with the relevant domestic law, which conclusion makes it unnecessary for it to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community on the one hand, and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights on the other (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], cited above, § 58), the seriousness of the alleged financial implications for the respondent State notwithstanding.
82. The Court further notes that there is no evidence that the applicants were recipients of the so-called “Kosovo pensions”, and that, in any event, they are both under 65 years of age, which would make them formally ineligible even to apply for such pensions (see paragraphs 39 and 40 above). The Government’s reference to the applicants’ place of residence and the missing documentation in general also seem irrelevant since the payment of their pensions was not suspended on those bases. In any event, the applicants would appear to have provided the SPDIF with the documents in question (see paragraph 17 above), even though they had lived in Kosovska Mitrovica at the relevant time, a town where according to the Government themselves there was a functioning branch of the SPDIF (see paragraph 69 above). The applicants cannot, lastly, be reasonably expected to spend all of their time living at their officially registered address in Novi Pazar, particularly given their need for medical treatment (see paragraph 68 above).
83. There has, accordingly, been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
84. The applicants further complained about being discriminated against on the basis of their ethnic minority status.
85. The Court considers that the applicants’ complaints fall to be examined under Article 14 of the Convention taken together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 thereto (see Akdeniz v. Turkey, cited above, § 88).
86. The former provision reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
87. In view of the relevant facts of the present case, as well as the parties’ submissions, the Court finds that there is no evidence to indicate that the applicants have been discriminated against on the grounds of ethnicity (see in particular, paragraphs 20, 56 and 66 above).
88. It follows that their complaints are manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
89. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
90. Each applicant claimed EUR 7,000 euros in respect of the non-pecuniary damage suffered. The applicants further requested, on account of pecuniary damages, the payment of their pensions due as of 9 June 1999 and 15 January 2000, respectively, plus statutory interest.
91. The Government contested these claims.
92. The Court considers that the applicants in the present case have certainly suffered some non-pecuniary damage, in respect of which it awards them the full amount sought, i.e. the sum of EUR 7,000 each. In addition, the respondent Government must pay the first and second applicants, on account of the pecuniary damage suffered, their pensions due as of 9 June 1999 and 15 January 2000, respectively (see paragraphs 9 and 11 above), together with statutory interest (see paragraphs 37 and 38 above).
B. Costs and expenses
93. Each applicant also claimed EUR 600 for the travel expenses incurred domestically, plus EUR 1 for the postage costs per domestic written pleading, as well as EUR 5 for the postage costs per submission filed with this Court. The applicants further sought costs for their representation before the Court, but left it to the Court’s discretion as to the exact amount.
94. The Government contested these claims.
95. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to their quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, as well as the fact that the applicants have already been granted EUR 850 under the Council of Europe’s legal aid scheme, the Court considers it reasonable to award them jointly the additional sum of EUR 3,000 covering costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
96. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
97. Article 46 of the Convention provides:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
98. Given these provisions, it follows, inter alia, that a judgment in which the Court finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation not just to pay those concerned any sums awarded by way of just satisfaction, but also to choose, subject to supervision by the Committee of Ministers, the general and/or, if appropriate, individual measures to be adopted in their domestic legal order to put an end to the violation found by the Court and to redress, in so far as possible, the effects thereof (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000-VIII).
99. In view of the above, as well as the large number of potential applicants, the respondent Government must take all appropriate measures to ensure that the competent Serbian authorities implement the relevant laws in order to secure payment of the pensions and arrears in question. It is understood that certain reasonable and speedy factual and/or administrative verification procedures may be necessary in this regard.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Serbian dinars at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 7,000 (seven thousand euros) to each applicant, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros) to the applicants jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to them, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the amounts specified under (a) at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
(c) that the respondent State shall pay the first and second applicants, on account of the pecuniary damage suffered, their pensions due as of 9 June 1999 and 15 January 2000, respectively, together with statutory interest, all within the said three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention.
(d) that the respondent Government must, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, take all appropriate measures to ensure that the competent Serbian authorities implement the relevant laws in order to secure payment of the pensions and arrears in question, it being understood that certain reasonable and speedy factual and/or administrative verification procedures may be necessary in this regard.
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 17 April 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Françoise Tulkens
Registrar President
1 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Protezione della Proprietà (Articolo 1 par. 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 - Godimento Tranquillo della Proprietà; Prescritto dalla Legge); Resto inammissibile; Stato Rispondente deve prendere misure di carattere generale (Articolo 46 - Misura Generale); danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - assegnazione (Articolo 41 - Danno Non Patrimoniale; Danno Patrimoniale)
SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA GRUDIĆ C. SERBIA
(Richiesta n. 31925/08)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
17 aprile 2012
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Grudić c. Serbia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente Dragoljub Popović, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre András Sajó, Guido Raimondi Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque, Helen Keller, giudici,
e Stanley Naismith, Cancellieredi Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato 27 marzo 2012,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 31925/08) contro la Serbia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini serbi di origine Bosniaca, OMISSIS, precedentemente OMISSIS (“il primo richiedente”) ed OMISSIS (“il secondo richiedente”), il 24 giugno 2008.
2. I richiedenti a cui era stato accordato il patrocinio gratuito furono rappresentati da OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica a Novi Pazar. Il Governo serbo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. S. Carić.
3. Il Presidente della Seconda Sezione diede priorità alla richiesta in conformità con l’Articolo 41 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
4. I richiedenti addussero che non erano state pagate le loro pensioni di invalidità da più di un decennio, e, inoltre, che loro erano stati discriminati sulla base del loro status di minoranza etnica.
5. Il 3 marzo 2010 il Presidente della Seconda Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (Articolo precedente 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero in 1952 e 1948, rispettivamente e si sposano all'un l'altro.
7. Nel 1995 e 1999, rispettivamente ai richiedenti fu accordata una pensione di invalidità dalle Pensioni serbe e dal Fondo di Previdenza dell'Invalidità (Republički fond za penzijsko i invalidsko osiguranje zaposlenih; hereinafter “the SPDIF”) –Filiale del Kosovo1.
8. Vivendo a Kosovska Mitrovica dal molti anni, nel 2005 loro si trasferirono a Novi Pazar, Serbia corretto (cioè il territorio di Serbia che esclude il Kosovo), come documentato nelle loro carte di identità personali emesse dal Ministero dello Stato rispondente degli Affari Interni (Ministarstvo unutrašnjih poslova).

A. I procedimenti relativi alla pensione
9. I primo e secondo richiedenti ricevettero le loro pensioni sino al 1999 e 15 gennaio 2000 di 9 giugno, rispettivamente regolarmente quando i pagamenti mensili si fermarono senza qualsiasi chiarimento fosse stato previsto dal SPDIF.
10. In 22 maggio 2003 i richiedenti chiesero che il pagamento delle loro pensioni sia ripreso.
11. Nel 2005 e 17 maggio 2004 di 1 marzo, il SPDIF adottò decisioni formali di sospendere pagamento dei richiedenti ' assegna una pensione a come del 1999 e 15 gennaio 2000 di 9 giugno, retroattivamente. Nel fare così, notò, che Kosovo ora era sotto amministrazione internazionale che era perché le pensioni non potrebbero essere pagate più.
12. Con due sentenze separate di 11 luglio 2006 la Corte distrettuale (Okružni sud) in Novi Pazar annullò (poništio) le decisioni contestate, notando inter alia che loro non si sono riferiti al diritto nazionale attinente od offrirono un chiarimento soddisfacente come a perché il pagamento dei richiedenti che le pensioni di ' dovrebbero essere sospese. In riguardo del secondo, la Corte distrettuale efficacemente parti re-determinate dell'Opinione della Corte Suprema di 15 novembre 2005, ma non lo citò formalmente (vedere paragrafo 31 sotto).
13. Il SPDIF registrò da allora in poi due ricorsi separati su questioni di diritto (dva zasebna zahteva za vanredno preispitivanje presude) in riguardo delle direttive della Corte distrettuale di 11 luglio 2006. Nel suo ricorso come riguardi il secondo richiedente il SPDIF, inter l'alia, affermò che, poiché lo Stato rispondente è stato incapace per raccogliere qualsiasi contributi di assicurazione di pensione in Kosovo come di 1999, persone che già erano state accordate le pensioni di SPDIF in questo territorio non potevano continuare riceverli. In appoggio di questa posizione il SPDIF citò l'Opinione del Ministero per Affari Sociali (Ministarstvo za socijalna pitanja) di 7 marzo 2003 (vedere paragrafo 29 sotto) e celebre che considerò questa rilegatura di opinione.
14. Il 2007 e 26 febbraio 2008 di 13 settembre la Corte Suprema (Vrhovni sud Srbije) respinto i ricorsi detti su questioni di diritto. Mentre il ricorso come riguardi il secondo richiedente fu respinto come incompleto, la stessa via di ricorso riguardo al primo richiedente fu respinta sui suoi meriti. Nella causa seconda, la Corte Suprema confermò la decisione contestata della Corte distrettuale.
15. Tramitedue decisioni separate di 3 aprile 2008 il SPDIF sospese i procedimenti avviati sulla base dei richiedenti che ' richiede per la riassunzione di pagamento delle loro pensioni sino a simile tempo, come affermato nelle disposizioni operative, quando il problema intero sarà risolto fra le autorità serbe e l'amministrazione internazionale in Kosovo. Le decisioni di SPIDF avevano una comparizione di maschere stampate dove soltanto i richiedenti che ' chiama, la loro residenza e dati di identificazione di causa furono entrati a mano.
16. I richiedenti sostengono che loro registrarono ricorsi amministrativi contro queste decisioni. Il Governo contesta questa rivendicazione. I richiedenti hanno fornito alla Corte copie di certificati postali che indicano che corrispondenza di alcuno genere era stata spedita al SPDIF, così come il Ministero per Lavori, Lavoro e Politica Sociale (Ministarstvo rada, zapošljavanja i socijalne politike), ma non ha provvisto la Corte con copie dei ricorsi in oggetto.
17. Senza decidere formalmente di riprendere i procedimenti sospesi, il SPDIF richiese 7 aprile 2008 (zaključkom o obezbeđenju dokaza) i richiedenti per offrirli con le decisioni che accordano le loro pensioni. Sembrerebbe che i richiedenti approvarono questa richiesta. Loro hanno fornito anche a questa Corte copie delle decisioni in oggetto.
18. Là sembri non essere stati da allora in poi sviluppi procedurali.
B. gli Altri fatti attinenti
19. A giugno 1999 Kosovo fu messo sotto amministrazione internazionale.
20. I richiedenti presentarono che pensionati del tutto etnicamente serbi da Kosovo avevano continuato ricevere le loro pensioni normalmente, siccome ha molti Bosniaci, Rom, turchi e albanesi. Loro contesero inoltre che avrebbero potuto risolvere il loro problema di pensioni se avessero voluto disposto “corrompere coloro che erano in carica.”
21. 18 giugno 2004 il Ministero serbo per Lavoro, Lavoro e Politica Sociale, in risposta ad una consultazione precedente il Difensore civile di Kosovo informato del quale il sistema di pensione in Serbia è stato basato sul concetto “finanziamento in corso.” Specificamente, pensioni furono garantite per contributi di assicurazione di pensione correnti. Seguì che poiché le autorità serbe sono state incapaci per raccogliere qualsiasi simile contributi in Kosovo come di 1999, persone che già erano state accordate anche le pensioni di SPDIF in Kosovo non potevano aspettarsi, per l'essere di tempo, continuare riceverli. Inoltre, il Ministero notò l'adozione di Regolamentazione 2001/35 su pensioni in Kosovo, prevedendo per un sistema di pensione separato per persone che vivono nel territorio (vedere paragrafo 39 sotto).
22. Nel 2005, seguendo la distruzione di alloggio loro, i richiedenti si trasferiti da Kosovska Mitrovica a Novi Pazar ubicato in Serbia corretto.
23. 2 aprile 2008 il SPDIF certificò, inter alia, che il cognome nubile del primo richiedente era stato Klapija.
24. Ambo i richiedenti stanno patendo le condizioni cuore-relative e serie, e sta vivendo circostanze finanziarie e molto difficili sotto. Comunque, loro sostengono che loro non hanno fatto domanda mai per pensioni in Kosovo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. L’Atto di Previdenza delle Pensioni e dell'Invalidità (Zakon o penzijskom i invalidskom osiguranju; pubblicato nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Serbia-OG RS-N. 34/03, 64/04 84/04, 85/05 101/05, 63/06 5/09, 107/09 30/10 e 101/10)
25. Articolo 104 prevede, inter alia che procedimenti amministrativi di fronte al SPDIF possono essere riaperti, alla richiesta della persona assicurata o ex proprio motu, se fatti attinenti e nuovi o prova sono conosciute o se nei procedimenti originali simile fatti o prova non fossero presentate.
26. Articolo 110 prevede, inter l'alia che uni che la pensione di ' e diritti di invalidità saranno terminati se traspira che uno non soddisfa più i requisiti legali ed originali. Comunque, se un pensionato concesso dovesse garantire prima una pensione supplementare un'altra pensione e finanziamento di assicurazione di invalidità stabilì entro uno degli altri Stati formato nel territorio dell'Iugoslavia precedente, suo o la sua pensione pagò col SPDIF, a meno che convenne altrimenti con un accordo internazionale, sarà rimposto (ricalcolò) basato nel periodo di lavoro pensionabile (penzijski staž) già preso in considerazione col precedente.
27. Articolo 169 prevede, inter alia del quale i beni del SPDIF consistono: pensione e contributi di assicurazione di invalidità; la sua propria proprietà; marchiò somme nello Stati ' imposti un bilancio; sussidi e donazioni, ritorni su vari investimenti; ed una certa porzione dei finanziamenti ottenne per la privatizzazione di Statale e socialmente-possedette capitale.
B. Le Decisioni del SPDIF concernenti problemi giurisdizionali che hanno adottato il 19 agosto 1999 e il 22 marzo 2007, rispettivamente (Odluka o privremenom načinu ostvarivanja prava iz penzijskog i invalidskog osiguranja osiguranika i lica sa područja AP Kosovo i Metohija od 19. avgusta 1999. i Odluka o privremenoj nadležnosti za ostvarivanje prava iz penzijskog i invalidskog osiguranja za osiguranike i lica sa područja AP Kosovo i Metohija od 22. marta 2007)
28. Queste decisioni esposero fuori dettagli riguardo alla competenza procedurale di vari rami del SPDIF come riguardi i diritti di persone assicurate da Kosovo.
C. L'Opinione del Ministero per Affari Sociali (Mišljenje Ministarstva za socijalna pitanja) n. 181-01-126/2003 7 marzo 2003, e l'Opinione del Ministero per Lavori, Lavoro e Politica Sociale (Mišljenje la rada di Ministarstva, zapošljavanja politike di socijalne dei) n. 182-02-20/2004-07 18 giugno 2004
29. Queste Opinioni affermano, inter alia del quale il sistema di pensione in Serbia è basato sul concetto “finanziamento in corso.” Specificamente, pensioni sono garantite per contributi di assicurazione di pensione correnti. Poiché le autorità serbe sono state incapaci per raccogliere qualsiasi simile contributi in Kosovo come di 1999, persone che sono state accordate anche le pensioni di SPDIF in Kosovo non possono aspettarsi, per l'essere di tempo, continuare riceverli. Inoltre, è notato che Regolamentazione 2001/35 su pensioni in Kosovo, adottò con le Nazioni Unito Amministrazione Missione Provvisoria, prevede per un sistema di pensione separato per persone che vivono nel territorio che in se stesso corrisponde ad un problema serio (vedere paragrafo 39 sotto).
D. La giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale
30. La Corte Costituzionale serba (sud di Ustavni Srbije) ha sostenuto costantemente che Opinioni ed Istruzioni emisero coi vari ministeri Statali non corrisponda a legislazione (ne predstavljaju propis ili opšti pravni akt), e è voluto dire invece soltanto facilitare al riguardo l'attuazione (vedere, per esempio, IU-293/2004 di 29 giugno 2006 ed IUo-275/2009 di 19 novembre 2009).
E. L'Opinione adottata dal Dipartimento Civile della Corte Suprema 15 novembre 2005 (shvatanje di Pravno l'odeljenja di Građanskog il sud di Vrhovnog Srbije, sa obrazloženjem sednici di na di utvrdjeno od 15. novembra 2005. godine, Bilten sudske prakse br. 3/05)
31. In risposta alla situazione in Kosovo, questa Opinione afferma, inter l'alia che uno riconobbe diritto ad una pensione può essere restretto solamente sulla base di Articolo 110 delle Pensioni ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). In prospettiva di Articolo 169 dell'Atto detto, uno riconobbe diritti di pensione non possono dipendere o su se o contributi di assicurazione di pensione non corrente possono essere raccolti in un territorio determinato (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra).
32. L'Opinione spiega inoltre che procedimenti amministrativi (upravni postupak) e, se è avuto bisogno, procedimenti di controllo giurisdizionale (upravni spor) sarebbe il viale appropriato da impugnare qualsiasi restrizione dei diritti di pensione di uno.
33. Infine, l'Opinione nota che le corti civili possono, in questo contesto, solamente sia competente per aggiudicare cause che comportano rivendicazioni di condotta disonesta (nezakonit i nepravilan rad) da parte del SPDIF.
F. L’Atto sulle Controversie Amministrative (Zakon sporovima di upravnim di o; pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia-OG Fry-n. 46/96)
34. Articoli che 5 e 6 offrono, inter alia che procedimenti di controllo giurisdizionale possono essere portati contro una decisione amministrativa emesso con un corpo Statale e competente o autorità pubblica.
35. Articolo 24 prevede quel debba una seconda istanza corpo amministrativo non riesca a decidere su un ricorso registrò più di 60 giorni più primi, e se non dovesse riuscire a fare così su ricevuta della richiesta ripetuta del rivendicatore a questo effetto, i secondi possono avviare direttamente un abito di controllo giurisdizionale in un altro 7 giorni, cioé. come se suo o il suo ricorso era stato respinto.
36. Articolo che 41 § 3 offre che la corte competente non solo può annullare l'atto amministrativo e contestato ma può decidere anche sui meriti della rivendicazione del querelante, debba i fatti della causa e la molta natura della controversia in oggetto lasci spazio a questo particolare corso di azione.
G. L'Atto sull’ Interesse Legale (Zakon o visini stope zatezne kamate; pubblicò in OG Fry n. 9/01 ed OG RS n. 31/11)
37. Articolo 1 prevede che interesse legale sarà pagato come della data di scadenza di una rivendicazione valutaria e riconosciuta in dinars serbo sino alla data del suo accordo.
38. Articolo 2 stati che simile interesse sarà calcolato sulla base dell'indice dei prezzi al consumo ufficiale più un altro 0.5% ogni mese.
III. LEGGE ATTINENTE IN KOSSOVO
A. Regolamentazione 2001/35 sulle pensioni in Kossovo e Regolamentazione 2005/20 Regolamentazione 2001/35 che la emenda, ambo le regolamentazioni sono state adottate dall’ Amministrazione Provvisoria delle Nazioni Unite in Missione in Kosovo
39. Queste regolamentazioni prevedono un sistema di pensione separato per cui, inter alia, tutte le persone “abitualmente residenti” in Kosovo, di 65 anni o più, avranno il diritto ad un “pensione di base.”
B. L’Atto degli Emendamenti e delle aggiunte alle Regolamentazioni 2001/35 e 2005/20 adottato dalla Assemblea Kosovara
40. 13 giugno 2008 l’assemblea Kosovara adottò questo Atto che, essenzialmente, girò il sistema di pensione come stabilito dalle due Regolamentazioni citate sopra ma trasferì le competenze funzionali dalle Nazioni Unito Amministrazione Missione Provvisoria in Kosovo alle autorità Kosovare.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
41. I richiedenti non si appellarono su una specifica disposizione della Convenzione o di qualsiasi dei Protocolli inoltre. In sostanza, comunque loro si lamentarono di non essendo pagati le loro pensioni di invalidità per più di una decade.
42. Sé che è il “padrone della caratterizzazione ” da dare in legge ai fatti di qualsiasi causa di fronte a sé (vedere Akdeniz c. la Turchia, n. 25165/94, § 88 31 maggio 2005), la Corte considera che queste azioni di reclamo incorrono essere esaminate sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che approvvigiona legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
43. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali e del tutto effettive.
44. In particolare, loro non avevano depositato un ricorso contro la decisione del SPDIF di 3 aprile 2008 né, per che la questione, successivamente richiese una re-apertura dei procedimenti in conformità con Articolo 104 delle Pensioni ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità (vedere paragrafi 15 e 25 sopra).
45. Come riguardi i procedimenti di controllo giurisdizionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 34-36 sopra), il Governo notò che era impossibile per le corti per decidere sui meriti di rivendicazioni di pensione come i richiedenti '. La ragione per questo era i distrussero o la documentazione mancante, mancanza di co-operazione fra le istituzioni competenti in Kosovo ed in Serbia, l'abuso frequente di diritti di pensione, ed il bisogno di avere il problema intero risolse per negoziazioni. In più cause le corti rifiutarono così anche di annullare le decisioni contestate adottate col SPDIF, mentre essenzialmente girando il ragionamento contenuto nelle Opinioni dei due ministeri del 2003 e 18 giugno 2004 di 7 marzo (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). A questo effetto il Governo offrì copie di più di un decisioni di corte di dozzina rese in tutto il paese.
46. I richiedenti sostennero che loro si erano attenuti col requisito di esaurimento. Specificamente, loro avevano registrato un ricorso contro la decisione del SPDIF di 3 aprile 2008 (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra). Comunque, una richiesta per la re-apertura dei procedimenti amministrativi, o davvero un'azione di controllo giurisdizionale, chiaramente sarebbe stato inefficace. Infine, i richiedenti espressero dubbi come riguardi la distruzione allegato della documentazione pensione-relativa in oggetto poiché, per esempio, molte persone dalla parte settentrionale di Kosovska Mitrovica, una città dove loro vissero fino a 2005, ha continuato ricevere le loro pensioni.
2. La valutazione della Corte
47. La Corte reitera che l'articolo dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali assegnò ad in Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione costringe richiedenti ad usare le via di ricorso previste con l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale prima, mentre dispensando così Stati dall'essere responsabile di fronte alla Corte per i loro atti prima che loro hanno avuto un'opportunità di mettere diritto di questioni per il loro proprio ordinamento giuridico. L'articolo è basato sull'assunzione che il sistema nazionale offre una via di ricorso effettiva in riguardo della violazione allegato. L'onere della prova è sulla non-esaurimento che chiede Statale per soddisfare la Corte che una via di ricorso effettiva era disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente; quel è dire, che la via di ricorso era accessibile, capace di offrire compensazione in riguardo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e prospettive ragionevoli ed offerte del successo. Questo onere della prova è stato soddisfatto una volta comunque, incorre al richiedente per stabilire che la via di ricorso avanzò col Governo era infatti esausto o era per della ragione inadeguato ed inefficace nelle particolari circostanze della causa o che esistevano delle circostanze speciali che li assolvono dal requisito (vedere Mirazović c. Bosnia e Herzegovina (il dec.), n. 13628/03, 6 maggio 2006).
48. L'articolo di esaurimento è anche inapplicabile dove una pratica amministrativa che consiste di una ripetizione di atti incompatibile con la Convenzione e la tolleranza ufficiale con le autorità Statali è stata mostrata per esistere, e è di tale natura come fare procedimenti futile o inefficace (Aksoy c. la Turchia, 18 dicembre 1996, § 52 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI).
49. La Corte ha riconosciuto che Articolo 35 § 1 (precedentemente Articolo 26) deve essere fatto domanda con del grado della flessibilità e senza il formalismo eccessivo (vedere, per esempio, Cardot c. la Francia, sentenza di 19 marzo 1991, § 34 Serie A n. 200). L'articolo dell'esaurimento è né assoluto né capace di essere fatto domanda automaticamente; nel fare una rassegna se è stato osservato è essenziale per avere riguardo ad alle particolari circostanze di ogni causa individuale (vedere, per esempio, Van Oosterwijk c. Belgio, sentenza di 6 novembre 1980, § 35 la Serie Un n. 40). Questo vuole dire, fra le altre cose, che non solo deve prendere conto realistico dell'esistenza di via di ricorso formali nell'ordinamento giuridico della Parte Contraente riguardò ma anche del contesto generale nel quale loro operano così come le circostanze personali dei richiedenti (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia [GC], 16 settembre 1996, § 69 Relazioni 1996-IV).
50. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte nota che il SPDIF ha espresso inequivocabilmente la sua prospettiva che il pagamento di pensioni a tutte le persone in una situazione come i richiedenti ' dovrebbe essere sospeso (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). Faceva così sulla base dell'Opinione del Ministero per Affari Sociali di 7 marzo 2003 che si era Opinione riaffermati con l'Opinione susseguente del Ministero per Lavori, Lavoro e Politica Sociale di 18 giugno 2004 (vedere divide in paragrafi 13 e 29 sopra). Sia di queste Opinioni affermate, inter alia del quale il sistema di pensione in Serbia è stato basato sul concetto “finanziamento in corso.” Questo volle dire che poiché le autorità serbe sono state incapaci per raccogliere qualsiasi contributi di assicurazione di pensione in Kosovo come di 1999, persone che già erano state accordate anche le pensioni di SPDIF in Kosovo non potevano continuare riceverli. La Corte considera perciò che nessuna via di ricorso amministrativa all'interno della competenza del SPDIF ai vari livelli, sia sé un ricorso o una richiesta per la re-apertura di procedimenti, o, davvero qualsiasi l'altra via di ricorso rivolse ai ministeri detti, potrebbe essere ritenuto effettivo nelle specifiche circostanze della causa presente. È irrilevante, in questo contesto che un numero di persone nei richiedenti la situazione di ' sembrerebbe avere continuato ricevere il loro SPDIF assegna una pensione a, determinato che questo sembra essere accaduto su una base opaca.
51. Come riguardi la procedura di controllo giurisdizionale, il Governo che loro hanno concesso che era “impossibile” per l'ordinamento giudiziario serbo per decidere sui meriti di rivendicazioni di pensione come i richiedenti '. Le corti sostennero invece in gran parte, le decisioni amministrative e contestate, mentre accettando il ragionamento contenuto nelle Opinioni summenzionate (vedere divide in paragrafi 45 e 29 sopra, in che ordine). In simile circostanze molto specifiche, i richiedenti non potevano essere aspettatisi di nuovo, di avvalersi di ancora un altro viale di, alla migliore, teoretica compensazione.
52. In prospettiva del sopra, così come la giurisprudenza citata di questa Corte, l'eccezione del Governo come riguardi la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive deve essere respinta.
53. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo in oggetto non è mal-fondato manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
(a) Gli argomenti dei richiedenti
54. I richiedenti riaffermarono le loro azioni di reclamo.
55. Nel fare così, loro sostennero, che lo Stato rispondente chiaramente era non disposto per riprendere pagamento delle loro pensioni. La decisione del SPDIF di 3 aprile 2008 di sospendere al riguardo semplicemente il pagamento ignorato la Corte distrettuale sta decidendo di 11 luglio 2006 (vedere divide in paragrafi 15 e 12 in che ordine).
56. I diritti di pensione in oggetto fu acquisito diritti (stečena prava) e non poteva essere revocato legalmente o potrebbe essere sospeso eccetto in cause previste per con le Pensioni ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). Il conflitto di Kosovo era di nessuna attinenza in questo riguardo. In qualsiasi l'evento, molte persone che risiedono in Kosovo continuarono ricevere le loro pensioni, soprattutto i serbi ma anche un numero di altri, incluso Bosniaci.
57. La nozione che pensioni correnti sono pagate solamente da in corso assegna una pensione a contributi di assicurazione di ' è senza merito, perché se questa fosse davvero la causa, e determinato il numero di società che non sono state capaci di pagare questi contributi in tutto Serbia, appena qualsiasi pensioni sarebbero potute essere pagate.
58. I richiedenti non hanno chiesto mai o hanno accordato pensioni con le istituzioni di Kosovo, e la sospensione contestata di pensioni loro non può essere descritta più come provvisoria, poiché più di dieci anni sono passati nel frattempo. Molte persone nei richiedenti la situazione di ' già è morta senza questo problema era stato risolto.
59. Nonostante alloggio loro era stato distrutto, i richiedenti vissero in Kosovska Mitrovica sino a maggio 2005. Durante questo periodo loro sospesero coi loro parenti. In maggio 2005 loro si trasferirono a Novi Pazar in Serbia corretto e registrarono formalmente la loro residenza in questa città.
60. I richiedenti furono detti dal Centro di Cura Sociale a Novi Pazar che loro non sono stati concessi per ricevere qualsiasi assistenza sociale, “essendo destinatari di pensioni di invalidità” che è perché loro non registrarono mai una richiesta formale a questo effetto. I richiedenti non potevano sopravvivere tutti questi anni senza l'appoggio finanziario dei loro figli.
61. I richiedenti rivolsero ripetutamente il SPDIF, per iscritto ed in persona, ma inutilmente. Irrispettoso delle varie considerazioni politiche, i richiedenti insisterono, che loro fossero concessi alle loro pensioni.
(b) Gli argomenti dei Governi
62. Il Governo notò che dal 1992 un nuovo sistema di previdenza di pensioni di invalidità era stato stabilito. Dall'inizio, comunque incontrò problemi di consolidamento notevoli che frequentemente provocarono pagamento ritardato di pensioni in tutto il paese. Alcune delle ragioni per questa situazione inclusero conflitto armato nel territorio della Repubblica Federale Socialista e precedente dell'Iugoslavia, crisi politica ed in corso che sanzioni economiche hanno imposto su Serbia e la debolezza complessiva dell'economia serba, così come il numero aumentato di pensionati combinò con meno impiegati che pagano i loro contributi nel sistema.
63. Come un risultato del nord Atlantico Trattato Organizzazione (in seguito “la Nato”) intervento in Serbia, nel 1999 specificamente i bombardamenti aerei e gli sviluppi la documentazione più attinente riguardo ai pensionati concessi in Kosovo o fu distrutta da allora in poi, o sequestrò con altri, ed era così più disponibile al SPDIF.
64. A giugno 1999 Kosovo fu messo sotto amministrazione internazionale, ed il sistema di pensioni serbo cessò operare nel territorio.
65. Il sistema di pensione serbo e corrente è basato sul principio di “di pagamento in avanzamento”, da che cosa pensioni sono procurate per contributi di assicurazione di pensione correnti, mentre come di 2001 un sistema di pensione separato, basato su un approccio diverso, è stato esposto su in Kosovo (vedere divide in paragrafi 39 e 40 sopra). Secondo informazioni compilate con le autorità di Kosovan, come di novembre 2008 erano 137,792 persone che ricevono simile pensioni.
66. Come di 1999 persone assunte in Kosovo aveva cessato pagare i loro contributi di assicurazione al SPDIF. Ci non è stato mai qualsiasi co-ordinazione fra i due sistemi di pensione. In una situazione di questo genere, le autorità serbe essenzialmente avevano nessuna alternativa ma sospendere il pagamento di pensioni nella provincia. Loro facevano così con adottando Opinioni a questo effetto (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). Serbia non adottò mai comunque, legislazione mirata a discriminando contro qualsiasi il particolare gruppo etnico. Il Governo inoltre fornito alla Corte un ruolo indicativo di 32 persone di origine etnica non-serba che continuò ricevere il SPDIF assegna una pensione ad in oggetto. Loro notarono anche che c'erano molti altri, ma che simile statistiche sarebbero difficili produrre poiché loro non furono raccolti mai e riservato sulla base dell’etnia .
67. Il SPDIF continuò pagare pensioni ad internamente deportati da Kosovo, così come, insolitamente, a quegli ancora vivendo in Kosovo ma dove ancora erano operativi i rami locali del SPDIF, e dove possibilità per l'abuso furono escluse (l'identità di pensionati, status e residenza che sono verificabili). Il secondo è tutto il più significativo in prospettiva degli importi in oggetto. Nel 2009 lo Stato rispondente spese 40% del suo bilancio su pensioni e gli altri benefici sociali per esempio. Il pagamento di pensioni a persone la cui residenza era equivoca, comunque e che non aveva registrato col SPDIF prima della costituzione del sistema di pensioni parallelo in Kosovo non poteva essere ricapitolato. Chiaramente, sarebbe stato inaccettabile per certe persone per stare ricevendo due pensioni sulla stessa base.
68. I richiedenti sostennero che loro erano rimasti in Kosovo che segue l'intervento di Nato sino a 2005 quando loro si trasferirono a Novi Pazar. Comunque, è poco chiaro dove precisamente loro vissero durante questo periodo. Seguendo la comunicazione della richiesta presente al Governo, e sulla propria iniziativa dell'Agente, la polizia serba offrì informazioni all'effetto che i richiedenti esisterono al loro indirizzo in Novi Pazar solamente di quando in quando. Al tempo di verifica loro erano nella Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia, per ragioni mediche ed avevano autorizzato il Sig.ra Z.F. ricevere la loro posta in Novi Pazar.
69. Il Governo fortemente la persona sospetta che i richiedenti stanno ricevendo una pensione dalle istituzioni internazionali e competenti in Kosovo. Loro tentarono di verificare questo con contattando queste istituzioni, ma inutilmente. Un argomento a questo effetto è che i richiedenti chiesero solamente la riassunzione di pagamento delle loro pensioni nel 2003, anche se loro dicono di avere vissuto nella parte settentrionale di Kosovska Mitrovica dove c'era un ramo che funziona del SPDIF. È strano che loro aspettarono pressoché quattro anni che seguono la sospensione per fare così. I richiedenti non chiesero anche mai qualsiasi l'altra assistenza sociale sino alla decisione della loro causa. Il Governo offrì una copia del certificato emessa col Novi Pazar Cura Centre Sociale a questo effetto. C'erano similmente problemi di abuso seri riguardo all'osservazione di informazioni false come riguardi la residenza di pensionati numerosi, particolarmente quelli che chiedono di essere residenti di Novi Pazar. In questo riguardo il Governo presentò un memorandum prodotto col SPDIF, mentre affermando che molti simile persone avevano registrato inizialmente la loro residenza in Novi Pazar ma avevano restituito poi vivere in Kosovo, dopo avendo autorizzato altri a continuare ricevere la loro corrispondenza in Novi Pazar.
70. In qualsiasi l'evento, l'argomento della richiesta presente è un problema politico che richiede una soluzione politica, per negoziazioni. Non può essere risolto unilateralmente con Serbia. L'Agente aveva informato tutti i corpi Statali e competenti dell'importanza di trattare urgentemente con la situazione. In 19 maggio 2010, inter alia, il Ministro di Finanza girò l'approccio generale del SPDIF alla questione, ma si impegnò personalmente ad organizzare una riunione coi corpi Statali coinvolti immediatamente in seguito alla conclusione delle discussioni del Fondo Valutario Internazionale.
71. Il Governo notò che l'importo totale del debito potenziale dello Stato rispondente che comporta situazioni come quella dei richiedenti sarebbe stato davvero molto alto, e minerebbe significativamente la stabilità finanziaria del paese. A questo effetto il Governo si riferì a dati ufficiali previsti col SPDIF che indica che la somma in oggetto era stato valutato a 1,008,358,614 Euro (“EUR”), mentre il Ministero di Finanza si aveva esporre questa somma ad EUR 1,050,468,312, cioè meno del 10% delle riserve di valuta estera totali di Serbia.
2. La valutazione della Corte
72. I principi che si applicano in cause sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo generalmente N.ro 1 è ugualmente attinente quando viene a pensioni (vedere Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 77, 18 febbraio 2009 e, più recentemente, Stummer c. l'Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 82 7 luglio 2011). Così, che disposizione non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà (vedere, fra le altre autorità, il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 48 la Serie Un n. 70; Slivenko c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II; e Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Né garantisce, come tale qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Müller c. l'Austria, n. 5849/72, il rapporto di Commissione di 1 ottobre 1975, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 3, p. 25; T. c. la Svezia, n. 10671/83, decisione di Commissione di 4 marzo 1985, DR 42, p. 229; Janković c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Kuna c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 52449/99, il 2001-V di ECHR (gli estratti); Lenz c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 40862/98, ECHR 2001-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39 ECHR 2004-IX; Apostolakis c. la Grecia, n. 39574/07, § 36 22 ottobre 2009; Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 57 8 dicembre 2009; Poulain c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 52273/08, 8 febbraio 2011; e Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia, N. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08 54486/08 e 56001/08, § 55 31 maggio 2011). Comunque, dove un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di una pensione-se o non condizionale sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione doveva essere considerata generando un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 64 ECHR 2010 -...). La riduzione o la cessazione di una pensione può costituire perciò un'interferenza con godimento tranquillo di proprietà che hanno bisogno di essere giustificate (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citato sopra, § 40; Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71 28 aprile 2009; e Wieczorek, citato sopra, § 57).
73. Il primo e il più importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (vedere Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, §§ 79 e 82, ECHR 2000-XII) e che dovrebbe intraprendere un scopo legittimo “nell'interesse pubblico.”
74. Come legalità di riguardi, richiede nel primo posto l'esistenza di ed ottemperanza con disposizioni legali nazionali adeguatamente accessibili e sufficientemente precise (vedere, fra le altre autorità, la sentenza di Malone di 2 agosto 1984, §§ 66-68 la Serie Un n. 82; e Lithgow ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 8 luglio 1986, § 110 la Serie Un n. 102).
75. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, le autorità nazionali, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di Convenzione, è così per quelle autorità per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è esteso. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi riguardo a pensioni o benefici di welfare comportano considerazione di vari problemi economici e sociali. La Corte accetta che nell'area di legislazione sociale incluso nell'area di pensioni Stati godono un margine ampio di valutazione che negli interessi della giustizia sociale e benessere economico legittimamente può condurrli ad aggiustare, copertura o anche riduce l'importo di pensioni normalmente pagabile alla popolazione qualificativa. Comunque qualsiasi simile misure devono essere implementate in una maniera non-discriminatoria e devono essere attenutesi coi requisiti della proporzionalità. Perciò, il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nella scelta di politiche dovrebbe essere un ampio, e la sua sentenza come a che che è “nell'interesse pubblico” dovrebbe essere rispettato a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere, per esempio, Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], citato sopra, § 61; Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], citato sopra, § 83; così come Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 61 15 settembre 2009).
76. Qualsiasi interferenza deve essere anche ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Nelle altre parole, un “equilibrio equo” deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. L'equilibrio richiesto non si troverà se la persona o persone riguardate hanno dovuto sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 50 la Serie Un n. 98; e Wieczorek, citato sopra, §§ 59-60, con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Chiaramente, il problema di se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto davvero diviene solamente attinente se e quando è stato stabilito che l'interferenza in oggetto ha soddisfatto il requisito summenzionato della legalità e non è stato arbitrario (vedere Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
77. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte considera che i richiedenti ' diritti di pensione esistenti costituirono una proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Inoltre, la sospensione del SPDIF di pagamento delle pensioni in oggetto chiaramente corrispose ad un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
78. Come riguardi il requisito della legalità, la Corte nota che Articolo 110 delle Pensioni ed Invalidità Assicurazione Atto stati che uni che la pensione di ' e diritti di invalidità saranno terminati solamente se traspira che uno non soddisfa più i requisiti legali ed originali, una base patentemente inapplicabile ai richiedenti. Non c'è anche riferimento ad una possibile sospensione indefinita di pensioni in questa disposizione, ed il ricalcolo di pensioni si riferì a preoccupazioni circostanze molto specifiche che non sono similmente attinenti alla causa presente (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra).
79. È notato inoltre che le sospensioni contestate furono basate invece sulle Opinioni del Ministero per Affari Sociali ed il Ministero per Lavori, Lavoro e Politica Sociale del 2003 e 18 giugno 2004 di 7 marzo, rispettivamente dove fu affermato, inter alia del quale il sistema di pensione in Serbia è stato basato sul concetto “finanziamento in corso.” Secondo queste Opinioni per che non c'è nessuna prova che loro mai sono stati pubblicati nell'Ufficiale Pubblichi della Repubblica di Serbia, poiché le autorità serbe sono state incapaci per raccogliere qualsiasi contributi di assicurazione di pensione in Kosovo come di 1999, persone che già erano state accordate anche le pensioni di SPDIF in Kosovo non potevano aspettarsi, per l'essere di tempo, continuare riceverli. Il Governo che loro hanno accettato che la sospensione dei richiedenti le pensioni di ' sono state basate sulle Opinioni dette (vedere paragrafo 66 sopra).
80. Allo stesso tempo, comunque la Corte Costituzionale, nelle sue decisioni di 2006 e 2009 sostenne che simile Opinioni non corrispondono a legislazione, e è voluto dire invece soltanto facilitare al riguardo l'attuazione, mentre la Corte Suprema, nella sua Opinione di 15 novembre 2005, riguardo alla situazione in Kosovo specificamente notata che uno riconobbe diritto ad una pensione può essere restretto solamente sulla base di Articolo 110 delle Pensioni ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità. In prospettiva di Articolo 169 dell'Atto detto, diritti di pensione riconosciuti non potevano dipendere inoltre, su se o contributi di assicurazione di pensione non corrente possono essere raccolti in un territorio determinato (vedere divide in paragrafi 30 e 31 sopra).
81. In simile circostanze, la Corte non può, ma conclude che l'interferenza coi richiedenti ' “le proprietà” non era in conformità col diritto nazionale attinente che conclusione gli rende non necessario per sé accertare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità sulla mano del una, ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo sull'altro (vedere Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], citato sopra, § 58), la serietà delle implicazioni finanziarie ed allegato per lo Stato rispondente ciononostante.
82. La Corte nota inoltre che non c'è prova che i richiedenti erano destinatari del così definito “Kosovo assegna una pensione a”, e che in qualsiasi l'evento, loro sono sia sotto 65 anni maggiorenne che li farebbe anche formalmente ineleggibile fare domanda per simile pensioni (vedere divide in paragrafi 39 e 40 sopra). Il riferimento del Governo ai richiedenti la residenza di ' e la documentazione mancante in generale anche sembri irrilevante fin dal pagamento delle loro pensioni non fu sospeso su quelle basi. In qualsiasi l'evento, i richiedenti sembrerebbero avere fornito al SPDIF i documenti in oggetto (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra), anche se loro avevano vissuto in Kosovska Mitrovica al tempo attinente, una città dove secondo il Governo loro c'era un ramo che funziona del SPDIF (vedere paragrafo 69 sopra). I richiedenti non possono essere aspettatisi ragionevolmente infine, di passare tutto il loro tempo che vive al loro indirizzo ufficialmente registrato in Novi Pazar, particolarmente dato il loro bisogno per trattamento medico (vedere paragrafo 68 sopra).
83. C’è stata , di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
84. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre di essendo discriminati contro sulla base del loro status di minoranza etnico.
85. La Corte considera che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' incorrono essere esaminate sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 inoltre (vedere Akdeniz c. la Turchia, citato sopra, § 88).
86. La disposizione precedente si legge come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
87. In prospettiva dei fatti attinenti della causa presente, così come le osservazioni delle parti la Corte costata che non c'è nessuna prova che indichi che i richiedenti sono stati discriminati per motivi etnici (vedere in particolare, paragrafi 20, 56 e 66 sopra).
88. Segue che le loro azioni di reclamo sono manifestamente mal-fondate e devono essere respinte in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
89. l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
90. Ogni richiedente chiese EUR 7,000 Euro in riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale subito. I richiedenti richiesero inoltre, su conto di danni patrimoniali, il pagamento delle loro pensioni dovuto come del 1999 e 15 gennaio 2000 di 9 giugno, rispettivamente interesse legale e positivo.
91. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni.
92. La Corte considera che i richiedenti nella causa presente certamente hanno sofferto di del danno non-patrimoniale, in riguardo del quale assegna loro il pieno importo chiesto cioé. la somma di EUR 7,000 ognuno. In oltre, il Governo rispondente deve pagare i primo e secondo richiedenti, su conto del danno patrimoniale subito le loro pensioni dovuto come del 1999 e 15 gennaio 2000 di 9 giugno, rispettivamente (vedere divide in paragrafi 9 e 11 sopra), insieme con interesse legale (vedere divide in paragrafi 37 e 38 sopra).
B. Costi e spese
93. Ogni richiedente chiese anche EUR 600 per le spese di viaggio incorse in nazionalmente, più EUR 1 per i costi di affrancatura per nota scritto e nazionale, così come EUR 5 per i costi di affrancatura per osservazione registrata con questa Corte. I richiedenti chiesero inoltre costi per la loro rappresentanza di fronte alla Corte, ma sinistra sé alla discrezione della Corte come all'importo esatto.
94. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni.
95. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come al loro quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, così come il fatto che i richiedenti già sono stati accordati EUR 850 sotto il Consiglio dello schema di patrocinio gratuito dell'Europa, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare loro congiuntamente la somma supplementare di EUR 3,000 costi di copertura sotto tutti i capi.
C. Interesse di mora
96. La Corte considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
97. L’Articolo 46 della Convenzione prevede:
“1. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà la sua esecuzione.”
98. Dato queste disposizioni, segue, inter alia che una sentenza nella quale la Corte trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per non pagare quelli riguardarono qualsiasi somme assegnate con modo della soddisfazione equa, ma anche scegliere, soggetto a soprintendenza col Comitato di Ministri l'and/or generale, se misure appropriate, individuali per essere adottato nel loro ordine legale e nazionale per porre fine alla violazione trovassero con la Corte e compensare, in finora come possibile, gli effetti al riguardo (vedere Scozzari e Giunta c. l'Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000-VIII).
99. In prospettiva del sopra, così come il grande numero di richiedenti potenziali, il Governo rispondente deve prendere tutte le misure appropriate per assicurare che le autorità serbe e competenti implementano le leggi attinenti per garantire pagamento delle pensioni ed arretrati in oggetto. È capito che certo and/or che riguarda i fatti ragionevole e veloce procedure di verifica amministrative possono essere necessarie a questo riguardo .
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibili ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente è pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, da convertire in dinars serbi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 7,000 (sette mila Euro) ad ogni richiedente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 3,000 (tre mila Euro) ai richiedenti congiuntamente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico di loro, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi specificati sotto (a) ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
(c) che lo Stato rispondente pagherà al primo e al secondo richiedente, a causa del danno patrimoniale subito le loro pensioni dovute tra il 9 giugno 1999 e il 15 gennaio 2000, rispettivamente insieme con l’interesse legale, tutti entro i tre mesi detti dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione.
(d) che il Governo rispondente deve, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, prendere tutte le misure appropriate per assicurare che le autorità competenti serbe implementino leggi atte a garantire il pagamento delle pensioni e degli arretrati in oggetto, restando inteso che alcune ragionevoli procedure di verifica amministrativa e /o dei fatti possono essere necessarie a questo riguardo.
4. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 17 aprile 2012, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Françoise Tulkens
Cancelliere Presidentessa
1 ogni riferimento a Kosovo, sia al territorio,alle istituzioni che alla popolazione, in questo testo sarà capito nella piena ottemperanza con il Consiglio della Sicurezza delle Nazioni Unito Decisione 1244 e senza pregiudizio allo status del Kosovo.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.