Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF RAVIV v. AUSTRIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, P1-1

NUMERO: 26266/05/2012
STATO: Austria
DATA: 13/03/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; No violation of Art. 14+P1-1
SECOND SECTION
CASE OF RAVIV v. AUSTRIA
(Application no. 26266/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
13 March 2012
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Raviv v. Austria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Dragoljub Popović,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
András Sajó,
Guido Raimondi,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque, judges,
Ewald Wiederin, ad hoc judge,
and Françoise Elens-Passos, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 14 February 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 26266/05) against the Republic of Austria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Austrian and Israeli national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 20 July 2005.
2. The applicant was represented by Ms OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Vienna. The Austrian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ambassador H. Tichy, Head of the International Law Department at the Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that she was discriminated against in that provisions of the Austrian General Social Security Act aimed at compensating victims of National Socialism failed to take periods of child-raising abroad into account.
4. On 3 September 2007 the President of the First Section decided to communicate the above complaint to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 1). The application was later transferred to the Second Section of the Court, following the re-composition of the Court’s sections on 1 February 2011.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in Vienna in 1936 to Jewish parents. Her father was arrested in 1939. In 1942 the family learned of his death. In the same year the applicant’s mother was arrested. In 1943 the applicant and her mother were deported to the concentration camp in Bergen-Belsen. They were transferred to the concentration camp in Vittel in 1944 and were liberated the same year. After having spent four further years in camps for displaced persons, the applicant and her mother emigrated to Israel in 1948. The applicant is still living in Israel, where she resides in Petah-Tikva.
6. The applicant married in 1957. She has three children born in 1961, 1965 and 1971. She worked as a practising lawyer and notary public.
7. On 1 March 2002 an amendment to the General Social Security Act (Allgemeines Sozialversicherungsgesetz) entered into force, creating additional possibilities of obtaining pension entitlements for persons who had been prevented from accumulating insurance periods by their arrest, punishment, detention, unemployment, denaturalisation or emigration as a result of National Socialist persecution.
8. Subsequently, the applicant requested the Pension Insurance Office (Pensionsversicherungsanstalt) to apply these provisions to her case.
9. On 29 October 2002 the Pension Insurance Office issued a declaratory decision stating that the applicant was entitled to pay insurance contributions in respect of periods of emigration between 20 January 1951 and 31 December 1965 – a total of 180 insurance months – pursuant to section 504(2) taken in conjunction with section 502(6) of the General Social Security Act. Moreover, certain periods of secondary and university education were accepted as substitute periods (Ersatzzeiten) provided that contributions were paid in respect of periods of emigration.
10. In a letter of the same day the Pension Insurance Office informed the applicant that she would have to pay 24.19 euros (EUR) per month, making a total amount of EUR 4,354.20 for 180 insurance months. By making this payment by 31 May 2003 at the latest she would be entitled to a monthly pension of EUR 277.25 plus two additional payments in the same amount per year, with effect from 1 March 2002.
11. The applicant appealed against the decision of 29 October 2002, arguing, inter alia, that periods of child-raising should be counted for the purpose of calculating her pension. Not doing so would discriminate against her in relation to women who had not been forced to emigrate and had thus raised their children in Austria.
12. On 6 May 2003 the Office of the Vienna Regional Governor (Amt der Landesregierung) dismissed the applicant’s appeal. It found that the Pension Insurance Office had correctly applied sections 502(4) and (6) of the General Social Security Act by declaring that the applicant was entitled to a maximum of 180 insurance months between January 1951, when she had reached the age of fifteen, and December 1965. Periods of secondary and university education abroad in the years 1953 to 1959 were accepted as substitute periods pursuant to section 502(7) of the General Social Security Act taken in conjunction with sections 227(1)(1) and 228(1)(3). However, section 500 and the subsequent sections of the General Social Security Act did not provide for periods of child-raising within the meaning of section 227a to be counted as substitute periods.
13. The applicant lodged a complaint with the Constitutional Court (Verfassungsgerichthof), alleging that section 502 of the General Social Security Act breached the principle of equality as guaranteed by Article 7 § 1 of the Federal Constitution. She argued in particular that excluding periods of child-raising on the ground that they were spent abroad ran counter to the underlying intention of the rules concerning preferential treatment of persons who had suffered disadvantages in their social security status during the National Socialist era. These rules were aimed at eliminating the financial disadvantages suffered by victims of National Socialism under social security law.
14. On 23 September 2003 the Constitutional Court refused to deal with the applicant’s complaint for lack of prospects of success. It observed that in an area such as the present one, concerning special provisions giving preferential treatment to a particular group of persons under social security law, the legislature had a wide margin of appreciation in assessing whether events which occurred abroad were to be treated on an equal footing with events that occurred in Austria.
15. Following a request by the applicant the Constitutional Court referred the case to the Administrative Court (Verwaltungsgerichtshof). Before that court the applicant repeated in essence the arguments she had raised before the Constitutional Court. She asserted in particular that, having regard to the aim pursued by section 502 of the General Social Security Act and the fact that periods of secondary and university education abroad were accepted as substitute periods, the lack of a provision including periods of child-raising abroad as substitute periods could only be regarded as an omission. The authorities should have closed this unintended gap in the law by accepting periods of child-raising abroad as substitute periods.
16. On 22 December 2004 the Administrative Court dismissed the applicant’s complaint as being unfounded. It noted that section 500 of the General Social Security Act and its subsequent sections were aimed at eliminating disadvantages in accumulating insurance periods which victims of National Socialism had suffered on account of their persecution or emigration. The law did not require there to be an actual causal link between persecution and the loss of insurance periods. It proceeded from the assumption that without the persecution, insurance periods would have been accumulated, and provided for overall crediting (pauschalierte Anrechnung) of contribution periods or substitute periods to compensate for periods of persecution or emigration.
The Administrative Court went on to hold:
“In such a system, a teleological gap cannot in principle result from the fact that the legislature has not extended the crediting of periods of child-raising in Austria under section 227a of the General Social Security Act to persons who, for reasons linked to persecution within the meaning of section 500, live abroad during periods of child-raising. Section 227a has a similar (substitute) function in that it likewise provides for the crediting for insurance purposes of periods during which the person concerned was prevented from accumulating insurance periods (in this instance, on account of child-raising). In so far as the legislature already compensates for the loss of insurance periods as a result of persecution, no further compensation is needed. In so far as it does not make such provision, there is no difference in relation to other persons who are resident abroad: on account of the territoriality principle applicable under the social security scheme, the crediting of insurance periods in accordance with section 227a of the General Social Security Act would in any event require an equalisation arrangement through an international agreement and, moreover, decisions in such matters would be taken not in administrative proceedings but in proceedings concerning benefit entitlements.
Section 502(7) of the General Social Security Act does not alter this finding in any way. This provision has two aims: it ensures that periods of schooling that were interrupted as a result of persecution are regarded as completed (thus constituting a situation giving rise to preferential treatment under section 502(4)), and it places school and university attendance abroad and in Austria on an equal footing. This equal treatment is admittedly of significance for benefit entitlement (and not only for the application of preferential treatment on the basis of emigration). However, as such it falls within the discretion enjoyed by the legislature in matters of legal policy. No further inferences are to be drawn from this in terms of the principle of equality, especially not in the manner argued by the complainant.”
Finally, the Administrative Court noted that the applicant’s complaint failed to give more detailed reasons as to why accepting periods of child-raising abroad as substitute periods was objectively required.
17. The judgment was served on the applicant’s counsel on 20 January 2005.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The General Social Security Act – general rules
18. The General Social Security Act (Allgemeines Sozialversicherungs-gesetz) regulates health and accident insurance and old-age pension insurance for persons employed in Austria, based on the contributory principle.
19. Section 4 of the General Social Security Act regulates compulsory affiliation to the social security system. Pursuant to section 4(1)(1), employees are affiliated to the health and accident insurance scheme and to the old-age pension scheme. Section 4(2) defines an employee as any person working in consideration of remuneration in a relationship of personal and economic dependency. For an employee affiliated to the social security system, compulsory contributions have to be paid in part by the employer and in part by the employee.
20. Entitlement to an old-age pension arises when a person who has reached pensionable age has accumulated a sufficient number of insurance months, the required minimum being 180 months.
21. When calculating the number of insurance months, certain periods during which no gainful activity has been pursued, and thus no contributions have been made, are nevertheless taken into account as substitute periods, for instance periods of secondary or university education, child-raising, unemployment, or military or alternative service.
22. The relevant rules on substitute periods are laid down in sections 227, 227a and 228 of the General Social Security Act. The following provisions are relevant in the context of the present case.
Section 227(1)(1) and section 228(1)(3) regulate in detail which periods of secondary education and university education in Austria are to be credited as substitute periods.
Section 227a of the General Social Security Act provides that periods which the insured person has spent exclusively or mainly raising his or her child are to be counted as substitute periods up to a maximum of forty-eight months, starting with the birth of each child, if the period of child-raising was spent in Austria.
B. Preferential treatment of persons who suffered disadvantages in their social security status in the National Socialist era
23. Section 500 of the General Social Security Act provides that persons who, between 4 March 1933 and 9 May 1945, suffered a disadvantage in their social security status for political reasons – except in connection with National Socialist activities – or on account of their religion or race are to receive preferential treatment.
24. The details regarding this preferential treatment are regulated in the subsequent sections and differ according to whether the person emigrated or not. The relevant provisions were enacted in 1968 and have subsequently been amended several times.
25. Section 502(4) provides that persons who emigrated during the above-mentioned period and had accumulated insurance periods or substitute periods prior to that time are entitled to pay retroactive contributions (of approximately EUR 25 per month) for periods of emigration up to 31 March 1959.
26. Pursuant to section 502(6), in the version in force since 1 March 2002, persons who emigrated but had, for reasons beyond their control, not accumulated any insurance periods or substitute periods before their emigration are also entitled to pay retroactive contributions if they were born on or before 12 March 1938 and were resident in Austria on that date. Retroactive contributions can be made with effect from the person’s fifteenth birthday at the earliest. A further provision (section 592(2)) limits the possibility of making retroactive contributions to 180 insurance months.
27. Pursuant to section 502(7), periods of secondary education or university education abroad between 4 March 1933 and 31 March 1959 are to be dealt with in the same way as periods falling under sections 227(1)(1) and 228(1)(3). In essence, that means that such periods are to be counted as substitute periods, in the same way as periods of secondary education or university education spent in Austria.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
28. The applicant complained that the relevant provisions of the General Social Security Act, which did not treat periods of child-raising spent abroad on the same footing as such periods spent in Austria, discriminated against her. She relied on Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 Protocol No. 1.
Article 14 provides:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
29. Firstly, the applicant claimed to have been discriminated against on account of her residence abroad. Secondly, she alleged that the distinction contained inherent gender discrimination, since mainly women were affected by it. Thirdly, she claimed to have been discriminated against as periods of unemployment were counted as insurance periods irrespective of whether they were spent in Austria or abroad, whereas periods of child-raising were counted as substitute periods only if they were spent in Austria.
30. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
31. The Government asserted that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies as required by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention. In the Government’s view, the applicant had only claimed a violation of the principle of equality (Gleichheitsgrundsatz) under Article 7 § 1 of the Federal Constitution, but had neither explicitly nor in substance relied on her right of property in her complaints lodged with the Constitutional Court and the Administrative Court. Noting that the applicant had been represented by counsel throughout the domestic proceedings, the Government argued that she could have been expected to raise her complaint concerning her right of property with the domestic authorities, in addition to her allegation of discrimination. In conclusion, the Government claimed that the applicant had not duly exhausted domestic remedies in respect of her complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention.
32. The applicant contested the Government’s view, stating that it was sufficient to raise the alleged violations in substance, which she had done in the domestic proceedings. In contrast, it was not necessary to refer explicitly to the relevant Convention Articles before the domestic authorities. The applicant asserted that the principle of equality under Article 7 § 1 of the Federal Constitution corresponded to Article 14 of the Convention but was wider in scope as it was not accessory in nature.
33. The Court reiterates that Article 35 § 1 of the Convention requires that the complaints intended to be made subsequently in Strasbourg should have been made to the appropriate domestic body, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law (see Cardot v. France, 19 March 1991, § 34, Series A no. 200, and Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 66, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV). However, that provision should be applied with a certain degree of flexibility and without excessive regard for matters of form (see Cardot, cited above, § 34, and Akdivar and Others, cited above, § 69).
34. The Court notes that, in the domestic proceedings, the applicant complained of discrimination in relation to her pension claims on the ground that periods of child-raising spent abroad were not treated as substitute periods in the same way as child-raising periods spent in Austria. Such consideration of substitute periods has inherent and direct effects on the applicant’s pension claim, and thus on a financial claim. The Court therefore finds that the applicant has raised her complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in substance before the domestic authorities and courts, thus affording the State the opportunity of putting right the violations alleged against it (see Akdivar and Others, cited above, § 65).
35. The Court therefore concludes that in so far as the applicant complains that periods of child-raising spent abroad were not taken into account as substitute periods for the calculation of her pension claim, her complaint cannot be rejected for failure to exhaust domestic remedies.
36. The Court considers that this complaint is also not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
37. However, the Court notes that in the domestic proceedings the applicant did not raise, either explicitly or in substance, her complaints of indirect gender discrimination and of discrimination in relation to periods of unemployment spent abroad, which are treated as substitute periods for the calculation of a pension claim. She only raised those complaints in her application before the Court.
38. It follows that these complaints must be rejected under Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
39. The applicant claimed that the relevant provisions of the General Social Security Act discriminated against her on account of the fact that they did not treat periods of child-raising spent abroad on the same footing as such periods spent in Austria. She maintained that the purpose of section 500 and the subsequent sections of the General Social Security Act was to compensate victims of National Socialism for disadvantages suffered under social security law. However, the law failed to achieve that aim in that it treated periods of child-raising spent abroad as a result of forced emigration differently from periods of child-raising spent in Austria. There were no public policy reasons justifying this difference.
40. In so far as the Government referred to the principle of territoriality underlying social security law, the applicant argued that section 502 of the General Social Security Act already made exceptions to that principle in the context of preferential treatment of victims of National Socialism. There were no reasons not to apply the same approach to periods of child-raising spent abroad.
41. The Government contested the applicant’s view. They noted that section 500 and subsequent sections of the General Social Security Act pursued the aim of providing preferential treatment for victims of National Socialist persecution by allowing them to buy contribution periods at preferential rates in order to become entitled to an old-age pension under the Austrian social security system. This possibility was only open to victims of National Socialism and persons benefiting from these provisions were thus in a different situation from other contributors.
42. Referring to the reasons set out in the Administrative Court’s judgment of 22 December 2004, they argued that section 500 and subsequent sections of the General Social Security Act provided for overall crediting of contribution periods or substitute periods in order to eliminate disadvantages suffered as a result of National Socialist persecution, including periods of emigration. In such a system the legislature was not obliged to provide for crediting of periods of child-raising spent abroad. On the contrary, the exclusion of such crediting served to prevent a situation where the same period was taken into account twice. If the law treated periods of secondary education and university education spent abroad as substitute periods, this fell within a member State’s margin of appreciation in matters of social policy.
43. Moreover, the Government asserted that the principle of territoriality was inherent in all matters of social security policy and law. The statutory old-age pension scheme under the General Social Security Act was in principle confined to the federal territory, providing for compulsory insurance of persons employed in Austria or by companies with their head office in Austria. Consequently, periods of child-raising led to the crediting of substitute periods only if the child was raised in Austria. Exceptions were only made under Community law, which was not relevant in the present context, and on the basis of bilateral agreements. There was no bilateral agreement with Israel in that respect. Finally, it had to be borne in mind that the crediting of substitute periods for child-raising under social security law was also a matter of family policy. This was underlined by the fact that substitute periods for child-raising were as a rule credited to the parent receiving parental leave allowance. In sum, it was justified to limit the crediting of substitute periods to cases in which the child was being raised in Austria.
44. In conclusion, the Government asserted that the legislature had not transgressed the margin of appreciation when – in setting up a system of preferential treatment in social security law for victims of National Socialist persecution – it had decided not to grant additional crediting for periods of child-raising abroad. Consequently, the fact that in the applicant’s case such periods were not counted as substitute periods did not disclose any appearance of a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
45. The Court notes that it has not been disputed in the present case that Article 14 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, applies. The Court reiterates that although Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not include the right to receive a social security payment of any kind, if a State does decide to create a benefits scheme, it must do so in a manner which is compatible with Article 14 (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 55, ECHR 2005-X; Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, §79, ECHR 2009-...; Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 64, ECHR 2010-...and Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 83, 7 July 2011). Having regard to its case-law, the Court sees no reason to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
46. The Court has established in its case-law that only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14 (see Carson and Others, cited above, § 61; and Stummer, cited above, § 87).
47. Moreover, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous or relevantly similar situations. Such a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification, in other words if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is no reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 65731/01, § 51, ECHR 2006-VI; Andrejeva, cited above, § 81; Carson and Others, cited above, § 61; and Stummer, cited above, § 87).
48. The Contracting State enjoys a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment. The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject matter and the background. As a general rule, very weighty reasons would have to be put forward before the Court could regard a difference in treatment based exclusively on the ground of sex as compatible with the Convention. On the other hand, a wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the public interest on social and economic grounds, and the Court will generally respect the legislature’s policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (see Stec and Others, cited above, §§ 51-52, with further references; see also Andrejeva, cited above, § 82-83; Carson and Others, cited above, § 61; and Stummer, cited above, § 88).
(b) Application of these principles to the present case
49. In the present case, the applicant’s claim is that she was discriminated against as periods of child-raising abroad were not treated on an equal footing with periods of child-raising spent in Austria. The Court has already held that “place of residence” constitutes an aspect of personal status for the purposes of Article 14 (see Carson and Others, cited above, §§ 70-71).
50. The Court notes at the outset that section 500 and subsequent sections of the General Social Security Act created a special regime for victims of National Socialist persecution. These provisions are aimed at eliminating disadvantages in social security law suffered by this group through overall crediting of insurance periods. As a general rule, affiliation to the social security system, including the old-age pension system, is linked to employment in Austria and is based on the compulsory payment of contributions.
51. In contrast, under the special regime referred to above, victims of National Socialist persecution who either did not complete a full career of insurance contributions in Austria or who, like the applicant, did not accumulate any insurance months in Austria owing to their age at the time of their emigration may become eligible for an old-age pension by paying retroactive contributions on a voluntary basis. Moreover, these contributions can be made at preferential rates determined by Section 502 (4) of the General Social Security Act, which amounted to approximately EUR 25 per month at the time when the applicant made use of this possibility.
52. The Court notes that the special regime for victims of National Socialist persecution makes exceptions from the basic principles of Austrian social security law and applies a distinct set of rules to them. Having regard in particular to the possibility of accumulating insurance months without being employed in Austria, the voluntary nature of the insurance and the application of preferential rates, the Court considers that persons like the applicant who are covered by the special regime are not in a relevantly similar situation to persons who have made regular contributions to the old-age pension system on the basis of their employment in Austria. Consequently, no issue of discrimination under Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 arises on account of the fact that periods of child-care spent abroad are not counted as substitute periods.
53. However, the applicant also appears to be complaining that within the group of persons benefiting from the special regime described above, she was discriminated against. In so far as she complains that the failure to credit periods of child-raising abroad as substitute periods amounts to inherent gender discrimination, the Court has already noted above that the applicant did not raise this argument in the domestic proceedings, and has rejected this part of the complaint for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. The same applies to the comparison with periods of unemployment, which the applicant did not raise in the domestic proceedings either (see paragraphs 37-38 above).
54. What remains to be examined is the applicant’s argument, which she did raise before the Administrative Court, that in addition to the overall crediting of insurance periods by way of paying preferential contributions retroactively, periods of higher education are taken into account as substitute periods if they have occurred abroad, while periods of child-raising are not. The Government asserted that in the area of social policy, the legislature had to decide whether or not the crediting of substitute periods within the special regime was reconcilable with other policy aims, such as for instance family policy in respect of crediting of child-raising periods abroad. In contrast, the applicant appears to argue that, within the special regime, the legislature is obliged to treat all sets of facts which are capable of being credited as substitute periods under Austrian social security law on the same footing.
55. The Court disagrees with that view. It observes that here the comparison is between persons falling under the special regime for victims of National-Socialist persecution who cannot obtain crediting for child-raising periods abroad, and persons falling under the special regime and who can obtain crediting for periods of higher education abroad. The Court does not find that there is a difference of treatment between those two groups based on an aspect of personal status as required by Article 14.
56. Indeed, the applicant herself, while she could not obtain crediting for periods of child-raising abroad, obtained crediting of periods of higher education spent abroad between 1953 and 1959 as substitute periods. In essence, the applicant is complaining that the law requires different conditions for the crediting of different types of substitute periods in respect of the same group of people, which in itself does not disclose any element of discrimination.
57. In conclusion, the Court finds that compared to persons who have made regular contributions to the old-age pension system the applicant, who is covered by the special regime for victims of National Socialist persecution, is not in a relevantly similar situation. Within the group of persons covered by the special regime the Court finds that there is no difference of treatment based on any element of personal status.
58. Consequently, there has been no violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
59. The applicant complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone that the Austrian courts’ refusal to count periods of child-raising spent abroad as substitute periods violated her right to peaceful enjoyment of property. She appears to be arguing that, had the periods in question been counted as substitute periods, she would have received a higher pension.
60. The Court notes that the Government have also raised an objection of failure to exhaust domestic remedies in respect of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 alone. However, the Court is not called upon to determine this issue as the complaint is in any case inadmissible for the following reasons.
61. According to the Court’s established case-law, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee the right to acquire possessions or to receive a social security benefit or pension payment of any kind or amount, unless provided for by national law (see mutatis mutandis, Stec and Others (dec.), cited above, § 55, and Carson and Others, cited above, §§ 53 and 57). In the present case, national law does not provide for counting child-raising periods abroad as substitute periods. Consequently, no entitlement to a higher pension can follow from having spent periods of child-raising outside Austria.
62. It follows that this complaint is incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the complaint concerning Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible in so far as the applicant complains that periods of child-raising spent abroad were not taken into account as substitute periods for the calculation of her pension claim, and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds by four votes to three that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 13 March 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Françoise Elens-Passos Françoise Tulkens Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judges Popović, Sajó and Pinto de Albuquerque is annexed to this judgment.
F.T.
F.E.P.


JOINT DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES POPOVIĆ, SAJÓ AND PINTO DE ALBUQUERQUE
1. The present case concerns a claim of discrimination based on the fact that periods of child-raising abroad were not treated on an equal footing with periods of child-raising spent in Austria for the purpose of counting substitute insurance periods. The Court has already held that “place of residence” constitutes an aspect of personal status for the purposes of Article 14 (see Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, §§ 70-71, ECHR 2010). We find that the claim is founded since the applicant was subjected to discriminatory treatment based precisely on her residence abroad. Thus, our disagreement with the majority is strictly based on a question of legal principle, the factual situation of the applicant being undisputed. And the question of principle in this case is the following: should social security and family policy privilege Austrian mothers who raise their children in Austria over Austrian mothers who raise them abroad? Contrary to the majority’s positive answer, our reply is an unequivocal “no”.
2. As a general rule, affiliation to the social security system, including the old-age pension system, is linked to employment in Austria and is based on the compulsory payment of contributions. Section 500 and subsequent sections of the General Social Security Act created a special regime for victims of National Socialist persecution, the aim being to compensate victims of such persecution through overall crediting of insurance periods for disadvantages suffered under social security law as a result of persecution or emigration. Under this special regime, victims of National Socialist persecution who either did not complete a full career of insurance contributions in Austria or who, like the applicant, did not accumulate any insurance months in Austria owing to their age at the time of their emigration may become eligible for an old-age pension by paying retroactive contributions at preferential rates on a voluntary basis. The problem lies in the fact that periods of child-raising in Austria are counted as substitute periods pursuant to section 227a of the General Social Security Act, which is not the case for periods of child-raising spent abroad.
3. The Administrative Court in its judgment of 22 December 2004 noted that section 500 and the subsequent sections of the General Social Security Act achieved the aim of eliminating disadvantages in social security status suffered by victims of National Socialist persecution by way of overall crediting of insurance periods. This was based on the assumption that insurance periods would have been accumulated if there had been no persecution. In such a system, further compensation for specific periods, such as periods of child-raising, was not required. It was within the legislature’s margin of appreciation to decide whether and, if so, which substitute periods would be credited in respect of facts which occurred abroad.
In their observations the Government relied on the same reasons, but added two further arguments. First, they stated that within the special regime for victims of National Socialist persecution, the crediting of periods of child-raising abroad in addition to the overall crediting of insurance periods might amount to counting the same periods twice. Second, they argued that the crediting of substitute periods for child-raising was not only a matter of social security law but also of family policy. Both the territoriality principle inherent in social security law and the legitimate interests of family policy provided objective reasons for counting periods of child-raising as substitute periods only if they had been spent in Austria.
4. We are not convinced by the Government’s first argument. We note in particular that the argument that accepting periods of child-raising abroad as substitute periods in addition to the overall crediting of insurance periods provided for by the special regime may lead to counting the same period twice would also apply to periods of higher education spent abroad. Indeed, the applicant herself obtained the entitlement to overall crediting of 180 insurance months in respect of the years 1951 to 1965 by paying retroactive contributions. In addition, periods of higher education in the years 1953 to 1959 were counted as substitute periods. If the argument of “double” crediting of insurance periods does not count for periods of higher education spent abroad, there is no sense in allowing it to count with regard to periods of child-raising abroad.
5. We are not convinced by the Government’s second argument either, which relies essentially on the principle of territoriality inherent in social security law, for the simple reason that the regime for victims of National Socialist persecution itself creates a special situation with regard to the territoriality principle. The argument of territoriality is clearly misplaced in the context of a law which aims precisely to compensate victims of persecution in their own country who had to leave the country to survive. In this connection, it should be noted that the applicant was deported, first, to the concentration camp in Bergen-Belsen at the age of seven, and subsequently to the concentration camp in Vittel, spent four years in camps for displaced persons and emigrated to Israel at the age of twelve. She never accumulated any insurance periods in Austria under the ordinary regime. In the context of the special legal regime described above, any considerations linked to the principle of territoriality, including considerations of family policy based on that principle, cannot provide a justification for distinguishing between facts that occurred in Austria and facts that occurred abroad. We find it very disturbing, to say the least, that family policy should privilege Austrian mothers who raise their children in Austria over Austrian mothers who do so abroad. The presumption of “less valuable” child-raising by Austrian mothers living abroad is totally unacceptable.
6. Finally, the Administrative Court’s argument does not stand either. Given the aim of the special regime of eliminating disadvantages for victims of National Socialist persecution, we cannot see any reasonable and objective grounds for excluding one particular type of period, namely time spent child-raising, on the sole ground of residence abroad, taking into account in particular the fact that the applicant’s residence abroad was precisely because of her status as a victim of persecution.
We attach significant weight to the fact that the applicant was persecuted in her own country and was forced to emigrate. Consequently, it cannot be said that she chose to live abroad (in contrast to the position in Carson and Others, cited above, § 86). On the contrary, the fact that she is resident abroad is linked to the persecution she suffered during the period of National Socialism. We find that the applicant was placed against her will in a different situation from persons who have paid regular contributions to the old-age pension system on the basis of their employment in Austria. In other words, she was forcibly excluded from a career of regular contributions, such exclusion being the result of a grave human rights violation. The contested legal solution perpetuates the pattern of exclusion to which the legislature wanted to put an end. By not counting periods of child-raising spent abroad as substitute periods, the respondent State has treated the applicant differently on the basis of a situation that she was forced to accept as a result of that grave human rights violation. The applicant’s actual situation reinforces that pattern of exclusion: years of childcare for children born in the context of such exclusion are treated as years of childcare provided by a non-Austrian mother.
7. We accept that the Convention does not restrict the Contracting States’ freedom to decide whether or not to have special social security regimes for victims of persecution. If, however, a State does decide to create a special scheme, as Austria did when it approved the 2002 amendment to the General Social Security Act, it must do so in a manner which is compatible with Article 14 of the Convention (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 53, ECHR 2006-VI). This State obligation is even more compelling in the present case, where the special regime in question aims to repair the harm done to people who suffered persecution. For the reasons set out above, we consider that the exclusion of periods of child-raising by Austrian mothers abroad not only contradicted the generous aim of the 2002 amendment but, more seriously, infringed the European standard of equality. Consequently, we consider that there has been a violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 14+P1-1
SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA RAVIV C. AUSTRIA
(Richiesta n. 26266/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
13 marzo 2012
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Raviv c. Austria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente Dragoljub Popović, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre András Sajó, Guido Raimondi Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque, giudici, Ewald Wiederin ad giudice di hoc,
e Françoise Elens-Passos, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato il 14 febbraio 2012,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 26266/05) contro la Repubblica dell'Austria depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino austriaco ed israeliano, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 20 luglio 2005.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica a Vienna. Il Governo austriaco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, Ambasciatore H. Tichy Capo del Diritto internazionale Settore al Ministero Federale per europeo ed Affari Internazionali.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che lei fu discriminata contro in che approvvigiona dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale austriaco mirato a vittime compensatore del Socialismo Nazionale non riuscì a prendere periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero in conto.
4. 3 settembre 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di comunicare l'azione di reclamo sopra al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo come la sua ammissibilità (l'Articolo 29 § 1). La richiesta fu trasferita più tardi alla Seconda Sezione della Corte, mentre seguendo la re-composizione delle sezioni della Corte 1 febbraio 2011.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque a Vienna nel 1936 da genitori ebrei. Suo padre fu arrestato nel 1939. Nel 1942 la famiglia seppe della sua morte. Lo stesso anno la madre del richiedente fu arrestata. Nel 1943 il richiedente e sua madre fu deportata al campo di concentramento in Bergen-Belsen. Loro furono trasferiti al campo di concentramento in Vittel nel 1944 e furono liberati lo stesso anno. Dopo avere passato quattro ulteriori anni in campi per deportati, il richiedente e sua madre emigrarono ad Israele nel 1948. Il richiedente ancora sta vivendo in Israele, dove lei risiede in Petah-Tikva.
6. Il richiedente si sposò nel 1957. Lei fa nascere tre figli in 1961, 1965 e 1971. Lei lavorò come un avvocato che pratica e pubblico di notaio.
7. Il 1 marzo 2002 un emendamento all'Atto della Previdenza Sociale Generale (Allgemeines Sozialversicherungsgesetz) entrò in vigore, mentre creando possibilità supplementari di ottenere diritti di pensione per persone a che erano state impedite dell'accumulare periodi di assicurazione col loro arresto, punizione, la detenzione, disoccupazione, denaturalizzazione o l'emigrazione come risultato della persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale.
8. Successivamente, il richiedente richiese all'Ufficio dell'Assicurazione della Pensione (Pensionsversicherungsanstalt) di applicare queste disposizioni alla sua causa.
9. Il 29 ottobre 2002 l'Ufficio dell'Assicurazione della Pensione emise una decisione dichiaratoria che afferma che il richiedente fu concesso per pagare contributi di assicurazione in riguardo di periodi dell'emigrazione fra il 20 gennaio 1951 e il 31 dicembre 1965 -un totale di 180 mesi di assicurazione-facendo seguito a sezione 504(2) preso in concomitanza con sezione 502(6) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale. Inoltre, i certi periodi di secondario ed istruzione di università fu accettata come periodi di sostituto (Ersatzzeiten) purché che contributi furono pagati in riguardo di periodi dell'emigrazione.
10. In una lettera dello stesso giorno l'Ufficio dell'Assicurazione della Pensione informò il richiedente che lei dovrebbe pagare 24.19 euro (EUR) per mese, costituendo un importo totale di EUR 4,354.20 180 mesi di assicurazione. Facendo questo pagamento con 31 maggio 2003 all'ultimo lei sarebbe concessa ad una pensione mensile di EUR 277.25 più due pagamenti supplementari nello stesso importo per anno, con effetto da 1 marzo 2002.
11. Il richiedente fece appello contro la decisione di 29 ottobre 2002, mentre dibattendo, inter alia che periodi di figlio-sollevare dovrebbero essere contati per il fine di calcolare la sua pensione. Non facendo discriminerebbe così contro lei in relazione a donne che non erano state costrette per emigrare ed avevano allevato così i loro figli in Austria.
12. In 6 maggio 2003 l'Ufficio della Vienna Governatore Regionale (der di Amt Landesregierung) respinse il ricorso del richiedente. Fondò che l'Ufficio dell'Assicurazione della Pensione aveva fatto domanda correttamente sezioni 502(4) e (6) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale con dichiarando che il richiedente fu concesso ad un massimo di 180 mesi di assicurazione fra gennaio 1951, quando lei era giunta all'età di quindici, e dicembre 1965. Periodi di secondario ed istruzione di università di anni 1953 a 1959 furono accettati all'estero come periodi di sostituto facendo seguito a sezione 502(7) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale preso in concomitanza con sezioni 227(1)(1) e 228(1)(3). Comunque, sezione 500 e le sezioni susseguenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale non previdero per periodi di figlio-sollevare all'interno del significato di sezione 227a per essere contato come periodi di sostituto.
13. Il richiedente presentò un reclamo con la Corte Costituzionale (Verfassungsgerichthof), adducendo che sezione 502 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale violata il principio dell'uguaglianza come garantita con Articolo 7 § 1 della Costituzione Federale. Lei dibattè in particolare che escludendo periodi di figlio-sollevare sulla base che loro sono stati spesi all'estero funzionò cassa all'intenzione fondamentale degli articoli riguardo a trattamento preferenziale di persone che avevano sofferto di svantaggi nel loro status di previdenza sociale durante l'era Socialista e Nazionale. Questi articoli che eliminarono gli svantaggi finanziari subiti con vittime del Socialismo Nazionale sotto legge di previdenza sociale furono tirati.
14. 23 settembre 2003 la Corte Costituzionale rifiutò di trattare con l'azione di reclamo del richiedente per mancanza di prospettive del successo. Osservò che in un'area come il presente, concernendo disposizioni speciali che danno trattamento preferenziale ad un particolare gruppo di persone sotto legge di previdenza sociale, la legislatura aveva un margine ampio della valutazione nel valutare se eventi che accaddero all'estero sarebbero trattati su un appiglio uguale con eventi che sono accaduti in Austria.
15. Seguendo una richiesta col richiedente la Corte Costituzionale si riferì la causa alla Corte amministrativa (Verwaltungsgerichtshof). Prima che corte che il richiedente ha ripetuto in essenza gli argomenti che lei aveva sollevato di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. Lei asserì in particolare che, avendo riguardo ad allo scopo perseguito con sezione 502 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale ed il fatto che periodi di secondario ed istruzione di università fu accettata all'estero come periodi di sostituto, la mancanza di una disposizione incluso periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero come periodi di sostituto potrebbe essere considerata solamente un'omissione. Le autorità avrebbero dovuto chiudere questa apertura non intenzionale nella legge con accettando periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero come periodi di sostituto.
16. 22 dicembre 2004 la Corte amministrativa respinse l'azione di reclamo del richiedente come essendo infondato. Notò che sezione 500 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale e le sue sezioni susseguenti che eliminò svantaggi nell'accumulare periodi di assicurazione dei quali vittime del Socialismo Nazionale avevano sofferto su conto della loro persecuzione o l'emigrazione fu tirata. La legge non costrinse a c'essere un collegamento causale ed effettivo fra persecuzione e la perdita di periodi di assicurazione. Procedè dall'assunzione che senza la persecuzione, periodi di assicurazione sarebbero stati accumulati, e purché per accreditare in generale (il pauschalierte Anrechnung) di periodi di contributo o periodi di sostituto per compensare per periodi di persecuzione o l'emigrazione.
La Corte amministrativa seguì a sostenere:
“In tale sistema, un gap teologico non può in linea di principio risultare dal fatto che la legislatura non ha prolungato l'accreditare di periodi di figlio-sollevare in Austria sotto sezione 227a dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale a persone che, per ragioni collegarono a persecuzione all'interno del significato di sezione 500, viva all'estero durante periodi di figlio-sollevare. Sezione 227a ha un simile (il sostituto) la funzione in che prevede similmente per l'accreditare per fini di assicurazione di periodi durante i quali la persona riguardata fu ostacolato dall'accumulare periodi di assicurazione (in questa istanza, su conto di figlio-sollevare). In finora come la legislatura già compensa per la perdita di periodi di assicurazione come un risultato di persecuzione, di nessun ulteriore risarcimento è avuto bisogno. In finora come sé non faccia simile disposizione, non c'è differenza in relazione alle altre persone che sono all'estero residenti: su conto del principio di territoriality applicabile sotto lo schema di previdenza sociale, gli accreditare di periodi di assicurazione in conformità con sezione 227a dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale possono, in qualsiasi evento richiede una disposizione di equalisation per un accordo internazionale e, inoltre, decisioni in simile questioni non sarebbero prese in procedimenti amministrativi ma in procedimenti riguardo a diritti di beneficio.
Sezione 502(7) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale questa sentenza non altera in qualsiasi il modo. Questa disposizione ha due scopi: assicura che periodi di istruzione che è stata interrotta come un risultato di persecuzione sono riguardati siccome completato (costituendo così una situazione che genera trattamento preferenziale sotto sezione 502(4)), e mette all'estero scuola e presenza di università ed in Austria su un appiglio uguale. Questa uguaglianza di trattamento per ammissione è di significato per diritto di beneficio (e non solo per la richiesta di trattamento preferenziale sulla base dell'emigrazione). Comunque, come simile incorre all'interno della discrezione goduta con la legislatura nelle questioni di politica legale. Nessuno ulteriori inferenze saranno dedotte da questo in termini del principio dell'uguaglianza, specialmente non nella maniera dibattuta col reclamante.”
Infine, la Corte amministrativa notò che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente andò a vuoto a dare ragioni più particolareggiate come a perché accettando periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero come periodi di sostituto fu richiesto obiettivamente.
17. La sentenza fu notificata sul consiglio del richiedente 20 gennaio 2005.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. L'Atto Generale della Previdenza Sociale -norme generali
18. L'Atto del Social Security del Generale (Allgemeines Sozialversicherungs-gesetz) regola salute ed assicurazione contro gli incidenti ed assicurazione di pensione di vecchio-età per persone assunte in Austria, basato sul principio contribuente.
19. Sezione 4 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale regola l'affiliazione obbligatoria al sistema di previdenza sociale. Facendo seguito a sezione 4(1)(1), impiegati sono affiliati alla salute e schema di assicurazione contro gli incidenti ed allo schema di pensione di anzianità. Sezione 4(2) definisce un impiegato come qualsiasi persona che lavora nella considerazione di rimunerazione in una relazione di dipendenza personale ed economica. Per un impiegato affiliato al sistema di previdenza sociale, contributi obbligatori dovevano essere pagati in parte col datore di lavoro ed in parte con l'impiegato.
20. Diritto ad una pensione di vecchio-età sorge quando una persona che è giunta ad età pensionabile ha accumulato un numero sufficiente di mesi di assicurazione, il minimo essere richiesto 180 mesi.
21. Quando calcolando il numero di mesi di assicurazione, i certi periodi durante i quali è stata intrapresa nessuna attività lucrativa e così nessuno contributi sono stati resi, è preso ciononostante in considerazione come periodi di sostituto, per periodi di istanza di secondario o istruzione di università, figlio-alzata, disoccupazione, o servizio militare o alternativo.
22. Gli articoli attinenti in periodi di sostituto sono posati in giù in sezioni 227, 227a e 228 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale. Le disposizioni seguenti sono attinenti nel contesto della causa presente.
Sezione 227(1)(1) e sezione 228(1)(3) regoli in dettaglio che periodi di istruzione secondaria ed istruzione di università in Austria saranno accreditati come periodi di sostituto.
Sezione 227a dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale prevede che periodi che la persona assicurata ha speso sollevando esclusivamente o principalmente suo o il suo figlio sarà contato come periodi di sostituto su ad un massimo di quarantotto mesi, cominciando con la nascita di ogni figlio se il periodo di figlio-sollevare fosse passato in Austria.
B. Trattamento preferenziale di persone che soffrirono di svantaggi nel loro status di previdenza sociale nell'era Socialista e Nazionale
23. Sezione 500 dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale prevede che persone che, fra il 1933 e 9 maggio 1945 di 4 marzo, soffrì di un svantaggio nel loro status di previdenza sociale per ragioni politiche -eccetto in collegamento con attività Socialiste e Nazionali -o a causa della loro religione o razza ricevere trattamento preferenziale è.
24. I dettagli riguardo a questo trattamento preferenziale sono regolati nelle sezioni susseguenti e differiscono secondo se la persona emigrò o non. Le disposizioni attinenti furono decretate nel 1968 e furono corrette successivamente molte volte.
25. Sezione 502(4) prevede che persone che emigrarono durante il periodo summenzionato ed avevano accumulato periodi di assicurazione o periodi di sostituto prima di che tempo è concesso per pagare contributi retroattivi (di verso EUR 25 per mese) per periodi dell'emigrazione su a 31 marzo 1959.
26. Facendo seguito a sezione 502(6), nella versione in vigore fin da 1 marzo 2002, persone che emigrarono ma avevano, per ragioni oltre il loro controllo non accumularono, qualsiasi periodi di assicurazione o periodi di sostituto prima della loro emigrazione sono concessi anche per pagare contributi retroattivi se loro nascessero su o prima 12 marzo 1938 ed era residente in Austria su quel la data. Contributi retroattivi possono essere resi con effetto dal quindicesimo compleanno della persona al più primo. Un'ulteriore disposizione (sezione 592(2)) i limiti la possibilità di fare contributi retroattivi a 180 mesi di assicurazione.
27. Facendo seguito a sezione 502(7), periodi di istruzione secondaria o istruzione di università saranno dati all'estero fra il 1933 e 31 marzo 1959 di 4 marzo con nello stesso modo come periodi che incorrono sezioni 227(1)(1 sotto) e 228(1)(3). In essenza che vuole dire che simile periodi saranno contati come periodi di sostituto, nello stesso modo come periodi di istruzione secondaria o istruzione di università spesi in Austria.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
28. Il richiedente si lamentò che le disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale che non trattò periodi di figlio-sollevare spesero all'estero sullo stesso appiglio come simile periodi spesi in Austria, discriminata contro lei. Lei si appellò su Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1.
Articolo 14 prevede:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
29. In primo luogo, il richiedente chiese di essere stato discriminato all'estero contro su conto della sua residenza. In secondo luogo, lei addusse che la distinzione contenne la discriminazione di genere inerente, poiché donne ne furono colpite principalmente. In terzo luogo, lei disse di essere stata discriminata contro come periodi di disoccupazione fu contato come periodi di assicurazione irrispettoso di se loro furono spesi in Austria o all'estero, mentre periodi di figlio-sollevare furono contati solamente come periodi di sostituto se loro fossero spesi in Austria.
30. Il Governo contestò quel l'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
31. Il Governo asserì che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire via di ricorso nazionali come richiesto con Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione. Nella prospettiva del Governo, il richiedente aveva chiesto solamente una violazione del principio dell'uguaglianza (Gleichheitsgrundsatz) sotto Articolo 7 § 1 della Costituzione Federale, ma né aveva esplicitamente né in sostanza si appellata sul suo diritto di proprietà nelle sue azioni di reclamo depositate con la Corte Costituzionale e la Corte amministrativa. Notando che il richiedente era stato rappresentato con consiglio in tutto i procedimenti nazionali, il Governo dibattè che lei si sarebbe potuta essere aspettata di sollevare la sua azione di reclamo che concerne il suo diritto di proprietà con le autorità nazionali, oltre alla sua dichiarazione della discriminazione. In conclusione, il Governo affermò, che il richiedente non aveva esaurito debitamente via di ricorso nazionali in riguardo della sua azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
32. Il richiedente contestò la prospettiva del Governo, mentre affermando che era sufficiente per sollevare le violazioni allegato in sostanza che lei aveva fatto nei procedimenti nazionali. In contrasto, non era necessario per riferirsi esplicitamente ai Convenzione Articoli attinenti di fronte alle autorità nazionali. Il richiedente asserì che il principio dell'uguaglianza sotto Articolo 7 § 1 della Costituzione Federale corrispose ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione ma era più ampio in sfera come sé non era complice in natura.
33. La Corte reitera che Articolo che 35 § 1 della Convenzione richiede che le azioni di reclamo intesero di essere rese successivamente in Strasburgo sarebbe dovuto essere reso al corpo nazionale ed appropriato, almeno in sostanza ed in ottemperanza coi requisiti formali e tempo-limiti posati in giù in diritto nazionale (vedere Cardot c. Francia, 19 marzo 1991, § 34 la Serie Un n. 200, ed Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, § 66 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV). Comunque, che disposizione dovrebbe essere fatta domanda con un certo grado della flessibilità e senza eccessivo riguardo a per le questioni di forma (vedere Cardot, citata sopra, § 34, ed Akdivar ed Altri, citata sopra, § 69).
34. La Corte nota che, nei procedimenti nazionali, il richiedente si lamentò della discriminazione in relazione alla sua pensione chiede sulla base che periodi di figlio-sollevare hanno speso all'estero non fu trattato come periodi di sostituto nello stesso modo come figlio-sollevando periodi spesi in Austria. Simile considerazione di periodi di sostituto ha effetti inerenti e diretti sulla rivendicazione di pensione del richiedente, e così su una rivendicazione finanziaria. La Corte perciò i costatazione che il richiedente ha sollevato la sua azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in sostanza di fronte alle autorità nazionali e corti, riconoscendo così che lo Stato l'opportunità di mettere diritto le violazioni, addusse contro sé (vedere Akdivar ed Altri, citata sopra, § 65).
35. La Corte conclude perciò che in finora come il richiedente si lamenta che periodi di figlio-sollevare spesero all'estero non fu preso in considerazione come periodi di sostituto per il calcolo della sua rivendicazione di pensione, la sua azione di reclamo non può essere respinta per insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali.
36. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata anche manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
37. Comunque, la Corte nota che nei procedimenti nazionali il richiedente non sollevò, o esplicitamente o in sostanza, le sue azioni di reclamo della discriminazione di genere indiretta e della discriminazione in relazione a periodi di disoccupazione spesi all'estero che è trattato come periodi di sostituto per il calcolo di una rivendicazione di pensione. Lei sollevò solamente quelle azioni di reclamo nella sua richiesta di fronte alla Corte.
38. Segue che queste azioni di reclamo devono essere respinte sotto Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
39. Il richiedente affermò che le disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale discriminarono contro lei su conto del fatto che loro non trattarono periodi di figlio-sollevare spesi all'estero sullo stesso appiglio come simile periodi spesi in Austria. Lei sostenne che il fine di sezione 500 e le sezioni susseguenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale era compensare vittime del Socialismo Nazionale per svantaggi subito sotto legge di previdenza sociale. Comunque, la legge andò a vuoto a realizzare che scopo in che trattò periodi di figlio-sollevare passati all'estero differentemente come un risultato della forzata emigrazione da periodi di figlio-sollevare spesi in Austria. C'era nessuna politica pubblica discute giustificando questa differenza.
40. Nella misura in cui il Governo si riferisce al principio di territorialità sottostante la legge di previdenza sociale fondamentale, il richiedente dibatté che sezione 502 dell'Atto Generale della previdenza Sociale già fece eccezioni a che principio nel contesto di trattamento preferenziale di vittime del Socialismo Nazionale. Non c’erano nessuna ragione di non applicare lo stesso approccio a periodi di allevamento di figli trascorsi all'estero.
41. Il Governo contestò la prospettiva del richiedente. Loro notarono che la sezione 500 e sezioni susseguenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale intrapresero lo scopo di offrire trattamento preferenziale per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale con concedendo loro comprare periodi di contributo a tassi preferenziali per essere concesso ad una pensione di anzianità sotto il sistema di previdenza sociale austriaco. Questa possibilità era solamente aperta a vittime del Socialismo Nazionale e persone che traggono profitto da queste disposizioni era così in una situazione diversa dagli altri sottoscrittori.
42. Riferendosi alle ragioni espose fuori nella sentenza della Corte amministrativa di 22 dicembre 2004, loro dibatterono che sezione 500 e sezioni susseguenti dell'Atto Generale della Previdenza Sociale prevedevano di accreditare in generale di periodi di contributo o periodi di sostituto per eliminare svantaggi subiti come risultato di persecuzione Socialista Nazionale, incluso periodi dell'emigrazione. In tale sistema la legislatura non fu obbligata per prevedere per accreditare di periodi di figlio-sollevare spese all'estero. Sul contrario, l'esclusione di simile accreditare notificò ostacolare una situazione dove lo stesso periodo fu preso due volte in considerazione. Se la legge trattasse periodi di istruzione secondaria ed istruzione di università spesi all'estero come periodi di sostituto, questo incorse all'interno del margine di un Stato membro della valutazione nelle questioni di politica sociale.
43. Inoltre, il Governo asserì che il principio di territorialità era inerente in tutte le questioni di politica di previdenza sociale e legge. Lo schema di pensione di anzianità legale sotto l'Atto del Social Security del Generale era in principio confinato al territorio federale, mentre prevedendo per assicurazione obbligatoria di persone assunse in Austria o con società con la loro sede centrale in Austria. Di conseguenza, periodi di figlio-sollevare condussero all'accreditare solamente di periodi di sostituto se il figlio fosse allevato in Austria. Eccezioni furono rese solamente sotto legge di Comunità che non era attinente nel contesto presente e sulla base di accordi bilaterali. Non c'era accordo bilaterale con l'Israele in quel il riguardo. Doveva infine, essere tenuto presente. Questo fu sottolineato col fatto che periodi di sostituto per figlio-sollevare erano come un articolo accreditato al genitore che riceve assegno di permesso parentale. In somma, fu giustificato per limitare l'accreditare di periodi di sostituto a cause nelle quali il figlio era allevato in Austria.
44. In conclusione, il Governo asserì, che la legislatura non aveva trasgredito il margine della valutazione quando -nel preparare un sistema di trattamento preferenziale in legge di previdenza sociale per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale -aveva deciso di non accordare accreditando supplementare per periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero. Di conseguenza, il fatto che nella causa del richiedente simile periodi non fu contato come periodi di sostituto non riveli qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) principi di Generale
45. La Corte nota che non è stato contestato nella causa presente che Articolo 14 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, fa domanda. La Corte reitera che benché Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non include il diritto per ricevere un pagamento di previdenza sociale di qualsiasi il genere, se un Stato decide di creare un schema di benefici, deve fare così in una maniera che è compatibile con Articolo 14 (vedere Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 55 ECHR 2005-X; Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, §79 ECHR 2009 -...; Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 64 ECHR 2010 -... e Stummer c. l'Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 83 7 luglio 2011). Avendo riguardo ad alla sua causa-legge, la Corte non vede nessuna ragione di giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella causa presente.
46. La Corte ha stabilito nella sua causa-legge che solamente differenzia in trattamento basata su una caratteristica identificabile, o “lo status”, è capace di corrispondere alla discriminazione all'interno del significato di Articolo 14 (vedere Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, § 61; e Stummer, citata sopra, § 87).
47. Inoltre, in ordine per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo o in modo pertinente situazioni simili. Tale differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole, in altre parole se non intraprende uno scopo legittimo o se non c'è nessuna relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso (vedere Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 65731/01, § 51 ECHR 2006-VI; Andrejeva, citata sopra, § 81; Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, § 61; e Stummer, citata sopra, § 87).
48. Lo Stato Contraente gode di un margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed in che misura differenze in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifichino un trattamento diverso. La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, il soggetto e il background. Come un articolo generale, ragioni molto pesanti dovrebbero essere fissate spedisce di fronte alla Corte potrebbe riguardare una differenza in trattamento basato esclusivamente sulla base di sesso come compatibile con la Convenzione. D'altra parte ad un margine ampio è concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione di solito quando viene a misure generali della strategia economica o sociale. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che che è nell'interesse pubblico su motivi sociali ed economici, e la Corte rispetterà la scelta di politica della legislatura generalmente a meno che è “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (vedere Stec ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 51-52, con gli ulteriori riferimenti; vedere anche Andrejeva, citata sopra, § 82-83; Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, § 61; e Stummer, citata sopra, § 88).
(b) l’applicazione di questi principi alla presente causa
49. Nella presente causa, la rivendicazione del richiedente è che lei fu discriminata contro come periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero non fu trattato su un appiglio uguale con periodi di figlio-sollevare spesi in Austria. La Corte già ha sostenuto che “la residenza” costituisce un aspetto di status personale per i fini di Articolo 14 (vedere Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 70-71).
50. La Corte nota all'inizio che sezione 500 e sezioni susseguenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale crearono un regime speciale per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale. Queste disposizioni che eliminano svantaggi in legge di previdenza sociale sono tirate subì con questo gruppo per accreditando in generale di periodi di assicurazione. Come un articolo generale, l'affiliazione al sistema di previdenza sociale, incluso il sistema di pensione di anzianità è collegata a lavoro in Austria e è basata sul pagamento obbligatorio di contributi.
51. In contrasto, sotto il regime speciale assegnato a sopra vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale che uno non completò una piena carriera di contributi di assicurazione in Austria o che, come il richiedente, non accumuli qualsiasi mesi di assicurazione in Austria che deve alla loro età al tempo della loro emigrazione possono divenire eleggibili per una pensione di anzianità con pagando contributi retroattivi su una base volontaria. Inoltre, questi contributi possono essere resi a tassi preferenziali determinati con Sezione 502 (4) dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale che corrispose a verso EUR 25 per mese al tempo quando il richiedente si avvalse di questa possibilità.
52. La Corte nota che il regime speciale per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale fa eccezioni dai principi di base di legge di previdenza sociale austriaca e fa domanda un set distinto di articoli a loro. Avendo riguardo ad in particolare alla possibilità di accumulare mesi di assicurazione senza avere un lavoro in Austria, la natura volontaria dell'assicurazione e la richiesta di tassi preferenziali, la Corte considera che persone come il richiedente che è coperto col regime speciale non sono in un in modo pertinente situazione simile a persone che hanno fatto contributi regolari al sistema di pensione di anzianità sulla base del loro lavoro in Austria. Di conseguenza, nessun problema della discriminazione sotto Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 sorge su conto del fatto che periodi della figlio-cura spesero all'estero non è contato come periodi di sostituto.
53. Il richiedente sembra anche comunque, stia lamentandosi che all'interno del gruppo di persone che traggono profitto dal regime speciale descritto sopra di, lei fu discriminata contro. In finora siccome lei si lamenta che l'insuccesso per accreditare periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero come importi di periodi di sostituto alla discriminazione di genere inerente, la Corte già ha notato sopra che il richiedente non sollevò questo argomento nei procedimenti nazionali, e ha respinto questa parte dell'azione di reclamo per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali. Lo stesso fa domanda al paragone con periodi di disoccupazione che il richiedente non sollevò nei procedimenti nazionali uno (vedere divide in paragrafi 37-38 sopra).
54. Che resti per essere esaminato sono l'argomento del richiedente che lei sollevò di fronte alla Corte amministrativa che oltre all'accreditare complessivo di periodi di assicurazione con modo di pagare retroattivamente contributi preferenziali, periodi dell'istruzione superiore sono presi in considerazione come periodi di sostituto se sono accaduti all'estero loro, mentre periodi di figlio-sollevare non sono. Il Governo asserì che nell'area di politica sociale, la legislatura doveva decidere se o non l'accreditare di periodi di sostituto all'interno del regime speciale era riconciliabile con gli altri scopi di politica, come per politica di famiglia di istanza in riguardo di accreditare all'estero di periodi di figlio-alzata. In contrasto, il richiedente sembra dibattere che, all'interno del regime speciale, la legislatura è obbligata per trattare tutti i set di fatti che sono capaci di essere accreditati come periodi di sostituto sotto legge di previdenza sociale austriaca sullo stesso appiglio.
55. La Corte non è d'accordo con quel la prospettiva. Osserva che qui il paragone è fra persone che incorrono il regime speciale per vittime di persecuzione Cittadino-socialista che non può ottenere accreditando per figlio-sollevare all'estero periodi sotto, e persone che incorrono il regime speciale sotto e che può ottenere accreditando all'estero per periodi dell'istruzione superiore. La Corte non trova che c'è una differenza di trattamento fra quelli due gruppi basati su un aspetto di status personale come richiesti con Articolo 14.
56. Effettivamente, il richiedente stesso, mentre lei non potesse ottenere accreditando per periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero, ottenne accreditando di periodi dell'istruzione superiore spese all'estero fra il 1953 ed il 1959 come periodi di sostituto. In essenza, il richiedente sta lamentandosi, che la legge richiede le condizioni diverse per l'accreditare di tipi diversi di periodi di sostituto in riguardo dello stesso gruppo di persone che in se stesso non rivelano qualsiasi elemento della discriminazione.
57. In conclusione, i costatazione di Corte che hanno comparato a persone che hanno fatto contributi regolari al sistema di pensione di vecchio-età il richiedente che è sostituito col regime speciale vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale non sono in un pertinentemente situazione simile. All'interno del gruppo di persone coperto col regime speciale i costatazione di Corte che non c'è nessuna differenza di trattamento basati su qualsiasi elemento di status personale.
58. C'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
59. Il richiedente si lamentò Articolo 1 di Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 preso da solo che l'austriaco corteggia il rifiuto di ' per contare periodi di figlio-sollevare spesi all'estero come periodi di sostituto violati il suo diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Lei sembra stia dibattendo che, aveva i periodi in oggetto stato contato come periodi di sostituto, lei avrebbe ricevuto una pensione più alta.
60. La Corte nota che il Governo ha sollevato anche una difficoltà di insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali in riguardo dell'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 da solo. Comunque, la Corte non è chiamata su per determinare questo problema come l'azione di reclamo è in qualsiasi la causa inammissibile per le ragioni seguenti.
61. Secondo la giurisprudenza stabilita della Corte, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà o ricevere un beneficio di previdenza sociale o pagamento di pensione di qualsiasi il genere o corrisponde, a meno che purché per con legge nazionale (vedere mutatis mutandis, Stec ed Altri (il dec.), citata sopra, § 55, e Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 53 e 57). Al giorno d'oggi la causa, legge nazionale non prevede per contare all'estero periodi di figlio-alzata come periodi di sostituto. Di conseguenza, nessun diritto ad una pensione più alta può seguire dall'avere passato periodi di figlio-sollevare fuori dell'Austria.
62. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è incompatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) e deve essere respinto in conformità con Articolo 35 § 4.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità l'azione di reclamo riguardo all’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibile nella misura in cui il richiedente si lamenta che periodi di allevamento del figlio trascorsi all'estero non furono preso in considerazione come periodi di sostituto per il calcolo della sua rivendicazione di pensione, ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene per quattro voti a tre che c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 13 marzo 2012, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Françoise Elens-Passos Françoise Tulkens Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione separata dei Giudici Popović, Sajó and Pinto de Albuquerque è annesso a questa sentenza.
F.T.
F.E.P.


OPINIONE CONGIUNTA CHE DISSENTE DEI GIUDICI POPOVIĆ, SAJÓ E PINTO DE ALBUQUERQUE
1. La presente causa riguarda una rivendicazione della discriminazione basata sul fatto che periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero non furono trattati su un appiglio uguale con periodi di figlio-sollevare spesi in Austria per il fine di contare periodi di assicurazione di sostituto. La Corte già ha sostenuto che “la residenza” costituisce un aspetto di status personale per i fini di Articolo 14 (vedere Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, §§ 70-71 ECHR 2010). Noi troviamo che la rivendicazione è fondata poiché il richiedente fu sottoposto a trattamento discriminatorio basato precisamente all'estero sulla sua residenza. Il nostro disaccordo con la maggioranza è basato severamente così, su una questione di principio legale, la situazione che riguarda i fatti del richiedente che è incontrastato. E la questione di principio in questa causa è la seguente: debba previdenza sociale e diritto di politica di famiglia madri austriache che allevano i loro figli in Austria su madri austriache che li sollevano all'estero? Contrari alla risposta positiva della maggioranza, la nostra replica è un inequivocabile “nessuno.”
2. Come un articolo generale, l'affiliazione al sistema di previdenza sociale, incluso il sistema di pensione di anzianità è collegata a lavoro in Austria e è basata sul pagamento obbligatorio di contributi. Sezione 500 e sezioni susseguenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale crearono un regime speciale per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale, l'essere di scopo per compensare vittime di simile persecuzione per accreditando in generale di periodi di assicurazione per svantaggi subì sotto legge di previdenza sociale come un risultato di persecuzione o l'emigrazione. Sotto questo regime speciale, vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale che uno non completò una piena carriera di contributi di assicurazione in Austria o che, come il richiedente, non accumuli qualsiasi mesi di assicurazione in Austria che deve alla loro età al tempo della loro emigrazione possono divenire eleggibili per una pensione di anzinaità con pagando contributi retroattivi a tassi preferenziali su una base volontaria. Il problema giace nel fatto che periodi di figlio-sollevare in Austria sono contati come periodi di sostituto facendo seguito a sezione 227a dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale che non è la causa per periodi di figlio-sollevare spesa all'estero.
3. La Corte amministrativa nella sua sentenza di 22 dicembre 2004 celebre che sezione 500 e le sezioni susseguenti dell'Atto del Social Security del Generale realizzarono lo scopo di eliminare svantaggi in status di previdenza sociale subito con vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale con modo di accreditare in generale di periodi di assicurazione. Questo fu basato sull'assunzione che periodi di assicurazione sarebbero stati accumulati se non c'era stata persecuzione. In tale sistema, l'ulteriore risarcimento per specifici periodi, come periodi di figlio-sollevare non fu richiesto. Era all'interno del margine della legislatura della valutazione per decidere se e, in tal caso che sostituisce periodi sarebbe accreditato in riguardo di fatti che accaddero all'estero.
Nelle loro osservazioni il Governo si appellò sulle stesse ragioni, ma aggiunse due ulteriori argomenti. Prima, loro affermarono che all'interno del regime speciale per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale, gli accreditare di periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero oltre all'accreditare complessivo di periodi di assicurazione corrisponderebbero a contando due volte gli stessi periodi. Secondo, loro dibatterono che l'accreditare di periodi di sostituto per figlio-sollevare non solo era una questione di legge di previdenza sociale ma anche di politica di famiglia. Sia il principio di territoriality inerente in legge di previdenza sociale e gli interessi legittimi di politica di famiglia ragioni obiettive previdero per contare periodi di figlio-sollevare solamente come periodi di sostituto se loro fossero stati spesi in Austria.
4. Noi non siamo convinti col primo argomento del Governo. Noi notiamo in particolare che l'argomento che accettando periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero come periodi di sostituto oltre all'accreditare complessivo di periodi di assicurazione ha previsto per col regime speciale può condurre a contando due volte lo stesso periodo farebbe domanda anche a periodi dell'istruzione superiore spesi all'estero. Effettivamente, il richiedente stessa ottenne il diritto ad accreditando in generale di 180 mesi di assicurazione in riguardo degli anni 1951 a 1965 con pagando contributi retroattivi. In oltre, periodi dell'istruzione superiore negli anni che 1953 a 1959 sono stati contati come periodi di sostituto. Se l'argomento di “duplice” accreditando di periodi di assicurazione non conta per periodi dell'istruzione superiore spesi all'estero, non c'è senso nel concedergli contare con riguardo ad a periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero.
5. Noi non siamo convinti con o il secondo argomento del Governo che essenzialmente si appella sul principio di territorialità inerente in legge di previdenza sociale per la semplice ragione che il regime per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale stessa crea una situazione speciale con riguardo ad al principio di territorialità. L'argomento di territorialità chiaramente è riposto male nel contesto di una legge che mira precisamente a compensare vittime di persecuzione nel loro proprio paese che doveva lasciare il paese per sopravvivere. In questo collegamento, dovrebbe essere notato, che il richiedente fu deportato, prima, al campo di concentramento in Bergen-Belsen all'età di sette, e successivamente al campo di concentramento in Vittel, quattro anni esausti in campi per deportati ed emigrò ad Israele all'età di dodici. Lei non accumulò mai qualsiasi periodi di assicurazione in Austria sotto il regime ordinario. Nel contesto del regime legale e speciale descritto sopra di qualsiasi le considerazioni collegarono al principio di territoriality, incluso le considerazioni di politica di famiglia basate su che principio, non può offrire una giustificazione per avere distinto fra fatti che accadde in Austria e fatti che accadde all'estero. Noi lo troviamo il molto disturbando, dire il minimo che politica di famiglia dovrebbe privilegiare madri austriache che allevano i loro figli in Austria su madri austriache che fanno così all'estero. La presunzione di “meno prezioso” figlio-sollevare con madri austriache che vivono all'estero è totalmente inaccettabile.
6. Infine, l'argomento della Corte amministrativa non sostiene uno. Dato lo scopo del regime speciale di eliminare svantaggi per vittime di persecuzione Socialista e Nazionale, noi non possiamo vedere qualsiasi i motivi ragionevoli ed obiettivi per escludere un particolare tipo di periodo, vale a dire tempo spese figlio-alzata, sul risuola all'estero base di residenza, mentre prendendo in considerazione in particolare il fatto che la residenza del richiedente era all'estero precisamente a causa del suo status come una vittima di persecuzione.
Noi alleghiamo peso significativo al fatto che il richiedente fu perseguitato nel suo proprio paese e fu costretto per emigrare. Di conseguenza, non si può dire che lei scelse di vivere all'estero (in contrasto alla posizione in Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, § 86). Sul contrario, il fatto che lei è all'estero residente è collegato alla persecuzione della quale lei ha sofferto durante il periodo del Socialismo Nazionale. Noi troviamo che il richiedente fu messo contro la sua volontà in una situazione diversa da persone che hanno pagato contributi regolari al sistema di pensione di anzianità sulla base del loro lavoro in Austria. Nelle altre parole, lei forzatamente fu esclusa da una carriera di contributi regolari, simile esclusione che è il risultato di una violazione di diritti umani grave. La soluzione legale e contestata perpetua il modello di esclusione al quale la legislatura volle mettere una fine. Non contando periodi di figlio-sollevare spesi all'estero come periodi di sostituto, lo Stato rispondente ha trattato differentemente il richiedente sulla base di una situazione che lei è stata costretta per accettare come un risultato di che violazione di diritti umani grave. La situazione effettiva del richiedente esegue che modello di esclusione: anni di babysitting per figli nati nel contesto di simile esclusione sono trattati come anni di babysitting previsti con una madre di non-austriaco.
7. Noi accettiamo che la Convenzione non restringe gli Stati Contraenti la libertà di ' per decidere se avere regimi di previdenza sociale speciali per vittime di persecuzione o no. Comunque, se un Stato decide di creare un schema speciale, siccome faceva Austria quando approvò l'emendamento del 2002 all'Atto del Social Security del Generale, deve fare così in una maniera che è compatibile con Articolo 14 della Convenzione (vedere Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 53 ECHR 2006-VI). Questo obbligo Statale sta obbligando anche più nella causa presente, dove il regime speciale in oggetto scopi per riparare il danno fatto a persone che soffrirono di persecuzione. Per le ragioni esposero fuori sopra, noi consideriamo che l'esclusione di periodi di figlio-sollevare all'estero non solo con madri austriache contraddisse lo scopo generoso dell'emendamento del 2002 ma, più seriamente, infranse lo standard europeo dell'uguaglianza. Di conseguenza, noi consideriamo che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.