Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF B. v. THE UNITED KINGDOM

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, P1-1

NUMERO: 36571/06/2012
STATO: Inghilterra
DATA: 14/02/2012
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE


Conclusion No violation of Art. 14+P1-1
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF B. v. THE UNITED KINGDOM
(Application no. 36571/06)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
14 February 2012
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the
Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of B. v. the United Kingdom,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Lech Garlicki, President,
Nicolas Bratza,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Nebojša Vučinić,
Vincent A. De Gaetano, judges
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 24 January 2012,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 36571/06) against the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a British national, Ms B. (“the applicant”), on 31 August 2006. The Vice-President of the Section acceded to the applicant’s request not to have her name disclosed (Rule 47 § 3 of the Rules of Court).
2. The applicant, who had been granted legal aid, was represented by Ms OMISSIS of Child Poverty Action Group, a lawyer practising in London. The United Kingdom Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms H. Upton of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.
3. On 18 March 2009 the Vice-President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant was born in 1964 and lives in Middlesex.
5. The facts of the case, as submitted by the applicant, may be summarised as follows.
6. The applicant, who has a severe learning disability, has three children. From May 1990 she was in receipt of two non-contributory state benefits administered by the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions: child benefit and means-tested income support. Her income support personal allowance was assessed on the basis that she was a lone parent. She received an additional amount of personal allowance for each child who was a member of her family and a family premium. The benefits were paid by order book.
7. Pursuant to regulation 32(1) of the Income Support (General) Regulations 1987 (“the 1987 Regulations”), the applicant was under a duty to report any change of circumstance which might affect her entitlement to benefit to the Department of Work and Pensions (“DWP”). A note on the back of her order book advised her that she might break the law if she did not notify the DWP if a dependent or someone living with her moved to a different address. She had also received a Form INF4, which advised her that she should immediately inform the DWP if, inter alia, children that she had claimed for were taken into care.
8. In October 2000 the applicant’s three children were taken into care. She did not report this fact to the DWP. At the time, however, the applicant did not have the services of a social worker and she did not receive any practical help from the local authority disability team. It was accepted that she did not realise that this was a fact which she was required to report.
9. In November 2001 the applicant began to receive support from the Owl Housing Link Project, a charity which provides a range of support services to people with learning difficulties.
10. In December 2001 Owl Housing notified the DWP that the applicant’s children had been taken into care. There followed four separate decisions. First, the Secretary of State decided, pursuant to section 71(5A) of the Social Security Administration Act 1992 (“the 1992 Act”), to supersede her award of income support to reflect the fact that she had been receiving benefit to which she was not entitled. Secondly, a decision was made that the requirements of section 71(1) were satisfied so that the Secretary of State was entitled to recover the overpayment. Thirdly, the Secretary of State decided to exercise his discretion so as to recover the overpayment. Fourthly, the Secretary of State decided to recover the overpayment by reducing the applicant’s future payments of income support by the amount permitted by regulation 16 of the Recovery Regulations.
11. The amount of income support that the applicant had received in respect of her children after they had been taken into care was GBP 6,561.76. However, this amount was reduced by approximately 30 percent to GBP 4,626.74 because during the relevant period the applicant could have claimed, but did not claim, an income support disability premium.
12. The applicant appealed to the Social Security Appeal Tribunal (“the Tribunal”) against the Secretary of State’s decision that she had to repay GBP 4,626.74. She relied on previous decisions of the Social Security Commissioners, in which they held that there would be no failure to disclose unless disclosure was reasonably to be expected. If there was no failure to disclose, the question of recovery of an overpayment would not arise at all. The Tribunal allowed the applicant’s appeal, finding that the relevant test was not what a reasonable man would have thought it appropriate to disclose, but rather what a reasonable man knowing the particular circumstances of the claimant would have expected her to disclose. The Tribunal accepted that the applicant did not understand that the placing of her children in care was a material fact which she needed to disclose to the DWP, and that it was not reasonable to expect her, in the particular circumstances of her case, to have disclosed that fact.
13. The Secretary of State appealed to the Social Security Commissioners (“the Commissioners”). The Commissioners allowed the appeal, holding that if a claimant was aware of a matter which he or she had been required to disclose, there would be a breach of that duty even if, because of mental incapacity, the claimant was unaware of the materiality or relevance of the matter or did not understand an unambiguous request for information. Notwithstanding the settled case-law of the Commissioners, the “reasonableness test” was not a requirement under section 71 of the 1992 Act and did not represent a possible construction of section 71. Capacity was not relevant to the issue of failure to disclose and the applicant was in breach of the obligations imposed on her under the first limb of regulation 32(1) of the 1987 Regulations.
14. The applicant appealed to the Court of Appeal. She submitted that there had been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. I in that the State’s interference with her possessions discriminated unjustifiably between people who were unable to report facts because they were not aware of them and people who, like the applicant, were unable to report them for some other reason. It was argued in the alternative that the law treated identically people who were capable and people who were incapable of understanding that there was a fact which they were required to report.
15. The Court of Appeal held that the argument fell at the first fence because there were no possessions of the applicant at stake: what the Secretary of State was claiming was an entitlement to recover money which should not have been paid to the applicant in the first place. Although the decision of the Court of Appeal in the case of R. (Carson and Reynolds) v. the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions to the effect that a non-contributory benefit such as income support was not a possession within the meaning of Article 1 was taken as correct by the House of Lords, the underlying issue of principle awaited the decision of the Grand Chamber of the Court in the case of Stec. The recovery of overpaid benefits, however, stood outside this question and by parity of reasoning outside Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
16. The Court of Appeal went on to reject in any event the applicant’s first alleged ground of discrimination as it did not consider people who were unable to report facts because they were not aware of them to be in an analogous, or relevantly similar, situation to people who were unable to report them for some other reason. The proposition that you could not report something that you did not know was a simple proposition of logic, whereas the proposition that you could not report something you did not appreciate you had to report depended on difficult questions of cognitive capacity and moral sensitivity which varied from person to person.
17. As to the latter ground relied upon by the applicant, namely that the law treated identically people who were capable and people who were incapable of understanding that there was a fact which they were required to report, the Court of Appeal found it unnecessary to determine what was considered to be a difficult question, since the recovery of overpaid benefits could not in any event amount to a deprivation of possessions.
18. On 6 March 2006 the applicant was refused permission to appeal to the House of Lords.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
19. At the relevant time, regulation 32(1) of the 1987 Regulations provided that:
“Except in the case of a jobseeker’s allowance, every beneficiary and every person by whom or on whose behalf sums payable by way of benefit are receivable shall furnish in such a manner and at such times as the Secretary of State ... may determine such certificates or other documents and such information and facts affecting the right to benefit or its receipt as the Secretary of State ... may require (either as a condition on which any sum or sums shall be receivable or otherwise) and in particular shall notify the Secretary of State ... of any change of circumstances which he might reasonably be expected to know might affect the right to benefit, or to its receipt, as soon as reasonably practicable after its occurrence, by giving notice in writing (unless the Secretary of State ... determines in any particular case to accept notice otherwise than in writing) of any such change to the appropriate office.”
20. Pursuant to section 10 of the Social Security Act 1998, the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions had power to supersede an award of income support, where there had been a relevant change in circumstances, with retrospective effect from the date when the change occurred.
21. Where there was a failure to disclose a relevant change in circumstances, section 71 of the 1992 Act provided that:
“(1) Where it is determined that, whether fraudulently or otherwise, any person has misrepresented, or failed to disclose, any material fact and in consequence of the misrepresentation or failure—
(a) a payment has been made in respect of a benefit to which this section applies; or
...
the Secretary of State shall be entitled to recover the amount of any payment which he would not have made or any sum which he would have received but for the misrepresentation or failure to disclose.
(2) Where any such determination as is referred to in subsection (1) above is made on an appeal or review, there shall also be determined in the course of the appeal or review the question whether any, and if so what, amount is recoverable under that subsection by the Secretary of State.
(3) An amount recoverable under subsection (1) above is in all cases recoverable from the person who misrepresented the fact or failed to disclose it.
(5) Except where regulations otherwise provide, an amount shall not be recoverable under subsection (1) above unless the determination in pursuance of which it was paid has been reversed or varied on an appeal or revised on a review or has been revised under section 9 or suspended under section 10 of the Social Security Act 1998.
(8) Where any amount paid is recoverable under—
(a) subsection (1) above;
it may, without prejudice to any other method of recovery, be recovered by deduction from prescribed benefits.
(10) Any amount recoverable under the provisions mentioned in subsection (8) above—
(a) if the person from whom it is recoverable resides in England and Wales and the county court so orders, shall be recoverable by execution issued from the county court or otherwise as if it were payable under an order of that court; and
...
(11) This section applies to the following benefits—
(b) income support; ”
22. Regulations 13, 15 and 16 of the Social Security (Payments on account, Overpayments and Recovery) Regulations 1988 (“the 1988 Regulations) provide as follows:
“Sums to be deducted in calculating recoverable amounts
13. In calculating the amounts recoverable ... where there has been an overpayment of benefit, the adjudicating authority shall deduct—
(a) any amount which has been offset under Part III;
(b) any additional amount of income support which was not payable under the original, or any other, determination, but which should have been determined to be payable—
(i) on the basis of the claim as presented to the adjudicating authority, or
(ii) on the basis of the claim as it would have appeared had the misrepresentation or non-disclosure been remedied before the determination;
but no other deduction shall be made in respect of any other entitlement to benefit which may be, or might have been, determined to exist.
...
Recovery by deduction from prescribed benefits
15.—(1) Subject to regulation 16, where any amount is recoverable ... that amount shall be recoverable by the Secretary of State from any of the benefits prescribed by the next paragraph to which the person from whom it is determined the amount to be recoverable is entitled.
(2) The following benefits are prescribed for the purposes of this regulation—
...
(d) subject to regulation 16, any income support.
Limitations on deductions from prescribed benefits
16.—
...
(4) Regulation 15 shall apply to the amount of income support to which a person is presently entitled only to the extent that there may, subject to paragraphs 8 and 9 of Schedule 9 to the Claims and Payments Regulations, be recovered in respect of any one benefit week—
(a) in a case to which paragraph (5) applies, not more than the amount there specified; and
(b) in any other case, 3 times 5 per cent. of the personal allowance for a single claimant aged not less than 25, that 5 per cent. being, where it is not a multiple of 5 pence, rounded to the next higher such multiple.
(5) Where the person responsible for the misrepresentation of or failure to disclose a material fact has, by reason thereof, been found guilty of an offence under section 55 of the Act or under any other enactment, or has made a written statement after caution in admission of deception or fraud for the purpose of obtaining benefit, the amount mentioned in paragraph (4)(a) shall be 4 times 5 per cent. of the personal allowance for a single claimant aged not less than 25, that 5 per cent. being, where it is not a multiple of 10 pence, rounded to the nearest such multiple or, if it is a multiple of 5 pence but not of 10 pence, the next higher multiple of 10 pence.
(6) Where, in the calculation of the income of a person to whom the income support is payable, the amount of earnings or other income falling to be taken into account is reduced by paragraphs 4 to 9 of Schedule 8 to the Income Support Regulations (sums to be disregarded in the calculation of earnings) or paragraphs 15 and 16 of Schedule 9 to those Regulations (sums to be disregarded in the calculation of income other than earnings) the weekly amount applicable under paragraph (4) may be increased by not more than half the amount of the reduction, and any increase under this paragraph has priority over any increase which would, but for this paragraph, be made under paragraph 6(5) of Schedule 9 to the Claims and Payments Regulations.
(7) Regulation 15 shall not be applied to a specified benefit so as to reduce the benefit in any one benefit week to less than 10 pence.
...”
23. The Secretary of State’s policy on the recovery of overpaid benefit is set out in the Overpayment Recovery Guide, which contains guidance for decision-makers to adjudicate in overpayment cases. Section 12 of the Guide addresses “abatement by notional entitlement”, which is the exercise of discretion to recover a lower amount on account of the fact that a claimant could have claimed, but did not claim, some other social security benefit during the same period. In those circumstances, recovery is made of the net loss to public funds. Section 12 also addresses the exercise of discretion to waive recovery of overpayments, which is normally considered where there is reasonable evidence available that the recovery of an overpayment would be detrimental to the health and/or welfare of the debtor or their family or that recovery would not be in the public interest.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
24. The applicant complained that contrary to Article 14 of the Convention read together with Article 1 of Protocol No.1 persons unable to report facts because they were unaware of them were treated differently under section 71 of the 1992 Act from those who were unable to report facts for some other reason. In the alternative, she complained that the law treated identically persons who were capable and persons who were incapable of understanding that there was something which they were required to report.
25. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 provides as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
26. Article 14 of the Convention provides as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
27. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
1. The Government’s preliminary objection on incompatibility ratione materiae
(a) The Government’s submissions
28. The Government submitted that the application should be dismissed on account of its incompatibility ratione materiae with the Convention because there was no interference with any “possessions” of the applicant. The Government submitted that there was no interference with the applicant’s possessions first and foremost because she never satisfied the conditions of entitlement to the amounts of income support which were overpaid to her (see, for example, Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, 28 April 2009). She had never had any enforceable right to receive the disputed sums and could not have complained under Article 14 read together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 if the Secretary of State had refused to pay those sums in the first place. Indeed, the applicant had accepted that she was not entitled to child additions to her income support once she was no longer responsible for looking after her children and had not sought to challenge the Secretary of State’s decision to supersede her award of income support once he became aware of her changed circumstances.
29. The Government further submitted that as the overpaid sums were recovered by reducing the applicant’s future benefits, the case could be distinguished from Tsironis v. Greece, no. 44584/98, 6 December 2001, which concerned the seizure of existing possessions to enforce a debt.
(b) The applicant’s submissions
30. The applicant submitted that a determination under section 71 of the 1992 Act created a chose in action enforceable by the Secretary of State against the possessions of those subject to it. The possessions from which the Secretary of State could recover overpaid benefits included prescribed benefits to which the recipient was entitled and any other possessions that the recipient might have. Consequently, the applicant submitted that the creation of such a chose in action interfered with her peaceful enjoyment of possessions for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
31. The applicant disputed the Court of Appeal’s finding that no “possession” was involved as the amount in question should not have been paid to the applicant in the first place. Instead, she submitted that laws regulating the recovery of debt or damages from the possessions of a person and the resulting recovery of such sums from those possessions fell within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 since they authorised an interference with that person’s possessions. Thus, the Court held in Tsironis v. Greece, no. 44584/98, § 38, 6 December 2001 that the sale of a persons possessions to satisfy debts owed to a bank constituted an interference with his possessions.
32. In any event the applicant submitted that a person who was overpaid benefit owed no debt until the benefit was set aside with retrospective effect. Until then, she was entitled to payment of it. Setting aside her rights with retrospective effect had itself engaged Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for example, Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, ECHR 2004-IX). Replacing the right to payment an individual might have had retrospectively with a liability to repay an amount involved an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions (Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 74, ECHR 1999-VII).
(c) The Court’s assessment
33. The Court recalls that Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and the Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions (see, amongst many authorities, Şahin v. Germany [GC], no. 30943/96, § 85, ECHR 2003-VIII). The application of Article 14 does not necessarily presuppose the violation of one of the substantive rights guaranteed by the Convention. It is necessary but it is also sufficient for the facts of the case to fall “within the ambit” of one or more of the Convention Articles (see, among many other authorities, Abdulaziz, Cabales and Balkandali v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 28 May 1985, Series A no. 94, § 71; Karlheinz Schmidt v. Germany, judgment of 18 July 1994, Series A no. 291-B, § 22; and Petrovic v. Austria, judgment of 27 March 1998, Reports 1998-II, § 22).
34. The prohibition of discrimination in Article 14 thus extends beyond the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms which the Convention and its Protocols require each State to guarantee. It applies also to those additional rights, falling within the general scope of any Convention article, for which the State has voluntarily decided to provide. This principle is well entrenched in the Court’s case-law. It was expressed for the first time in the Case “relating to certain aspects of the laws on the use of languages in education in Belgium” v. Belgium (Merits) (judgment of 23 July 1968, Series A no. 6, § 9), when the Court noted that the right to obtain from the public authorities the creation of a particular kind of educational establishment could not be inferred from Article 2 of Protocol No. 1, and continued as follows:
“... nevertheless, a State which had set up such an establishment could not, in laying down entrance requirements, take discriminatory measures within the meaning of Article 14.”
35. The Court must decide, therefore, whether the interests of the applicant which were adversely affected by the impugned legislative scheme fell within the “ambit” or “scope” of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In this regard, the Court accepts that if the present case concerns a “possession” belonging to the applicant, then it would fall within the “ambit” or “scope” of Article 14 of the Convention.
36. The Court has consistently held that “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 can be either “existing possessions” (see Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 48, Series A no. 70, and Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, § 69, ECHR 2002-VII) or assets, including claims, in respect of which an applicant can argue that he has at least a “legitimate expectation” that they will be realised (see, for example, Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, 20 November 1995, § 31, Series A no. 332, and Ouzounis and Others v. Greece, no. 49144/99, § 24, 18 April 2002). In particular, the Court has held that where an individual has an assertable right under domestic law to a welfare benefit, the importance of that interest should be reflected by holding Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be applicable (Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 51, ECHR 2005-X). Moreover, the Court has held that the reduction or discontinuation of a benefit may constitute an interference with possessions which requires to be justified in the general interest (Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, judgment of 12 October 2004, ECHR 2004-IX, and Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, 15 September 2009).
37. The applicant primarily complained that a determination under section 71 of the 1992 Act created a chose in action enforceable by the Secretary of State against any possessions which she might have. However, it is clear to the Court that the Secretary of State decided, apparently pursuant to an invariable policy, to recover the overpaid benefit by deducting it from future prescribed benefits. There does not appear to have been any question of his interfering with the applicant’s existing possessions. Consequently, the Court considers that the present case can be distinguished from that of Tsironis v. Greece (cited above), which concerned the sale of an applicant’s actual possessions to satisfy a debt.
38. In the alternative, the applicant complained that the overpaid benefit was itself a “possession” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 because she had remained entitled to the increased award until the Secretary of State formally decided to supersede it. Consequently, the decision to recover the overpaid benefit amounted to an interference with her possessions, regardless of how it was to be achieved. The applicant relied on the Court’s approach in Moskal v. Poland, cited above, in which it held that the discontinuation of a benefit wrongly awarded to the applicant interfered with her possessions for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
39. However, the Court considers that the decision in Moskal v. Poland can be distinguished in one important respect. Unlike the situation in Moskal, where the relevant mistake was that of the Polish Social Security Board, in the present case the payment of benefit to which the applicant was not entitled was the result of her own failure to report the fact that her children had been taken into care. Where a benefit system relies on recipients to report any change in their circumstances, the Court considers that it would be perverse if they could acquire an assertable right to overpaid benefit where they have failed to report such a change. To hold otherwise would enable recipients of benefits to profit from their own omissions and, in some cases, fraud.
40. Consequently, the Court concludes that the applicant did not have an assertable right to the overpaid benefit. It does not, therefore, accept that it amounted to a possession for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
41. That being said, the Court observes that in order to recover the overpaid benefit the Secretary of State reduced the applicant’s future award of income support. Even after the increased award was superseded, the applicant continued to meet the criteria for the basic award (without the child allowance and family premium). She therefore had an assertable right to the receipt of income support at this reduced rate. The Court has previously accepted that the reduction of a benefit to which an applicant is entitled may amount to an interference with a possession (see, for example, Moskal v. Poland and Ásmundsson v. Iceland, both cited above). Consequently, the Court considers that the reduction of the award to which the applicant was entitled, albeit to recover overpaid benefits, could be said to have interfered with a “possession” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention.
42. It therefore follows that the applicant’s interests fall within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and of the right to property which it guarantees. This is sufficient to render Article 14 applicable.
43. The Court therefore rejects the Government’s submission that the application is incompatible ratione materiae. It further notes that the application is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The applicant’s submissions
44. The applicant submitted that the basis upon which the Secretary of State could recover overpaid benefit from her possessions involved discrimination contrary to Article 14 because it treated persons in analogous situations differently and it treated in the same manner those whose situations were significantly different.
45. First, she submitted that those who could not reasonably be expected to report a material fact because they were not aware of it were treated differently from those who could not reasonably be expected to report it because they were unaware of the requirement to report it. These two groups were in an analogous situation because neither could reasonably be expected to report the fact and they were equally not to blame for not reporting it. Secondly, she complained that those who were incapable of understanding that they were required to report a fact were treated the same as those who were capable of understanding the requirement to report. The capacity or incapacity to report a fact was a personal characteristic for the purposes of Article 14 of the Convention.
46. The applicant complained that in neither case was there any objective and reasonable justification for such treatment, especially as the basis for liability to repay overpaid benefit was personal fault. Moreover, she complained that the discriminatory treatment demonstrated a failure to recognise the particular difficulties experienced by persons with learning disabilities.
2. The Government’s submissions
47. With regard to the alleged difference in treatment between those who could not reasonably be expected to report a material fact because they were not aware of it and those who could not reasonably be expected to report it because they were unaware of the requirement to report it, the Government relied on the findings of the Court of Appeal, which held that there was no proper analogy between the two situations because the former involved a straightforward proposition of logic while the latter involved very different questions of cognitive capacity and moral sensitivity. Whereas it was reasonable to expect decision-makers to assess whether a claimant was aware of a fact, it was a much more difficult and complicated matter for them to decide whether a claimant’s cognitive capacity and moral sensitivity rendered them able or unable to understand the materiality of that fact, and whether any such claimant could reasonably be expected to report it.
48. Further, the Government submitted that such a distinction was not based upon any “personal characteristic or status”, which was an essential requirement of Article 14 of the Convention (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen and Pedersen v. Denmark, 7 December 1976, Series A no. 23). In particular, they submitted that this was not a distinction on grounds of disability, as a claimant could be aware of a fact but unable to report it for a reason entirely unrelated to disability, such as a failure to understand instructions.
49. With regard to the applicant’s alternative formulation, the Government contended that section 71 did not seek to attribute blame. The underlying policy was to permit recovery, regardless of whether the failure to disclose was excusable or not. In any case, the Government argued that the distinction suggested by the applicant was again not one which was based on a personal characteristic.
50. Alternatively, the Government contended that if the applicant succeeded in establishing that there had been discrimination, then justification had clearly been made out. It was well-established that Contracting States had a broad margin of appreciation in determining features of their social security systems and that decisions taken in this context would be respected by the Court unless they were “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (see, for example, Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom, no. 42184/05, § 73, 4 November 2008).
51. Against the backdrop of the wide margin of appreciation, the Government submitted that section 71 manifestly pursued the legitimate aim of ensuring that claimants for certain social security benefits were not permitted to retain sums of money to which they were not entitled because they did not fulfil the conditions of entitlement at the material time. The recovery of overpaid benefits served to maximise the resources available within the social security system for the payment of benefits to claimants who did meet the conditions of entitlement. The sums involved were significant across the social security system as a whole. Overpayments of Income Support identified in 2008/9 totalled almost GBP 280 million, of which approximately GBP 173 million was considered to be recoverable by the Secretary of State.
52. Moreover, the Government pointed out that the relatively broad test of liability under section 71 was counter-balanced by a number of other features of the social security system which served to reduce its adverse impact on benefit claimants. For example, a claimant would only be liable to repay overpaid benefit if she had acted in breach of a legal obligation to disclose; domestic law provided for the appointment of a third party to act on behalf of a claimant who might otherwise have difficulty complying with their obligations; section 71 did not permit the Secretary of State to charge interest on overpaid sums; and finally, there was a limit on the maximum amount which could be recovered each week and the Secretary of State could, in certain circumstances, apply his policies on abatement or waiver.
53. The Government therefore submitted that the applicant was not required to bear an “excessive burden” (see, for example, Moskal v. Poland, cited above, § 73).
3. The Court’s assessment
54. The Court has established in its case-law that only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14 (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen and Pedersen, cited above, § 56). Moreover, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007; Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 60, ECHR 2008-). Such a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised.
55. Article 14 does not prohibit a Contracting State from treating groups differently in order to correct “factual inequalities” between them; indeed in certain circumstances a failure to attempt to correct inequality through different treatment may in itself give rise to a breach of the Article (see Case “relating to certain aspects of the laws on the use of languages in education in Belgium” (merits), 23 July 1968, pp. 34-35, § 10, Series A no. 6, and Thlimmenos v. Greece [GC], no. 34369/97, § 44, ECHR 2000-IV).
56. The Contracting States enjoy a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment (Burden v. the United Kingdom, cited above, § 60). The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject-matter and the background. A wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the public interest on social or economic grounds, and the Court will generally respect the legislature’s policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom, [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 52, ECHR 2006).
57. In the present case the applicant has claimed that the difference in treatment between persons who could not reasonably be expected to report a material fact because they were not aware of the fact and those who could not reasonably be expected to report a fact because they were not aware of its materiality was discriminatory. However, the Court agrees with the Court of Appeal that these two groups could not be said to be in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations. On the contrary, although neither could be said to be “to blame” for the failure to report, the Court considers the situation of persons who are not aware of a fact to be qualitatively of a different nature to that of persons who are aware of a fact but who are not aware of its materiality. As the Court of Appeal found, the proposition that you cannot report something that you do not know is a simple proposition of logic, whereas the proposition that you cannot report something you do not appreciate you have to report depends on difficult questions of cognitive capacity and moral sensitivity which vary from person to person.
58. The Court considers the applicant’s alternative formulation, namely that, as someone who did not have the capacity to understand the obligation to report, she should have been treated differently from someone who did, to be somewhat more persuasive. It appears to the Court that the situation of these two groups is sufficiently different to require the respondent State to objectively and reasonably justify its failure to treat them differently.
59. That being said, the Court accepts that requiring decision-makers to assess levels of understanding or mental capacity before deciding whether or not overpaid benefits were recoverable would hinder their recovery and thereby reduce the resources available within the social security fund. It therefore considers that the decision not to treat the applicant differently from someone who had the capacity to understand the requirement to report pursued a legitimate aim, namely that of ensuring the smooth operation of the welfare system and the facilitation of the recovery of overpaid benefits.
60. With regard to the question of proportionality, the Court recalls that in the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 it has held that public authorities should not be prevented from correcting mistakes in the award of benefits, even those mistakes resulting from their own negligence. Holding otherwise would be contrary to the doctrine of unjust enrichment, would be unfair to other individuals contributing to the social security fund, and would amount to sanctioning an inappropriate allocation of scarce public resources. However, the Court has observed that the above general principle cannot prevail in a situation where the individual concerned is required to bear an excessive burden as a result of a measure divesting him or her of a benefit (Moskal v. Poland, cited above, § 73).
61. In the present case the Secretary of State took a number of steps to ensure that the applicant was not required to bear an excessive burden. In particular, the Court observes that she was not required to pay interest on the overpaid sums, there was a statutory limit on the amount that could be deducted each month from her award of income support, and the amount to be repaid was in fact reduced to reflect the fact that during the material time she was entitled to, but had not been in receipt of, a disability allowance. Indeed, the Court observes that it would have been open to the applicant to request that the Secretary of State waive his right to recover the overpaid benefit if there was evidence that recovery would be detrimental to her health or welfare. As she did not make any such request, the Court cannot accept that the recovery would have had such a detrimental impact.
62. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that any failure to treat the applicant differently from persons who understood the reporting requirement was objectively and reasonably justified.
63. There has accordingly been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read together with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 14 February 2012, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Lech Garlicki Registrar President




TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 14+P1-1
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA B. C. REGNO UNITO
(Richiesta n. 36571/06)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
14 febbraio 2012
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa di B. c. il Regno Unito,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta di:
Lech Garlicki, Presidente,
Nicolas Bratza Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Nebojša Vučinić
Vincenzo A. De Gaetano, giudici e Lorenzo Early, Sezione Cancelliere,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 24 gennaio 2012,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 36571/06) contro il Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e l'Irlanda Settentrionale depositato con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino britannico, il Sig.ra B. (“il richiedente”), 31 agosto 2006. Il Vicepresidente della Sezione acconsentì alla richiesta del richiedente per non avere il suo nome rivelato (l'Articolo 47 § 3 degli Articoli di Corte).
2. Il richiedente a cui era stato accordato patrocinio gratuito fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra OMISSIS di Gruppo dell'Azione della Povertà Bambino, un avvocato che pratica a Londra. Il Regno Unito Governo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra H. Upton dell'Estero e Repubblica Ufficio.
3. 18 marzo 2009 il Vicepresidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il richiedente nacque nel 1964 e vive in Middlesex.
5. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato col richiedente, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
6. Il richiedente che ha un'invalidità di cultura grave ha tre figli. Da maggio 1990 lei era in ricevuta di due benefici statali non contribuenti amministrata col Ministro di Stato per Lavoro e Pensioni: beneficio di figlio ed appoggio di reddito mezzi-esaminato. La sua franchigia individuale di appoggio di reddito fu valutata sulla base che lei era una genitrice sola. Lei ricevette un importo supplementare di franchigia individuale per ogni figlio che era un membro della sua famiglia ed un premio di famiglia. I benefici furono pagati con libro di ordine.
7. Facendo seguito a regolamentazione 32(1) dell'Appoggio di Reddito (il Generale) Regolamentazioni 1987 (“le 1987 Regolamentazioni”), il richiedente era sotto un dovere di riportare qualsiasi cambio di circostanza che colpirebbe il suo diritto per trarre profitto al Settore di Lavoro e Pensioni (“DWP”). Un noti sulla schiena del suo libro di ordine la consigliò che è probabile che lei rompa la legge se lei non notificasse il DWP se un dipendente o qualcuno vivendo con lei si mossero ad un indirizzo diverso. Lei aveva ricevuto anche una Forma INF4 che la consigliò che lei immediatamente dovrebbe informare il DWP se, inter l'alia, figli per i quali lei aveva detto furono presi in cura.
8. Ad ottobre 2000 i tre figli del richiedente furono presi in cura. Lei non riportò questo fatto al DWP. Al tempo, comunque il richiedente non aveva i servizi di un lavoratore sociale e lei non ricevette qualsiasi aiuto pratico dalla squadra di invalidità di autorità locale. Si accettò che lei non comprese che questo era un fatto che lei fu costretta a riportare.
9. A novembre 2001 il richiedente cominciò a ricevere appoggio dal Gufo Alloggio Collegamento Progetto, una carità che fornisce ad una serie di servizi di appoggio a persone imparando le difficoltà.
10. A dicembre 2001 Gufo Alloggio notificò il DWP che i figli del richiedente erano stati presi in cura. Là seguì quattro decisioni separate. Prima, il Ministro di Stato decise, facendo seguito a sezione 71(5A) della Social Security Amministrazione Atto 1992 (“l'Atto del 1992”), sostituire la sua assegnazione di appoggio di reddito per riflettere il fatto che lei stava ricevendo beneficio al quale non fu concessa lei. In secondo luogo, una decisione fu presa che i requisiti di sezione 71(1) fu soddisfatto così che il Ministro di Stato fu concesso per recuperare il sovra pagamento . In terzo luogo, il Ministro di Stato decise di esercitare la sua discrezione così come recuperare il sovra pagamento . Quarto, il Ministro di Stato deciso di recuperare il sovra pagamento con riducendo i pagamenti futuri del richiedente di appoggio di reddito con l'importo permesso con regolamentazione 16 delle Ricupero Regolamentazioni.
11. L'importo di appoggio di reddito che il richiedente aveva ricevuto in riguardo dei suoi figli dopo che loro erano stati presi in cura era GBP 6,561.76. Comunque, questo importo fu ridotto entro approssimativamente 30 percento a GBP 4,626.74 perché durante il periodo attinente il richiedente avesse potuto chiedere, ma non chiese, un reddito appoggio invalidità premio.
12. Il richiedente fece appello al Tribunale del Ricorso del Social Security (“il Tribunale”) contro la decisione del Ministro di Stato che lei doveva rimborsare GBP 4,626.74. Lei si appellò su decisioni precedenti dei Social Security Commissari nelle quali loro contennero che non ci sarebbe stato nessun insuccesso per rivelare a meno che rivelazione si sarebbe stata aspettata ragionevolmente. Se non c'era nessun insuccesso per rivelare, la questione di ricupero di un sovra pagamento non sorgerebbe affatto. Il Tribunale accolse il ricorso del richiedente, mentre trovando che la prova attinente non era ciò che un uomo medio l'avrebbe pensato appropriato rivelare, ma piuttosto ciò che un uomo medio che sa le particolari circostanze del rivendicatore l'avrebbe aspettata rivelare. Il Tribunale accettò che il richiedente non capì che il mettere dei suoi figli in cura era un fatto di materiale che lei ebbe bisogno di rivelare al DWP, e che non era ragionevole aspettarsela, nelle particolari circostanze della sua causa avere rivelato quel il fatto.
13. Il Ministro di Stato fece appello ai Social Security Commissari (“i Commissari”). I Commissari accolsero il ricorso, mentre sostenendo che se un rivendicatore fosse consapevole di una questione che lui o lei erano state costrette a rivelare, ci sarebbe una violazione di che il dovere anche se, a causa dell'incapacità mentale, il rivendicatore non sapeva della materialità o attinenza della questione o non capì una richiesta non ambigua per informazioni. Nonostante la causa-legge fissa dei Commissari, il “prova di ragionevolezza” non era un requisito sotto sezione 71 dell'Atto del 1992 e non rappresentò una possibile costruzione di sezione 71. Veste non era attinente al problema di insuccesso per rivelare ed il richiedente era in violazione degli obblighi imposta su lei sotto il primo margine di regolamentazione 32(1) delle 1987 Regolamentazioni.
14. Il richiedente fece appello alla Corte d'appello. Lei presentò che c'era stata una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro io in che l'interferenza dello Stato con le sue proprietà discriminate ingiustificabilmente fra persone che non erano capaci di riportare fatti perché loro non erano consapevoli di loro e persone che, come il richiedente, non era capace di riportarli per dell'altra ragione. Fu dibattuto nell'alternativa che la legge trattò identicamente persone che erano capaci e persone che erano incapaci di comprensione che c'era un fatto che loro furono costretti a riportare.
15. La Corte d'appello sostenne che l'argomento incorse al primo recinto perché non c'erano nessuno proprietà del richiedente in pericolo: ciò che stava chiedendo il Ministro di Stato era un diritto per recuperare soldi che non sarebbe dovuto essere pagato al richiedente nel primo posto. Benché la decisione della Corte d'appello nella causa di R. (Carson e Reynolds) c. il Ministro di Stato per Lavoro e Pensioni all'effetto che un beneficio non contribuente come appoggio di reddito non era una proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 fu preso come corretto con la Casa di Dio, il problema fondamentale di principio attese la decisione della Grande Camera della Corte nella causa di Stec. Comunque, il ricupero di benefici sovra pagati restava fuori questa questione e con parità di ragionare fuori di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
16. La Corte d'appello seguì a respingere in qualsiasi l'evento la base prima addotta del richiedente della discriminazione come sé non considerò persone che non erano capaci di riportare fatti perché loro non erano consapevoli di loro per essere in un analogo, o in modo pertinente simile, situazione a persone che non erano capaci di riportarli per dell'altra ragione. La proposta che Lei non potesse riportare qualche cosa che Lei non seppe era una semplice proposta della logica, mentre la proposta che Lei non potesse riportare qualche cosa Lei non apprezzi Lei doveva riportare dipeso su questioni difficili di veste conoscitiva e la sensibilità morale che variarono da persona a persona.
17. Come alla base seconda si appellata su col richiedente, vale a dire che la legge trattò identicamente persone che erano capaci e persone che erano incapaci di comprensione che c'era un fatto che loro furono costretti a riportare, la Corte d'appello lo trovò non necessario determinare che che era considerato che fosse una questione difficile, fin dal ricupero di benefici di overpaid non poteva in qualsiasi importo di evento ad una privazione di proprietà.
18. 6 marzo 2006 il richiedente fu rifiutato permesso per fare appello alla Casa di Dio.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
19. Al tempo attinente, regolamentazione 32(1) delle 1987 Regolamentazioni previste quel:
“Eccetto nella causa dell'assegno di un jobseeker, ogni beneficiario ed ogni persona con chi o su cui somme di conto pagabile con modo di beneficio è ricevibile fornirà in tale maniera ed a simile volte come il Ministro di Stato... può determinare simile certificati o gli altri documenti e simile informazioni e fatti che colpiscono il diritto per trarre profitto o la sua ricevuta come il Ministro di Stato... può richiedere (o come una condizione su che qualsiasi somma o somme saranno ricevibili o altrimenti) ed in particolare notificherà il Ministro di Stato... di qualsiasi cambio di circostanze che lui si sarebbe aspettato ragionevolmente di sapere colpirebbero il diritto per trarre profitto, o alla sua ricevuta, appena ragionevolmente praticabile dopo il suo avvenimento, con dando per iscritto avviso (a meno che il Ministro di Stato... determina in qualsiasi la particolare causa per accettare altrimenti avviso che per iscritto) di qualsiasi simile cambio all'ufficio appropriato.”
20. Facendo seguito a sezione 10 del Social Security 1998 Agiscono, il Ministro di Stato per Lavoro e Pensioni aveva il potere per sostituire un'assegnazione di appoggio di reddito, dove c'era stato un cambio attinente in circostanze, con effetto di retrospettiva dalla data quando accaddero i cambi.
21. Dove c'era un insuccesso per rivelare un cambio attinente in circostanze, sezione 71 dell'Atto del 1992 previde quel:
“(1) dove è determinato che, se dolosamente o altrimenti qualsiasi persona ha svisato, o non riuscì a rivelare qualsiasi fatto di materiale ed in conseguenza del travisamento o insuccesso—
(un) un pagamento è stato reso in riguardo di un beneficio al quale questa sezione fa domanda; o
...
il Ministro di Stato sarà concesso per recuperare l'importo di qualsiasi pagamento che lui non avrebbe reso o qualsiasi somma che lui avrebbe ricevuto ma per il travisamento o insuccesso per rivelare.
(2) dove qualsiasi simile determinazione siccome è assegnato ad in sottosezione (1) sopra è reso su un ricorso o fa una rassegna, là sarà determinato anche nel corso del ricorso o sarà fatto una rassegna la questione se qualsiasi, ed in tal caso che che, importo è recuperabile sotto che sottosezione del Ministro di Stato.
(3) un importo recuperabile sotto sottosezione (1) sopra è in tutte le cause recuperabile dalla persona che svisò il fatto o non riuscì a rivelarlo.
(5) eccetto dove regolamentazioni prevedono altrimenti, un importo non sarà recuperabile sotto sottosezione (1) sopra a meno che la determinazione in adempimento della quale fu pagato è stata revocata o è stata variata su un ricorso o riveduto su una revisione o è stato revisionato sotto sezione 9 o è stato sospeso sotto sezione 10 del Social Security Agisca 1998.
(8) dove sotto qualsiasi importo pagato è recuperabile—
(a) la sottosezione (1) sopra;
può, senza pregiudizio a qualsiasi l'altro metodo di ricupero, sia recuperato con deduzione da benefici prescritti.
(10) qualsiasi l'importo recuperabile sotto le disposizioni menzionate in sottosezione (8) sopra—
(a) se la persona da chi è recuperabile risiede in Inghilterra e Galles e l'organo giudiziario locale così ordini, sarà recuperabile con esecuzione emessa dall'organo giudiziario locale o altrimenti come se fosse pagabile sotto un ordine di che corte; e
...
(11) questa sezione fa domanda ai benefici seguenti—
(b) appoggio di reddito;”
22. Regolamentazioni 13, 15 e 16 del Social Security (Pagamenti su conto, Overpayments e Ricupero) Regolamentazioni 1988 (“le 1988 Regolamentazioni) prevedere siccome segue:
“Somme da dedurre nel calcolare importi recuperabili
13. Nel calcolare gli importi recuperabile... dove c'è stato un overpayment di beneficio, l'autorità che aggiudica dedurrà—
(a) qualsiasi importo che è stato compensa sotto Parte III;
(b) qualsiasi importo supplementare di appoggio di reddito che non era pagabile sotto l'originale, o qualsiasi altro, la determinazione, ma che sarebbe dovuto essere determinato essere pagabile—
(i) sulla base della rivendicazione siccome presentato all'autorità che aggiudica, o
(l'ii) sulla base della rivendicazione come sé sarebbe sembrato avuto il travisamento o mancata divulgazione stata rimediata a di fronte alla determinazione;
ma nessuna altra deduzione sarà resa in riguardo di qualsiasi l'altro diritto per trarre profitto quale può essere, o sarebbe stato, determinò esistere.
...
Ricupero con deduzione da benefici prescritti
15.—(1) soggetto a regolamentazione 16, dove qualsiasi importo è recuperabile... che importo sarà recuperabile col Ministro di Stato da qualsiasi dei benefici prescritti col prossimo paragrafo a che la persona da chi è determinato l'importo per essere recuperabile è concesso.
(2) i benefici seguenti sono prescritti per i fini di questa regolamentazione—
...
(d) soggetto a regolamentazione 16 qualsiasi appoggio di reddito.
Limitazioni su deduzioni da benefici prescritti
16.—
...
(4) regolamentazione 15 farà domanda all'importo di appoggio di reddito al quale una persona è concessa al momento solamente alla misura che là può, soggetto a paragrafi 8 e 9 di Orario 9 alle Rivendicazioni e Pagamenti Regolamentazioni, sia recuperato in riguardo di qualsiasi una settimana di beneficio—
(un) in una causa a che il paragrafo (5) fa domanda, non più che l'importo specificò là; e
(b) in qualsiasi l'altra causa, 3 calcolano 5 per cento. della franchigia individuale per un solo rivendicatore meno non invecchiarono che 25, che 5 per cento. essendo, dove non è un multiplo di 5 pence, arrotondati al seguente multiplo più alto.
(5) dove la persona responsabile per il travisamento di o insuccesso per rivelare un fatto di materiale ha, con ragione al riguardo, stato trovato colpevole di un reato sotto sezione 55 dell'Atto o sotto qualsiasi l'altra promulgazione, o ha costituito una dichiarazione scritto dopo la cautela in ammissione della falsità o frode il fine di ottenere beneficio, l'importo menzionò in paragrafo (4)(a) sarà 4 calcola 5 per cento. della franchigia individuale per un solo rivendicatore meno non invecchiarono che 25, che 5 per cento. essendo, dove non è un multiplo di 10 pence, arrotondò al più vicino così multiplo o, se è un multiplo di 5 pence ma non di 10 pence, il prossimo multiplo più alto di 10 pence.
(6) dove, nel calcolo del reddito di una persona a chi l'appoggio di reddito è pagabile, l'importo di guadagni o l'altro reddito che incorrono essere preso in considerazione è ridotto con paragrafi 4 a 9 di Orario 8 al Reddito Sostenga Regolamentazioni (somme per essere trascurato nel calcolo di guadagni) o divide in paragrafi 15 e 16 di Orario 9 a quelle Regolamentazioni (somme per essere trascurato nel calcolo di reddito altro che i guadagni) l'importo settimanale applicabile sotto paragrafo (4) può essere aumentato entro non più di mezzo importo della riduzione, e qualsiasi aumenta sotto questo paragrafo ha priorità su qualsiasi aumento che può, ma per questo paragrafo, sia reso sotto paragrafo 6(5) di Orario 9 alle Rivendicazioni e Pagamenti Regolamentazioni.
(7) regolamentazione 15 non sarà fatta domanda ad un beneficio specificato così come ridurre il beneficio in qualsiasi una settimana di beneficio a meno che 10 pence.
...”
23. La politica del Ministro di Stato sul ricupero di beneficio di sovra pagamento è esposta fuori Guida per il Recupero del sovra pagamento che contiene guida per autorità decisionali per aggiudicare in cause di sovra pagamento . Sezione 12 degli indirizzi di Guida “diminuzione con diritto astratto” che è l'esercizio della discrezione per recuperare un importo più basso su conto del fatto che un rivendicatore avesse potuto chiedere, ma non chiese, dell'altro beneficio di previdenza sociale durante lo stesso periodo. In quelle circostanze, ricupero è reso della perdita netta a finanziamenti pubblici. Sezione 12 anche gli indirizzi l'esercizio della discrezione per rinunciare a ricupero di overpayments che normalmente è considerato dove c'è prova ragionevole disponibile che il ricupero di un sovra pagamento sarebbe dannoso al welfare di and/or di salute del debitore o la loro famiglia o che ricupero non sarebbe nell'interesse pubblico.
LA LEGGE
I . VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE LETTO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
24. Il richiedente si lamentò che contrario ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo le persone di No.1 incapace riportare fatti perché loro non sapevano di loro fu trattato differentemente sotto sezione 71 dell'Atto del 1992 da quelli che non erano capaci di riportare fatti per dell'altra ragione. Nell'alternativa, lei si lamentò, che la legge trattò identicamente persone che erano capaci e persone che erano incapaci di comprensione che c'era qualche cosa che loro furono costretti a riportare.
25. Articolo 1 sdel Protocollo N.ro 1 prevede come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
26. Articolo 14 della Convenzione prevede siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà insorse avanti [il] Convenzione sarà garantita senza la discriminazione su qualsiasi base come sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadino od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o l'altro status.”
27. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità 1. L'eccezione preliminare del Governo su incompatibilità ratione materiae
(a) le osservazioni di Il Governo
28. Il Governo presentò che la richiesta dovrebbe essere respinta su conto del suo materiae di ratione di incompatibilità con la Convenzione perché non c'era interferenza con qualsiasi “le proprietà” del richiedente. Il Governo presentò che non c'era prima e primo interferenza con le proprietà del richiedente perché lei non soddisfece mai le condizioni di diritto agli importi di appoggio di reddito che era sovra pagato (vedere, per esempio, Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, 28 aprile 2009). Lei non aveva avuto mai qualsiasi diritto esecutivo per ricevere le somme contestate e non poteva lamentarsi sotto insieme Articolo 14 lettura con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 se il Ministro di Stato avesse rifiutato di pagare quelle somme nel primo posto. Effettivamente, il richiedente aveva accettato che lei non fu concessa ad addizioni di figlio al suo reddito sostenga una volta lei non era più responsabile per guardare dopo i suoi figli e non aveva cercato di impugnare la decisione del Ministro di Stato di sostituire una volta la sua assegnazione di appoggio di reddito lui divenne consapevole di lei cambiò circostanze.
29. Il Governo presentò inoltre che come le somme sovra pagate fu recuperato riducendo i benefici futuri del richiedente, la causa potrebbe essere distinta da Tsironis c. la Grecia, n. 44584/98, 6 dicembre 2001 che interessato la confisca di proprietà esistenti per eseguire un debito.
(b) le osservazioni del richiedente
30. Il richiedente presentò che una determinazione sotto sezione 71 dell'Atto del 1992 creata un scelse in azione esecutivo col Ministro di Stato contro le proprietà di quelli soggetto a sé. Le proprietà dalle quali il Ministro di Stato potrebbe recuperare benefici di overpaid inclusero benefici prescritti ai quali fu concesso il destinatario e qualsiasi le altre proprietà che il ricettivo avrebbe. Di conseguenza, il richiedente presentò che la creazione di tale scelse in azione interferita col suo godimento tranquillo di proprietà per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
31. Il richiedente contestò la Corte d'appello sta trovando che nessuno “la proprietà” fu coinvolto come l'importo in oggetto non sarebbe dovuto essere pagato al richiedente nel primo posto. Invece, lei presentò che leggi che regolano il ricupero di debito o danni dalle proprietà di una persona ed il ricupero risultante di simile somme da quelle proprietà incorsero all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 poiché loro autorizzarono un'interferenza con quel le proprietà di persona. Così, la Corte sostenne in Tsironis c. la Grecia, n. 44584/98, § 38 6 dicembre 2001 che la vendita di un proprietà di persone per soddisfare debiti dovuti ad una banca costituiti un'interferenza con le sue proprietà.
32. In qualsiasi evento che il richiedente ha presentato che una persona che era beneficio di overpaid non dovette debito finché il beneficio fu accantonato con effetto retrospettivo. Sino a poi, lei fu concessa a pagamento di sé. Accantonando i suoi diritti con effetto retrospettivo si aveva Articolo 1 occupato di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, per esempio, Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, ECHR 2004-IX). Sostituendo il diritto a pagamento un individuale avrebbe avuto retrospettivamente con una responsabilità per rimborsare un importo comportato un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà (Brumărescu c. la Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 74 ECHR 1999-VII).
(c) la valutazione della Corte
33. I richiami di Corte che l'Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni (vedere, fra molte autorità, Şahin c. la Germania [GC], n. 30943/96, § 85 ECHR 2003-VIII). La richiesta di Articolo 14 non presuppone necessariamente la violazione di uno dei diritti effettivi garantita con la Convenzione. È necessario ma è anche sufficiente per i fatti della causa per incorrere “all'interno dell'ambito” di uno o più dei Convenzione Articoli (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Abdulaziz, Cabales e Balkandali c. il Regno Unito, sentenza di 28 maggio 1985 la Serie Un n. 94, § 71; Karlheinz Schmidt c. Germania, sentenza di 18 luglio 1994 la Serie Un n. 291-B, § 22; e Petrovic c. l'Austria, sentenza di 27 marzo 1998, Relazioni 1998-II § 22).
34. La proibizione della discriminazione in Articolo 14 prolunga così oltre il godimento dei diritti e le libertà che la Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli costringono ogni Stato a garantire. Fa domanda anche a quelli diritti supplementari, mentre incorrendo all'interno della sfera generale di qualsiasi articolo di Convenzione per il quale lo Stato ha deciso volontariamente di prevedere. Questo principio è trincerato bene nella causa-legge della Corte. Fu espresso nella Causa per la prima volta “relativo ai certi aspetti delle leggi sull'uso di lingue in istruzione in Belgio” c. il Belgio (i Meriti) (sentenza di 23 luglio 1968, Serie Un n. 6, § 9), quando la Corte notò che il diritto per ottenere dalle autorità pubbliche la creazione di un particolare genere di costituzione istruttiva non poteva essere dedotta da Articolo 2 di Protocollo N.ro 1, e continuò siccome segue:
“... ciononostante, un Stato che aveva preparato tale costituzione non poteva, nel posare in giù requisiti di ingresso, prenda misure discriminatorie all'interno del significato di Articolo 14.”
35. La Corte deve decidere, perciò, se gli interessi del richiedente che fu colpito avversamente con lo schema legislativo e contestato incorsero entro il “l'ambito” o “la sfera” di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. In questo riguardo a, la Corte accetta che se la causa presente riguarda un “la proprietà” appartenendo al richiedente, poi incorrerebbe entro il “l'ambito” o “la sfera” di Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
36. La Corte ha sostenuto costantemente che “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 può essere uno “proprietà esistenti” (vedere il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 48 la Serie Un n. 70, e Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. la Repubblica ceca (il dec.) [GC], n. 39794/98, § 69 ECHR 2002-VII) o i beni, incluso rivendicazioni in riguardo dei quali un richiedente può dibattere che lui ha almeno un “l'aspettativa legittima” che di loro si saranno resi conto (vedere, per esempio, Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri c. il Belgio, 20 novembre 1995, § 31 la Serie Un n. 332, ed Ouzounis ed Altri c. la Grecia, n. 49144/99, § 24 18 aprile 2002). In particolare, la Corte ha sostenuto che dove un individuo ha un diritto rivendicabile sotto diritto nazionale ad un beneficio di welfare, l'importanza di che interesse dovrebbe essere riflesso con sostenendo Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per essere applicabile (Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito (il dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 51 ECHR 2005-X). Inoltre, la Corte ha sostenuto che la riduzione o interruzione di un beneficio può costituire un'interferenza con proprietà che costringono ad essere giustificate nell'interesse generale (Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, sentenza di 12 ottobre 2004, ECHR 2004-IX, e Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, 15 settembre 2009).
37. Il richiedente si lamentò primariamente che una determinazione sotto sezione 71 dell'Atto del 1992 creata un scelse in azione esecutivo col Ministro di Stato contro qualsiasi proprietà che è probabile che lei abbia. Comunque, è chiaro alla Corte che il Ministro di Stato ha deciso, evidentemente facendo seguito ad una politica invariabile, recuperare l'overpaid trae profitto deducendolo da futuro prescrisse benefici. Là non sembri essere stato qualsiasi questione del suo interferire col richiedente sta esistendo proprietà. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che la causa presente può essere distinta da che di Tsironis c. la Grecia (citò sopra) che interessato la vendita delle proprietà effettive di un richiedente per soddisfare un debito.
38. Nell'alternativa, il richiedente si lamentò, che il beneficio di sovra pagamento era un “la proprietà” per i fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 perché lei era rimasta concesso all'assegnazione aumentata finché il Ministro di Stato decise formalmente di sostituirlo. Di conseguenza, la decisione di recuperare il beneficio di overpaid corrisposto ad un'interferenza con proprietà sue, nonostante come sarebbe realizzato. Il richiedente si appellò sull'approccio della Corte in Moskal c. la Polonia, citato sopra in che contenne che l'interruzione di un beneficio assegnò erroneamente al richiedente interferito con le sue proprietà per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
39. Comunque, la Corte considera che la decisione in Moskal c. Polonia può essere distinta in un importante riguardo. Diversamente da situazione in Moskal, dove era l'errore attinente che del Social Security Consiglio polacco, al giorno d'oggi la causa il pagamento di beneficio al quale il richiedente non fu concesso era il risultato di suo proprio insuccesso per riportare il fatto che i suoi figli erano stati presi in cura. Dove un sistema di beneficio si appella su destinatari per riportare qualsiasi cambio nelle loro circostanze, la Corte considera che sarebbe perverso se loro potessero acquisire un diritto rivendicabile a benefici di sovra pagamento dove loro non sono riusciti a riportare tale cambio. Sostenere altrimenti abiliterebbe destinatari di benefici per trarre profitto dalle loro proprie omissioni e, in delle cause, frode.
40. Di conseguenza, la Corte conclude che il richiedente non aveva un diritto rivendicabile al beneficio di sovra pagamento. Non fa, perciò, accetta che corrispose ad una proprietà per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
41. Che essendo detto, la Corte osserva che per recuperare l'overpaid tragga profitto il Ministro di Stato ridusse l'assegnazione futura del richiedente di appoggio di reddito. Anche dopo che l'assegnazione aumentata fu sostituita, il richiedente continuò a soddisfare il criterio per l'assegnazione di base (senza l'assegno di figlio e famiglia eccellente). Lei aveva perciò un diritto rivendicabile alla ricevuta di appoggio di reddito a questo tasso ridotto. La Corte prima ha accettato che la riduzione di un beneficio alla quale un richiedente è concesso può corrispondere ad un'interferenza con una proprietà (vedere, per esempio, Moskal c. Polonia e Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, sia citò sopra). Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che la riduzione dell'assegnazione alla quale il richiedente fu concesso, benché recuperare beneficio di sovra pagamento, si potrebbe dire che abbia interferito con, un “la proprietà” per i fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 della Convenzione.
42. Segue perciò che gli interessi del richiedente incorrono all'interno della sfera di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, e del diritto a proprietà che garantisce. Questo è sufficiente per rendere Articolo 14 applicabile.
43. La Corte respinge perciò l'osservazione del Governo che la richiesta è incompatibile ratione materiae. Nota inoltre che la richiesta non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni del richiedente
44. Il richiedente presentò che la base sulla quale il Ministro di Stato potrebbe recuperare overpaid trae profitto dalle sue proprietà comportò contrario di discriminazione ad Articolo 14 perché trattò differentemente persone in situazioni analoghe e trattò nella stessa maniera quelli le cui situazioni erano significativamente diverse.
45. Prima, lei presentò che quelli che non potevano essere aspettatisi ragionevolmente di riportare un fatto di materiale perché loro non ne erano consapevoli fu trattato differentemente da quelli che non potevano essere aspettatisi ragionevolmente di riportarlo perché loro non sapevano del requisito per riportarlo. Questi due gruppi erano in una situazione analoga perché né potrebbe essere aspettatosi ragionevolmente di riportare il fatto e loro dovettero biasimare ugualmente per non riportarlo. In secondo luogo, lei si lamentò che quelli che erano incapaci di comprensione che loro sono stati costretti a riportare un fatto furono trattati lo stessi come quelli che erano capaci di comprensione il requisito riportare. La veste o l'incapacità per riportare un fatto era una caratteristica personale per i fini di Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
46. Il richiedente si lamentò che in nessuna causa era là qualsiasi obiettivo e la giustificazione ragionevole per simile trattamento, specialmente come la base per la responsabilità rimborsare beneficio di sovra pagamento era colpa personale. Inoltre, lei si lamentò che il trattamento discriminatorio dimostrò un insuccesso per riconoscere le particolari difficoltà esperimentato con persone con l'imparando le invalidità.
2. Le osservazioni del Governo
47. Con riguardo ad alla differenza allegato in trattamento fra quelli che non potevano essere aspettatisi ragionevolmente di riportare un fatto di materiale perché loro non ne erano consapevoli perché loro non sapevano del requisito per riportarlo, il Governo si appellò sulle sentenze della Corte d'appello che sostenne che non c'era analogia corretta fra le due situazioni perché il precedente coinvolto una proposta diritta della logica mentre le questioni molto diverse coinvolte e seconde di veste conoscitiva e la sensibilità morale. Mentre era ragionevole per aspettarsi che autorità decisionali valutare se un rivendicatore era consapevole di un fatto, era una questione molto più difficile e complicata per decidere, per loro se la veste conoscitiva di un rivendicatore e la sensibilità morale li resero in grado o incapace capire la materialità di che fatto, e se qualsiasi simile rivendicatore potrebbe essere aspettato ragionevolmente riportarlo.
48. Inoltre, il Governo presentò che tale distinzione non fu basata su qualsiasi “caratteristica personale o status” che era un requisito essenziale di Articolo 14 della Convenzione (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen e Pedersen c. Danimarca, 7 dicembre 1976 la Serie Un n. 23). In particolare, loro presentarono che questa non era una distinzione sui motivi dell'invalidità, siccome un rivendicatore potesse essere consapevole di un fatto ma incapace riportarlo per una ragione completamente non correlato all'invalidità, come un insuccesso per capire istruzioni.
49. Con riguardo ad alla formulazione di alternativa del richiedente, il Governo contese, che sezione 71 non cercò di attribuire biasimo. La politica fondamentale era permettere ricupero, nonostante se l'insuccesso per rivelare era scusabile o non. In qualsiasi la causa, il Governo dibatté che la distinzione suggerì col richiedente non era di nuovo nessuno che fu basato su una caratteristica personale.
50. Alternativamente, il Governo contese che se il richiedente succedesse nello stabilire che c'era stata discriminazione, poi la giustificazione chiaramente era stata estesa. Era ben stabilito che Stati Contraenti avevano un margine largo della valutazione nel determinare caratteristiche dei loro sistemi di previdenza sociale e che decisioni prese in questo contesto sarebbero rispettate con la Corte a meno che loro erano “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (vedere, per esempio, Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, n. 42184/05, § 73 4 novembre 2008).
51. Contro il fondale del margine ampio della valutazione, il Governo presentò, che sezione 71 intraprese manifestamente lo scopo legittimo di assicurare che rivendicatori per certi benefici di previdenza sociale non furono permessi di trattenere somme di soldi alle quali loro non furono concessi perché loro non adempierono le condizioni di diritto al tempo di materiale. Il ricupero di benefici di sovra pagamento serviva a massimizzare le risorse disponibili all'interno del sistema di previdenza sociale per il pagamento di benefici a rivendicatori che soddisfecero le condizioni di diritto. Le somme coinvolte erano significative attraverso il sistema di previdenza sociale nell'insieme. Overpayments di Appoggio di Reddito identificò in 2008/9 ammontava pressoché GBP 280 milione di che verso GBP 173 milione era considerato che fosse recuperabile col Ministro di Stato.
52. Inoltre, il Governo indicò che il relativamente prova larga della responsabilità sotto sezione 71 fu cassa-bilanciata con un numero di altre caratteristiche del sistema di previdenza sociale che notificò ridurre il suo impatto avverso su rivendicatori di beneficio. Per esempio, un rivendicatore sarebbe solamente responsabile per rimborsare il beneficio di sovra pagamento se lei avesse agito in violazione di un obbligo legale per rivelare; diritto nazionale previde per l'appuntamento di una terza parte per agire in favore di un rivendicatore che avrebbe altrimenti difficoltà che si attiene coi loro obblighi; sezione 71 non permise il Ministro di Stato per accusare interessi sulla somma sovra pagata; e c'era infine, un limite sull'importo di massimo che potrebbe essere recuperato ogni settimana ed il Ministro di Stato poteva, nelle certe circostanze, faccia domanda le sue politiche su diminuzione o rinuncia.
53. Il Governo presentò perciò che il richiedente non fu costretto a nascere un “carico eccessivo” (vedere, per esempio, Moskal c. la Polonia, citato sopra, § 73).
3. La valutazione della Corte
54. La Corte ha stabilito nella sua causa-legge che solamente differenzia in trattamento basata su una caratteristica identificabile, o “lo status”, è capace di corrispondere alla discriminazione all'interno del significato di Articolo 14 (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen e Pedersen citato sopra, § 56). Inoltre, in ordine per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo, o in modo pertinente simile, situazioni (D.H. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 175 ECHR 2007; il Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 60 ECHR 2008 -). Tale differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; nelle altre parole, se non intraprende un scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso.
55. Articolo 14 non proibisce un Stato Contraente dal trattare differentemente gruppi per correggere “le ineguaglianze che riguarda i fatti” fra loro; davvero nelle certe circostanze un insuccesso per tentare di correggere l'ineguaglianza per trattamento diverso può generare in se stesso una violazione dell'Articolo (vedere Causa “relativo ai certi aspetti delle leggi sull'uso di lingue in istruzione in Belgio” (i meriti), 23 luglio 1968, pp. 34-35, § 10 la Serie Un n. 6, e Thlimmenos c. la Grecia [GC], n. 34369/97, § 44 ECHR 2000-IV).
56. Gli Stati Contraenti godono un margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifichi un trattamento diverso (il Carico c. il Regno Unito, citato sopra, § 60). La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, la materia-questione e lo sfondo. Ad un margine ampio è concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione di solito quando viene a misure generali della strategia economica o sociale. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare ciò che è nell'interesse pubblico su motivi sociali o economici, e la Corte rispetterà la scelta di politica della legislatura generalmente a meno che è “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 52 ECHR 2006).
57. Nella presente causa che il richiedente ha chiesto che la differenza in trattamento fra persone che non potevano essere aspettatesi ragionevolmente di riportare un fatto di materiale perché loro non erano consapevoli del fatto e quelli che non potevano essere aspettatisi ragionevolmente di riportare un fatto perché loro non erano consapevoli della sua materialità era discriminatorio. Comunque, la Corte si confà con la Corte d'appello che non si poteva dire che questi due gruppi siano in analogo, o in modo pertinente simile, situazioni. Sul contrario, benché né si potrebbe dire che sia, “biasimare” per l'insuccesso per riportare, la Corte considera la situazione di persone che non sono consapevoli di un fatto per essere qualitativamente di una natura diversa a che di persone che sono consapevoli di un fatto ma che non sono consapevole della sua materialità. Siccome fondò la Corte d'appello, la proposta che Lei non può riportare qualche cosa che Lei non sa è una semplice proposta della logica, mentre la proposta che Lei non può riportare qualche cosa Lei non apprezzi Lei deve riportare dipende da questioni difficili di veste conoscitiva e la sensibilità morale che variano da persona a persona.
58. La Corte considera la formulazione di alternativa del richiedente, vale a dire che, come qualcuno che non aveva la veste di capire l'obbligo per riportare, lei sarebbe dovuta essere trattata differentemente da qualcuno che faceva, essere piuttosto più persuasivo. Sembra alla Corte che la situazione di questi due gruppi è sufficientemente diversa per richiedere obiettivamente e ragionevolmente lo Stato rispondente a giustifichi il suo insuccesso per trattarli differentemente.
59. Che essendo detto, la Corte accetta che costringendo autorità decisionali a valutare livelli di capire o veste mentale prima di decidere se o non benefici di sovra pagamento erano recuperabili impedirebbe il loro ricupero e con ciò ridurrebbe le risorse disponibile all'interno del finanziamento di previdenza sociale. Considera perciò che la decisione di non trattare differentemente il richiedente da qualcuno che aveva la veste di capire il requisito di riportare intraprese un scopo legittimo, vale a dire che di assicurare l'operazione liscia del sistema di welfare e la facilitazione del ricupero di benefici di sovrapagamento.
60. Con riguardo ad alla questione della proporzionalità, i richiami di Corte che nel contesto di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che ha contenuto che ad autorità pubbliche non dovrebbero essere impedite di correggere errori nell'assegnazione di benefici, anche quegli errori che sono il risultato della loro propria negligenza. Sostenere altrimenti sarebbe contrario alla dottrina dell'arricchimento ingiusto, sarebbe ingiusto agli altri individui che contribuiscono al finanziamento di previdenza sociale, e corrisponderebbe a sanzionando un'allocazione impropria di risorse pubbliche e scarse. Comunque, la Corte ha osservato che il principio generale e sopra non può prevalere in una situazione dove l'individuo riguardò è costretto a sopportare un carico eccessivo come un risultato di una misura che li spossessa lui o di un beneficio (Moskal c. la Polonia, citato sopra, § 73).
61. Al giorno d'oggi la causa il Ministro di Stato prese un numero di passi per assicurare che il richiedente non fu costretto a sopportare un carico eccessivo. In particolare, la Corte osserva che lei non fu costretta a pagare interesse sulla somma sovra pagata, c'era un limite legale sull'importo che potrebbe essere dedotto ogni mese dalla sua assegnazione di appoggio di reddito, e l'importo per essere rimborsato era infatti ridotto riflettere il fatto che durante il tempo di materiale lei fu concessa a, ma non era stato in ricevuta di, un assegno di invalidità. Effettivamente, la Corte osserva che sarebbe stato aperto al richiedente per richiedere che il Ministro di Stato rinuncia al suo diritto per recuperare il beneficio di sovra pagamento se c'era prova che ricupero sarebbe dannoso alla sua salute o welfare. Siccome lei non rese qualsiasi simile richiesta, la Corte non può accettare che il ricupero avrebbe avuto tale impatto dannoso.
62. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per abilitare la Corte per concludere che qualsiasi insuccesso per trattare differentemente il richiedente da persone che capirono il requisito che riporta era obiettivamente e ragionevolmente giustificò.
63. Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta insieme con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto insieme con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 14 febbraio 2012, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento della Corte.
Lorenzo Early Lech Garlicki Cancelliere Presidente






DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.