Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF LADUNA v. SLOVAKIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 14, 08, P1-1

NUMERO: 31827/02/2011
STATO: Slovacchia
DATA: 13/12/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 14+8 ; No violation of Art. 13 ; No violation of P1-1 ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
THIRD SECTION
CASE OF LADUNA v. SLOVAKIA
(Application no. 31827/02)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
13 December 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Laduna v. Slovakia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Josep Casadevall, President,
Corneliu Bîrsan,
Alvina Gyulumyan,
Ján Šikuta,
Luis López Guerra,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Santiago Quesada, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 15 November 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 31827/02) against the Slovak Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Slovak national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 10 August 2002.
2. The applicant, who had been granted legal aid, was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Bratislava. The Government of the Slovak Republic (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Pirošíková.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that his rights under Articles 8, 13 and 14 of the Convention and under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had been breached in the context of his detention on remand and his subsequent term of imprisonment.
4. By a decision of 20 October 2010, the Court declared the application partly admissible.
5. The applicant and the Government each filed further written observations (Rule 59 § 1) on the merits.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1973. At present he is serving a life sentence in Leopoldov Prison.
7. The applicant was accused of several serious offences. In that context he was detained pending trial from 1 September 2001 to 9 February 2006. On the latter date he started serving a nine-year prison term to which he had been sentenced for robbery. Further details are set out in the decision of 20 October 2010 on the admissibility of the present application.
8. During his detention on remand the applicant lodged several complaints with the Directorate General of Prison Administration, in which he complained about the conditions of his detention. He raised many issues, among which were the restrictions on his visiting rights (visits were allowed only once a month for thirty minutes and it was only possible to speak to visitors through a partition), the right to buy food in prison, the lack of hot water in his cell, and a lack of contact with other prisoners. He also alleged that convicted prisoners serving a sentence had more rights than he had as a remand prisoner.
9. The Directorate General of Prison Administration sent replies to the applicant on more than ten occasions. It found all of the applicant’s complaints to be ill-founded. It also held that the conditions in the prisons in which the applicant had been detained during the investigation and judicial proceedings had been in conformity with the relevant law.
10. Furthermore, the applicant has been obliged both during his detention and after his conviction, to use half of the money he received from his family to reimburse the debt which he owed to the State (this debt resulted from courts’ decisions and from the statutory obligation to contribute to his maintenance in prison), failing which he was not allowed to buy supplementary food in the prison shop.
Thus the applicant’s overall debt amounted to the equivalent of some 750 euros (EUR) in March 2008. In the period from December 2002 to January 2008 he had paid some EUR 360 in reimbursement of his debt.
11. On 16 January 2003 the applicant lodged a complaint with the Prosecutor General submitting that his human rights had been violated. He complained, inter alia, about the manner in which the State had forced him to reimburse the debt resulting from the statutory obligation to contribute to his maintenance in prison.
12. On 30 January 2003 the Prosecutor General dismissed that complaint as no breach of the law had been found in the applicant’s case.
13. During the whole period of his detention during the investigation and trial the applicant could not watch television whereas convicted prisoners had the possibility of watching television programmes collectively in the assembly room of the relevant prison wing. Through the prison broadcast system the prison administration let the detainees listen to a public and a private radio station, each of which was transmitted every other day. For almost the whole period of his detention during trial the applicant was kept alone in his cell.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Legal framework concerning detention on remand
1. Detention Act 1993, in force until 30 June 2006 (Law no. 156/1993)
14. Pursuant to section 2(1), a person’s detention during investigation and judicial proceedings must respect the detained person’s right to be presumed innocent. Any restrictions must be justified by the purpose of the detention and by the aim of ensuring order, the safety of others and the protection of property in places where accused persons are detained. Subsection 2 of section 2 permits the restriction of only those rights of detained persons of which they cannot avail themselves in view of the fact that they are detained on remand. Detention on remand must not diminish the human dignity of the accused person.
15. Section 10(1) provides that an accused person detained during investigation and judicial proceedings is entitled to receive visitors once a month for at least thirty minutes. Where justified, the prison governor may permit more frequent visits or another form of contact. Subsection 5 of section 10 provides that visits to accused persons should take place in the presence of a prison officer and without direct contact between the accused and the visitor. Other arrangements may be authorised by the prison director in justified cases.
16. Section 12a(10) states that an accused person is entitled to use his or her money to purchase groceries and other items in prison, provided that he or she has fulfilled the relevant statutory requirements. These include, inter alia, the obligation to pay at least the same amount of his or her debt to the prison administration or to other entitled people when wishing to withdraw money from his or her account in prison. When this and the other conditions are not met, the prison governor should allow the detained person, at his or her written request, to use money to purchase medicine and medical items which are not provided for free of charge under the relevant law, to buy basic personal-hygiene items, and also to pay any applicable taxes and fees (section 12(11)).
2. Detention Act 2006, in force as from 1 July 2006 (Law no. 221/2006)
17. Pursuant to section 19(1), accused persons are entitled to receive visitors every three weeks for at least one hour.
Where an accused is detained on the ground that he or she could influence witnesses or co-accused, or hamper the criminal investigation into the case, he or she can receive visitors only subject to the consent of the prosecuting authority or court dealing with the case (section 19(2)).
Accused persons detained in prisons at the lowest security level are allowed to have direct contact with their visitors as a general rule. In other cases visits take place without direct contact unless the prison governor decides otherwise, and in the presence of a prison officer. In the situations set out in section 19(2), the prosecuting authority or court may request that the visit take place in the presence of one or more of their representatives (section 19(3)).
B. Legal framework concerning the service of prison sentences
1. Serving of Prison Sentences Act 1965, in force until 31 December 2005 (Law no. 59/1965)
18. Section 1(1) defines the purpose of the serving of a prison term as preventing convicted persons from committing further offences and preparing them on a continuous basis for an appropriate way of life.
19. Section 2 lists cultural and educational work as one of the means of attaining the purpose of the imprisonment of convicted persons.
20. Section 11 provides for the social rights of convicted persons. Subsection 1 guarantees to convicted persons the necessary material and cultural conditions for ensuring their appropriate physical and mental development.
21. Section 12(3) provides that a convicted person is entitled to receive visitors who are his or her close friends and/or relatives at a time determined by the prison governor. The frequency of the visits depends on the type of security level to which a convicted person is subject: visits are allowed at least once a fortnight for convicted persons at the lowest security level; once a month for convicted persons at the medium security level; and once in six weeks for those at the highest security level. Visits to a convicted person subject to the medium or highest levels of security take place without physical contact. A prison governor may exceptionally decide otherwise.
2. Serving of Prison Sentences Act 2005, in force as from 1 January 2006 (Law no. 475/2005)
22. Section 24(1) provides that a convicted person is entitled to receive visitors at least once a month for two hours.
23. Section 28(3) provides that, where a convicted person has not paid a part of his or her debt to the State in respect of prisoners’ maintenance contributions and to other creditors registered with the prison authorities, he or she can use his or her money only for the purchase of basic sanitary items, objects necessary to engage in correspondence, medicine (which cannot be provided free of charge), medical fees, and for the payment of debts and court and administrative fees.
24. Pursuant to section 34(1), subject to the approval of the prison governor, convicted persons may use in their cells, at their own expense, their own radio and television receivers.
3. Ministry of Justice Serving of Prison Sentences Regulations 1994, in force until 31 December 2005 (Regulations no. 125/1994))
25. Regulation 3(1) provides that convicted persons should be treated in a way which reduces the negative impact of imprisonment on their personality.
26. Regulation 8(1) lists sports and hobby activities, radio and television broadcasts, films and convicted persons’ own cultural, educational or entertainment activities among the cultural and educational activities for persons who serve a prison term.
27. Regulation 8(6) provides that convicted persons are allowed to follow radio and television broadcasts. The scope is to be determined by prison rules.
28. The frequency and duration of visits to convicted persons by their close friends and/or relatives is governed by Regulations 80, 86 and 90. Visits are allowed at least once a fortnight for convicted persons at the lowest security level; once a month for convicted persons at the medium security level; and once every six weeks for those at the highest security level. As a rule, visits take place without direct supervision by a prison officer in prisons with the lowest security level. In other cases visits are supervised by a prison officer and no direct contact between the convicted person and the visitor is allowed. In all three types of prison the duration of a visit is to be a minimum of two hours.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTS
A. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
29. The relevant part of Article 10 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, by which Slovakia has been bound as from 28 May 1993, reads as follows:
“2. (a) Accused persons shall, save in exceptional circumstances, be segregated from convicted persons and shall be subject to separate treatment appropriate to their status as unconvicted persons;” ...
30. General Comment No. 21 on Article 10 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights was adopted by the Human Rights Committee on 10 April 1992. In its relevant part it reads:
“9. Article 10, paragraph 2 (a), provides for the segregation, save in exceptional circumstances, of accused persons from convicted ones. Such segregation is required in order to emphasize their status as unconvicted persons who at the same time enjoy the right to be presumed innocent as stated in article 14, paragraph 2.” (...)
B. The Council of Europe documents
1. European Prison Rules
31. The European Prison Rules are recommendations of the Committee of Ministers to member States of the Council of Europe as to the minimum standards to be applied in prisons. States are encouraged to be guided in legislation and policies by those rules and to ensure wide dissemination of the Rules to their judicial authorities as well as to prison staff and inmates.
(a) The 1987 European Prison Rules
32. The 1987 European Prison Rules (Recommendation No. R (87) 3 were adopted by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe on 12 February 1987. In Part V they contained a number of basic principles concerning untried prisoners, including the following:
“91. Without prejudice to legal rules for the protection of individual liberty of prescribing the procedure to be observed in respect of untried prisoners, these prisoners, who are presumed to be innocent until they are found guilty, shall be ... treated without restrictions other than those necessary for the penal procedure and the security of the institution.
92. 1. Untried prisoners shall be allowed to inform their families of their detention immediately and given all reasonable facilities for communication with family and friends and persons with whom it is in their legitimate interest to enter into contact.
2. They shall also be allowed to receive visits from them ... subject only to such restrictions and supervision as are necessary in the interests of the administration of justice and of the security and good order of the institution.” (...)
(b) The 2006 European Prison Rules
33. On 11 January 2006 the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe adopted a new version of the European Prison Rules, Recommendation Rec(2006)2. It noted that the 1987 Rules “needed to be substantively revised and updated in order to reflect the developments which ha[d] occurred in penal policy, sentencing practice and the overall management of prisons in Europe”.
34. The 2006 Rules contain, the following principles concerning untried prisoners, inter alia:
“95.1. The regime for untried prisoners may not be influenced by the possibility that they may be convicted of a criminal offence in the future. ...
95.3. In dealing with untried prisoners prison authorities shall be guided by the rules that apply to all prisoners and allow untried prisoners to participate in various activities for which these rules provide. ...
99. Unless there is a specific prohibition for a specified period by a judicial authority in an individual case, untried prisoners:
a. shall receive visits and be allowed to communicate with family and other persons in the same way as convicted prisoners;
b. may receive additional visits and have additional access to other forms of communication;” (...)
2. Reports on the CPT’s visits to Slovakia
35. On 6 December 2001 the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) published its report on the visit to Slovakia which had taken place from 9 to 18 October 2000. The relevan t parts read as follows:
“79. In the report on the 1995 visit (cf. paragraphs 126 to 130 of CPT/Inf (97) 2), the CPT stressed the importance for prisoners to be able to maintain good contact with the outside world. In view of the situation found in 1995, the Committee recommended that the visit entitlement of remand prisoners in Bratislava Prison be substantially increased and invited the Slovak authorities to explore the possibility of offering more open visiting arrangements for such prisoners...
80. In their responses, the Slovak authorities expressed some misgivings about the approach proposed by the CPT, principally based on the objective of preserving the interests of justice (preventing collusion, etc.).
It is therefore not surprising that the delegation which carried out the 2000 visit observed little or no change in this area. In particular, remand prisoners’ visit entitlement remained limited to a mere 30 minutes every month..., although they could receive from time to time an additional visit at the director’s discretion. Further, visits for such prisoners continued to take place in booths, with prisoner and visitor(s) separated by a screen...
81. The CPT accepts that in certain cases it will be justified, for security-related reasons or to protect the legitimate interests of an investigation, to have visits take place in booths and/or monitored. However, the CPT wishes once again to invite the Slovak authorities to move towards more open visiting arrangements for remand prisoners in general...
Arguments based on the need to protect the interests of justice are totally unconvincing as a justification for the present inadequate visit entitlement for remand prisoners. The CPT therefore reiterates its recommendation that the visit entitlement for remand prisoners be substantially increased (for example, to 30 minutes every week).”
36. On 2 February 2006 the CPT published its report on the visit to Slovakia which had taken place from 22 February to 3 March 2005. The relevant parts read as follows:
“46. A fundamental problem as regards remand prisoners in the Slovak Republic is the total lack of out-of-cell activities offered to such inmates.
At the time of the visit, remand prisoners were being held for 23 hours a day in their cells in a state of enforced idleness; their only source of distraction was reading books from the prison library and listening to the radio and, in a limited number of cases, watching television. No work was offered to such prisoners, and possibilities for sports activities were few and far between, if available at all... The deleterious effects of such a restricted regime were exacerbated by the lengthy periods of time for which persons could be held in remand prisons...
The CPT calls upon the Slovak authorities to take steps, as a matter of priority, to devise and implement a comprehensive regime of out-of-cell activities (including group association activities) for remand prisoners. The aim should be to ensure that all prisoners are allowed to spend a reasonable part of the day outside their cells, engaged in purposeful activities of a varied nature (group association activities; work, preferably with vocational value; education; sport). The legislative framework governing remand imprisonment should be revised accordingly...
61. The situation as regards the visiting entitlements for remand prisoners had not changed in the last ten years. It remained the case that adults were entitled to a mere 30-minute visit per month... The conditions under which visits took place continued to be closed (in booths with a screen separating inmates from their visitors). This was exactly the situation which prevailed during the first visit of the CPT to the Slovak Republic in 1995.
The CPT calls upon the Slovak authorities to revise the relevant legal provisions in order to increase substantially the visit entitlement for remand prisoners. The objective should be to offer the equivalent of a visit every week, of at least 30 minutes duration. Further, the Committee invites the Slovak authorities to introduce more open arrangements for visits to remand prisoners.”
37. The Government’s response to the latter report, published on 2 February 2006, contains the following information:
“Under the new draft legislation on remand imprisonment, the visit entitlement is to be extended from one visit of at least 30 minutes a month to a visit of at least one hour once in three weeks. In justified cases, the prison governor will have the right to grant more frequent visits...
Under the methodological guidance issued by the General Director of the CPCG (No. GR ZVJS-116-45/20-2003) in conformity with the current legislation on the enforcement of remand imprisonment, remand prisoners are allowed to have their own TV sets subject to certain conditions. The methodological guidance issued by the General Director of the CPCG (No. GR ZVJS-116-38/20-2003) provides for certain leisure-time activities and allows the performance of certain sports and special-interest activities, in particular to juvenile and female remand prisoners. Remand prisons take permanent efforts to create spatial and material conditions for special-interest activities of remand prisoners, and for sports activities both inside and in outdoor premises of prison establishments.
The issue of creating adequate programme of activities for remand prisoners is addressed also in the new draft law on remand imprisonment, which is currently considered by the National Council of the Slovak Republic in connection with the re-codification of the Criminal Code and of the Code of Criminal Procedure. The new draft law on remand imprisonment aims at introducing a lighter remand regime and proposes that remand prisoners be differentiated by categories to enable their participation in special-interest activities that can mitigate or reduce the negative impact of incarceration on remand prisoners. The implementation of adequate activity programmes proposed for all remand prisoners is conditional on the creation of adequate spatial, material and staffing conditions. After the new law has entered into effect, the CPCG will gradually create material conditions for abovementioned programmes and start with their practical implementation.”
THE LAW
I. THE SCOPE OF THE CASE
38. On 20 October 2010 the Court declared admissible complaints under: (i) Articles 8 and 14 concerning the alleged difference in treatment between the applicant when he was in detention on remand and convicted persons; (ii) Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerning the use of his money in prison; and (iii) Article 13 concerning the lack of an effective remedy in this respect. It declared inadmissible the remainder of the application.
39. As regards the complaints under Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention in particular, the issues which the Court considered included the visiting rights of the applicant, the lack of a possibility of watching television and having a private radio receiver, as well as the lack of appropriate arrangements for having hot water and preparing hot drinks in the cells of persons detained on remand. The Court reiterates that it declared admissible that part of the application to the extent that the alleged breaches of the applicant’s rights stemmed from the legislation in force at the relevant time.
40. In his observations on the merits of the case the applicant maintained that the Court should also examine whether the facts complained of amounted to a breach of his rights under Article 3 and Article 6 §§ 1 and 2 of the Convention.
41. The Court notes that the above decision on the admissibility of the application determines the scope of the case currently before it. There is therefore no call for an examination in the context of the present application as to whether the relevant facts of the case gave rise to a breach of other provisions of the Convention as claimed by the applicant.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN ALONE AND IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14
42. The applicant complained that during the period of his detention on remand his rights had been restricted to a greater extent than the rights of convicted persons serving their prison terms. He alleged a breach of Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention which, in so far as relevant, provide:
Article 8
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, ...
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Article 14
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The applicant
43. The applicant alleged, in particular, that during his detention on remand he had been allowed to have visits only once a month and that their duration had always been limited to the statutory minimum, namely thirty minutes. He had not been allowed to have direct contact with his visitors, from whom he had been separated by a partition and with whom he could talk only through a phone. The duration of the visits had been shorter than that to which convicted persons had been entitled.
44. While detained on remand, the applicant could only listen to radio programmes from two stations selected by the prison administration, one public and one private, each of which had been available in turn for one day centrally through the internal wire system. He had not been able to watch television programmes at all. The applicant maintained that, unlike him, convicted prisoners had been allowed to watch television every day in rooms designed for that purpose and to have a private radio receiver in their cell allowing them to choose the broadcasts they wished to follow. Furthermore, during the period of his detention the applicant had been unable to take part in various sport activities, attend cultural events and work in various hobby groups which had been available in prison to convicted prisoners.
45. In the applicant’s view, there had been no justification for the imposition of those types of restrictions on him as a person detained during investigation and judicial proceedings before any verdict had been delivered. In particular, he contended that detained persons in his position had not been found guilty and should not therefore be placed in a worse situation than convicted prisoners. The restrictions imposed on him had concerned many issues that were irrelevant to the proper conduct of the criminal proceedings and they had been imposed on him for the whole duration of his detention on remand, namely for a period exceeding four years.
2. The Government
46. The Government maintained that the situations referred to by the applicant in his assertions that he had been in a worse position compared with convicted persons had not been relevantly similar. The aim of detention on remand during judicial proceedings and that of a prison sentence were different. The former was aimed at ensuring the availability of an accused person for the purpose of criminal proceedings and their smooth conduct. The latter represented the most severe form of punishment within the system of criminal law. Any difference in the two regimes, which in any event had not been substantial, resulted from the difference in the relevant law. The applicant had not been discriminated against contrary to Article 14 of the Convention.
47. The law in force at the relevant time contained no provisions governing the possibility for persons detained on remand to watch television programmes either collectively or individually in their cells. In 2003 an instruction issued by the General Prison Administration allowed for the use by persons detained on remand of their own television sets in cells at their own expense where it was technically feasible. The Government admitted that for technical reasons the use of private television sets had not been possible in the building where the applicant had been detained on remand.
At the relevant time convicted persons had been allowed to watch television, in accordance with Regulation no. 125/1994, in prison assembly rooms.
48. Lastly, the Government maintained that, in any event, all the restrictions imposed on the applicant had been standard procedure and had exclusively served the interests of the maintenance of order and the proper functioning of prisons. They argued that individuals detained during investigation and judicial proceedings had to expect certain restrictions on their rights. All the restrictions imposed on the applicant had been in accordance with the relevant law and could not be regarded as discriminatory.
B. The Court’s assessment
49. Since the essence of the applicant’s grievances is the allegedly unjustified difference in treatment between himself as a person detained on remand and convicted prisoners serving the terms to which they had been sentenced, the Court considers it appropriate to address them first from the standpoint of Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 8, and then under Article 8 alone.
1. Alleged violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8
50. The Court reiterates that Article 14 of the Convention protects individuals in similar situations from being treated differently without justification in the enjoyment of their Convention rights and freedoms. This provision has no independent existence, since it has effect solely in relation to the rights and freedoms safeguarded by the other substantive provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. However, the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of one or more of such provisions and to this extent it is autonomous. For Article 14 to become applicable, it suffices that the facts of a case fall within the ambit of another substantive provision of the Convention or its Protocols (see Sidabras and Džiautas v. Lithuania, nos. 55480/00 and 59330/00, § 38, ECHR 2004-VIII).
51. The Court will therefore establish whether the facts of the case fall within the ambit of Article 8, whether there has been a difference in the treatment of the applicant and, if so, whether such different treatment was compatible with Article 14 of the Convention.
(a) Whether the facts of the case fall under Article 8 of the Convention
52. The Court has held that detention, similarly to any other measure depriving a person of his or her liberty, entails inherent limitations on private and family life. Restrictions such as limitations on the number of family visits and the supervision of those visits constitute an interference with a detained person’s rights under Article 8 but are not, of themselves, in breach of that provision (see, among other authorities, Bogusław Krawczak v. Poland, no. 24205/06, §§ 107-108, 31 May 2011, and Moiseyev v. Russia, no. 62936/00, §§ 207-208, 9 October 2008).
53. The fact that the applicant was unable to watch television programmes while in detention might, in the circumstances, bear on his private life as protected under Article 8, which includes a right to maintain relationships with the outside world and also a right to personal development (see Uzun v. Germany, no. 35623/05, § 43, 2 September 2010). Such an activity can also be regarded as important for maintaining the mental stability of a person who, like the applicant, has been detained on remand for a long period of time. The Court has held that the preservation of mental stability is an indispensable precondition to the effective enjoyment of the right to respect for one’s private life (see, mutatis mutandis, Dolenec v. Croatia, no. 25282/06, § 57, 26 November 2009). The above considerations do not imply, however, that lack of access to television broadcasts in prison is in itself contrary to Article 8.
54. The Court thus accepts that, among the facts complained of by the applicant and falling within the scope of the present application as determined by the admissibility decision (see also paragraph 39 above), those concerning family visits and his alleged lack of access to television broadcasts interfered with his right under Article 8 to respect for his private and family life. In accordance with the Court’s decision on the admissibility, the interference and the alleged discriminatory treatment of the applicant in that context will be examined exclusively to the extent that they resulted from the laws applicable at the relevant time.
(b) Whether the applicant had an “other status” and whether his position was analogous to convicted prisoners
55. Being a person detained on remand may be regarded as placing the individual in a distinct legal situation, which even though it may be imposed involuntarily and generally for a temporary period, is inextricably bound up with the individual’s personal circumstances and existence. The Court is therefore satisfied, and it has not been disputed between the parties, that by the fact of being detained on remand the applicant fell within the notion of “other status” within the meaning of Article 14 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Shelley v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 23800/06, 4 January 2008, and Clift v. the United Kingdom, no. 7205/07, §§ 55-63, 13 July 2010).
56. In order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (see D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007–IV). The requirement to demonstrate an “analogous position” does not require that the comparator groups be identical. The fact that the applicant’s situation is not fully analogous to that of convicted prisoners and that there are differences between the various groups based on the purpose of their deprivation of liberty does not preclude the application of Article 14. It must be shown that, having regard to the particular nature of his complaint, the applicant was in a relevantly similar situation to others treated differently (see Clift, cited above, § 66).
57. The applicant’s complaints under examination concern the legal provisions regulating his visiting rights, and his lack of access to television programmes in prison. They thus relate to issues which are of relevance to all persons detained in prisons, as they determine the scope of the restrictions on their private and family life which are inherent in the deprivation of liberty, regardless of the ground on which they are based.
58. The Court therefore considers that, as regards the facts in issue, the applicant can claim to be in a relevantly similar situation to convicted persons.
(c) Whether the difference in treatment was objectively justified
59. A difference in treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification, in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. The Contracting States enjoy a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment. The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject-matter and the background. The Court has accepted that, in principle, a wide margin of appreciation applies in questions of prisoners and penal policy (see Clift, cited above, § 73, with further references).
60. As to the facts of the present case, the Court notes that the applicant was detained pending trial from 1 September 2001 to 9 February 2006. During that period, the regime of his detention on remand was governed by the Detention Act 1993. Under section 10(1) and (5), all accused persons detained during investigation and judicial proceedings were entitled to receive visitors once a month for at least thirty minutes. The visits took place without direct contact between the accused and the visitor. Other arrangements were within the discretionary power of the prison governor (see paragraph 15 above). However, it does not appear from the documents submitted that such arrangements had been frequently made in general or in respect of the applicant in particular.
61. During the same period the statutory duration of visits to convicted persons was fixed at a minimum of two hours. From 1 September 2001 to 31 December 2005 the frequency at which convicted prisoners could receive visitors was determined according to their prison security level. Visits to convicted persons by their close friends and/or relatives were allowed at least once a fortnight for convicted prisoners at the lowest security level and direct contact was allowed between the visitors and the convicted person in such cases. Visits to convicted prisoners at the medium-security level by their close friends and/or relatives were allowed once a month, and once in six weeks for those at the highest security level. In medium and high-security level prisons, visits were supervised by a prison officer and no direct contact between the convicted person and the visitor was allowed. As from 1 January 2006, the Serving of Prison Sentences Act 2005 entitled convicted persons to meet visitors at least once a month for two hours (see paragraphs 21 and 22 above).
62. Thus, at the relevant time, the duration of visits to persons detained on remand, such as the applicant, was considerably shorter (thirty minutes) than that which the law allowed in respect of convicted persons (two hours).
Moreover, during a substantial part of the relevant period the frequency of visits and the type of contact of convicted persons differed according to the security level of the prison in which they were being held. In particular, in prisons with the lowest security level visits took place, under the Serving of Prison Sentences Act 1965 at least once a fortnight and direct contact between convicted persons and their visitors was allowed. The restrictions on visiting rights of persons detained on remand were applicable in a general manner, regardless of the reasons for their detention and the security considerations related thereto.
63. Pursuant to section 2(1) of the Detention Act 1993, any restrictions on detained persons’ rights must be justified by the purpose of the detention and by the aim of ensuring order, the safety of others and the protection of property in places where accused persons are detained. Paragraph 2 of section 2 permits the restriction only of those rights of detained persons of which they cannot avail themselves in view of the fact that they are detained on remand.
64. In the Court’s view, neither the above provisions, nor the arguments put forward by the Government, provide an objective and reasonable justification for restricting visiting rights of persons detained on remand - who are to be presumed innocent (see paragraph 14 above) - in the above respect and in a general manner, to a greater extent than those of convicted persons. The arrangements in place were criticised by the CPT in its reports on visits to Slovakia which took place in 1995, 2000 and 2005 (see paragraphs 35 and 36 above).
65. As regards the lack of direct contact with visitors, the Court reiterates that in a different case it has held that a person detained on remand who had been physically separated from his visitors throughout his detention lasting three and a half years was, in the absence of any demonstrated need such as security considerations, not justified under the second paragraph of Article 8 (see Moiseyev, cited above, §§ 258-259). It further notes that, apart from an exception which was at the discretion of the prison governor, at the relevant time the law in force did not entitle persons detained on remand to have direct contact with their visitors regardless of their particular situation.
66. The Court concurs with the view expressed in the report of 6 December 2001 on the CPT’s visit to Slovakia, according to which in certain cases it may be justified, for security-related reasons or to protect the legitimate interests of an investigation, to have particular restrictions on a detained person’s visiting rights (see paragraph 35 above, and also Vlasov v. Russia, no. 78146/01, § 123, with further references). That aim can, however, be attained by other means which do not affect all detained persons regardless of whether they are actually required, such as the setting up of different categories of detention, or particular restrictions as may be required by the circumstances of an individual case.
67. The above considerations are also in line with the relevant international documents. Thus Article 10 § 2(a) the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights requires, inter alia, that accused persons should, save in exceptional circumstances, be subject to separate treatment appropriate to their status as not convicted persons who enjoy the right to be presumed innocent (see paragraphs 29 and 30 above).
The 1987 European Prison Rules stated that untried prisoners, who are to be presumed innocent until they are found guilty, should be subjected only to such restrictions which are necessary for the penal procedure and the security of the institution (see paragraph 32 above).
Finally, the 2006 European Prison Rules, which were adopted shortly before the applicant’s detention on remand ended, provide, in particular, that unless there is a specific reason to the contrary, untried prisoners should receive visits and be allowed to communicate with family and other persons in the same way as convicted prisoners. Moreover, there is a possibility of additional visits and other forms of communication (see paragraph 34 above).
68. The Court observes that the subsequent legislation, namely the 2006 Detention Act, extended the visiting rights of remand prisoners, and it allows for a differentiation between them with a view to ensuring that the restrictions imposed corresponded to an objective need (see paragraph 17 above). This cannot, however, affect the position in the present case.
69. In view of the above, the Court concludes that the restrictions on visits to the applicant by his family members during his detention on remand constituted a disproportionate measure, contrary to his rights under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention.
70. As regards the lack of access to television broadcasts, the law which governed detention on remand at the relevant time did not provide for such a possibility. By contrast, at the time when the applicant was detained on remand, convicted persons had the right and were able to collectively watch television programmes in special rooms in prison (see paragraphs 26, 27 and 47 above).
71. In the absence of any relevant arguments put forward by the Government the Court finds no objective justification for such a difference in treatment between persons detained on remand and convicted prisoners. It attaches weight to the fact that being able to follow television broadcasts was considered to be a part of the cultural and educational activities organised for convicted persons, whereas such activities were not provided for in the law applicable to persons detained on remand. This was also criticised by the CPT.
72. It is true that the General Prison Administration issued instructions in 2003 allowing detained persons to have their own television sets in their cells. This does not affect the position in the present case, as such a possibility was open only to persons who could afford the costs involved and, in any event, it was not technically feasible in the prison wing where the applicant was being held.
73. There has therefore been a violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention.
2. Alleged violation of Article 8 of the Convention taken alone
74. The Court considers that since it has found a breach of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 8, it is not necessary to examine whether there has been a violation of Article 8 alone.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
75. The applicant complained that, when receiving a sum of money from his family, he was required to use half of that amount to pay back part of his debt to the State. Refusal to pay the amount would have led to the suspension of his right to buy groceries and other items in the prison shop. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which provides as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
76. The applicant stated that he had been in prison for several years and had not had any income. The only way in which he could have received the money needed to pay for supplementary food, personal items, correspondence, medicine and so forth, had been to ask his family members for help. However, he was under an obligation to use half of the money he received from his family to pay back his debt to the State. If he had failed to reimburse a part of that debt on a monthly basis, he would have been prevented from buying groceries and other items in the prison shop.
77. Overall, considering the amount of money he had received from his family and the obligation to use half of it to pay back his debt to the State, he claimed that he had been left with amounts between EUR 7 and EUR 15 per month that he could use in the prison shop. He also claimed that the quantity of the food provided in prison had been poor, and that the prisoners had therefore been forced to buy supplementary food. The restrictions set by law had not fulfilled the requirement of proportionality, as a fair balance had not been struck between the general interest of society and his fundamental rights. As a result, the legislation had placed an unreasonable burden on him.
78. The Government maintained that the relevant legislation regulating the use of prisoners’ money was compatible with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They argued that that provision did not impair the right of States to adopt such laws as they deemed necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes and other contributions or penalties.
79. The purpose of the relevant legislation was to ensure that prisoners paid their debts. The applicant was entitled to use his money only if he fulfilled the statutory requirements. More specifically, in the previous calendar month, he had had to pay at least the same amount of his debt to the Prison Administration or other entitled people as he had wished to withdraw. Nevertheless, if a person did not fulfil those requirements, the prison governor was entitled to grant leave to that person to use his or her money to buy medicine, indispensable sanitary items, or to pay taxes or fees.
80. Even though such a regulation interfered with the right of prisoners to freely dispose of their money, it was not a disproportionate interference because prisoners were provided with food, clothing and other items and services. When using additional financial resources, the prisoners secured above-standard conditions for themselves.
81. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 guarantees in substance the right of property. Any interference with that right must comply with the principle of lawfulness and pursue a legitimate aim by means reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (for a recapitulation of the relevant principles see, for example, Metalco Bt. v. Hungary, no. 34976/05, § 16, 1 February 2011, with further references).
82. In the present case the applicant has been allowed to use money on his account in prison to buy supplementary food and other products in the prison shop, only if he used at least the same amount for reimbursement of his registered debts. There has thus been an interference with the applicant’s right under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.
83. That interference has had a legal basis, namely section 12a of the Detention Act 1993 and, after the applicant’s conviction, section 28 of the Serving of Prison Sentences Act 2005 (see paragraphs 16 and 23 above). The reimbursement of debts undoubtedly falls within the general interest as envisaged in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
84. As to the requirement of a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim pursued, the Court has recognised that the Contracting States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing the means of recovery of debts and to ascertaining whether the consequences of such recovery are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question. In such cases the Court will respect the State authorities’ judgment as to what is in the general interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Benet Czech, spol. s r.o. v. the Czech Republic, no. 31555/05, §§ 30 and 35, 21 October 2010, with further references).
85. The Court notes that the interference in issue has limited but does not deprive the applicant of the possibility of using the money on his account in prison to buy supplementary food and other products in the prison shop.
It further notes that, even if a person does not fulfil the requirement of using an equivalent amount towards the reimbursement of a part of his or her debt, that person is to be allowed to use his or her money to buy medicine, indispensable sanitary items, items necessary to engage in correspondence, or to pay taxes or fees. It does not follow from the documents submitted that the applicant has not been allowed to use his money for that purpose regardless whether or not he reimbursed a part of his debt.
86. In view of the information before it, and considering the wide margin of appreciation afforded to the Contracting States in similar cases, the Court considers that the interference complained of was not disproportionate to the aim pursued.
87. There has therefore been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
88. The applicant complained that he had no effective remedy at his disposal as regards the complaints set out above. He relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
89. The Court notes that it declared admissible and examined the applicant’s complaints under the substantive provisions of the Convention only to the extent that the alleged breach stemmed from the alleged deficiencies in the relevant law.
90. However, Article 13 cannot be interpreted as requiring a remedy against the state of domestic law (see Iordachi and Others v. Moldova, no. 25198/02, § 56, 10 February 2009).
91. In these circumstances, the Court finds no breach of Article 13 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
92. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
93. The applicant claimed 50,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
94. The Government considered that claim to be excessive.
95. The Court, making an assessment on an equitable basis, considers it appropriate to grant EUR 9,000 to the applicant in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
96. The applicant claimed EUR 500 in respect of his own out-of-pocket expenses, which he incurred in the context of his attempts to obtain redress before both the domestic authorities and the Court. He further claimed EUR 3,900 in respect of the costs of his legal representation in the proceedings before the Court, as well as EUR 920 for the translation of submissions and other expenses incurred by his lawyer.
97. The Government considered that any award should correspond to the principles established in the Court’s case-law.
98. The Court reiterates that costs and expenses will not be awarded under Article 41 unless it is established that they were actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum (see Sanoma Uitgevers B.V. v. the Netherlands, no. 38224/03, § 109, ECHR 2010-...., with further references).
99. Regard being had to the information in its possession and the above-mentioned criteria, and noting that the applicant was granted legal aid under the Council of Europe legal-aid scheme (see paragraph 2 above), the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicant the additional sum of EUR 600 in respect of costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant on that amount.
C. Default interest
100. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention;
2. Holds that it is not necessary to examine whether there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention taken alone;
3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention;
4. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 9,000 (nine thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 600 (six hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 13 December 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Santiago Quesada Josep Casadevall
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judges Gyulumyan and Tsotsoria is annexed to this judgment.
J.C.M.
S.Q.

JOINT CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGES GYULUMYAN AND TSOTSORIA
We voted with the majority in finding a violation of Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention in the particular circumstances of the present case. However, with due respect, we would like to express our separate opinion on certain points of the judgment that, we believe, are crucial in shaping the Court’s case-law on the rights of remand prisoners. From this point of view, the judgment may well go beyond the legal system of the respondent State and have implications for all the Contracting States.
In the present case, the applicant based his complaints on Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention and alleged that as a remand prisoner, his rights were restricted to a greater extent than those of convicted persons (see paragraphs 38-39 and 42 of the judgment).
We are mindful of the tendency towards greater protection of the rights of remand prisoners, which is adequately outlined in the relevant parts of the judgment. The most pertinent elements can be summarised as follows:
- when determining the appropriate regime for remand prisoners, the Government should take into consideration the fact that they enjoy the right to be presumed innocent;
- unless there is a time- and content-specific restriction imposed by a judicial authority in an individual case, remand prisoners should enjoy at least the same rights as convicted prisoners;
- the restrictions imposed must be necessary in the interests of the administration of justice or for the security of the custodial facility.
Based on the above-mentioned elements, the crucial question that arises is whether remand and convicted prisoners should enjoy the same rights, thus making Article 14 of the Convention applicable. Here we refer to the following facts of the case: the applicant was detained on remand for more than four years (see paragraphs 7 and 60). This unusually long period makes the present case specific in relation to regular cases concerning the rights of remand and convicted prisoners, as detention on remand is normally imposed for a significantly shorter period of time (see paragraph 55). This specific circumstance of the case, namely the long period of detention on remand, did not go unnoticed and was appropriately highlighted in paragraph 53 of the judgment. Therefore, we doubt that the rights of remand and convicted prisoners should be equal in all circumstances.
Having said that, we had no difficulties in agreeing with the majority that the present case fell within the ambit of Article 14 of the Convention, as the respondent Government also accepted the argument that the applicant, as a remand prisoner, had an “other status” within the meaning of Article 14. However, we did have difficulties in fully aligning ourselves with the

majority’s principal argument for the justification of the applicability of Article 14 of the Convention to the present case. In this regard, the majority found:
“57. The applicant’s complaints under examination concern the legal provisions regulating his visiting rights, and his lack of access to television programmes in prison. They thus relate to issues which are of relevance to all persons detained in prisons, as they determine the scope of the restrictions on their private and family life which are inherent in the deprivation of liberty, regardless of the ground on which they are based.” (emphasis added)
The paragraph cited above and the overall spirit of the judgment (see also, for instance, paragraph 67) bring us to the conclusion that the majority, at least implicitly, support the idea of making the status of remand and convicted prisoners equal. We think that the effect of the judgment as it now stands might go beyond the circumstances of the present case, irrespective of the preconditions for legitimate restrictions of rights; it is not certain that its impact will be limited to the right to have family visits and access to television, which formed the subject of the complaints in the underlying application. We are afraid that, in the light of the scarce case-law on the cumulative application of Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention in the field of prison rules, the importance of the present case has not been adequately assessed and carefully anticipated.
We feel compelled to say that, despite these unfortunate disagreements with the majority, we fully subscribe to the rationale of the judgment that the rights of remand prisoners should be further strengthened, albeit without prejudice to, inter alia, the legitimate interests of the criminal proceedings and the security of the institution concerned. The margin of appreciation enjoyed by the Contracting States in penal policy-making should likewise be respected, as reaffirmed by the majority (see paragraph 59).
The present judgment, as it now stands, fails to shed light on some of the very complex issues in penal policy that are equally important and relevant for the Contracting States. The ambiguity of the arguments in the judgment may turn the indisputably good intentions of the Court into something unintended.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di Art. 14+8; nessuna violazione di Art. 13; nessuna violazione di P1-1; danno Non-patrimoniale - l'assegnazione
TERZA SEZIONE
CAUSA LADUNA C. SLOVACCHIA
(Richiesta n. 31827/02)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
13 dicembre 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Laduna c. Slovacchia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Josep Casadevall, Presidente, Corneliu Bîrsan, Alvina Gyulumyan, Ján Šikuta, Luis López Guerra, Nona Tsotsoria, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e Santiago Quesada, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato 15 novembre 2011,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 31827/02) contro la Repubblica slovacca depositata presso la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino slovacco, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 10 agosto 2002.
2. Il richiedente che era stato accordato patrocinio gratuito fu rappresentato da OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Bratislava. Il Governo della Repubblica slovacca (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra M. Pirošíková.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che i suoi diritti sotto Articoli 8, 13 e 14 della Convenzione e sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 era stato violato nel contesto della sua detenzione su carcerazione preventiva ed il suo termine susseguente di reclusione.
4. Con una decisione di 20 ottobre 2010, la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente ammissibile.
5. Il richiedente ed il Governo ognuno registrò inoltre osservazioni scritto (l'Articolo 59 § 1) sui meriti.
I FATTI
IO. LE CIRCOSTANZE DI LA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1973. Attualmente lui sta notificando una condanna a vita in Prigione di Leopoldov.
7. Il richiedente fu accusato di molti reati seri. In che contesto lui fu detenuto processo pendente dal 2001 a 9 febbraio 2006 di 1 settembre. Sulla data seconda lui cominciò a notificare un termine di prigione di nove anni al quale lui era stato condannato per furto. Gli ulteriori dettagli sono esposti fuori nella decisione di 20 ottobre 2010 sull'ammissibilità della richiesta presente.
8. Durante la sua detenzione su carcerazione preventiva il richiedente presentò molti reclami col Direzione Generale di Prigione Amministrazione nel quale lui si lamentò delle condizioni della sua detenzione. Lui sollevò molti problemi fra che era le restrizioni sui suoi diritti da visita (alle visite fu lasciato spazio solamente una volta per mese a trenta minuti ed era solamente possibile parlare a visitatori per una sezione), il diritto per comprare cibo in prigione, la mancanza di acqua calda nella sua cella ed una mancanza di contatto con gli altri prigionieri. Lui addusse anche quel dichiarò colpevole prigionieri che scontano una condanna avevano più diritti che lui aveva come un prigioniero di carcerazione preventiva.
9. Il Direzione Generale di Prigione Amministrazione spedì repliche al richiedente su più di dieci occasioni. Trovò tutte l'azioni di reclamo di richiedente per essere mal-fondato. Contenne anche che le condizioni nelle prigioni nelle quali il richiedente era stato detenuto durante l'indagine e procedimenti giudiziali erano stati in conformità alla legge attinente.
10. Inoltre, il richiedente è stato obbligato sia durante la sua detenzione e dopo la sua condanna, usare la metà dei soldi lui ricevette dalla sua famiglia per rimborsare il debito che lui dovette allo Stato (questo debito fu il risultato di corti le decisioni di ' e dall'obbligazione legale per contribuire al suo mantenimento in prigione), fallendo a quale lui non fu permesso di comprare cibo supplementare nel negozio di prigione.
Così il debito complessivo del richiedente corrispose all'equivalente di alcuni 750 euro (EUR) a marzo 2008. Nel periodo da dicembre 2002 a gennaio 2008 lui aveva pagato dell'EUR 360 in rimborso del suo debito.
11. 16 gennaio 2003 il richiedente presentò un reclamo con l'Accusatore Generale che presenta che i suoi diritti umani erano stati violati. Lui si lamentò, inter alia, della maniera nella quale lo Stato l'aveva costretto a rimborsare il debito che è il risultato dell'obbligazione legale per contribuire al suo mantenimento in prigione.
12. 30 gennaio 2003 l'Accusatore Generale respinse che azione di reclamo come nessuna violazione della legge era stata trovata nella causa del richiedente.
13. Durante il periodo intero della sua detenzione durante l'indagine e processo il richiedente non poteva guardare la televisione mentre prigionieri condannato avevano la possibilità di guardare collettivamente programmes della televisione nella stanza di riunione dell'ala di prigione attinente. Per il sistema di trasmissione di prigione l'amministrazione di prigione lasciò i detenuti ascolta ad un pubblico ed una stazione di radio privata ognuno di che furono trasmesse un giorno sì un giorno no. Per pressocché il periodo intero della sua detenzione durante processo il richiedente fu tenuto da solo nella sua cella.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. struttura Legale riguardo alla detenzione su carcerazione preventiva
1. Detenzione Atto 1993, in vigore sino a 30 giugno 2006 (la Legge n. 156/1993)
14. Facendo seguito a sezione 2(1), la detenzione di una persona durante indagine e procedimenti giudiziali deve rispettare il diritto della persona detenuta per essere presunta innocente. Qualsiasi restrizioni devono essere giustificate col fine della detenzione e con lo scopo di assicurare ordine, la sicurezza di altri e la protezione di proprietà in posti dove persone accusato sono detenute. Sottosezione 2 di sezione 2 licenze la restrizione di solamente quelli diritti di persone detenute dei quali loro non possono giovarsi ad in prospettiva del fatto che loro sono detenuti su carcerazione preventiva. La detenzione su carcerazione preventiva non deve diminuire la dignità umana della persona accusato.
15. Sezione 10(1) prevede che una persona accusato detenne durante indagine e procedimenti giudiziali sono concessi per ricevere una volta visitatori per mese per almeno trenta minuti. Dove allineato, il governatore di prigione può permettere visite più frequenti o un'altra forma di contatto. Sottosezione 5 di sezione 10 prevede quel visita a persone accusato dovrebbe succedere nella presenza di un ufficiale di prigione e senza contatto diretto fra l'accusato ed il visitatore. Le altre disposizioni possono essere autorizzate col direttore di prigione in cause allineato.
16. Sezione 12a(10) stati che una persona accusato è concessa per usare suo o i suoi soldi per acquistare generi alimentari e gli altri articoli in prigione, purché che lui o lei hanno adempiuto ai requisiti legali ed attinenti. Questi includono, inter l'alia, l'obbligo per pagare almeno lo stesso importo di suo o il suo debito all'amministrazione di prigione o alle altre persone concesse quando desiderando ritirare soldi da suo o il suo conto in prigione. Quando questo e le altre condizioni non sono soddisfatte, il governatore di prigione dovrebbe permettere la persona detenuta, a suo o la sua richiesta scritto, usare soldi per acquistare medicina ed articoli medici che non sono offerti per esente da spese sotto la legge attinente, comprare articoli di personale-igiene di base ed anche pagare qualsiasi tasse applicabili e parcelle (sezione 12(11)).
2. Atto sulla Detenzione del 2006, in vigore dal 1 luglio 2006 (la Legge n. 221/2006)
17. Facendo seguito a sezione 19(1), persone accusato sono concesse per ricevere visitatori ogni tre settimane per almeno un'ora.
Dove un accusato è detenuto sulla base che lui o lei potessero influenzare testimoni o co-accusato, o impedisce l'indagine penale nella causa, lui o lei può ricevere solamente visitatori soggetto al beneplacito dell'autorità che persegue o distribuzione di corte con la causa (sezione 19(2)).
A persone accusato detenute in prigioni al livello di sicurezza più basso è permesso per avere contatto diretto coi loro visitatori come un articolo generale. Nelle altre visite di cause succede senza contatto diretto a meno che il governatore di prigione decide altrimenti, e nella presenza di un ufficiale di prigione. Nel set di situazioni fuori in sezione 19(2), l'autorità che persegue o corte possono richiedere che la visita ha luogo nella presenza di uno o più di rappresentanti loro (sezione 19(3)).
B. struttura Legale riguardo al servizio di pene detentive
1. Atto di notifica di Pene detentive ddl 1965, in vigore sino al 31 dicembre 2005 (la Legge n. 59/1965)
18. Sezione 1(1) definisce il fine del servizio di un termine di prigione siccome impedendo a persone condannato di commettendo gli ulteriori reati e prepararli su una base continua per un modo appropriato della vita.
19. Sezione 2 ruoli lavoro culturale ed istruttivo come uno dei mezzi di raggiungere il fine della reclusione di persone condannato.
20. Sezione 11 prevede per i diritti sociali di persone condannato. Sottosezione 1 garanzie a persone condannato il materiale necessario e le condizioni culturali per assicurare il loro sviluppo fisico e mentale appropriato.
21. Sezione 12(3) prevede che una persona condannato è concessa per ricevere visitatori che sono suo o i suoi vicini parenti di and/or di amici ad un tempo determinato col governatore di prigione. La frequenza delle visite dipende dal tipo di livello di sicurezza al quale una persona condannato è soggetta: alle visite è lasciato spazio almeno una volta per due settimane a persone condannato alla sicurezza più basso livelli; una volta per mese per persone condannato al livello di sicurezza di mezzo; ed una volta in sei settimane per quegli al livello di sicurezza più alto. Visite ad una persona condannato soggetto al mezzo o livelli più alti della sicurezza hanno luogo senza contatto fisico. Un governatore di prigione può decidere insolitamente altrimenti.
2. Atto di notifica di Pene detentive del 2005, in vigore dal 1 gennaio 2006 (la Legge n. 475/2005)
22. Sezione 24(1) prevede che una persona condannato è concessa per ricevere almeno una volta visitatori per mese per due ore.
23. Sezione 28(3) prevede che, dove una persona condannato non ha pagato una parte di suo o il suo debito allo Stato in riguardo di prigionieri contributi di mantenimento di ' ed agli altri creditori registrati con le autorità di prigione, lui o lei può usare, suo o i suoi soldi solamente per l'acquisto di articoli sanitari e di base, oggetti necessario prendere parte in corrispondenza, medicina (quale non può essere offerto esente da spese), parcelle mediche, e per il pagamento di debiti e corte e tasse amministrative.
24. Facendo seguito a sezione 34(1), soggetto all'approvazione del governatore di prigione, persone condannato possono usare nelle loro celle, alla loro propria spesa, la loro propria radio e ricevitori di televisione.
3. Ministero di Giustizia che Notifica di Pene detentive Regolamentazioni 1994, in vigore sino a 31 dicembre 2005 (le Regolamentazioni n. 125/1994))
25. Regolamentazione 3(1) prevede quel dichiarò colpevole persone dovrebbero essere trattate in un modo che riduce l'impatto negativo di reclusione sulla loro personalità.
26. Regolamentazione 8(1) sport di ruoli e le attività di hobby, radio e trasmissioni di televisione, film e persone condannato ' proprio culturale, istruttivo o le attività di divertimento fra i culturali e le attività istruttive per persone che notificano un termine di prigione.
27. Regolamentazione 8(6) prevede quel dichiarò colpevole alle persone è permesso per seguire radio e trasmissioni di televisione. La sfera sarà determinata con articoli di prigione.
28. La frequenza e la durata di visite a persone condannato coi loro vicini parenti di and/or di amici sono governate con Regolamentazioni 80, 86 e 90. Alle visite è lasciato spazio almeno una volta per due settimane a persone condannato alla sicurezza più basso livelli; una volta per mese per persone condannato al livello di sicurezza di mezzo; ed una volta ogni sei settimane per quegli al livello di sicurezza più alto. Visite hanno luogo senza soprintendenza diretta con un ufficiale di prigione in prigioni come un articolo, col livello di sicurezza più basso. Nelle altre visite di cause è supervisionato con un ufficiale di prigione e nessun contatto diretto fra la persona condannato ed il visitatore è permesso. In tutti i tre tipi di prigione la durata di una visita deve essere un minimo di due ore.
III. DOCUMENTI INTERNAZIONALI ATTINENTI
A. L'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici
29. La parte attinente di Articolo 10 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici con la quale Slovacchia è legata come da 28 maggio 1993, legge siccome segue:
“2. (un) persone Accusato possono, salvi in circostanze eccezionali, sia segregato da persone condannato e sarà soggetto a trattamento separato appropriato al loro status come persone non condannate;”...
30. Generale Commento N.ro 21 su Articolo 10 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici furono adottati col Diritti umani Comitato 10 aprile 1992. Nella sua parte attinente legge:
“9. Articolo 10, divida in paragrafi 2 (un), prevede per la segregazione, salvi in circostanze eccezionali, di persone accusato da uni condannato. Simile segregazione è costretta ad enfatizzare il loro status come persone di unconvicted che allo stesso tempo godono il diritto per essere presunte innocente come affermato in articolo 14, divida in paragrafi 2.” (...)
B. Il Consiglio dei documenti di Europa
1. Norme europee sulle prigioni
31. I Prigione Articoli europei sono raccomandazioni del Comitato di Ministri a membro Stati del Consiglio dell'Europa come ai minimi standard essere fatto domanda in prigioni. Stati è incoraggiato essere guidato in legislazione e politiche con quegli articoli ed assicurare disseminazione ampia degli Articoli alle loro autorità giudiziali così come a personale di prigione e detenuti.
(a) Norme europee sulla prigione del 1987
32. Le norme europee sulla prigione del 1987 (la Raccomandazione N.ro R (87) 3 furono adottati col Comitato di Ministri del Consiglio dell'Europa 12 febbraio 1987. In Parte V loro contennero un numero di principi di base che concernono prigionieri non provati, incluso il seguente:
“91. Senza pregiudizio ad articoli legali per la protezione della libertà individuale di prescrivere la procedura per essere osservato in riguardo di prigionieri non provati, questi prigionieri che sono presunti per essere innocente finché loro sono trovati colpevoli, sarà... trattato senza restrizioni altro che quelli necessario per la procedura penale e la sicurezza dell'istituzione.
92. 1. A prigionieri non provati sarà permesso per immediatamente informare le loro famiglie della loro detenzione e determinato tutti gli installazioni ragionevoli per comunicazione con famiglia ed amici e persone con chi è nel loro interesse legittimo per entrare in contatto.
2. Loro sarà concesso anche per ricevere visite da loro... sottoponga solamente a simile restrizioni e soprintendenza siccome è necessario negli interessi dell'amministrazione della giustizia e della sicurezza ed il buon ordine dell'istituzione.” (...)
(b) Norme europee sulla prigione del 2006
33. 11 gennaio 2006 il Comitato di Ministri del Consiglio dell'Europa adottò una versione nuova dei Prigione Articoli europei, Raccomandazione Rec(2006)2. Notò che i 1987 Articoli “ebbe bisogno di essere revisionato effettivamente ed aggiornò per riflettere gli sviluppi che il ha[d] accadde in politica penale, mentre condannando pratica e la gestione complessiva di prigioni in Europa.”
34. I 2006 Articoli contengono, i principi seguenti che concernono prigionieri non provati, inter l'alia:
“95.1. Il regime per prigionieri non provati non può essere influenzato con la possibilità che loro possono essere dichiarati colpevole di un reato penale nel futuro. ...
95.3. Nel trattare con autorità di prigione di prigionieri non provate sarà guidato con gli articoli che fanno domanda a tutti i prigionieri e permettono prigionieri non provati di partecipare in varie attività per le quali prevedono questi articoli. ...
99. A meno che c'è una specifica proibizione per un periodo specificato con un'autorità giudiziale in una causa individuale, prigionieri non provati:
un. riceverà visite e concederà comunicare con famiglia e le altre persone nello stesso modo come prigionieri dichiarati colpevole;
b. ricevere visite supplementari ed avere accesso supplementare alle altre forme di comunicazione;” (...)
2. Relazioni sulle visite del CPT alla Slovacchia
35. 6 dicembre 2001 il Comitato europeo per la Prevenzione di Tortura e Trattamento Inumano o Degradante o Punizione (CPT) pubblicò il suo rapporto sulla visita a Slovacchia che aveva luogo da 9 a 18 ottobre 2000. Le parti di t di relevan lessero siccome segue:
“79. Nel rapporto sulla visita del 1995 (il cf. paragrafi 126 a 130 di CPT/Inf (97) 2), il CPT sottolineò l'importanza per prigionieri per essere in grado mantenere il buon contatto col mondo di fuori. In prospettiva della situazione trovata nel 1995, il Comitato raccomandò, che il diritto di visita di prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva in Prigione di Bratislava sia aumentato sostanzialmente ed invitò le autorità slovacche ad esplorare la possibilità di offrire disposizioni da visita e più aperte per simile prigionieri...
80. Nelle loro risposte, le autorità slovacche espressero delle apprensioni dell'approccio proposto col CPT, principalmente basò sull'obiettivo di preservare gli interessi della giustizia (ostacolando collusione, ecc.).
Non sta sorprendendo perciò che la delegazione che eseguì la visita del 2000 osservò poco o nessun cambio in questa area. In particolare, prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva ' visita diritto rimasto limitato ad un 30 minuti meri ogni mese..., benché loro potessero ricevere una visita supplementare alla discrezione del direttore a volte. Inoltre, visita per simile prigionieri continuò a succedere in cabine, con prigioniero e visitor(s) separò con un schermo...
81. Il CPT accetta che nelle certe cause sarà giustificato, per ragioni sicurezza-relative o proteggere gli interessi legittimi di un'indagine, avere visite succedere in and/or di cabine esaminato. Il CPT ancora una volta desidera comunque, invitare le autorità slovacche a muoversi verso disposizioni da visita e più aperte per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva in generale...
Argomenti basati sul bisogno di proteggere gli interessi della giustizia sono totalmente poco convincenti come una giustificazione per il diritto di visita inadeguato e presente per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva. Il CPT reitera perciò la sua raccomandazione che il diritto di visita per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva sia aumentato sostanzialmente (per esempio, a 30 minuti ogni settimana).”
36. 2 febbraio 2006 il CPT pubblicò il suo rapporto sulla visita a Slovacchia che aveva luogo da 22 febbraio a 3 marzo 2005. Le parti attinenti lessero siccome segue:
“46. Un problema fondamentale come prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva di riguardi nella Repubblica slovacca è la mancanza totale delle attività di fuori-di-cella proposta a simile detenuti.
Prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva erano sostenuti per 23 ore per giorno nelle loro celle in un stato dell'ozio eseguito al tempo della visita,; la loro fonte sola di distrazione stava leggendo libri dalla biblioteca di prigione ed ascoltando la radio e, in un numero limitato di cause, guardando la televisione. Nessun lavoro fu proposto a simile prigionieri, e possibilità per si diverte le attività erano poche e lontano fra, se disponibile a tutti... Gli effetti deleteri di tale regime limitato furono esacerbati col lungo periodi di tempo per i quali persone potrebbero essere sostenute in prigioni di carcerazione preventiva...
Il CPT fa appello alle autorità slovacche per prendere passi, come una questione di priorità concepire ed implementare un regime comprensivo delle attività di fuori-di-cella (incluso le attività di associazione di gruppo) per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva. Lo scopo dovrebbe essere assicurare che a tutti i prigionieri è permesso per spendere una parte ragionevole del giorno fuori delle loro celle, occupato nelle attività decise di una varia natura (attività di associazione di gruppo; il lavoro, preferibilmente con valore vocazionale; l'istruzione; lo sport). La struttura legislativa reclusione di carcerazione preventiva governante dovrebbe essere revisionata di conseguenza...
61. La situazione come riguardi i diritti da visita per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva non avevano cambiato negli ultimi dieci anni. Rimase la causa che adulti sono stati concessi ad una visita 30-minuta e mera per mese... Le condizioni sotto le quali visite ebbero luogo continuarono ad essere chiuse (in cabine con un schermo detenuti di separazione dai loro visitatori). Questa era precisamente la situazione che prevalse durante la prima visita del CPT alla Repubblica slovacca nel 1995.
Il CPT fa appello alle autorità slovacche per revisionare le disposizioni legali ed attinenti per aumentare sostanzialmente il diritto di visita per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva. L'obiettivo dovrebbe essere offrire l'equivalente di una visita ogni settimana, di almeno il durata di 30 minuti. Inoltre, il Comitato invita le autorità slovacche ad introdurre disposizioni più aperte per visite per mandare indietro prigionieri.”
37. La risposta del Governo al rapporto secondo, pubblicò 2 febbraio 2006, contiene le informazioni seguenti:
“Sotto la legislazione di bozza nuova su reclusione di carcerazione preventiva, il diritto di visita si sarà esteso da uno visiti una volta di almeno 30 minuti per mese ad una visita di almeno un'ora in tre settimane. In cause allineato, il governatore di prigione avrà diritto ad accordare visite più frequenti...
Sotto la guida metodologica emessa col Generale Direttore del CPCG (N.ro GR ZVJS-116-45/20-2003) a prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva è permesso per avere la loro propria Tivù in conformità alla legislazione corrente sull'esecuzione di reclusione di carcerazione preventiva, espone soggetto alle certe condizioni. La guida metodologica emessa col Generale Direttore del CPCG (N.ro GR ZVJS-116-38/20-2003) prevede per le certe attività di agio-tempo e concede l'adempimento di certi sport e speciale-interessa le attività, in particolare a prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva minorili e femmina. Prigioni di carcerazione preventiva prendono sforzi permanenti di creare spaziale e materiale condiziona per speciale-interessi attività di prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva, e per gioca le attività sia in ed in locali all'aperti di costituzioni di prigione.
Il problema di creare programma adeguato delle attività per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva è rivolto anche nella legge di bozza nuova su reclusione di carcerazione preventiva che è considerata attualmente col Consiglio Nazionale della Repubblica slovacca in collegamento con la re-codificazione del Codice Penale e del Codice di Diritto processuale penale. La legge di bozza nuova su reclusione di carcerazione preventiva mira ad introducendo un regime di carcerazione preventiva agile e propone che prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva siano resi differente con categorie per abilitare la loro partecipazione in speciale-interessi attività che possono attenuare o possono ridurre l'impatto negativo dell'incarceramento su prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva. L'attuazione di programmi di attività adeguato proposta per tutti i prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva è condizionale sulla creazione di adeguato spaziale, materiale e fornendo di personale le condizioni. Dopo che la legge nuova è entrata in effetto, i CPCG gradualmente creeranno le condizioni di materiale per i sopra menzionati programmi e cominceranno con la loro attuazione pratica.”
LA LEGGE
I. AMBITO DELLA CAUSA
38. 20 ottobre 2010 la Corte dichiarò azioni di reclamo ammissibili sotto: (i) gli Articoli 8 e 14 riguardo alla differenza allegato in trattamento fra il richiedente quando lui era in detenzione su carcerazione preventiva e persone condannato; (l'ii) Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo all'uso dei suoi soldi in prigione; e (l'iii) Articolo 13 riguardo alla mancanza di una via di ricorso effettiva in questo riguardo. Dichiarò inammissibile il resto della richiesta.
39. Come riguardi le azioni di reclamo sotto Articoli 8 e 14 della Convenzione in particolare, i problemi che la Corte considerò inclusa i diritti da visita del richiedente, la mancanza di una possibilità di guardando la televisione ed avere un ricevitore di radio privato così come la mancanza di disposizioni appropriate per avere acqua calda e bibite calde che preparano nelle celle di persone detenne su carcerazione preventiva. La Corte reitera che dichiarò ammissibile che parte della richiesta alla misura che le violazioni allegato dei diritti del richiedente hanno arginato dalla legislazione vigente al tempo attinente.
40. Nelle sue osservazioni sui meriti della causa il richiedente sostenne che la Corte dovrebbe esaminare anche se i fatti si lamentarono di corrispose ad una violazione dei suoi diritti sotto Articolo 3 ed Articolo 6 §§ 1 e 2 della Convenzione.
41. La Corte nota che la decisione sopra sull'ammissibilità della richiesta determina attualmente la sfera della causa di fronte a sé. Non c'è perciò chiamata per un esame nel contesto della richiesta presente come a se i fatti attinenti della causa generarono una violazione di altre disposizioni della Convenzione siccome chiesto col richiedente.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO DA SOLO ED IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 14
42. Il richiedente si lamentò che durante il periodo della sua detenzione su carcerazione preventiva i suoi diritti erano stati restretti ad una più grande misura che i diritti di persone condannato che notificano i loro termini di prigione. Lui addusse una violazione di Articoli 8 e 14 della Convenzione che, in finora come attinente, prevedere:
Articolo 8
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
Articolo 14
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il richiedente
43. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che durante la sua detenzione su carcerazione preventiva lui era stato concesso per avere solamente una volta visite per mese e che la loro durata era stata limitata al minimo legale, vale a dire trenta minuti sempre. Gli non era stato concesso per avere contatto diretto coi suoi visitatori, da chi lui era stato separato con una sezione e con chi lui potrebbe parlare solamente per un telefono. La durata delle visite era stata più breve che che a che erano state concesse persone condannato.
44. Mentre detenne su carcerazione preventiva, il richiedente potrebbe ascoltare solamente radiotrasmettere programmes da due stazioni selezionò con l'amministrazione di prigione, uno pubblico ed uno privato ognuno di che era stato in posizione centrale disponibile a turno per un giorno per il sistema di filo interno. Lui non era stato in grado guardare affatto programmi della televisione. Il richiedente sostenne che, a prigionieri condannato era stato permesso per guardare la televisione ogni giorno in stanze diversamente da lui, disegnò per che fine ed avere un ricevitore di radio privato nella loro cella che concede loro scegliere le trasmissioni loro desiderarono seguire. Durante il periodo della sua detenzione il richiedente non era stato inoltre, capace di prendere parte in varie attività di sport, aveva frequentato eventi culturali ed aveva lavorato nel vario hobby raggruppa che era stato disponibile in prigione a prigionieri condannato.
45. Non c'era stata giustificazione per l'imposizione di quelli tipi di restrizioni su lui come una persona detenuta durante indagine e procedimenti giudiziali di fronte a qualsiasi verdetto era stato consegnato nella prospettiva del richiedente. In particolare, lui contese quel detenne persone nella sua posizione non era stato trovato colpevole e non dovrebbe essere messo perciò in una peggiore situazione che prigionieri condannato. Le restrizioni imposte su lui avevano concernito molti problemi che erano irrilevanti alla condotta corretta dei procedimenti penali e loro erano stati imposti su lui per la durata intera della sua detenzione su carcerazione preventiva, vale a dire per un periodo che eccede quattro anni.
2. Il Governo
46. Il Governo sostenne che le situazioni assegnarono a col richiedente nelle sue asserzioni che lui era stato in una peggiore posizione comparò con persone condannato non era stato in modo pertinente simile. Lo scopo della detenzione su carcerazione preventiva durante procedimenti giudiziali e che di una pena detentiva era diverso. Il precedente fu puntato contro di assicurando la disponibilità di una persona accusato per il fine di procedimenti penali e la loro condotta liscia. I secondi rappresentarono la forma più grave di punizione all'interno del sistema di diritto penale. Qualsiasi la differenza nei due regimi che in qualsiasi evento non era stato sostanziale, diede luogo dalla differenza alla legge attinente. Il richiedente non era stato discriminato contro contrario ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
47. Il diritto vigente al tempo attinente contenne nessuno disposizioni che governano la possibilità per persone detenute su carcerazione preventiva per guardare o collettivamente o individualmente programmi della televisione nelle loro celle. Nel 2003 un'istruzione emessa dall'Amministrazione Generale della Prigione del lasciata spazio all'uso con persone detenute su carcerazione preventiva di loro propria televisione insorge celle alla loro propria spesa dove era tecnicamente fattibile. Il Governo ammise che per ragioni tecniche l'uso di set di televisione privati non era stato possibile nell'edificio dove il richiedente era stato detenuto su carcerazione preventiva.
Alle persone era stato permesso per guardare la televisione al tempo attinente dichiarato colpevole, nella conformità con Regolamentazione n. 125/1994, in stanze di riunione di prigione.
48. Infine, il Governo sostenne che in qualsiasi l'evento, tutte le restrizioni imposte sul richiedente erano state procedura standard ed avevano notificato esclusivamente gli interessi del mantenimento di ordine ed il corretto che funzionano di prigioni. Loro dibatterono che individui detennero durante indagine e procedimenti giudiziali doveva aspettarsi le certe restrizioni sui loro diritti. Tutte le restrizioni imposte sul richiedente erano state in conformità con la legge attinente e non potevano essere riguardate come discriminatorio.
B. La valutazione della Corte
49. Fin dall'essenza dei danni del richiedente è il presumibilmente la differenza ingiustificata in trattamento fra lui come una persona detenuta su carcerazione preventiva e prigionieri condannato che notificano i termini ai quali loro era stato condannato, la Corte lo considera appropriato rivolgerli dal posto d'osservazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con Articolo 8 prima, e poi sotto Articolo 8 da solo.
1. Violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 14 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8
50. La Corte reitera che Articolo 14 della Convenzione protegge individui in situazioni simili dall'essere trattato differentemente senza la giustificazione nel godimento dei loro diritti di Convenzione e le libertà. Questa disposizione non ha esistenza indipendente, poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione ai diritti e le libertà salvaguardate con le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli. Comunque, la richiesta di Articolo 14 non presuppone una violazione di uno o più di simile disposizioni ed a questa misura è autonomo. Per Articolo 14 divenuto applicabile, basta che i fatti di una causa incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di un'altra disposizione effettiva della Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli (vedere Sidabras e Džiautas c. la Lituania, N. 55480/00 e 59330/00, § 38 ECHR 2004-VIII).
51. La Corte stabilirà perciò se i fatti della causa incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 8, se c'è stata una differenza nel trattamento del richiedente e, in tal caso, se trattamento così diverso era compatibile con Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
(a) Se i fatti della causa rientrano all’interno dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione
52. La Corte ha sostenuto che la detenzione, similmente a qualsiasi l'altra misura che spoglia una persona di suo o la sua libertà, comporta limitazioni inerenti su privato e la vita di famiglia. Restrizioni come limitazioni sul numero di visite di famiglia e la soprintendenza di quelle visite costituiscono un'interferenza coi diritti di una persona detenuta sotto Articolo 8 ma non sono, di loro, in violazione di che approvvigiona (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Bogusław Krawczak c. la Polonia, n. 24205/06, §§ 107-108, 31 maggio 2011, e Moiseyev c. la Russia, n. 62936/00, §§ 207-208 9 ottobre 2008).
53. Il fatto che il richiedente non era capace di guardare programmes della televisione mentre in detenzione, nelle circostanze, nasca su vita privata sua come protegguto sotto Articolo 8 che include un diritto per mantenere relazioni col mondo di fuori ed anche un diritto a sviluppo personale (vedere Uzun c. la Germania, n. 35623/05, § 43 2 settembre 2010). Tale attività può essere riguardata anche come importante per mantenere la stabilità mentale di una persona che, come il richiedente, è detenuto su carcerazione preventiva da un periodo lungo di tempo. La Corte ha sostenuto che la conservazione della stabilità mentale è un requisito indispensabile indispensabile al godimento effettivo del diritto per rispettare per la vita privata di uno (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Dolenec c. Croatia, n. 25282/06, § 57 26 novembre 2009). Le considerazioni sopra non implicano, comunque, che mancanza di accesso a televisione trasmette in prigione è in se stesso contrario ad Articolo 8.
54. La Corte accetta così che, fra i fatti si lamentò di col richiedente ed incorrendo all'interno della sfera della richiesta presente come determinato con la decisione di ammissibilità (vedere anche paragrafo 39 sopra), quelli riguardo a visite di famiglia e la sua mancanza allegato di accesso a trasmissioni di televisione interferite con diritto suo sotto Articolo 8 per rispettare per suo privato e la vita di famiglia. Nella conformità con la decisione della Corte sull'ammissibilità, l'interferenza ed il trattamento discriminatorio allegato del richiedente in che contesto sarà esaminato esclusivamente alla misura che loro sono stati il risultato delle leggi applicabile al tempo attinente.
(b) Se il richiedente aveva un “altro status” e se la sua posizione era analoga ai prigionieri condannati
55. Essendo una persona detenuta su carcerazione preventiva si può riguardare siccome mettendo l'individuo in una situazione legale e distinta che anche se può essere imposto involontariamente e generalmente per un periodo provvisorio, è legato inestricabilmente su con le circostanze personali dell'individuo ed esistenza. La Corte è soddisfatta perciò, e non è stato contestato fra le parti che col fatto di essere detenuto su carcerazione preventiva la pelle di richiedente all'interno della nozione di “l'altro status” all'interno del significato di Articolo 14 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Shelley c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 23800/06, 4 gennaio 2008, e Clift c. il Regno Unito, n. 7205/07, §§ 55-63 13 luglio 2010).
56. In ordine per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo, o in modo pertinente simile, situazioni (vedere D.H. ed Altri c. la Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 175 ECHR 2007-IV). Il requisito per dimostrare un “posizione analoga” non richiede che i gruppi di comparatore siano identici. Il fatto che la situazione del richiedente non è completamente analoga a che di prigionieri condannato e che ci sono differenze fra i vari gruppi basati sul fine della loro privazione della libertà non precluda la richiesta di Articolo 14. Deve essere mostrato che, avendo riguardo ad alla particolare natura della sua azione di reclamo, il richiedente era in un in modo pertinente situazione simile ad altri trattati differentemente (vedere Clift, citata sopra, § 66).
57. Le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto preoccupazione di esame le disposizioni legali che regolano i suoi diritti da visita, e la sua mancanza di accesso a programmes della televisione in prigione. Loro riferiscono così a problemi che sono di attinenza a tutte le persone detenuti in prigioni, siccome loro determinano la sfera delle restrizioni su loro privato e vita di famiglia che è inerente nella privazione della libertà, nonostante la base sulla quale loro sono basati.
58. La Corte considera perciò che, come riguardi i fatti in problema, il richiedente può chiedere di essere in modo pertinente situazione simile a persone condannato.
(c) Se la differenza nel trattamento era obiettivamente giustificata
59. Una differenza in trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha nessuna giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole, nelle altre parole se non intraprende un scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Gli Stati Contraenti godono un margine della valutazione nel valutare se ed a che misura differenzia in situazioni altrimenti simili giustifichi un trattamento diverso. La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, la materia-questione e lo sfondo. La Corte ha accettato che, in principio, un margine ampio della valutazione fa domanda in questioni di prigionieri e politica penale (vedere Clift, citata sopra, § 73, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
60. Come ai fatti della causa presente, la Corte nota, che il richiedente fu detenuto processo pendente dal 2001 a 9 febbraio 2006 di 1 settembre. Durante che periodo, il regime della sua detenzione su carcerazione preventiva fu governato con la Detenzione Atto 1993. Sotto sezione 10(1) e (5), tutte le persone di accusato detenute durante indagine e procedimenti giudiziali furono concesse per ricevere una volta visitatori per mese per almeno trenta minuti. Le visite ebbero luogo senza contatto diretto fra l'accusato ed il visitatore. Le altre disposizioni erano all'interno del potere discrezionale del governatore di prigione (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra). Comunque, non sembra dai documenti presentati che simile disposizioni erano state rese in generale frequentemente o in riguardo del richiedente in particolare.
61. Durante lo stesso periodo la durata legale di visite a persone condannato fu fissata ad un minimo di due ore. Dal 2001 a 31 dicembre 2005 di 1 settembre la frequenza alla quale prigionieri condannato potrebbero ricevere visitatori fu determinata secondo il loro livello di sicurezza di prigione. A visite a persone condannato coi loro vicini parenti di and/or di amici fu lasciato spazio almeno una volta per due settimane a prigionieri condannato alla sicurezza più basso livelli ed a contatto diretto fu concesso fra i visitatori e la persona condannato in simile cause. Visite a prigionieri condannato alla mezzo-sicurezza livellano coi loro vicini parenti e/o di amici fu concesso una volta per mese, ed una volta in sei settimane per quegli al livello di sicurezza più alto. In mezzo e prigioni di livello protette dalle forze di sicurezza, visite furono supervisionate con un ufficiale di prigione e nessun contatto diretto fra la persona condannato ed il visitatore fu permesso. Come da 1 gennaio 2006, il Servizio di Pene detentive Atto 2005 persone condannato concesse per incontrare almeno una volta visitatori per mese per due ore (vedere divide in paragrafi 21 e 22 sopra).
62. Al tempo attinente, la durata di visite a persone detenute su carcerazione preventiva, come il richiedente era così, notevolmente più breve (trenta minuti) di ciò che la legge concedeva in riguardo di persone condannato (due ore).
Durante una parte sostanziale del periodo attinente la frequenza di visite ed il tipo di contatto di persone condannato differì inoltre, secondo il livello di sicurezza della prigione nel quale loro erano contenuti. In particolare, in prigioni con la sicurezza più basso livelli visite ebbero luogo, sotto il Servizio di Pene detentive ad Atto 1965 fu concesso almeno una volta per due settimane e contatto diretto fra persone condannato ed i loro visitatori. Le restrizioni su diritti da visita di persone detenuti su carcerazione preventiva erano applicabili in una maniera generale, nonostante le ragioni per la loro detenzione e le considerazioni di sicurezza riferirono inoltre.
63. Facendo seguito a sezione 2(1) della Detenzione Atto 1993 qualsiasi restrizioni su persone detenute i diritti di ' devono essere giustificati col fine della detenzione e con lo scopo di assicurare ordine, la sicurezza di altri e la protezione di proprietà in posti dove persone accusato sono detenute. Divida in paragrafi solamente 2 di sezione 2 licenze la restrizione di quelli diritti di persone detenute dei quali loro non possono giovarsi ad in prospettiva del fatto che loro sono detenuti su carcerazione preventiva.
64. Nella prospettiva della Corte, né le disposizioni sopra, né gli argomenti fissarono in avanti col Governo, offra una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole per restringere diritti da visita di persone detenuti su carcerazione preventiva - chi sarà presunto innocente (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra) - nel riguardo sopra ed in una maniera generale, ad una più grande misura che quelli di persone condannato. Le disposizioni in posto furono criticate col CPT nei suoi rapporti su visite a Slovacchia che ebbe luogo nel 1995, 2000 e 2005 (vedere divide in paragrafi 35 e 36 sopra).
65. Come riguardi la mancanza di contatto diretto con visitatori, la Corte reitera che in una causa diversa ha contenuto che una persona detenne su carcerazione preventiva che era stata separata fisicamente dai suoi visitatori in tutta la sua detenzione che dura l'anni di tre e mezza era, nell'assenza di qualsiasi dimostrò bisogno come considerazioni di sicurezza, non allineato sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 8 (vedere Moiseyev, citata sopra, §§ 258-259). Nota inoltre che, al tempo attinente il diritto vigente non diede un titolo a separatamente da un'eccezione che era alla discrezione del governatore di prigione, persone detenute su carcerazione preventiva per avere contatto diretto coi loro visitatori nonostante la loro particolare situazione.
66. La Corte coincide con la prospettiva espressa nel rapporto di 6 dicembre 2001 sulla visita del CPT a Slovacchia secondo che nelle certe cause può essere giustificato, per ragioni sicurezza-relative o proteggere gli interessi legittimi di un'indagine, avere le particolari restrizioni su una persona detenuta sta visitando diritti (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra, ed anche Vlasov c. la Russia, n. 78146/01, § 123 con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Comunque, che scopo può essere raggiunto con altro vuole dire quali non colpiscono tutti detennero persone nonostante se loro davvero sono richiesti, come il setting su di categorie diverse della detenzione, o le particolari restrizioni siccome può essere richiesto con le circostanze di una causa individuale.
67. Le considerazioni sopra sono anche in linea coi documenti internazionali ed attinenti. Così l'Articolo 10 § 2(a) l'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Civili e Politici richiede, inter alia che hanno accusato persone devono, salvi in circostanze eccezionali, sia soggetto a trattamento separato appropriato al loro status come persone non condannato che godono il diritto per essere presunte innocente (vedere divide in paragrafi 29 e 30 sopra).
I 1987 Prigione Articoli europei affermarono che prigionieri non provati che saranno presunti innocente finché loro sono trovati colpevoli, dovrebbe essere sottoposto solamente a simile restrizioni che sono necessarie per la procedura penale e la sicurezza dell'istituzione (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra).
Infine, i 2006 Prigione Articoli europei che furono adottati poco prima della detenzione del richiedente su carcerazione preventiva terminarono, prevedere, in particolare, che a meno che c'è una specifica ragione al contrario, prigionieri non provati dovrebbero ricevere visite e dovrebbero concedere comunicare con famiglia e le altre persone nello stesso modo come prigionieri dichiarati colpevole. C'è inoltre, una possibilità di visite supplementari e le altre forme di comunicazione (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra).
68. La Corte osserva che la legislazione susseguente, vale a dire l'Atto di Detenzione del 2006 steso i diritti da visita di prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva, e lascia spazio ad una differenziazione fra loro con una prospettiva ad assicurando che le restrizioni imposte corrisposto ad un bisogno obiettivo (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra). Comunque, questo non può colpire la posizione nella causa presente.
69. In prospettiva del sopra, la Corte conclude, che le restrizioni su visite al richiedente coi suoi membri di famiglia durante la sua detenzione su carcerazione preventiva costituirono una misura sproporzionata, contrari ai suoi diritti sotto Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
70. Come riguardi la mancanza di accesso a televisione trasmette, la legge che governò la detenzione su carcerazione preventiva al tempo attinente non previde per tale possibilità. Con contrasto, al tempo quando il richiedente fu detenuto su carcerazione preventiva, persone condannato avevano il diritto ed erano in grado guardare collettivamente programmi della televisione in stanze speciali in prigione (vedere divide in paragrafi 26, 27 e 47 sopra).
71. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi argomenti attinenti fissarono in avanti col Governo la Corte nessuna giustificazione obiettiva trova per tale differenza in trattamento fra persone detenute su carcerazione preventiva e prigionieri condannato. Allega peso al fatto che essendo in grado seguire televisione trasmette era considerato che fosse una parte dei culturali e le attività istruttive organizzata per persone condannato, mentre simile attività non furono offerte per nella legge applicabile a persone detenute su carcerazione preventiva. Questo fu criticato anche col CPT.
72. È vero che l'Amministrazione della Prigione del Generale emise istruzioni in 2003 persone detenute che concedono per avere la loro propria televisione insorge le loro celle. Questo non colpisce la posizione nella causa presente, siccome tale possibilità era solamente aperta a persone che potrebbero riconoscere i costi coinvolte ed in qualsiasi l'evento, non era tecnicamente fattibile nell'ala di prigione dove il richiedente era sostenuto.
73. C'è stata perciò una violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
2. Violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione preso da solo
74. La Corte considera che poiché ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con Articolo 8, non è necessario per esaminare se c'è stata da solo una violazione di Articolo 8.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
75. Il richiedente si lamentò che, quando ricevendo una somma di soldi dalla sua famiglia, lui fu costretto ad usare mezzo di che importo per pagare di nuovo parte del suo debito allo Stato. Rifiuto di pagamento l'importo avrebbe condotto alla sospensione del suo diritto a comprare generi alimentari e gli altri articoli nel negozio di prigione. Lui si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che prevede siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
76. Il richiedente affermò che lui era in prigione dal molti anni e non aveva avuto qualsiasi il reddito. Il modo solo dove lui avrebbe potuto ricevere i soldi ebbe bisogno di pagare per cibo supplementare, articoli personali, corrispondenza la medicina e così avanti, era stato chiedere aiuto i suoi membri di famiglia. Comunque, lui era sotto un obbligo per usare la metà dei soldi lui ricevette dalla sua famiglia per pagare di nuovo il suo debito allo Stato. Se lui non fosse riuscito a rimborsare una parte di che debito su una base mensile, gli sarebbe stato impedito dal comprare generi alimentari e gli altri articoli nel negozio di prigione.
77. In considerazione dell'importo di soldi lui aveva ricevuto in generale, dalla sua famiglia e l'obbligo per usare la metà di sé pagare di nuovo il suo debito allo Stato, lui disse che lui era stato lasciato con importi fra EUR 7 ed EUR 15 per mese che lui potrebbe usare nel negozio di prigione. Lui disse anche che la quantità del cibo previde in prigione era stato povero, e che i prigionieri erano stati costretti perciò per comprare cibo supplementare. Le restrizioni esposte con legge non aveva adempiuto il requisito della proporzionalità, siccome un equilibrio equo non era stato previsto fra l'interesse generale di società ed i suoi diritti essenziali. Di conseguenza, la legislazione aveva messo un carico irragionevole su lui.
78. Il Governo sostenne che la legislazione attinente che regola l'uso di prigionieri i soldi di ' era compatibile coi requisiti di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro dibatterono che questa disposizione non danneggiò il diritto degli Stati per adottare simile leggi siccome loro ritennero necessari controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o garantire il pagamento di tasse e gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.
79. Il fine della legislazione attinente era assicurare che prigionieri pagarono i loro debiti. Il richiedente fu concesso per usare solamente i suoi soldi se lui adempiesse ai requisiti legali. Di mese di calendario precedente, lui più specificamente aveva dovuto, pagare almeno lo stesso importo del suo debito alla Prigione Amministrazione o le altre persone concesse siccome lui aveva desiderato ritirare. Ciononostante, se una persona non adempiesse quelli requisiti, il governatore di prigione fu concesso per accordare lasci a che persona per usare suo o i suoi soldi per comprare medicina, articoli sanitari ed indispensabili o pagare tasse o parcelle.
80. Anche se tale regolamentazione interferì col diritto di prigionieri per sbarazzarsi liberamente dei loro soldi, non era un'interferenza sproporzionata perché a prigionieri furono forniti cibo, abbigliamento e gli altri articoli e servizi. Quando usando risorse finanziarie e supplementari, i prigionieri garantirono le condizioni di sopra-standard per loro.
81. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 garanzie in sostanza il diritto di proprietà. Qualsiasi l'interferenza con che diritto deve attenersi col principio della legalità e deve intraprendere un scopo legittimo con vuole dire ragionevolmente proporzionato allo scopo cercò di essere compreso (per una ricapitolazione dei principi attinenti vedere, per esempio, Metalco Bt. c. l'Ungheria, n. 34976/05, § 16, 1 febbraio 2011 con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
82. Al giorno d'oggi la causa al richiedente è stato permesso per usare soldi sul suo conto in prigione comprare cibo supplementare e gli altri prodotti nella prigione faccia compere, solamente se lui usasse almeno lo stesso importo per rimborso dei suoi debiti registrati. C'è stata così un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 a godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
83. Che interferenza ha avuto una base legale, vale a dire sezione 12a della Detenzione Agisce 1993 e, dopo la condanna del richiedente, sezione 28 del Servizio di Pene detentive Atto 2005 (vedere divide in paragrafi 16 e 23 sopra). Il rimborso di debiti incorre indubbiamente all'interno dell'interesse generale siccome previsto in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
84. Come al requisito di una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo perseguì, la Corte ha riconosciuto che gli Stati Contraenti godono un margine ampio della valutazione con riguardo a sia a scegliendo i mezzi di ricupero di debiti ed ad accertando se le conseguenze di simile ricupero sono giustificate nell'interesse generale per il fine di realizzare l'oggetto della legge in oggetto. In simile cause la Corte rispetterà il giudizio delle autorità Statali in merito come a ciò che è nell'interesse generale a meno che questo giudizio sia manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere Benet ceco, spol. s r.o. c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 31555/05, §§ 30 e 35, 21 ottobre 2010 con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
85. La Corte nota che l'interferenza in problema ha limitato ma non spoglia il richiedente della possibilità di usare i soldi sul suo conto in prigione comprare cibo supplementare e gli altri prodotti nel negozio di prigione.
Nota inoltre che, anche se una persona non adempie il requisito di usare un importo equivalente verso il rimborso di una parte di suo o il suo debito al quale alla persona sarà permesso per usare suo o i suoi soldi per comprare medicina, articoli sanitari ed indispensabili gli articoli necessario prendere parte in corrispondenza, o pagare tasse o parcelle. Non segue dai documenti presentati che al richiedente non è stato permesso per usare i suoi soldi per che fine malgrado tutto se o non lui rimborsò una parte del suo debito.
86. In prospettiva delle informazioni di fronte a sé, ed in considerazione del margine ampio della valutazione riconosciuto agli Stati Contraenti in cause simili, la Corte considera, che l'interferenza si lamentò di non era sproporzionato allo scopo perseguito.
87. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
88. Il richiedente si lamentò che lui non aveva via di ricorso effettiva alla sua disposizione come riguardi il set di azioni di reclamo fuori sopra. Lui si appellò su Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
89. La Corte nota che dichiarò ammissibile ed esaminò solamente le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto le disposizioni effettive della Convenzione alla misura che la violazione allegato ha arginato dalle deficienze allegato nella legge attinente.
90. Comunque, Articolo 13 non si può interpretare siccome richiedendo una via di ricorso contro lo stato di diritto nazionale (vedere Iordachi ed Altri c. la Moldavia, n. 25198/02, § 56 10 febbraio 2009).
91. In queste circostanze, la Corte non trova nessuna violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
IV. APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
92. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
93. Il richiedente chiese 50,000 euro (EUR) in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
94. Il Governo considerò che rivendicazione per essere eccessivo.
95. La Corte, mentre facendo una valutazione su una base equa, lo considera appropriato accordare EUR 9,000 al richiedente in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
96. Il richiedente chiesto EUR 500 in riguardo di sue proprie spese effettive che lui incorse in nel contesto dei suoi tentativi di ottenere compensa prima sia le autorità nazionali e la Corte. Lui disse inoltre EUR 3,900 in riguardo dei costi della sua rappresentanza legale nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, così come EUR 920 per la traduzione di osservazioni e le altre spese incorsa in col suo avvocato.
97. Il Governo considerò che qualsiasi assegnazione dovrebbe corrispondere ai principi stabilì nella causa-legge della Corte.
98. La Corte reitera che costa e spese non saranno assegnate sotto Articolo 41 a meno che è stabilito che loro davvero e necessariamente erano incorsi in ed erano ragionevoli come a quantum (vedere Sanoma Uitgevers B.V. c. i Paesi Bassi, n. 38224/03, § 109 ECHR 2010 -...., con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
99. Essendo avuto riguardo alle informazioni nella sua proprietà ed il criterio summenzionato, e notando che il richiedente fu accordato patrocinio gratuito sotto il Consiglio di schema di legale-aiuto di Europa (vedere paragrafo 2 sopra), la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare la somma supplementare di EUR 600 il richiedente in riguardo di costi e spese, più qualsiasi tassa sulla quale può essere a carico del richiedente quel l'importo.
C. Interesse di mora
100. La Corte considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8 della Convenzione;
2. Sostiene che non è necessario per esaminare se c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione presa da solo;
3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare al richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 9,000 (nove mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 600 (seicento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 13 dicembre 2011, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Santiago Quesada Josep Casadevall
Cancelliere President
Nella conformità con Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudici Gyulumyan e Tsotsoria è annesso a questa sentenza.
J.C.M.
S.Q.

OPINIONE CONCORDANTE UNITA DEIGIUDICI GYULUMYAN E TSOTSORIA
Noi votammo con la maggioranza nel trovare una violazione di Articolo 14 in concomitanza con Articolo 8 della Convenzione nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente. Con riguardo dovuto, gradiremmo comunque, esprimere la nostra opinione separata su certi punti della sentenza che, noi crediamo, è cruciale nel plasmare la causa-legge della Corte sui diritti di prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva. Da questo punto di vista, la sentenza può andare bene oltre l'ordinamento giuridico dello Stato rispondente e può avere implicazioni per tutti gli Stati Contraenti.
Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il richiedente basò le sue azioni di reclamo su Articoli 8 e 14 della Convenzione ed allegato che come un prigioniero di carcerazione preventiva, i suoi diritti furono restretti ad una più grande misura che quelli di persone condannato (vedere divide in paragrafi 38-39 e 42 della sentenza).
Noi siamo attenti della tendenza verso la più grande protezione dei diritti di prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva che sono delineati adeguatamente nelle parti attinenti della sentenza. Gli elementi più pertinenti possono essere riassunti siccome segue:
- quando determinando il regime appropriato per prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva, il Governo dovrebbe prendere nell'esame il fatto che loro godono il diritto per essere presunti innocente;
- a meno che c'è un tempo - e restrizione contenuto-specifica impose con un'autorità giudiziale in una causa individuale, prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva dovrebbero godere almeno gli stessi diritti come prigionieri dichiarati colpevole;
- le restrizioni imposte devono essere necessarie negli interessi dell'amministrazione della giustizia o per la sicurezza della facilità di custodial.
Basato sugli elementi summenzionati, la questione cruciale che sorge è se carcerazione preventiva e prigionieri condannato dovrebbero godere gli stessi diritti, mentre facendo così Articolo 14 della Convenzione applicabile. Qui noi ci riferiamo ai fatti seguenti della causa: il richiedente fu detenuto su carcerazione preventiva per più di quattro anni (vedere divide in paragrafi 7 e 60). Questo periodo insolitamente lungo fa la causa presente specifico in relazione a cause regolari riguardo ai diritti di carcerazione preventiva e prigionieri condannato, come detenzione su carcerazione preventiva è imposto per un periodo significativamente più breve di tempo normalmente (vedere paragrafo 55). Questa specifica circostanza della causa, vale a dire il periodo lungo della detenzione su carcerazione preventiva non andò inosservata ed accentuò propriamente in paragrafo 53 della sentenza. Perciò, noi dubitiamo che i diritti di carcerazione preventiva e prigionieri condannato dovessero essere uguali in tutte le circostanze.
Avendo detto che, noi non avevamo difficoltà nel convenire con la maggioranza che la pelle di causa presente all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 14 della Convenzione, come il Governo rispondente anche accettò l'argomento che il richiedente, come un prigioniero di carcerazione preventiva aveva un “l'altro status” all'interno del significato di Articolo 14. Comunque, noi avevamo le difficoltà nell'allinearsi pienamente con l'argomento principale di maggioranza per la giustificazione dell'applicabilità di Articolo 14 della Convenzione alla causa presente. In questo riguardo a, la maggioranza fondò:
“57. Le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto preoccupazione di esame le disposizioni legali che regolano i suoi diritti da visita, e la sua mancanza di accesso a programmes della televisione in prigione. Loro riferiscono così a problemi che sono di attinenza a tutte le persone detenuti in prigioni, siccome loro determinano la sfera delle restrizioni su loro privato e vita di famiglia che è inerente nella privazione della libertà, nonostante la base sulla quale loro sono basati.” (enfasi aggiunse)
Il paragrafo citò sopra di e lo spirito complessivo della sentenza (vedere anche, per istanza, divida in paragrafi 67) ci porti alla conclusione che la maggioranza, almeno implicitamente, sostenga l'idea di fare lo status di carcerazione preventiva e prigionieri condannato uguagli. Noi pensiamo che l'effetto della sentenza come sé ora sta in piedi andrebbe oltre le circostanze della causa presente, irrispettoso dei requisiti indispensabile per restrizioni legittime di diritti; non è sicuro che il suo impatto sarà limitato al diritto per avere famiglia visita ed accesso a televisione che formò la materia delle azioni di reclamo nella richiesta fondamentale. Noi abbiamo paura che, nella luce della causa-legge scarsa sulla richiesta cumulativa di Articoli 8 e 14 della Convenzione nel campo di articoli di prigione, l'importanza della causa presente non è stata valutata anticipato adeguatamente ed attentamente.
Noi ci sentiamo obbligati a dire che, nonostante questi disaccordi sfortunati con la maggioranza, noi pienamente sottoscriviamo alla base razionale della sentenza che i diritti di prigionieri di carcerazione preventiva dovrebbero essere fortificati inoltre, benché senza pregiudizio a, inter l'alia, gli interessi legittimi dei procedimenti penali e la sicurezza dell'istituzione riguardarono. Il margine della valutazione goduto con gli Stati Contraenti in politica-creazione penale dovrebbe essere rispettato similmente, siccome riaffermato con la maggioranza (vedere paragrafo 59).
La sentenza presente, come sé ora sta in piedi, non riesce a versare luce su alcuni dei problemi molto complessi in politica penale che è ugualmente importante ed attinente per gli Stati Contraenti. L'ambiguità degli argomenti nella sentenza può trasformare le intenzioni insindacabilmente buone della Corte in qualche cosa non intenzionale.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.