Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF LAKICEVIC AND OTHERS v. MONTENEGRO AND SERBIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 27458/06/2011
STATO: Serbia
DATA: 13/12/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of P1-1; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF LAKIĆEVIĆ AND OTHERS
v. MONTENEGRO AND SERBIA
(Applications nos. 27458/06, 37205/06, 37207/06 and 33604/07)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
13 December 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Lakićević and others v. Montenegro and Serbia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Lech Garlicki, President,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Päivi Hirvelä,
George Nicolaou,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Nebojša Vučinić,
Vincent A. De Gaetano, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 22 November 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in four separate applications (nos. 27458/06, 37205/06, 37207/06 and 33604/07) lodged with the Court against both Montenegro and Serbia (the first and the third applicants) and against Montenegro alone (the second and the fourth applicants) under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by four Montenegrin nationals, OMISSIS (the first applicant), OMISSIS (the second applicant), OMISSIS (the third applicant) and OMISSIS (the fourth applicant) on 5 June 2006, 2 August 2006, 24 July 2006 and 24 July 2007 respectively.
2. The first, third and fourth applicants were, exceptionally, granted leave to represent themselves (Rule 36 § 2 of the Rules of Court). The second applicant was represented by OMISSIS a lawyer practising in Podgorica. The Montenegrin Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Z. Pažin.
3. The applicants complained under Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No.1 about the suspension of their pensions.
4. On 19 April 2010 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the applications to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the applications at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants - OMISSIS (the first applicant), OMISSIS (the second applicant), OMISSIS(the third applicant), and OMISSIS (the fourth applicant) - are all Montenegrin nationals who were born in 1947, 1937, 1924, and 1944 respectively. They live in Herceg-Novi (the first and third applicants) and Podgorica (the second and fourth applicants).
6. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
A. Suspension of pensions
7. Between November 1989 and June 2002 the applicants closed their private law firms and submitted papers to begin their retirements.
8. Between August 1990 and September 2002 their old-age and disability pension entitlements, as well as the exact amount of their pensions (starosna i invalidska penzija), were established by decisions of the Pension and Disability Insurance Fund (Republički fond penzijskog i invalidskog osiguranja; hereinafter “the Pension Fund”). The decisions, as submitted by the second and fourth applicants, allowed the applicants to resume working on a part-time basis.
9. Between April 1996 and June 2002 the applicants reopened their own legal practices on a part-time basis.
10. On 1 April 2004, 20 July 2005, 3 June 2005 and 24 November 2005 the Pension Fund suspended (obustavlja) payment of the applicants’ pensions respectively, until such time as they ceased professional activity. These decisions were all “deemed to be applicable as of 1 January 2004”, which was when section 112 of the Pension and Disability Insurance Act 2003 (hereinafter “the Pension Act 2003”) entered into force (see paragraphs 23 and 25 below).
11. The Pension Fund’s rulings were subsequently upheld by the Ministry of Labour and Social Welfare (Ministarstvo rada i socijalnog staranja), as well as, ultimately, by the Administrative Court (Upravni sud) on 6 December 2005, 4 April 2006, 18 April 2006 and 7 February 2007 in respect of the first, second, third and fourth applicants respectively. The Administrative Court explained, inter alia, that the applicants had not been deprived of their pension entitlements as such, but that the payment of their pensions had instead been suspended on the basis of the relevant domestic legislation.
12. Finally, on 13 June 2006, 27 June 2006 and 28 May 2007 respectively, the Supreme Court (Vrhovni sud) in Podgorica dismissed the second, third and fourth applicants’ requests for judicial review of their cases (zahtjev za vanredno preispitivanje sudske odluke). In so doing, the Supreme Court essentially endorsed the reasons given by the Administrative Court.
13. The first applicant did not attempt to make use of the judicial review avenue, in view of the fact that the other applicants’ identical requests had already been rejected by the Supreme Court.
14. Payment of the second applicant’s pension was resumed with effect from 1 December 2007, which is when he ceased his professional activity. The payment of the second, third and fourth applicants’ pensions was resumed with effect from 1 January 2009, which is when the Amendments to the Pension Act entered into force, repealing section 112 of the Pension Act 2003 (see paragraph 26 below).
B. Civil proceedings against the applicants
1. The first applicant
15. On 30 June 2004 the Pension Fund lodged a compensation claim against the first applicant, seeking repayment of the pension payments she had received for January and February 2004 in the total amount of 425.74 euros (EUR). In response, the first applicant lodged a counterclaim seeking payment of the pension which had not been paid to her between March 2004 and December 2008 due to the suspension of her pension rights, amounting in total to EUR 15,332.45.
16. On 4 November 2009 the Court of First Instance (Osnovni sud) in Herceg Novi, after joining the two proceedings, ruled in favour of the first applicant, referring, in particular, to section 6 of the Amendments to the Pension and Disability Insurance Act 2003 (hereinafter “the Amendments to the Pension Act”), section 193 of the Pension Act 2003 as well as a decision of the Constitutional Court of Montenegro (see paragraphs 26, 24 and 28 below). On 19 January 2010 the High Court (Viši sud) in Podgorica overturned this judgment and ruled against the first applicant, relying on sections 112 and 222 of the Pension Act 2003 and considering that their application was not retroactive. This judgment was upheld by the Supreme Court on 3 June 2010, which court mainly endorsed the reasons of the High Court. In doing so, the Supreme Court in particular referred to section 112 of the Pension Act 2003.
17. On 29 July 2010 the Court of First Instance issued an enforcement order providing that the Pension Fund would retain half the first applicant’s pension until the entire sum owed had been paid. On 4 November 2010 this decision was upheld by the High Court.
2. The second and third applicants
18. On 17 January 2007 and an unspecified date the Pension Fund lodged compensation claims against the second and third applicants respectively, seeking repayment of the pension they had received from 1 January 2004 onwards.
19. On 20 June 2007 the Court of First Instance in Podgorica ruled against the second applicant, which judgment was upheld by the High Court in Podgorica on 13 February 2009. It would appear from the case file that this decision has been enforced.
20. On 25 February 2010 the Court of First Instance in Herceg Novi ruled in favour of the third applicant. On 16 April 2010 the High Court in Podgorica overturned this decision and ruled against him. In doing so, it referred to the above decisions of the Administrative Court and the Supreme Court (see paragraphs 11 and 12 above). It would appear from the case file that this decision has been enforced in subsequent enforcement proceedings.
4. The fourth applicant
21. There is no information in the case file as to whether the Pension Fund instituted civil proceedings against the fourth applicant.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Constitutional Charter of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro (Ustavna povelja državne zajednice Srbija i Crna Gora, published in the Official Gazette of Serbia and Montenegro no. 1/03)
22. Article 9 § 1 of the Constitutional Charter provided that both member States shall regulate, safeguard and protect human rights in its territory.
B. Pension and Disability Insurance Act 2003 (Zakon o penzijskom i invalidskom osiguranju, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Montenegro - OG RM - no. 54/03)
23. Section 112 paragraph 1 provided that a person’s pension shall be suspended should he or she resume working or establish a private practice, for as long as this activity continues.
24. Section 193 paragraph 1 provided that beneficiaries of, inter alia, old-age pension (starosna penzija) and disability pension (invalidska penzija), who obtained these rights in accordance with the relevant legislation in force before this Act entered into force, shall preserve these rights afterwards at the same level (u istom obimu) with appropriate adjustments [on the basis of living expenses and average salaries].
25. Section 222 provided that this Act would enter into force on 1 January 2004.
C. Amendments to the Pension and Disability Insurance Act 2003 (Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama zakona o penzijskom i invalidskom osiguranju, published in the Official Gazette of Montenegro - OGM - no. 79/08)
26. Section 6 repealed section 112 paragraph 1 of the Pension Act 2003. These Amendments entered into force on 1 January 2009.
D. Decision of the Federal Constitutional Court published in the Official Gazette of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia no. 39/2002
27. On 12 July 2002 the Federal Constitutional Court of Yugoslavia, Yugoslavia being comprised of Montenegro and Serbia at the time, held that section 32 of the Federal Pension and Disability Insurance Act, which essentially corresponded to section 112 paragraph 1 of the Pension Act 2003, was in breach of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. In particular, once pension entitlements had been acquired they could not be repealed or restricted by subsequent measures. Further, there was a lack of proportionality between the public interest, protection of which was allegedly the intention of the provisions in question on the one hand and the interests of individuals in respect of their property rights on the other. Lastly, the court held that the section in question was indeed retroactive in nature, since it had also been applied to pensioners who had resumed professional activities before its entry into force.
E. Decision of the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Montenegro U br. 7/04, 11/04, 30/04, 60/04 and 101/04
28. On 10 November 2004 the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Montenegro rejected an initiative to assess the constitutionality of section 112 paragraph 1 of the Pension Act 2003. In so doing, it held, inter alia, that it was a matter of legislative judgment whether or not to allow a person to simultaneously receive pension and resume working, and that therefore this matter fell outside the jurisdiction of the Constitutional Court. It further held:
“According to the ...Constitutional Court, Article 112 § 1 of the 2003 Act does not have retroactive effect, as it does not apply to situations which came into existence before its entry into force, but only as regards those ... which have arisen ... [thereafter] ...”.
F. Administrative Dispute Act (Zakon o upravnom sporu, published in OG RM no. 60/03 and OGM no. 32/11)
29. Articles 40-46 provide details concerning a request for judicial review (zahtjev za vanredno preispitivanje sudske odluke).
30. In particular, Articles 40-42 provide that parties may file a request for judicial review with the Supreme Court. They may do so within a period of 30 days following receipt of a final decision rendered by the Administrative Court, and only if the relevant legislation, procedural or substantive, has been breached by the lower court.
31. In accordance with Article 46, the Supreme Court shall, should it accept a request for judicial review lodged by one of the parties concerned, have the power to overturn the impugned judgment or quash it and order a re-trial before the Administrative Court.
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
32. The Court notes that the applications under examination concern the same issue. It is therefore appropriate to join them, in accordance with Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
33. The applicants complained about the suspension of their pensions.
34. The Court considers that their complaints naturally fall to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only (see, mutatis mutandis, Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Skórkiewicz v. Poland (dec.), no 39860/98, 1 June 1999; and Domalewski v. Poland (dec.), no. 34610/97, 15 June 1999), which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Compatibility ratione personae
(a) As regards the applicants
35. The Government maintained that the applicants had lost their victim status when the Amendments to the Pension Act entered into force on 1 January 2009, as of that moment payment of their pensions was resumed (see paragraphs 26 and 14 above).
36. The first, second and third applicants contested this claim. The fourth applicant made no comment in this respect. In particular, the first applicant maintained that her victim status persisted, as she had never obtained any compensation for the pension she had not received for the period between 1 March 2004 and 31 December 2008, and was thus still deprived of her property.
37. The Court reiterates that an individual can no longer claim to be a victim of a violation of the Convention when the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, a breach of the Convention and have provided redress (see Eckle v. Germany, 15 July 1982, § 66, Series A no. 51). Accordingly, in principle, where domestic proceedings are settled and include an admission of the breach by the national authorities and the payment of a sum of money amounting to redress, the dual requirements established in Eckle are satisfied, and the applicant can no longer claim to be a victim of a violation of the Convention.
38. The Court notes that in the present case the national authorities have never acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, a breach of the Convention, nor did they provide any redress for the suspension of pensions which the applicants allege constituted a violation of the Convention. On the contrary, the Government explicitly stated that the suspension of the pensions was not in breach of the Convention, and the domestic courts refused to award any compensation in this respect (see paragraph 57 below and paragraphs 15-17 above).
39. In view of the above, without prejudging the merits of the case, the Court considers that the applicants’ status as “victims” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention is unaffected. Accordingly, the Government’s objection in this regard must be dismissed.
(b) As regards the respondent States
40. The first and third applicants made complaints against both Montenegro and Serbia.
41. The Court notes that each member State of the then State Union of Serbia and Montenegro was responsible for the protection of human rights in its own territory (see paragraph 22 above). Given the fact that the entire proceedings have been conducted solely within the competence of the Montenegrin authorities, which also had the exclusive competence to deal with the subject matter, the Court, without prejudging the merits of the case, finds the applicants’ complaints in respect of Montenegro compatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention and Protocol No. 1 thereto. For the same reason, however, the first and third applicants’ complaint in respect of Serbia is incompatible ratione personae within the meaning of Article 35 § 3, and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention (see Bijelić v. Montenegro and Serbia, no. 11890/05, § 70, 28 April 2009, and Šabanović v. Montenegro and Serbia, no. 5995/06, § 28, 31 May 2011).
2. Compatibility ratione temporis
42. Even though the Government did not raise any objection in this regard, the Court has to satisfy itself that it has jurisdiction in any case brought before it (see, mutatis mutandis, Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 67, ECHR 2006-III, as well as Kavaja and Miljanić v. Montenegro (dec.), nos. 43562/02 and 37454/08, § 30, 23 November 2010).
43. The Court notes that the relevant domestic legislation providing for the suspension of the applicants’ pensions had entered into force on 1 January 2004, which was before the respondent State’s ratification of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention on 3 March 2004. However, the Court also observes that the applicants continued to receive their pensions until well after 3 March 2004. The suspension, therefore, did not automatically take place on the basis of the legislation alone, but only after the Pension Fund had rendered specific decisions to that effect, all of which were issued after the respondent State’s ratification of the Convention and Protocol No. 1 thereto.
44. In view of this, the Court considers that the impugned interference falls within this Court’s competence ratione temporis (see, mutatis mutandis, Blečić, cited above, § 83-84; as well as Zana v. Turkey, 25 November 1997, § 42, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-VII).
3. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
(a) As regards the first applicant
45. The Government maintained that the first applicant had not exhausted all effective domestic remedies. In particular, she did not seek a Supreme Court judicial review.
46. The first applicant contested the effectiveness of this remedy, especially in view of the decisions given in respect of the other three applicants, and in view of the fact that the Supreme Court had, in any case, ruled against her in the civil proceedings (see paragraphs 12, 15 and 16 above).
47. The Court reiterates that, according to its established case-law, the purpose of the domestic remedies rule contained in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the violations alleged before they are submitted to the Court. However, the only remedies to be exhausted are those which are effective.
48. It is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one, available in theory and in practice at the relevant time, that is to say, that it was accessible, was one which was capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant’s complaints and which offered reasonable prospects of success. However, once this burden of proof has been satisfied, it falls to the applicant to establish that the remedy advanced by the Government was in fact used or was for some reason inadequate and ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case, or that there existed special circumstances absolving him or her from the requirement (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 65, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV).
49. The application of this rule must make due allowance for the context. Accordingly, it has recognised that Article 35 § 1 must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism (see Akdivar and Others, cited above, § 69).
50. The Court recalls that it has already established that an appeal on points of law in civil proceedings (revizija) and an appeal on points of law in criminal proceedings (zahtjev za ispitivanje zakonitosti pravosnažne presude), are, in principle, effective domestic remedies within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Rakić and Others v. Serbia, nos. 47460/07 et seq., §§ 37 and 27, 5 October 2010, and the authorities cited therein; Debelić v. Croatia, no. 2448/03, §§ 20 and 21, 26 May 2005; and Mamudovski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (dec.), no. 49619/06, 10 March 2009). As the request for judicial review in the administrative dispute, even if described as “extraordinary” in the Administrative Dispute Act (zahtjev za vanredno preispitivanje sudske odluke) corresponds to the said remedies in civil and criminal proceedings, the Court considers that, given its nature, it must also, in principle and whenever available in accordance with the relevant rules on procedure, be considered an effective domestic remedy within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (compare and contrast the analysis in Kolu v. Finland (dec.), no. 56463/10, ECHR 3 May 2011).
51. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the first applicant indeed failed to submit a request for judicial review with the Supreme Court. It also notes that the Supreme Court ruled against the other three applicants upon their requests for judicial review, whose claims were identical to the claim of the first applicant, and, in doing so, it essentially endorsed the reasons given previously by the Administrative Court (see paragraph 12 above). In addition, the Supreme Court had indeed had a chance to rule in respect of the first applicant, albeit in civil proceedings, and it ruled against her (see paragraph 16 above). As there is nothing in the case file to suggest that the Supreme Court would have ruled any differently in respect of the first applicant, the Court considers that requiring her to use this remedy in such circumstances, would amount to excessive formalism and that therefore she did not have to exhaust this particular avenue of redress (see, mutatis mutandis, Uljar and Others v. Croatia, no. 32668/02, § 32 in fine, 8 March 2007). The Government’s objection in this regard must therefore be dismissed.
(b) As regards the other applicants
52. The Government maintained that the applicants had not exhausted all effective domestic remedies. In particular, they had not instituted civil proceedings in order to obtain compensation.
53. The first applicant submitted that she had instituted civil proceedings, but to no avail, as the domestic courts had ruled against her. The second and third applicants contested the effectiveness of civil proceedings, claiming that the domestic courts had never awarded any damages in such cases, and inviting the Government to submit any domestic case-law to the contrary. The fourth applicant made no comment in this respect.
54. The Court notes that the first applicant did institute civil proceedings for compensation, but that the domestic courts ruled against her (see paragraphs 15-17 above). The Court also observes that the Government failed to submit any other domestic case-law in support of their claim that the applicants could have obtained compensation in civil proceedings.
55. In view of the above, the Court is of the opinion that the civil proceedings cannot be considered as an effective domestic remedy in the particular circumstances of the case, thus absolving the second, third and fourth applicants of the requirement to make use of this remedy. The Government’s objection in this regard must therefore also be dismissed.
4. Conclusion
56. The Court notes that the applicants’ complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
57. The Government maintained that there was no general obligation on the State to allow pensioners to work, and that thus it was within the State’s discretion as to how to regulate it. In particular, it was not in the public interest for people to enjoy the benefits of both a pension and work at the same time. In this respect the Government noted that the domestic authorities were better placed to assess what was in the public interest, and had a wide margin of appreciation in that regard. Therefore, the impugned provision of the Pension Act 2003 was a legitimate measure in the public interest, proportionate to the legitimate aim of preserving the budgetary stability of the State and improving social policy. As everybody could choose which right they preferred to use, a fair balance was achieved between the private interests of the applicants on the one hand and the public interest on the other. Therefore, there was no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
58. The first, second and third applicants contested these claims. In particular, the first applicant referred to section 193 of the Pension Act 2003 (see paragraph 24 above), arguing that it confirmed that this Act did not have retroactive effect but that it should have been applied only to pensioners who re-established their private practice after this Act had entered into force. She held that this was further confirmed by the Constitutional Court of Montenegro (see paragraph 28 above), as well as, eventually, by the State itself when it abolished the relevant part of the relevant section (see paragraph 26 above). The second applicant, in particular, maintained that the State had proved the unlawfulness of the relevant part of the provision concerned by abolishing it by means of the Amendments to the Pension Act. The fourth applicant made no comment in this respect.
2. The Court’s assessment
59. The principles which apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are equally relevant when it comes to pensions (see Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 77, 18 February 2009, and, more recently, Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 82, 7 July 2011). Thus, that provision does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see, among other authorities, Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 48, Series A no. 70; Slivenko v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II; and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, among other authorities, Müller v. Austria, no. 5849/72, Commission’s report of 1 October 1975, Decisions and Reports (DR) 3, p. 25; T. v. Sweden, no. 10671/83, Commission decision of 4 March 1985, DR 42, p. 229; Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Kuna v. Germany (dec.), no. 52449/99, ECHR 2001-V (extracts); Lenz v. Germany (dec.), no. 40862/98, ECHR 2001-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX; Apostolakis v. Greece, no. 39574/07, § 36, 22 October 2009; Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 57, 8 December 2009; Poulain v. France (dec.), no. 52273/08, 8 February 2011; and Maggio and Others v. Italy, nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, § 55, 31 May 2011). However, where a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a pension – whether or not conditional on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation has to be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 64, ECHR 2010-...). The reduction or the discontinuance of a pension may therefore constitute interference with possessions that needs to be justified (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40; Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 57).
60. The first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see The Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, §§ 79 and 82, ECHR 2000-XII) and that it should pursue a legitimate aim “in the public interest”.
61. According to the Court’s case-law, the national authorities, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the Convention system, it is thus for those authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. Moreover, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws concerning pensions or welfare benefits involves consideration of various economic and social issues. The Court accepts that in the area of social legislation including in the area of pensions States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation, which in the interests of social justice and economic well-being may legitimately lead them to adjust, cap or even reduce the amount of pensions normally payable to the qualifying population including, like in the instant case, by means of rules on incompatibility between the receipt of a pension and paid employment. However, any such measures must be implemented in a non-discriminatory manner and comply with the requirements of proportionality. Therefore, the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing such policies should be a wide one, and its judgment as to what is “in the public interest” should be respected unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see, for example, Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 61, 16 March 2010; Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 83, 18 February 2009; as well as Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 61, 15 September 2009).
62. Any interference must also be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised. In other words, a “fair balance” must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The requisite balance will not be found if the person or persons concerned have had to bear an individual and excessive burden (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 50, Series A no. 98; and Wieczorek, cited above, §§ 59-60, with further references).
63. While it must not be overlooked that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not restrict a State’s freedom to choose the type or amount of benefits that it provides under a social security scheme (see Stec and Others, cited above § 54; Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 65731/01, § 53, ECHR 2006-VI; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 66 in limine), it is also important to verify whether an applicant’s right to derive benefits from the social security scheme in question has been infringed in a manner resulting in the impairment of the essence of his pension rights (see Domalewski, cited above; Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 39 in fine; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 57 in fine).
64. Turning to the present case, the Court considers that the applicants’ pension entitlements constituted a possession within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Further, the Pension Fund’s suspension of payment of the applicants’ pensions clearly amounted to an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions (see paragraph 59 above).
65. As regards the requirement of lawfulness, the Court notes that the payment of pensions was suspended on the basis of section 112 of the Pension Act 2003, which seems to imply that it was in accordance with the law. Certainly, the interpretation of this provision given by the domestic courts favours such a conclusion (see paragraph 16 above).
66. The Court considers that such an interpretation of the domestic courts raises some doubts in view of Section 193 of the Pension Act 2003, as well as in view of the decision of the Constitutional Court of Montenegro, and the ruling of the Federal Constitutional Court in respect of an essentially identical provision of the Federal Pension and Disability Insurance Act, both Montenegro and Serbia being part of one legal system at the time (see paragraphs 24, 28 and 27 above).
67. In any event, even assuming that it was in accordance with law, it remains to be resolved whether the said interference pursued a legitimate aim and if there was a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised.
68. Even though the Government submitted no supporting documents as to the benefits of this measure, the Court may accept that the aims pursued were social justice and the State’s economic well-being, both of which are legitimate.
69. As regard the issue of proportionality the Court notes that the initial decisions issued by the Pension Fund conferred on the applicants the entitlement to receive their respective pensions. In doing so, the Pension Fund agreed that the applicants had satisfied all the statutory conditions and qualified for the pensions. Under the rules in force at the time, gainful employment was not incompatible with a Fund member’s receipt of a full pension, as long as the employment was on a part-time basis (see paragraph 8 above). After meeting the legal criteria for retirement, and encouraged by the pension system to which they had contributed over a number of years, the applicants reopened their private practices on a part-time basis whilst at the same time receiving their pensions (see, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 44, ECHR 2004-IX).
70. The Court further notes that, when the applicants’ pensions were suspended by the relevant Pension Fund decisions in 2004 and 2005, this was not due to any changes in their own circumstances, but to changes in the law. This particularly affected the applicants, as it entirely suspended the payment of the pensions they had been receiving for a number of years, taking no account of the amount of revenue generated by their part-time work (see, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 44, as well as, in contrast, among many authorities, Domalewski and Skórkiewicz, both cited above, where the applicants were deprived only of their special privileged status, while retaining all the rights attaching to their ordinary pension under the general social insurance system). Even though the applicants have submitted no data as to how much exactly they earned in their private practice, and as the Government have offered no evidence to the contrary, in view of the fact that they worked on a part-time basis only the Court considers that the pension still constituted a considerable part of their gross monthly income (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 44).
71. In this context, the Court also observes that the Pension Act 2003 affected not only the applicants’ right to receive their pension in the future but partly also the payments received hitherto, as the first, second and third applicants were obliged to pay back the amounts they had received after 1 January 2004 (see paragraphs 17, 19 and 20 above, as well as, in contrast, mutatis mutandis, Wieczorek v. Poland, cited above, § 72, and Hasani v. Croatia (dec.), no. 20844/09, 30 September 2010).
72. Against this background, the Court finds that, as individuals, the applicants were made to bear an excessive and disproportionate burden. Even having regard to the wide margin of appreciation enjoyed by the State in the area of social legislation, the impact of the impugned measure on the applicants’ rights, even assuming its lawfulness (see paragraph 66 above), cannot be justified by the legitimate public interest relied on by the Government. It could have been otherwise had the applicants been obliged to endure a reasonable and commensurate reduction rather than the total suspension of their entitlements (see, among many authorities, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 45; Wieczorek v. Poland, cited above, § 67, Maggio and Others v. Italy, cited above, § 62, Banfield v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 6223/04, 18 October 2005) or if the legislature had afforded them a transitional period within which to adjust themselves to the new scheme. Furthermore, they were required to pay back the pensions they had received as of 1 January 2004 onwards, which must also be considered a relevant factor to be weighed in the balance.
73. In view of the above, the Court considers that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
74. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
75. The first applicant claimed EUR 15,769.07 in respect of pecuniary damage (EUR 15,332.45 on account of suspended pensions and EUR 436.62 on account of pensions reimbursed to the Pension Fund) and EUR 9.000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
76. The second applicant claimed EUR 12,377.3 in respect of pecuniary damage (EUR 8,532.86 on account of suspended pensions and EUR 3,844.44 on account of pensions reimbursed to the Pension Fund).
77. The third applicant claimed a total amount of EUR 18,448.8 in respect of pecuniary damage and EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
78. The fourth applicant claimed EUR 10,618.49 in respect of pecuniary damage. He enclosed a calculation made by the Pension Fund stating that the unpaid pensions amounted to EUR 8,038.53, as he had been regularly receiving the pension until 1 May 2005.
79. The Government maintained that the amounts sought by the applicants were inappropriately high and not in line with the relevant case-law of the Court.
80. The Court is satisfied that the applicants have suffered pecuniary damage as a result of the violation found and considers that they should be awarded compensation in an amount reasonably related to any prejudice suffered. It cannot award them the full amounts claimed, precisely because a reasonable and commensurate reduction in their entitlement could have been compatible with their Convention rights (see paragraph 72 above). Deciding in the light of the figures available in the case file, the Court awards the first and third applicants EUR 8,000 each, the second applicant EUR 6,000 and the fourth applicant EUR 4,000, plus any tax that may be chargeable on those amounts (see, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 51).
81. Even if not the subject of a specific claim by the second and fourth applicants, the Court accepts that all the applicants in the present case have certainly suffered some non-pecuniary damage which cannot be sufficiently compensated by the sole finding of a violation (see, mutatis mutandis, Garzičić v. Montenegro, no. 17931/07, § 42, 21 September 2010; as well as Staroszczyk v. Poland, no. 59519/00, §§ 141-143, 22 March 2007). Making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards each of them the sum of EUR 4,000.
B. Costs and expenses
82. The first applicant claimed EUR 679.8 in total for the costs and expenses incurred both before the domestic courts and this Court. The third applicant claimed a lump sum of EUR 400 for the costs of “translation and correspondence”. The second and the fourth applicants made no claims in this respect.
83. The Government left the decision in this respect to the Court’s discretion.
84. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the entire sum claimed by the first applicant. As the third applicant failed to submit evidence, such as itemised bills and invoices, that the expenses sought had actually been incurred, the Court accordingly rejects that claim. Lastly, the Court considers that there is no call to award the second and fourth applicants any sum on this account, as they made no claims in this respect.
C. Default interest
85. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decides to join the applications;
2. Declares the complaints in respect of Montenegro admissible, and the complaints in respect of Serbia inadmissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts plus any tax that may be chargeable:
(i) the first and third applicants EUR 8,000 (eight thousand euros) each, the second applicant EUR 6,000 (six thousand euros) and the fourth applicant EUR 4,000 (four thousand euros), in respect of pecuniary damage,
(ii) EUR 4,000 (four thousand euros) each for non-pecuniary damage, and
(iii) EUR 679.8 (six hundred and seventy-nine euros and eighty cents) to the first applicant for costs and expenses.
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 13 December 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Lech Garlicki Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione di P1-1; danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA LAKIĆEVIĆ ED ALTRI
C. MONTENEGRO E SERBIA
(Richieste N. 27458/06, 37205/06 37207/06 e 33604/07)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
13 dicembre 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Lakićević ed altri c. Montenegro e Serbia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Lech Garlicki, Presidente, David Thór Björgvinsson Päivi Hirvelä, Giorgio Nicolaou Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Nebojša Vučinić Vincenzo A. De Gaetano, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato 22 novembre 2011,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in quattro richieste separate (N. 27458/06, 37205/06 37207/06 e 33604/07) depositò con la Corte contro Montenegro e Serbia, (i primi ed i terzi richiedenti) e contro il Montenegro da solo (il secondo ed i quarto richiedenti) sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con quattro cittadini Montenegrini, OMISSIS (il primo richiedente), OMISSIS (il secondo richiedente), OMISSIS (il terzo richiedente) ed OMISSIS (il quarto richiedente) 5 giugno 2006, 2 agosto 2006 il 2006 e 24 luglio 2007 di 24 luglio rispettivamente.
2. Il primo, terzo e quarto richiedenti, insolitamente furono accordati permesso per rappresentarsi (l'Articolo 36 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte). Il secondo richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS un avvocato che pratica in Podgorica. Il Governo Montenegrini (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Z. Pažin.
3. I richiedenti si lamentarono sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 della sospensione delle loro pensioni.
4. 19 aprile 2010 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso delle richieste al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti - OMISSIS (il primo richiedente), OMISSIS (il secondo richiedente), OMISSIS(the terzo richiedente), ed OMISSIS (il quarto richiedente) - è tutti i cittadini di Montenegrin che nacquero rispettivamente in 1947, 1937, 1924, e 1944. Loro vivono in Herceg-Novi (i primo e terzi richiedenti) e Podgorica (il secondo e quarto richiedenti).
6. I fatti della causa, siccome presentato con le parti, può essere riassunto siccome segue.
A. Sospensione delle pensioni
7. Fra novembre 1989 e giugno 2002 i richiedenti chiusero le loro ditte legali private e carte presentate per cominciare i loro pensionamenti.
8. Fra agosto 1990 e settembre 2002 i loro diritti di pensione di vecchiaia e di invalidità, così come l'importo esatto delle loro pensioni (starosna i invalidska penzija), fu stabilito con decisioni della Pensione e Fondo dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità ((Republički fond penzijskog i invalidskog osiguranja ; in seguito “il Pensione Fondo”). Le decisioni, siccome presentato col secondo e quarto richiedenti, permise i richiedenti di ricapitolare lavorando su una base ad orario ridotto.
9. Fra aprile 1996 e giugno 2002 i richiedenti riaprirono le loro proprie pratiche legali su una base ad orario ridotto.
10. 1 aprile 2004, 20 luglio 2005, il 2005 e 24 novembre 2005 di 3 giugno il Pensione Fondo sospese (obustavlja) pagamento dei richiedenti che ' assegna una pensione a rispettivamente, sino a simile tempo siccome loro cessarono l'attività professionale. Queste decisioni erano tutte “ritenne essere applicabile come di 1 gennaio 2004” che era quando sezione 112 della Pensione ed Assicurazione di Invalidità Atto 2003 (in seguito “la Pensione Atto 2003”) entrò in vigore (vedere divide in paragrafi 23 e 25 sotto).
11. Le direttive del Pensione Fondo furono sostenute successivamente col Ministero di Lavori e Benessere sociale (Ministarstvo rada i socijalnog staranja), così come, ultimamente, con la Corte amministrativa (Upravni sud) 6 dicembre 2005, 4 aprile 2006, il 2006 e 7 febbraio 2007 di 18 aprile in riguardo del primo secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti rispettivamente. La Corte amministrativa spiegò, inter alia come il quale i richiedenti non erano stati privati dei loro diritti di pensione così, ma che il pagamento delle loro pensioni era stato sospeso invece sulla base della legislazione nazionale ed attinente.
12. Infine, 13 giugno 2006, il 2006 e 28 maggio 2007 di 27 giugno rispettivamente, la Corte Suprema (Vrhovni sud) in Podgorica il secondo respinse, terzo e quarto richiedenti ' richiede per controllo giurisdizionale delle loro cause (zahtjev za vanredno preispitivanje sudske odluke). Nel fare così, la Corte Suprema essenzialmente girò le ragioni date con la Corte amministrativa.
13. Il primo richiedente non tentò di avvalersi del viale di controllo giurisdizionale, in prospettiva del fatto che gli altri richiedenti ' che richieste identiche già erano state respinte con la Corte Suprema.
14. Pagamento della pensione del secondo richiedente fu ripreso con da 1 dicembre 2007 effetto che è quando lui cessò la sua attività professionale. Il pagamento del secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti le pensioni di ' furono riprese con da 1 gennaio 2009 effetto che è quando gli Emendamenti al Pensione Atto entrato in vigore, mentre abrogando sezione 112 della Pensione Atto 2003 (vedere paragrafo 26 sotto).
B. procedimenti Civili contro i richiedenti
1. Il primo richiedente
15. 30 giugno 2004 il Pensione Fondo depositò una rivendicazione di risarcimento contro il primo richiedente, mentre chiese rimborso dei pagamenti di pensione lei riceveva da gennaio e febbraio 2004 nell'importo totale di 425.74 euro (EUR). In risposta, il primo richiedente depositò un'eccezione riconvenzionale che chiede pagamento della pensione che non era stata pagata a lei fra marzo 2004 e dicembre 2008 a causa della sospensione dei suoi diritti di pensione, mentre corrispondendo in totale ad EUR 15,332.45.
16. 4 novembre 2009 il Giudice di prima istanza ( Osnovni sud) in Herceg Novi, dopo avere congiunto i due procedimenti rigato in favore del primo richiedente, assegnando, in particolare, a sezione 6 degli Emendamenti alla Pensione ed Assicurazione di Invalidità Atto 2003 (in seguito “gli Emendamenti al Pensione Atto”), sezione 193 della Pensione Atto 2003 così come una decisione della Corte Costituzionale del Montenegro (vedere divide in paragrafi 26, 24 e 28 sotto). 19 gennaio 2010 la Corte Alta (Viši sud ) in Podgorica questa sentenza rovesciò e rigato contro il primo richiedente, appellandosi su sezioni 112 e 222 della Pensione Atto 2003 e considerando che la loro richiesta non era retroattiva. Questa sentenza fu sostenuta con 3 giugno 2010 la Corte Suprema che corteggia principalmente girò le ragioni della Corte Alta. Nel fare così, la Corte Suprema in particolare si riferì a sezione 112 della Pensione Atto 2003.
17. 29 luglio 2010 il Giudice di prima istanza emise un ordine di esecuzione che prevede che il Pensione Fondo avrebbe trattenuto metà la pensione del primo richiedente finché la somma intera dovuta era stata pagata. 4 novembre 2010 questa decisione fu sostenuta con la Corte Alta.
2. Il secondo e terzi richiedenti
18. Su 17 gennaio 2007 ed una data non specificata il Pensione Fondo depositò rispettivamente rivendicazioni di risarcimento contro il secondo e terzi richiedenti, mentre chiese rimborso della pensione loro avevano ricevuto dal 1 gennaio 2004 in avanti .
19. 20 giugno 2007 il Giudice di prima istanza in Podgorica decise contro il secondo richiedente che sentenza fu sostenuta con la Corte Alta in Podgorica 13 febbraio 2009. Sembrerebbe dall'archivio di causa che questa decisione è stata eseguita.
20. 25 febbraio 2010 il Giudice di prima istanza in Herceg Novi decise in favore del terzo richiedente. 16 aprile 2010 la Corte Alta in Podgorica rovesciò questa decisione e rigato contro lui. Nel fare così, si riferì alle decisioni sopra della Corte amministrativa e la Corte Suprema (vedere divide in paragrafi 11 e 12 sopra). Sembrerebbe dall'archivio di causa che questa decisione è stata eseguita in procedimenti di esecuzione susseguenti.
4. Il quarto richiedente
21. Non ci sono informazioni nell'archivio di causa come a se il Pensione Fondo avviò procedimenti civili contro il quarto richiedente.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Statuto Costituzionale dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro (Ustavna povelja državne zajednice Srbija i Crna Gora, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale di Serbia e Montenegro n. 1/03)
22. Articolo 9 § 1 dello Statuto Costituzionale previde che ambo il membro Stati regoleranno, salvaguarderanno e proteggeranno diritti umani nel suo territorio.
B. Atto di Previdenza pensionistica e d’Invalidità del 2003 (Zakon o penzijskom osiguranju di invalidskom dei, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica del Montenegro - OG RM - n. 54/03)
23. Sezione 112 paragrafo 1 purché che la pensione di una persona sarà sospesa se lui o lei dovessero ricapitolare lavorando o dovrebbero stabilire una pratica privata, per come lungo come questa attività continua.
24. Sezione 193 paragrafo 1 purché che beneficiari di, inter alia, pensione anzianità (starosna penzija) e pensione di invalidità (invalidska penzija) che ottenne questi diritti in conformità con la legislazione vigente attinente di fronte a questo Atto entrò in vigore, preserverà dopo questi diritti allo stesso livello (obimu di istom di u) con rettifiche appropriate [sulla base di spese viventi e salari di media].
25. Sezione 222 purché che questo Atto entrerebbe in vigore 1 gennaio 2004.
C. Emendamenti all’Atto di Previdenza pensionistica e d’Invalidità del 2003 (Zakon o izmjenama i dopunama zakona o penzijskom i invalidskom osiguranju, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale del Montenegro - OGM - n. 79/08)
26. Sezione 6 sezione abrogata 112 paragrafo 1 della Pensione Atto 2003. Questi Emendamenti entrarono in vigore 1 gennaio 2009.
D. Decisione della Corte Costituzionale e Federale pubblicata pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia n. 39/2002
27. 12 luglio 2002 la Corte Costituzionale e Federale dell'Iugoslavia, Iugoslavia che è comprised di Montenegro e Serbia al tempo sostenne che sezione 32 della Pensione Federale ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità che essenzialmente corrisposero a sezione 112 paragrafo 1 della Pensione Atto 2003 era in violazione della Costituzione della Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia. In particolare, una volta diritti di pensione erano stati acquisiti loro non potevano essere abrogati o potrebbero essere restretti con misure susseguenti. C'era inoltre, una mancanza della proporzionalità fra l'interesse pubblico, protezione di che era presumibilmente l'intenzione delle disposizioni in oggetto sulla mano del un'e gli interessi di individui in riguardo dei loro diritti di proprietà sull'altro. Infine, la corte contenne che la sezione in oggetto era davvero retroattivo in natura, poiché era stato fatto domanda anche a pensionati che avevano ripreso le attività professionali di fronte alla sua entrata in vigore.
E. Decisione della Corte Costituzionale della Repubblica del Montenegro il br di U. 7/04, 11/04, 30/04, 60/04 e 101/04
28. 10 novembre 2004 la Corte Costituzionale della Repubblica del Montenegro respinse un'iniziativa per valutare la costituzionalità di sezione 112 paragrafo 1 della Pensione Atto 2003. Nel fare così, contenne, inter l'alia, che era una questione di sentenza legislativa se permettere una persona di ricevere simultaneamente pensione e ricapitolare lavorando o no, e che perciò questa questione incorse fuori della giurisdizione della Corte Costituzionale. Contenne inoltre:
“Secondo il... Corte Costituzionale, Articolo 112 § 1 dell'Atto del 2003 non ha effetto retroattivo, come sé non faccia domanda a situazioni che entrarono in esistenza di fronte alla sua entrata in vigore, ma solamente come riguarda quelli... quali sono sorti... [da allora in poi]....”
F. Atto sulla Controversia Amministrativa (Zakon sporu di upravnom di o, pubblicato in OG RM n. 60/03 ed OGM n. 32/11)
29. Articoli 40-46 offrono dettagli riguardo ad una richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale (zahtjev za vanredno preispitivanje sudske odluke).
30. In particolare, Articoli 40-42 prevedono che parti possono registrare una richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale con la Corte Suprema. Loro possono fare così entro un periodo del ricevuta seguente di 30 giorni di una definitivo decisione reso con la Corte amministrativa, e solamente se la legislazione attinente, procedurale o effettivo è stata violata con la corte più bassa.
31. Nella conformità con Articolo 46, la Corte Suprema può, se dovesse accettare una richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale depositato entro una delle parti riguardata, dovrebbe avere il potere per rovesciare la sentenza contestata o annullarlo e dovrebbe ordinare una re-processo di fronte alla Corte amministrativa.
LA LEGGE
I. IUNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
32. La Corte nota che le richieste sotto preoccupazione di esame lo stesso problema. È perciò appropriato per congiungerli, nella conformità con Articolo 42 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
33. I richiedenti si lamentarono della sospensione delle loro pensioni.
34. La Corte considera che le loro azioni di reclamo incorrono naturalmente essere esaminate sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Janković c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Skórkiewicz c. la Polonia (il dec.), nessuno 39860/98, 1 giugno 1999; e Domalewski c. la Polonia (il dec.), n. 34610/97, 15 giugno 1999) che legge siccome segue:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al rispetto dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato della sua proprietà se non a causa di utilità pubblica e nelle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni precedenti non recano offesa al diritto che possiedono gli Stati di mettere in vigore le leggi che giudicano necessarie per regolamentare l'uso dei beni conformemente all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento delle imposte o di altri contributi o delle multe. "
A. Ammissibilità
1 Compatibilità Ratione Personae
(a) Riguardo ai richiedenti
35. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti avevano perso il loro status di vittima quando gli Emendamenti al Pensione Atto entrato in vigore 1 gennaio 2009, come di che pagamento di momento delle loro pensioni fu ripreso (vedere divide in paragrafi 26 e 14 sopra).
36. Il primo, secondo e terzi richiedenti contestarono questa rivendicazione. Il quarto richiedente non fece commento in questo riguardo. In particolare, il primo richiedente sostenne che il suo status di vittima persistè, siccome lei non aveva ottenuto mai qualsiasi il risarcimento per la pensione lei non riceveva dall'il periodo fra il 2004 e 31 dicembre 2008 di 1 marzo, e fu privato così ancora della sua proprietà.
37. La Corte reitera che un individuo non può chiedere più di essere una vittima di una violazione della Convenzione quando le autorità nazionali hanno ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, una violazione della Convenzione e ha offerto compensazione (vedere Eckle c. la Germania, 15 luglio 1982, § 66 la Serie Un n. 51). Di conseguenza, in principio, dove procedimenti nazionali sono stabiliti ed includono un'ammissione della violazione con le autorità nazionali ed il pagamento di una somma di soldi che corrisponde compensare, i requisiti duplici stabiliti in Eckle sono soddisfatti, ed il richiedente non può chiedere più di essere una vittima di una violazione della Convenzione.
38. La Corte nota che nella causa presente le autorità nazionali non hanno ammesso mai, o espressamente o in sostanza, una violazione della Convenzione, né loro previdero qualsiasi compensa per la sospensione di pensioni che adducono i richiedenti costituì una violazione della Convenzione. Sul contrario, il Governo affermò esplicitamente, che la sospensione delle pensioni non era in violazione della Convenzione, e le corti nazionali rifiutarono di assegnare qualsiasi il risarcimento in questo riguardo (vedere paragrafo 57 sotto e divide in paragrafi 15-17 sopra).
39. In prospettiva del sopra, senza giudicare prematuramente i meriti della causa la Corte considera che i richiedenti lo status di ' come “le vittime” all'interno del significato di Articolo 34 della Convenzione è non soggetto ad influssi. Di conseguenza, l'eccezione del Governo in questo riguardo a deve essere respinto.
(b) Riguardo gli Stati rispondenti
40. I primo e terzi richiedenti fecero azioni di reclamo contro Montenegro e Serbia.
41. La Corte nota che ogni Stato membro del poi Unione Statale di Serbia ed il Montenegro era responsabile per la protezione di diritti umani nel suo proprio territorio (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra). Dato il fatto che i procedimenti interi sono stati condotti solamente all'interno della competenza delle autorità Montenegrine che anche avevano la competenza esclusiva per trattare con l'argomento la Corte, senza giudicare prematuramente i meriti della causa costata le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti a riguardo del Montenegro compatibili ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione e Protocollo N.ro 1 inoltre. Per la stessa ragione, comunque i primo e terzi richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' in riguardo di Serbia è ratione personae incompatibile all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3, e deve essere respinto facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione (vedere Bijelić c. Montenegro e Serbia, n. 11890/05, § 70, 28 aprile 2009, e Šabanović c. Montenegro e Serbia, n. 5995/06, § 28 31 maggio 2011).
2 Compatibilità Ratione Temporis
42. Anche se il Governo non sollevò nessuna eccezione in questo riguardo a, la Corte deve soddisfarsi che ha giurisdizione in qualsiasi causa portò di fronte a sé (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Blečić c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 67, ECHR 2006-III così come Kavaja e Miljanić c. il Montenegro (il dec.), N. 43562/02 e 37454/08, § 30 23 novembre 2010).
43. La Corte nota che la legislazione nazionale ed attinente che prevede per la sospensione dei richiedenti le pensioni di ' era entrata in 1 gennaio 2004 vigore che era di fronte alla ratifica dello Stato rispondente di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione 3 marzo 2004. La Corte osserva anche comunque, che i richiedenti continuarono a ricevere bene le loro pensioni sino a dopo 3 marzo 2004. La sospensione, perciò non ebbe automaticamente da solo luogo sulla base della legislazione, ma solamente dopo che il Pensione Fondo aveva reso le specifiche decisioni a che effetto tutti di che fu emesso dopo la ratifica dello Stato rispondente della Convenzione e Protocollo N.ro 1 inoltre.
44. In prospettiva di questo, la Corte considera, che l'interferenza contestata incorre all'interno della competenza ratione temporis di questa Corte (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Blečić citata sopra, § 83-84; così come Zana c. la Turchia, 25 novembre 1997, § 42 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-VII).
3. L'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
(a) Riguardo il primo richiedente
45. Il Governo sostenne che il primo richiedente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali e del tutto effettive. In particolare, lei non chiese un controllo giurisdizionale di Corte Supremo.
46. Il primo richiedente contestò l'efficacia di questa via di ricorso, specialmente in prospettiva delle decisioni data in riguardo degli altri tre richiedenti ed in prospettiva del fatto che la Corte Suprema aveva in qualsiasi la causa, rigato contro lei nei procedimenti civili (vedere divide in paragrafi 12, 15 e 16 sopra).
47. La Corte reitera che, secondo la sua causa-legge stabilita, il fine dell'articolo di via di ricorso nazionale contenne in Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione è riconoscere gli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolando o mettere diritto le violazioni addussero prima che loro sono presentati alla Corte. Comunque, le via di ricorso sole per essere esaurito sono quelle che sono effettive.
48. È in carica sulla non-esaurimento che chiede Statale per soddisfare la Corte che la via di ricorso era un effettivo, disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente che è dire che era accessibile, era uno che era capace di offrire compensazione in riguardo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e quale offrì prospettive ragionevoli del successo. Questo onere della prova è stato soddisfatto una volta comunque, incorre al richiedente per stabilire che la via di ricorso avanzò col Governo era infatti usato o era per della ragione inadeguato ed inefficace nelle particolari circostanze della causa, o che là esisteva circostanze speciali che li assolvono lui o dal requisito (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, § 65 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV).
49. La richiesta di questo articolo deve costituire assegno dovuto il contesto. Di conseguenza, ha riconosciuto che Articolo 35 § 1 deve essere fatto domanda con del grado della flessibilità e senza il formalismo eccessivo (vedere Akdivar ed Altri, citata sopra, § 69).
50. I richiami di Corte che già ha stabilito che un ricorso su questioni di diritto in procedimenti civili (revizija) ed un ricorso su questioni di diritto in procedimenti penali (zahtjev za ispitivanje zakonitosti pravosnažne presude), è, in principio, via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Rakić ed Altri c. Serbia, N. 47460/07 et seq., §§ 37 e 27, 5 ottobre 2010, e le autorità citati therein; Debelić c. Croatia, n. 2448/03, §§ 20 e 21, 26 maggio 2005; e Mamudovski c. la Repubblica iugoslava e precedente del Macedonia (il dec.), n. 49619/06, 10 marzo 2009). Come la richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale nella controversia amministrativa, anche se descrisse come “straordinario” nel Controversia Atto Amministrativo (zahtjev za vanredno preispitivanje sudske odluke) corrisponde alle via di ricorso dette in procedimenti civili e penali, la Corte considera che, determinato la sua natura, deve anche, in principio ed ogni qualvolta disponibile nella conformità con gli articoli attinenti su procedura, sia considerato una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (compari e contrapponga l'analisi in Kolu c. la Finlandia (dec.), n. 56463/10, ECHR 3 maggio 2011).
51. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte nota che il primo richiedente non riuscì davvero a presentare una richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale con la Corte Suprema. Nota anche che la Corte Suprema decise contro gli altri tre richiedenti sulle loro richieste per controllo giurisdizionale le cui rivendicazioni erano identiche alla rivendicazione del primo richiedente, e, nel fare così, essenzialmente girò le ragioni prima date con la Corte amministrativa (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra). In oltre, la Corte Suprema aveva avuto davvero un'opportunità di decidere in riguardo del primo richiedente, benché in procedimenti civili, e decise contro lei (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra). Come là nulla è nell'archivio di causa per suggerire che la Corte Suprema avrebbe deciso qualsiasi differentemente in riguardo del primo richiedente, la Corte considera che costringendola ad usare questa via di ricorso in simile circostanze, corrisponderebbe al formalismo eccessivo e che lei non doveva perciò esaurire questo particolare viale di compensazione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Uljar ed Altri c. Croatia, n. 32668/02, § 32 in multa 8 marzo 2007). L'eccezione del Governo in questo riguardo a deve essere respinto perciò.
(b) Riguardo gli altri richiedenti
52. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti non avevano esaurito via di ricorso nazionali e del tutto effettive. In particolare, loro non avevano avviato procedimenti civili per ottenere il risarcimento.
53. Il primo richiedente presentò che lei aveva avviato procedimenti civili, ma inutilmente, siccome le corti nazionali avevano deciso contro lei. Il secondo e terzi richiedenti contestarono l'efficacia di procedimenti civili, mentre chiedendo che le corti nazionali non avevano assegnato mai qualsiasi danni in simile cause, ed invitando il Governo a presentare qualsiasi causa-legge nazionale al contrario. Il quarto richiedente non fece commento in questo riguardo.
54. La Corte nota che il primo richiedente avviò procedimenti civili per il risarcimento, ma che le corti nazionali decisero contro lei (vedere divide in paragrafi 15-17 sopra). La Corte osserva anche che il Governo andò a vuoto a presentare qualsiasi l'altra causa-legge nazionale in appoggio della loro rivendicazione che i richiedenti avessero potuto ottenere il risarcimento in procedimenti civili.
55. In prospettiva del sopra, la Corte è dell'opinione che i procedimenti civili non possono essere considerati come una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva nelle particolari circostanze della causa, mentre assolvendo così il secondo, terzo e quarto richiedenti del requisito per avvalersi di questa via di ricorso. L'eccezione del Governo in questo riguardo a deve essere respinto perciò anche.
4. Conclusione
56. La Corte nota che i richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
57. Il Governo sostenne che non c'era obbligo generale sullo Stato per permettere pensionati di lavorare, e che così era all'interno della discrezione dello Stato come a come regolarlo. In particolare, non era nell'interesse pubblico per persone per godere i benefici di sia una pensione e lavora allo stesso tempo. In questo riguardo il Governo notò che le autorità nazionali furono messe meglio per valutare che che era nell'interesse pubblico, ed aveva un margine ampio della valutazione in quel riguardo a. Perciò, la disposizione contestata della Pensione Atto 2003 era una misura legittima nell'interesse pubblico, proporzioni allo scopo legittimo di preservando la stabilità budgetaria dello Stato e migliorare politica sociale. Come ognuno quale potrebbe scegliere diritto che loro hanno preferito usare, un equilibrio equo fu realizzato fra gli interessi privati dei richiedenti sulla mano del un'e l'interesse pubblico sull'altro. Non c'era perciò, nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
58. Il primo, secondo e terzi richiedenti contestarono queste rivendicazioni. In particolare, il primo richiedente si riferì a sezione 193 della Pensione Atto 2003 (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra), dibattendo che confermò che questo Atto non aveva effetto retroattivo ma che sarebbe dovuto essere fatto domanda solamente a pensionati che riattivarono la loro pratica privata dopo che questo Atto era entrato in vigore. Lei contenne che questo fu confermato inoltre con la Corte Costituzionale del Montenegro (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra), così come, infine, con lo Stato stesso quando abolì la parte attinente della sezione attinente (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). Il secondo richiedente, in particolare, sostenne che lo Stato aveva provò l'illegalità della parte attinente della disposizione riguardata con abolendolo con vuole dire degli Emendamenti al Pensione Atto. Il quarto richiedente non fece commento in questo riguardo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
59. I principi che fanno domanda in cause sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo generalmente N.ro 1 è ugualmente attinente quando viene a pensioni (vedere Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 77, 18 febbraio 2009 e, più recentemente, Stummer c. l'Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 82 7 luglio 2011). Così, che disposizione non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà (vedere, fra le altre autorità, il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 48 la Serie Un n. 70; Slivenko c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II; e Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Né garantisce, come così qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Müller c. l'Austria, n. 5849/72, il rapporto di Commissione di 1 ottobre 1975, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 3, p. 25; T. c. la Svezia, n. 10671/83, decisione di Commissione di 4 marzo 1985, DR 42, p. 229; Jankoviæ c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Kuna c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 52449/99, il 2001-V di ECHR (gli estratti); Lenz c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 40862/98, ECHR 2001-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39 ECHR 2004-IX; Apostolakis c. la Grecia, n. 39574/07, § 36 22 ottobre 2009; Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 57 8 dicembre 2009; Poulain c. la Francia (il dec.), n. 52273/08, 8 febbraio 2011; e Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia, N. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08 54486/08 e 56001/08, § 55 31 maggio 2011). Comunque, dove un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di una pensione-se o non condizionale sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione doveva essere considerata generando un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 64 ECHR 2010 -...). La riduzione o la cessazione di una pensione può costituire perciò interferenza con proprietà che hanno bisogno di essere giustificate (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 40; Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71 28 aprile 2009; e Wieczorek, citata sopra, § 57).
60. Il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (vedere Il Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, §§ 79 e 82, ECHR 2000-XII) e che dovrebbe intraprendere un scopo legittimo “nell'interesse pubblico.”
61. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, le autorità nazionali, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di Convenzione, è così per quelle autorità per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è esteso. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi riguardo a pensioni o benefici di welfare comportano considerazione di vari problemi economici e sociali. La Corte accetta che nell'area di legislazione sociale incluso nell'area di pensioni Stati godono un margine ampio di valutazione che negli interessi della giustizia sociale e benessere economico legittimamente può condurli ad aggiustare, copertura o anche riduce l'importo di pensioni normalmente pagabile alla popolazione qualificativa incluso, come nella causa presente, con vuole dire di articoli su incompatibilità fra la ricevuta di una pensione e lavoro pagato. Comunque qualsiasi simile misure devono essere implementate in una maniera non-discriminatoria e devono essere attenutesi coi requisiti della proporzionalità. Perciò, il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare simile politiche dovrebbe essere un ampio, e la sua sentenza come a ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico” dovrebbe essere rispettato a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere, per esempio, Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 61 16 marzo 2010; Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 83 18 febbraio 2009; così come Moskal c. la Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 61 15 settembre 2009).
62. Qualsiasi interferenza deve essere anche ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Nelle altre parole, un “equilibrio equo” deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. L'equilibrio richiesto non si troverà se la persona o persone riguardate hanno dovuto sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 50 la Serie Un n. 98; e Wieczorek, citata sopra, §§ 59-60, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
63. Mentre non deve essere trascurato che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non restringe la libertà di un Stato per scegliere il tipo o importo di benefici che offre sotto un schema di previdenza sociale (vedere Stec ed Altri, § 54 sopra e citata; Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 65731/01, § 53 ECHR 2006-VI; e Wieczorek, citata sopra, § 66 in limine), è anche importante per verificare se il diritto di un richiedente per dedurre benefici dallo schema di previdenza sociale in oggetto è stato infranto in una maniera che dà luogo al danneggiamento dell'essenza dei suoi diritti di pensione (vedere Domalewski, citata sopra; Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 39 in multa; e Wieczorek, citata sopra, § 57 in multa).
64. Rivolgendosi alla causa presente, la Corte considera che i richiedenti che ' assegna una pensione a diritti costituirono una proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Inoltre, la sospensione del Pensione Fondo di pagamento dei richiedenti le pensioni di ' chiaramente corrisposero ad un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà (vedere paragrafo 59 sopra).
65. Come riguardi il requisito della legalità, la Corte nota che il pagamento di pensioni fu sospeso sulla base di sezione 112 della Pensione Atto 2003 che sembra implicare che era in conformità con la legge. Certamente, l'interpretazione di questa disposizione data col nazionale corteggia favori tale conclusione (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra).
66. La Corte considera che tale interpretazione degli aumenti di corti nazionali dei dubbi in prospettiva di Sezione 193 della Pensione Atto 2003, così come in prospettiva della decisione della Corte Costituzionale del Montenegro, e la direttiva della Corte Costituzionale e Federale in riguardo di una disposizione essenzialmente identica della Pensione Federale ed Atto dell'Assicurazione dell'Invalidità, Montenegro e Serbia che sono parte di un ordinamento giuridico al tempo (vedere divide in paragrafi 24, 28 e 27 sopra).
67. In qualsiasi caso, presumendo anche che era in conformità con legge, rimane essere risolto se l'interferenza detta intraprese un scopo legittimo e se c'era una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso.
68. Anche se il Governo non presentò documenti che sostengono come ai benefici di questa misura, la Corte può accettare che gli scopi perseguiti erano giustizia sociale ed il benessere economico dello Stato, sia di che è legittimo.
69. Come riguardo al problema della proporzionalità che la Corte nota che le decisioni iniziali emisero col Pensione Fondo conferito sui richiedenti il diritto per ricevere le loro rispettive pensioni. Nel fare così, il Pensione Fondo concordò che i richiedenti avevano soddisfatto tutte le condizioni legali e qualificato per le pensioni. Sotto gli articoli in vigore al tempo, lavoro lucrativo non era incompatibile con la ricevuta di un membro di Fondo di una piena pensione, come lungo come il lavoro era su una base ad orario ridotto (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra). Dopo avere soddisfatto il criterio legale per pensionamento, ed incoraggiò col sistema di pensione al quale loro avevano offerto su un numero di anni, i richiedenti riaprirono le loro pratiche private su una base ad orario ridotto mentre alla stessa ricettazione di tempo le loro pensioni (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson citata sopra, § 44, ECHR 2004-IX).
70. La Corte nota inoltre che, quando i richiedenti che le pensioni di ' sono state sospese con le decisioni di Fondo di Pensione attinenti nel 2004 e 2005, questo non era a causa di qualsiasi cambi nelle loro proprie circostanze, ma a cambi nella legge. Questo colpì particolarmente i richiedenti, come sé completamente sospese il pagamento delle pensioni che loro stavano ricevendo per un numero di anni, prendendo nessun conto dell'importo di ufficio imposte generato col loro lavoro a tempo parziale (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson citata sopra, § 44, così come, in contrasto, fra molte autorità, Domalewski e Skórkiewicz sia citò sopra, dove i richiedenti furono privati solamente del loro status privilegiato e speciale, mentre trattenne tutti i diritti che allegano alla loro pensione ordinaria sotto il sistema di assicurazione sociale e generale). Anche se i richiedenti non hanno presentato precisamente dati come a quanto loro guadagnarono nella loro pratica privata, e come il Governo non ha proposto prova al contrario, in prospettiva del fatto che loro lavorarono su una base ad orario ridotto solamente la Corte considera che la pensione ancora costituì una parte considerevole del loro reddito mensile e lordo (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 44).
71. In questo contesto, la Corte osserva anche, che la Pensione Atto 2003 non solo colpì i richiedenti il diritto di ' per ricevere la loro pensione nel futuro ma in parte anche i pagamenti ricevettero fin qui, come il primo, secondo e terzi richiedenti furono obbligati per pagare di nuovo gli importi, loro avevano ricevuto dopo 1 gennaio 2004 (vedere divide in paragrafi 17, 19 e 20 sopra, così come, in contrasto, mutatis mutandis, Wieczorek c. la Polonia, citata sopra, § 72, e Hasani c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 20844/09, 30 settembre 2010).
72. Contro questo sfondo, i costatazione di Corte che, come individui, i richiedenti furono resi per sopportare un carico eccessivo e sproporzionato. Avendo anche riguardo ad al margine ampio della valutazione goduto con lo Stato nell'area di legislazione sociale, l'impatto della misura contestata sui richiedenti i diritti di ', presumendo anche la sua legalità (vedere paragrafo 66 sopra), non può essere giustificato con l'interesse pubblico e legittimo si appellato su col Governo. Sarebbe potuto essere avuto altrimenti i richiedenti stato obbligato per sopportare una riduzione ragionevole e commisurata piuttosto che la sospensione totale dei loro diritti (vedere, fra molte autorità, Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 45; Wieczorek c. la Polonia, citata sopra, § 67, Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia, citata sopra, § 62, Banfield c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 6223/04, 18 ottobre 2005) o se la legislatura li avesse riconosciuti un periodo di transizione entro che adattarsi allo schema nuovo. Inoltre, loro furono costretti a pagare di nuovo le pensioni loro avevano ricevuto come dal1 gennaio 2004 in avanti che devono essere considerati anche un fattore attinente per essere pesati nell'equilibrio.
73. In prospettiva del sopra, la Corte considera, che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
74. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
75. Il primo richiedente chiese EUR 15,769.07 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale (EUR 15,332.45 su conto di pensioni sospese ed EUR 436.62 su conto di pensioni rimborsato al Pensione Fondo) ed EUR 9.000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
76. Il secondo richiedente chiese EUR 12,377.3 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale (EUR 8,532.86 su conto di pensioni sospese ed EUR 3,844.44 su conto di pensioni rimborsato al Pensione Fondo).
77. Il terzo richiedente chiese un importo totale di EUR 18,448.8 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale ed EUR 5,000 in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
78. Il quarto richiedente chiese EUR 10,618.49 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale. Lui incluse un calcolo reso col Pensione Fondo che afferma che le pensioni non retribuite corrisposero ad EUR 8,038.53, siccome lui stava ricevendo la pensione fino a 1 maggio 2005 regolarmente.
79. Il Governo sostenne che gli importi chiesero coi richiedenti era inopportunamente alto e non in linea con la causa-legge attinente della Corte.
80. La Corte si soddisfa che i richiedenti hanno sofferto di danno patrimoniale come un risultato della violazione trovato e considera che loro dovrebbero essere assegnati ragionevolmente il risarcimento in un importo riferito a qualsiasi pregiudizio subì. Non può assegnarloro i pieni importi chiesti, precisamente perché una riduzione ragionevole e commisurata nel loro diritto fosse potuta essere compatibile coi loro diritti di Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 72 sopra). Decidendo nella luce delle cifre disponibile nell'archivio di causa, la Corte assegna EUR 8,000 i primo e terzi richiedenti ognuno, il secondo richiedente EUR 6,000 ed il quarto richiedente EUR 4,000, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quegli importi (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kjartan Ásmundsson citata sopra, § 51).
81. Anche se non la materia di una specifica rivendicazione col secondo e quarto richiedenti, la Corte accetta che tutti i richiedenti nella causa presente certamente hanno sofferto di del danno non-patrimoniale col quale sufficientemente non può essere compensato il risuoli sentenza di una violazione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Garzičić c. il Montenegro, n. 17931/07, § 42 21 settembre 2010; così come Staroszczyk c. la Polonia, n. 59519/00, §§ 141-143 22 marzo 2007). Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna ognuno di loro la somma di EUR 4,000.
B. Costi e spese
82. Il primo richiedente chiese EUR 679.8 in totale per i costi e spese incorse in sia di fronte alle corti nazionali e questa Corte. Il terzo richiedente chiese un prezzo globale di EUR 400 per i costi di “traduzione e corrispondenza.” Il secondo ed i quarto richiedenti non fecero rivendicazioni in questo riguardo.
83. Il Governo lasciò la decisione in questo riguardo alla discrezione della Corte.
84. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare la somma intera chiesta col primo richiedente. Siccome il terzo richiedente non riuscì a presentare prova, come conti particolareggiati e fatture che le spese chieste davvero era stato incorso in, la Corte di conseguenza rifiuti che chiedono. Infine, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna chiamata per assegnare il secondo e quarto richiedenti qualsiasi sommano su questo conto, siccome loro non fecero rivendicazioni in questo riguardo.
C. Interesse di mora
85. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere le richieste;
2. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo a riguardo del Montenegro ammissibile, e le azioni di reclamo a riguardo di Serbia inammissibili;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi della data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile:
(i) al primo e terzo richiedente EUR 8,000 (otto mila euro) ognuno, al secondo richiedente EUR 6,000 (sei mila euro) ed al quarto richiedente EUR 4,000 (quattro mila euro), a riguardo di danno patrimoniale,
(ii) EUR 4,000 (quattro mila euro) ognuno per danno non-patrimoniale, e
(iii) EUR 679.8 (seicento e settanta-nove euro ed ottanta cento) al primo richiedente per costi e spese.
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
5. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 13 dicembre 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Lech Garlicki Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.