CASO: CASE OF RAFIG ALIYEV v. AZERBAIJAN

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF RAFIG ALIYEV v. AZERBAIJAN

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 03, 05, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 45875/06/2011
STATO: Azerbaijan
DATA: 06/12/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 5-3 ; Violation of Art. 5-4 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Remainder inadmissible ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF RAFIG ALIYEV v. AZERBAIJAN
(Application no. 45875/06)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
6 December 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Rafig Aliyev v. Azerbaijan,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nina Vajić, President,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque,
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos,
Erik Møse, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 15 November 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 45875/06) against the Republic of Azerbaijan lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Azerbaijani national, OMISSIS (Rafiq Şövlət oğlu Əliyev – “the applicant”), on 13 November 2006.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, lawyers practising in London, and OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Baku. The Azerbaijani Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Ç. Asgarov.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that during his pre-trial detention his rights under Articles 3, 5, 6, 8, 13 and 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention had been infringed by various domestic authorities and officials.
4. On 4 April 2007 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1967 and lives in Baku. He was the chief executive officer of various Azerbaijani subsidiaries of Azpetrol International Holdings B.V. (hereafter “Azpetrol”, including its various subsidiaries and subdivisions), one of the largest private companies operating in Azerbaijan.
A. Criminal proceedings against the applicant
1. The circumstances of the applicant’s arrest
(a) The applicant’s version of the events
6. At approximately 7 a.m. on 19 October 2005 the applicant arrived at Baku International Airport for a business trip to Chişinău, Moldova. When passing through customs and border controls, the applicant reported that he was carrying 900 US dollars (USD) in foreign currency, which was below the minimum threshold of USD 1,000 required at the material time for a customs declaration.
7. Having passed through customs, the applicant waited for his flight in the VIP area for 25-30 minutes. His luggage was with the VIP staff who were responsible for taking it to the aircraft. After the flight was announced, the passengers from the VIP area were taken to the aircraft in a minibus. However, when boarding the aircraft the applicant was stopped by officers of the State Customs Committee, taken back to the airport customs office and informed that he was suspected of carrying a large amount of foreign currency in his carry-on luggage.
8. During the inspection of the carry-on luggage, three packs of banknotes for a total amount of USD 30,000 were found in the outer compartment of the bag. The applicant protested, claiming that it was not his money and that it must have been “planted” in his bag when the bag was with the VIP staff.
9. From 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. the applicant was detained at the airport by the State Customs Committee. During this time, he was not allowed to contact his family or a lawyer of his choosing. At around 4 p.m. the applicant was taken to the Investigation Department of the State Border Service. At 9 p.m. he was allowed to contact one of his brothers, OMISSIS, to inform him of his whereabouts.
10. The investigator in charge of the applicant’s case informed him that a criminal case had been instituted against him under Article 206.1 of the Criminal Code (contraband; illegal transfer of large quantities of goods or other valuables through customs without a declaration).
11. At around 11.55 p.m. the investigator attempted to interrogate the applicant in the presence of a State-appointed lawyer, but the applicant refused to be represented by that lawyer. An entry was made in the investigator’s records concerning this refusal.
(b) The Government’s version of the events
12. At about 7 a.m. on 19 October 2005 the applicant arrived at the airport. When the applicant passed through the customs control area, the X-ray monitor revealed some paper packets in the applicant’s bag. A customs official asked the applicant whether he had anything undeclared with him. The applicant replied in the negative. After the applicant entered the VIP lounge, the customs official reported his suspicions to his superior. At about 7:30 a.m. a representative of the airport’s customs office, together with the representative of the State Border Service and two witnesses, searched the applicant’s baggage and found USD 30,000 that had not been declared.
13. The customs officials conducted an initial inquiry, made records of the applicant’s explanation and witness statements and took an inventory of each bank note. These procedures took several hours and lasted until around 5.50 p.m. The customs officials then sent the relevant material to the Prosecutor General’s Office.
14. At around 9.30 p.m. the applicant made a telephone call to one of his brothers, requesting a lawyer. The lawyer of the applicant’s choosing did not appear and the investigator of the Investigation Department of the State Border Service called a lawyer at the State’s expense. However, the applicant refused the lawyer’s assistance and stated, in writing, that he would conduct his own defence until the moment the lawyer of his own choosing arrived.
15. At 10.30 p.m. the investigator drew up a record of the applicant’s arrest as a person suspected of committing a criminal offence (tutma protokolu). He was informed of his rights and questioned from 10.50 p.m. to 11.15 p.m.
16. On 20 October 2005 two lawyers secured by the applicant’s family arrived. The applicant was subsequently charged and questioned in the presence of his lawyers.
2. Other events around the time of the applicant’s arrest
(a) Arrest of the applicant’s brother OMISSIS and alleged persecution of the applicant’s other relatives
17. On the same day, one of the applicant’s brothers, OMISSIS, the then Minister of Economic Development, was arrested by the Ministry of National Security on suspicion of organising a coup d’état (see OMISSISv. Azerbaijan, no. 37138/06, 9 November 2010, for more details concerning that case).
18. According to the applicant, his other brothers were either dismissed from their jobs or arrested. OMISSIS, the Head of the Environment Committee of the Baku City Executive Authority, was dismissed from his job. OMISSIS, a CEO of a private company, was prosecuted on charges of tax evasion but was later released after agreeing to pay what was alleged to be due. OMISSIS, a manager of a small carpet factory, was also accused of tax evasion. OMISSIS, who intended to stand as a candidate for the forthcoming parliamentary elections, had his candidature revoked by a court decision. According to the applicant, a number of his colleagues were also dismissed from their positions.
(b) Searches
19. According to the applicant, on the day of his arrest, officials of the Ministry of Taxes carried out an inspection in the offices of Azpetrol in Baku and seized large amounts of cash from the company’s cash register after finding some irregularities in the company’s bookkeeping.
20. At the same time, officials of the Ministry of National Security (hereinafter “MNS”) carried out searches in the applicant’s apartment as well as two office buildings of Azpetrol. According to the applicant, MNS officials seized a number of personal and household items from the applicant’s apartment, including his children’s computers, phonebooks, two videotapes, and a number of valuable items including expensive watches and jewellery belonging to the applicant and his wife. From the Azpetrol offices, they also seized certain documents and officially registered firearms used by the company’s security personnel. Although several months later, in March 2006, the applicant lodged a petition with the prosecution authorities asking for the return of personal items seized from him, this petition was rejected on 27 March 2006 on the ground that under Article 129.4 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCrP”) the prosecution could retain physical evidence until the trial.
(c) Press releases by law-enforcement authorities concerning the criminal proceedings against the applicant, his brother OMISSIS, and other persons
21. On 20 and 21 October 2005 the official newspapers and other mass media published two press releases with the headline “Special Statement of the Prosecutor General’s Office, the Ministry of National Security and the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Republic of Azerbaijan”. These press releases officially informed the public about the arrest and indictment of a number of well-known current and former State officials and provided a summary of the evidence gathered in respect of their alleged plans for the “forcible capture of power” during the election period, “under the guise of an appeal for democratic changes in the political situation in the country”. The evidence mainly consisted of the testimony of one of the arrested persons concerning secret meetings between them and their sources of financing, as well as large amounts of cash and other valuables found in the homes of some of them. Additionally, some of the arrested persons were suspected of embezzlement of public funds and abuse of authority. Specifically, the press releases mentioned the names of the applicant’s brother OMISSIS, the former Parliament Speaker Rasul Guliyev, the former Minister of Finance Fikret Yusifov, the Minister for Health Care Ali Insanov, as well as other, less prominent names. It appears that all of the mentioned persons (except Rasul Guliyev, who was not physically present in Azerbaijan) had been arrested prior to the publication of the press releases.
22. The applicant’s name was also mentioned in the press releases, as quoted below, together with the names of other persons suspected of an attempted coup d’état. However, none of these statements disclosed the fact that, as of the time of publication of these statements, the applicant had actually been arrested on suspicion of, and charged with, an unrelated offence.
23. The press release of 20 October 2005 stated, inter alia:
“It was established that former Minister of Finance Fikret Yusifov was the contact responsible for obtaining large amounts of funding for the forcible capture of State power... He was arrested as a suspect on 16 October. ... 100,000 euros and 60,000 US dollars were seized from Fikret Yusifov’s flat during a search conducted in the context of the investigation...
On 18 October 2005 Fikret Yusifov wrote to the Prosecutor General... and indicated his willingness to voluntarily provide information about the preparatory actions by Rasul Guliyev and his supporters aimed at usurping State power...
Fikret Yusifov stated in his testimony that, during his visit to St Petersburg in the Russian Federation in July 2005, Rasul Guliyev ... had contacted him on his mobile phone and instructed him to pass on his directions concerning the financing of the process of the capture of State power to the Minister for Economic Development, OMISSIS, and his other supporters who had the necessary financial means.
In this connection, in August of the current year Fikret Yusifov met OMISSIS in the office of the latter’s brother Rafig Aliyev and informed him about Rasul Guliyev’s directions. OMISSIS promised to provide any kind of assistance in this matter and to take additional measures via his contacts. At the end of August Fikret Yusifov went to St Petersburg and notified Rasul Guliyev by phone about OMISSIS’s agreement.
Pursuant to another instruction by Rasul Guliyev, [Fikret Yusifov] returned to Baku on 23 September and again met OMISSISin the same office ... [OMISSIS] again gave assurances that he would provide any kind of assistance and that he was ready to provide funding in the amount of 3,000,000 US dollars and to organise anything within his capability.
On 3 October 2005 Fikret Yusifov met Rasul Guliyev in Berlin. During the meeting, Rasul Guliyev stated that he was planning to return to Baku in the middle of October and stressed that it was important that he be met by a large group of people, which would prevent his arrest, and that State power be forcibly seized by creating public disorder. Rasul Guliyev also gave a specific instruction that OMISSIS should provide substantial financial assistance for implementing these plans.
Having returned to Baku, Fikret Yusifov met OMISSIS and notified him about this instruction. On 15 October OMISSIS personally gave cash in the amount of 100,000 US dollars to Fikret Yusifov for the purposes of financing the usurpation of State power. This money was found during the search of Fikret Yusifov’s flat on 16 October 2005 and was seized as physical evidence.
During the searches conducted in the course of the investigation in houses, dachas and other properties belonging to OMISSIS, [the authorities] seized large amounts of foreign currency, jewellery, works of art and other valuable items obtained in a criminal manner.
As a result of operational measures, it was also established that OMISSIS, having abused his official authority and committed serious breaches of the law during the process of privatisation of State property, had procured documents of title to State property at negligible prices and formally registered the property in the name of his relatives and acquaintances, and thus de facto transferred it into his ownership.
An investigation into breaches of the law is currently under way in numerous commercial companies linked to OMISSIS, including Azpetrol. Rafig Aliyev, the owner of Azpetrol, was arrested at the airport while attempting to leave the country.
Based on the material gathered, the Prosecutor General instituted criminal proceedings under Articles 179.3 (embezzlement), 308.2 (abuse of official authority), 28/220 (preparation to organise public disorder) and 278 (usurpation or forcible retention of State power) of the Criminal Code and on 19 October 2005 OMISSISwas arrested as a suspect in connection with these criminal proceedings.”
24. The press release of 21 October 2005 stated, inter alia:
“As has been notified earlier, during the searches conducted in the course of the investigation in houses, dachas and other properties belonging to the former Minister for Economic Development OMISSIS, arrested as a suspect in connection with the criminal proceedings under Articles 179.3, 308.2, 28/220 and 278 of the Criminal Code, [the authorities] have seized large amounts of foreign currency, jewellery, works of art and other valuable items obtained in a criminal manner.
In particular, [the following were seized during the searches:] 50,500 US dollars, 6,000 euros and 860 UK pounds sterling from OMISSIS’s personal office in the administrative building of the Ministry of Economic Development; 30,000 euros and 6,500 US dollars from his flat...; 34 valuable works of art and 500 privatisation vouchers from his dacha; 565,000 US dollars and 5,609,000,000 [old] Azerbaijani manats, which had not been entered in accounting books, from his brother Rafig Aliyev’s office at Azpetrol. In addition, jewellery in large amounts, seven firearms of various models, other valuable items, and documents of title to numerous items of real property have been discovered at the mentioned addresses. The investigation continues into offences of corruption and other breaches of the law within numerous commercial companies belonging de facto to OMISSIS. ...”
3. Formal charges against the applicant, detention order, and joinder of the applicant’s case with OMISSIS’s case
25. On 20 October 2005 the investigator of the State Border Service opened a criminal case against the applicant (case no. 76587) and formally charged the applicant under Article 206.1 of the Criminal Code with an attempt to transfer a large amount of undeclared foreign currency through customs.
26. At 6 p.m. on the same day, the applicant was taken to the Sabail District Court. The hearing lasted about ten to fifteen minutes. Based on the official charges brought against the applicant and the prosecutor’s request for applying the preventive measure of remand in custody, the judge ordered the applicant’s remand in custody (həbs qətimkan tədbiri) for a period of two months. The judge substantiated the necessity of this measure by the gravity of the alleged criminal action of the applicant and by the possibility of his absconding. This was the only court hearing at which the applicant was present himself. He was represented by his lawyers in the subsequent court hearings, but was not permitted to attend them in person.
27. It appears that, following the Sabail District Court’s detention order, the applicant was taken to Detention Facility No. 1.
28. The applicant appealed against the Sabail District Court’s order of 20 October 2005, complaining about a lack of evidence and the absence of any relevant and sufficient reasons for his pre-trial detention. On 27 October 2007 the Court of Appeal dismissed his appeal, repeating the lower court’s reasoning and finding that it was correct. The Court of Appeal’s decision did not address any of the applicant’s specific complaints.
29. On 22 October 2005 the applicant was transferred to the MNS Detention Facility. His lawyer was not informed about this. He made enquiries with the Deputy Head of the Department of Investigation of Serious Crimes at the Prosecutor General’s Office, requesting information as to the applicant’s whereabouts.
30. On 10 November 2005 the lawyer was officially informed that on 22 October 2005 the applicant’s criminal case no. 76587 had been transferred to the Prosecutor General’s Office and joined with OMISSIS’s criminal case no. 76586. The applicant’s lawyer requested a copy of the decision on the joinder of the criminal cases. On 25 November this request was rejected on the ground that the CCrP did not require such decisions to be made available to the applicant’s lawyer.
31. On 2 December 2005 the applicant lodged a complaint with the Prosecutor General, claiming that there were no legal grounds for joining the applicant’s case to OMISSIS’s case because they had each been charged with totally unrelated offences. On 8 December 2005 the Prosecutor General rejected this complaint.
4. Extensions of the pre-trial detention period
32. On 25 November 2005 the applicant applied to the Sabail District Court with a request to substitute house arrest for the preventive measure of remand in custody. He argued that, owing to the questionable nature of the evidence, there could be no reasonable suspicion that he had committed a criminal offence, and that in any event the detention order was not justified in his personal circumstances. On 6 December 2005 the Sabail District Court rejected this request, finding that there were “no circumstances excluding the possibility of the applicant’s absconding, creating danger for society, and failing to appear before the investigating authorities without good reason”.
33. On 13 December 2005 the Nasimi District Court (which supervised criminal case no. 76586, to which the applicant’s original case was now joined) extended the period of the applicant’s remand in custody by two months (until 19 February 2006). The judge substantiated the necessity of this measure as follows:
“... It is not possible to complete all the [required] investigative steps before [the expiry of the applicant’s initially authorised detention period].
Taking into account the gravity of the actions imputed to [the applicant], the circumstances in which the criminal offence was committed, and the possibility of the accused absconding from the authority conducting the criminal proceedings, the preventive measure of remand in custody chosen in his case should be extended.”
34. On 20 December 2005 the Court of Appeal upheld this decision.
35. By a decision of 10 February 2006, the Nasimi District Court extended the period of the applicant’s detention by another two months (until 19 April 2006). On 16 February 2006 the Court of Appeal upheld this decision.
36. On 13 April 2006 the Nasimi District Court extended the period of the applicant’s detention by another three months (until 19 July 2006). On 21 April 2006 the Court of Appeal upheld this decision.
37. Prior to each of the extension orders, the applicant lodged a series of applications with the Prosecutor General’s Office, asking the prosecuting authorities not to lodge an extension request with the court, owing to the applicant’s personal circumstances, which made it unlikely that he would flee from investigation. All of these applications were rejected.
38. In all of the hearings concerning the extension of his detention and the related appeal hearings, the applicant was represented by his lawyer (or lawyers). The applicant himself was absent.
39. In all of its decisions extending the applicant’s detention, the Nasimi District Court’s reasoning justifying his continued detention was the same as or similar to that cited in paragraph 33 above. In his appeals against those decisions, the applicant complained that there was no reliable evidence giving rise to a reasonable suspicion that he had committed a criminal offence, that in any event the investigation for the rather simple charge against him was proving unreasonably long and he should already have been committed for trial, that the extension orders were based only on the submissions of the prosecuting authority and without an independent review by the court of the evidentiary material, that there were no reasons to believe that he would abscond or influence the investigation, and that his personal circumstances had not been taken into account when assessing the necessity of his continued detention. The Court of Appeal’s decisions upholding the extension of the applicant’s detention repeated the lower court’s reasoning and did not contain any assessment of the specific arguments raised by the applicant in his appeals.
5. Attachment of the applicant’s assets
40. On an unspecified date in June 2006 the Prosecutor General’s Office requested the Nasimi District Court to impose a measure of restraint on some of the applicant’s assets, based on the prosecution’s discovery of evidence that in June and September 2005 the applicant, as the head of some of the companies belonging to him and with the help of a number of accomplices forming an organised criminal group, had smuggled large quantities of petroleum products belonging to the State out of the country across the Azerbaijani-Georgian border, evading customs control by means of forging documentation and misrepresenting the true nature of the transaction. The prosecution also claimed that they had discovered evidence of tax evasion committed by Prestige LLC, a company “actually controlled” by the applicant, as well as of embezzlement of others’ property in large amounts. By the time of this request by the Prosecutor General’s Office, no formal charges had been brought against the applicant in connection with any of the above incidents involving the alleged criminal offences of petroleum smuggling, tax evasion or embezzlement.
41. Following the above-mentioned injunction request by the Prosecutor General’s Office, on 8 June 2006 the Nasimi District Court issued a restraint order (attachment order) in respect of 381,310 shares owned personally by the applicant in the registered capital of the Bank of Baku JSC (11.215% of the registered capital), as well as another 336,430 shares in the same bank (9.895% of the registered capital) owned by Azinvest LLC, a company “de facto owned by the applicant”. The court noted that the illegal activities described in the prosecution’s request for attachment of property constituted criminal offences for which the relevant provisions of the Criminal Code prescribed inter alia a sanction of confiscation of property. The court further noted that the prosecution possessed information that the applicant had acquired the shares in the Bank of Baku using the funds obtained from these illegal activities. Therefore, there was a basis for attaching the applicant’s assets under Articles 248, 249 and 250 of the CCrP in order to guarantee the sanction of confiscation of property that might subsequently be imposed by the trial court.
42. The applicant subsequently lodged a belated appeal against this decision, which was accepted for examination owing to the finding that the applicant had good reasons for having missed the appeal deadline. However, on 10 October 2006 the Court of Appeal dismissed the applicant’s appeal and upheld the Nasimi District Court’s decision of 8 June 2006.
6. New charges against the applicant and further extension of the pre-trial detention
43. On 5 July 2006 the investigator issued a new decision bringing formal criminal charges against the applicant. Under this decision, the applicant was now charged with criminal offences under Articles 206.3.1 (contraband, committed repeatedly), 206.4 (contraband, committed by an organised group) and 313 (forgery in public office) of the Criminal Code. Specifically, these charges related to the alleged smuggling of large quantities of petroleum to Georgia in June and September 2005, as described in paragraph 40 above, and to the original accusation of smuggling the undeclared amount of USD 30,000 through customs on 19 October 2005.
44. Later, on an unspecified date, the investigator lodged a request with the Nasimi District Court for the extension of the period of the applicant’s pre-trial detention. In addition to the new formal charges of 5 July 2006, the request also mentioned that the investigation had evidence of the applicant’s complicity in the attempted coup d’état, an offence with which his brother OMISSIS and other persons had been charged.
45. On 14 July 2006, based on the new criminal charges against the applicant and the investigator’s extension request, the Nasimi District Court extended the period of the applicant’s detention by another three months (until 19 October 2006). The court’s reasoning justifying the applicant’s continued detention was similar to that given in previous extension orders.
46. On 28 September 2006 the investigator issued a new decision bringing formal criminal charges against the applicant. Under this decision, the applicant was now charged with criminal offences under Articles 206.4, 206.3.1, 28/220.1 (preparation to organise public disorder), 278 (actions aimed at usurping State power) and 313 of the Criminal Code. In addition to the criminal offences with which he had already been charged, the applicant was also accused of organising, together with a number of other persons including his brother OMISSIS, massive unrest and a coup d’état after the parliamentary elections of 6 November 2005. More specifically, he had allegedly undertaken to provide necessary funding for preparation of the coup d’état and arranged secret meetings between its organisers in his office.
47. On 2 October 2006 the Nasimi District Court extended the period of the applicant’s detention by another six months (until 19 April 2007). On 10 October 2006 the Court of Appeal upheld that decision.
48. On 1 March 2007 the investigator issued a new decision bringing formal criminal charges against the applicant. By this decision, the applicant was now charged with criminal offences under Articles 179.3.1 (embezzlement by an organised group), 179.3.2 (embezzlement in large amounts), 188 (violation of the right of ownership to land), 192.2.1 (illegal commercial activity resulting in grave pecuniary damage), 192.2.2 (illegal commercial activity yielding a large amount of profit), 206.3.1, 206.4, 213.4 (tax evasion in large amounts), 28/220.1, 278, 259 (illegal damage to forests) and 313 of the Criminal Code.
49. On 5 March 2007 a new criminal case (no. 76961) was severed from criminal case no. 76586. In the context of the new criminal case no. 76961, the applicant was charged under Articles 179.3.1, 179.3.2, 188, 192.2.1, 192.2.2, 206.3.1, 206.4, 213.4, 259 and 313 of the Criminal Code.
50. The investigation in criminal case no. 76961 was completed on 5 March 2007.
51. On 16 April 2007 the investigator issued the final bill of indictment in criminal case no. 76961. On the same day, the bill of indictment was signed by the Prosecutor General and the case was referred to the Assize Court for trial.
52. Thus, criminal case no. 76961 was sent for trial in the Assize Court. There were nineteen co-defendants standing trial in this case, including the applicant and his brother OMISSIS, on charges of complicity in various offences involving embezzlement and corruption. It appears that the original criminal case no. 76586, which still carried the charges against the applicant under Articles 28/220.1 (preparation to organise public disorder) and 278 (actions aimed at usurping State power) of the Criminal Code, was not sent for trial, but was not terminated either.
53. On 15 May 2007 the applicant’s lawyers applied to the Assize Court, seeking his release on the ground that the latest detention order in respect of him, as well as the statutory maximum period for detention during the pre-trial investigation, had expired on 19 April 2007. It appears that at least six other co-defendants also requested release pending trial, relying on various grounds.
54. At its preliminary hearing on 21 May 2007 the Assize Court rejected the requests by the applicant and his co-defendants for release and authorised their continued detention pending trial. In particular, in connection with the applicant’s specific argument that his detention was unlawful following the expiry of the relevant period on 19 April 2007, the Assize Court noted that the criminal case had been referred to the court a few days before 19 April 2007, and that the period of the applicant’s detention “pending investigation” had ended on that day. Therefore, his detention had not exceeded the time-limits specified by law.
55. Furthermore, assessing the situation of all the detained co-defendants collectively, the Assize Court decided that “the preventive measure of remand in custody had been chosen correctly and should remain unchanged”. The court noted that “the accused persons detained on remand” had sufficient financial means, as well as business and other contacts in foreign countries, which could enable them to leave the territory of Azerbaijan and thus abscond from the trial. It further noted that, using those significant financial means, the detained persons could apply illegal pressure on persons participating in the trial.
7. The applicant’s conviction and appeals against it
56. The applicant was tried by the Assize Court together with eighteen other accused persons, including his brother OMISSIS.
57. On 25 October 2007 the Assize Court convicted the applicant of all the criminal offences he was charged with under criminal case no. 76961 and sentenced him to nine years’ imprisonment, with confiscation of property.
58. On 16 July 2008 the Baku Court of Appeal upheld the Assize Court’s judgment. On 6 July 2009 the Supreme Court upheld the lower courts’ judgments in respect of the applicant.
B. Conditions of detention
1. The applicant’s version
59. Starting from 22 October 2005 and throughout the pre-trial and trial proceedings until his conviction on 25 October 2007, the applicant was detained in the MNS Detention Facility. The applicant was kept in a cell which had sufficient space for only one person, although it might have been designated as a double-occupancy cell. He was detained alone for a period of approximately one year before the authorities offered to place a second inmate in his cell; the applicant refused this offer. The cell was dirty and measured about 8 sq. m. Approximately 4.2 sq. m of the total floor area was occupied by the furniture. The window was 0.7 m high and 1.1 m wide. However, because of the width of the window frames (5 cm), the window pane measured 0.5 m by 1 m. The window was covered, with only its top part open, allowing very little natural light to enter the cell. The ventilation and heating systems did not function properly and, therefore, it was extremely cold in winter and extremely hot in summer. There was a wall lamp which was switched on throughout the day and night, which constantly disturbed the applicant and made it hard for him to sleep.
60. The applicant was allowed one hour of out-of-cell exercise per day. The exercise area was extremely confined. The gym facilities in the MNS Detention Facility were not freely available during the applicant’s exercise time, as their use was dependent on a warder being available to supervise the applicant.
61. There was no proper laundry and the applicant had to send his dirty clothes home for washing. He was allowed to take a shower once a week in a shower area where the temperature of the water was regulated from the outside by warders. The food was of poor quality. The applicant had no television set in his cell and had limited access to radio and literature and was provided only with “pro-Government” newspapers.
62. The applicant was handcuffed when he was taken to meet with his lawyers and to interrogations. The handcuffs were removed during those meetings and interrogations. The applicant was not allowed to make telephone calls or write to his wife and family, who were not permitted to write to him or visit him either. The applicant’s requests to be allowed to correspond or be visited by his family during the pre-trial investigation were rejected.
2. The Government’s version
63. In the MNS Detention Facility, at his own request, the applicant was detained alone in a cell designed for two inmates. The area of the cell was about 10 sq. m. The cell had a window that was 1.4 m wide and 1.2 m high. The cell was connected to the MNS building’s central heating system and was well lit and ventilated. While the electric lighting was switched on throughout the day and night in accordance with the relevant regulations, the lamp was mounted in a manner that did not disturb inmates’ sleep.
64. The applicant was permitted to walk outside his cell for two hours a day and to use a gym. Food was served three times a day. In addition, like all other detainees, the applicant was allowed to receive from home a food package of up to 5 kg per week. The applicant was provided with clean towels and bedding, which were washed in the detention facility’s laundry. Once a week he received clean clothing from his family, so he was always dressed according to the season. The applicant was never handcuffed during questioning or any other investigative steps.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Pre-trial detention
65. The relevant provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure (CCrP) concerning police custody, detention on remand and proceedings concerning application and review of detention on remand are summarised in the OMISSIScase (cited above, §§ 83-102).
B. Attachment of property in criminal proceedings
66. According to Articles 248 and 249 of the CCrP, in order to ensure execution of a judgment in a part pertaining to a civil claim or an eventual confiscation of property in circumstances provided for under criminal law, an investigator or prosecutor can apply to a court for attachment of property of the alleged perpetrator of a criminal offence. Attachment of property prohibits the proprietor or owner from disposing of and, if necessary, using the property. In particular, Article 248 provides as follows:
Article 248. Nature of attachment of property
“248.1. Attachment of property:
248.1.1. shall be carried out with the aim of securing a civil claim or the confiscation of property in circumstances provided for under criminal law;
248.1.2. shall consist of making an inventory of the property and prohibiting the owner or possessor from disposing of this property and, where necessary, making use of the same;
248.1.3. where applied to bank deposits, shall prevent any further transactions on them.
248.2. Property of the accused person or property of persons who may be held materially liable, irrespective of what comprises this property or in whose possession it is, may be subject to attachment.
248.3. Attachment shall apply to the accused person’s share in the joint property of the accused and his or her spouse or in the property owned by the accused persons jointly with other persons. If there is sufficient evidence that the property [was an instrument of a criminal offence or constitutes proceeds of crime], the whole property or the greater part thereof shall be attached.
[If the instrument or proceeds of crime has been used, disposed of or is unavailable for confiscation for other reasons], money or other property belonging to the accused person, which is equivalent in value [to the instrument or proceeds of crime], shall be subject to attachment. ...”
67. Article 249 (grounds for attachment of property) of the CCrP provides that property may be attached if this measure is justified by sufficient evidentiary material and, as a general rule, on the basis of a court order. The investigator may take a decision to attach property without a court order only in exceptional circumstances. Article 250 of the CCrP contains rules for valuation of the attached property.
68. The following are the relevant extracts from The Commentary on the Code of Criminal Procedure of the Republic of Azerbaijan, Volume I (scientific editor: Prof. J. Movsumov, Baku 2003, p. 166) concerning Article 248 of the CCrP:
“6. Attachment of property with a view to guaranteeing confiscation of property can be ordered only in cases where the Criminal Code provides for a possibility of confiscation of property as an additional sanction for the criminal offence with which the accused person is charged ...
7. The factual basis for the attachment of property is ... the existence of a substantiated belief that the property could be hidden, disposed of or destroyed. ...
8. According to the annotated Article 248.2 of the CCrP, attachment can be ordered in respect of property of the following persons: (a) accused persons; (b) persons who could be held materially liable. The latter refers to persons who could be liable with their property for the actions of the accused person. This category of persons includes: (a) the accused person’s employer (Article 1099 of the Civil Code); (b) financial departments of the relevant authorities liable for actions of their officials (Articles 1100 and 1102 of the Civil Code); (c) legal representatives of minors between fourteen to eighteen years of age or of legally incapacitated persons (Articles 1104 and 1105 of the Civil Code); (d) the owner of a source of special danger (Article 1108 of the Civil Code). The above-mentioned persons are designated as civil defendants in the civil claim [lodged in the criminal proceedings].”
According to Article 91.1 of the CCrP, an accused person is an individual charged with a criminal offence by a decision taken by an investigator, prosecutor or court.
THE LAW
I. SCOPE OF THE CASE
69. The original application was limited to the facts relating to the period prior to the applicant’s criminal trial and resulting conviction and the case was communicated to the respondent Government on 4 April 2007 under Articles 3, 5, 6 § 2, 8 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The Court notes that, after communication, the applicant made a number of new submissions concerning “further new and continuing violations” stemming from the events that occurred during the subsequent criminal trial and the appeals against his criminal conviction. On page 6 of the applicant’s observations he noted that complaints concerning these “new and continuing violations” would be the subject of a new application which he intended to lodge with the Court. As it has decided in previous cases, the Court does not find it appropriate to examine any new matters raised after the communication of the application to the Government, as long as they do not constitute a mere elaboration upon the applicant’s original complaints to the Court (see Nuray Şen v. Turkey (no. 2), no. 25354/94, § 200, 30 March 2004; Piryanik v. Ukraine, no. 75788/01, § 20, 19 April 2005; Kovach v. Ukraine, no. 39424/02, § 38, ECHR 2008-...; Kats and Others v. Ukraine, no. 29971/04, § 88, ECHR 2008-...; Yusupova and Others v. Russia, no. 5428/05, § 51, 9 July 2009; Saghinadze and Others v. Georgia, no. 18768/05, § 72, 27 May 2010; and Ruža v. Latvia (dec.), no. 44798/05, § 30, 11 May 2010).
70. Given that no complaints in connection with those subsequent events were raised before the communication of the present application and the decision to examine its merits at the same time as its admissibility, the scope of the present case is limited to the facts as they stood at the time of the communication, which concerned the events that took place during the period of the applicant’s pre-trial detention and up to his conviction. However, the applicant has the opportunity to lodge new applications in respect of any other complaints relating to the subsequent events (see Dimitriu and Dumitrache v. Romania, no. 35823/03, §§ 23-24, 20 January 2009).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 5 OF THE CONVENTION
A. Article 5 § 1 of the Convention
71. Relying on Article 5 §§ 1 and 3 and Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention, the applicant complained that his arrest and detention had not been based on reasonable grounds for suspicion that he had committed a criminal offence. He argued that the cash in question had been “planted” in his bag at the airport and that there were numerous shortcomings in the procedure of obtaining and documenting the initial incriminating evidence against him.
72. The Court considers that these complaints fall to be examined under Article 5 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows, in the relevant part:
“1. Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be deprived of his liberty save in the following cases and in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law:
...
(c) the lawful arrest or detention of a person effected for the purpose of bringing him before the competent legal authority on reasonable suspicion of having committed an offence or when it is reasonably considered necessary to prevent his committing an offence or fleeing after having done so ...”
73. The Government contested the applicant’s arguments and maintained that the applicant had been caught in the act of committing an offence of smuggling and that, therefore, his detention was based on a reasonable suspicion that he committed a criminal offence.
74. The applicant argued that the USD 30,000 found in his bag had not belonged to him and had been placed there during the time that the bag had been with the airport employees. He claimed that, despite his persistent requests, no video tapes from the X-ray security monitor, which had allegedly been the initial source of suspicion, had been produced. He further argued that the paperwork documenting the search was flawed. According to the applicant, the grounds for his arrest had been fabricated and premeditated, as confirmed inter alia by the fact that some of the officials that participated in his arrest had been at work earlier than their normal working hours. The applicant concluded that the domestic authorities had failed to demonstrate that there had been any lawfully obtained evidence against him that was sufficient to found a reasonable suspicion that he had committed any criminal offence.
75. The Court reiterates that in order for an arrest on reasonable suspicion to be justified under Article 5 § 1 (c) it is not necessary for the police to have obtained sufficient evidence to bring charges, either at the point of arrest or while the applicant is in custody (see Brogan and Others v. the United Kingdom, 29 November 1988, § 53, Series A no. 145-B, and Erdagöz v. Turkey, 22 October 1997, § 51, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-VI). Neither is it necessary that the person detained should ultimately have been charged or taken before a court. The object of detention for questioning is to further a criminal investigation by confirming or discontinuing suspicions which provide the grounds for detention. Thus, facts which raise a suspicion need not be of the same level as those necessary to justify a conviction or even the bringing of a charge, which comes at the next stage of the process of criminal investigation (see Murray v. the United Kingdom, 28 October 1994, § 55, Series A no. 300-A). However, the requirement that the suspicion must be based on reasonable grounds forms an essential part of the safeguard against arbitrary arrest and detention. The fact that a suspicion is held in good faith is insufficient. The words “reasonable suspicion” mean the existence of facts or information which would satisfy an objective observer that the person concerned may have committed the offence (see Fox, Campbell and Hartley v. the United Kingdom, 30 August 1990, § 32, Series A no. 182).
76. In the present case, the applicant was suspected of having attempted to carry a large amount of cash in foreign currency through customs without the requisite declaration. It is not disputed that this action was classified as a criminal offence under the domestic law.
77. The suspicion was based on a finding of cash in an amount of USD 30,000 in the applicant’s carry-on bag. The Court considers that, within the meaning of the previously cited case-law, the fact that the cash was found in the applicant bag and was undeclared, in itself, objectively linked the applicant to the alleged criminal offence and was sufficient to have created a “reasonable suspicion” against him.
78. In so far as the applicant argued that the manner in which this evidence had been allegedly “discovered” and documented had been subject to serious flaws giving rise to a strong indication that the evidence might have been “planted”, the Court considers that these arguments relate to the lawfulness of the manner in which the evidence was obtained and its admissibility and reliability, which issues fall to be examined under Article 6 of the Convention in the context of fairness of criminal proceedings (see paragraph 138 below for Article 6 issues).
79. It follows that, from the standpoint of Article 5 § 1 of the Convention, this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
80. In addition, the Court observes that in the OMISSIScase, it found a violation of Article 5 § 1 of the Convention in respect of the fact that the applicant’s brother (who was the applicant in that case) was detained without a lawful basis during the period from 19 April to 21 May 2007, as there was no valid court order authorising his detention during that period (see OMISSIS, cited above, §§ 172-79). In the present case, it appears from the material in the case file that the applicant was in the same situation during the same period. However, having examined the applicant’s submissions, the Court notes that he has not raised any complaints in this respect in his application before the Court. Accordingly, there is no call to examine this particular issue in the present case.
B. Article 5 § 3 of the Convention
81. The applicant complained under Article 5 §§ 1 and 3 and Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention that his pre-trial detention had been unreasonably long and that no relevant and sufficient reasons had been offered to justify its continuation. The Court considers that this complaint falls to be examined under Article 5 § 3 of the Convention, which provides as follows:
“Everyone arrested or detained in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 1 (c) of this Article shall be ... entitled to trial within a reasonable time or to release pending trial. Release may be conditioned by guarantees to appear for trial.”
1. Admissibility
82. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
(a) The parties’ submissions
83. The Government argued that the applicant’s detention was justified by the reasonable suspicion that he had committed a criminal offence and that, in deciding on the prosecuting authorities’ requests concerning his detention, the courts had had regard to the reasons given by them to justify those requests and had assessed both parties’ arguments.
84. The applicant reiterated his complaint and argued that it was arbitrary and irrational to continue detaining him rather than order his release pending trial, if necessary conditioned by guarantees to appear for trial. He contended that there had been no risk that he would abscond or seek to interfere with the criminal proceedings and that, even if there had been such a risk, non-custodial preventive measures should have been considered.
(b) The Court’s assessment
85. According to the Court’s settled case-law, the presumption under Article 5 is in favour of release. The second limb of Article 5 § 3 does not give judicial authorities a choice between either bringing an accused to trial within a reasonable time or granting him provisional release pending trial. Until conviction, he must be presumed innocent, and the purpose of the provision under consideration is essentially to require his provisional release once his continuing detention ceases to be reasonable (see McKay v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 543/03, § 41, ECHR 2006-X, and Bykov v. Russia [GC], no. 4378/02, § 61, ECHR 2009-...).
86. Continued detention can therefore be justified in a given case only if there are specific indications of a genuine requirement of public interest which, notwithstanding the presumption of innocence, outweighs the rule of respect for individual liberty laid down in Article 5 of the Convention (see, among other authorities, Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, §§ 110 et seq., ECHR 2000-XI).
87. The responsibility falls in the first place to the national judicial authorities to ensure that, in a given case, the pre-trial detention of an accused person does not exceed a reasonable time. To this end they must, paying due regard to the principle of the presumption of innocence, examine all the facts arguing for or against the existence of the above-mentioned demand of public interest justifying a departure from the rule in Article 5 and must set them out in their decisions on the applications for release. It is essentially on the basis of the reasons given in these decisions and of the established facts stated by the applicant in his appeals that the Court is called upon to decide whether or not there has been a violation of Article 5 § 3 (see, for example, Weinsztal v. Poland, no. 43748/98, § 50, 30 May 2006; Labita v. Italy [GC], no. 26772/95, § 152, ECHR 2000-IV; and McKay, cited above, § 43).
88. The persistence of reasonable suspicion that the person arrested has committed an offence is a condition sine qua non for the lawfulness of the continued detention, but with the lapse of time this no longer suffices and the Court must then establish whether the other grounds given by the judicial authorities continued to justify the deprivation of liberty. Where such grounds were “relevant” and “sufficient”, the Court must also be satisfied that the national authorities displayed “special diligence” in the conduct of the proceedings (see, among other authorities, Letellier v. France, 26 June 1991, § 35, Series A no. 207, and Yağcı and Sargın v. Turkey, 8 June 1995, § 50, Series A no. 319-A). The burden of proof in these matters should not be reversed by making it incumbent on the detained person to demonstrate the existence of reasons warranting his release (see Ilijkov v. Bulgaria, no. 33977/96, § 85, 26 July 2001).
89. As for the total period to be taken into consideration for the purposes of Article 5 § 3, such period begins on the day the accused is taken into custody and ends on “the day when the charge is determined, even if only by a court of first instance” (see Kalashnikov v. Russia, no. 47095/99, § 110, ECHR 2002-VI, and Labita, cited above, § 147). In the present case this period commenced on 19 October 2005, when the applicant was arrested, and ended on 25 October 2007, when the Assize Court delivered its judgment convicting him. Thus, the applicant’s pre-trial detention lasted two years and six days in total.
90. Even if the existence of a reasonable suspicion that the applicant had committed a criminal offence might have initially sufficed to warrant his detention, with the passage of time that ground inevitably became less and less relevant (see paragraph 88 above), and his continued detention had to be justified by other relevant reasons, taking into account his personal situation.
91. During the pre-trial investigation stage of the proceedings, the applicant’s detention was extended by the Nasimi District Court five times, by its decisions of 13 December 2005, 10 February 2006, 13 April 2006, 14 July 2006 and 2 October 2006. All of these decisions were upheld by the Court of Appeal following appeals by the applicant in which he argued in favour of his release. Lastly, at the trial stage of the proceedings, the applicant’s detention was extended by the Assize Court’s decision of 21 May 2007 (which, by virtue of Article 173.2 of the CCrP, could not be appealed against).
92. As to the first-instance and appellate courts’ decisions extending the applicant’s detention during the pre-trial investigation, his continued detention was justified each time on the grounds of either the gravity of the charges or the likelihood of his absconding and exerting pressure on persons participating in the proceedings, or both. In this connection, the Court notes that, while the severity of the sentence faced is one of the relevant elements in the assessment of the risk of absconding, the gravity of the charges cannot by itself serve to justify long periods of detention on remand (see Ilijkov, cited above, §§ 80-81). Moreover, the risk of absconding, which may justify detention, cannot be gauged solely on the basis of the severity of the sentence faced. It must be assessed with reference to a number of other relevant factors, which may either confirm the existence of a danger of absconding or make it appear so slight that it cannot justify detention pending trial (see Panchenko v. Russia, no. 45100/98, § 106, 8 February 2005, and Letellier, cited above, § 43). In the present case, however, the judicial decisions did not go any further than listing the above-mentioned grounds, including the risk of absconding, using a stereotyped formula paraphrasing the terms of the CCrP (compare Giorgi Nikolaishvili v. Georgia, no. 37048/04, §§ 23-24, 28, 76 and 79, 13 January 2009, and OMISSIS, cited above, § 191). They failed to mention any case-specific facts relevant to those grounds or to substantiate them with relevant and sufficient reasons. The Court also notes that the courts extending the applicant’s detention repeatedly used the same stereotyped formula and their reasoning did not evolve with the passing of time to reflect the developing situation or to verify whether these grounds remained valid at the later stages of the proceedings.
93. The Court does not deny that there may have existed specific, relevant facts warranting the applicant’s deprivation of liberty. However, even if such facts existed, they were not set out in the relevant domestic decisions. It is not the Court’s task to take the place of the national authorities and establish such facts in their stead (see Ilijkov, cited above, § 86; Panchenko, cited above, § 105; and Giorgi Nikolaishvili, cited above, § 77).
94. As to the Assize Court’s decision of 21 May 2007, the Court notes that it mentioned certain factors in assessing the risk that the defendants might abscond and exert pressure on witnesses (such as the defendants’ wealth and their contacts abroad). However, the Assize Court’s analysis concerned several defendants collectively, without a case-by-case assessment of the grounds justifying the continued detention of each individual detainee, including the applicant. Such practice of issuing “collective” extension orders is, in itself, incompatible with the guarantees enshrined in Article 5 § 3 of the Convention, as it fails to take into account the personal circumstances of each detained person (see Khudoyorov v. Russia, no. 6847/02, § 186, ECHR 2005-X (extracts), and OMISSIS, cited above, § 193).
95. In view of the foregoing considerations, the Court concludes that, by using a stereotyped formula merely listing the grounds for detention without addressing the specific facts of the applicant’s case, the authorities failed to give “relevant” and “sufficient” reasons to justify extending the applicant’s pre-trial detention to two years and six days.
96. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 5 § 3 of the Convention.
C. Article 5 § 4 of the Convention
97. Relying on Articles 5, 6 and 13 of the Convention, the applicant complained that the judicial proceedings concerning his detention had not been adversarial in nature and had been unfair. In particular, he noted that the courts had examined the question of his continued detention in his absence, that there had been no public hearings, that he had not been given access to the material that the prosecuting authorities had submitted to the courts to justify their requests for his continued detention, that the courts had not addressed his specific arguments in favour of his release, and that, generally, he had been denied equality of arms.
98. In so far as the present complaint concerns only the proceedings concerning the applicant’s pre-trial detention and not the criminal proceedings as a whole, it does not fall within the ambit of Article 6 (see, for example, Guliyev v. Azerbaijan (dec.), no. 35584/02, 27 May 2004), and the Court considers that it falls to be examined under Article 5 § 4 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone who is deprived of his liberty by arrest or detention shall be entitled to take proceedings by which the lawfulness of his detention shall be decided speedily by a court and his release ordered if the detention is not lawful.”
1. Admissibility
99. The Court notes that, among other arguments raised in connection with this complaint, the applicant complained that the hearings in the proceedings concerning his pre-trial detention had not been public. In this connection, the Court has previously held that Article 5 § 4, although requiring a hearing for the review of the lawfulness of pre-trial detention (see paragraph 104 below), does not as a general rule require such a hearing to be open to the public (see Reinprecht v. Austria, no. 67175/01, §§ 34-41, ECHR 2005-XII, and OMISSIS, cited above, § 198). The Court does not find any special circumstances in the present case that could have required a public hearing in the proceedings concerning the review of the lawfulness of the applicant’s detention. It follows that this part of the complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
100. As to the remainder of the complaint, the Court notes that it is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
(a) The parties’ submissions
101. The Government submitted that the applicant had had at his disposal an effective procedure by which he could challenge the lawfulness of his detention. In the Government’s view, this procedure was provided for by the provisions of the CCrP concerning an accused person’s right to lodge complaints with the domestic courts against any procedural steps or decisions taken by the prosecuting authorities.
102. The applicant reiterated his complaint, arguing that equality of arms and the requirements of fairness had not been ensured in the proceedings in which he had challenged the lawfulness of his detention.
(b) The Court’s assessment
103. Having regard to the specific circumstances complained of, the Court notes that the scope of the present complaint is limited to facts relating to the proceedings for the review of the lawfulness of the applicant’s detention during the pre-trial investigation.
104. The Court reiterates that by virtue of Article 5 § 4, an arrested or detained person is entitled to bring proceedings for the review by a court of the procedural and substantive conditions which are essential for the “lawfulness”, within the meaning of Article 5 § 1, of his or her deprivation of liberty. This means that the competent court has to examine not only compliance with the procedural requirements of domestic law but also the reasonableness of the suspicion underpinning the arrest, and the legitimacy of the purpose pursued by the arrest and the ensuing detention (see Brogan and Others, cited above, § 65). Although it is not always necessary for the procedure under Article 5 § 4 to be attended by the same guarantees as those required under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention for criminal or civil litigation, it must have a judicial character and provide guarantees appropriate to the kind of deprivation of liberty in question. The proceedings must be adversarial and must always ensure equality of arms between the parties. In the case of a person whose detention falls within the ambit of Article 5 § 1 (c), a hearing is required (see Assenov and Others v. Bulgaria, 28 October 1998, § 162, Reports 1998-VIII). The possibility for a detainee to be heard either in person or through some form of representation features among the fundamental guarantees of procedure applied in matters of deprivation of liberty (see Kampanis v. Greece, 13 July 1995, § 47, Series A no. 318-B). Moreover, equality of arms is not ensured where a detainee or his or her counsel is denied access to those documents in the investigation file which are essential in order to challenge effectively the lawfulness of the detention (see Lamy v. Belgium, 30 March 1989, § 29, Series A no. 151).
105. Article 5 § 4 does not compel the Contracting States to set up a second level of jurisdiction for the examination of applications for release from detention. Nevertheless, where domestic law provides for a system of appeal, the appellate body must also comply with Article 5 § 4 (see Toth v. Austria, 12 December 1991, § 84, Series A no. 224). As for court decisions ordering or extending detention, Article 5 § 4 guarantees no right, as such, to an appeal against those decisions, but the intervention of a judicial body at least at one level of jurisdiction must comply with the guarantees of Article 5 § 4 (see, mutatis mutandis, Ječius v. Lithuania, no. 34578/97, § 100, ECHR 2000-IX).
106. Turning to the facts of the present case, the Court notes that the applicant’s detention was ordered when he was brought before the judge of the Nasimi District Court on 20 October 2005. The domestic law gave him a right of appeal against that decision. The requirements of Article 5 § 4 of the Convention can be said to apply to these appeal proceedings, which resulted in the Court of Appeal’s decision of 27 October 2005 and in which the applicant was represented by his lawyer.
107. Subsequently, the applicant’s detention “pending investigation” was extended five times by the Nasimi District Court, on 13 December 2005, 10 February 2006, 13 April 2006, 14 July 2006 and 2 October 2006. As the applicant appealed against all of these extension orders challenging the lawfulness of his continued detention, all of these proceedings at the Court of Appeal also attracted the guarantees of Article 5 § 4 of the Convention. The Court notes that the applicant was represented by his lawyers during the examination of these appeals, but was absent himself.
108. While by virtue of the above proceedings the applicant’s detention “pending investigation” was extended for significant periods of time, he was unable to attend personally any of those court sessions, which took place months after the original detention order. The Court considers that, given what was at stake for the applicant – that is, his liberty – as well as the lapse of time between the original hearing and the subsequent extension orders, the courts could have taken steps to ensure that the applicant was heard in person and was afforded an opportunity to convey to the courts his personal situation and arguments for his release (compare, mutatis mutandis, Graužinis v. Lithuania, no. 37975/97, §§ 33-34, 10 October 2000; Mamedova v. Russia, no. 7064/05, § 91, 1 June 2006; and OMISSIS, cited above, § 207). While this was not done, efforts should have been made to ensure that the applicant’s position was conveyed through effective representation by counsel. However, the Court is not convinced that this took place in the present case either. Although the applicant’s lawyers attended the court sessions held in connection with the examination of his appeals, the Court notes, having regard to the material in its possession, that those court sessions were held as a matter of formality and did not take the form of genuinely adversarial hearings. It is true that the applicant’s lawyers could make their submissions in writing by lodging their complaints on appeal, but this fact does not, in itself, mean that equality of arms was ensured. The Court notes that the prosecuting authority’s submissions in support of the applicant’s detention were not made available either to the applicant or his lawyers, depriving them of the opportunity to comment on those submissions, either in writing or orally, in order to effectively contest the reasons invoked by the prosecuting authority to justify his detention.
109. In any event, the courts did not address any of the specific arguments advanced by the applicant in his written submissions challenging his continued detention (see paragraph 39 above), although those arguments did not appear to be irrelevant or frivolous. The Court reiterates that, while Article 5 § 4 of the Convention does not impose an obligation to address every argument contained in the detainee’s submissions, the judge examining appeals against pre-trial detention must take into account concrete facts which are referred to by the detainee and are capable of casting doubt on the existence of those conditions essential for the “lawfulness”, for Convention purposes, of the deprivation of liberty (see Nikolova v. Bulgaria [GC], no. 31195/96, § 61, ECHR 1999-II). By not taking into account the applicant’s specific arguments against his continued detention, the domestic courts failed to carry out a judicial review of the scope and nature required by Article 5 § 4 of the Convention.
110. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 5 § 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
111. The applicant complained about the seizure, during the searches of his apartment and offices, of a number of personal items belonging to him and various members of his family, including a number of valuable items and jewellery belonging to him and his wife, two notebook computers, some personal documents, phonebooks and two videotapes. He argued that those items had been irrelevant for the criminal proceedings in question and did not constitute physical evidence.
He also complained about the authorities’ decision to attach his assets (in particular, shares in the Bank of Baku) in the absence of a decision formally charging him with the relevant criminal offences.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
112. In so far as the applicant complained about the allegedly unjustified seizure as physical evidence of a number of personal items belonging to him and his family members, the Court notes that, as can be seen from the case file, the applicant has not challenged before the supervising domestic courts the prosecution authorities’ procedural actions in connection with the searches conducted in his apartment and office or the seizure of those items. It follows that this part of the complaint must be rejected under Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
113. As to the remainder of the complaint, the Court considers it is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention and no other ground for declaring it inadmissible has been established. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
114. The Government submitted that the applicant’s shares in the Bank of Baku had not been confiscated pursuant to the court order of 8 June 2006, but attached with the aim of guaranteeing a possible confiscation of property in circumstances provided for by the criminal law. Accordingly, that decision in itself, in the absence of a final court verdict in the criminal case, did not deprive the applicant of his property. The Government argued that this measure was lawful and that the applicable provisions of domestic law (in particular, Article 248 of the CCrP) were sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application. They further maintained that the freezing of the applicant’s assets constituted a restriction made in the public interest, with a view to ensuring the proper administration of justice.
115. The applicant submitted that the measure complained of had been unlawful, arbitrary, unjustified and failed to satisfy the requirements of legal certainty. In particular, he stressed that while the assets had been attached in connection with alleged criminal offences for which the Criminal Code envisaged confiscation of property as a penalty, he had not actually been charged with any of those offences at the time the attachment order had been made. Accordingly, in the applicant’s submission, in the absence of the relevant criminal charges, the attachment order was unlawful.
2. The Court’s assessment
116. The Court observes that on 8 June 2006 the Nasimi District Court ordered the attachment of a number of shares in the Bank of Baku owned by the applicant, on the ground that the prosecution possessed evidence that the applicant had committed the criminal offences of smuggling petroleum products, tax evasion and embezzlement, and that he had used the proceeds of these offences to acquire shares in the Bank of Baku. Noting that commission of such criminal offences could entail a sanction of confiscation of property under the Criminal Code, the court ordered the attachment of the applicant’s shares, relying on Articles 248-250 of the CCrP as the basis for such decision. At the time of this attachment order, the applicant was not charged with either of the criminal offences mentioned in the order. Up to that point, he had only been charged in connection with an unrelated offence of attempting to transfer undeclared currency through customs at the airport. After the attachment order of 8 June 2006, he was later formally charged with the offence of smuggling petroleum products on 5 July 2006 (Articles 206.3.1 and 206.4 of the Criminal Code) and with the offences of embezzlement and tax evasion on 1 March 2007 (Articles 179.3.1, 179.3.2 and 213.4 of the Criminal Code).
117. It is common ground between the parties that the applicant was the owner of the attached shares; in other words, these assets constituted his “possessions”. Nor is it disputed that the attachment order amounted to an interference with the applicant’s right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions or that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is therefore applicable.
118. The Court notes that the attachment of the applicant’s shares in the Bank of Baku, in itself, did not deprive him of his possessions, but provisionally prevented him from using them and from disposing of them, with a view to securing a possible penalty of confiscation imposed at the outcome of the criminal proceedings. The Court reiterates that the seizure of property for legal proceedings normally relates to the control of the use of property, which falls within the ambit of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, among other authorities, Raimondo v. Italy, 22 February 1994, § 27, Series A no. 281-A, and Borzhonov v. Russia, no. 18274/04, § 57, 22 January 2009).
119. The Court further emphasises that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be “lawful”: the second paragraph recognises that the States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention. The issue of whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights only becomes relevant once it has been established that the interference in question satisfied the requirement of lawfulness and was not arbitrary (see, among other authorities, Baklanov v. Russia, no. 68443/01, § 39, 9 June 2005, and Frizen v. Russia, no. 58254/00, § 33, 24 March 2005).
120. When speaking of “law”, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 alludes to the same concept that is to be found elsewhere in the Convention (see Špaček, s.r.o. v. the Czech Republic, no. 26449/95, § 54, 9 November 1999, and Baklanov, cited above, § 40). This concept requires firstly that the impugned measures should have a basis in domestic law. It also refers to the quality of the law in question, requiring that it be accessible to the persons concerned, precise, and foreseeable (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 109, ECHR 2000-I).
121. The applicant’s primary argument in connection with the present complaint is that the attachment order was unlawful because, at the material time, he had not been formally charged with any of the criminal offences which served as a ground for the attachment. The Court notes that, in the context of the present case, it is not called upon to decide in general whether attachment of a person’s property for criminal proceedings prior to that person being formally charged with a criminal offence could, in itself, be considered compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention. What is necessary to determine is whether, in this specific case, such interference was permitted, and thus “lawful” under the Azerbaijani law in force at the material time.
122. The Court observes that the provisions of Article 248 et seq. of the CCrP dealing with the attachment of property provided that attachment could be ordered only in respect of property of the “accused person” or “other persons who could be held materially liable” for the criminal actions of the accused (see paragraph 66 above for the text of Article 248 of the CCrP and paragraph 68 above for the commentary on that Article). An “accused person” was defined by the CCrP as a person charged with a criminal offence (Article 91.1 of the CCrP). Article 248 of the CCrP contained no reference to property of other categories of persons such as, for example, “suspected persons” who had not yet been formally charged with a criminal offence.
123. As mentioned above, in relation to the criminal offences described in the attachment order, the applicant was not an “accused person” at the material time, as he had not been formally charged with any of those criminal offences. Moreover, he did not appear to be a “person who could be held materially liable” for the criminal actions of another accused person, since he himself was regarded as the prime suspect and since at the material time there were no other persons charged in connection with those specific criminal actions.
124. In such circumstances, the Court notes that, based on the literal meaning of Article 248 et seq. of the CCrP, it appears that at the time of issuance of the attachment order the applicant did not fall into either of the two categories of persons whose property could be subject to attachment. Accordingly, it appears that, at the material time, the applicant’s property rights could not be restricted under this legal provision. No other legal provision was cited by the domestic courts as a basis for the interference.
125. The Court accepts that its power to review compliance with domestic law is limited as it is in the first place for the national authorities to interpret and apply that law. However, the Court notes that neither the Nasimi District Court, in its attachment order, nor the Court of Appeal, when reviewing the lawfulness of the attachment order, provided an explanation as to how Article 248 of the CCrP could be applied in the applicant’s situation. They did not attempt to provide any interpretation of this provision or to rely on any existing or accessible jurisprudence that would interpret that provision, in a precise and foreseeable manner, as being applicable to the property of suspects who had not yet been charged with the relevant criminal offence.
126. Likewise, the Government, while arguing that the interference was lawful under Article 248 of the CCrP, did not attempt to explain how that provision could be applied in respect of persons who had not been charged with the relevant criminal offence, given that the text of that provision did not expressly provide for such a possibility. Nor did the Government argue that this provision was applicable to such persons by virtue of any extensive interpretation of its text by the higher courts, and they did not rely on any specific domestic jurisprudence, complying with the requirements of accessibility and foreseeability, in support of such interpretation.
127. In such circumstances, the Court concludes that the interference with the applicant’s property could not be considered lawful within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. This conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights.
128. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
IV. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
A. Article 3 of the Convention
129. The applicant complained under Article 3 of the Convention of the allegedly harsh conditions of his detention in the MNS Detention Facility. Article 3 reads as follows:
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
130. The Government argued that the applicant had not exhausted domestic remedies, as he had never raised this issue before the national courts.
131. The Government further submitted that the conditions of the applicant’s detention could not be regarded as inhuman or degrading, that he had been held in standard conditions and that there had been no intention to somehow humiliate or debase him. In this connection, the Government referred to the findings in the 2002 CPT Report in respect of the general conditions of detention in the MNS Detention Facility, which had been considered acceptable by the CPT.
132. The applicant argued that he should be exempted from the requirement to exhaust domestic remedies because any theoretically available remedies in respect of this complaint were ineffective in practice and therefore the pursuit of these remedies was futile, and because the domestic authorities had repeatedly examined all of his other complaints in an unfair manner.
133. The applicant disputed the Government’s factual submissions concerning the conditions of his detention in the MNS Detention Facility (see paragraphs 63-64 above) and maintained that the actual conditions of his detention, as described by him (see paragraphs 59-62 above), amounted to ill-treatment under Article 3 of the Convention. He further claimed that the Government had relied selectively on the 2002 CPT Report and that this same report also contained “numerous criticisms” of the conditions in the MNS Detention Facility. In any event, in the applicant’s opinion, the 2002 CPT Report was old and outdated and did not provide an accurate representation of the conditions of detention during the period of his detention in the MNS Detention Facility.
134. The Court finds that it is not necessary to examine the Government’s objection as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies as, even assuming that the applicant has complied with this requirement, the complaint is in any event inadmissible for the following reasons.
135. The Court notes that, while the parties provided differing descriptions of the applicant’s conditions of detention, each party’s submissions in this regard were very similar to those made in the OMISSIScase (cited above, §§ 75-82). Having regard to the material in its possession, the Court concludes that the applicant’s conditions of detention were essentially very similar to the conditions of detention of his brother OMISSIS, who was also detained in the MNS Detention Facility in a similar cell and during the same time period.
136. The Court further notes that, in the OMISSIScase, based on the parties’ submissions and the findings in the 2002 CPT Report, it assessed the material conditions of the applicant’s detention and found that those conditions, while not entirely satisfactory, were on the whole acceptable and were not so bad as to amount to inhuman or degrading treatment (see OMISSIS, cited above, §§ 117-19). Having regard to the fact that the conditions of the applicant’s detention in the present case were essentially very similar to those in the OMISSIScase, the Court finds no reason to depart from its findings in that case and considers that, despite certain problematic aspects, the conditions of the applicant’s detention in the MNS Detention Facility did not amount to inhuman or degrading treatment under Article 3 of the Convention.
137. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
B. Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 of the Convention
138. Relying on Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 of the Convention, the applicant raised a number of complaints concerning the proceedings relating to his pre-trial detention, which the Court has already examined under the relevant paragraphs of Article 5 above. In so far as some of the applicant’s submissions under Article 6 can be construed as a complaint about the alleged unfairness of the criminal proceedings against him as a whole, the Court notes that the scope of the present application is limited to the facts relating to the period prior to the applicant’s trial, conviction and appeals against this conviction, and that therefore it does not cover the entirety of the proceedings concerning the determination of criminal charges against him (see paragraphs 69-70 above). Even if some factual events that took place prior to the trial may be relevant for the assessment of the fairness of the proceedings as a whole, this part of the complaint must be rejected as having been raised prematurely in the context of the present application
C. Article 6 § 2 of the Convention
139. The applicant complained that, in the decisions ordering and extending his pre-trial detention, the domestic courts had breached his right to be presumed innocent by prejudging his guilt before he had been proved guilty following a criminal trial. He further complained that the joint statements made by the Prosecutor General’s Office, the MNS and the Ministry of Internal Affairs to the press on 20 and 21 October 2005 had amounted to an infringement of his right to the presumption of innocence. Article 6 § 2 of the Convention provides as follows:
“Everyone charged with a criminal offence shall be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law.”
140. The Government submitted that the applicant had not exhausted domestic remedies in respect of this complaint, arguing that there were several avenues of redress available to him at the domestic level. The Government further submitted that, in any event, none of the decisions rendered by the domestic courts on various matters relating to the pre-trial investigation had declared the applicant guilty of any criminal offence. They also argued that the impugned press statements of 20 and 21 October 2005 made by the law-enforcement authorities had not depicted the applicant as a criminal. Rather, they had informed the public about the fact of his arrest and referred to the available evidence and various items found during the searches of the premises belonging to him. This information had been provided “without making any legal assessment of those facts”.
141. The applicant reiterated his complaint and argued that, while he had not expressly been called a “criminal”, the purpose and effect of those statements had been to portray him as such.
142. The Court finds that it is not necessary to examine the Government’s objection as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies as, even assuming that the applicant has complied with this requirement, the complaint is in any event inadmissible for the following reasons.
143. In so far as the applicant complained of a breach of his right to the presumption of his innocence by the domestic courts in their decisions ordering and extending his pre-trial detention, the Court, having carefully examined the original texts of the relevant decisions, finds that none of them contained any wording that could be interpreted as prematurely declaring the applicant guilty of the offences that he was charged with.
144. In so far as the applicant complained about the joint statements made by the Prosecutor General’s Office, the MNS and the Ministry of Internal Affairs to the press on 20 and 21 October 2005, the Court observes that in the OMISSIScase it found that those same statements were in breach of Mr OMISSIS’s right to presumption of innocence under Article 6 § 2 of the Convention, because they contained wording amounting to a declaration, made without the necessary qualifications or reservations, that he had committed criminal offences (see OMISSIS, cited above, §§ 217-27). However, having examined these statements in the framework of the present case, the Court considers that the parts of those statements referring specifically to the applicant could not be considered incompatible with the requirements of Article 6 § 2. In respect of the applicant in the present case, the statements merely contained brief information that he had been arrested and that certain items and cash had been seized from his office. They also mentioned that his office had been used for meetings between OMISSISand Fikret Yusifov. It is true that the statements did not clarify that, at that time, the applicant had been detained on suspicion of an offence unrelated to the offences allegedly committed by other persons mentioned in those statements. Accordingly, the statements might have been misleading as to the real reasons for the applicant’s arrest. Nevertheless, no wording contained in those statements went as far as declaring the applicant guilty of any criminal offence.
145. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
D. Article 8 of the Convention
146. The applicant complained of a restriction of correspondence and visits from his family and his British lawyer during the period of his pre-trial detention. He claimed that his letters had been intercepted and censored, and that any legal basis for such restrictions had not been disclosed to him. Article 8 of the Convention provides as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
147. The Government submitted that the applicant had failed to exhaust the domestic remedies, as he had never raised any of the specific allegations in the present complaint before any domestic authority and had never relied on Article 8 of the Convention, or provisions of domestic law of the same or a similar nature, in his applications to the domestic authorities. The Government noted that, under Article 449 of the CCrP, it was open to the applicant to complain to the domestic courts about any actions of the prosecuting or investigating authorities that violated his rights.
148. The applicant contested the Government’s objection, arguing that the domestic courts were not independent and impartial and that it was “futile to seek to obtain effective remedies from them in politically-driven cases of this kind”.
149. The Court reiterates that the purpose of the domestic-remedies rule in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the alleged violations before they are submitted to the Court (see, among other authorities, Hajibeyli v. Azerbaijan, no. 16528/05, § 35, 10 July 2008, and OMISSIS, cited above, § 232). Mere doubts about the effectiveness of a remedy are not sufficient to dispense with the requirement to make normal use of the available avenues for redress (see, among other authorities, Mammadov v. Azerbaijan, no. 34445/04, § 52, 11 January 2007). The Court accepts the Government’s submission that it was open to the applicant to complain to the domestic courts about the actions or omissions of the prosecuting authorities that had allegedly breached his rights. However, the applicant has not applied to the courts with any of the grievances raised by him in the present complaint before the Court concerning the general bans on family visits and correspondence throughout the entire detention period. While he argued that attempting to seek redress from the courts would be futile, he has not shown convincingly that such steps were bound to be ineffective.
150. It follows that this complaint must be rejected under Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
E. Other alleged violations
151. The applicant complained under Article 5 § 2 of the Convention that he had not been informed promptly of the reasons for his arrest and of the charges against him. The applicant also complained under Articles 13 and 14 of the Convention, in conjunction with all of his other complaints, that there were no effective remedies by which to seek redress for the violation of his Convention rights and that he had been subjected to discriminatory treatment for political reasons, as punishment for being a brother of OMISSIS.
152. However, in the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court finds that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
153. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
1. Pecuniary damage
154. The applicant claimed at least 4,500,184.58 United States Dollars (USD) in respect of pecuniary damage, including (a) USD 428,451.84 for loss of salary during the period from 1 October 2005 to 1 October 2007, calculated on the basis of his salaries at Azpetrol and Azertrans Ltd, plus any further loss of income during the period from 1 October 2007 to the date of the Court’s judgment, to be calculated on the same basis; (b) USD 1,300,000 of his “personal savings unlawfully seized from his office” at Azpetrol; (c) USD 1,686,815.51 for the value of the attached shares in Bank of Baku and USD 1,048,306.23 for unpaid dividends on those shares accruing from 2004 to 2007; and (d) USD 36,611 for the value of various items seized from his apartment.
155. The Government submitted that the amount claimed for the loss of salary was excessive, unsubstantiated and based on insufficient documentary evidence. They further submitted that the documents presented in support of the claims for pecuniary damage were not “detailed and exhaustive”. Lastly, the Government argued that, at the time of the lodging and communication of the application, the applicant had not been deprived of any property and the issue of possible confiscation was still to be determined by the courts.
156. The Court does not discern any causal link between the violations found and the pecuniary damage alleged in respect of the loss of salary. As for the claims in respect of various seized possessions, the Court notes that part of the complaints concerning those possessions were declared inadmissible. As to the complaint concerning the attachment of shares in the Bank of Baku, the Court notes that the scope of that complaint was limited solely to the unlawfulness of the measure temporarily restricting the applicant’s property rights, and did not concern any measures completely depriving him of his ownership of those shares. In such circumstances, within the scope of the present application, no causal link can be discerned between the violation found and the claim for the entire value of the attached shares and dividends.
157. The Court therefore rejects the claims in respect of pecuniary damage.
2. Non-pecuniary damage
158. The applicant submitted that the violations of his Convention rights had caused him pain, suffering, anxiety and distress and damaged his reputation. Without specifying any amount, the applicant requested the Court to make an award that it considered to be “just and equitable in this case”.
159. The Government submitted that the finding of violations would constitute sufficient reparation in respect of any non-pecuniary damage suffered.
160. The Court considers that the applicant has suffered non-pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated for solely by the finding of violations and that compensation has thus to be awarded. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards the applicant the sum of 7,000 euros (EUR) under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable on this amount.
B. Costs and expenses
161. The applicant claimed 172,737 pounds sterling (GBP) for the legal fees incurred in connection with the proceedings before the Court, and an additional amount of GBP 9,619.50 for “unbilled work in progress”. These legal fees were claimed in connection with the work done by various lawyers of OMISSIS. In support of this claim, the applicant submitted a number of time sheets and invoices prepared by the above-mentioned lawyers, including charges for lawyers’ hourly fees and a number of various other disbursements and charges.
162. The Government submitted that the amounts claimed were excessive and had not been reasonably or necessarily incurred. They noted that a significant number of entries in the submitted invoices were of a very general nature and did not specify the actual work done by the relevant lawyer. Moreover, the invoices also contained entries relating to work done by persons who had no authorisation to represent the applicant before the Court.
163. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum.
164. The Court notes that a significant portion of the submissions made by the applicant’s lawyers concerned complaints that were either declared inadmissible or were outside the scope of the present case. Therefore, no award can be made in respect of the costs and expenses incurred in connection with those submissions.
165. The Court also notes that the claims in respect of a number of costs and expenses were not supported by the relevant evidence. Furthermore, the Court is not persuaded that all of the fees claimed by the applicant’s lawyers were necessarily and reasonably incurred. Deciding on an equitable basis and having regard to the details of the claims submitted by the applicant and the amounts awarded to British lawyers in cases of comparable complexity, the Court awards the applicant the sum of EUR 25,000 in respect of legal fees and other costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to him.
C. Default interest
166. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints under Articles 5 § 3 and 5 § 4 (in the part relating to the fairness of judicial review of the lawfulness of the applicant’s continued detention) of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (in the part relating to the attachment order concerning the applicant’s shares in the Bank of Baku) admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 5 § 3 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 5 § 4 of the Convention in respect of the judicial review of the applicant’s continued detention;
4. Holds that that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of the lawfulness of the attachment order concerning the applicant’s shares in the Bank of Baku;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 7,000 (seven thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into Azerbaijani manats at the rate applicable at the date of settlement; and
(ii) EUR 25,000 (twenty-five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses, to be converted into pounds sterling at the rate applicable at the date of settlement and to be paid into his representatives’ bank account in the United Kingdom;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 6 December 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Nina Vajić
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di Art. 5-3; violazione di Art. 5-4; violazione di P1-1; Resto inammissibile; danno Patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinsta; danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA RAFIG ALIYEV C. AZERBAIJAN
(Richiesta n. 45875/06)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
6 dicembre 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Rafig Aliyev c. Azerbaijan,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Nina Vajić, Presidente, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Julia Laffranque, Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, Erik Møse, giudici,
ed André Wampach, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato 15 novembre 2011,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 45875/06) contro la Repubblica di Azerbaijan depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con un cittadino di Azerbaijani, OMISSIS (Rafiq Əliyev di əoğlu di Şövlt-“il richiedente”), 13 novembre 2006.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, avvocati che praticano a Londra ed OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Baku. Il Governo di Azerbaijani (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Ç. Asgarov.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che durante la sua detenzione pre-processo i suoi diritti sotto Articoli 3, 5, 6, 8 13 e 14 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione sono stati infranti dalle varie autorità nazionali ed ufficiali.
4. 4 aprile 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1967 e vive in Baku. Lui era l'ufficiale esecutivo e principale di vari assistenti di Azerbaijani di Azpetrol Partecipazione azionaria Internazionali B.V. (in futuro “Azpetrol”, incluso i suoi vari assistenti e suddivisioni), una delle più grandi società private che operano in Azerbaijan.
A. procedimenti Penali contro il richiedente
1. Le circostanze dell'arresto del richiedente
(A) la versione di Il richiedente degli eventi
6. Ad approssimativamente 7 di mattina 19 ottobre 2005 che il richiedente č arrivato a Baku Aeroporto Internazionale per un viaggio di affari a Chişinău, Moldavia. Quando passando per dogane e controlli di confine, il richiedente riportň che lui stava portando 900 dollari Stati Uniti (USD) in valuta estera che era sotto la minima soglia di USD 1,000 richiesto al tempo di materiale per una dichiarazione doganale.
7. Essendo passato per dogane, il richiedente aspettò il suo volo nell'area di VIP per 25-30 minuti. Il suo bagaglio era col personale di VIP che era responsabile per portarlo all'aereo. Dopo che il volo fu annunciato, i passeggeri dall'area di VIP furono portati all'aereo in un minibus. Comunque, quando abborda l'aereo che il richiedente è stato fermato con ufficiali del Dogane Comitato Statale, ripreso all'ufficio doganale di aeroporto ed informato che lui fu sospettato di portare un grande importo di valuta estera nel suo portare-su bagaglio.
8. Durante l'ispezione del portare-su bagaglio, tre pacchi di banconote per un importo totale di USD 30,000 furono trovati nel compartimento esterno della borsa. Il richiedente protestò, mentre chiedendo che non era i suoi soldi e che è dovuto essere “piantò” nella sua borsa quando la borsa era col personale di VIP.
9. Da 7 di mattina a 4 di sera il richiedente fu detenuto all'aeroporto col Dogane Comitato Statale. Durante questa volta, lui non fu concesso per contattare la sua famiglia o un avvocato del suo scegliere. A circa le 4 di sera il richiedente fu portato all'Indagine Settore del Servizio di Confine Statale. Alle 9 di sera lui fu permesso di contattare uno dei suoi fratelli, OMISSIS informarlo di suo dove.
10. L'investigatore in accusa della causa del richiedente l'informò che una causa penale era stata avviata contro lui sotto Articolo 206.1 del Codice Penale (il contrabbando; trasferimento illegale di grandi quantità di beni o altri valori per dogane senza una dichiarazione).
11. A circa le 11.55 di sera l'investigatore tentò di interrogare il richiedente nella presenza di un avvocato Stato - nominato, ma il richiedente rifiutò di essere rappresentato con quel l'avvocato. Un'entrata fu resa nei documenti dell'investigatore riguardo a questo rifiuto.
(b) la versione di Il Governo degli eventi
12. Ad approssimativamente 7 di mattina 19 ottobre 2005 che il richiedente è arrivato all'aeroporto. Quando il richiedente passò per l'area di controllo di dogane, il monitor di Raggio X rivelò dei pacchetti di carta nella borsa del richiedente. Un ufficiale di dogane chiese al richiedente se lui aveva qualsiasi cosa undeclared con lui. Il richiedente rispose nel negativo. Dopo che il richiedente digitò l'ozio di VIP, l'ufficiale di dogane riportò i suoi sospetti a suo superiore. Ad approssimativamente 7:30 di mattina un rappresentante dell'ufficio doganale dell'aeroporto, insieme col rappresentante del Servizio di Confine Statale e due testimoni percorse il bagaglio del richiedente ed USD 30,000 trovato quel non era stato dichiarato.
13. Gli ufficiali di dogane condussero un'indagine iniziale, documenti resi del chiarimento del richiedente e dichiarazioni di testimone e prese un inventario di ogni banconota. Queste procedure impiegarono molte ore e durarono poi sino a circa 5.50 di sera che Gli ufficiali di dogane hanno spedito il materiale attinente all'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale.
14. A circa le 9.30 di sera il richiedente fece una telefonata ad uno dei suoi fratelli, mentre richiedendo un avvocato. L'avvocato del richiedente sta scegliendo non sembri e l'investigatore dell'Indagine Settore del Servizio di Confine Statale chiamò un avvocato alla spesa dello Stato. Comunque, il richiedente rifiutò l'assistenza dell'avvocato e determinato, per iscritto, che lui condurrebbe la sua propria difesa sino al momento l'avvocato del suo proprio scegliere arrivò.
15. A 10.30 di sera l'investigatore stese un documento dell'arresto del richiedente come una persona sospettata di commettere un reato penale (tutma protokolu). Lui fu informato dei suoi diritti ed interrogò da 10.50 di sera a 11.15 di sera
16. Sul 2005 due avvocati di 20 ottobre garantiti con la famiglia del richiedente arrivata. Il richiedente fu accusato successivamente ed interrogò nella presenza dei suoi avvocati.
2. Altri eventi circa il tempo dell'arresto del richiedente
(a) Arresto del fratello OMISSIS del richiedente e persecuzione allegato degli altri parenti del richiedente
17. Nello stesso giorno, uno dei fratelli del richiedente, OMISSISil poi Ministro di Sviluppo Economico, fu arrestato col Ministero della Sicurezza Nazionale su sospetto di organising un d'état del colpo di stato (vedere OMISSISc. Azerbaijan, n. 37138/06, 9 novembre 2010 per più dettagli che riguardano che causa).
18. Secondo il richiedente, i suoi altri fratelli o furono respinti dai loro lavori o furono arrestati. OMISSIS, il Capo dell'Ambiente Comitato della Città di Baku Autorità Esecutiva, fu respinto dal suo lavoro. OMISSIS, un CEO di una società privata fu perseguito su accuse di evasione fiscale ma fu rilasciato più tardi dopo essere stato d'accordo a pagare che che fu addotto per essere dovuto. OMISSIS, un direttore di una piccola fabbrica di tappeto fu accusato anche di evasione fiscale. OMISSIS che intese presentarsi come un candidato per le elezioni parlamentari ed imminenti aveva la sua candidatura revocata con una decisione di corte. Secondo il richiedente, un numero dei suoi colleghi fu respinto anche dalle loro posizioni.
(b) le Ricerche
19. Nel giorno del suo arresto, ufficiali del Ministero di Tasse eseguirono un'ispezione negli uffici di Azpetrol in Baku secondo il richiedente, e presero i grandi importi di soldi dal registratore di cassa della società dopo avere trovato delle irregolarità nella contabilità della società.
20. Allo stesso tempo, ufficiali del Ministero della Sicurezza Nazionale (in seguito “MNS”) eseguì ricerche nell'appartamento del richiedente così come due palazzi degli uffici di Azpetrol. Secondo il richiedente, gli ufficiali di MNS presero un numero di personale ed articoli di famiglia dall'appartamento del richiedente, incluso i computer dei suoi figli, elenchi telefonici, due videonastri, ed un numero di articoli preziosi incluso orologi costosi e gioielleria che appartengono al richiedente e sua moglie. Dagli uffici di Azpetrol, loro presero anche i certi documenti ed arma da fuoco ufficialmente registrate usate col personale di sicurezza della società. Benché a marzo 2006, il richiedente depositasse molto mesi più tardi, un ricorso con le autorità di accusa che chiedono il ritorno di articoli personali sequestrate da lui, questo ricorso fu respinto 27 marzo 2006 sulla base che sotto Articolo 129.4 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (“il CCrP”) l'accusa potrebbe trattenere prova fisica sino al processo.
(c) Stampa rilascia con autorità di legge-esecuzione riguardo ai procedimenti penali contro il richiedente, il suo fratello OMISSIS, e le altre persone
21. 20 e 21 ottobre 2005 che i giornali ufficiali e gli altri mass media hanno pubblicato due stampa rilascia col titolo “Dichiarazione Speciale dell'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, il Ministero della Sicurezza Nazionale ed il Ministero di Affari Interni della Repubblica di Azerbaijan.” Questi pigiano rilascia ufficialmente informato il pubblico sull'arresto ed accusa di un numero di corrente notoria ed ufficiali Statali e precedenti e purché un riassunto della prova raggruppò in riguardo dei loro piani allegato per il “la forzata cattura del potere” durante il periodo di elezione, “sotto la sembianza di un ricorso per cambi democratici nella situazione politica nel paese.” La prova consistè principalmente della testimonianza di una delle persone arrestate che concernono riunioni segrete fra loro e le loro fonti di finanziare, così come i grandi importi di soldi e l'altro valuables trovati nelle case di alcuni di loro. Inoltre, alcune delle persone arrestate furono sospettati di appropriazione indebita di finanziamenti pubblici e l'abuso di autorità. Specificamente, le liberazioni di stampa menzionarono i nomi del fratello OMISSIS del richiedente, il Parlamento Oratore precedente Rasul Guliyev, il Ministro precedente di Finanza Fikret Yusifov, il Ministro per Assistenza sanitaria Ali Insanov, così come gli altri, meno prominenti nomi. Sembra che tutte le persone menzionate (eccetto Rasul Guliyev che non era fisicamente presente in Azerbaijan) era stato arrestato prima della pubblicazione delle liberazioni di stampa.
22. Il nome del richiedente fu menzionato anche nelle liberazioni di stampa, siccome citata sotto, insieme coi nomi di altre persone sospettati di un d'état del colpo di stato tentato. Comunque, nessune di queste dichiarazioni rivelò il fatto che, come del tempo di pubblicazione di queste dichiarazioni, il richiedente davvero era stato arrestato su sospetto di, ed accusò con, un reato non correlato.
23. Il comunicato stampa di 20 ottobre 2005 determinato, inter l'alia:
“Fu stabilito che Ministro precedente di Finanza Fikret Yusifov era il contatto responsabile per ottenere i grandi importi di procurare per la forzata cattura del potere Statale... Lui fu arrestato come una persona sospetta 16 ottobre. ... 100,000 euro e 60,000 dollari Stati Uniti furono sequestrati dall'appartamento di Fikret Yusifov durante una ricerca condotta nel contesto dell'indagine...
Sul 2005 Fikret Yusifov di 18 ottobre scrisse all'Accusatore Generale... ed indicò la sua buona volontà per offrire volontariamente informazioni delle azioni preparatorie con Rasul Guliyev ed i suoi sostenitori mirò ad usurpando il potere Statale...
Fikret Yusifov affermò nella sua testimonianza che, durante la sua visita a St Petersburg nella Federazione russa a luglio 2005, Rasul Guliyev... l'aveva contattato sul suo telefono mobile e l'aveva istruito a passare sulle sue direzioni riguardo al finanziamento dell'elaborazione della cattura del potere Statale al Ministro per Sviluppo Economico, OMISSIS, ed i suoi altri sostenitori che avevano il necessario finanziario vuole dire.
In agosto dell'anno corrente Fikret Yusifov incontrò OMISSISnell'ufficio del fratello Rafig Aliyev secondo in questo collegamento, e l'informò delle direzioni di Rasul Guliyev. OMISSIS promise di prevedere qualsiasi genere di assistenza in questa questione e prendere via di misure supplementare i suoi contatti. Alla fine di agosto Fikret Yusifov andò a St Petersburg e Rasul Guliyev notificato con telefono dell'accordo di OMISSIS.
Facendo seguito ad un'altra istruzione di Rasul Guliyev, [Fikret Yusifov] ritornò a Baku 23 settembre e rincontrò OMISSIS nello stesso ufficio... [OMISSIS] di nuovo diede assicurazioni che lui offrirebbe qualsiasi genere di assistenza e che lui era pronto offrire consolidamento nell'importo di 3,000,000 dollari Stati Uniti ed organizzare qualsiasi cosa all'interno della sua capacità.
Sul 2005 Fikret Yusifov di 3 ottobre Rasul Guliyev si incontrò a Berlino. Durante la riunione, Rasul Guliyev affermò, che lui stava progettando di ritornare a Baku nel medio di ottobre e sottolineò che era importante che lui sia soddisfatto con un grande gruppo di persone che ostacolerebbero il suo arresto e che il potere Statale forzatamente sia sequestrato con creando disturbo pubblico. Rasul Guliyev diede anche una specifica istruzione che OMISSIS dovrebbe offrire assistenza finanziaria sostanziale per implementare questi piani.
Essendo ritornato a Baku, Fikret Yusifov incontrò OMISSIS e lo notificò di questa istruzione. Sul OMISSISdi 15 ottobre personalmente diede soldi nell'importo di 100,000 dollari Stati Uniti a Fikret Yusifov per i fini di finanziare l'usurpazione del potere Statale. Questi soldi fu trovato durante la ricerca dell'appartamento di Fikret Yusifov 16 ottobre 2005 e fu sequestrato come prova fisica.
Durante le ricerche condotte nel corso dell'indagine in alloggi, dachas e le altre proprietà che appartengono a OMISSIS, [le autorità] prese i grandi importi di valuta estera, gioielleria che lavori di arte e gli altri articoli preziosi hanno ottenuto in una maniera penale.
Come un risultato di misure operative, fu stabilito anche, che OMISSIS, mentre avendo abusato la sua autorità ufficiale e violazioni serie ed impegnate della legge durante l'elaborazione di privatizzazione di proprietà Statale, aveva procurato titoli di legittimazione per Affermare proprietà a prezzi trascurabili ed aveva registrato formalmente la proprietà nel nome dei suoi parenti e conoscenze, e così de facto lo trasferì nella sua proprietà.
Un'indagine in violazioni della legge è attualmente in corso in società commerciali e numerose collegate a OMISSIS, incluso Azpetrol. Rafig Aliyev, il proprietario di Azpetrol fu arrestato all'aeroporto mentre tentò di lasciare il paese.
Basato sul materiale raggruppato, l'Accusatore Generale avviò procedimenti penali sotto Articoli 179.3 (l'appropriazione indebita), 308.2 (l'abuso di autorità ufficiale), 28/220 (preparazione per organizzare disturbo pubblico) e 278 (usurpazione o la forzata ritenuta del potere Statale) del Codice Penale e sul 2005 OMISSIS di 19 ottobre fu arrestato come una persona sospetta in collegamento con questi procedimenti penali.”
24. Il comunicato stampa di 21 ottobre 2005 determinato, inter l'alia:
“Siccome è stato notificato più primo, durante le ricerche condotte nel corso dell'indagine in alloggi, dachas e le altre proprietà che appartengono al Ministro precedente per Sviluppo Economico OMISSIS, arrestate come una persona sospetta in collegamento coi procedimenti penali sotto Articoli 179.3 308.2, 28/220 e 278 del Codice Penale [le autorità] ha preso i grandi importi di valuta estera, gioielleria che lavori di arte e gli altri articoli preziosi hanno ottenuto in una maniera penale.
In particolare, [il seguente fu sequestrato durante le ricerche:] 50,500 dollari Stati Uniti, 6,000 euro e 860 Regno Unito controlla il peso genuino dall'ufficio personale di OMISSIS nell'edificio amministrativo del Ministero di Sviluppo Economico; 30,000 euro e 6,500 dollari Stati Uniti dal suo appartamento...; 34 lavori preziosi di arte e 500 ricevute di privatizzazione dal suo dacha; 565,000 dollari Stati Uniti e 5,609,000,000 [vecchio] manats di Azerbaijani che non era stato entrato in libri di contabilità dall'ufficio del suo fratello Rafig Aliyev ad Azpetrol. In oltre, gioielleria nei grandi importi, sette arma da fuoco di vari modelli, gli altri articoli preziosi, e titoli di legittimazione ad articoli numerosi di beni immobili sono state scoperte agli indirizzi menzionati. L'indagine continua in reati della corruzione e le altre violazioni della legge all'interno di società commerciali e numerose che appartengono de facto a OMISSIS. ...”
3. Accuse formali contro il richiedente, ordine di detenzione, e unione della causa del richiedente con la causa OMISSIS
25. 20 ottobre 2005 l'investigatore del Servizio di Confine Statale aprì una causa penale contro il richiedente (la causa n. 76587) ed accusò formalmente il richiedente sotto Articolo 206.1 del Codice Penale con un tentativo di trasferire un grande importo di valuta estera non dichiarata per dogane.
26. A 6 di sera nello stesso giorno, il richiedente fu portato alla Corte distrettuale di Sabail. L'udienza durò approssimativamente dieci a quindici minuti. Basato sulle accuse ufficiali portate contro il richiedente e la richiesta dell'accusatore per fare domanda la misura preventiva di carcerazione preventiva in custodia, il giudice ordinò la carcerazione preventiva del richiedente in custodia (ətdbiri di qtimkan di hbs) per un periodo di due mesi. Il giudice provò la necessità di questa misura con la gravità dell'azione penale ed allegato del richiedente e con la possibilità della sua latitanza. Questa era l'udienza di corte sola alla quale il richiedente era presente lui. Lui fu rappresentato coi suoi avvocati nelle udienze di corte susseguenti, ma non fu permesso di frequentarli in persona.
27. Sembra che, seguendo l'ordine di detenzione della Corte distrettuale di Sabail, il richiedente fu portato alla Facilità di Detenzione N.ro 1.
28. Il richiedente fece appello contro l'ordine della Corte distrettuale di Sabail di 20 ottobre 2005, mentre lamentandosi di una mancanza di prove e l'assenza di qualsiasi ragioni attinenti e sufficienti per la sua detenzione di pre-processo. 27 ottobre 2007 la Corte d'appello respinse il suo ricorso, mentre ripetendo la corte più bassa sta ragionando e trovando che aveva ragione. La decisione della Corte d'appello non rivolse qualsiasi delle specifiche azioni di reclamo del richiedente.
29. 22 ottobre 2005 il richiedente fu trasferito alla MNS Detenzione Facilità. Il suo avvocato non fu informato di questo. Lui fece indagini col Capo Aggiunto del Settore di Indagine di Crimini Seri all'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, richiedere che informazioni come al richiedente, è dove.
30. 10 novembre 2005 l'avvocato fu informato ufficialmente che 22 ottobre 2005 la causa penale del richiedente n. 76587 erano stati trasferiti all'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale ed erano stati congiunti con la causa penale di OMISSISn. 76586. L'avvocato del richiedente richiese una copia della decisione sulla riunione delle cause penali. 25 novembre questa richiesta fu respinta sulla base che il CCrP non costrinse simile decisioni ad essere reso disponibile all'avvocato del richiedente.
31. 2 dicembre 2005 il richiedente presentò un reclamo con l'Accusatore Generale, mentre chiedendo che non c'erano motivi legali per congiungere la causa del richiedente alla causa di OMISSISperché loro facevano essere accusato ognuno con reati totalmente non correlati. 8 dicembre 2005 l'Accusatore Generale respinse questa azione di reclamo.
4. Proroghe del periodo di detenzione di pre-processo
32. 25 novembre 2005 il richiedente fece domanda alla Corte distrettuale di Sabail con una richiesta per sostituire arresti domiciliari per la misura preventiva di carcerazione preventiva in custodia. Lui dibattè che, dovendo alla natura discutibile della prova, non ci potrebbe essere ragionevole sospetto che lui aveva commesso un reato penale, e che in qualsiasi evento che l'ordine di detenzione non è stato giustificato nelle sue circostanze personali. 6 dicembre 2005 la Corte distrettuale di Sabail respinse questa richiesta, mentre trovando che c'era “nessuno circostanze che escludono la possibilità del richiedente stanno scappando, creando pericolo per società, e non riuscendo a sembrare di fronte alle autorità inquirenti senza la buon ragione.”
33. 13 dicembre 2005 la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi (quale soprintese a causa penale n. 76586 a che ora fu congiunta la causa originale del richiedente) steso il periodo della carcerazione preventiva del richiedente in custodia con due mesi (fino a 19 febbraio 2006). Il giudice provò la necessità di questa misura siccome segue:
“... Non è possibile completare tutti il [richiesto] passi investigativi prima [la scadenza del periodo di detenzione inizialmente autorizzato del richiedente].
Prendendo in considerazione la gravità delle azioni imputò [il richiedente], le circostanze nelle quali fu commesso il reato penale, e la possibilità della latitanza accusato dall'autorità che conduce i procedimenti penali, la misura preventiva di carcerazione preventiva in eletto di custodia nella sua causa dovrebbe essere prolungata.”
34. 20 dicembre 2005 la Corte d'appello sostenne questa decisione.
35. Con una decisione di 10 febbraio 2006, la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi prolungò il periodo della detenzione del richiedente con un altro due mesi (fino a 19 aprile 2006). 16 febbraio 2006 la Corte d'appello sostenne questa decisione.
36. 13 aprile 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi prolungò il periodo della detenzione del richiedente con un altro tre mesi (fino a 19 luglio 2006). 21 aprile 2006 la Corte d'appello sostenne questa decisione.
37. Prima di ognuno degli ordini di proroga, il richiedente depositò una serie delle richieste con l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, mentre chiedendo alle autorità che perseguono di non depositare una richiesta di proroga con la corte, dovendo alle circostanze personali del richiedente che lo fecero improbabile che lui fuggirebbe da indagine. Tutte di queste richieste furono respinti.
38. In tutte le udienze riguardo alla proroga della sua detenzione e le udienze di ricorso relative, il richiedente fu rappresentato col suo avvocato (o avvocati). Il richiedente stesso era assente.
39. In tutte le sue decisioni che prolungano la detenzione del richiedente, la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi sta discutendo giustificando la sua detenzione continuata era lo stesso come o simile a quel citò in paragrafo 33 sopra. Nei suoi ricorsi contro quelle decisioni, il richiedente si lamentò, che non c'era nessuna prova affidabile che genera un ragionevole sospetto che lui aveva commesso un reato penale che in qualsiasi l'evento l'indagine per il piuttosto la semplice accusa contro lui stava dimostrandosi irragionevolmente lunga e lui già sarebbe dovuto essere rinviato a giudizio che gli ordini di proroga sono stati basati solamente sulle osservazioni dell'autorità che persegue e senza una revisione indipendente con la corte del materiale probatorio che non c'erano nessuno ragioni di credere che lui scapperebbe o influenzerebbe l'indagine, e che le sue circostanze personali non erano state prese in considerazione quando valutando la necessità della sua detenzione continuata. Le decisioni della Corte d'appello che sostengono la proroga della detenzione del richiedente ripeterono la corte più bassa sta ragionando e non contenne qualsiasi valutazione degli specifici argomenti sollevata col richiedente nei suoi ricorsi.
5. Sequestro dei beni del richiedente
40. Su una data non specificata a giugno 2006 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale richiese la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi per imporre una misura di limitazione su alcuni dei beni del richiedente, basò sulla scoperta dell'accusa di prova che in giugno e settembre 2005 il richiedente, come il capo di alcune delle società che appartengono a lui e con l'aiuto di un numero di complici che formano un gruppo penale ed organizzato, aveva contrabbandato le grandi quantità di prodotti di petrolio che appartengono allo Stato fuori del paese attraverso il confine Azerbaijani -georgiano, mentre evadendo dogane controlla con vuole dire della documentazione di fucinatura e svisando la vera natura dell'operazione. L'accusa affermò anche che loro avevano scoperto prova di evasione fiscale commessa con Prestigio LLC, una società “davvero controllato” col richiedente, così come di appropriazione indebita di altri la proprietà di ' nei grandi importi. Col tempo di questa richiesta dell'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, erano state sporte querela contro il richiedente in collegamento con qualsiasi degli incidenti sopra che comportano i reati penali ed allegato di petrolio contrabbandando, evasione fiscale o appropriazione indebita.
41. Seguendo la richiesta di ingiunzione summenzionata con l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, 8 giugno 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi emise un ordine di limitazione (ordine di sequestro) in riguardo di 381,310 quote posseduto personalmente col richiedente nella capitale registrata della Banca di Baku JSC (11.215% del capitale registrato), così come un'altra 336,430 quote nella stessa banca (9.895% del capitale registrato) possedette con Azinvest LLC, una società “de facto possedette col richiedente.” La corte notò che le attività illegali descrissero nella richiesta dell'accusa per sequestro di proprietà costituì reati penali per i quali prescrissero le disposizioni attinenti del Codice Penale inter l'alia una sanzione della confisca dei beni. La corte notò inoltre che l'accusa possedette informazioni che il richiedente aveva acquisito le quote nella Banca di Baku che usa i finanziamenti ottenne da queste attività illegali. C'era perciò, una base per allegare i beni del richiedente sotto Articoli 248, 249 e 250 del CCrP per garantire la sanzione di confisca dei beni che sarebbe imposta successivamente col giudice.
42. Il richiedente depositò successivamente un ricorso tardo contro questa decisione che fu accettata per esame che deve alla sentenza che il richiedente aveva le buon ragioni per avuto fallito il termine massimo di ricorso. 10 ottobre 2006 la Corte d'appello respinse comunque, il ricorso del richiedente e sostenne la decisione della Corte distrettuale di Nasimi di 8 giugno 2006.
6. Accuse Nuove contro il richiedente e l'ulteriore proroga della detenzione di pre-processo
43. 5 luglio 2006 l'investigatore emise una decisione nuova che porta accuse criminali formali contro il richiedente. Sotto questa decisione, il richiedente ora fu accusato con reati penali sotto Articoli 206.3.1 (il contrabbando, commise ripetutamente), 206.4 (il contrabbando, commise con un gruppo organizzato) e 313 (falsificazione in ufficio pubblico) del Codice Penale. Specificamente, queste accuse riferirono al contrabbando allegato di grandi quantità di petrolio a Georgia in giugno e settembre 2005, siccome descritto in paragrafo 40 sopra, ed all'accusa originale di contrabbando non dichiarato corrisponda di USD 30,000 per dogane 19 ottobre 2005.
44. Su una data non specificata, l'investigatore depositò più tardi, una richiesta con la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi per la proroga del periodo della detenzione di pre-processo del richiedente. Oltre alle accuse formali e nuove di 5 luglio 2006, la richiesta menzionò anche, che l'indagine aveva prova della complicità del richiedente nel d'état del colpo di stato tentato, un reato col quale erano state accusate i suo fratello OMISSISe le altre persone.
45. 14 luglio 2006, basato sulle accuse criminali nuove contro il richiedente e la richiesta di proroga dell'investigatore, la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi prolungò il periodo della detenzione del richiedente con un altro tre mesi (fino a 19 ottobre 2006). La corte sta discutendo giustificando la detenzione continuata del richiedente era simile a che determinato in ordini di proroga precedenti.
46. 28 settembre 2006 l'investigatore emise una decisione nuova che porta accuse criminali formali contro il richiedente. Sotto questa decisione, il richiedente ora fu accusato con reati penali sotto Articoli 206.4, 206.3.1 28/220.1 (preparazione per organizzare disturbo pubblico), 278 (azioni mirarono ad usurpando il potere Statale) e 313 del Codice Penale. Oltre ai reati penali coi quali gli già era stato accusato, il richiedente fu accusato anche di organising, insieme con un numero di altre persone incluso il suo fratello OMISSIS, agitazione massiccia ed un colpo di stato dopo le elezioni parlamentari di 6 novembre 2005. Lui si era impegnato presumibilmente più specificamente, offrire consolidamento necessario per preparazione dei d'état del colpo di stato e riunioni segrete e sistemate fra i suoi organizzatori nel suo ufficio.
47. 2 ottobre 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi prolungò il periodo della detenzione del richiedente con un altro sei mesi (fino a 19 aprile 2007). 10 ottobre 2006 la Corte d'appello sostenne quel la decisione.
48. 1 marzo 2007 l'investigatore emise una decisione nuova che porta accuse criminali formali contro il richiedente. Con questa decisione, il richiedente ora fu accusato con reati penali sotto Articoli 179.3.1 (appropriazione indebita con un gruppo organizzato), 179.3.2 (appropriazione indebita nei grandi importi), 188 (violazione del diritto di proprietà per sbarcare), 192.2.1 (attività commerciale ed illegale che dà luogo a danno patrimoniale e grave), 192.2.2 (attività commerciale ed illegale che produce un grande importo di profitto), 206.3.1, 206.4 213.4 (evasione fiscale nei grandi importi), 28/220.1, 278 259 (danno illegale a foreste) e 313 del Codice Penale.
49. 5 marzo 2007 una causa penale e nuova (n. 76961) fu troncato da causa penale n. 76586. Nel contesto della causa penale e nuova n. 76961, il richiedente fu accusato sotto Articoli 179.3.1, 179.3.2, 188, 192.2.1, 192.2.2, 206.3.1, 206.4, 213.4, 259 e 313 del Codice Penale.
50. L'indagine in causa penale n. 76961 furono completati 5 marzo 2007.
51. 16 aprile 2007 l'investigatore emise il definitivo conto di accusa in causa penale n. 76961. Nello stesso giorno, il conto di accusa fu firmato con l'Accusatore Generale e la causa si fu riferita alla Corte di Assise per processo.
52. Così, causa penale n. 76961 furono spediti per processo nella Corte di Assise. C'erano diciannove co-imputati processo eretto in questa causa, incluso il richiedente ed il suo fratello OMISSIS, su accuse della complicità nei vari reati che comportano appropriazione indebita e la corruzione. Sembra che la causa penale ed originale n. 76586 che ancora portarono le accuse contro il richiedente sotto Articoli 28/220.1 (preparazione per organizzare disturbo pubblico) e 278 (azioni mirarono ad usurpando il potere Statale) del Codice Penale, non fu spedito per processo, ma non fu terminato uno.
53. In 15 maggio 2007 gli avvocati del richiedente fecero domanda alla Corte di Assise, mentre chiedendo la sua liberazione sulla base che l'ultimo ordine di detenzione in riguardo di lui, così come il periodo di massimo legale per la detenzione durante l'indagine di pre-processo, era scaduto 19 aprile 2007. Sembra che almeno sei altri co-imputati richiesero anche liberazione processo pendente, mentre si appella su vari motivi.
54. Alla sua udienza preliminare in 21 maggio 2007 la Corte di Assise respinse le richieste col richiedente ed i suoi co-imputati per liberazione ed autorizzato la loro detenzione continuata processo pendente. In particolare, nel collegamento con lo specifico argomento del richiedente che la sua detenzione era seguendo illegale la scadenza del periodo attinente 19 aprile 2007, la Corte di Assise notò che la causa penale si era stata riferita alla corte alcuni giorni di fronte a 19 aprile 2007, e che il periodo della detenzione del richiedente “indagine pendente” aveva terminato su quel giorno. Perciò, la sua detenzione non aveva ecceduto i tempo-limiti specificati con legge.
55. Inoltre, valutando collettivamente la situazione di tutti i co-imputati detenuti, la Corte di Assise decise che “la misura preventiva di carcerazione preventiva in custodia era stata scelta correttamente e dovrebbe rimanere immutato.” La corte notò che “le persone accusato detennero su carcerazione preventiva” aveva sufficiente finanziario vuole dire, così come affari e gli altri contatti in paesi esteri che potrebbero abilitarli per lasciare il territorio di Azerbaijan e così scappare dal processo. Notò inoltre che, usando quelli significativo finanziario vuole dire, le persone detenute potrebbero fare domanda pressione illegale su persone che partecipano nel processo.
7. La condanna del richiedente e ricorsi contro sé
56. Il richiedente fu processato insieme con la Corte di Assise con diciotto altre persone accusato, incluso il suo fratello OMISSIS.
57. 25 ottobre 2007 la Corte di Assise dichiarò colpevole il richiedente di tutti i reati penali lui fu accusato con sotto causa penale n. 76961 e lo condannò al reclusione di ' di nove anni, con confisca dei beni.
58. 16 luglio 2008 la Corte d'appello di Baku sostenne la sentenza della Corte di Assize. 6 luglio 2009 la Corte Suprema sostenne il più basso corteggia le sentenze di ' in riguardo del richiedente.
B. Conditions della detenzione
1. La versione del richiedente
59. Cominciando da 22 ottobre 2005 ed in tutto la pre-processo e procedimenti di processo sino alla sua condanna 25 ottobre 2007, il richiedente fu detenuto nella MNS Detenzione Facilità. Il richiedente fu tenuto in una cella che aveva spazio sufficiente per solamente uno persona, benché è probabile che sarebbe stato designato come una cella di duplice-occupazione. Lui fu detenuto per un periodo di approssimativamente un anno di fronte alle autorità da solo offrì di mettere un secondo detenuto nella sua cella; il richiedente rifiutò questa offerta. La cella era sporca e misurò approssimativamente 8 sq. metro. Approssimativamente 4.2 sq. metro dell'area di pavimento totale fu occupato con la mobilia. La finestra era 0.7 metro alto e 1.1 metro ampio. Comunque, a causa dell'ampiezza dei limiti della finestra (5 cm), il vetro di finestra misurò 0.5 metro con 1 metro. La finestra fu coperta, con solamente sua parte di cima aperto, permettendo a naturale luce molto piccola di entrare nella cella. La ventilazione e scaldando sistemi non funzionò in modo appropriato e, perciò, aveva estremamente freddo in inverno ed estremamente caldo in estate. C'era una lampada di muro che fu accesa in tutta il giorno e notte che disturbarono il richiedente continuamente e lo fecero duro per lui dormire.
60. Al richiedente fu permesso di uno ore di esercizio di fuori -cella al giorno. L'area di esercizio era estremamente confinata. Gli installazioni di palestra nella MNS Detenzione Facilità non erano liberamente disponibili durante il tempo di esercizio del richiedente, siccome il loro uso era dipendente su un carceriere che è disponibile per soprintendere al richiedente.
61. Non c'era bucato corretto ed il richiedente doveva spedire la sua casa di vestiti sporca per lavare. Gli fu concesso per fare una volta una doccia per settimana in un'area di doccia dove la temperatura dell'acqua fu regolata dal fuori con carcerieri. Il cibo era di qualità povera. Il richiedente non aveva set di televisione nella sua cella ed aveva limitato accesso per radiotrasmettere e la letteratura e fu previsto solamente con “la pro-governo” i giornali.
62. Il richiedente si ammanettò quando lui fu preso incontrarsi coi suoi avvocati ed ad interrogazioni. Le manette furono rimosse durante quelle riunioni ed interrogazioni. Al richiedente non fu permesso di fare telefonate o scrivere a sua moglie e famiglia che non furono permesse di scrivere a lui od o visitarlo. Le richieste del richiedente per essere concesso per corrispondere o sia visitato con la sua famiglia durante l'indagine di pre-processo fu respinto.
2. La versione del Governo
63. Nella MNS Detenzione Facilità, alla sua propria richiesta il richiedente fu detenuto da solo in una cella disegnata per due detenuti. L'area della cella era approssimativamente 10 sq. metro. La cella aveva una finestra che era 1.4 metro ampio e 1.2 metro alto. La cella fu connessa al sistema di riscaldamento centrale dell'edificio di MNS e fu accesa bene e ventilò. Mentre l'illuminazione elettrica fu accesa in tutta il giorno e notte in conformità con le regolamentazioni attinenti, la lampada fu montata in una maniera che non ha disturbato detenuti il sonno di '.
64. Il richiedente fu permesso di camminare fuori della sua cella per due ore per giorno ed usare una palestra. Cibo fu notificato tre volte al giorno. In oltre, al richiedente fu permesso per ricevere da casa un pacco di cibo di su a 5 kg per settimana come tutti gli altri detenuti. Al richiedente fu fornito asciugamani puliti e biancheria da letto che furono lavate nel bucato della facilità di detenzione. Una volta per settimana lui ricevette abbigliamento pulito dalla sua famiglia, così lui fu vestito secondo la stagione sempre. Il richiedente non fu ammanettato mai durante interrogando o qualsiasi gli altri passi investigativi.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Detenzione di Pre-processo
65. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (CCrP) riguardo a custodia di polizia, la detenzione su carcerazione preventiva e procedimenti riguardo alla richiesta e fa una rassegna della detenzione su carcerazione preventiva è riassunto nel Farhad la causa di Aliyev (citò sopra, §§ 83-102).
B. Sequestro della proprietà in procedimenti penali
66. Secondo Articoli 248 e 249 del CCrP per assicurare esecuzione di una sentenza in una parte che concerne ad una rivendicazione civile o una confisca dei beni eventuale in circostanze previdero per sotto diritto penale, un investigatore o accusatore può fare domanda ad una corte per sequestro di proprietà del perpetratore allegato di un reato penale. Sequestro di proprietà proibisce il proprietario o proprietario dal disporre di e, se necessario, usando la proprietà. In particolare, Articolo 248 prevede siccome segue:
Articolo 248. Natura del sequestro di proprietà
“248.1. Sequestro di proprietà:
248.1.1. sarà eseguito con lo scopo di garantire una rivendicazione civile o la confisca dei beni in circostanze previsto per sotto diritto penale;
248.1.2. consisterà di creazione un inventario della proprietà e proibendo il proprietario o possessore dallo sbarazzarsi di questa proprietà e, dove necessario, avvalendosi dello stesso;
248.1.3. dove fece domanda depositare denaro depositi, ostacolerà qualsiasi le ulteriori operazioni su loro.
248.2. Proprietà della persona accusato o proprietà di persone che possono essere sostenute materialmente responsabile, irrispettoso di che che comprende questa proprietà o in cui proprietà che è, può essere soggetto a sequestro.
248.3. Sequestro farà domanda alla quota della persona accusato nella proprietà unita dell'accusato e suo o il suo consorte o nella proprietà posseduta congiuntamente con le persone accusato con le altre persone. Se c'è prova sufficiente che la proprietà [era un strumento di un reato penale o costituisce incassi di crimine], la proprietà intera o la più grande parte saranno allegate al riguardo.
[Se lo strumento o incassi di crimine sono usati, disposto di o è non disponibile per il sequestro per altre ragioni], soldi o l'altra proprietà che appartengono alla persona accusato che è equivalente nel valore [allo strumento o incassi di crimine], sarà soggetto a sequestro. ...”
67. Articolo 249 (i motivi per sequestro di proprietà) del CCrP prevede che proprietà può essere allegata se questa misura è giustificata con materiale probatorio e sufficiente e, come un articolo generale, sulla base di un ordine della corte. L'investigatore può prendere una decisione di allegare solamente proprietà senza un ordine della corte in circostanze eccezionali. Articolo 250 del CCrP contiene articoli per valutazione della proprietà attaccata.
68. Il seguente è gli estratti attinenti di Il Commentario sul Codice di Diritto processuale penale della Repubblica di Azerbaijan, Volume io (redattore scientifico: Prof. J. Movsumov, Baku 2003, p. 166) riguardo ad Articolo 248 del CCrP:
“6. Sequestro di proprietà con una prospettiva a garantendo la confisca dei beni può essere ordinato solamente in cause dove il Codice Penale prevede per una possibilità della confisca dei beni come una sanzione supplementare per il reato penale col quale è accusata la persona accusato...
7. La base che riguarda i fatti per il sequestro di proprietà è... l'esistenza di una credenza provata che la proprietà potrebbe essere nascosta, disposto di o distrusse. ...
8. Secondo l'Articolo 248.2 annotato del CCrP, sequestro può essere ordinato in riguardo di proprietà delle persone seguenti: (un) persone accusato; (b) persone che potrebbero essere sostenute materialmente responsabile. Il secondo si riferisce a persone che potrebbero essere responsabili con la loro proprietà per le azioni della persona accusato. Questa categoria di persone include: (un) il datore di lavoro della persona accusato (Articolo 1099 del Codice civile); (b) reparti finanziari delle autorità attinenti responsabile per azioni dei loro ufficiali (gli Articoli 1100 e 1102 del Codice civile); (il c) rappresentanti legali di minors fra quattordici a diciotto anni maggiorenne o di persone giuridicamente incapacitate (gli Articoli 1104 e 1105 del Codice civile); (d) il proprietario di una fonte di pericolo speciale (Articolo 1108 del Codice civile). Le persone summenzionate sono designate come imputati civili nella rivendicazione civile [depositò nei procedimenti penali].”
Secondo Articolo 91.1 del CCrP, una persona accusato è un individuo accusato con un reato penale con una decisione presa con un investigatore, accusatore o corte.
LA LEGGE
I. SFERA DELLA CAUSA
69. La richiesta originale fu limitata ai fatti relativo al periodo prima del processo penale del richiedente e la condanna risultante e la causa furono comunicate al Governo rispondente 4 aprile 2007 sotto Articoli 3, 5, 6 § 2 8 e 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. La Corte nota che, dopo comunicazione, il richiedente fece un numero di osservazioni nuove che riguardano “inoltre nuovo e continuando violazioni” scaturendo dagli eventi che sono accaduti durante il processo penale e susseguente ed i ricorsi contro la sua condanna penale. Su pagina 6 delle osservazioni del richiedente lui notò che azioni di reclamo che concernono questi “nuovo e continuando violazioni” sarebbe la materia di una richiesta nuova che lui intese di depositare con la Corte. Come sé ha deciso in cause precedenti, la Corte non lo trova appropriato esaminare qualsiasi le questioni nuove sollevarono dopo la comunicazione della richiesta al Governo, come lungo come loro non costituiscono un'elaborazione mera sulle azioni di reclamo originali del richiedente alla Corte (vedere Nuray Şen c. la Turchia (n. 2), n. 25354/94, § 200 30 marzo 2004; Piryanik c. l'Ucraina, n. 75788/01, § 20 19 aprile 2005; Kovach c. l'Ucraina, n. 39424/02, § 38 ECHR 2008 -...; Kats ed Altri c. l'Ucraina, n. 29971/04, § 88 ECHR 2008 -...; Yusupova ed Altri c. la Russia, n. 5428/05, § 51 9 luglio 2009; Saghinadze ed Altri c. la Georgia, n. 18768/05, § 72 27 maggio 2010; e Ruža c. la Lettonia (il dec.), n. 44798/05, § 30 11 maggio 2010).
70. Dato che nessuno azioni di reclamo nel collegamento con quegli eventi susseguenti furono sollevate di fronte alla comunicazione della richiesta presente e la decisione per esaminare i suoi meriti allo stesso tempo come la sua ammissibilità, la sfera della causa presente è limitata ai fatti siccome loro furono di fronte al tempo della comunicazione che concernè gli eventi che hanno avuto luogo durante il periodo della detenzione di pre-processo del richiedente e su alla sua condanna. Comunque, il richiedente ha l'opportunità di depositare le richieste nuove in riguardo di qualsiasi le altre azioni di reclamo relativo agli eventi susseguenti (vedere Dimitriu e Dumitrache c. la Romania, n. 35823/03, §§ 23-24 20 gennaio 2009).
II. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 5 DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Articolo 5 § 1 della Convenzione
71. Appellandosi su Articolo 5 §§ 1 e 3 ed Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione, il richiedente si lamentò che il suo arresto e la detenzione non erano state basate su motivi ragionevoli per sospetto che lui aveva commesso un reato penale. Lui dibattè che i soldi in oggetto era stato “piantò” nella sua borsa all'aeroporto e che c'erano difetti numerosi nella procedura di ottenendo e documentare la prova che incrimina iniziale contro lui.
72. La Corte considera che queste azioni di reclamo incorrono essere esaminate sotto Articolo 5 § 1 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue, nella parte attinente:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà ed alla sicurezza della persona. Nessuno sarà privato della sua libertà salvo nei seguenti casi e in conformità con una procedura prescritta dalla legge:...
(c) l'arresto legale o la detenzione di una persona effettuati al fine di portarlo di fronte all'autorità legale competente su ragionevole sospetto di avere commesso un reato o quando è considerato ragionevolmente necessario per prevenire la perpetrazione di un reato o la fuga dopo avere agito così;
73. Il Governo contestò gli argomenti del richiedente e sostenne che il richiedente era stato preso nell'atto di commettere un reato di contrabbandare e che, perciò, la sua detenzione fu basata su un ragionevole sospetto che lui commise un reato penale.
74. Il richiedente dibatté che l'USD 30,000 trovato nella sua borsa non aveva appartenuto a lui ed era stato messo durante il tempo là che la borsa era stata con le impiegate di aeroporto. Lui disse che, nonostante le sue richieste di persistente, nessun video lega con un nastro dal monitor di sicurezza di Raggio X che era stato presumibilmente la fonte iniziale di sospetto era stato prodotto. Lui dibatté inoltre che il lavoro che documenta la ricerca fu crepato. Secondo il richiedente, i motivi per il suo arresto erano stati fabbricati, ed erano stati premeditati, come confermato inter alia col fatto che alcuni degli ufficiali che hanno partecipato nel suo arresto erano stati a lavoro più primo dei loro orari di lavoro normali. Il richiedente concluse che le autorità nazionali erano andate a vuoto a dimostrare che c'era stato qualsiasi ottenne legalmente prova contro lui quel era sufficiente per fondare un ragionevole sospetto che lui aveva commesso qualsiasi reato penale.
75. La Corte reitera che in ordine per un arresto su ragionevole sospetto per essere giustificato sotto Articolo 5 § 1 (il c) non è necessario per la polizia per avere ottenuto prova sufficiente per sporgere querela, o al punto di arresto o mentre il richiedente è in custodia (vedere Brogan ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 29 novembre 1988, § 53 la Serie Un n. 145-B, ed Erdagöz c. la Turchia, 22 ottobre 1997, § 51 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-VI). Né è necessario che la persona detenuta sarebbe dovuta essere accusata ultimamente o sarebbe dovuta essere presa di fronte ad una corte. L'oggetto di fermo di polizia per l'interrogatorio è ad ulteriore un'indagine penale con confermando o cessando sospetti che offrono i motivi per la detenzione. Così, fatti che sollevano un bisogno di sospetto di essere dello stesso livello come quelli necessario giustificare una condanna o anche il portare di un'accusa che viene al prossimo stadio dell'elaborazione di indagine penale (vedere Murray c. il Regno Unito, 28 ottobre 1994, § 55 la Serie Un n. 300-un). Comunque, il requisito che il sospetto deve essere basato su forme di motivi ragionevoli una parte essenziale della salvaguardia contro arresto arbitrario e la detenzione. Il fatto che un sospetto è contenuto in buon fede è insufficiente. Le parole “il ragionevole sospetto” il mezzo l'esistenza di fatti o informazioni che soddisferebbero un osservatore obiettivo che la persona riguardata ha potuto commettere il reato (vedere Volpe, Campbell e Hartley c. il Regno Unito, 30 agosto 1990, § 32 la Serie A n. 182).
76. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il richiedente fu sospettato di avere tentato di portare un grande importo di soldi in valuta estera per dogane senza la dichiarazione richiesta. Non si contesta che questa azione fu classificata come un reato penale sotto il diritto nazionale.
77. Il sospetto fu basato su una sentenza di soldi in un importo di USD 30,000 nel richiedente portare-su borsa. La Corte considera che, all'interno del significato della causa-legge prima citata, il fatto che i soldi stato trovato nella borsa di richiedente ed erano non dichiarati, in se stesso obiettivamente collegò il richiedente al reato penale ed allegato ed era sufficiente per avere creato un “il ragionevole sospetto” contro lui.
78. In finora come il richiedente dibattuto che la maniera nella quale era stata presumibilmente questa prova “scoprì” e documentò era stato soggetto a difetti seri che generano un'indicazione forte che è probabile che la prova sarebbe stata “piantò”, la Corte considera che questi argomenti riferiscono alla legalità della maniera nella quale la prova fu ottenuta e la sua ammissibilità e l'affidabilità che problemi incorrono essere esaminati sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione nel contesto dell'equità di procedimenti penali (vedere paragrafo 138 sotto per Articolo 6 problemi).
79. Segue che, dal posto d'osservazione di Articolo 5 § 1 della Convenzione, questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
80. In oltre, la Corte osserva che nella causa Farhad Aliyev, trovò una violazione di Articolo 5 § 1 della Convenzione in riguardo del fatto che il fratello del richiedente (in chi il richiedente era che causa) fu detenuto senza una base legale durante il periodo da 19 aprile a 21 maggio 2007, come là nessun autorizzazione dell'ordine della corte valido era la sua detenzione durante che periodo (vedere OMISSIS, citata sopra, §§ 172-79). Nella presente causa, sembra dal materiale nell'archivio di causa che il richiedente era nella stessa situazione durante lo stesso periodo. Comunque, avendo esaminato le osservazioni del richiedente, la Corte nota che lui non ha sollevato qualsiasi azioni di reclamo in questo riguardo nella sua richiesta di fronte alla Corte. Non c'è di conseguenza, nessuna chiamata per esaminare questo particolare problema nella causa presente.
B. Articolo 5 § 3 della Convenzione
81. Il richiedente si lamentò Articolo 5 §§ 1 e 3 ed Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione sotto che la sua detenzione di pre-processo era stata irragionevolmente lunga e che nessuno ragione attinente e sufficiente era stato offerto di giustificare la sua continuazione. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo incorre essere esaminata sotto Articolo 5 § 3 della Convenzione che prevede siccome segue:
“Ognuno arrestato o detenuto in conformità con le disposizioni del paragrafo 1 (c) di questo Articolo sarà portato prontamente di fronte ad un giudice o ad un altro ufficiale autorizzato dalla legge ad esercitare il potere giudiziale e gli verrà concesso un processo all'interno di un termine ragionevole o al rilascio essendo pendente il processo. La liberazione può essere condizionata da garanzie di comparire al processo.”
1. Ammissibilità
82. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
(a) Le osservazioni delle parti
83. Il Governo dibatté che la detenzione del richiedente fu giustificata col ragionevole sospetto che lui aveva commesso un reato penale e che, nel decidere sulle autorità che perseguono ' richiede concernere la sua detenzione, le corti avevano avuto riguardo ad alle ragioni date con loro per giustificare quelle richieste ed aveva valutato sia festeggia gli argomenti di '.
84. Il richiedente reiterò la sua azione di reclamo e dibattè che era arbitrario ed irrazionale per continuare detenerlo piuttosto che ordine la sua liberazione processo pendente, se necessario condizionò con garanzie per sembrare per processo. Lui contese che non c'era stato nessun rischio che lui scapperebbe o cercherebbe di interferire coi procedimenti penali e che, anche se c'era stato tale rischio, misure preventive non di custodia avrebbero dovuto essere considerate.
(b) la valutazione della Corte
85. Secondo la causa-legge fissa della Corte, la presunzione sotto Articolo 5 è in favore di liberazione. Il secondo margine di Articolo 5 § 3 non dà autorità giudiziali una scelta fra uno portando un accusato a processo all'interno di un termine ragionevole o accordandolo liberazione provvisoria processo pendente. Sino alla condanna, lui deve essere presunto innocente, ed il fine della disposizione sotto la considerazione essenzialmente deve richiedere una volta la sua liberazione provvisoria la sua detenzione che continua cessa essere ragionevole (vedere McKay c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 543/03, § 41, ECHR 2006-X, e Bykov c. la Russia [GC], n. 4378/02, § 61 ECHR 2009 -...).
86. La detenzione continuata può essere giustificata perciò solamente in una causa determinata se ci sono le specifiche indicazioni di un requisito genuino di interesse pubblico che, nonostante la presunzione dell'innocenza, vince l'articolo di riguardo per libertà individuale posata in giù in Articolo 5 della Convenzione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Kudła c. la Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, §§ 110 et seq., ECHR 2000-XI).
87. La responsabilità incorre nel primo posto alle autorità giudiziali e nazionali per assicurare che, in una causa determinata, la detenzione di pre-processo di una persona accusato non eccede un termine ragionevole. A questa fine loro devono, mentre pagando dovuto riguardo ad al principio della presunzione dell'innocenza, esamini tutti i fatti che dibattono per o contro l'esistenza della richiesta summenzionata di interesse pubblico che giustifica una partenza dall'articolo in Articolo 5 e deve esporrli fuori nelle loro decisioni sulle richieste per liberazione. Essenzialmente è sulla base delle ragioni data in queste decisioni e dei fatti stabiliti affermati col richiedente nei suoi ricorsi che la Corte è chiamata su per decidere se o c'è stata non una violazione di Articolo 5 § 3 (vedere, per esempio, Weinsztal c. la Polonia, n. 43748/98, § 50 30 maggio 2006; Labita c. l'Italia [GC], n. 26772/95, § 152 ECHR 2000-IV; e McKay, citata sopra, § 43).
88. La persistenza di ragionevole sospetto che la persona arrestata ha commesso un reato è una condizione qua sinusoidale non per la legalità della detenzione continuata, ma col decorso del tempo questo non basta più e la Corte deve stabilire poi se gli altri motivi dati con le autorità giudiziali continuarono a giustificare la privazione della libertà. Dove erano simile motivi “attinente” e “sufficiente”, la Corte si deve soddisfare anche che le autorità nazionali esposero “diligenza speciale” nella condotta dei procedimenti (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Letellier c. la Francia, 26 giugno 1991, § 35 la Serie Un n. 207, e Yağcı e Sargın c. la Turchia, 8 giugno 1995, § 50 la Serie Un n. 319-un). L'onere della prova in queste questioni non dovrebbe essere revocato con facendolo in carica sulla persona detenuta dimostrare l'esistenza di ragioni che garantiscono la sua liberazione (vedere Ilijkov c. la Bulgaria, n. 33977/96, § 85 26 luglio 2001).
89. Come per il periodo totale simile periodo comincia nel giorno per essere preso nell'esame per i fini di Articolo 5 § 3 l'accusato è assunto in custodia e fini “il giorno quando l'accusa è determinata, anche se solamente con un giudice di prima istanza” (vedere Kalashnikov c. la Russia, n. 47095/99, § 110, ECHR 2002-VI, e Labita citata sopra, § 147). Al giorno d'oggi causa questo periodo cominciò 19 ottobre 2005, quando il richiedente fu arrestato, e terminò 25 ottobre 2007, quando la Corte di Assize consegnò la sua sentenza che lo dichiara colpevole. Così, la detenzione di pre-processo del richiedente durò due anni e sei giorni in totale.
90. Anche se l'esistenza di un ragionevole sospetto che il richiedente aveva commesso un reato penale sarebbe bastato inizialmente garantire la sua detenzione, col passaggio di tempo che incaglia inevitabilmente divenne meno attinente (vedere paragrafo 88 sopra), e la sua detenzione continuata doveva essere giustificata con le altre ragioni attinenti, mentre prendendo in considerazione la sua situazione personale.
91. Durante lo stadio di indagine di pre-processo dei procedimenti, la detenzione del richiedente fu prolungata con la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi cinque volte, con le sue decisioni di 13 dicembre 2005 10 febbraio 2006, 13 aprile 2006, il 2006 e 2 ottobre 2006 di 14 luglio. Tutte di queste decisioni furono sostenuti con la Corte d'appello ricorsi seguenti col richiedente nel quale lui dibattè in favore della sua liberazione. Allo stadio di processo dei procedimenti, la detenzione del richiedente fu prolungata infine, con la decisione della Corte di Assise di 21 maggio 2007 (quale, con virtù di Articolo 173.2 del CCrP non poteva essere piaciuto contro).
92. Come alla prima - istanza e di appello corteggia decisioni di ' che prolungano la detenzione del richiedente durante l'indagine di pre-processo, la sua detenzione continuata fu giustificata ogni tempo per motivi di o la gravità delle accuse o la probabilità della sua latitanza ed esercitando pressione su persone che partecipano nei procedimenti, o sia. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che, mentre la gravità della frase affrontata è uno degli elementi attinenti nella valutazione del rischio di scappare, la gravità delle accuse non può notificare giustificare periodi lunghi della detenzione su carcerazione preventiva da sola (vedere Ilijkov, citata sopra, §§ 80-81). Il rischio di scappare che può giustificare la detenzione non può essere solamente inoltre, gauged sulla base della gravità della frase affrontata. Deve essere valutato con riferimento ad un numero di altri fattori attinenti che o possono confermare l'esistenza di un pericolo di scappare o possono farlo sembri così disdegna che non può giustificare la detenzione processo pendente (vedere Panchenko c. la Russia, n. 45100/98, § 106, 8 febbraio 2005, e Letellier citata sopra, § 43). Al giorno d'oggi causa, comunque le decisioni giudiziali non andarono qualsiasi inoltre che elencando i motivi summenzionati, incluso il rischio di scappare che usa una formula stereotipata che parafrasa i termini del CCrP (compari Giorgi Nikolaishvili c. la Georgia, n. 37048/04, §§ 23-24, 28, 76 e 79, 13 gennaio 2009, e OMISSIS citata sopra, § 191). Loro non riuscirono a menzionare qualsiasi fatti causa-specifici attinente a quelli motivi o provarli con ragioni attinenti e sufficienti. La Corte nota anche che le corti che prolungano la detenzione del richiedente usarono ripetutamente la stessa formula stereotipata ed il loro ragionamento non evolse col passeggero di tempo per riflettere la situazione in sviluppo o verificare se questi motivi rimasero validi al più tardi stadi dei procedimenti.
93. La Corte non nega che là è potuto esistere gli specifici, attinenti fatti che garantiscono la privazione del richiedente della libertà. Comunque, anche se simile fatti esisterono, loro non furono esposti fuori nelle decisioni nazionali ed attinenti. Non è il compito della Corte per succedere e stabilire simile fatti nel loro posto (vedere Ilijkov, citata sopra, § 86; Panchenko, citata sopra, § 105; e Giorgi Nikolaishvili, citata sopra, § 77).
94. Come alla decisione della Corte di Assise di 21 maggio 2007, la Corte nota, che menzionò i certi fattori nel valutare il rischio che è probabile che gli imputati scappino ed eserciterebbero pressione su testimoni (come gli imputati la ricchezza di ' ed i loro contatti all'estero). L'analisi della Corte di Assize concernè collettivamente comunque, molti imputati, senza una valutazione di causa-con-causa dei motivi che giustificano la detenzione continuata di ogni detenuto individuale, incluso il richiedente. Simile pratica di emettere “il collettivo” ordini di proroga sono, in se stesso, incompatibile con le garanzie custodite in Articolo 5 § 3 della Convenzione, come sé non riesce a prendere in considerazione le circostanze personali di ognuno detennero persona (vedere Khudoyorov c. la Russia, n. 6847/02, § 186 ECHR 2005-X (gli estratti), e OMISSIS, citata sopra, § 193).
95. In prospettiva delle considerazioni precedenti, la Corte conclude, che, usando una formula stereotipata che elenca soltanto i motivi per la detenzione senza rivolgere gli specifici fatti della causa del richiedente, le autorità andarono a vuoto a dare “attinente” e “sufficiente” ragioni di giustificare prolungando la detenzione di pre-processo del richiedente a due anni e sei giorni.
96. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 5 § 3 della Convenzione.
Articolo di C. 5 § 4 della Convenzione
97. Appellandosi su Articoli 5, 6 e 13 della Convenzione il richiedente si lamentò che i procedimenti giudiziali che concernono la sua detenzione non erano stati di opposizione in natura ed erano stati ingiusti. In particolare, lui notò che le corti avevano esaminato la questione della sua detenzione continuata nella sua assenza che non c'erano state udienze pubbliche che lui non era stato dato accesso al materiale che le autorità che perseguono avevano presentato alle corti per giustificare le loro richieste per la sua detenzione continuata, che le corti non avevano rivolto i suoi specifici argomenti in favore della sua liberazione, e che, generalmente, lui era stato negato uguaglianza di braccio.
98. In finora come le preoccupazioni di azione di reclamo presenti solamente i procedimenti riguardo alla detenzione di pre-processo del richiedente e non i procedimenti penali nell'insieme, non incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 6 (vedere, per esempio, Guliyev c. Azerbaijan (il dec.), n. 35584/02, 27 maggio 2004), e la Corte considera che incorre essere esaminato sotto Articolo 5 § 4 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ad ognuno che viene privato della sua libertà tramite arresto o detenzione verrà concesso di intraprendere procedimenti con cui la legalità della sua detenzione sarà decisa velocemente da una corte ed ordinata la sua liberazione se la detenzione non è legale.”
1. Ammissibilità
99. La Corte nota che, fra gli altri argomenti sollevati in collegamento con questa azione di reclamo, il richiedente si lamentò, che le udienze nei procedimenti che concernono la sua detenzione di pre-processo non erano state pubbliche. In questo collegamento, la Corte prima ha sostenuto, che Articolo 5 § 4, benché richiedendo un'udienza per la revisione della legalità della detenzione di pre-processo (vedere paragrafo 104 sotto), non fa come un articolo generale costringa tale udienza ad essere aperto al pubblico (vedere Reinprecht c. l'Austria, n. 67175/01, §§ 34-41 ECHR 2005-XII, e OMISSIS, citata sopra, § 198). La Corte non trova qualsiasi circostanze speciali nella causa presente che avrebbe potuto richiedere un'udienza pubblica nei procedimenti riguardo alla revisione della legalità della detenzione del richiedente. Segue che questa parte dell'azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
100. Come al resto dell'azione di reclamo, la Corte nota, che non è mal-fondato manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
(a) Le osservazioni delle parti
101. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente aveva avuto alla sua disposizione una procedura effettiva con la quale lui potrebbe impugnare la legalità della sua detenzione. Questa procedura fu offerta per con le disposizioni del CCrP riguardo al diritto di una persona accusato presentare reclami con le corti nazionali contro qualsiasi passi procedurali o decisioni prese con le autorità che perseguono nella prospettiva del Governo.
102. Il richiedente reiterò la sua azione di reclamo, mentre dibattendo che l'uguaglianza di braccio ed i requisiti dell'equità non era stata assicurata nei procedimenti nei quali lui aveva impugnato la legalità della sua detenzione.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
103. Avendo riguardo ad alle specifiche circostanze si lamentò di, la Corte nota che la sfera dell'azione di reclamo presente è limitata a fatti relativo ai procedimenti per la revisione della legalità della detenzione del richiedente durante l'indagine di pre-processo.
104. La Corte reitera che con virtù di Articolo 5 § 4, una persona arrestata o detenne è concessa per portare procedimenti per la revisione con una corte dei procedurali e le condizioni effettive per la quale sono essenziali il “la legalità”, all'interno del significato di Articolo 5 § 1, di suo o la sua privazione della libertà. Questo vuole dire che la corte competente deve non solo esaminare ottemperanza coi requisiti procedurali di diritto nazionale ma anche la ragionevolezza del sospetto che puntella l'arresto, e la legittimità del fine perseguì con l'arresto e la detenzione che consegue (vedere Brogan ed Altri, citata sopra, § 65). Benché non sia necessario per la procedura sotto Articolo 5 § 4 sempre essere frequentato con le stesse garanzie come quelli richiese sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione per criminale o controversia civile, deve avere un carattere giudiziale e deve offrire garanzie appropriato a qualche genere della privazione della libertà in oggetto. I procedimenti devono essere adversarial e devono assicurare uguaglianza di braccio fra le parti sempre. Nella causa di una persona la cui detenzione incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 5 § 1 (il c), un'udienza è richiesta (vedere Assenov ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, 28 ottobre 1998, § 162 Relazioni 1998-VIII). La possibilità per un detenuto o essere ascoltato in persona o per della forma di caratteristiche di rappresentanza fra le garanzie fondamentali di procedura fatte domanda nelle questioni della privazione della libertà (vedere Kampanis c. la Grecia, 13 luglio 1995, § 47 la Serie Un n. 318-B). Inoltre, l'uguaglianza di braccio non è assicurata dove un detenuto o suo o il suo consiglio è negato accesso a quelli documenti nell'indagine registri che è essenziale per impugnare efficacemente la legalità della detenzione (vedere Lamy c. il Belgio, 30 marzo 1989, § 29 la Serie Un n. 151).
105. Articolo 5 § 4 non obbliga gli Stati Contraenti a preparare un secondo livello di giurisdizione per l'esame delle richieste per liberazione dalla detenzione. Ciononostante, dove diritto nazionale prevede per un sistema di ricorso, il corpo di appello deve approvare anche Articolo 5 § 4 (vedere Toth c. l'Austria, 12 dicembre 1991, § 84 la Serie Un n. 224). Come per decisioni di corte ordinando o prolungando la detenzione, Articolo 5 § 4 garanzie nessuno corretto, come così, ad un ricorso contro quelle decisioni, ma l'intervento di un corpo giudiziale almeno a quello livello di giurisdizione deve attenersi con le garanzie di Articolo 5 § 4 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Ječius c. la Lituania, n. 34578/97, § 100 ECHR 2000-IX).
106. Rivolgendosi ai fatti della causa presente, la Corte nota che la detenzione del richiedente fu ordinata quando lui fu portato di fronte al giudice della Corte distrettuale di Nasimi 20 ottobre 2005. Il diritto nazionale lo diede un diritto di appello contro quel la decisione. Ai requisiti di Articolo che si può dire che 5 § 4 della Convenzione faccia domanda a questi, piacciono procedimenti che diedero luogo alla decisione della Corte d'appello di 27 ottobre 2005 ed in che il richiedente fu rappresentato col suo avvocato.
107. Successivamente, la detenzione del richiedente “indagine pendente” fu prolungato cinque volte con la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi, 13 dicembre 2005, 10 febbraio 2006, 13 aprile 2006, il 2006 e 2 ottobre 2006 di 14 luglio. Siccome il richiedente fece appello contro tutti di questi ordini di proroga che impugnano la legalità della sua detenzione continuata, tutti di questi procedimenti alla Corte d'appello attirarono anche le garanzie di Articolo 5 § 4 della Convenzione. La Corte nota che il richiedente fu rappresentato coi suoi avvocati durante l'esame di questi ricorsi, ma era assente lui.
108. Mentre con virtù dei procedimenti sopra la detenzione del richiedente “indagine pendente” fu prolungato per periodi significativi di tempo, lui non era capace di frequentare personalmente qualsiasi di quelli corteggia sessioni che impiegarono mesi di posto dopo l'ordine di detenzione originale. La Corte considera che, determinato che che era in pericolo per il richiedente-quel è, la sua libertà-così come il decorso del tempo fra l'udienza originale e la proroga susseguente ordina, le corti avrebbero potuto prendere passi per assicurare che il richiedente fu ascoltato in persona e fu riconosciuto un'opportunità di portare alle corti la sua situazione personale ed argomenti per la sua liberazione (paragone, mutatis mutandis Graužinis c. la Lituania, n. 37975/97, §§ 33-34 10 ottobre 2000; Mamedova c. la Russia, n. 7064/05, § 91 1 giugno 2006; e OMISSIS, citata sopra, § 207). Mentre questo non era fatto, sforzi sarebbero dovuti essere resi per assicurare che la posizione del richiedente fu portata per rappresentanza effettiva con consiglio. Comunque, la Corte non si convince che questo o succedette nella causa presente. Benché gli avvocati del richiedente frequentassero le sessioni di corte sostenute in collegamento con l'esame dei suoi ricorsi, la Corte nota, mentre avendo riguardo ad al materiale nella sua proprietà che quelle sessioni di corte sono state contenute come una questione della formalità e non prese la forma di sinceramente udienze di adversarial. È vero che gli avvocati del richiedente potessero fare per iscritto le loro osservazioni con presentando i loro reclami su ricorso, ma questo fatto non fa, in se stesso, mezzo che l'uguaglianza di braccio è stata assicurata. La Corte nota che le osservazioni dell'autorità che persegue in appoggio della detenzione del richiedente non furono rese o disponibili al richiedente o i suoi avvocati, mentre spogliandoli dell'opportunità di fare commenti su quelle osservazioni, per iscritto od oralmente per contestare efficacemente le ragioni invocate con l'autorità che persegue per giustificare la sua detenzione.
109. In qualsiasi l'evento, le corti non rivolsero qualsiasi degli specifici argomenti avanzati col richiedente nelle sue osservazioni scritte che impugnano la sua detenzione continuata (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra), benché quegli argomenti non sembrassero essere irrilevanti o frivolo. La Corte reitera che, mentre Articolo 5 § 4 della Convenzione non impone un obbligo per rivolgere ogni argomento contenuto nelle osservazioni del detenuto, il giudice ricorsi esaminatore contro la detenzione di pre-processo devono prendere in considerazione fatti concreti che sono assegnati a col detenuto e sono capace di dubbio di getto sull'esistenza di quelle condizioni essenziale per il “la legalità”, per fini di Convenzione, della privazione della libertà (vedere Nikolova c. la Bulgaria [GC], n. 31195/96, § 61 ECHR 1999-II). Con non prendendo in considerazione gli specifici argomenti del richiedente contro la sua detenzione continuata, le corti nazionali non riuscite ad eseguire un controllo giurisdizionale della sfera e natura richieste con Articolo 5 § 4 della Convenzione.
110. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 5 § 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
111. Il richiedente si lamentò della confisca, durante le ricerche del suo appartamento ed uffici, di un numero di articoli personali che appartengono a lui ed i vari membri della sua famiglia, incluso un numero di articoli preziosi e gioielleria che appartengono a lui e sua moglie, due computer formato agenda, dei documenti personali, elenchi telefonici e due videonastri. Lui dibattè che quegli articoli erano stati irrilevanti per i procedimenti penali in oggetto e non costituirono prova fisica.
Lui si lamentò anche delle autorità la decisione di ' per allegare i suoi beni (in particolare, quote nella Banca di Baku) nell'assenza di una decisione che l'accusa formalmente coi reati penali ed attinenti.
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
112. In finora come il richiedente si lamentò del presumibilmente la confisca ingiustificata come prova fisica di un numero di articoli personali che appartengono a lui ed i suoi membri di famiglia, la Corte nota che, siccome può essere visto dall'archivio di causa, il richiedente non ha impugnato di fronte alle corti nazionali che supervisionano le autorità di accusa ' azioni procedurali in collegamento con le ricerche condotte nel suo appartamento ed ufficio o la confisca di quegli articoli. Segue che questa parte dell'azione di reclamo deve essere respinta sotto Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
113. Come al resto dell'azione di reclamo, la Corte considera, non è mal-fondato manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione e nessuna altra base per dichiararlo inammissibile è stato stabilito. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
114. Il Governo presentò che le quote del richiedente nella Banca di Baku non erano state confiscate facendo seguito all'ordine della corte di 8 giugno 2006, ma attaccato con lo scopo di garantire una possibile confisca dei beni in circostanze previsto per col diritto penale. Di conseguenza, che decisione in se stesso, nell'assenza di un definitivo verdetto di corte nella causa penale, non spogli il richiedente della sua proprietà. Il Governo dibatté che questa misura era legale e che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale (in particolare, Articolo 248 del CCrP) era sufficientemente accessibile, preciso e prevedibile nella loro richiesta. Loro sostennero inoltre che il congelamento dei beni del richiedente costituì una restrizione resa nell'interesse pubblico, con una prospettiva ad assicurando l'amministrazione corretta della giustizia.
115. Il richiedente presentò che la misura si lamentò di era stata illegale, arbitrario, ingiustificato e non era riuscita a soddisfare i requisiti della certezza legale. In particolare, lui sottolineò che mentre i beni erano stati allegati in collegamento con reati penali ed allegato per i quali il Codice Penale previde la confisca dei beni come una sanzione penale, gli non era stato accusato davvero con qualsiasi di quelli reati al tempo l'ordine di sequestro era stato reso. Nell'osservazione del richiedente, nell'assenza delle accuse criminali attinenti l'ordine di sequestro era di conseguenza, illegale.
2. La valutazione della Corte
116. La Corte osserva che 8 giugno 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi ordinò il sequestro di un numero di quote nella Banca di Baku posseduta col richiedente, sulla base che l'accusa possedette prova che il richiedente aveva commesso i reati penali di contrabbandare prodotti di petrolio, evasione fiscale ed appropriazione indebita, e che lui aveva usato gli incassi di questi reati per acquisire quote nella Banca di Baku. Notando che perpetrazione di simile reati penali potesse comportare una sanzione della confisca dei beni sotto il Codice Penale, l'ordine della corte il sequestro delle quote del richiedente, appellandosi su Articoli 248-250 del CCrP come la base per simile decisione. Al tempo di questo ordine di sequestro, il richiedente non fu accusato con entrambi i reati penali menzionati nell'ordine. Su a quello punto, lui era stato accusato solamente in collegamento con un reato non correlato di tentare di trasferire valuta non dichiarata per dogane all'aeroporto. Dopo l'ordine di sequestro di 8 giugno 2006, lui fu accusato più tardi formalmente col reato di contrabbandare prodotti di petrolio 5 luglio 2006 (gli Articoli 206.3.1 e 206.4 del Codice Penale) e coi reati di appropriazione indebita ed evasione fiscale 1 marzo 2007 (Articoli 179.3.1, 179.3.2 e 213.4 del Codice Penale).
117. È base comune fra le parti che il richiedente era il proprietario delle quote attaccate; nelle altre parole, questi beni costituirono, suo “le proprietà.” Né si contesta che l'ordine di sequestro corrispose ad un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente a godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà o che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è perciò applicabile.
118. La Corte nota che il sequestro delle quote del richiedente nella Banca di Baku, in se stesso non lo spogliò delle sue proprietà, ma gli impedì provvisoriamente dall'usarli e dallo sbarazzarsi di loro, con una prospettiva a garantendo una possibile sanzione penale del sequestro imposta alla conseguenza dei procedimenti penali. La Corte reitera che la confisca di proprietà per procedimenti legali riferisce al controllo dell'uso di proprietà che incorre all'interno dell'ambito del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo normalmente N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Raimondo c. l'Italia, 22 febbraio 1994, § 27 la Serie Un n. 281-un, e Borzhonov c. la Russia, n. 18274/04, § 57 22 gennaio 2009).
119. La Corte enfatizza inoltre che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere “legale”: il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso di proprietà con eseguendo “le leggi.” Inoltre, l'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione. Il problema di se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto solamente fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo diviene una volta attinente è stato stabilito che l'interferenza in oggetto soddisfatto il requisito della legalità e non era arbitrario (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Baklanov c. la Russia, n. 68443/01, § 39, 9 giugno 2005, e Frizen c. la Russia, n. 58254/00, § 33 24 marzo 2005).
120. Quando parlando di “la legge”, Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 allude allo stesso concetto che sarà trovato altrove nella Convenzione (vedere Špaček, s.r.o. c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 26449/95, § 54, 9 novembre 1999, e Baklanov citata sopra, § 40). Questo concetto richiede in primo luogo che le misure contestate dovrebbero avere una base in diritto nazionale. Si riferisce anche alla qualità della legge in oggetto, mentre richiedendo che è accessibile alle persone riguardate, preciso, e prevedibile (vedere Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 109 ECHR 2000-io).
121. L'argomento primario del richiedente nel collegamento con l'azione di reclamo presente è che l'ordine di sequestro era illegale perché, al tempo di materiale, lui non era stato accusato formalmente, con qualsiasi dei reati penali che notificarono come una base per il sequestro. La Corte nota che, nel contesto della causa presente, non è chiamato su per decidere in generale se sequestro della proprietà di una persona per procedimenti penali prima di che persona che è accusata formalmente con un reato penale poteva, in se stesso, sia considerato compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 della Convenzione. Che che è necessario per determinare è se, in questa specifica causa, simile interferenza fu permessa, e così “legale” sotto il diritto vigente di Azerbaijani al tempo di materiale.
122. La Corte osserva che le disposizioni di Articolo 248 et seq. del CCrP che tratta col sequestro di proprietà previde che sequestro potrebbe essere ordinato solamente in riguardo di proprietà del “persona accusato” o “le altre persone che potrebbero essere sostenute materialmente responsabile” per le azioni penali dell'accusato (vedere paragrafo 66 sopra per il testo di Articolo 248 del CCrP e divida in paragrafi 68 sopra per il commentario su che Articolo). Un “persona accusato” fu definito col CCrP come una persona accusata con un reato penale (Articolo 91.1 del CCrP). Articolo 248 del CCrP non contenne riferimento a proprietà di altre categorie di persone come, per esempio, “sospettò persone” chi non era stato accusato ancora formalmente con un reato penale.
123. Siccome menzionato sopra, in relazione ai reati penali descritti nell'ordine di sequestro, il richiedente non era un “persona accusato” al tempo di materiale, siccome gli non era stato accusato formalmente con qualsiasi di quelli reati penali. Inoltre, lui non sembrò essere un “persona che potrebbe essere sostenuta materialmente responsabile” per le azioni penali di un'altra persona accusato, poiché lui lui fu considerato la prima persona sospetta e non c'erano da allora al tempo di materiale nessuno altre persone accusate in collegamento con quelle specifiche azioni penali.
124. In simile circostanze, la Corte nota, che, basato sul significato letterale di Articolo 248 et seq. del CCrP, sembra, che al tempo di emissione dell'ordine di sequestro il richiedente non incorse in entrambe le due categorie di persone la cui proprietà potrebbe essere soggetto a sequestro. Di conseguenza, sembra che, al tempo di materiale, i diritti di proprietà del richiedente non potevano essere restretti sotto questa disposizione legale. Nessuna altra disposizione legale fu citata con le corti nazionali come una base per l'interferenza.
125. La Corte accetta che il suo potere per fare una rassegna ottemperanza con diritto nazionale è limitato come sé è nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali per interpretare e fare domanda quel la legge. Comunque, la Corte nota che né la Corte distrettuale di Nasimi, in ordine di sequestro suo né la Corte d'appello, quando facendo una rassegna la legalità dell'ordine di sequestro, purché un chiarimento come a come Articolo 248 del CCrP potrebbe essere fatto domanda nella situazione del richiedente. Loro non tentarono di prevedere qualsiasi interpretazione di questa disposizione o appellarsi su qualsiasi esistendo o giurisprudenza accessibile che interpreterebbe che disposizione, in una maniera precisa e prevedibile, come essendo applicabile alla proprietà di persone sospette che non erano state accusate ancora col reato penale ed attinente.
126. Similmente, il Governo, mentre dibattè che l'interferenza era legale sotto Articolo 248 del CCrP, non tenti di spiegare come che disposizione potrebbe essere fatta domanda in riguardo di persone che non erano state accusate col reato penale ed attinente, dato che il testo di che disposizione non previde espressamente per tale possibilità. Né il Governo dibattè che questa disposizione era applicabile a simile persone con virtù di qualsiasi interpretazione estesa del suo testo con le corti più alte, e loro non si appellarono su qualsiasi la specifica giurisprudenza nazionale, attenendosi coi requisiti dell'accessibilità e prevedibilità, in appoggio di simile interpretazione.
127. In simile circostanze, la Corte conclude, che l'interferenza con la proprietà del richiedente non poteva essere considerata legale all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Questa conclusione lo fa non necessario accertare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo.
128. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
IV. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Articolo 3 della Convenzione
129. Il richiedente si lamentò Articolo 3 della Convenzione di sotto il presumibilmente le condizioni aspre della sua detenzione nella MNS Detenzione Facilità. Articolo 3 letture siccome segue:
“Nessuno sarà sottoposto a tortura o a trattamento inumano o degradante o punizione.”
130. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non aveva esaurito via di ricorso nazionali, siccome lui non aveva sollevato mai questo problema di fronte alle corti nazionali.
131. Il Governo presentò inoltre che le condizioni della detenzione del richiedente non potevano essere riguardate come inumane o degradante, che lui era stato contenuto in condizioni di standard e che non c'era stata nessuna intenzione per umiliare in qualche modo o abbassarlo. Il Governo si riferì alle sentenze nella Relazione di CPT del 2002 in riguardo delle condizioni generali della detenzione nella MNS Detenzione Facilità che era stata considerata accettabile col CPT in questo collegamento.
132. Il richiedente dibattè che lui dovrebbe essere esentato dal requisito per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali perché qualsiasi via di ricorso teoreticamente disponibili in riguardo di questa azione di reclamo erano inefficaci in pratica e perciò la ricerca di queste via di ricorso era futile, e perché le autorità nazionali avevano esaminato ripetutamente tutte le sue altre azioni di reclamo in una maniera ingiusta.
133. Il richiedente contestò le osservazioni che riguarda i fatti del Governo che concernono le condizioni della sua detenzione nella MNS Detenzione Facilità (vedere divide in paragrafi 63-64 sopra) e sostenne che le condizioni effettive della sua detenzione, siccome descritto con lui (vedere divide in paragrafi 59-62 sopra), corrispose a mal-trattamento sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione. Lui disse inoltre che il Governo si era appellato selettivamente sulla Relazione di CPT del 2002 e che questo stesso rapporto contenne anche “le critiche numerose” delle condizioni nella MNS Detenzione Facilità. In qualsiasi evento, nell'opinione del richiedente la Relazione di CPT del 2002 era vecchia ed antiquata e non offrì una rappresentanza accurata delle condizioni della detenzione durante il periodo della sua detenzione nella MNS Detenzione Facilità.
134. I costatazione di Corte che non è necessario per esaminare l'eccezione del Governo come alla non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali come, mentre presume anche che il richiedente ha approvato questo requisito, l'azione di reclamo è in qualsiasi l'evento inammissibile per le ragioni seguenti.
135. La Corte nota che, mentre le parti offrirono descrizioni differenti delle condizioni del richiedente della detenzione, le osservazioni di ogni parte in questo riguardo ad era molto simile a quelli resi nel Farhad la causa di Aliyev (citò sopra, §§ 75-82). Avendo riguardo ad al materiale nella sua proprietà, la Corte conclude, che le condizioni del richiedente della detenzione erano essenzialmente molto simili alle condizioni della detenzione del suo fratello OMISSISche fu detenuto anche nella MNS Detenzione Facilità in una cella simile e durante lo stesso periodo di tempo.
136. La Corte nota inoltre che, nel Farhad la causa di Aliyev, basato sulle parti le osservazioni di ' e le sentenze nella Relazione di CPT del 2002, valutò le condizioni di materiale della detenzione del richiedente e fondò che quelle condizioni, mentre non completamente soddisfacente, era sull'intero accettabile e non era così cattivo come corrispondere a trattamento inumano o degradante (vedere OMISSIS, citata sopra, §§ 117-19). Avendo riguardo ad al fatto che le condizioni della detenzione del richiedente nella causa presente erano essenzialmente molto simili a quelli nel Farhad la causa di Aliyev, la Corte non trova nessuna ragione di abbandonare dalle sue sentenze in che causa e considera che, nonostante i certi aspetti problematici, le condizioni della detenzione del richiedente nella MNS Detenzione Facilità non corrisposero a trattamento inumano o degradante sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
137. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
B. Articolo 6 §§ 1 e 3 della Convenzione
138. Appellandosi su Articolo 6 §§ 1 e 3 della Convenzione, il richiedente sollevò un numero di azioni di reclamo riguardo ai procedimenti relativo alla sua detenzione di pre-processo che la Corte già ha esaminato sotto i paragrafi attinenti di Articolo 5 sopra. In finora come alcune delle osservazioni del richiedente sotto Articolo 6 può essere costruito come un'azione di reclamo dell'iniquità allegato dei procedimenti penali contro lui nell'insieme, la Corte nota che la sfera della richiesta presente è limitata ai fatti relativo al periodo prima del processo del richiedente, la condanna e ricorsi contro questa condanna, e che perciò non copre l'interezza dei procedimenti riguardo alla determinazione di accuse criminali contro lui (vedere divide in paragrafi 69-70 sopra). Anche se degli eventi che riguarda i fatti che hanno avuto luogo prima del processo possono essere attinenti per la valutazione dell'equità dei procedimenti nell'insieme, questa parte dell'azione di reclamo deve essere respinta siccome prematuramente sollevata nel contesto della richiesta presente
C. Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione
139. Il richiedente si lamentò che, nelle decisioni ordinando e prolungando la sua detenzione di pre-processo, le corti nazionali avevano violato il suo diritto per essere presunte innocente con giudicando prematuramente la sua colpa prima che lui era stato provato seguendo colpevoli un processo penale. Lui si lamentò inoltre che le dichiarazioni unite resero con l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, il MNS ed il Ministero di Affari Interni alla stampa 20 e 21 ottobre 2005 aveva corrisposto ad una violazione del suo diritto alla presunzione dell'innocenza. Articolo che 6 § 2 della Convenzione offre siccome segue:
“Ognuno accusato di un reato penale sarà presunto innocente sino a che venga dimostrato colpevole secondo legge.”
140. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non aveva esaurito via di ricorso nazionali in riguardo di questa azione di reclamo, mentre dibatté che c'erano molti viali di compensazione disponibili a lui al livello nazionale. Il Governo presentò inoltre che in qualsiasi l'evento, nessuna delle decisioni reso con le corti nazionali su varie questioni relativo all'indagine di pre-processo aveva dichiarato il richiedente colpevole di qualsiasi reato penale. Loro dibatterono anche che le dichiarazioni di stampa contestate di 20 e 21 ottobre 2005 resero con le autorità di legge-esecuzione non aveva dipinto il richiedente come un criminale. Piuttosto, loro avevano informato il pubblico del fatto del suo arresto e si erano riferiti alla prova disponibile ed i vari articoli trovati durante le ricerche dei locali che appartengono a lui. Queste informazioni erano state offerte “senza rendere qualsiasi valutazione legale di quelli fatti.”
141. Il richiedente reiterò la sua azione di reclamo e dibatté che, mentre egli non era stato chiamato espressamente un “criminale”, il fine ed effetto di quelle dichiarazioni erano stati di trattarlo come tale.
142. I costatazione di Corte che non è necessario per esaminare l'eccezione del Governo come alla non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali come, mentre presume anche che il richiedente ha approvato questo requisito, l'azione di reclamo è in qualsiasi l'evento inammissibile per le ragioni seguenti.
143. In finora come il richiedente si lamentò di una violazione del suo diritto alla presunzione della sua innocenza con le corti nazionali nelle loro decisioni ordinando e prolungando la sua detenzione di pre-processo, la Corte, avendo esaminato attentamente i testi originali delle decisioni attinenti costatazione che nessuno di loro ha contenuto qualsiasi mettendo in parole quel potrebbe essere interpretato come prematuramente dichiarando il richiedente colpevole dei reati coi quali lui è stato accusato.
144. In finora come il richiedente si lamentò delle dichiarazioni unite rese con l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, il MNS ed il Ministero di Affari Interni alla stampa 20 e 21 ottobre 2005, la Corte osserva che nel Farhad causa di Aliyev che ha fondato che quelle stesse dichiarazioni erano in violazione del diritto del Sig. OMISSIS a presunzione dell'innocenza sotto Articolo 6 § 2 della Convenzione, perché loro contennero enunciazione che corrisponde ad una dichiarazione, resa senza le qualifiche necessarie o riserve che lui aveva commesso reati penali (vedere OMISSIS, citata sopra, §§ 217-27). Comunque, avendo esaminato queste dichiarazioni nella struttura della causa presente, la Corte considera che le parti di quelle dichiarazioni che specificamente si riferiscono al richiedente non potevano essere considerate incompatibili coi requisiti di Articolo 6 § 2. In riguardo del richiedente nella causa presente, le dichiarazioni contennero soltanto le brevi informazioni che gli era stato arrestato e che i certi articoli e soldi erano stati sequestrati dal suo ufficio. Loro menzionarono anche che il suo ufficio era usato per riunioni fra OMISSISe Fikret Yusifov. È vero che le dichiarazioni non chiarificarono che, a che tempo, il richiedente era stato detenuto su sospetto di un reato non correlato ai reati commessi presumibilmente con le altre persone menzionate in quelle dichiarazioni. Di conseguenza, le dichiarazioni starebbero fuorviando come alle vere ragioni per l'arresto del richiedente. Ciononostante, nessuna enunciazione contenuta in quelle dichiarazioni andò come lontano siccome dichiarando il richiedente colpevole di qualsiasi reato penale.
145. Segue che questa azione di reclamo è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
D. Articolo 8 della Convenzione
146. Il richiedente si lamentò di una restrizione di corrispondenza e visite dalla sua famiglia ed il suo avvocato britannico durante il periodo della sua detenzione di pre-processo. Lui disse che le sue lettere erano state intercettate ed erano state censurate, e che qualsiasi base legale per simile restrizioni non era stata rivelata a lui. Articolo 8 della Convenzione prevede siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
147. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali, siccome lui non aveva sollevato mai qualsiasi delle specifiche dichiarazioni nell'azione di reclamo presente di fronte a qualsiasi autorità nazionale e non si era appellato mai su Articolo 8 della Convenzione, o approvvigiona di diritto nazionale dello stesso o una natura simile, nelle sue richieste alle autorità nazionali. Il Governo notò che, sotto Articolo 449 del CCrP, era aperto al richiedente per lamentarsi alle corti nazionali di qualsiasi azioni del perseguire o autorità inquirenti che hanno violato i suoi diritti.
148. Il richiedente contestò l'eccezione del Governo, mentre dibattendo che le corti nazionali non erano indipendenti ed imparziali e che era “futile cercare di ottenere via di ricorso effettive da loro in cause politicamente-controllate di qualche genere.”
149. La Corte reitera che il fine delle nazionale-via di ricorso decide in Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione è riconoscere gli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolando o mettere diritto le violazioni allegato prima che loro sono presentati alla Corte (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Hajibeyli c. Azerbaijan, n. 16528/05, § 35, 10 luglio 2008, e OMISSIScitata sopra, § 232). Dubbi meri dell'efficacia di una via di ricorso non sono sufficienti per dispensare col requisito per costituire uso normale dei viali disponibili compensazione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Mammadov c. Azerbaijan, n. 34445/04, § 52 11 gennaio 2007). La Corte accetta l'osservazione del Governo che era aperto al richiedente per lamentarsi alle corti nazionali delle azioni od omissioni delle autorità che perseguono che avevano violato presumibilmente i suoi diritti. Comunque, il richiedente non ha fatto domanda alle corti con qualsiasi dei danni sollevati con lui nell'azione di reclamo presente di fronte alla Corte riguardo alle proibizioni generali su visite di famiglia e corrispondenza in tutto il periodo di detenzione intero. Mentre lui dibattè che tentare di chiedere compensazione dalle corti sarebbe futile, lui non ha mostrato convincentemente che simile passi furono legati per essere inefficace.
150. Segue che questa azione di reclamo deve essere respinta sotto Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
E. Altre violazioni addotte
151. Il richiedente si lamentò Articolo 5 § 2 della Convenzione che lui non era stato informato prontamente delle ragioni per il suo arresto sotto e delle accuse contro lui. Il richiedente si lamentò anche sotto Articoli 13 e 14 della Convenzione, in concomitanza con tutte le sue altre azioni di reclamo che non c'erano via di ricorso effettive con che chiedere compensazione per la violazione dei suoi diritti di Convenzione e che lui era stato sottoposto a trattamento discriminatorio per ragioni politiche, come punizione per essere un fratello di OMISSIS.
152. Comunque, nella luce di tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come le questioni si lamentò di è all'interno della sua competenza, i costatazione di Corte che loro non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e le libertà espose fuori nella Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli. Segue che questa parte della richiesta è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione.
V. APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
153. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
1. Danno patrimoniale
154. Il richiedente chiese almeno 4,500,184.58 Dollari di Stati Uniti (USD) in riguardo di danno patrimoniale, incluso (un) USD 428,451.84 per perdita di salario durante il periodo dal 2005 a 1 ottobre 2007 di 1 ottobre, calcolato sulla base dei suoi salari ad Azpetrol ed Azertrans Ltd più qualsiasi l'ulteriore perdita di utili durante il periodo da 1 ottobre 2007 alla data della sentenza della Corte, essere calcolato sulla stessa base; (b) USD 1,300,000 di suo “risparmi personali sequestrarono illegalmente dal suo ufficio” ad Azpetrol; (il c) USD 1,686,815.51 per il valore delle quote attaccate in Banca di Baku ed USD 1,048,306.23 per dividendi non retribuiti su quelle quote che accumulano da 2004 a 2007; e (d) USD 36,611 per il valore di vari articoli sequestrato dal suo appartamento.
155. Il Governo presentò che l'importo chiese per la perdita di salario era eccessivo, non comprovato e basato sulla prova di documentario insufficiente. Loro presentarono inoltre che i documenti presentarono in appoggio delle rivendicazioni per danno patrimoniale non era “particolareggiato ed esauriente.” Infine, il Governo dibatté che, al tempo dell'alloggio e comunicazione della richiesta, il richiedente non era stato privato, di qualsiasi proprietà ed il problema del possibile sequestro ancora sarebbero determinati con le corti.
156. La Corte non discerne qualsiasi collegamento causale fra le violazioni fondò ed il danno patrimoniale addusse in riguardo della perdita di salario. Come per le rivendicazioni in riguardo di varie proprietà sequestrate, la Corte nota, che parte delle azioni di reclamo che concernono quelle proprietà fu dichiarata inammissibile. Come all'azione di reclamo riguardo al sequestro di quote nella Banca di Baku, la Corte nota, che la sfera di che azione di reclamo fu limitata solamente all'illegalità della misura che restringe temporaneamente i diritti di proprietà del richiedente, e non riguardò qualsiasi misura spogliandolo completamente della sua proprietà di quelle quote. In simile circostanze, all'interno della sfera della richiesta presente nessun collegamento causale può essere trovato fra la violazione trovata e la rivendicazione per il valore intero delle quote attaccate e dividendi.
157. La Corte respinge perciò le rivendicazioni in riguardo di danno patrimoniale.
2. Danno non-patrimoniale
158. Il richiedente presentò che le violazioni dei suoi diritti di Convenzione l'avevano provocato il dolore, mentre subì, l'ansia e l'angoscia e danneggiato la sua reputazione. Senza specificare qualsiasi l'importo, il richiedente richiese la Corte per fare un'assegnazione che ha considerato essere “equo ed equo in questa causa.”
159. Il Governo presentò che la sentenza di violazioni avrebbe costituito riparazione sufficiente in riguardo di qualsiasi danno non-patrimoniale subì.
160. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha sofferto di danno non-patrimoniale che non può essere compensato solamente per con la sentenza di violazioni e che il risarcimento doveva essere assegnato così. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto con Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna la somma di 7,000 euro il richiedente (EUR) sotto questo capo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo importo.
B. Costi e spese
161. Il richiedente chiese 172,737 libbre genuino (GBP) per le parcelle legali incorse in collegamento coi procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, ed un importo supplementare di GBP 9,619.50 per “lavoro in corso non saldato.” Queste parcelle legali furono chieste in collegamento col lavoro fatto coi vari avvocati di OMISSIS In appoggio di questa rivendicazione, il richiedente presentò un numero di strati di tempo e fatture preparato con gli avvocati summenzionati, incluso accuse per avvocati ' parcelle orarie ed un numero di vari altri pagamenti ed accuse.
162. Il Governo presentò che gli importi chiesti erano eccessivi e non erano stati ragionevolmente o necessariamente incorso in. Loro notarono che un numero significativo di entrate nelle fatture presentate sia di una natura molto generale e non specificò il lavoro effettivo fatto con l'avvocato attinente. Le fatture contennero anche inoltre, entrate relativo a lavoro fatto con persone che non avevano nessuno autorizzazione per rappresentare il richiedente di fronte alla Corte.
163. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum.
164. La Corte nota che una porzione significativa delle osservazioni rese con gli avvocati del richiedente rigiardavano azioni di reclamo che o sono state dichiarate inammissibile o erano fuori della sfera della causa presente. Perciò, nessuna assegnazione può essere resa in riguardo dei costi e spese incorso in in collegamento con quelle osservazioni.
165. La Corte nota anche che le rivendicazioni in riguardo di un numero di costi e spese non furono sostenute con la prova attinente. Inoltre, la Corte non è persuasa che tutte le parcelle chiesero con gli avvocati del richiedente era necessariamente e ragionevolmente incorso in. Decidendo su una base equa ed avendo riguardo ad ai dettagli delle rivendicazioni presentati col richiedente e gli importi assegnarono ad avvocati britannici in cause della complessità comparabile, la Corte assegna la somma di EUR 25,000 il richiedente in riguardo di parcelle legali e gli altri costi e spese, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico di lui.
C. Interesse di mora
166. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunto tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto Articoli 5 § 3 e 5 § 4 (nella parte relativoa all'equità di controllo giurisdizionale della legalità della detenzione continuata del richiedente) della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (nella parte relativo all'ordine di sequestro riguardo alle quote del richiedente nella Banca di Baku) ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 5 § 3 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 5 § 4 della Convenzione in riguardo del controllo giurisdizionale della detenzione continuata del richiedente;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in riguardo della legalità dell'ordine di sequestro riguardo alle quote del richiedente nella Banca di Baku;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 7,000 (sette mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale da convertire in manats di Azerbaijani al tasso applicabile in data dell’accordo; e
(ii) EUR 25,000 (venticinque mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, in riguardo di costi e spese per essere convertito in libbre genuino al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo da pagare sul conto bancario dei suoi rappresentanti nel Regno Unito;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesei, e notificato per iscritto il 6 dicembre 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
André Wampach Nina Vajić
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidentessa



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 27/07/2021.